WorldWideScience

Sample records for tomographic image guidance

  1. Tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Tomographic images of an object or scene are produced by an analysis of two or more stereographic images of the scene including shifting one image laterally with respect to another and logically summing the image data sets. Several image processing, edge enhancement and edge extraction algorithms may be applied to the images in digitised video data form to provide wire-frame or skeleton type representations of each of the original images. Tomographic images of planes not parallel with the image plane (or normal to the camera axes) may be produced by changing the magnification of one image prior to logical summing. The images may be generated by three video cameras arranged on two orthogonal axes for elimination of spurious coincidences. The images are preferably produced using X-rays. (author)

  2. Tomographic imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, T.; Horiba, I.; Kohno, H.; Nakaya, C.; Sekihara, K.; Shiono, H.; Tomura, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yanaka, S.

    1980-01-01

    A tomographic imaging system comprising: irradiating means for irradating a cross-section of an object under consideration with radiation rays from plural directions; detector means for detecting the radiation rays transmitted through the cross-section of said object to produce an output signal; first memory means for storing the output signal of said detector means; and an image jreconstructing section for performing a convolution integral operation on the contents of said first memory means by means of a first weighting function to reconstruct a three-dimensional image of the cross-section of said object, said image reconstructing section including (I) second memory means for storing a second weighting function, said second weighting function being provided with a predetermined positive and negative (N-1)th order when the output signal of said detector means produced by the irradiation of the cross-section of said object from one of said plural directions is sampled by N points, the value of the (N-1)th order of said second weighting function being an integration of said first weighting function from the (N-1)th order to positive infinity and the value of -(N-1)th order of said second weighting function being an integration of said first weighting function from the -(N-1)th order to negative infinity, (II) control means for successively reading out the contents of said first and second memory means, and (III) operational means for performing multiplying and summing operations on the read-out contents of said first and second memory means, said operational means producing the product of the values fo the (N-1)th and -(N-1)th orders of said second weighting function and a component of the output signal of said detector means relating to the radiation rays free from the absorption thereof by said object

  3. Tomographic Scanning Imaging Seeker

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hovland, Harald

    2005-01-01

    .... Simulation results are provided to show the reconstruction quality. The concept, using a single pixel and a simple rotating axis scan mechanism, allows for a simple, low-cost, software-driven imaging sensor...

  4. Caveats on tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulger, Gillian R.; Panza, Giuliano F.; Artemieva, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Geological and geodynamic models of the mantle often rely on joint interpretations of published seismic tomography images and petrological/geochemical data. This approach tends to neglect the fundamental limitations of, and uncertainties in, seismic tomography results. These limitations and uncer......Geological and geodynamic models of the mantle often rely on joint interpretations of published seismic tomography images and petrological/geochemical data. This approach tends to neglect the fundamental limitations of, and uncertainties in, seismic tomography results. These limitations...

  5. Tomographic image reconstruction using training images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Hansen, Per Christian

    2017-01-01

    the framework of sparse learning as a regularized non-negative matrix factorization. Incorporating the dictionary as a prior in a convex reconstruction problem, we then find an approximate solution with a sparse representation in the dictionary. The dictionary is applied to non-overlapping patches of the image......We describe and examine an algorithm for tomographic image reconstruction where prior knowledge about the solution is available in the form of training images. We first construct a non-negative dictionary based on prototype elements from the training images; this problem is formulated within...

  6. Tomographic image reconstruction from continuous projections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Cant (Jeroen); W.J. Palenstijn (Willem Jan); G. Behiels; J. Sijbers (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractAn important design aspect in tomographic image reconstruction is the choice between a step-and-shoot protocol versus continuous X-ray tube movement for image acquisition. A step-and-shoot protocol implies a perfectly still tube during X-ray exposure, and hence involves moving the tube

  7. A NMR Tomographic System for image visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, M.S.V. de; Slaets, J.F.W.; Almeida, L.O.B. de

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents some characteristics of a graphics system that is being constructed in the Electronics Instrumentation and Computation Laboratory (LIE) of IFQSC. This system will be used in reconstruction and interpretation of MR tomographic images. A minimum system is at moment being used at our laboratory to visualize MR images. (author) [pt

  8. Blunt oesophageal perforation: treatment with surgical exclusion and percutaneous drainage under computed tomographic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauthey, J.N.; Lerut, J.; Laube, M.; Gertsch, P.

    1992-01-01

    We report a patient with a left thoracic contusion and rupture of the distal oesophagus. Persistent sepsis developed after oesophageal exclusion without closure. Two collection were drained percutaneously under computed tomographic guidance and the sepsis resolved. (11 refs., 1 fig.)

  9. Connections model for tomographic images reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.G.S.; Pela, C.A.; Roque, S.F. A.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper shows an artificial neural network with an adequately topology for tomographic image reconstruction. The associated error function is derived and the learning algorithm is make. The simulated results are presented and demonstrate the existence of a generalized solution for nets with linear activation function. (Author)

  10. Interpretation of computed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stickle, R.L.; Hathcock, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the production of optimal CT images in small animal patients as well as principles of radiographic interpretation. Technical factors affecting image quality and aiding image interpretation are included. Specific considerations for scanning various anatomic areas are given, including indications and potential pitfalls. Principles of radiographic interpretation are discussed. Selected patient images are illustrated

  11. First tomographic image of ionospheric outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Dyson, P. L.; Fraser, B. J.; Morley, S.

    2006-10-01

    An image of the dayside low-energy ion outflow event that occurred on 16 December 2003 was constructed with ground- and space-based GPS (Global Positioning System) Total Electron Content (TEC) data and ion drift meter data from the DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program). A tomographic reconstruction technique has been applied to the GPS TEC data obtained from the GPS receiver on the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite FedSat. The two dimensional tomographic image of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere reveals a spectacular beam-like dayside ion outflow emanating from the cusp region. The transverse components of the magnetic field in FedSat's NewMag data show the presence of field aligned current (FAC) sheets, indicating the existence of low-energy electron precipitation in the cusp region. The DMSP ion drift data show upward ion drift velocities and upward fluxes of low-energy ions and electrons at the orbiting height of the DMSP spacecraft in the cusp region. This study presents the first tomographic image of the flux tube structure of ionospheric ion outflows from 0.13 Re up to 3.17 Re altitude.

  12. Intravenous volume tomographic pulmonary angiography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ruola; Strang, John G.; Chen, Biao; Conover, David L.; Yu, Rongfeng

    1999-05-01

    This study presents a new intravenous (IV) tomographic angiography imaging technique, called intravenous volume tomographic digital angiography (VTDA) for cross sectional pulmonary angiography. While the advantages of IV-VTDA over spiral CT in terms of volume scanning time and resolution have been validated and reported in our previous papers for head and neck vascular imaging, the superiority of IV-VTDA over spiral CT for cross sectional pulmonary angiography has not been explored yet. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantage of isotropic resolution of IV-VTDA in the x, y and z directions through phantom and animal studies, and to explore its clinical application for detecting clots in pulmonary angiography. A prototype image intensifier-based VTDA imaging system has been designed and constructed by modifying a GE 8800 CT scanner. This system was used for a series of phantom and dog studies. A pulmonary vascular phantom was designed and constructed. The phantom was scanned using the prototype VTDA system for direct 3D reconstruction. Then the same phantom was scanned using a GE CT/i spiral CT scanner using the routine pulmonary CT angiography protocols. IV contrast injection and volume scanning protocols were developed during the dog studies. Both VTDA reconstructed images and spiral CT images of the specially designed phantom were analyzed and compared. The detectability of simulated vessels and clots was assessed as the function of iodine concentration levels, oriented angles, and diameters of the vessels and clots. A set of 3D VTDA reconstruction images of dog pulmonary arteries was obtained with different IV injection rates and isotropic resolution in the x, y and z directions. The results of clot detection studies in dog pulmonary arteries have also been shown. This study presents a new tomographic IV angiography imaging technique for cross sectional pulmonary angiography. The results of phantom and animal studies indicate that IV-VTDA is

  13. Techniques of noninvasive optical tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Joseph; Abookasis, David; Gokhler, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Recently invented methods of optical tomographic imaging through scattering and absorbing media are presented. In one method, the three-dimensional structure of an object hidden between two biological tissues is recovered from many noisy speckle pictures obtained on the output of a multi-channeled optical imaging system. Objects are recovered from many speckled images observed by a digital camera through two stereoscopic microlens arrays. Each microlens in each array generates a speckle image of the object buried between the layers. In the computer each image is Fourier transformed jointly with an image of the speckled point-like source captured under the same conditions. A set of the squared magnitudes of the Fourier-transformed pictures is accumulated to form a single average picture. This final picture is again Fourier transformed, resulting in the three-dimensional reconstruction of the hidden object. In the other method, the effect of spatial longitudinal coherence is used for imaging through an absorbing layer with different thickness, or different index of refraction, along the layer. The technique is based on synthesis of multiple peak spatial degree of coherence. This degree of coherence enables us to scan simultaneously different sample points on different altitudes, and thus decreases the acquisition time. The same multi peak degree of coherence is also used for imaging through the absorbing layer. Our entire experiments are performed with a quasi-monochromatic light source. Therefore problems of dispersion and inhomogeneous absorption are avoided.

  14. Formation of tomographic images with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, A.; Tenreiro, C; Valencia, J; Steinman, G.; Henriquez, C

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of having a non-destructive method of analysis for archaeological and paleontological samples is of interest. A special group of fossil samples has come to our attention, which because of their value should be preserved and, therefore, the availability of an indirect, non-destructive, non contaminating analytical technique is important. The strong absorption of usual kinds of radiation by a fossilized sample restricts the application of conventional methods of analysis. A type of radiation that is not completely attenuated by thick samples, in sizes that are typical in paleontology, is necessary. Neutrons may be considered as an ideal non-invasive probe with the possibility of developing a technique for the formation and analysis of images. A technique has been developed for the spatial reconstruction of the contents of a fossilized sample (tomography) with neutrons, without touching or altering the sample in any way. The neutron beam was extracted from the RECH-1 reactor belonging to the CCHEN, La Reina. The tomographic images of the contents of a fossilized egg are presented for the first time and represent views or cuts of the content as well as a set that permits the three dimensional reconstruction of the inside of the object and its subsequent animation in graphic format. This project developed a technique for taking neutron radiographs of this kind of sample including the numerical algorithms and the treatment and formation of the images (CW)

  15. Computer tomographic imaging of rabbit bulbourethral glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to utilize the obtained data for differentiation of normal and pathologically altered bulbourethral glands in rabbits with regard to using this animal species as a model for studying diseases in this organ in humans. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten sexually mature healthy male white New Zealand rabbits, 12 months old, weighed 2.8−3.2 kg were investigated. The animals were anesthetized. Scans were done at 2 mm intervals and the image reconstruction was three-dimensional. RESULTS: Rabbit bulbourethral glands were observed as a transversely oval homogeneous, relatively hyperdense structure against the surrounding soft tissues. They are visualized in the transverse cut of the pelvic outlet in the plane through the cranial part of cg2, the body of ischium, cranially to tuber ischiadicum and dorsally to the caudal part of symphysis pubis –sciatic arch. The glandular margins are adequately distinguished from the adjacent soft tissue structures. The density of the rabbit bulbourethral glands was similar to this of the soft tissues. CONCLUSION: The data obtained by the computed tomographic imaging of the rabbit bulbourethral glands could be used as an anatomical reference in the diagnosis and interpretation of imaging findings of various pathological states of the gland in this species, as well as in utilization of the rabbit as an animal model for studying diseases of this organ in humans, particularly diverticula, stenosis, lithiasis and valves

  16. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Alarfaj, Meshal K.

    2016-02-01

    Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging by Meshal K Alarfaj, Master of Science King Abdullah University of Science & Technology, 2015 Tomographic Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a recent PIV method capable of reconstructing the full 3D velocity field of complex flows, within a 3-D volume. For nearly the last decade, it has become the most powerful tool for study of turbulent velocity fields and promises great advancements in the study of fluid mechanics. Among the early published studies, a good number of researches have suggested enhancements and optimizations of different aspects of this technique to improve the effectiveness. One major aspect, which is the core of the present work, is related to reducing the cost of the Tomographic PIV setup. In this thesis, we attempt to reduce this cost by using an experimental setup exploiting 4 commercial digital still cameras in combination with low-cost Light emitting diodes (LEDs). We use two different colors to distinguish the two light pulses. By using colored shadows with red and green LEDs, we can identify the particle locations within the measurement volume, at the two different times, thereby allowing calculation of the velocities. The present work tests this technique on the flows patterns of a jet ejected from a tube in a water tank. Results from the images processing are presented and challenges discussed.

  17. From tomographic images to fault heterogeneities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Amato

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Local Earthquake Tomography (LET is a useful tool for imaging lateral heterogeneities in the upper crust. The pattern of P- and S-wave velocity anomalies, in relation to the seismicity distribution along active fault zones. can shed light on the existence of discrete seismogenic patches. Recent tomographic studies in well monitored seismic areas have shown that the regions with large seismic moment release generally correspond to high velocity zones (HVZ's. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between the seismogenic behavior of faults and the velocity structure of fault zones as inferred from seismic tomography. First, we review some recent tomographic studies in active strike-slip faults. We show examples from different segments of the San Andreas fault system (Parkfield, Loma Prieta, where detailed studies have been carried out in recent years. We also show two applications of LET to thrust faults (Coalinga, Friuli. Then, we focus on the Irpinia normal fault zone (South-Central Italy, where a Ms = 6.9 earthquake occurred in 1980 and many thousands of attershock travel time data are available. We find that earthquake hypocenters concentrate in HVZ's, whereas low velocity zones (LVZ’ s appear to be relatively aseismic. The main HVZ's along which the mainshock rupture bas propagated may correspond to velocity weakening fault regions, whereas the LVZ's are probably related to weak materials undergoing stable slip (velocity strengthening. A correlation exists between this HVZ and the area with larger coseismic slip along the fault, according to both surface evidence (a fault scarp as high as 1 m and strong ground motion waveform modeling. Smaller wave-length, low-velocity anomalies detected along the fault may be the expression of velocity strengthening sections, where aseismic slip occurs. According to our results, the rupture at the nucleation depth (~ 10-12 km is continuous for the whole fault lenoth (~ 30 km, whereas at shallow depth

  18. Compact Positron Tomograph for Prostate Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huber, Jennifer S

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project is to construct a functioning compact positron tomograph, whose geometry is optimized for detecting prostate tumors with molecular tracers such as 11Ccholine (carbon-11 choline...

  19. Compact Positron Tomograph for Prostate Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huber, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project is to construct a functioning compact positron tomograph, whose geometry is optimized for detecting prostate tumors with molecular tracers such as 11Ccholine (carbon-11 choline...

  20. Comparative study of the macroscopic finding, conventional tomographic imaging, and computed tomographic imaging in locating the mandibular canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Moon; You, Dong Soo

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was comparison of conventional tomography with reformatted computed tomography for dental implant in locating the mandibular canal. Five dogs were used and after conventional tomographs and fitted computed tomographs were taken, four dentist traced all films. Mandibles were sectioned with 2 mm slice thickness and the sections were then radiographed (contact radiography). Each radiograpic image was traced and linear measurements were made from mandibular canal to alveolar crest, buccal cortex, lingual cortex, and inferior border. The following results were obtained; 1. Reformatted computed tomographs were exacter than conventional tomography by alveolar crest to canal length of -0.6 mm difference between real values and radiographs 2. The average measurements of buccal cortex to mandibular canal width and lingual cortex to mandibular canal width of conventional tomographs were exacter than reformatted computed tomographs, but standard deviations were higher than reformatted computed tomographs. 3. Standard deviations of reformatted computed tomographs were lower than conventional tomographs at all comparing sites 4. At reformatted computed tomography 62.5% of the measurements performed were within ±1 mm of the true value, and at conventional tomography 24.1% were. 5. Mandibular canal invisibility was 0.8% at reformatted computed tomography and 9.2% at conventional tomography. Reformatted computed tomography has been shown to be more useful radiographic technique for assessment of the mandibular canal than conventional tomography.

  1. Image interface in Java for tomographic reconstruction in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, M.A.; Silva, A.M. Marques da

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to implement a software for tomographic reconstruction of SPECT data from Nuclear Medicine with a flexible interface design, cross-platform, written in Java. Validation tests were performed based on SPECT simulated data. The results showed that the implemented algorithms and filters agree with the theoretical context. We intend to extend the system by implementing additional tomographic reconstruction techniques and Java threads, in order to provide simultaneously image processing. (author)

  2. Correction of ring artifacts in X-ray tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Johnson, G.; Tafforeau, P.

    2011-01-01

    Ring artifacts are systematic intensity distortions located on concentric circles in reconstructed tomographic X-ray images. When using X-ray tomography to study for instance low-contrast grain boundaries in metals it is crucial to correct for the ring artifacts in the images as they may have...... are separable. The method is implemented in Matlab, it works with very little user interaction and may run in parallel on a cluster if applied to a whole stack of images. The strength and robustness of the method implemented will be demonstrated on three tomographic X-ray data sets: a mono-phase β...... the same intensity level as the grain boundaries and thus make it impossible to perform grain segmentation. This paper describes an implementation of a method for correcting the ring artifacts in tomographic X-ray images of simple objects such as metal samples where the object and the background...

  3. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  4. Application of tomographic particle image velocimetry to complex (dusty) plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Jeremiah

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques have been used to obtain detailed measurements of the thermal and transport properties of weakly-coupled dusty plasmas. This paper reports on the application of an extension of these techniques, tomographic PIV (tom-PIV), which provides an instantaneous volumetric measurement of the particle transport.

  5. Retrospective registration of tomographic brain images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maintz, J.B.A.

    1996-01-01

    In modern clinical practice, the clinician can make use of a vast array of specialized imaging techniques supporting diagnosis and treatment. For various reasons, the same anatomy of one patient is sometimes imaged more than once, either using the same imaging apparatus (monomodal acquisition ),

  6. Segmentation Toolbox for Tomographic Image Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur

    , techniques to automatically analyze such data becomes ever more important. Most segmentation methods for large datasets, such as CT images, deal with simple thresholding techniques, where intensity values cut offs are predetermined and hard coded. For data where the intensity difference is not sufficient......Motivation: Image acquisition has vastly improved over the past years, introducing techniques such as X-ray computed tomography (CT). CT images provide the means to probe a sample non-invasively to investigate its inner structure. Given the wide usage of this technique and massive data amounts......, and partial volume voxels occur frequently, thresholding methods do not suffice and more advanced methods are required. Contribution: To meet these requirements a toolbox has been developed, combining well known methods within the image analysis field. The toolbox includes cluster-based methods...

  7. Optical tomographic imaging for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Intes, Xavier; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse optical breast imaging utilizes near-infrared (NIR) light propagation through tissues to assess the optical properties of tissues for the identification of abnormal tissue. This optical imaging approach is sensitive, cost-effective, and does not involve any ionizing radiation. However, the image reconstruction of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a nonlinear inverse problem and suffers from severe illposedness due to data noise, NIR light scattering, and measurement incompleteness. An image reconstruction method is proposed for the detection of breast cancer. This method splits the image reconstruction problem into the localization of abnormal tissues and quantification of absorption variations. The localization of abnormal tissues is performed based on a well-posed optimization model, which can be solved via a differential evolution optimization method to achieve a stable reconstruction. The quantification of abnormal absorption is then determined in localized regions of relatively small extents, in which a potential tumor might be. Consequently, the number of unknown absorption variables can be greatly reduced to overcome the underdetermined nature of DOT. Numerical simulation experiments are performed to verify merits of the proposed method, and the results show that the image reconstruction method is stable and accurate for the identification of abnormal tissues, and robust against the measurement noise of data.

  8. Soil structure characterized using computed tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanqi Cheng; Stephen H. Anderson; Clark J. Gantzer; J. W. Van Sambeek

    2003-01-01

    Fractal analysis of soil structure is a relatively new method for quantifying the effects of management systems on soil properties and quality. The objective of this work was to explore several methods of studying images to describe and quantify structure of soils under forest management. This research uses computed tomography and a topological method called Multiple...

  9. Three dimensional reconstruction of tomographic images of the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glittenberg, C.; Zeiler, F.; Falkner, C.; Binder, S.; Povazay, B.; Hermann, B.; Drexler, W.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new display system for the three-dimensional visualization of tomographic images in ophthalmology. Specifically, a system that can use stacks of B-mode scans from an ultrahigh resolution optical tomography examination to vividly display retinal specimens as three-dimensional objects. Several subroutines were programmed in the rendering and raytracing program Cinema 4D XL 9.102 Studio Bundle (Maxon Computer Inc., Friedrichsburg, Germany), which could process stacks of tomographic scans into three-dimensional objects. Ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography examinations were performed on patients with various retinal pathologies and post processed with the subroutines that had been designed. All ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomographies were performed with a titanium: sapphire based ultra broad bandwidth (160 nm) femtosecond laser system (INTEGRAL, Femtolasers Productions GmbH. Vienna Austria) with an axial resolution of 3 μm. A new three dimensional display system for tomographic images in ophthalmology was developed, which allows a highly vivid display of physiological and pathological structures of the retina. The system also distinguishes itself through its high interactivity and adaptability. This new display system allows the visualization of physiological and pathological structures of the retina in a new way, which will give us new insight into their morphology and development. (author) [de

  10. Trailing edge noise estimation by tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröbsting, Stefan; Tuinstra, Marthijn; Scarano, Fulvio

    2015-06-01

    The feasibility of estimating broadband trailing edge noise with high-speed tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements is studied. A thin plate terminating in a sharp trailing edge provides a generic test case for turbulent boundary layer trailing edge interaction noise. Far-field noise is linked to the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of the surface pressure fluctuations in proximity of the trailing edge through diffraction theory. High-speed tomographic PIV measurements return volumetric and time-resolved information about all velocity components for the resolved spatio-temporal scales and can therefore provide the required statistical quantities. For the turbulent boundary layer interacting with the trailing edge, these statistics include the auto-spectral density, spanwise correlation length, and convection velocity of the unsteady surface pressure, which are thus estimated. Acoustic phased array measurements in an anechoic environment provide a reference for comparison. Over the resolved frequency band, PIV based noise estimation results compare favorably with the reference measurements. Especially at lower frequencies, where existing, empirical models for the unsteady surface pressure spectrum are not accurate, tomographic PIV can offer an alternative approach to complex and intrusive model instrumentation for assessing the relevant statistical quantities.

  11. A suggested theory of the conventional tomographic imaging process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.; Moores, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to re-examine the well established theoretical basis of conventional tomography in the light of more detailed techniques being applied elsewhere in image analysis. Transfer function theory has been used to quantify the amount of edge detail reproduced by this process and the information in a tomogram is investigated in terms of edge detail associated with well resolved (unblurred) detail and also that associated with unresolved detail. Because resolved and unresolved detail is associated with particular anatomical layers within the tomographed object, the theory has been used to define a cut plane thickness. A variety of different tube movements have been considered and calculated values of cut plane thickness are compared with those predicted by a simple geometric model. Besides the blurring associated with the tube movement the effect of X-ray focal spot, film-screen combination and also visual response of the observer have been included and their importance in the definition of cut plane thickness highlighted. One advantage of this approach appears to be the facility to quantify the performance of different tomographic tube movements and highlight the role of tomographic detail reproduced from body sections well removed from the cut plane. (author)

  12. Gas microstrip detectors for X-ray tomographic flow imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Key, M J; Luggar, R D; Kundu, A

    2003-01-01

    A investigation into the suitability of gas microstrip detector technology for a high-speed industrial X-ray tomography system is reported. X-ray energies in the region 20-30 keV are well suited to the application, which involves imaging two-dimensional slices through gas/liquid multiphase pipeline flows for quantitative component fraction measurement. Stable operation over a period representing several hundred individual tomographic scans at gas gains of 500 is demonstrated using a Penning gas mixture of krypton/propylene.

  13. Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Tomographic Imaging for Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, K. S.; Popovics, J. S.

    2009-03-01

    Ultrasonic tomography is a powerful tool for identifying defects within an object or structure. Ultrasonic tomography is limited by time consuming transducer coupling. Air-coupled UPV may eliminate this problem and allow for more rapid data collection. This research aims to integrate recent developments in air-coupled ultrasonic measurements with the current tomography technology to image inclusions within solids. Air-coupled ultrasonic signals are collected though large PVC samples. Volumetric and planar inclusions within the samples are identified in the constructed velocity tomographs.

  14. Imaging MOSS tomographic system for H-1NF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, F.; Howard, J.

    1999-01-01

    A tomographic diagnostic utilising the Modulated Optical Solid-State spectrometer (MOSS) is planned for the H-1NF stellarator at the ANU. It is designed to create two-dimensional temperature or velocity maps of a poloidal cross-section of the high temperature plasma of H-1NF. The introduction of the MOSS spectrometers has enabled the development of several diagnostics to be used on the H-1NF stellerator. The MOSS spectrometer allows calculations of the plasma temperature and bulk velocity based on a line-integrated measurement of light emitted from electronic transitions within the plasma. A tomographic system utilising a rotatable multi-view ring apparatus and spatial multiplexing through a MOSS spectrometer is currently being developed. The ring apparatus is placed inside the H-1NF vessel and encircles the plasma. Multiple line-of-sight views collect light through a poloidal cross-section of the plasma and the emitted light is coupled into large core optical fibres. The transmitted light, via the optical fibre bundle, is then imaged through a large aperture MOSS spectrometer and onto another optical fibre array. Each fibre is then fed into a photomultiplier tube for signal detection. Characterisation of the properties of the lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) crystal used for modulation in the MOSS spectrometer is being undertaken to account for ray divergence in the imaging system. Tomographic techniques enable the construction of a temperature or velocity map of the poloidal cross-section. Rotating the ring apparatus to a new viewing position for the next pulse of plasma should allow an accurate picture to be built up based on the reproducibility of the plasma pulses. It is expected that initial testing of the system will begin in May when H-1NF begins operations at 0.5 Telsa field strength

  15. The development of a compact positron tomograph for prostate imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Qi, Jinyi; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2002-12-17

    We give design details and expected image results of a compact positron tomograph designed for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair of external curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis). The bottom bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank moves upward for patient access and downward for maximum sensitivity. Each bank is composed of two rows (axially) of 20 CTI PET Systems HR+ block detectors, forming two arcs that can be tilted to minimize attenuation. Compared to a conventional PET system, our camera uses about one-quarter the number of detectors and has almost two times higher solid angle coverage for a central point source, because the detectors are close to the patient. The detectors are read out by modified CTI HRRT data acquisition electronics. The individual detectors are angled in the plane to point towards the prostate to minimize reso

  16. Scanning tomographic particle image velocimetry applied to a turbulent jet

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, T. A.

    2013-02-21

    We introduce a modified tomographic PIV technique using four high-speed video cameras and a scanning pulsed laser-volume. By rapidly illuminating adjacent subvolumes onto separate video frames, we can resolve a larger total volume of velocity vectors, while retaining good spatial resolution. We demonstrate this technique by performing time-resolved measurements of the turbulent structure of a round jet, using up to 9 adjacent volume slices. In essence this technique resolves more velocity planes in the depth direction by maintaining optimal particle image density and limiting the number of ghost particles. The total measurement volumes contain between 1 ×106 and 3 ×106 velocity vectors calculated from up to 1500 reconstructed depthwise image planes, showing time-resolved evolution of the large-scale vortical structures for a turbulent jet of Re up to 10 000.

  17. A maximum entropy reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilsky, A V; Lozhkin, V A; Markovich, D M; Tokarev, M P

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies a novel approach for reducing tomographic PIV computational complexity. The proposed approach is an algebraic reconstruction technique, termed MENT (maximum entropy). This technique computes the three-dimensional light intensity distribution several times faster than SMART, using at least ten times less memory. Additionally, the reconstruction quality remains nearly the same as with SMART. This paper presents the theoretical computation performance comparison for MENT, SMART and MART, followed by validation using synthetic particle images. Both the theoretical assessment and validation of synthetic images demonstrate significant computational time reduction. The data processing accuracy of MENT was compared to that of SMART in a slot jet experiment. A comparison of the average velocity profiles shows a high level of agreement between the results obtained with MENT and those obtained with SMART. (paper)

  18. Tomographic Image Reconstruction Using Training Images with Matrix and Tensor Formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara

    machine learning technique (here, the dictionary learning), prototype elements from the training images are extracted and then incorporated in the tomographic reconstruction problem both with matrix and tensor representations of the training images. First, an algorithm for the tomographic image...... and robustness of the reconstruction to variations of the scale and rotation in the training images is investigated and algorithms to estimate the correct relative scale and orientation of the unknown image to the training images are suggested. Then, a third-order tensor representation for the training images...... images is used. The dictionary and image reconstruction problem are reformulated using the tensor representation. The dictionary learning problem is presented as a nonnegative tensor factorization problem with sparsity constraints and the reconstruction problem is formulated in a convex optimization...

  19. Fusion Imaging for Procedural Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Brandon M; Eleid, Mackram F; Thaden, Jeremy J

    2017-11-27

    The field of percutaneous structural heart interventions has grown tremendously in recent years. This growth has fueled the development of new imaging protocols and technologies in parallel to help facilitate these minimally-invasive procedures. Fusion imaging is an exciting new technology that combines the strength of 2 imaging modalities and has the potential to improve procedural planning and the safety of many commonly performed transcatheter procedures. In this review we discuss the basic concepts of fusion imaging along with the relative strengths and weaknesses of static vs dynamic fusion imaging modalities. This review will focus primarily on echocardiographic-fluoroscopic fusion imaging and its application in commonly performed transcatheter structural heart procedures. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of basic software for processing and visualization of NMR tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traina, A.J.M.; Slaets, J.F.W.

    1989-01-01

    The present work describes the software under development for Image Processing and Visualization of MR Images. This project is part of Magnetic Ressonance Tomographic System which is being built at the IFQSC - USP [pt

  1. Combination tomographic and cardiographic ultrasonic imaging method and system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, T.; Fukukita, H.; Fukumoto, A.; Hayakawa, Y.; Irioka, K.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic echo signals are successively sampled and converted to digital echo data which are written into a first digital memory column by column and then read out row by row into a first buffer memory. The digital echo data which are derived in response to beams successively transmitted in a predetermined direction are written into columns of a second digital memory and read out of the memory in rows into a second buffer memory. The data stored in the first and second buffer memories are read out for digital-to-analog conversion and selectively applied within a television ''frame'' interval to control electron beam intensity of a single cathode ray tube so as to present tomographic and cardiographic images in different display areas of the tube

  2. Remote diagnosis via a telecommunication satellite--ultrasonic tomographic image transmission experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, I; Inokuchi, S; Tajima, T; Takahashi, T

    1985-04-01

    An experiment to transmit ultrasonic tomographic section images required for remote medical diagnosis and care was conducted using the mobile telecommunication satellite OSCAR-10. The images received showed the intestinal condition of a patient incapable of verbal communication, however the image screen had a fairly coarse particle structure. On the basis of these experiments, were considered as the transmission of ultrasonic tomographic images extremely effective in remote diagnosis.

  3. Pediatric computed tomographic angiography: imaging the cardiovascular system gently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Pena, Andres; Poon, Michael; Chan, Frandics P; Epelman, Monica

    2010-03-01

    Whether congenital or acquired, timely recognition and management of disease is imperative, as hemodynamic alterations in blood flow, tissue perfusion, and cellular oxygenation can have profound effects on organ function, growth and development, and quality of life for the pediatric patient. Ensuring safe computed tomographic angiography (CTA) practice and "gentle" pediatric imaging requires the cardiovascular imager to have sound understanding of CTA advantages, limitations, and appropriate indications as well as strong working knowledge of acquisition principles and image post processing. From this vantage point, CTA can be used as a useful adjunct along with the other modalities. This article presents a summary of dose reduction CTA methodologies along with techniques the authors have employed in clinical practice to achieve low-dose and ultralow-dose exposure in pediatric CTA. CTA technical principles are discussed with an emphasis on the low-dose methodologies and safe contrast medium delivery strategies. Recommended parameters for currently available multidetector-row computed tomography scanners are summarized alongside recommended radiation and contrast medium parameters. In the second part of the article an overview of pediatric CTA clinical applications is presented, illustrating low-dose and ultra-low dose techniques, with an emphasis on the specific protocols. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Voxel-based model construction from colored tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    2002-07-01

    This work presents a new approach in the construction of voxel-based phantoms that was implemented to simplify the segmentation process of organs and tissues reducing the time used in this procedure. The segmentation process is performed by painting tomographic images and attributing a different color for each organ or tissue. A voxel-based head and neck phantom was built using this new approach. The way as the data are stored allows an increasing in the performance of the radiation transport code. The program that calculates the radiation transport also works with image files. This capability allows image reconstruction showing isodose areas, under several points of view, increasing the information to the user. Virtual X-ray photographs can also be obtained allowing that studies could be accomplished looking for the radiographic techniques optimization assessing, at the same time, the doses in organs and tissues. The accuracy of the program here presented, called MCvoxEL, that implements this new approach, was tested by comparison to results from two modern and well-supported Monte Carlo codes. Dose conversion factors for parallel X-ray exposure were also calculated. (author)

  5. Spiral computed tomographic imaging related to computerized ultrasonographic images of carotid plaque morphology and histology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Wagner, A; Wiebe, B M

    2001-01-01

    Echolucency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques, as evaluated by computerized B-mode ultrasonographic images, has been associated with an increased incidence of brain infarcts on cerebral computed tomographic scans. We tested the hypotheses that characterization of carotid plaques on spiral comput...

  6. Visual servoing in medical robotics: a survey. Part II: tomographic imaging modalities--techniques and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Mahdi; Najmaei, Nima; Khoshnam, Mahta; Patel, Rajni

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative application of tomographic imaging techniques provides a means of visual servoing for objects beneath the surface of organs. The focus of this survey is on therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications where tomographic imaging is used in visual servoing. To this end, a comprehensive search of the electronic databases was completed for the period 2000-2013. Existing techniques and products are categorized and studied, based on the imaging modality and their medical applications. This part complements Part I of the survey, which covers visual servoing techniques using endoscopic imaging and direct vision. The main challenges in using visual servoing based on tomographic images have been identified. 'Supervised automation of medical robotics' is found to be a major trend in this field and ultrasound is the most commonly used tomographic modality for visual servoing. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Linear analysis of rotationally invariant, radially variant tomographic imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huesmann, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method to analyze the linear imaging characteristics of rotationally invariant, radially variant tomographic imaging systems using singular value decomposition (SVD). When the projection measurements from such a system are assumed to be samples from independent and identically distributed multi-normal random variables, the best estimate of the emission intensity is given by the unweighted least squares estimator. The noise amplification of this estimator is inversely proportional to the singular values of the normal matrix used to model projection and backprojection. After choosing an acceptable noise amplification, the new method can determine the number of parameters and hence the number of pixels that should be estimated from data acquired from an existing system with a fixed number of angles and projection bins. Conversely, for the design of a new system, the number of angles and projection bins necessary for a given number of pixels and noise amplification can be determined. In general, computing the SVD of the projection normal matrix has cubic computational complexity. However, the projection normal matrix for this class of rotationally invariant, radially variant systems has a block circulant form. A fast parallel algorithm to compute the SVD of this block circulant matrix makes the singular value analysis practical by asymptotically reducing the computation complexity of the method by a multiplicative factor equal to the number of angles squared

  8. Method of making tomographic images of X-rayed objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eickel, R.

    1979-01-01

    A tomographic image of a selected layer of a stationary object is made by moving the source of X-rays along a first path at one side of the selected layer and by moving an ionography imaging chamber which contains a dielectric receptor sheet along a second path at the other side of the selected layer. The movement of the sheet is synchronized with movement of the source of X-rays and includes a translatory movement in a direction counter to the direction of movement of the source, a pivotal movement to maintain the sheet in a plane which is normal to the central beam of the bundle of X-rays, and a sidewise movement to vary the distance between the selected layer and the sheet so that the length of the projection of selected layer upon the sheet remains unchanged. If the sheet is rectangular, the pivotal movement is performed about an axis which is located in the plane of the selected layer and is parallel to the shorter sides of the sheet

  9. Cardiac imaging systems and methods employing computerized tomographic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richey, J.B.; Wake, R.H.; Walters, R.G.; Hunt, W.F.; Cool, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to cardiac imaging systems and methods employing computerised tomographic scanning. Apparatus is described which allows an image of the radiation attenuation of the heart at a desired phase of the cardiac cycle. The patients ECG signal can be used in a transverse-and-rotate type CT scanner as a time base, so that the beam reaches the heart at a desired phase of the cardiac cycle, or, in a purely rotational-type CT scanner continuously generated scan data is only stored for corresponding phases of successive cardiac cycles. Alternatively, gating of the beams themselves by shuttering or switching the power supply can be controlled by the ECG signal. A pacemaker is used to stabilize the cardiac period. Also used is a system for recognising unacceptable variations in the cardiac period and discarding corresponding scan data. In a transverse-and-rotate type fan-beam CT scanner, the effective beam width is narrowed to reduce the duration of the traverse of the heart. (U.K.)

  10. Tomographic diffractive microscopy with agile illuminations for imaging targets in a noisy background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Godavarthi, C; Chaumet, P C; Maire, G; Giovannini, H; Talneau, A; Prada, C; Sentenac, A; Belkebir, K

    2015-02-15

    Tomographic diffractive microscopy is a marker-free optical digital imaging technique in which three-dimensional samples are reconstructed from a set of holograms recorded under different angles of incidence. We show experimentally that, by processing the holograms with singular value decomposition, it is possible to image objects in a noisy background that are invisible with classical wide-field microscopy and conventional tomographic reconstruction procedure. The targets can be further characterized with a selective quantitative inversion.

  11. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Smartphones and Colored Shadows

    KAUST Repository

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A.

    2017-06-12

    We demonstrate the viability of using four low-cost smartphone cameras to perform Tomographic PIV. We use colored shadows to imprint two or three different time-steps on the same image. The back-lighting is accomplished with three sets of differently-colored pulsed LEDs. Each set of Red, Green & Blue LEDs is shone on a diffuser screen facing each of the cameras. We thereby record the RGB-colored shadows of opaque suspended particles, rather than the conventionally used scattered light. We subsequently separate the RGB color channels, to represent the separate times, with preprocessing to minimize noise and cross-talk. We use commercially available Tomo-PIV software for the calibration, 3-D particle reconstruction and particle-field correlations, to obtain all three velocity components in a volume. Acceleration estimations can be done thanks to the triple pulse illumination. Our test flow is a vortex ring produced by forcing flow through a circular orifice, using a flexible membrane, which is driven by a pressurized air pulse. Our system is compared to a commercial stereoscopic PIV system for error estimations. We believe this proof of concept experiment will make this technique available for education, industry and scientists for a fraction of the hardware cost needed for traditional Tomo-PIV.

  12. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Smartphones and Colored Shadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A; Alarfaj, Meshal K; Li, Er Qiang; Hernández-Sánchez, J F; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-06-16

    We demonstrate the viability of using four low-cost smartphone cameras to perform Tomographic PIV. We use colored shadows to imprint two or three different time-steps on the same image. The back-lighting is accomplished with three sets of differently-colored pulsed LEDs. Each set of Red, Green & Blue LEDs is shone on a diffuser screen facing each of the cameras. We thereby record the RGB-colored shadows of opaque suspended particles, rather than the conventionally used scattered light. We subsequently separate the RGB color channels, to represent the separate times, with preprocessing to minimize noise and cross-talk. We use commercially available Tomo-PIV software for the calibration, 3-D particle reconstruction and particle-field correlations, to obtain all three velocity components in a volume. Acceleration estimations can be done thanks to the triple pulse illumination. Our test flow is a vortex ring produced by forcing flow through a circular orifice, using a flexible membrane, which is driven by a pressurized air pulse. Our system is compared to a commercial stereoscopic PIV system for error estimations. We believe this proof of concept experiment will make this technique available for education, industry and scientists for a fraction of the hardware cost needed for traditional Tomo-PIV.

  13. Linear adaptive noise-reduction filters for tomographic imaging: Optimizing for minimum mean square error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Winston Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    This thesis solves the problem of finding the optimal linear noise-reduction filter for linear tomographic image reconstruction. The optimization is data dependent and results in minimizing the mean-square error of the reconstructed image. The error is defined as the difference between the result and the best possible reconstruction. Applications for the optimal filter include reconstructions of positron emission tomographic (PET), X-ray computed tomographic, single-photon emission tomographic, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Using high resolution PET as an example, the optimal filter is derived and presented for the convolution backprojection, Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, and the natural-pixel basis set reconstruction methods. Simulations and experimental results are presented for the convolution backprojection method.

  14. ECAT: a new computerized tomographic imaging system for position-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Huang, S.C.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    The ECAT was designed and developed as a complete computerized positron radionuclide imaging system capable of providing high contrast, high resolution, quantitative images in 2 dimensional and tomographic formats. Flexibility, in its various image mode options, allows it to be used for a wide variety of imaging problems

  15. Localization of ectopic parathyroid glands using technetium-99m sestamibi imaging: comparison with magnetic resonance and computed tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Nishida, Hidemi; Hiromatsu Yuji; Kojima, Kazuyuki; Uchida, Masafumi; Hayabuvhi, Naofumi

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the accuracy of technetium-99m sestamibi imaging for localization of ectopic parathyroid glands in patients with hyperparathyroidism with that of magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomographic (CT) imaging. Eleven patients with primary (n=3) or secondary (n=8) hyperparathyroidism were studied with 99m Tc sestamibi parathyroid imaging CT and MR imaging. Images of the neck were acquired at 10 min and 2-3 after tracer injection. The three patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and five patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism underwent parathyroidectomy. The ectopic glands were confirmed by histopathological examination of the resected specimens. In respect of 20 parathyroid glands in the eight patients explored surgically, the sensitivity and specificity of sestamibi imaging were 70% (14/20) and 88%, respectively, those of CT, 40% (8/20) and 88%, and those of MR imaging, 60% (12/20) and 88%. Of these patients, three had parathyroid adenomas while five had hyperplasia (17 glands). Sestamibi imaging localized eight ectopic parathyroid glands, which were surgically confirmed (six were located in the thymus and two in the mediastinum). In one patient explored surgically, the ectopic gland was located outside the field of the MR coil. Although the remaining three cases of secondary hyperparathyroidism were not confirmed surgically, these patients demonstrated sestamibi uptake in five parathyroid glands, including three ectopic glands. MR imagedemonstrated abnormal parathyroid glands in the same regions as sestamibi imaging. Our data indicate that 99m Tc-sestamibi imaging should be used initially to localize the ectopic parathyroid glands in patients with hyperparathyroidism for anatomical guidance prior to MR or CT imaging

  16. Advances in imaging for oncology guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amies, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 30 years major improvements in medical imaging have played a significant role to help advance the management of oncology diseases. These advances have covered the continuum of care from screening, diagnosis, staging, treatment planning and intervention. More recently image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has placed sophisticated imaging closer to the treatment event. The opportunity to improve care seems obvious; however the clinical benefits of IGRT are at present not easily proven and yet contribute to the complexity of treatment and the rising costs of care. It is proposed that this is in part due to the present immaturity of IGRT technology development, which is predominantly determined by the challenge of achieving precise delivery of radiation in one or many episodes (fractions) for very different diseases. There is no single type or mode of imaging that will be suitable to address all radiotherapy guidance challenges whether defined by the general criteria identified for a specific disease or the unique characteristics encountered with an individual patient. Finally the wide adoption of this or any medical technology general requires the attainment of a sufficient degree of safety and efficiency. I present the challenges faced by industry as well as select interesting technology based solutions and concepts that may help advance the field of oncology guidance

  17. Imaging properties of a positron tomograph with 280 BGO crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Vuletich, T.

    1980-11-01

    The basic imaging properties of the Donner 280-BGO-Crystal positron tomograph were measured and compared with the same system when it was equipped with 280 NaI(T1) crystals. The NaI(T1) crystals were 8 mm x 30 mm x 50 mm deep, sealed in 10 mm wide stainless steel cans. The BGO crystals are 9.5 mm x 32 mm x 32 mm deep and as they are not hygroscopic do not require sealed cans. With a shielding gap of 3 cm (section thickness 1.7 cm FWHM) the sensitivity of the BGO system is 55,000 events per sec for 1 μCi per cm 3 in a 20 cm cylinder of water, which is 2.3 times higher than the NaI(T1) system. For a 200 μCi/cm line source on the ring axis in a 20 cm diameter water cylinder, the BGO system records 86% of the scatter fraction and 66% of the accidental fraction of the NaI(T1) system. The lower light yield and poorer time resolution of BGO requires a wider coincidence timing window than NaI(T1). However, the ability to use full-energy pulse height selection with a 2.3-fold improvement in sensitivity results in an overall reduction in the fraction of accidental events recorded. The in-plane resolution of the BGO system is 9 to 10 mm FWHM within the central 30 cm diameter field, and the radial elongation at the edge of the field in the NaI(T1) system has been nearly eliminated

  18. Application of tomographic particle image velocimetry to studies of transport in complex (dusty) plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past twelve years, two-dimensional and stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques have been used to obtain detailed measurements of the thermal and transport properties of the microparticle component of dusty plasma systems. This letter reports on an extension of these techniques to obtain a volumetric, three-dimensional velocity vector measurement using tomographic PIV. Initial measurements using the tomographic PIV diagnostic are presented.

  19. Tomographic and planar radionuclide imaging in patients suspected meniscal injury: Arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajman, W.A.; Diehl, M.; Dunaway, E.; Stephenson, R.; Eisner, R.; Riggins, R.S.; Berger, H.J.

    1985-05-01

    In patients (pts) with knee pain which may be related to meniscal tears, clinical judgment is used to determine whether medical management or arthroscopy is indicated. Based on the assumption that meniscal injury will result in adjacent changes in Tc-99m MDP bone images, studies using both planar and tomographic techniques were performed in 12 pts referred for arthroscopy. Planar imaging was performed in the anterior, posterior, and posterior medial and lateral oblique positions of the symptomatic knee. Single photon emission computed tomography was performed using a 64 view 360/sup 0/ acquisition of both knees. In this series, both imaging techniques were accurate in identifying abnormality, but analysis of transaxial tomographic data showed greater contrast and facilitated localization because of the better spatial orientation provided by this method. Thus, tomographic bone imaging appears valuable in defining areas of localized abnormality in the knees of pts with meniscal injury.

  20. Temporal bone anomalies in the branchio-oto-renal syndrome: detailed computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceruti, S.; Stinckens, C.I.C.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Casselman, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To inventory computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging study on a family with the BOR syndrome. SETTING: Department of medical imaging and magnetic

  1. Ultrasound image guidance of cardiac interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Terry M.; Pace, Danielle F.; Lang, Pencilla; Guiraudon, Gérard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2011-03-01

    Surgical procedures often have the unfortunate side-effect of causing the patient significant trauma while accessing the target site. Indeed, in some cases the trauma inflicted on the patient during access to the target greatly exceeds that caused by performing the therapy. Heart disease has traditionally been treated surgically using open chest techniques with the patient being placed "on pump" - i.e. their circulation being maintained by a cardio-pulmonary bypass or "heart-lung" machine. Recently, techniques have been developed for performing minimally invasive interventions on the heart, obviating the formerly invasive procedures. These new approaches rely on pre-operative images, combined with real-time images acquired during the procedure. Our approach is to register intra-operative images to the patient, and use a navigation system that combines intra-operative ultrasound with virtual models of instrumentation that has been introduced into the chamber through the heart wall. This paper illustrates the problems associated with traditional ultrasound guidance, and reviews the state of the art in real-time 3D cardiac ultrasound technology. In addition, it discusses the implementation of an image-guided intervention platform that integrates real-time ultrasound with a virtual reality environment, bringing together the pre-operative anatomy derived from MRI or CT, representations of tracked instrumentation inside the heart chamber, and the intra-operatively acquired ultrasound images.

  2. Reconstruction of tomographic image from x-ray projections of a few views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1982-01-01

    Computer tomographs have progressed rapidly, and in the latest high performance types, the photographing time has been shortened to less than 5 sec, but the clear images of hearts have not yet been obtained. The X-ray tomographs used so far irradiate X-ray from many directions and measure the projected data, but by limiting projection direction to a small number, it was planned to shorter the X-ray photographing time and to reduce X-ray exposure as the objective of this study. In this paper, a method is proposed, by which tomographic images are reconstructed from projected data in a small number of direction by generalized inverse matrix penalty method. This method is the calculation method newly devised by the authors for this purpose. It is a kind of the nonlinear planning method added with the restrictive condition using a generalized inverse matrix, and it is characterized by the simple calculation procedure and rapid convergence. Moreover, the effect on reconstructed images when errors are included in projected data was examined. Also, the simple computer simulation to reconstruct tomographic images using the projected data in four directions was performed, and the usefulness of this method was confirmed. It contributes to the development of superhigh speed tomographs in future. (Kako, I.)

  3. Preoperative imaging for DIEA perforator flaps: a comparative study of computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Warren M; Phillips, Timothy J; Ashton, Mark W; Stella, Damien L; Gibson, Robert N; Taylor, G Ian

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal donor-site flaps, including the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) and deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) perforator flaps, are standard in autologous breast reconstruction. With significant variation in the vascular anatomy of the abdominal wall, preoperative imaging is essential for preoperative planning and reducing intraoperative error. Doppler and color duplex sonography have been used with varying results, and the quest continues for optimal preoperative assessment. Computed tomographic angiography has recently been proposed as a noninvasive modality for this purpose. This is the first study to formally compare preoperative Doppler ultrasound with computed tomographic angiography for imaging the DIEA. Eight consecutive patients undergoing DIEA perforator flap surgery for breast reconstruction underwent both computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound preoperatively. All investigations and procedures were performed at the same institution with the same primary and assisting surgeons and the same radiology team. Computed tomographic angiography was superior to Doppler ultrasound at identifying the course of the DIEA and its branching pattern, and in visualizing its perforators. Preoperative computed tomographic angiography was highly specific (100 percent) and more sensitive in mapping and visualizing perforators (p = 0.0078). It was also proficient at identifying the superficial epigastric arterial system and for effectively displaying the results intraoperatively. It was substantially quicker and removed the interobserver error associated with Doppler ultrasonography. The study was ceased after eight patients because of the overwhelming benefit of computed tomographic angiography over Doppler ultrasonography. Computed tomographic angiography is a valuable imaging modality for the preoperative assessment of the donor-site vascular supply for TRAM and DIEA perforator flaps.

  4. 3D UWB Magnitude-Combined Tomographic Imaging for Biomedical Applications. Algorithm Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Capdevila

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical microwave imaging is a topic of continuous research for its potential in different areas especially in breast cancer detection. In this paper, 3D UWB Magnitude-Combined tomographic algorithm is assessed for this recurrent application, but also for a more challenging one such as brain stroke detection. With the UWB Magnitude-Combined concept, the algorithm can take advantage of both the efficiency of Fourier Diffraction Theorem-based tomographic formulation and the robustness and image quality improvement provided by a multi-frequency combination.

  5. A PC-controlled microwave tomographic scanner for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Shantanu; Howard, John; Fhager, A.; Bengtsson, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the design and development of a personal computer based controller for a microwave tomographic system for breast cancer detection. The system uses motorized, dual-polarized antennas and a custom-made GUI interface to control stepper motors, a wideband vector network analyzer (VNA) and to coordinate data acquisition and archival in a local MDSPlus database. Both copolar and cross-polar scattered field components can be measured directly. Experimental results are presented to validate the various functionalities of the scanner.

  6. Tomographic Image Reconstruction Using an Interpolation Method for Tree Decay Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailin Feng; Guanghui Li; Sheng Fu; Xiping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Stress wave velocity has been traditionally regarded as an indicator of the extent of damage inside wood. This paper aimed to detect internal decay of urban trees through reconstructing tomographic image of the cross section of a tree trunk. A grid model covering the cross section area of a tree trunk was defined with some assumptions. Stress wave data were processed...

  7. Connections model for tomographic images reconstruction; Modelo conexionista para reconstrucao de imagens tomograficas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.G.S.; Pela, C.A.; Roque, S.F. A.C. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica (FFCLRP) USP. Av. Bandeirantes, 3900- 14040- 901- Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    This paper shows an artificial neural network with an adequately topology for tomographic image reconstruction. The associated error function is derived and the learning algorithm is make. The simulated results are presented and demonstrate the existence of a generalized solution for nets with linear activation function. (Author)

  8. First tomographic image of neutron capture rate in a BNCT facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minsky, D.M., E-mail: minsky@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, , UNSAM, M. de Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Conicet, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, A.A. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, , UNSAM, M. de Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina); Kreiner, A.J. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, , UNSAM, M. de Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Conicet, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Green, S.; Wojnecki, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, B15 2 TT (United Kingdom)] [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TH (United Kingdom); Ghani, Z. [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TH (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    This work discusses the development of online dosimetry of the boron dose via Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) during a BNCT treatment irradiation. Such a system will allow the online computation of boron dose maps without the large current uncertainties in the assessment of the boron concentration in different tissues. The first tomographic boron dose image with a SPECT prototype is shown.

  9. Lamb-Wave-Based Tomographic Imaging Techniques for Hole-Edge Corrosion Monitoring in Plate Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengjiang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel monitoring method for hole-edge corrosion damage in plate structures based on Lamb wave tomographic imaging techniques. An experimental procedure with a cross-hole layout using 16 piezoelectric transducers (PZTs was designed. The A0 mode of the Lamb wave was selected, which is sensitive to thickness-loss damage. The iterative algebraic reconstruction technique (ART method was used to locate and quantify the corrosion damage at the edge of the hole. Hydrofluoric acid with a concentration of 20% was used to corrode the specimen artificially. To estimate the effectiveness of the proposed method, the real corrosion damage was compared with the predicted corrosion damage based on the tomographic method. The results show that the Lamb-wave-based tomographic method can be used to monitor the hole-edge corrosion damage accurately.

  10. Imaging earth's interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth's mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  11. Imaging earth`s interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, Robert Jay [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth`s mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  12. Multidetector computed tomographic imaging of Erdheim-Chester disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuceler, Zeyneb; Kantarci, Mecit; Karabulut, Nevzat; Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Akman, Canan

    2014-06-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease is a rarely reported disease that can affect nearly every organ and chiefly infiltrates the connective, perivascular, and adipose tissue. The disease is a form of non-Langerhans-cell histiocytosis characterized by the proliferation of foamy histiocytes; its cardiovascular complications carry a severe prognosis. We present the case of a 29-year-old woman who was admitted for analysis of her angina. Our evaluation with use of cardiac multidetector computed tomographic angiography revealed large mediastinal soft tissue that compressed the patient's left anterior descending coronary artery. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of low-dose, dual-source, 256-slice multidetector computed tomography to characterize Erdheim-Chester disease that exclusively caused angina and stenosis of a coronary artery in a young adult.

  13. A high resolution small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) with x-ray tomographic guidance capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, John; Armour, Elwood; Kazanzides, Peter; Iordachita, Iulian; Tryggestad, Erik; Deng, Hua; Matinfar, Mohammad; Kennedy, Christopher; Liu, Zejian; Chan, Timothy; Gray, Owen; Verhaegen, Frank; McNutt, Todd; Ford, Eric; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the CT imaging, conformal irradiation and treatment planning capabilities of a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). Methods The SARRP employs a dual-focal spot, constant voltage x-ray source mounted on a gantry with a source-to-isocenter distance of 35 cm. Gantry rotation is limited to 120° from vertical. Eighty to 100 kVp x-rays from the smaller 0.4 mm focal spot are used for imaging. Both 0.4 mm and 3.0 mm focal spots operate at 225 kVp for irradiation. Robotic translate/rotate stages are used to position the animal. Cone-beam (CB) CT imaging is achieved by rotating the horizontal animal between the stationary x-ray source and a flat-panel detector. Radiation beams range from 0.5 mm in diameter to (60 × 60) mm2. Dosimetry is measured with radio-chromic films. Monte Carlo dose calculations are employed for treatment planning. The combination of gantry and robotic stage motions facilitate conformal irradiation. Results The SARRP spans 3 ft × 4 ft × 6 ft (WxLxH). Depending on filtration, the isocenter dose outputs at 1 cm depth in water range from 22 to 375 cGy/min from the smallest to the largest radiation fields. The 20% to 80% dose fall-off spans 0.16 mm. CBCT with (0.6 × 0.6 × 0.6) mm3 voxel resolution is acquired with less than 1 cGy. Treatment planning is performed at sub-mm resolution. Conclusions The capability of the SARRP to deliver highly focal beams to multiple animal model systems provides new research opportunities that more realistically bridge laboratory research and clinical translation. PMID:18640502

  14. The application of real-time, non-destructive electrical tomographic imaging to heritage conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvy, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in recent times with the non-invasive electrical tomographic imaging of the shallow subsurface. These emerging technologies are analogous to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT scans used in medical physics. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is increasingly used to underpin studies in waste management, contaminated land characterisation and remediation, monitoring groundwater resources and the monitoring of geohazards or safety-critical plant. Ther...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  16. Unfolding and smoothing applied to the quality enhancement of neutron tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Silvani, Maria I.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2008-01-01

    Resolution and contrast are the major parameters defining the quality of a computer-aided tomographic image. These parameters depend upon several features of the image acquisition system, such as detector resolution, geometrical arrangement of the source-object-detector, beam divergence, source strength, detector efficiency and counting time. Roughly, the detector finite resolution is the main source of systematic errors affecting the separation power of the image acquisition system, while the electronic noise and statistical fluctuation are responsible for the data dispersion, which spoils the contrast. An algorithm has been developed in this work aiming at the improvement of the image quality through the minimization of both types of errors. The systematic ones are reduced by a mathematical unfolding of the position spectra - used as projections to reconstruct the 2D-images - using the Line Spread Function - LSF of the neutron tomographic system. The principle behind this technique is that every single channel contains information about all channels of the spectrum, but it is concealed due to the automatic integration carried out by the detector. Therefore, knowing the shape of this curve, it is possible to retrieve the original spectra. These spectra are unfortunately corrupted by the unavoidable statistical fluctuation, and by oscillations arising from the unfolding process, which strongly affects the quality of the final unfolded image. In order to reduce this impact, the spectra have been filtered by a Fourier transform technique or smoothed with a least square fitting procedure. The algorithm has been applied to spectra of some test-bodies generated by an earlier developed tomographic simulator, which reproduces the spectra furnished by a thermal neutron tomographic system employing a position sensitive detector. The obtained results have shown that the unfolded spectra produce final images capable to resolve features otherwise not achievable with the

  17. Image Guidance and Assessment of Radiation Induced Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pelizzari, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Image guidance and assessment techniques are being developed for combined radiation/gene therapy, which utilizes a radiation-inducible gene promoter to cause expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha...

  18. Process and installation for producing tomographic images of the distribution of a radiotracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonroget, Jacques; Brunol, Jean.

    1977-01-01

    The invention particularly concerns a process for obtaining tomographic images of an object formed by a radiotracer distributed spacially over three dimensions. This process, using a detection device with an appreciably plane detection surface and at least one collimation orifice provided in a partition between the detection surface and the object, enables tomographic sections to be obtained with an excellent three-dimensional resolution of the images achieved. It is employed to advantage in an installation that includes a detection device or gamma camera on an appreciably plane surface, a device having a series of collimation apertures which may be used in succession, these holes being appreciably distributed over a common plane parallel to the detection surface, and a holder for the object. This holder can be moved in appreciably parallel translation to the common plane. The aim of this invention is, inter alia, to meet two requirements: localization in space and obtaining good contrasts. This aim is achieved by the fact that at least one tomographic image is obtained from a series of intermediate images of the object [fr

  19. Tomographic imaging of the cervical spine of horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, L.P.; Machado, V.M.V.; Santos, R.V.; Evangelista, F.C.; Vulcano, L.C.

    2012-01-01

    The anatomy of the cervical spine of mature horses based on images obtained with a helical computed tomography examination performed on anatomic specimens was studied. Computed tomography was the diagnostic imaging method of choice and allowed three-dimensional reconstructions of images and other anatomical planes, such as coronal and sagittal. All images were acquired and evaluated in the filter and window to bone tissue. It was possible to demonstrate the anatomical differences and peculiarities of the normal vertebrae, particularly the occipito-atlantoaxial region, which has a higher incidence of changes to assist in the visualization of any change of the bone pattern on CT studies. (author)

  20. Single-Shot, Volumetrically Illuminated, Three-Dimensional, Tomographic Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Imaging in a Gaseous Free Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Single- shot , volumetrically illuminated, three- dimensional, tomographic laser-induced- fluorescence imaging in a gaseous free jet Benjamin R. Halls...37081 Göttingen, Germany 4School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA 5trmeyer@purdue.edu 6james.gord...us.af.mil Abstract: Single- shot , tomographic imaging of the three-dimensional concentration field is demonstrated in a turbulent gaseous free jet in co-flow

  1. On a novel low cost high accuracy experimental setup for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discetti, Stefano; Ianiro, Andrea; Astarita, Tommaso; Cardone, Gennaro

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the critical aspects related to cost reduction of a Tomo PIV setup and to the bias errors introduced in the velocity measurements by the coherent motion of the ghost particles. The proposed solution consists of using two independent imaging systems composed of three (or more) low speed single frame cameras, which can be up to ten times cheaper than double shutter cameras with the same image quality. Each imaging system is used to reconstruct a particle distribution in the same measurement region, relative to the first and the second exposure, respectively. The reconstructed volumes are then interrogated by cross-correlation in order to obtain the measured velocity field, as in the standard tomographic PIV implementation. Moreover, differently from tomographic PIV, the ghost particle distributions of the two exposures are uncorrelated, since their spatial distribution is camera orientation dependent. For this reason, the proposed solution promises more accurate results, without the bias effect of the coherent ghost particles motion. Guidelines for the implementation and the application of the present method are proposed. The performances are assessed with a parametric study on synthetic experiments. The proposed low cost system produces a much lower modulation with respect to an equivalent three-camera system. Furthermore, the potential accuracy improvement using the Motion Tracking Enhanced MART (Novara et al 2010 Meas. Sci. Technol. 21 035401) is much higher than in the case of the standard implementation of tomographic PIV. (paper)

  2. A system dedicated to the viewing and handling of tomographic images obtained by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaets, Joan F.W.; Almeida, Lirio O.B.; Traina, Agma J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present work describes the development of a dedicated system to be used in visualization and manipulation of a MR images. The graphics environment as well as the tool kit were developed for the dedicated TMS34010 based hardware. The developed software offers a compact kernel with primitives to support the creation and manipulation windows and menus directly in 'C' language. This work is fundamental for the implementation of a user friendly interface build to operate and visualize tomographic images. This tools are essential for the selection an archiving of images planes as used in clinical applications. (author)

  3. Automating the segmentation of medical images for the production of voxel tomographic computational models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, M.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry for the diagnostic medical imaging procedures performed on humans requires anatomically accurate, computational models. These may be constructed from medical images as voxel-based tomographic models. However, they are time consuming to produce and as a consequence, there are few available. This paper discusses the emergence of semi-automatic segmentation techniques and describes an application (iRAD) written in Microsoft Visual Basic that allows the bitmap of a medical image to be segmented interactively and semi-automatically while displayed in Microsoft Excel. iRAD will decrease the time required to construct voxel models. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  4. Tomographic imaging of the human thyroid using 124I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, P.; Townsend, D.; Flattet, A.

    1986-01-01

    After receiving between 100 and 300 mu Ci of the positron-emitting radioisotope 124 I (half-life, 4.2 days), 64 patients with a variety of thyroid disorders were imaged with a high resolution positron camera. A 3-dimensional image of the distribution of radi,iodine uptake within the thyroid was obtained from a single 10- to 15-min scan. This image may be viewed as a sequence of 2-mm thick transverse, sagittal, or frontal sections or as a 3-dimensional shaded surface. The functional volume of the thyroid may be estimated by counting the volume elements (voxels) inside the thyroid surface. The precision of the estimate varied from 6-15%, depending on the size and clinical status of the thyroid. The volume estimation procedure was validated with phantoms and with the thyroids of patients who subsequently underwent partial thyroidectomy. This 3-dimensional imaging technique may be useful for diagnosis and management of thyroid diseases

  5. Molecular imaging of small animals with dedicated PET tomographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatziioannou, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    Biological discovery has moved at an accelerated pace in recent years, with a considerable focus on the transition from in vitro to in vivo models. As a result, there has been a significant increase in the need to adapt clinical imaging methods, as well as for novel imaging technologies for biological research. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a clinical imaging modality that permits the use of positron-labeled molecular imaging probes for non-invasive assays of biochemical processes. The imaging procedure can be repeatedly performed before and after interventions, thereby allowing each animal to be used as its own control. Positron-labeled compounds that target a range of molecular targets have been and continue to be synthesized, with examples of biological processes ranging from receptors and synthesis of transmitters in cell communication, to metabolic processes and gene expression. In animal research, PET has been used extensively in the past for studies of non-human primates and other larger animals. New detector technology has improved spatial resolution, and has made possible PET scanning for the study of the most important modern molecular biology model, the laboratory mouse. This paper presents the challenges facing PET technology as applied to small animal imaging, provides a historical overview of the development of small animal PET systems, and discusses the current state of the art in small animal PET technology. (orig.)

  6. Positron imaging system with improved count rate and tomographic capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A system with improved count rate capability for detecting the radioactive distribution of positron events within an organ of interest in a living subject is described. Objects of the invention include improving the scintillation crystal and pulse processing electronics, avoiding the limitations of collimators and provide an Arger camera positron imaging system that avoids the use of collimators. (U.K.)

  7. Tomographic image reconstruction and rendering with texture-mapping hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, S.G.; Cabral, B.K.; Foran, J.

    1994-07-01

    The image reconstruction problem, also known as the inverse Radon transform, for x-ray computed tomography (CT) is found in numerous applications in medicine and industry. The most common algorithm used in these cases is filtered backprojection (FBP), which, while a simple procedure, is time-consuming for large images on any type of computational engine. Specially-designed, dedicated parallel processors are commonly used in medical CT scanners, whose results are then passed to graphics workstation for rendering and analysis. However, a fast direct FBP algorithm can be implemented on modern texture-mapping hardware in current high-end workstation platforms. This is done by casting the FBP algorithm as an image warping operation with summing. Texture-mapping hardware, such as that on the Silicon Graphics Reality Engine (TM), shows around 600 times speedup of backprojection over a CPU-based implementation (a 100 Mhz R4400 in this case). This technique has the further advantages of flexibility and rapid programming. In addition, the same hardware can be used for both image reconstruction and for volumetric rendering. The techniques can also be used to accelerate iterative reconstruction algorithms. The hardware architecture also allows more complex operations than straight-ray backprojection if they are required, including fan-beam, cone-beam, and curved ray paths, with little or no speed penalties

  8. The image of a brain stroke in a computed tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, E.G.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of 100 findings from patients who suffered brain strokes and by the use of 1500 ensured stroke images it was tested whether or not the stroke-predilection typologie outlined by Zuelch is based on a coincidental summation of individual cases. The radio-computed tomography with the possibility of evaluation of non-lethal cases proved itself as a suited method for confirmation or repudiation of this stroke theory. By means of the consistently achieved association of the frontal, respectively horizontal sectional image for the typology it could be proven and - with the exception of a few rather seldom types - also demonstrated that the basic and predilection types of brain stroke repeated themselves in their pattern. In individual cases a specification of lower types could also be undertaken. (orig./TRV) [de

  9. Advanced Tomographic Imaging Methods for the Analysis of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    differentiation, due to the fact that the natural abun- dance gel has virtually no 170 background. In the second case, proton MRi, was used to analyze the...evaluation of a diffusion coefficient from oroton data is virtually impossible. In-dramatic contrast, the- 17 o images provide unambiguous data for the...doctorat Ecole Nationale Sup6rieure des T616communications (1987). 10. P. Grangeat, in compn ter Asisted Radiologv, CAR18S, Springer-Verlag, Berlin (1985

  10. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virador, Patrick R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  11. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virador, Patrick R.G.

    2000-01-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  12. Initial results of a positron tomograph for prostate imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.S.; Choong, W.S.; Moses, W.W.; Qi, J.; Hu, J.; Wang,G.C.; Wilson, D.; Oh, S.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    2004-11-29

    We present the status and initial images of a positrontomograph for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair ofexternal curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis).The distance between detector banks adjusts to allow patient access andto position the detectors as closely as possible for maximum sensitivitywith patients of various sizes. Each bank is composed of two axial rowsof 20 CTI PET Systems HR+ block detectors for a total of 80 modules inthe camera. Compared to an ECAT HR PET system operating in 3D mode, ourcamera uses about one-quarter the number of detectors and hasapproximately the same sensitivity for a central point source, becauseour detectors are close to the patient. The individual detectors areangled in the plane to point towards the prostate to minimize resolutiondegradation in that region. The detectors are read out by modified CTIdata acquisition electronics. We have completed construction of thegantry and electronics, have developed detector calibration and dataacquisition software, and are taking coincidence data. We demonstratethat we can clearly visualize a "prostate" in a simple phantom.Reconstructed images of two phantoms are shown.

  13. Development of a portable computed tomographic scanner for on-line imaging of industrial piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaafar Abdullah; Mohd Arif Hamzah; Mohd Soyapi Mohd Yusof; Mohd Fitri Abdul Rahman; Fadil IsmaiI; Rasif Mohd Zain

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) technology is being increasingly developed for industrial application. This paper presents the development of a portable computed tomographic scanner for on?line imaging of industrial piping systems. The theoretical approach, the system hardware, the data acquisition system and the adopted algorithm for image reconstruction are discussed. The scanner has large potential to be used to determine the extent of corrosion under insulation (CUI), to detect blockages, to measure the thickness of deposit/materials built-up on the walls and to improve understanding of material flow in pipelines. (Author)

  14. Use of artificial neural networks in drug and explosive detection through tomographic images with thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Francisco J.O.; Crispim, Verginia R.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2009-01-01

    The artificial neural network technique was used to identify drugs and plastic explosives, from a tomography composed by a set of six neutrongraphic projections obtained in real time. Bidimensional tomographic images of samples of drugs, explosives and other materials, when digitally processed, yield the characteristic spectra of each type of material. The information contained in those spectra was then used for ANN training, the best images being obtained when the multilayer perceptron model, the back-propagation training algorithm and the Cross-validation interruption criterion were used. ANN showed to be useful in forecasting presence of drugs and explosives hitting a rate of success above 97 %. (author)

  15. Sequential computed tomographic imaging of a transplantable rabbit brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.J.; Rosenbaum, A.E.; Beck, T.J.; Ahn, H.S.; Anderson, J.

    1986-01-01

    The accuracy of CT imaging in evaluating VX-2 tumor growth in the rabbit brain was assessed. CT scanning was performed in 5 outbred New Zealand white male rabbits before and at 4, 7, 9 and 13 (in 3 animals) days after surgical implantation of 3 x 10 5 viable VX-2 tumor cells in the frontoparietal lobes. The CT studies were correlated with gross pathology in each. The tumor was visualized with CT in all 5 rabbits by the 9th day post implantation when the tumor ranged in size from 4-6 x 3-4 x 2-3 mm. Between the 9th and 13th day, the tumor increased 6-fold in two rabbits and 12-fold in the third rabbit. CT is a useful technique to evaluate brain tumor growth in this model and should be valuable in documenting the efficacy of chemotherapy on tumor growth. (orig.)

  16. Three-Dimensional Display Of Computed Tomographic Volume Images To Visualize Internal Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lowell D.

    1981-10-01

    Volume images made up of "stacks" of parallel computed tomographic (CT) cross-sectional images are displayed in three dimensions utilizing the method of projection imaging. This technique involves the mathematical projection of the volume picture elements (voxels) of the 3-D image onto a plane to form a two-dimensional projection image which, for x-ray CT volume images, resemble conventional radiographs. Projection images formed at two angles of view, 2° to 8° apart, are utilized as stereo-pair projections to view the volume image in three dimensions. Before projection, selected regions of the volume image are partially dissolved or totally removed from the volume to enhance the visibility of remaining struc-tures. These processes, referred to as numerical tissue "dissolution" and "dissection", are utilized to overcome the undesired effects of superposition which occur as natural consequence of displaying a stack of cross sections as a volume image, i.e., deeper image regions are obscured by overlying structure. Examples are shown where overlying regions of the volume image have been "cut" from the volume to more clearly visualize deeper anatomy. Particular emphasis is given to the use of these methods in identifying two-and three-dimensional subregions of interest within the volume for further detailed view-ing and quantitative analysis. As an example, the use of the 3-D display of volume images to guide the process of identifying the optimal orientation of oblique section images through internal organs of the body is illustrated.

  17. Positron transaxial emission tomograph with computerized image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jatteau, Michel.

    1981-01-01

    This invention concerns a positron transaxial emission tomography apparatus with computerized image reconstruction, like those used in nuclear medicine for studying the metabolism of organs, in physiological examinations and as a diagnosis aid. The operation is based on the principle of the detection of photons emitted when the positrons are annihilated by impact with an electron. The appliance is mainly composed of: (a) - a set of gamma ray detectors distributed on a polygonal arrangement around the body area to be examined, (b) - circuits for amplifying the signals delivered by the gamma ray detectors, (c) - computers essentially comprising energy integration and discrimination circuits and provided at the output of the detectors for calculating and delivering, as from the amplified signals, information on the position and energy relative to each occurrence constituted by the detections of photons, (d) - time coincidence circuits for selecting by emission of detector validation signals, only those occurrences, among the ensemble of those detected, which effectively result from the annihilation of positrons inside the area examined, (e) - a data processing system [fr

  18. An efficient simultaneous reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Soria, Julio

    2009-10-01

    To date, Tomo-PIV has involved the use of the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART), where the intensity of each 3D voxel is iteratively corrected to satisfy one recorded projection, or pixel intensity, at a time. This results in reconstruction times of multiple hours for each velocity field and requires considerable computer memory in order to store the associated weighting coefficients and intensity values for each point in the volume. In this paper, a rapid and less memory intensive reconstruction algorithm is presented based on a multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation that determines possible particle locations in the volume, followed by simultaneous iterative correction. Reconstructions of simulated images are presented for two simultaneous algorithms (SART and SMART) as well as the now standard MART algorithm, which indicate that the same accuracy as MART can be achieved 5.5 times faster or 77 times faster with 15 times less memory if the processing and storage of the weighting matrix is considered. Application of MLOS-SMART and MART to a turbulent boundary layer at Re θ = 2200 using a 4 camera Tomo-PIV system with a volume of 1,000 × 1,000 × 160 voxels is discussed. Results indicate improvements in reconstruction speed of 15 times that of MART with precalculated weighting matrix, or 65 times if calculation of the weighting matrix is considered. Furthermore the memory needed to store a large weighting matrix and volume intensity is reduced by almost 40 times in this case.

  19. Tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric volumes from infrared limb-imager measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungermann, Joern

    2011-08-12

    State-of-the art nadir and limb-sounders, but also in situ measurements, do not offer the capability to highly resolve the atmosphere in all three dimensions. This leaves an observational gap with respect to small-scale structures that arise frequently in the atmosphere and that still lack a quantitative understanding. For instance, filaments and tropopause folds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) are crucial for its composition and variability. One way to achieve a highly resolved three-dimensional (3-D) picture of the atmosphere is the tomographic evaluation of limb-imager measurements. This thesis presents a methodology for the tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric constituents. To be able to deal with the large increase of observations and unknowns compared to conventional retrievals, great care is taken to reduce memory consumption and processing time. This method is used to evaluate the performance of two upcoming infrared limb-imager instruments and to prepare their missions. The first examined instrument is the infrared limb-imager on board of PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetrewave Emitted Radiation), one of three remaining candidates for ESA's 7th Earth Explorer mission. Scientific goals of PREMIER are, among others, the examination of gravity waves and the quantification of processes controlling atmospheric composition in the UTLS, a region of particular importance for climate change. Simulations based on the performance requirements of this instrument deliver a vertical resolution that is slightly better than its vertical field-of-view (about 0.75 km) and a horizontal resolution of {approx}25km x 70 km. Non-linear end-to-end simulations for various gravity wave patterns demonstrate that the high 3-D resolution of PREMIER considerably extends the range of detectable gravity waves in terms of horizontal and vertical wavelength compared to previous observations. The second examined

  20. Collaborative Research: Tomographic imaging of laser-plasma structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downer, Michael [University of Texas at Austin

    2018-01-18

    The interaction of intense short laser pulses with ionized gases, or plasmas, underlies many applications such as acceleration of elementary particles, production of energy by laser fusion, generation of x-ray and far-infrared “terahertz” pulses for medical and materials probing, remote sensing of explosives and pollutants, and generation of guide stars. Such laser-plasma interactions create tiny electron density structures (analogous to the wake behind a boat) inside the plasma in the shape of waves, bubbles and filaments that move at the speed of light, and evolve as they propagate. Prior to recent work by the PI of this proposal, detailed knowledge of such structures came exclusively from intensive computer simulations. Now “snapshots” of these elusive, light-velocity structures can be taken in the laboratory using dynamic variant of holography, the technique used to produce ID cards and DVDs, and dynamic variant of tomography, the technique used in medicine to image internal bodily organs. These fast visualization techniques are important for understanding, improving and scaling the above-mentioned applications of laser-plasma interactions. In this project, we accomplished three things: 1) We took holographic pictures of a laser-driven plasma-wave in the act of accelerating electrons to high energy, and used computer simulations to understand the pictures. 2) Using results from this experiment to optimize the performance of the accelerator, and the brightness of x-rays that it emits. These x-rays will be useful for medical and materials science applications. 3) We made technical improvements to the holographic technique that enables us to see finer details in the recorded pictures. Four refereed journal papers were published, and two students earned PhDs and moved on to scientific careers in US National Laboratories based on their work under this project.

  1. Effect of Shot Noise on Simultaneous Sensing in Frequency Division Multiplexed Diffuse Optical Tomographic Imaging Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hansol; Lim, Gukbin; Hong, Keum-Shik; Cho, Jaedu; Gulsen, Gultekin; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2017-11-28

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has been studied for use in the detection of breast cancer, cerebral oxygenation, and cognitive brain signals. As optical imaging studies have increased significantly, acquiring imaging data in real time has become increasingly important. We have developed frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) DOT systems to analyze their performance with respect to acquisition time and imaging quality, in comparison with the conventional time-division multiplexing (TDM) DOT. A large tomographic area of a cylindrical phantom 60 mm in diameter could be successfully reconstructed using both TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems. In our experiment with 6 source-detector (S-D) pairs, the TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems required 6.18 and 1 s, respectively, to obtain a single tomographic data set. While the absorption coefficient of the reconstruction image was underestimated in the case of the FDM DOT, we experimentally confirmed that the abnormal region can be clearly distinguished from the background phantom using both methods.

  2. Effect of Shot Noise on Simultaneous Sensing in Frequency Division Multiplexed Diffuse Optical Tomographic Imaging Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansol Jang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT has been studied for use in the detection of breast cancer, cerebral oxygenation, and cognitive brain signals. As optical imaging studies have increased significantly, acquiring imaging data in real time has become increasingly important. We have developed frequency-division multiplexing (FDM DOT systems to analyze their performance with respect to acquisition time and imaging quality, in comparison with the conventional time-division multiplexing (TDM DOT. A large tomographic area of a cylindrical phantom 60 mm in diameter could be successfully reconstructed using both TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems. In our experiment with 6 source-detector (S-D pairs, the TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems required 6.18 and 1 s, respectively, to obtain a single tomographic data set. While the absorption coefficient of the reconstruction image was underestimated in the case of the FDM DOT, we experimentally confirmed that the abnormal region can be clearly distinguished from the background phantom using both methods.

  3. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A tomographic array with the following characteristics is described. An X-ray screen serving as detector is placed before a photomultiplier tube which itself is placed in front of a television camera connected to a set of image processors. The detector is concave towards the source and is replacable. Different images of the object are obtained simultaneously. Optical fibers and lenses are used for transmission within the system

  4. Microwave Tomographic Imaging Utilizing Low-Profile, Rotating, Right Angle-Bent Monopole Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Epstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a simple mechanism incorporating feedline bends and rotary joints to enable motion of a monopole antenna within a liquid-based illumination chamber for tomographic imaging. The monopole is particularly well suited for this scenario because of its small size and simplicity. For the application presented here a full set of measurement data is collected from most illumination and receive directions utilizing only a pair of antennas configured with the rotating fixture underneath the imaging tank. Alternatively, the concept can be adapted for feed structures entering the tank from the sides to allow for measurements with vertically and horizontally polarized antennas. This opens the door for more advanced imaging applications where anisotropy could play an important role such as in bone imaging.

  5. Two- and Three-Dimensional Fast Intrawall Imaging with Microwave Tomographic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenji Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A fast and efficient microwave tomographic algorithm is proposed for 2-D and 3-D real-time intrawall imaging. The exploding reflection model is utilized to simplify the imaging formulation, and the half-space Green’s function is expanded in the spectral domain to facilitate the easy implementation of the imaging algorithm with the fast Fourier transform (FFT and inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT. The linearization of the inversion scheme and employment of FFT/IFFT in the imaging formula make the algorithm suitable for various applications pertaining to the inspection of a large probed region and allow real-time processing. Representative numerical and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm for real-time intrawall characterization.

  6. Box Tomography: An efficient tomographic method for imaging localized structures in the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    The accurate imaging of localized geological structures inside the deep Earth is key to understand our planet and its history. Since the introduction of the Preliminary Reference Earth Model, many generations of global tomographic models have been developed and give us access to the 3D structure of the Earth's interior. The latest generation of global tomographic models has emerged with the development of accurate numerical wavefield computations in a 3D earth combined with access to enhanced HPC capabilities. These models have sharpened up mantle images and unveiled relatively small scale structures that were blurred out in previous generation models. Fingerlike structures have been found at the base of the oceanic asthenosphere, and vertically oriented broad low velocity plume conduits [1] extend throughout the lower mantle beneath those major hotspots that are located within the perimeter of the deep mantle large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). While providing new insights into our understanding of mantle dynamics, the detailed morphology of these features requires further efforts to obtain higher resolution images. In recent years, we developed a theoretical framework [2][3] for the tomographic imaging of localised geological structures buried inside the Earth, where no seismic sources nor receivers are necessarily present. We call this "box tomography" [4]. The essential difference between box-tomography and standard tomographic methods is that the numerical modeling (i.e. the raytracing in travel time tomography and the wave propagation in waveform tomography or full waveform inversion) is completely confined within the small box-region imaged. Thus, box tomography is a lot more efficient than global tomography (i.e. where we invert for the velocity in the larger volume that encompasses all the sources and receivers), for imaging localised objects. We present 2D and 3D examples showing that box tomography can be employed for imaging structures present

  7. Image quality of two different mobile cone beam computed tomographs for maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeberger, Robin; Buchgeister, Markus; Seethaler, Andreas C; Shiozawa, Thomas; Hoffmann, Juergen

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated two mobile cone beam computed tomographs (mCBCT) comparing image quality with respect to radiation dosage. Image quality was analyzed by using different scanning modes. The skulls of three human cadavers were scanned by use of conventional Computed Tomography (CT) as well as with two mobile cone beam computed tomographs (Siemens Arcadis Orbic 3D and Ziehm Vision Vario 3D). Six different acquisition modes with different radiation dosages were used. The axial views of all scans were evaluated by five medical doctors regarding image quality by identifying predefined anatomical structures of the skull. A five-point ranking scale was used. The inter-rater reliability was statistically depicted by Cohen's Kappa coefficient. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to evaluate the rater's results. For evaluating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) a Catphan 600 reference body with two different inlays was used. Comparing the mCBCTs, the image quality of the Siemens Arcadis Orbic 3D in high-dosage mode received the best score (median: 2.27). The inter-rater reliability was fair (Kappa=-0.030 to 0.328). The Wilcoxon test showed significant (p<0.05) different median rating values in 18 out of 21 imaging modes. The SNR was higher (better) in the high-dosage modes. Intra-operative 3D imaging by using mCBCT for maxillofacial surgery in low-dose mode acquisition is adequate in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and image quality. The image quality does not correlate in a linear manner with a higher radiation dosage. Surgeons using this technique should gather their own experience with the different acquisition modes. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 3D tomographic imaging with the γ-eye planar scintigraphic gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, H.; Georgiou, M.; Loudos, G. K.; Simcox, A.; Tsoumpas, C.

    2017-11-01

    γ-eye is a desktop planar scintigraphic gamma camera (100 mm × 50 mm field of view) designed by BET Solutions as an affordable tool for dynamic, whole body, small-animal imaging. This investigation tests the viability of using γ-eye for the collection of tomographic data for 3D SPECT reconstruction. Two software packages, QSPECT and STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction), have been compared. Reconstructions have been performed using QSPECT’s implementation of the OSEM algorithm and STIR’s OSMAPOSL (Ordered Subset Maximum A Posteriori One Step Late) and OSSPS (Ordered Subsets Separable Paraboloidal Surrogate) algorithms. Reconstructed images of phantom and mouse data have been assessed in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity to varying activity levels and uniformity. The effect of varying the number of iterations, the voxel size (1.25 mm default voxel size reduced to 0.625 mm and 0.3125 mm), the point spread function correction and the weight of prior terms were explored. While QSPECT demonstrated faster reconstructions, STIR outperformed it in terms of resolution (as low as 1 mm versus 3 mm), particularly when smaller voxel sizes were used, and in terms of uniformity, particularly when prior terms were used. Little difference in terms of sensitivity was seen throughout.

  9. Computer simulation and image guidance for individualised dynamic spinal stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, S R; Hausen, U; Kosterhon, M; Amr, A N; Gruber, K; Giese, A

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic implants for the human spine are used to re-establish regular segmental motion. However, the results have often been unsatisfactory and complications such as screw loosening are common. Individualisation of appliances and precision implantation are needed to improve the outcome of this procedure. Computer simulation, virtual implant optimisation and image guidance were used to improve the technique. A human lumbar spine computer model was developed using multi-body simulation software. The model simulates spinal motion under load and degenerative changes. After virtual degeneration of a L4/5 segment, virtual pedicle screw-based implants were introduced. The implants' positions and properties were iteratively optimised. The resulting implant positions were used as operative plan for image guidance and finally implemented in a physical spine model. In the simulation, the introduction and optimisation of virtually designed dynamic implants could partly compensate for the effects of virtual lumbar segment degeneration. The optimised operative plan was exported to two different image-guidance systems for transfer to a physical spine model. Three-dimensional computer graphic simulation is a feasible means to develop operative plans for dynamic spinal stabilization. These operative plans can be transferred to commercially available image-guidance systems for use in implantation of physical implants in a spine model. This concept has important potential in the design of operative plans and implants for individualised dynamic spine stabilization surgery.

  10. Augmented Reality Image Guidance in Minimally Invasive Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Daniel; Mayer, Erik; Chen, Dongbin; Anstee, Ann; Vale, Justin; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Edwards, Philip'eddie'

    This paper presents our work aimed at providing augmented reality (AR) guidance of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALP) using the da Vinci system. There is a good clinical case for guidance due to the significant rate of complications and steep learning curve for this procedure. Patients who were due to undergo robotic prostatectomy for organ-confined prostate cancer underwent preoperative 3T MRI scans of the pelvis. These were segmented and reconstructed to form 3D images of pelvic anatomy. The reconstructed image was successfully overlaid onto screenshots of the recorded surgery post-procedure. Surgeons who perform minimally-invasive prostatectomy took part in a user-needs analysis to determine the potential benefits of an image guidance system after viewing the overlaid images. All surgeons stated that the development would be useful at key stages of the surgery and could help to improve the learning curve of the procedure and improve functional and oncological outcomes. Establishing the clinical need in this way is a vital early step in development of an AR guidance system. We have also identified relevant anatomy from preoperative MRI. Further work will be aimed at automated registration to account for tissue deformation during the procedure, using a combination of transrectal ultrasound and stereoendoscopic video.

  11. Re-evaluation of Magnetic Resonance and Computerised Tomographic Imaging in Neuro-Ophthalmic Patients in an Academic Centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekoek, Clarence G. J.; Meiners, Linda C.; Pott, Jan Willem R.

    The aim of the study is to report the frequency of missed diagnoses on magnetic resonance and computerised tomographic imaging in neuro-ophthalmic patients who were referred to an academic ophthalmology department, with apparent normal imaging. The authors included all neuro-ophthalmic patients,

  12. Achievement report for fiscal 1998. Optical tomographic system; 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Hikari danso imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    Evaluations were given on spatial resolution and measurement time of an optical tomographic system by using the developed 64-channel time-resolved spectroscopy and an image reconstruction algorithm. With respect to the spatial resolution, the target value of 1 cm was verified from tomographic images of a phantom with a diameter of 10cm, simulating a neonate. The measurement time achieved 20 minutes, being one third of the target value. In installing the equipment at Hokkaido University, speeds of the optical switches and attenuators were increased to have reduced the measurement time to one minute. For installation at Kanagawa Rehabilitation Center, development has been made on a nano-second light pulser, whose average beam quantity has been increased to 40 times, and improvement has been given on the optical switches, the attenuators, and the indication software, by which the measurement time was decreased further by 30 seconds than that at Hokkaido University. In performing the clinical evaluation, the evaluation protocol resolved by the Experiment Evaluation Special Committee was submitted for deliberation at the Medical Welfare Device Clinical Evaluation Committee. Upon having been authorized by the Committee, the clinical evaluations were performed at Hokkaido University and the Kanagawa Rehabilitation Center. (NEDO)

  13. Technical Advances in Image Guidance of Radionuclide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijst, Casper; Kunnen, Britt; Lam, Marnix G E H; de Jong, Hugo W A M

    2017-12-01

    Internal radiation therapy with radionuclides (i.e., radionuclide therapy) owes its success to the many advantages over other, more conventional, treatment options. One distinct advantage of radionuclide therapies is the potential to use (part of) the emitted radiation for imaging of the radionuclide distribution. The combination of diagnostic and therapeutic properties in a set of matched radiopharmaceuticals (sometimes combined in a single radiopharmaceutical) is often referred to as theranostics and allows accurate diagnostic imaging before therapy. The use of imaging benefits treatment planning, dosimetry, and assessment of treatment response. This paper focuses on a selection of advances in imaging technology relevant for image guidance of radionuclide therapy. This involves developments in nuclear imaging modalities, as well as other anatomic and functional imaging modalities. The quality and quantitative accuracy of images used for guidance of radionuclide therapy is continuously being improved, which in turn may improve the therapeutic outcome and efficiency of radionuclide therapies. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  14. In vivo tomographic imaging with fluorescence and MRI using tumor-targeted dual-labeled nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhang,1 Bin Zhang,1 Fei Liu,1,2 Jianwen Luo,1,3 Jing Bai1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, 2Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, 3Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Dual-modality imaging combines the complementary advantages of different modalities, and offers the prospect of improved preclinical research. The combination of fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides cross-validated information and direct comparison between these modalities. Here, we report on the application of a novel tumor-targeted, dual-labeled nanoparticle (NP, utilizing iron oxide as the MRI contrast agent and near infrared (NIR dye Cy5.5 as the fluorescent agent. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the NP to tumor cells. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the NPs in a mouse model were visualized by fluorescence and MR imaging collected at different time points. Quantitative analysis was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of MRI contrast enhancement. Furthermore, tomographic images were also acquired using both imaging modalities and cross-validated information of tumor location and size between these two modalities was revealed. The results demonstrate that the use of dual-labeled NPs can facilitate the dual-modal detection of tumors, information cross-validation, and direct comparison by combing fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and MRI. Keywords: dual-modality, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, nanoparticle

  15. Space imaging infrared optical guidance for autonomous ground vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Mutoh, Eiichiro; Kumagai, Hideo; Yamada, Hirofumi; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    2008-08-01

    We have developed the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle based on the uncooled infrared camera and focusing technique to detect the objects to be evaded and to set the drive path. For this purpose we made servomotor drive system to control the focus function of the infrared camera lens. To determine the best focus position we use the auto focus image processing of Daubechies wavelet transform technique with 4 terms. From the determined best focus position we transformed it to the distance of the object. We made the aluminum frame ground vehicle to mount the auto focus infrared unit. Its size is 900mm long and 800mm wide. This vehicle mounted Ackerman front steering system and the rear motor drive system. To confirm the guidance ability of the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle we had the experiments for the detection ability of the infrared auto focus unit to the actual car on the road and the roadside wall. As a result the auto focus image processing based on the Daubechies wavelet transform technique detects the best focus image clearly and give the depth of the object from the infrared camera unit.

  16. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration of a tomographic array in which the object can rotate about its axis is described. The X-ray detector is a cylindrical screen perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The X-ray source has a line-shaped focus coinciding with the axis of rotation. The beam is fan-shaped with one side of this fan lying along the axis of rotation. The detector screen is placed inside an X-ray image multiplier tube

  17. Automated angular and translational tomographic alignment and application to phase-contrast imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunha Ramos, Tiago Joao; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel

    2017-01-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (CT) is a 3D imaging technique that makes use of x-ray illumination and image reconstruction techniques to reproduce the internal cross-sections of a sample. Tomographic projection data usually require an initial relative alignment or knowledge of the exact object...... algorithm for wrapped phase projection data and an alignment algorithm that automatically takes 5 degrees of freedom, including the possible linear and angular motion errors, into consideration. The presented concepts are applied to simulated and real measured phase-contrast data, exhibiting a possible...... improvement in the reconstruction resolution. A MATLAB implementation is made publicly available and will allow robust analysis of large volumes of phase-contrast tomography data....

  18. Classification of wet aged related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Anam; Mir, Fouwad Jamil; Yasin, Ubaid Ullah; Khan, Shoab A.

    2013-12-01

    Wet Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a type of age related macular degeneration. In order to detect Wet AMD we look for Pigment Epithelium detachment (PED) and fluid filled region caused by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). This form of AMD can cause vision loss if not treated in time. In this article we have proposed an automated system for detection of Wet AMD in Optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images. The proposed system extracts PED and CNV from OCT images using segmentation and morphological operations and then detailed feature set are extracted. These features are then passed on to the classifier for classification. Finally performance measures like accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are calculated and the classifier delivering the maximum performance is selected as a comparison measure. Our system gives higher performance using SVM as compared to other methods.

  19. Localization and quantification of acute myocardial infarction by myocardial perfusion tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Xiufang; Min Changgeng; Lin Zhihu; Ke Ruoyi

    1994-01-01

    The authors reported the result of the quantification and localization of 30 clinically confirmed acute myocardial infarction patients in comparison with that of ECG. A left ventricle model was used to correct the area calculated by the method of Bull's eye. The result indicated that the infarction area calculated by the corrected Bull's eye method correlated closely with that determined by the ECG QRS scoring method (r = 0.706, P<0.01). Myocardial infarctions of all 30 patients were detected by both ECG and myocardial perfusion tomographic imaging. The accuracy of localization of myocardial infarction by myocardial perfusion imaging was similar to that of ECG in the anterior wall, anterior septum, anterior lateral and inferior wall, but superior to that of ECG in the apex, posterior lateral, posterior septum, and posterior wall

  20. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and multiple infarct dementia by tomographic imaging of iodine-123 IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.B.; Graham, L.S.; Lake, R.

    1986-01-01

    Tomographic imaging of the brain was performed using a rotating slant hole collimator and [ 123 I]N-isopropyl p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) in normal subjects (n = 6) and patients with either Alzheimer's disease (n = 5) or multiple infarct dementia (n = 3). Four blinded observers were asked to make a diagnosis from the images. Normal subjects and patients with multiple infarct dementia were correctly identified. Alzheimer's disease was diagnosed in three of the five patients with this disease. One patient with early Alzheimer's disease was classified as normal by two of the four observers. Another patient with Alzheimer's disease had an asymmetric distribution of IMP and was incorrectly diagnosed as multiple infarct dementia by all four observers. Limited angle tomography of the cerebral distribution of 123 I appears to be a useful technique for the evaluation of demented patients

  1. Detection of various anatomic patterns of root canals in mandibular incisors using digital periapical radiography, 3 cone-beam computed tomographic scanners, and micro-computed tomographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes da Silva Ramos Fernandes, Luciana Maria; Rice, Dwight; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Alvares Capelozza, Ana Lucia; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Jaramillo, David; Christensen, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of digital periapical (PA) radiography and 3 cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scanners in the identification of various internal anatomic patterns in mandibular incisors. Forty mandibular incisors were scanned using micro-computed tomographic imaging as the gold standard to establish the internal anatomic pattern. The number of root canals and internal patterns were classified into type I (single canal, n = 12), type Ia (single oval canal, n = 12), and type III (2 canals, n = 16). The teeth were placed in a human mandible, and digital PA radiography and 3 CBCT scans (Kodak 9000 3D [Carestream Health, Rochester, NY], Veraviewepocs 3De [J Morita MFG Corp, Kyoto, Japan], NewTom 5G [QR Srl, Verona, Italy]) were performed. Two blinded examiners classified each tooth's anatomic pattern, which were then compared with the micro-computed tomographic determinations. Considering type I and type Ia, which both presented with 1 root canal, there was a high degree of accuracy for all methods used (P > .05). The same result was found for type III. When identifying the shape of single canals (type I), CBCT imaging was more accurate compared with PA radiography. Concerning oval canals (type Ia), there was a significant difference between PA radiography and NewTom CBCT (PA radiography = 44%, NewTom = 88%). However, there were no significant differences between the 3 CBCT units. Double-exposure digital PA radiography for mandibular incisors is sufficient for the identification of the number of root canals. All CBCT devices showed improved accuracy in the identification of single root canal anatomy when a narrow canal was present. However, the identification of oval canals was improved only with the NewTom CBCT device. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hybrid Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Tomograph for Real-Time Finger Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeri, Milan; Bost, Wolfgang; Sénégond, Nicolas; Tretbar, Steffen; Fournelle, Marc

    2017-10-01

    We report a target-enclosing, hybrid tomograph with a total of 768 elements based on capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer technology and providing fast, high-resolution 2-D/3-D photoacoustic and ultrasound tomography tailored to finger imaging. A freely programmable ultrasound beamforming platform sampling data at 80 MHz was developed to realize plane wave transmission under multiple angles. A multiplexing unit enables the connection and control of a large number of elements. Fast image reconstruction is provided by GPU processing. The tomograph is composed of four independent and fully automated movable arc-shaped transducers, allowing imaging of all three finger joints. The system benefits from photoacoustics, yielding high optical contrast and enabling visualization of finger vascularization, and ultrasound provides morphologic information on joints and surrounding tissue. A diode-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used to broaden the spectrum of emitted wavelengths to provide multispectral imaging. Custom-made optical fiber bundles enable illumination of the region of interest in the plane of acoustic detection. Precision in positioning of the probe in motion is ensured by use of a motor-driven guide slide. The current position of the probe is encoded by the stage and used to relate ultrasound and photoacoustic signals to the corresponding region of interest of the suspicious finger joint. The system is characterized in phantoms and a healthy human finger in vivo. The results obtained promise to provide new opportunities in finger diagnostics and establish photoacoustic/ultrasound-tomography in medical routine. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Retinal nerve fibre layer imaging: comparison of Cirrus optical coherence tomography and Heidelberg retinal tomograph 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Assaf; Lim, Ridia; Rush, Ryan; Sheth, Saumil; Goldberg, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Prospective, cross-sectional study. Hospital setting. One hundred seventy-three subjects (85 glaucoma and 88 normal subjects). One eye from each individual was selected randomly for imaging by the spectral domain Cirrus optical coherence tomography and Heidelberg retinal tomograph 3. Global thickness and measurements at the four quadrants around the optic disc. Measurements as determined by Heidelberg retinal tomograph 3 were significantly larger than measurements done by Cirrus optical coherence tomography (respectively in mm, for global thickness: 200.0 ± 87.2 and 80.7 ± 14.7; for temporal quadrant: 75.3 ± 31.9 and 59.1 ± 13.8; for superior quadrant: 223.2 ± 128.4 and 97.7 ± 20.9; for nasal quadrant: 208.0 ± 102.9 and 66.8 ± 11.8; and for inferior quadrant: 224.4 ± 116.9 and 99.1 ± 26.6, for all P fibre layer thickness. The normative diagnostic classification of the two technologies may not agree. The results preclude interchangeable use of these measurements in clinical practice. © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologistss.

  4. On the impact of neutron beam divergence and scattering on the quality of transmission acquired tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvani, Maria Ines; Lopes, Ricardo T.; de Almeida, Gevaldo L.; Gonçalves, Marcelo José; Furieri, Rosanne C. A. A.

    2007-10-01

    The impact of the divergence of a thermal neutron beam and the scattered neutrons on the quality of tomographic images acquired by transmission have been evaluated by using a third generation tomographic system incorporating neutron collimators under several different arrangements. The system equipped with a gaseous position sensitive detector has been placed at the main channel outlet of the Argonauta Research Reactor in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (CNEN-Brazil) which furnishes a thermal neutron flux of 2.3 × 105 n cm-2 s-1. Experiments have then been conducted using test-objects with well-known inner structure and composition to assess the influence of the collimators arrangement on the quality of the acquired images. Both, beam divergence and scattering - expected to spoil the image quality - have been reduced by using properly positioned collimators between the neutron source and the object, and in the gap between the object and the detector, respectively. The shadow cast by this last collimator on the projections used to reconstruct the tomographic images has been eliminated by a proper software specifically written for this purpose. Improvement of the tomographic images has been observed, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed approach to improve their quality by using properly positioned collimators.

  5. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Shin, Dong Won; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung Ho [Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology.

  6. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Shin, Dong Won; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo; Han, Seung Ho

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology

  7. A morphological study of the mandibular molar region using reconstructed helical computed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuno, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Makoto; Noguchi, Akira; Yoshida, Keiko; Tachinami, Yasuharu

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the morphological variance in the mandibular molar region using reconstructed helical computed tomographic (CT) images. In addition, we discuss the necessity of CT scanning as part of the preoperative assessment process for dental implantation, by comparing the results with the findings of panoramic radiography. Sixty patients examined using CT as part of the preoperative assessment for dental implantation were analyzed. Reconstructed CT images were used to evaluate the bone quality and cross-sectional bone morphology of the mandibular molar region. The mandibular cortical index (MCI) and X-ray density ratio of this region were assessed using panoramic radiography in order to analyze the correlation between the findings of the CT images and panoramic radiography. CT images showed that there was a decrease in bone quality in cases with high MCI. Cross-sectional CT images revealed that the undercuts on the lingual side in the highly radiolucent areas in the basal portion were more frequent than those in the alveolar portion. This study showed that three-dimensional reconstructed CT images can help to detect variances in mandibular morphology that might be missed by panoramic radiography. In conclusion, it is suggested that CT should be included as an important examination tool before dental implantation. (author)

  8. Neutron tomographic imaging of bone-implant interface: Comparison with X-ray tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Hanna; Le Cann, Sophie; Perdikouri, Christina; Turunen, Mikael J; Kaestner, Anders; Tägil, Magnus; Hall, Stephen A; Tudisco, Erika

    2017-10-01

    Metal implants, in e.g. joint replacements, are generally considered to be a success. As mechanical stability is important for the longevity of a prosthesis, the biological reaction of the bone to the mechanical loading conditions after implantation and during remodelling determines its fate. The bone reaction at the implant interface can be studied using high-resolution imaging. However, commonly used X-ray imaging suffers from image artefacts in the close proximity of metal implants, which limit the possibility to closely examine the bone at the bone-implant interface. An alternative ex vivo 3D imaging method is offered by neutron tomography. Neutrons interact with matter differently than X-rays; therefore, this study explores if neutron tomography may be used to enrich studies on bone-implant interfaces. A stainless steel screw was implanted in a rat tibia and left to integrate for 6weeks. After extracting the tibia, the bone-screw construct was imaged using X-ray and neutron tomography at different resolutions. Artefacts were visible in all X-ray images in the close proximity of the implant, which limited the ability to accurately quantify the bone around the implant. In contrast, neutron images were free of metal artefacts, enabling full analysis of the bone-implant interface. Trabecular structural bone parameters were quantified in the metaphyseal bone away from the implant using all imaging modalities. The structural bone parameters were similar for all images except for the lowest resolution neutron images. This study presents the first proof-of-concept that neutron tomographic imaging can be used for ex-vivo evaluation of bone microstructure and that it constitutes a viable, new tool to study the bone-implant interface tissue remodelling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Identifying High-Traffic Patterns in the Workplace with Radio Tomographic Imaging in 3D Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Tomographic Imaging for Ambient Assisted Living,” in Evaluating AAL Systems Through Competitive Benchmarking, pp. 108–130. Springer, 2013. [10] S...Int’l Conf. on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP). IEEE, 2011, pp. 3976–3979. [28] G. Mao , B. Fidan, and B. Anderson, “Wireless Sensor

  10. Positron tomographic imaging of the liver: 68Ga iron hydroxide colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, B.; Miller, T.R.; Siegel, B.A.; Mathias, C.J.; Markham, J.; Ehrhardt, G.J.; Welch, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A new radiopharmaceutical, 68 Ga ion hydroxide colloid, for hepatic imaging by positron emission tomography was prepared from the eluate of a 68 Ge- 68 Ga solvent extraction generator. In rats, 84% of the administered dose of colloid localized in the liver and 4.6% accumulated in the spleen. Initial imaging studies in normal dogs showed close correspondence of the findings by positron tomography and transmission computed tomography. Emission tomography with 68 Ga-colloid was performed in 10 patients with hepatic metastases demonstrated by conventional 99mTc sulfur colloid scintigraphy. All focal defects noted on the conventional scintigrams were easily identified and generally were seen more clearly by positron tomography. In one patient, additional lesions not identified on the initial 99mTc sulfur colloid images were demonstrated. The positron tomographic images were compared with those obtained by transmission computed tomography in seven patients; the two studies showed comparable findings in five patients, whereas positron tomography more clearly showed multiple lesions in two. Our results suggest that positron emission tomography is a suitable technique for obtaining high contrast, cross-sectional images of large abdominal organs

  11. Statistical list-mode image reconstruction for the high resolution research tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmim, A; Lenox, M; Reader, A J; Michel, C; Burbar, Z; Ruth, T J; Sossi, V

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated statistical list-mode reconstruction applicable to a depth-encoding high resolution research tomograph. An image non-negativity constraint has been employed in the reconstructions and is shown to effectively remove the overestimation bias introduced by the sinogram non-negativity constraint. We have furthermore implemented a convergent subsetized (CS) list-mode reconstruction algorithm, based on previous work (Hsiao et al 2002 Conf. Rec. SPIE Med. Imaging 4684 10-19; Hsiao et al 2002 Conf. Rec. IEEE Int. Symp. Biomed. Imaging 409-12) on convergent histogram OSEM reconstruction. We have demonstrated that the first step of the convergent algorithm is exactly equivalent (unlike the histogram-mode case) to the regular subsetized list-mode EM algorithm, while the second and final step takes the form of additive updates in image space. We have shown that in terms of contrast, noise as well as FWHM width behaviour, the CS algorithm is robust and does not result in limit cycles. A hybrid algorithm based on the ordinary and the convergent algorithms is also proposed, and is shown to combine the advantages of the two algorithms (i.e. it is able to reach a higher image quality in fewer iterations while maintaining the convergent behaviour), making the hybrid approach a good alternative to the ordinary subsetized list-mode EM algorithm

  12. New techniques for resolution enhancement of 3D x-ray tomographic imaging from incomplete data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vengrinovich, V.; Zolotarev, S.; Denkevich, Y.; Tillack, G.-R.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of dimensions directly from tomographic images, restored from only few x-ray projections, made in a limited observation sector, is considered exploiting pipes wall thickness assessment like a typical example. Both experiments and simulations are used to extract main errors sources. It is taken from as known, that neglecting of the scattered radiation and beam hardening effects results in image blurring, strong artifacts and finally inaccurate sizing. The computerized technique is developed to simulate the contribution of scattered radiation and beam hardening for the purpose of their further extraction from projected data. After those accompanying effects extraction the iterative Bayesian techniques are applied to reconstruct images from the projections, using volumetric and/or shell representation of the objects like pipes. The achieved error of virtual pipe wall thickness assessment from 3D images can be as small as 300μk comparing to 1mm provided by modern techniques. Finally the conclusion was drawn that standard projection techniques using X- or Gamma rays in combination with X-ray film or imaging plates can be applied for the data acquisition to reconstruct finally wall thickness profiles in an in-field environment. (author)

  13. Interior tomographic imaging for x-ray coherent scattering (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Sean; Zhu, Zheyuan

    2017-05-01

    Conventional computed tomography reconstructs the attenuation only high-dimensional images. Coherent scatter computed tomography, which reconstructs the angular dependent scattering profiles of 3D objects, can provide molecular signatures that improves the accuracy of material identification and classification. Coherent scatter tomography are traditionally acquired by setups similar to x-ray powder diffraction machine; a collimated source in combination with 2D or 1D detector collimation in order to localize the scattering point. In addition, the coherent scatter cross-section is often 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of the absorption cross-section for the same material. Coded aperture and structured illumination approaches has been shown to greatly improve the collection efficiency. In many applications, especially in security imaging and medical diagnosis, fast and accurate identification of the material composition of a small volume within the whole object would lead to an accelerated imaging procedure and reduced radiation dose. Here, we report an imaging method to reconstruct the material coherent scatter profile within a small volume. The reconstruction along one radial direction can reconstruct a scalar coherent scattering tomographic image. Our methods takes advantage of the finite support of the scattering profile in small angle regime. Our system uses a pencil beam setup without using any detector side collimation. Coherent scatter profile of a 10 mm scattering sample embedded in a 30 mm diameter phantom was reconstructed. The setup has small form factor and is suitable for various portable non-destructive detection applications.

  14. Post-processing methods of rendering and visualizing 3-D reconstructed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.T.C.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the computer processing techniques of tomographic images, after they have been generated by imaging scanners, for volume visualization. Volume visualization is concerned with the representation, manipulation, and rendering of volumetric data. Since the first digital images were produced from computed tomography (CT) scanners in the mid 1970s, applications of visualization in medicine have expanded dramatically. Today, three-dimensional (3D) medical visualization has expanded from using CT data, the first inherently digital source of 3D medical data, to using data from various medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance scanners, positron emission scanners, digital ultrasound, electronic and confocal microscopy, and other medical imaging modalities. We have advanced from rendering anatomy to aid diagnosis and visualize complex anatomic structures to planning and assisting surgery and radiation treatment. New, more accurate and cost-effective procedures for clinical services and biomedical research have become possible by integrating computer graphics technology with medical images. This trend is particularly noticeable in current market-driven health care environment. For example, interventional imaging, image-guided surgery, and stereotactic and visualization techniques are now stemming into surgical practice. In this presentation, we discuss only computer-display-based approaches of volumetric medical visualization. That is, we assume that the display device available is two-dimensional (2D) in nature and all analysis of multidimensional image data is to be carried out via the 2D screen of the device. There are technologies such as holography and virtual reality that do provide a open-quotes true 3D screenclose quotes. To confine the scope, this presentation will not discuss such approaches

  15. Percutaneous Thermal Ablation with Ultrasound Guidance. Fusion Imaging Guidance to Improve Conspicuity of Liver Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakime, Antoine; Yevich, Steven; Tselikas, Lambros; Deschamps, Frederic; Petrover, David; Baere, Thierry De

    2017-01-01

    PurposeTo assess whether fusion imaging-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) can improve visibility and targeting of liver metastasis that were deemed inconspicuous on ultrasound (US).Materials and MethodsMWA of liver metastasis not judged conspicuous enough on US was performed under CT/US fusion imaging guidance. The conspicuity before and after the fusion imaging was graded on a five-point scale, and significance was assessed by Wilcoxon test. Technical success, procedure time, and procedure-related complications were evaluated.ResultsA total of 35 patients with 40 liver metastases (mean size 1.3 ± 0.4 cm) were enrolled. Image fusion improved conspicuity sufficiently to allow fusion-targeted MWA in 33 patients. The time required for image fusion processing and tumors’ identification averaged 10 ± 2.1 min (range 5–14). Initial conspicuity on US by inclusion criteria was 1.2 ± 0.4 (range 0–2), while conspicuity after localization on fusion imaging was 3.5 ± 1 (range 1–5, p < 0.001). Technical success rate was 83% (33/40) in intention-to-treat analysis and 100% in analysis of treated tumors. There were no major procedure-related complications.ConclusionsFusion imaging broadens the scope of US-guided MWA to metastasis lacking adequate conspicuity on conventional US. Fusion imaging is an effective tool to increase the conspicuity of liver metastases that were initially deemed non visualizable on conventional US imaging.

  16. Percutaneous Thermal Ablation with Ultrasound Guidance. Fusion Imaging Guidance to Improve Conspicuity of Liver Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakime, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com; Yevich, Steven; Tselikas, Lambros; Deschamps, Frederic [Gustave Roussy - Cancer Campus, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Petrover, David [Imagerie Médicale Paris Centre, IMPC (France); Baere, Thierry De [Gustave Roussy - Cancer Campus, Interventional Radiology Department (France)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeTo assess whether fusion imaging-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) can improve visibility and targeting of liver metastasis that were deemed inconspicuous on ultrasound (US).Materials and MethodsMWA of liver metastasis not judged conspicuous enough on US was performed under CT/US fusion imaging guidance. The conspicuity before and after the fusion imaging was graded on a five-point scale, and significance was assessed by Wilcoxon test. Technical success, procedure time, and procedure-related complications were evaluated.ResultsA total of 35 patients with 40 liver metastases (mean size 1.3 ± 0.4 cm) were enrolled. Image fusion improved conspicuity sufficiently to allow fusion-targeted MWA in 33 patients. The time required for image fusion processing and tumors’ identification averaged 10 ± 2.1 min (range 5–14). Initial conspicuity on US by inclusion criteria was 1.2 ± 0.4 (range 0–2), while conspicuity after localization on fusion imaging was 3.5 ± 1 (range 1–5, p < 0.001). Technical success rate was 83% (33/40) in intention-to-treat analysis and 100% in analysis of treated tumors. There were no major procedure-related complications.ConclusionsFusion imaging broadens the scope of US-guided MWA to metastasis lacking adequate conspicuity on conventional US. Fusion imaging is an effective tool to increase the conspicuity of liver metastases that were initially deemed non visualizable on conventional US imaging.

  17. Detachments of the subducted Indian continental lithosphere based on 3D finite-frequency tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, X.; Tian, X.; Wang, M.

    2017-12-01

    Indian plate collided with Eurasian plate at 60 Ma and there are about 3000 km crustal shortening since the continental-continental collision. At least one third of the total amount of crustal shortening between Indian and Eurasian plates could not be accounted by thickened Tibetan crust and surface erosion. It will need a combination of possible transfer of lower crust to the mantle by eclogitization and lateral extrusion. Based on the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary images beneath the Tibetan plateau, there is also at least the same amount deficit for lithospheric mantle subducted into upper/lower mantle or lateral extrusion with the crust. We have to recover a detailed Indian continental lithosphere image beneath the plateau in order to explain this deficit of mass budget. Combining the new teleseismic body waves recorded by SANDWICH passive seismic array with waveforms from several previous temporary seismic arrays, we carried out finite-frequency tomographic inversions to image three-dimensional velocity structures beneath southern and central Tibetan plateau to examine the possible image of subducted Indian lithosphere in the Tibetan upper mantle. We have recovered a continuous high velocity body in upper mantle and piece-wised high velocity anomalies in the mantle transition zone. Based on their geometry and relative locations, we interpreted these high velocity anomalies as the subducted and detached Indian lithosphere at different episodes of the plateau evolution. Detachments of the subducted Indian lithosphere should have a crucial impact on the volcanism activities and uplift history of the plateau.

  18. Fractal analysis of en face tomographic images obtained with full field optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wanrong; Zhu, Yue [Department of Optical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-03-15

    The quantitative modeling of the imaging signal of pathological areas and healthy areas is necessary to improve the specificity of diagnosis with tomographic en face images obtained with full field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT). In this work, we propose to use the depth-resolved change in the fractal parameter as a quantitative specific biomarker of the stages of disease. The idea is based on the fact that tissue is a random medium and only statistical parameters that characterize tissue structure are appropriate. We successfully relate the imaging signal in FFOCT to the tissue structure in terms of the scattering function and the coherent transfer function of the system. The formula is then used to analyze the ratio of the Fourier transforms of the cancerous tissue to the normal tissue. We found that when the tissue changes from the normal to cancerous the ratio of the spectrum of the index inhomogeneities takes the form of an inverse power law and the changes in the fractal parameter can be determined by estimating slopes of the spectra of the ratio plotted on a log-log scale. The fresh normal and cancer liver tissues were imaged to demonstrate the potential diagnostic value of the method at early stages when there are no significant changes in tissue microstructures. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Stereoscopic Integrated Imaging Goggles for Multimodal Intraoperative Image Guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Mela

    Full Text Available We have developed novel stereoscopic wearable multimodal intraoperative imaging and display systems entitled Integrated Imaging Goggles for guiding surgeries. The prototype systems offer real time stereoscopic fluorescence imaging and color reflectance imaging capacity, along with in vivo handheld microscopy and ultrasound imaging. With the Integrated Imaging Goggle, both wide-field fluorescence imaging and in vivo microscopy are provided. The real time ultrasound images can also be presented in the goggle display. Furthermore, real time goggle-to-goggle stereoscopic video sharing is demonstrated, which can greatly facilitate telemedicine. In this paper, the prototype systems are described, characterized and tested in surgeries in biological tissues ex vivo. We have found that the system can detect fluorescent targets with as low as 60 nM indocyanine green and can resolve structures down to 0.25 mm with large FOV stereoscopic imaging. The system has successfully guided simulated cancer surgeries in chicken. The Integrated Imaging Goggle is novel in 4 aspects: it is (a the first wearable stereoscopic wide-field intraoperative fluorescence imaging and display system, (b the first wearable system offering both large FOV and microscopic imaging simultaneously,

  20. Advances in tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novara, M.

    2013-01-01

    This research deals with advanced developments in 3D particle image velocimetry based on the tomographic PIV technique (Tomo-PIV). The latter is a relatively recent measurement technique introduced by Elsinga et al. in 2005, which is based on the tomographic reconstruction of particle tracers in

  1. A simple image processing approach for electronic cleansing in computed tomographic colonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S; Iinuma, G; Suzuki, M; Tanaka, T; Muramatsu, Y; Moriyama, N

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of colon cancer has seen strong demand in screening for colorectal neoplasia, and this has drawn considerable attention to the technological advances in Computed Tomographic Colonography (CTC). With the assistance of an oral contrast agent, an imaging technique known as Electronic Cleansing (EC), can affect virtual cleaning of the computed tomography (CT) images, to remove fecal material that is tagged by the agent. Technical problems can arise with electronic cleansing however, when the air lumen causes distortions to the tagged regions which result in partial volume effects. Combining the simple image arithmetic of an electronic cleansing algorithm, with a vertical motion filter at the fluid level of the bowel, artifacts such as those caused by an air lumen are eliminated. Essentially, the filter becomes a vector for that carries the measurement of vertical motion to neutralise the artifact that is causing partial volume effects. Results demonstrate that despite its simplicity, this technique offers accuracy and is able to successfully maintain the normal intra-colonic structure, while supporting digital leaning of tagged residual material appearing on the colon wall. PMID:21611057

  2. A distribution-based parametrization for improved tomographic imaging of solute plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidlisecky, Adam; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2011-01-01

    Difference geophysical tomography (e.g. radar, resistivity and seismic) is used increasingly for imaging fluid flow and mass transport associated with natural and engineered hydrologic phenomena, including tracer experiments, in situ remediation and aquifer storage and recovery. Tomographic data are collected over time, inverted and differenced against a background image to produce 'snapshots' revealing changes to the system; these snapshots readily provide qualitative information on the location and morphology of plumes of injected tracer, remedial amendment or stored water. In principle, geometric moments (i.e. total mass, centres of mass, spread, etc.) calculated from difference tomograms can provide further quantitative insight into the rates of advection, dispersion and mass transfer; however, recent work has shown that moments calculated from tomograms are commonly biased, as they are strongly affected by the subjective choice of regularization criteria. Conventional approaches to regularization (Tikhonov) and parametrization (image pixels) result in tomograms which are subject to artefacts such as smearing or pixel estimates taking on the sign opposite to that expected for the plume under study. Here, we demonstrate a novel parametrization for imaging plumes associated with hydrologic phenomena. Capitalizing on the mathematical analogy between moment-based descriptors of plumes and the moment-based parameters of probability distributions, we design an inverse problem that (1) is overdetermined and computationally efficient because the image is described by only a few parameters, (2) produces tomograms consistent with expected plume behaviour (e.g. changes of one sign relative to the background image), (3) yields parameter estimates that are readily interpreted for plume morphology and offer direct insight into hydrologic processes and (4) requires comparatively few data to achieve reasonable model estimates. We demonstrate the approach in a series of

  3. Comparison of primary thyroid lymphoma with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma on computed tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (LY) and anaplastic carcinoma (AC) of the thyroid gland are rare malignant tumors, and the initial symptoms of these diseases are very similar. The aim of our study was to compare the characteristics of the two diseases using computed tomographic (CT) scans in order to make an accurate differential diagnosis. Ten patients with LY and 10 with AC were analyzed. Differences in the CT findings of the two diseases were evaluated before treatment and statistically tested with either Student's t-test or the chi-square test. In the analysis of characteristics of CT imaging, the existence of calcification and necrosis, and heterogeneous tumor were dominant findings in AC, and there was a statistically significant difference in frequency between the two diseases (p<0.01). Calcification detected in AC was usually multiple and/or gross (mean size: φ8.2 mm). All lymphadenopathies were delineated as having the same homogeneous attenuation as the tumors in the thyroid gland in LY, but were shown as irregular rim enhancement in AC. The CT features of the two diseases are characteristic in terms of calcification, necrosis, and tumor composition. Evaluation by means of CT imaging is useful in distinguishing between LY and AC. (author)

  4. Crustal tomographic imaging and geodynamic implications toward south of Southern Granulite Terrain (SGT), India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Laxmidhar

    2011-09-01

    The crustal structure toward southern part of SGT is poorly defined leaving an opportunity to understand the tectonic and geodynamic evolution of this high-grade granulite terrain surrounded by major shear and tectonically disturbed zones like Achankovil Shear Zone (AKSZ) and Palghat Cauvery Shear Zone (PCSZ). To develop a geologically plausible crustal tectonic model depicting major structural elements, a comprehensive tomographic image was derived using deep-seismic-sounding data corroborated by Bouguer gravity modeling, coincident-reflection-seismic, heat-flow and available geological/geochronological informations along the N-S trending Vattalkundu-Kanyakumari geotransect. The final tectonic model represents large compositional changes of subsurface rocks accompanied by velocity heterogeneities with crustal thinning (44-36 km) and Moho upwarping from north to south. This study also reveals and successfully imaged anomalous zone of exhumation near AKSZ having transpression of exhumed rocks at mid-to-lower crustal level (20-30 km) with significant underplating and mantle upwelling forming a complex metamorphic province. The presence of shear zones with high-grade charnockite massifs in the upper-crust exposed in several places reveal large scale exhumation of granulites during the Pan-African rifting (~ 550 Ma) and provide important insights of plume-continental lithosphere interaction with reconstruction of the Gondwanaland.

  5. Morphologic analysis of Japanese adult sacroiliac joint using computed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Xuanchao; Takayama, Akinori; Shibata, Yasuaki; Ito, Hiromoto

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the relationship of angles in adult sacroiliac joints (SJ) with laterality, age, gender, degeneration, childbearing in different locations. The study was performed in 92 healthy Japanese adult volunteers (46 males and 46 females, aged 21∼86 years) who had no low back complaints. Axial computed tomographic (CT) images were obtained using an X-VIGOR apparatus (Toshiba Medical Inc. Japan). The angle measurements were taken directly using soft National Institutes of Health (NIH) Image 1.61 (Scion Inc. USA). We examined possible factors. Statistical evaluation was calculated using t-test by soft SPSS (SPSS Inc. Japan). Our findings indicated that SJ angles had no relationships with laterality, gender. But from upper part to lower part, the average of SJ angle was 7.61 deg±8.7 deg, 5.16 deg±7.3 deg, -0.85 deg±7.3 deg respectively in the left and 6.56 deg±9.4 deg, 4.10 deg±7.2 deg, -2.30 deg±7.0 deg in the right. The difference is significant between lower part and upper-middle part (P<0.05). Our results provided new anatomic and morphological data for better understandings of SJ in the clinic work. (author)

  6. Estimation of the thermal conductivity of hemp based insulation material from 3D tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sawalhi, R.; Lux, J.; Salagnac, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we are interested in the structural and thermal characterization of natural fiber insulation materials. The thermal performance of these materials depends on the arrangement of fibers, which is the consequence of the manufacturing process. In order to optimize these materials, thermal conductivity models can be used to correlate some relevant structural parameters with the effective thermal conductivity. However, only a few models are able to take into account the anisotropy of such material related to the fibers orientation, and these models still need realistic input data (fiber orientation distribution, porosity, etc.). The structural characteristics are here directly measured on a 3D tomographic image using advanced image analysis techniques. Critical structural parameters like porosity, pore and fiber size distribution as well as local fiber orientation distribution are measured. The results of the tested conductivity models are then compared with the conductivity tensor obtained by numerical simulation on the discretized 3D microstructure, as well as available experimental measurements. We show that 1D analytical models are generally not suitable for assessing the thermal conductivity of such anisotropic media. Yet, a few anisotropic models can still be of interest to relate some structural parameters, like the fiber orientation distribution, to the thermal properties. Finally, our results emphasize that numerical simulations on 3D realistic microstructure is a very interesting alternative to experimental measurements.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Image-guidance for surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Terry M.

    2006-07-01

    Contemporary imaging modalities can now provide the surgeon with high quality three- and four-dimensional images depicting not only normal anatomy and pathology, but also vascularity and function. A key component of image-guided surgery (IGS) is the ability to register multi-modal pre-operative images to each other and to the patient. The other important component of IGS is the ability to track instruments in real time during the procedure and to display them as part of a realistic model of the operative volume. Stereoscopic, virtual- and augmented-reality techniques have been implemented to enhance the visualization and guidance process. For the most part, IGS relies on the assumption that the pre-operatively acquired images used to guide the surgery accurately represent the morphology of the tissue during the procedure. This assumption may not necessarily be valid, and so intra-operative real-time imaging using interventional MRI, ultrasound, video and electrophysiological recordings are often employed to ameliorate this situation. Although IGS is now in extensive routine clinical use in neurosurgery and is gaining ground in other surgical disciplines, there remain many drawbacks that must be overcome before it can be employed in more general minimally-invasive procedures. This review overviews the roots of IGS in neurosurgery, provides examples of its use outside the brain, discusses the infrastructure required for successful implementation of IGS approaches and outlines the challenges that must be overcome for IGS to advance further.

  8. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are given of a tomographic scanning apparatus, with particular reference to a multiplexer slip ring means for receiving output from the detectors and enabling interfeed to the image reconstruction station. (U.K.)

  9. Effects of small variations of speed of sound in optoacoustic tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel, E-mail: dr@tum.de [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Technical University of Munich and Helmholtz Center Munich, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Speed of sound difference in the imaged object and surrounding coupling medium may reduce the resolution and overall quality of optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions obtained by assuming a uniform acoustic medium. In this work, the authors investigate the effects of acoustic heterogeneities and discuss potential benefits of accounting for those during the reconstruction procedure. Methods: The time shift of optoacoustic signals in an acoustically heterogeneous medium is studied theoretically by comparing different continuous and discrete wave propagation models. A modification of filtered back-projection reconstruction is subsequently implemented by considering a straight acoustic rays model for ultrasound propagation. The results obtained with this reconstruction procedure are compared numerically and experimentally to those obtained assuming a heuristically fitted uniform speed of sound in both full-view and limited-view optoacoustic tomography scenarios. Results: The theoretical analysis showcases that the errors in the time-of-flight of the signals predicted by considering the straight acoustic rays model tend to be generally small. When using this model for reconstructing simulated data, the resulting images accurately represent the theoretical ones. On the other hand, significant deviations in the location of the absorbing structures are found when using a uniform speed of sound assumption. The experimental results obtained with tissue-mimicking phantoms and a mouse postmortem are found to be consistent with the numerical simulations. Conclusions: Accurate analysis of effects of small speed of sound variations demonstrates that accounting for differences in the speed of sound allows improving optoacoustic reconstruction results in realistic imaging scenarios involving acoustic heterogeneities in tissues and surrounding media.

  10. Radiation dose to patients and image quality evaluation from coronary 256-slice computed tomographic angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiological Technology, Yuan Pei University, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ching-Ching [Department of Radiological Technology, Tzu Chi College of Technology, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Chia-Jung [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jason J.S., E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.t [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-21

    The aim of this study is to assess radiation dose and the corresponding image quality from suggested CT protocols which depends on different mean heart rate and high heart rate variability by using 256-slice CT. Fifty consecutive patients referred for a cardiac CT examination were included in this study. All coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) examinations were performed on a 256-slice CT scanner with one of five different protocols: retrospective ECG-gating (RGH) with full dose exposure in all R-R intervals (protocol A), RGH of 30-80% pulsing window with tube current modulation (B), RGH of 78{+-}5% pulsing window with tube current modulation (C), prospective ECG-triggering (PGT) of 78% R-R interval with 5% padding window (D) and PGT of 78% R-R interval without padding window (E). Radiation dose parameters and image quality scoring were determined and compared. In this study, no significant differences were found in comparison on image quality of the five different protocols. Protocol A obtained the highest radiation dose comparing with those of protocols B, C, D and E by a factor of 1.6, 2.4, 2.5 and 4.3, respectively (p<0.001), which were ranged between 2.7 and 11.8 mSv. The PGT could significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to patients, as compared to the RGH. However, the use of PGT has limitations and is only good in assessing cases with lower mean heart rate and stable heart rate variability. With higher mean heart rate and high heart rate variability circumstances, the RGH within 30-80% of R-R interval pulsing window is suggested as a feasible technique for assessing diagnostic performance.

  11. Effects of small variations of speed of sound in optoacoustic tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speed of sound difference in the imaged object and surrounding coupling medium may reduce the resolution and overall quality of optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions obtained by assuming a uniform acoustic medium. In this work, the authors investigate the effects of acoustic heterogeneities and discuss potential benefits of accounting for those during the reconstruction procedure. Methods: The time shift of optoacoustic signals in an acoustically heterogeneous medium is studied theoretically by comparing different continuous and discrete wave propagation models. A modification of filtered back-projection reconstruction is subsequently implemented by considering a straight acoustic rays model for ultrasound propagation. The results obtained with this reconstruction procedure are compared numerically and experimentally to those obtained assuming a heuristically fitted uniform speed of sound in both full-view and limited-view optoacoustic tomography scenarios. Results: The theoretical analysis showcases that the errors in the time-of-flight of the signals predicted by considering the straight acoustic rays model tend to be generally small. When using this model for reconstructing simulated data, the resulting images accurately represent the theoretical ones. On the other hand, significant deviations in the location of the absorbing structures are found when using a uniform speed of sound assumption. The experimental results obtained with tissue-mimicking phantoms and a mouse postmortem are found to be consistent with the numerical simulations. Conclusions: Accurate analysis of effects of small speed of sound variations demonstrates that accounting for differences in the speed of sound allows improving optoacoustic reconstruction results in realistic imaging scenarios involving acoustic heterogeneities in tissues and surrounding media

  12. A three-dimensional strain measurement method in elastic transparent materials using tomographic particle image velocimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azuma Takahashi

    Full Text Available The mechanical interaction between blood vessels and medical devices can induce strains in these vessels. Measuring and understanding these strains is necessary to identify the causes of vascular complications. This study develops a method to measure the three-dimensional (3D distribution of strain using tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV and compares the measurement accuracy with the gauge strain in tensile tests.The test system for measuring 3D strain distribution consists of two cameras, a laser, a universal testing machine, an acrylic chamber with a glycerol water solution for adjusting the refractive index with the silicone, and dumbbell-shaped specimens mixed with fluorescent tracer particles. 3D images of the particles were reconstructed from 2D images using a multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART and motion tracking enhancement. Distributions of the 3D displacements were calculated using a digital volume correlation. To evaluate the accuracy of the measurement method in terms of particle density and interrogation voxel size, the gauge strain and one of the two cameras for Tomo-PIV were used as a video-extensometer in the tensile test. The results show that the optimal particle density and interrogation voxel size are 0.014 particles per pixel and 40 × 40 × 40 voxels with a 75% overlap. The maximum measurement error was maintained at less than 2.5% in the 4-mm-wide region of the specimen.We successfully developed a method to experimentally measure 3D strain distribution in an elastic silicone material using Tomo-PIV and fluorescent particles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that applies Tomo-PIV to investigate 3D strain measurements in elastic materials with large deformation and validates the measurement accuracy.

  13. A tomographic particle image velocimetry investigation of the flow development over dual step cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, C., E-mail: chris.morton@ucalgary.ca [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Yarusevych, S. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Scarano, F. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, 2628 Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    This experimental study focuses on the near wake development of a dual step cylinder geometry consisting of a long base cylinder of diameter d to which a larger diameter (D) cylinder of length L is attached coaxially at mid-span. The experiments cover a range of Reynolds numbers, 2000 ≤ Re{sub D} ≤ 5000, diameter ratios, 1.33 ≤ D/d ≤ 2.0 and large cylinder aspect ratios, 0.5 ≤ L/D ≤ 5 using Tomographic particle image velocimetry. Distinct changes in wake topology are observed varying the above parameters. Supporting previous experimental studies on the same geometry involving flow visualization and planar measurements, four distinct flow regimes are identified to which a distinct three-dimensional wake topology can be associated. The vortex-dominated wake dynamical behaviour is investigated with Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and conditional averaging of three-dimensional velocity fields is used to exemplify the different shedding regimes. The conditionally averaged flow fields are shown to quantitatively resolve flow features equivalent to those obtained from a reduced order model consisting of the first ten to twenty POD modes, identifying the dominant vortex shedding cells and their interactions.

  14. Tomographic Imaging of the Peru Subduction Zone beneath the Altiplano and Implications for Andean Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, P. M.; Foote, E. J.; Stubailo, I.; Phillips, K. E.; Clayton, R. W.; Skinner, S.; Audin, L.; Tavera, H.; Dominguez Ramirez, L. A.; Lukac, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    This work describes preliminary tomography results from the Peru Seismic Experiment (PERUSE) a 100 station broadband seismic network installed in Peru. The network consists a linear array of broadband seismic stations that was installed mid-2008 that runs from the Peruvian coast near Mollendo to Lake Titicaca. A second line was added in late 2009 between Lake Titicaca and Cusco. Teleseismic and local earthquake travel time residuals are being combined in the tomographic inversions. The crust under the Andes is found to be 70-80 km thick decreasing to 30 km near the coast. The morphology of the Moho is consistent with the receiver function images (Phillips et al., 2010; this meeting) and also gravity. Ray tracing through the heterogeneous structure is used to locate earthquakes. However the rapid spatial variation in crustal thickness, possibly some of the most rapid in the world, generates shadow zones when using conventional ray tracing for the tomography. We use asymptotic ray theory that approximates effects from finite frequency kernels to model diffracted waves in these regions. The observation of thickened crust suggests that models that attribute the recent acceleration of the Altiplano uplift to crustal delamination are less likely than those that attribute it to crustal compression.

  15. Tomographic images and focal mechanisms beneath the Tatun volcano group, northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, H.; Lin, C.; Chang, T.; Konstantinou, K.; Wen, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Tatun volcano group (TVG) is just located nearby the Taipei metropolis, where is the major economic and political center of Taiwan. To improve the understanding of the volcanic structures and their properties, we have deployed a dense seismic network at the TVG for monitoring the volcanic earthquakes since 2004. This network is composed of 18 seismic stations in the area about 10km by 10km. We detected a great quantity of local earthquakes (over 5,000). Over 3,000 events provide useful observations to invert detailed subsurface structures by using tomography method. Our tomographic images show that both variations of Vp and Vs might be likely related to the volcanic activity in some area. We also determined over 600 focal mechanisms of micro-earthquakes by using the first-motion polarization. Most of focal mechanisms are the normal faulting and indicating that the extensional stress predominate the micro-earthquakes beneath the TVG. These dense normal mechanisms may be caused by volcanic activity beneath the TVG area.

  16. Direct aperture deformation: An interfraction image guidance strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yuanming; Castro-Pareja, Carlos; Shekhar, Raj; Yu, Cedric

    2006-01-01

    A new scheme, called direct aperture deformation (DAD), for online correction of interfraction geometric uncertainties under volumetric imaging guidance is presented. Using deformable image registration, the three-dimensional geometric transformation matrix can be derived that associates the planning image set and the images acquired on the day of treatment. Rather than replanning or moving the patient, we use the deformation matrix to morph the treatment apertures as a potential online correction method. A proof-of-principle study using an intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan for a prostate cancer patient was conducted. The method, procedure, and algorithm of DAD are described. The dose-volume histograms from the original plan, reoptimized plan, and rigid-body translation plan are compared with the ones from the DAD plan. The study showed the feasibility of the DAD as a general method for both target dislocation and deformation. As compared with using couch translation to move the patient, DAD is capable of correcting both target dislocation and deformations. As compared with reoptimization, online correction using the DAD scheme could be completed within a few minutes rather than tens of minutes and the speed gain would be at a very small cost of plan quality

  17. MR imaging guidance and monitoring of focal thermotherapies. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; California Univ., San Francisco, CA; Heuck, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    Minimally invasive thermotherapies for focal tissue destruction on the basis of laser-, microwave-, focused ultrasound-, or cryogeninduced changes of tissue temperature represent an alternative to surgical tissue ablation, particularly in the treatment of tumors. The thermotherapy modalities listed necessitate indirect guidance and monitoring, since they often do not lend themselves to immediate visual control. In the brain, in head and neck tumors, in the liver, and in the prostate, MRI reliably and accurately delineates both the positions of interstitial thermotherapy applicators and - in contrast-enhanced, T1-weighted images - the perfusion defects in tissue necrosis induced by thermotherapy. The transfer of results of in-vitro and in-vivo model studies to assess interstitial temperature and lesion development during thermotherapy to the actual treatment of patients, however, is still in an initial phase. Further development of both rapid MRI sequences and MRI scanners suited for interventions will show how far treatment systems and guidance systems can be adapted to one another. (orig.) [de

  18. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging for dynamic radiation behavior study using infrared imaging video bolometers in large helical device plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Ryuichi; Iwama, Naofumi [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Peterson, Byron J.; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Mukai, Kiyofumi [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Teranishi, Masaru [Hiroshima Institute of Technology, 2-1-1, Miyake, Saeki-ku, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan); Pandya, Shwetang N. [Institute of Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat Village, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2016-05-15

    A three-dimensional (3D) tomography system using four InfraRed imaging Video Bolometers (IRVBs) has been designed with a helical periodicity assumption for the purpose of plasma radiation measurement in the large helical device. For the spatial inversion of large sized arrays, the system has been numerically and experimentally examined using the Tikhonov regularization with the criterion of minimum generalized cross validation, which is the standard solver of inverse problems. The 3D transport code EMC3-EIRENE for impurity behavior and related radiation has been used to produce phantoms for numerical tests, and the relative calibration of the IRVB images has been carried out with a simple function model of the decaying plasma in a radiation collapse. The tomography system can respond to temporal changes in the plasma profile and identify the 3D dynamic behavior of radiation, such as the radiation enhancement that starts from the inboard side of the torus, during the radiation collapse. The reconstruction results are also consistent with the output signals of a resistive bolometer. These results indicate that the designed 3D tomography system is available for the 3D imaging of radiation. The first 3D direct tomographic measurement of a magnetically confined plasma has been achieved.

  19. Imaging of Anal Fistulas: Comparison of Computed Tomographic Fistulography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Changhu [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Lu, Yongchao [Traditional Chinese Medicine Department, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Zhao, Bin [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Du, Yinglin [Shandong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Institute, Jinan 250014 (China); Wang, Cuiyan [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Jiang, Wanli [Department of Radiology, Taishan Medical University, Taian 271000 (China)

    2014-07-01

    The primary importance of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluating anal fistulas lies in its ability to demonstrate hidden areas of sepsis and secondary extensions in patients with fistula in ano. MR imaging is relatively expensive, so there are many healthcare systems worldwide where access to MR imaging remains restricted. Until recently, computed tomography (CT) has played a limited role in imaging fistula in ano, largely owing to its poor resolution of soft tissue. In this article, the different imaging features of the CT and MRI are compared to demonstrate the relative accuracy of CT fistulography for the preoperative assessment of fistula in ano. CT fistulography and MR imaging have their own advantages for preoperative evaluation of perianal fistula, and can be applied to complement one another when necessary.

  20. EPA guidance on improving the image of psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller-Leimkühler, A M; Möller, H-J; Maier, W; Gaebel, W; Falkai, P

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores causes, explanations and consequences of the negative image of psychiatry and develops recommendations for improvement. It is primarily based on a WPA guidance paper on how to combat the stigmatization of psychiatry and psychiatrists and a Medline search on related publications since 2010. Furthermore, focussing on potential causes and explanations, the authors performed a selective literature search regarding additional image-related issues such as mental health literacy and diagnostic and treatment issues. Underestimation of psychiatry results from both unjustified prejudices of the general public, mass media and healthcare professionals and psychiatry's own unfavourable coping with external and internal concerns. Issues related to unjustified devaluation of psychiatry include overestimation of coercion, associative stigma, lack of public knowledge, need to simplify complex mental issues, problem of the continuum between normality and psychopathology, competition with medical and non-medical disciplines and psychopharmacological treatment. Issues related to psychiatry's own contribution to being underestimated include lack of a clear professional identity, lack of biomarkers supporting clinical diagnoses, limited consensus about best treatment options, lack of collaboration with other medical disciplines and low recruitment rates among medical students. Recommendations are proposed for creating and representing a positive self-concept with different components. The negative image of psychiatry is not only due to unfavourable communication with the media, but is basically a problem of self-conceptualization. Much can be improved. However, psychiatry will remain a profession with an exceptional position among the medical disciplines, which should be seen as its specific strength.

  1. Cone beam computed tomographic imaging: perspective, challenges, and the impact of near-trend future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmão Paraiso

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be considered as a valuable imaging modality for improving diagnosis and treatment planning to achieve true guidance for several craniofacial surgical interventions. A new concept and perspective in medical informatics is the highlight discussion about the new imaging interactive workflow. The aim of this article was to present, in a short literature review, the usefulness of CBCT technology as an important alternative imaging modality, highlighting current practices and near-term future applications in cutting-edge thought-provoking perspectives for craniofacial surgical assessment. This article explains the state of the art of CBCT improvements, medical workstation, and perspectives of the dedicated unique hardware and software, which can be used from the CBCT source. In conclusion, CBCT technology is developing rapidly, and many advances are on the horizon. Further progress in medical workstations, engineering capabilities, and improvement in independent software-some open source-should be attempted with this new imaging method. The perspectives, challenges, and pitfalls in CBCT will be delineated and evaluated along with the technological developments.

  2. Reconstruction of computed tomographic image from a few x-ray projections by means of accelerative gradient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1982-01-01

    A method of the reconstruction of computed tomographic images was proposed to reduce the exposure dose to X-ray. The method is the small number of X-ray projection method by accelerative gradient method. The procedures of computation are described. The algorithm of these procedures is simple, the convergence of the computation is fast, and the required memory capacity is small. Numerical simulation was carried out to conform the validity of this method. A sample of simple shape was considered, projection data were given, and the images were reconstructed from 6 views. Good results were obtained, and the method is considered to be useful. (Kato, T.)

  3. 3D Tomographic SAR Imaging in Densely Vegetated Mountainous Rural Areas in China and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, L.; Muller, J. P., , Prof

    2017-12-01

    3D SAR Tomography (TomoSAR) and 4D SAR Differential Tomography (Diff-TomoSAR) exploit multi-baseline SAR data stacks to create an important new innovation of SAR Interferometry, to unscramble complex scenes with multiple scatterers mapped into the same SAR cell. In addition to this 3-D shape reconstruction and deformation solution in complex urban/infrastructure areas, and recent cryospheric ice investigations, emerging tomographic remote sensing applications include forest applications, e.g. tree height and biomass estimation, sub-canopy topographic mapping, and even search, rescue and surveillance. However, these scenes are characterized by temporal decorrelation of scatterers, orbital, tropospheric and ionospheric phase distortion and an open issue regarding possible height blurring and accuracy losses for TomoSAR applications particularly in densely vegetated mountainous rural areas. Thus, it is important to develop solutions for temporal decorrelation, orbital, tropospheric and ionospheric phase distortion.We report here on 3D imaging (especially in vertical layers) over densely vegetated mountainous rural areas using 3-D SAR imaging (SAR tomography) derived from data stacks of X-band COSMO-SkyMed Spotlight and L band ALOS-1 PALSAR data stacks over Dujiangyan Dam, Sichuan, China and L and P band airborne SAR data (BioSAR 2008 - ESA) in the Krycklan river catchment, Northern Sweden. The new TanDEM-X 12m DEM is used to assist co - registration of all the data stacks over China first. Then, atmospheric correction is being assessed using weather model data such as ERA-I, MERRA, MERRA-2, WRF; linear phase-topography correction and MODIS spectrometer correction will be compared and ionospheric correction methods are discussed to remove tropospheric and ionospheric delay. Then the new TomoSAR method with the TanDEM-X 12m DEM is described to obtain the number of scatterers inside each pixel, the scattering amplitude and phase of each scatterer and finally extract

  4. Standardization of the first-trimester fetal cardiac examination using spatiotemporal image correlation with tomographic ultrasound and color Doppler imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, S; Turan, O M; Ty-Torredes, K; Harman, C R; Baschat, A A

    2009-06-01

    The challenges of the first-trimester examination of the fetal heart may in part be overcome by technical advances in three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound techniques. Our aim was to standardize the first-trimester 3D imaging approach to the cardiac examination to provide the most consistent and accurate display of anatomy. Low-risk women with normal findings on first-trimester screening at 11 to 13 + 6 weeks had cardiac ultrasound using the following sequence: (1) identification of the four-chamber view; (2) four-dimensional (4D) volume acquisition with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) and color Doppler imaging (angle = 20 degrees, sweep 10 s); (3) offline, tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) analysis with standardized starting plane (four-chamber view), slice number and thickness; (4) assessment of fetal cardiac anatomy (four-chamber view, cardiac axis, size and symmetry, atrioventricular valves, great arteries and descending aorta) with and without color Doppler. 107 consecutive women (age, 16-42 years, body mass index 17.2-50.2 kg/m(2)) were studied. A minimum of three 3D volumes were obtained for each patient, transabdominally in 91.6%. Fetal motion artifact required acquisition of more than three volumes in 20%. The median time for TUI offline analysis was 100 (range, 60-240) s. Individual anatomic landmarks were identified in 89.7-99.1%. Visualization of all structures in one panel was observed in 91 patients (85%). Starting from a simple two-dimensional cardiac landmark-the four-chamber view-the standardized STIC-TUI technique enables detailed segmental cardiac evaluation of the normal fetal heart in the first trimester. (c) 2009 ISUOG.

  5. Autonomous aerial vehicles : guidance, control, signal and image processing platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jarrah, M.; Adiansyah, S.; Marji, Z. M.; Chowdhury, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    used as fusion algorithm for position and poses estimation. Then path planning, trajectory generation and trajectory guidance alternative strategies is presented. One of the important UAV mission is target surveillance using an onboard vision system. AUS-UAV Mazari is using a gimbaled camera for target monitoring and target tracking using basic digital image processing and techniques. Successful moving target geo-location algorithms were developed and results will be presented. Future plan is to develop a cooperation strategy between several vehicles in the air and on the ground. Use of vision system to aid the vehicle in localization using ground features is also under consideration.

  6. The effect of scatter correction on planar and tomographic semiquantitative 123I cardiac imaging. A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Emmanouil; Moralidis, Efstratios; Siountas, Anastasios

    2017-01-01

    In cardiac I-123 ( 123 I) imaging downscatter from high energy emissions degrades the image and introduces distortion of semi-quantitative analysis when using a low energy collimator. The effect of a triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction technique, using windows immediately above and below the principal window centered on 159keV, was examined. A hemispherical cardiac phantom was inserted into a cylindrical phantom and both were filled with radioactive 123 I water solutions. Phantoms were submitted to planar and tomographic scintigraphy under various acquisition and processing conditions, including the use of medium energy (ME) and low energy (LE) collimation. In planar imaging, there was a distance dependent count loss with the LEHR collimator which was partly restored with TEW correction. There was minimal dependence of count rate with distance in using ME collimation. Conversely, the heart to background (H/B) ratio increased with increasing distance with the LEHR collimator, but in applying the TEW correction that ratio paralleled the minimally affected values obtained with the ME collimation. In tomographic imaging the acquired H/B ratio was lower with LE collimation alone, in comparison to the ME collimator, but it was raised significantly when applying the TEW scatter correction. Quantitative measurements also depended on the background method and the reconstruction algorithm applied. In cardiac 123 I imaging with a LE collimator the use of TEW scatter correction provides a semi-quantitative assessment comparable to that attained with ME collimation and may moderate inter-institutional inconsistencies.

  7. 3D flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry for vortex breakdown over a non-slender delta wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ChengYue; Gao, Qi; Wei, RunJie; Li, Tian; Wang, JinJun

    2016-06-01

    Volumetric measurement for the leading-edge vortex (LEV) breakdown of a delta wing has been conducted by three-dimensional (3D) flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). The 3D flow visualization is employed to show the vortex structures, which was recorded by four cameras with high resolution. 3D dye streaklines of the visualization are reconstructed using a similar way of particle reconstruction in TPIV. Tomographic PIV is carried out at the same time using same cameras with the dye visualization. Q criterion is employed to identify the LEV. Results of tomographic PIV agree well with the reconstructed 3D dye streaklines, which proves the validity of the measurements. The time-averaged flow field based on TPIV is shown and described by sections of velocity and streamwise vorticity. Combining the two measurement methods sheds light on the complex structures of both bubble type and spiral type of breakdown. The breakdown position is recognized by investigating both the streaklines and TPIV velocity fields. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to extract a pair of conjugated helical instability modes from TPIV data. Therefore, the dominant frequency of the instability modes is obtained from the corresponding POD coefficients of the modes based on wavelet transform analysis.

  8. Reconstruction of Axial Tomographic High Resolution Data from Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy: A Method for Improving 3D FISH Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Heintzmann

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy allows an improved imaging of microscopic objects in three dimensions. However, the resolution along the axial direction is three times worse than the resolution in lateral directions. A method to overcome this axial limitation is tilting the object under the microscope, in a way that the direction of the optical axis points into different directions relative to the sample. A new technique for a simultaneous reconstruction from a number of such axial tomographic confocal data sets was developed and used for high resolution reconstruction of 3D‐data both from experimental and virtual microscopic data sets. The reconstructed images have a highly improved 3D resolution, which is comparable to the lateral resolution of a single deconvolved data set. Axial tomographic imaging in combination with simultaneous data reconstruction also opens the possibility for a more precise quantification of 3D data. The color images of this publication can be accessed from http://www.esacp.org/acp/2000/20‐1/heintzmann.htm. At this web address an interactive 3D viewer is additionally provided for browsing the 3D data. This java applet displays three orthogonal slices of the data set which are dynamically updated by user mouse clicks or keystrokes.

  9. Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by use of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system: a computer simulation feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrakis, George [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rannou, Fernando R [Departamento de Ingenieria Informatica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3659, Santiago (Chile); Chatziioannou, Arion F [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    The feasibility and limits in performing tomographic bioluminescence imaging with a combined optical-PET (OPET) system were explored by simulating its image formation process. A micro-MRI based virtual mouse phantom was assigned appropriate tissue optical properties to each of its segmented internal organs at wavelengths spanning the emission spectrum of the firefly luciferase at 37 deg. C. The TOAST finite-element code was employed to simulate the diffuse transport of photons emitted from bioluminescence sources in the mouse. OPET measurements were simulated for single-point, two-point and distributed bioluminescence sources located in different organs such as the liver, the kidneys and the gut. An expectation maximization code was employed to recover the intensity and location of these simulated sources. It was found that spectrally resolved measurements were necessary in order to perform tomographic bioluminescence imaging. The true location of emission sources could be recovered if the mouse background optical properties were known a priori. The assumption of a homogeneous optical property background proved inadequate for describing photon transport in optically heterogeneous tissues and led to inaccurate source localization in the reconstructed images. The simulation results pointed out specific methodological challenges that need to be addressed before a practical implementation of OPET-based bioluminescence tomography is achieved.

  10. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Jeong, Ho Gul; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung Hee; Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University, College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions.

  11. Dental computed tomographic imaging as age estimation: morphological analysis of the third molar of a group of Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantekin, Kenan; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmis

    2013-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is capable of providing accurate and measurable 3-dimensional images of the third molar. The aims of this study were to analyze the development of the mandibular third molar and its relation to chronological age and to create new reference data for a group of Turkish participants aged 9 to 25 years on the basis of cone-beam CT images. All data were obtained from the patients' records including medical, social, and dental anamnesis and cone-beam CT images of 752 patients. Linear regression analysis was performed to obtain regression formulas for dental age calculation with chronological age and to determine the coefficient of determination (r) for each sex. Statistical analysis showed a strong correlation between age and third-molar development for the males (r2 = 0.80) and the females (r2 = 0.78). Computed tomographic images are clinically useful for accurate and reliable estimation of dental ages of children and youth.

  12. Physics-based shape matching for intraoperative image guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwelack, Stefan, E-mail: suwelack@kit.edu; Röhl, Sebastian; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Reichard, Daniel; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie [Institute for Anthropomatics and Robotics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Adenauerring 2, Karlsruhe 76131 (Germany); Santos, Thiago dos; Maier-Hein, Lena [Computer-assisted Interventions, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Wagner, Martin; Wünscher, Josephine; Kenngott, Hannes; Müller, Beat P. [General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Soft-tissue deformations can severely degrade the validity of preoperative planning data during computer assisted interventions. Intraoperative imaging such as stereo endoscopic, time-of-flight or, laser range scanner data can be used to compensate these movements. In this context, the intraoperative surface has to be matched to the preoperative model. The shape matching is especially challenging in the intraoperative setting due to noisy sensor data, only partially visible surfaces, ambiguous shape descriptors, and real-time requirements. Methods: A novel physics-based shape matching (PBSM) approach to register intraoperatively acquired surface meshes to preoperative planning data is proposed. The key idea of the method is to describe the nonrigid registration process as an electrostatic–elastic problem, where an elastic body (preoperative model) that is electrically charged slides into an oppositely charged rigid shape (intraoperative surface). It is shown that the corresponding energy functional can be efficiently solved using the finite element (FE) method. It is also demonstrated how PBSM can be combined with rigid registration schemes for robust nonrigid registration of arbitrarily aligned surfaces. Furthermore, it is shown how the approach can be combined with landmark based methods and outline its application to image guidance in laparoscopic interventions. Results: A profound analysis of the PBSM scheme based on in silico and phantom data is presented. Simulation studies on several liver models show that the approach is robust to the initial rigid registration and to parameter variations. The studies also reveal that the method achieves submillimeter registration accuracy (mean error between 0.32 and 0.46 mm). An unoptimized, single core implementation of the approach achieves near real-time performance (2 TPS, 7–19 s total registration time). It outperforms established methods in terms of speed and accuracy. Furthermore, it is shown that the

  13. Subduction and volcanism in the Iberia-North Africa collision zone from tomographic images of the upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor, Antonio; Chevrot, Sébastien; Harnafi, Mimoun; Gallart, Josep; Pazos, Antonio; Serrano, Inmaculada; Córdoba, Diego; Pulgar, Javier A.; Ibarra, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    New tomographic images of the upper mantle beneath the westernmost Mediterranean suggest that the evolution of the region experienced two subduction-related episodes. First subduction of oceanic and/or extended continental lithosphere, now located mainly beneath the Betics at depths greater than 400 km, took place on a NW-SE oriented subduction zone. This was followed by a slab-tear process that initiated in the east and propagated to the west, leading to westward slab rollback and possibly lower crustal delamination. The current position of the slab tear is located approximately at 4°W, and to the west of this location the subducted lithosphere is still attached to the surface along the Gibraltar Arc. Our new P-wave velocity model is able to image the attached subducted lithosphere as a narrow high-velocity body extending to shallow depths, coinciding with the region of maximum curvature of the Gibraltar Arc, the occurrence of intermediate-depth earthquakes, and anomalously thick crust. This thick crust has a large influence in the measured teleseismic travel time residuals and therefore in the obtained P-wave tomographic model. We show that removing the effects of the thick crust significantly improves the shallow images of the slab and therefore the interpretations based on the seismic structure.

  14. Gynecologic radiation therapy. Novel approaches to image-guidance and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Akila N. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard (eds.) [Vienna General Hospital Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Erickson, Beth E. [Medical College of Wisconsin Clinics Froedtert Hospital, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-07-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies led to a new worldwide consensus to introduce image guidance to gynecologic radiation therapy, particularly to brachytherapy. The book summarizes the changed practice of management: treatment planning for cervical cancer, not modified for over 60 years, has been shifted to an image-based approach, endometrial cancer management with an increase in the use of chemotherapy and vaginal brachytherapy, and vaginal cancer therapy including image guidance and high-dose delivery with IMRT. (orig.)

  15. New technique for showing the relation of tomographic myocardial perfusion images obtained with thallium-201 to the coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, C J; Laird, E E; Williams, E D; Rajathurai, A; Mittra, B; Rankin, D

    1985-01-01

    A new technique has been developed for presenting myocardial tomograms that allows the observer to perceive the shape of the thallium-201 distribution directly. The surface of the myocardium was found by applying an interactive thresholding technique to a set of conventional transverse slices. Computer graphics techniques were used to display a shaded image of that surface on a television screen, showing the three dimensional shape of the myocardial surface from any chosen aspect. A set of normal preserved coronary arteries was digitised, and using scaling and transformation techniques these arteries were mapped on to the myocardial tomograms and a shaded surface image produced with superimposed coronary arteries. This provided a familiar anatomical framework for locating perfusion defects. Its value in identifying various diseased vessels was confirmed by a comparison of the tomographic findings with the angiographic findings in five individual cases. Images PMID:3876840

  16. Observer Evaluation of a Metal Artifact Reduction Algorithm Applied to Head and Neck Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpics, Mark; Surucu, Murat; Mescioglu, Ibrahim; Alite, Fiori; Block, Alec M.; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Solanki, Abhishek A.; Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose and Objectives: To quantify, through an observer study, the reduction in metal artifacts on cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images using a projection-interpolation algorithm, on images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants in patients treated for head and neck (H&N) cancer. Methods and Materials: An interpolation-substitution algorithm was applied to H&N CBCT images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants. Image quality with respect to metal artifacts was evaluated subjectively and objectively. First, 6 independent radiation oncologists were asked to rank randomly sorted blinded images (before and after metal artifact reduction) using a 5-point rating scale (1 = severe artifacts; 5 = no artifacts). Second, the standard deviation of different regions of interest (ROI) within each image was calculated and compared with the mean rating scores. Results: The interpolation-substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in 70% of the cases. From a total of 60 images from 15 H&N cancer patients undergoing image guided radiation therapy, the mean rating score on the uncorrected images was 2.3 ± 1.1, versus 3.3 ± 1.0 for the corrected images. The mean difference in ranking score between uncorrected and corrected images was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.9-1.2, P<.05). The standard deviation of each ROI significantly decreased after artifact reduction (P<.01). Moreover, a negative correlation between the mean rating score for each image and the standard deviation of the oral cavity and bilateral cheeks was observed. Conclusion: The interpolation-substitution algorithm is efficient and effective for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings and implants on CBCT images, as demonstrated by the statistically significant increase in observer image quality ranking and by the decrease in ROI standard deviation between uncorrected and corrected images.

  17. Feasibility of the combination of 3D CTA and 2D CT imaging guidance for clipping microsurgery of anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kojiro; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Hidenori; Arimoto, Hirohiko; Takeuchi, Satoru; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-04-01

    We report the technique of three-dimensional computed tomography angiography (3D CTA)+two-dimensional computed tomographic (2D CT) imaging as an adjunct in early surgery for a ruptured anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm by adopting an anterior interhemispheric approach. These combined imaging modalities provide accurate intraoperative anatomical information. To produce images for an anterior interhemispheric approach, 3D CTA+2D coronal CT images, which are perpendicular to the direction of the surgical approach at three levels (brain surface, genu of the corpus callosum and aneurysm neck), were constructed. We also produced two 3D CTA+2D CT images of the lamina terminalis, with a horizontal 10-degree difference, to clarify the vascular architecture around the aneurysm stereotactically, as well as the dissection point and direction to open the lamina terminalis. Furthermore, we produced a 3D CTA+2D sagittal CT image at the midline, which allowed us to understand the anatomical architecture of the aneurysm, planum sphenoidale and tuberculum sellae. In addition, four different 3D CTA aneurysm images were produced for deciding the clip size preoperatively. The imaging findings in 28 patients with 28 ACoA aneurysms facilitated early clipping. Based on these 3D CTA+2D CT images, we conducted aneurysm surgery, and successfully performed neck clipping via an anterior interhemispheric approach. The combination of 3D CTA and 2D CT images is a feasible and useful method of image guidance for ACoA aneurysm microsurgery.

  18. Comparing myocardial perfusion imaging and multi-slice computed tomographic coronary angiography: Leading to discrepancy or complementarity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doumas, A.; Iakovou, I.; Karatzas, N.; Koskinas, K.; Pagourelias, E.D.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this review is the in depth evaluation of two different diagnostic modalities, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI) and Multi slice Computed Tomographic Coronary Angiography (MSCTA) for the assessment of coronary artery disease. MPI using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) seems to be a simple and accurate integrated method for the evaluation of coronary flow reserve, offering high diagnostic and prognostic information to define coronary artery disease risk. On the other hand MSCTA is a novel technique with excellent diagnostic sensitivity for identifying stenoses, providing also qualitative and quantitative information concerning atherosclerotic plaque composition. A few studies have reported direct comparison of the two methods. All previous publications , support the notion that the two diagnostic modalities provide divergent, but apparently complementary information. The pre test likelihood of CAD, patients' individual characteristics, as well as the advantages and disadvantages or limitations of each method should be taken into consideration prior to the performance of either imaging technique. (author)

  19. Reconstruction of tomographic images from projections of a small number of views by means of mathematical programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1985-01-01

    Fundamental studies have been made on the application of mathematical programming to the reconstruction of tomographic images from projections of a small number of views without requiring any circular symmetry nor periodicity. Linear programming and quadratic programming were applied to minimize the quadratic sum of the residue and to finally obtain optimized reconstruction images. The mathematical algorithms were verified by the method of computer simulation, and the relationship between the number of picture elements and the number of iterations necessary for convergence was also investigated. The methods of linear programming and quadratic programming require fairly simple mathematical procedures, and strict solutions can be obtained within a finite number of iterations. Their only draw back is the requirement of a large quantity of computer memory. But this problem will be desolved by the advent of large fast memory devices in the near future. (Aoki, K.)

  20. An index of beam hardening artifact for two-dimensional cone-beam CT tomographic images: establishment and preliminary evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Yang, Huifang; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yuchun

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Based on the pixel gray value measurements, establish a beam-hardening artifacts index of the cone-beam CT tomographic image, and preliminarily evaluate its applicability. Methods: The 5mm-diameter metal ball and resin ball were fixed on the light-cured resin base plate respectively, while four vitro molars were fixed above and below the ball, on the left and right respectively, which have 10mm distance with the metal ball. Then, cone beam CT was used to scan the fixed base plate twice. The same layer tomographic images were selected from the two data and imported into the Photoshop software. The circle boundary was built through the determination of the center and radius of the circle, according to the artifact-free images section. Grayscale measurement tools were used to measure the internal boundary gray value G0, gray value G1 and G2 of 1mm and 20mm artifacts outside the circular boundary, the length L1 of the arc with artifacts in the circular boundary, the circumference L2. Hardening artifacts index was set A = (G1 / G0) * 0.5 + (G2 / G1) * 0.4 + (L2 / L1) * 0.1. Then, the A values of metal and resin materials were calculated respectively. Results: The A value of cobalt-chromium alloy material is 1, and resin material is 0. Conclusion: The A value reflects comprehensively the three factors of hardening artifacts influencing normal oral tissue image sharpness of cone beam CT. The three factors include relative gray value, the decay rate and range of artifacts.

  1. Evaluation of Image-Guidance Strategies in the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Lee, Choonik; Langen, Katja M.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Manon, Rafael R.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare different image-guidance strategies in the alignment of prostate cancer patients. Using data from patients treated using daily image guidance, the remaining setup errors for several different strategies were retrospectively calculated. Methods and Materials: The alignment data from 74 patients treated with helical tomotherapy were analyzed, resulting in a data set of 2,252 fractions during which a megavoltage computed tomography image was used for image guidance with intraprostatic metallic fiducials. Given the daily positional adjustments, a variety of protocols, differing in imaging frequency and method, were retrospectively studied. The residual setup errors were determined for each protocol. Results: As expected, the systematic errors were effectively reduced with imaging. However, the random errors were unaffected. Even when image guidance was performed every other day with a running mean of the previous displacements, residual setup errors >5 mm occurred in 24% of all fractions. This frequency increased to about 40% if setup errors >3 mm were scored. Conclusion: Setup errors increased with decreasing frequency of image guidance. However, residual errors were still significant at the 5-mm level, even with imaging was performed every other day. This suggests that localizations must be performed daily in the set up of prostate cancer patients during a course of external beam radiotherapy

  2. Development and application of a tomographic model from CT images for calculating internal dose to a pregnant woman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengyu

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of radiation dose and possible risk to a pregnant woman and her fetus is an important task in radiation protection. Although stylized models for male and female patients of different ages have been developed, tomographic models for pregnant women have not been developed to date. This dissertation presents an effort to construct a partial-body model of a pregnant woman from a set of CT images. The patient was 30-weeks pregnant, and the CT scan covered the portion of the body from above liver to below pubic symphysis in 70 slices, each 7 mm thick. The image resolution was 512x512 pixels in a 48 cmx48 cm field. The images were carefully segmented to identify 34 organs and tissues. It has been found that the masses are different from the Reference Woman. The characteristics of the resulting model are discussed and compared with one existing stylized mathematical model for pregnant women. Based on this tomographic model, a Monte Carlo code, EGS4-VLSI, was used to derive specific absorbed fractions. Monoenergetic and isotropic photon and electron emitters distributed in different source organs were assumed and the energies ranged from 10 keV to 4 MeV for photons and from 100 keV to 4 MeV for electrons. The results for high energy (>50 keV) photons showed general agreement with previous studies, however, the results for lower energy (<50 keV) photons showed differences of up to several hundred percent for some source and target organs. For electron results, several tens of percent differences were found. Those differences can be explained by mass differences and the relative geometry differences between source and target organs. In summary, the stylized models for pregnant women are satisfactory for a very large size patient for most of the photon energies (between 50 keV and 4 MeV). However, a tomographic model has to be used to obtain acceptable dose assessments for electrons. The newly calculated SAF data set can provide the nuclear medicine dosimetry field

  3. Thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation in eight dogs: clinical, low-field magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomographic myelography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Shinji; Doi, Shoko; Tamura, Yumiko; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Enomoto, Hirokazu; Ozawa, Tsuyoshi; Uchida, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Intradural disc herniation is a rarely reported cause of neurologic deficits in dogs and few published studies have described comparative imaging characteristics. The purpose of this retrospective cross sectional study was to describe clinical and imaging findings in a group of dogs with confirmed thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation. Included dogs were referred to one of four clinics, had acute mono/paraparesis or paraplegia, had low field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomographic myelography, and were diagnosed with thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation during surgery. Eight dogs met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation amongst the total population of dogs that developed a thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation and that were treated with a surgical procedure was 0.5%. Five dogs were examined using low-field MRI. Lesions that were suspected to be intervertebral disc herniations were observed; however, there were no specific findings indicating that the nucleus pulposus had penetrated into the subarachnoid space or into the spinal cord parenchyma. Thus, the dogs were misdiagnosed as having a conventional intervertebral disc herniation. An intradural extramedullary disc herniation (three cases) or intramedullary disc herniation (two cases) was confirmed during surgery. By using computed tomographic myelography (CTM) for the remaining three dogs, an intradural extramedullary mass surrounded by an accumulation of contrast medium was observed and confirmed during surgery. Findings from this small sample of eight dogs indicated that CTM may be more sensitive for diagnosing canine thoracolumbar intradural disc herniation than low-field MRI. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  4. The 3D tomographic image reconstruction software for prompt-gamma measurement of the boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, Boris; Auterinen, Iiro; Kotiluoto, Petri; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2006-01-01

    A tomographic imaging system based on the spatial distribution measurement of the neutron capture reaction during Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) would be very useful for clinical purpose. Using gamma-detectors in a 2D-panel, boron neutron capture and hydrogen neutron capture gamma-rays emitted by the neutron irradiated region can be detected, and an image of the neutron capture events can be reconstructed. A 3D reconstruction software package has been written to support the development of a 3D prompt-gamma tomographic system. The package consists of three independent modules: phantom generation, reconstruction and evaluation modules. The reconstruction modules are based on algebraic approach of the iterative reconstruction algorithm (ART), and on the maximum likelihood estimation method (ML-EM). In addition to that, two subsets of the ART, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the component averaging algorithms (CAV) have been included to the package employing parallel codes for multiprocessor architecture. All implemented algorithms use two different field functions for the reconstruction of the region. One is traditional voxel function, another is, so called, blob function, smooth spherically symmetric generalized Kaiser-Bessel function. The generation module provides the phantom and projections with background by tracing the prompt gamma-rays for a given scanner geometry. The evaluation module makes statistical comparisons between the generated and reconstructed images, and provides figure-of-merit (FOM) values for the applied reconstruction algorithms. The package has been written in C language and tested under Linux and Windows platforms. The simple graphical user interface (GUI) is used for command execution and visualization purposed. (author)

  5. The effects of temporomandibular joint internal derangement and degenerative joint disease on tomographic and arthrotomographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J W; Whinery, J G; Anderson, Q N; Keenan, K M

    1989-02-01

    In a blind study, 243 arthrograms were interpreted as showing normal disk position, anterior disk displacement with reduction, or anterior disk displacement without reduction. The presence or absence of a perforation of the posterior attachment or disk was recorded. Later, tomograms of the same patient were interpreted. The presence or absence of evidence of temporomandibular degenerative joint disease (TMDJD) was recorded. The condyle-to-fossa relationship was characterized as retropositioned or not retropositioned. O the 106 cases with tomographic evidence of TMDJD, 100 (94%) had arthrographic evidence of internal derangement (p less than 0.0001), whereas 47% of the cases with internal derangement (211) had evidence of TMDJD. Perforations were seen in 29 (27%) of the cases with degenerative joint disease and in none (0%) of the cases without TMDJD (p less than 0.001). In cases without TMDJD, 90% of the cases with internal derangement revealed condylar retropositioning (p less than 0.0001). With tomographic evidence of TMDJD present, the relationship between condylar position and disk position was not significant.

  6. Real-time image guidance in laparoscopic liver surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenngott, Hannes G.; Wagner, Martin; Gondan, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    . This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a commercially available augmented reality (AR) guidance system employing intraoperative robotic C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for laparoscopic liver surgery. Methods: A human liver-like phantom with sixteen target fiducials was used to evaluate...

  7. Image Guidance Technologies for Interventional Pain Procedures: Ultrasound, Fluoroscopy, and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dajie

    2018-01-26

    Chronic pain is a common medical condition. Patients who suffer uncontrolled chronic pain may require interventions including spinal injections and various nerve blocks. Interventional procedures have evolved and improved over time since epidural injection was first introduced for low back pain and sciatica in 1901. One of the major contributors in the improvement of these interventions is the advancement of imaging guidance technologies. The utilization of image guidance has dramatically improved the accuracy and safety of these interventions. The first image guidance technology adopted by pain specialists was fluoroscopy. This was followed by CT and ultrasound. Fluoroscopy can be used to visualize bony structures of the spine. It is still the most commonly used guidance technology in spinal injections. In the recent years, ultrasound guidance has been increasingly adopted by interventionists to perform various injections. Because its ability to visualize soft tissue, vessels, and nerves, this guidance technology appears to be a better option than fluoroscopy for interventions including SGB and celiac plexus blocks, when visualization of the vessels may prevent intravascular injection. The current evidence indicates the efficacies of these interventions are similar between ultrasound guidance and fluoroscopy guidance for SGB and celiac plexus blocks. For facet injections and interlaminar epidural steroid injections, it is important to visualize bony structures in order to perform these procedures accurately and safely. It is worth noting that facet joint injections can be done under ultrasound guidance with equivalent efficacy to fluoroscopic guidance. However, obese patients may present challenge for ultrasound guidance due to its poor visualization of deep anatomical structures. Regarding transforaminal epidural steroid injections, there are limited evidence to support that ultrasound guidance technology has equivalent efficacy and less complications comparing

  8. SU-F-J-209: Quantification of Image-Guidance Benefit in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, L [Division of Radiation Physics, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Deng, J [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Image-guidance has been widely used in radiation oncology for accurate radiotherapy. The goal of this study is to quantify the benefit of image-guidance in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of cancers. Methods: In this study, a new index termed image-guidance benefit (IGB), was proposed to quantify the benefit of image-guidance in cancer radiotherapy. It is calculated as a ratio of the square sum of dose differences between planning dose matrix and actual delivery dose matrix post image-guidance to the square sum of dose summation between the two matrixes, summing over all dose scoring voxels. Ranging from 0 to 1, larger IGB values indicate larger benefit out of image-guidance. With IRB approval, the DICOM RT files and 3D couch shifts applied during IGRT of 2219 patients were collected, based on which patient-specific IGB values were calculated with an in-house MATLAB code. Results: In this study, the mean IGB value was found to be 0.0398 (0.000583–0.999) with a positive correlation between IGB value and 3D couch shift vector at 0.0435 per cm (P<0.0001). With 2 mm shift as a threshold above which an image-guidance is deemed clinically necessary, the corresponding mean IGB value was 0.00457, much less than 0.0398 (P<0.001). However, the IGB values of 56 cases based on couch shifts were less than those based on 2 mm shift. Conclusion: The IGB values were patient-specific and site-dependent. Using 2 mm shifts as criterion for applying image-guidance, the applied image-guidance procedures were found clinically necessary and highly beneficial in 97.5% of cancer patients. However, image-guidance procedures were found over-used in about 2.5% of cancer patients in our current practices of IGRT, which should be avoided as they added no benefit in improving delivery accuracy while increasing cancer risk.

  9. Influence of arm positioning on tomographic thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging and the effect of attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prvulovich, E.M.; Jarritt, P.H.; Vorontsova, E.; Bomanji, J.B.; Ell, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Lateral attenuation in single-photon emission tomography (SPET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has been attributed to the left arm if it is held by the patient's side during data acquisition. As a result MPI data are conventionally acquired with the arms held above the head. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of imaging arms down on reconstructed tomographic images depicting regional myocardial thallium-201 distribution and to assess whether attenuation-corrected (AC) myocardial perfusion images acquired arms down could replace uncorrected (NC) images acquired arms up for routine clinical service. Twenty-eight patients referred for routine MPI underwent sequential 180 emission/transmission imaging for attenuation correction using an L-shaped dual-headed gamma camera (GE Optima) fitted with two gadolinium-153 scanning line sources. Delay data were acquired twice: once supine with the arms up and then supine with the arms down. Detector radius of rotation (ROR) for arms up and arms-down studies was recorded. For each data set, count density was measured in 17 segments of a polar plot and segmental uptake expressed relative to study maximum. Oblique images were assessed qualitatively by two observers blinded to study type for tracer distribution and overall quality. Transmission maps were assessed for truncation. Mean detector ROR was 190 mm for arms-up studies and 232 mm for arms-down studies (P 201 Tl distribution, particularly anterolaterally. There is lateral undercorrection in approximately 10% of AC arms-down studies, possibly because of attenuation map truncation. Image quality is reduced in about one-third of AC arms-down studies compared with NC arms-up studies. These data suggest that this attenuation correction method is not sufficiently robust to allow routine acquisition of MPI data with the arms down. (orig.)

  10. Semi-automated software to measure luminal and stromal areas of choroid in optical coherence tomographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Shozo; Sakamoto, Taiji; Kakiuchi, Naoko; Shiihara, Hideki; Sakoguchi, Tomonori; Tomita, Masatoshi; Yamashita, Takehiro; Uchino, Eisuke

    2018-03-01

    To determine the capabilities of "EyeGround" software in measuring the choroidal cross sectional areas in optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images. Cross sectional, prospective study. The cross-sectional area of the subfoveal choroid within a 1500 µm diameter circle centered on the fovea was measured both with and without using the EyeGround software in the OCT images. The differences between the evaluation times and the results of the measurements were compared. The inter-rater, intra-rater, inter-method agreements were determined. Fifty-one eyes of 51 healthy subjects were studied: 24 men and 27 women with an average age of 35.0 ± 8.8 years. The time for analyzing a single image was significantly shorter with the software at 3.2±1.1 min than without the software at 12.1±5.1 min (P software, the inter-rater correlation efficient was significantly high [0.997, 95% CI (0.995-0.999)], and the intra-rater correlation efficient was also significantly high [0.999, 95% CI (0.999-1.0)]. The EyeGround software can measure the choroidal area in the OCT cross sectional images with good reproducibility and in a significantly shorter times. It can be a valuable tool for analyzing the choroid.

  11. Fusion imaging of computed tomographic pulmonary angiography and SPECT ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy: initial experience and potential benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Benjamin; Bailey, Dale; Roach, Paul; Bailey, Elizabeth; King, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of fusing ventilation and perfusion data from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) ventilation perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy together with computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) data. We sought to determine the accuracy of this fusion process. In addition, we correlated the findings of this technique with the final clinical diagnosis. Thirty consecutive patients (17 female, 13 male) who had undergone both CTPA and SPECT V/Q scintigraphy during their admission for investigation of potential pulmonary embolism were identified retrospectively. Image datasets from these two modalities were co-registered and fused using commercial software. Accuracy of the fusion process was determined subjectively by correlation between modalities of the anatomical boundaries and co-existent pleuro-parenchymal abnormalities. In all 30 cases, SPECT V/Q images were accurately fused with CTPA images. An automated registration algorithm was sufficient alone in 23 cases (77%). Additional linear z-axis scaling was applied in seven cases. There was accurate topographical co-localisation of vascular, parenchymal and pleural disease on the fused images. Nine patients who had positive CTPA performed as an initial investigation had co-localised perfusion defects on the subsequent fused CTPA/SPECT images. Three of the 11 V/Q scans initially reported as intermediate could be reinterpreted as low probability owing to co-localisation of defects with parenchymal or pleural pathology. Accurate fusion of SPECT V/Q scintigraphy to CTPA images is possible. This technique may be clinically useful in patients who have non-diagnostic initial investigations or in whom corroborative imaging is sought. (orig.)

  12. 256-Slice coronary computed tomographic angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: optimal reconstruction phase and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Seitaro; Yuki, Hideaki; Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Chuou-ku, Kumamoto (Japan); Honda, Keiichi; Yoshimura, Akira; Katahira, Kazuhiro [Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Minami-ku, Kumamoto (Japan); Noda, Katsuo; Oshima, Shuichi [Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Minami-ku, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    To assess the optimal reconstruction phase and the image quality of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We performed CCTA in 60 patients with AF and 60 controls with sinus rhythm. The images were reconstructed in multiple phases in all parts of the cardiac cycle, and the optimal reconstruction phase with the fewest motion artefacts was identified. The coronary artery segments were visually evaluated to investigate their assessability. In 46 (76.7 %) patients, the optimal reconstruction phase was end-diastole, whereas in 6 (10.0 %) patients it was end-systole or mid-diastole, and in 2 (3.3 %) patients it was another cardiac phase. In 53 (88.3 %) of the controls, the optimal reconstruction phase was mid-diastole, whereas it was end-systole in 4 (6.7 %), and in 3 (5.0 %) it was another cardiac phase. There was a significant difference between patients with AF and the controls in the optimal phase (p < 0.01) but not in the visual image quality score (p = 0.06). The optimal reconstruction phase in most patients with AF was the end-diastolic phase. The end-systolic phase tended to be optimal in AF patients with higher average heart rates. (orig.)

  13. In vivo tomographic imaging of lung colonization of tumour in mouse with simultaneous fluorescence and X-ray CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Gao, Fuping; Wang, Mengjiao; Cao, Xu; Liu, Fei; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jianwen; Wang, Guangzhi; Bai, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging of diffuse and wide-spread colonization within the lungs, rather than distinct solid primary tumors, is still a challenging work. In this work, a lung colonization mouse model bearing A549 human lung tumor was simultaneously scanned by a dual-modality fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) system in vivo. A two steps method which incorporates CT structural information into the FMT reconstruction procedure is employed to provide concurrent anatomical and functional information. By using the target-specific fluorescence agent, the fluorescence tomographic results show elevated fluorescence intensity deep within the lungs which is colonized with diffuse and wide-spread tumors. The results were confirmed with ex vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging and histological examination of the lung tissues. With FMT reconstruction combined with the CT information, the dual-modality FMT/micro-CT system is expected to offer sensitive and noninvasive imaging of diffuse tumor colonization within the lungs in vivo. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Tomographic particle image velocimetry investigation of the flow in a modeled human carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, N. A.; Atkinson, C.; Jeremy, M. C.; Soria, J.

    2011-04-01

    Hemodynamic forces within the human carotid artery are well known to play a key role in the initiation and progression of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The degree and extent of the disease largely depends on the prevailing three-dimensional flow structure and wall shear stress (WSS) distribution. This work presents tomographic PIV (Tomo-PIV) measurements of the flow structure and WSS in a physiologically accurate model of the human carotid artery bifurcation. The vascular geometry is reconstructed from patient-specific data and reproduced in a transparent flow phantom to demonstrate the feasibility of Tomo-PIV in a complex three-dimensional geometry. Tomographic reconstruction is performed with the multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation and simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction (SMART) technique. The implemented methodology is validated by comparing the results with Stereo-PIV measurements in the same facility. Using a steady flow assumption, the measurement error and RMS uncertainty are directly inferred from the measured velocity field. It is shown that the measurement uncertainty increases for increasing light sheet thickness and increasing velocity gradients, which are largest near the vessel walls. For a typical volume depth of 6 mm (or 256 pixel), the analysis indicates that the velocity derived from 3D cross-correlation can be measured within ±2% of the maximum velocity (or ±0.2 pixel) near the center of the vessel and within ±5% (±0.6 pixel) near the vessel wall. The technique is then applied to acquire 3D-3C velocity field data at multiple axial locations within the carotid artery model, which are combined to yield the flow field and WSS in a volume of approximately 26 mm × 27 mm × 60 mm. Shear stress is computed from the velocity gradient tensor and a method for inferring the WSS distribution on the vessel wall is presented. The results indicate the presence of a complex and three-dimensional flow structure, with

  15. SU-E-J-06: Additional Imaging Guidance Dose to Patient Organs Resulting From X-Ray Tubes Used in CyberKnife Image Guidance System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, A; Ding, G [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The use of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has become increasingly common, but the additional radiation exposure resulting from repeated image guidance procedures raises concerns. Although there are many studies reporting imaging dose from different image guidance devices, imaging dose for the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is not available. This study provides estimated organ doses resulting from image guidance procedures on the CyberKnife system. Methods: Commercially available Monte Carlo software, PCXMC, was used to calculate average organ doses resulting from x-ray tubes used in the CyberKnife system. There are seven imaging protocols with kVp ranging from 60 – 120 kV and 15 mAs for treatment sites in the Cranium, Head and Neck, Thorax, and Abdomen. The output of each image protocol was measured at treatment isocenter. For each site and protocol, Adult body sizes ranging from anorexic to extremely obese were simulated since organ dose depends on patient size. Doses for all organs within the imaging field-of-view of each site were calculated for a single image acquisition from both of the orthogonal x-ray tubes. Results: Average organ doses were <1.0 mGy for every treatment site and imaging protocol. For a given organ, dose increases as kV increases or body size decreases. Higher doses are typically reported for skeletal components, such as the skull, ribs, or clavicles, than for softtissue organs. Typical organ doses due to a single exposure are estimated as 0.23 mGy to the brain, 0.29 mGy to the heart, 0.08 mGy to the kidneys, etc., depending on the imaging protocol and site. Conclusion: The organ doses vary with treatment site, imaging protocol and patient size. Although the organ dose from a single image acquisition resulting from two orthogonal beams is generally insignificant, the sum of repeated image acquisitions (>100) could reach 10–20 cGy for a typical treatment fraction.

  16. Spectrometry and emission tomographic image reconstruction stimulated by neutrons via EM algorithm and Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, Rodrigo Sartorelo Salemi

    2014-01-01

    The NSECT (Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography) figures as a new spectrographic technique able to evaluate in vivo the concentration of elements using the inelastic scattering reaction (n,n'). Since its introduction, several improvements have been proposed with the aim of investigating applications for clinical diagnosis and reduction of absorbed dose associated with CT acquisition. In this context, two new diagnostic applications are presented using spectroscopic and tomographic approaches from NSECT. A new methodology has also been proposed to optimize the sinogram sampling that is directly related to the quality of the reconstruction by the irradiation protocol. The studies were developed based on simulations with MCNP5 code. Diagnosis of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and the detection of breast microcalcifications were evaluated in studies conducted using a human phantom. The obtained results demonstrate the ability of the NSECT technique to detect changes in the composition of the modeled tissues as a function of the development of evaluated pathologies. The proposed method for optimizing sinograms was able to analytically simulate the composition of the irradiated medium allowing the assessment of quality of reconstruction and effective dose in terms of the sampling rate. However, future research must be conducted to quantify the sensitivity of detection according to the selected elements. (author)

  17. Near-infrared image guidance in cancer surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, B.E.

    2017-01-01

    Intraoperative imaging using near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence is a fast developing imaging modality as it provides real-time visual information during surgery (Chapter 1). The ability to detect lymph nodes and tumours that need to be resected can assist the surgeon to improve surgery by reducing

  18. Tomographic Ocean Imaging Facility: 2D and 3D Visualization of Real Marine Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ketten, Darlene

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an imaging facility which would assist multiple areas of research that depend upon high resolution imaging and, in particular, to develop new approaches...

  19. Effect of optical property estimation accuracy on tomographic bioluminescence imaging: simulation of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrakis, George [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rannou, Fernando R [Departamento de Ingenieria Informatica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3659, Santiago (Chile); Chatziioannou, Arion F [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2006-04-21

    Inevitable discrepancies between the mouse tissue optical properties assumed by an experimenter and the actual physiological values may affect the tomographic localization of bioluminescent sources. In a previous work, the simplifying assumption of optically homogeneous tissues led to inaccurate localization of deep sources. Improved results may be obtained if a mouse anatomical map is provided by a high-resolution imaging modality and optical properties are assigned to segmented tissues. In this work, the feasibility of this approach was explored by simulating the effect of different magnitude optical property errors on the image formation process of a combined optical-PET system. Some comparisons were made with corresponding simulations using higher spatial resolution data that are typically attainable by CCD cameras. In addition, simulation results provided insights on some of the experimental conditions that could lead to poor localization of bioluminescent sources. They also provided a rough guide on how accurately tissue optical properties need to be known in order to achieve correct localization of point sources with increasing tissue depth under low background noise conditions.

  20. Effective segmentation of fresh post-mortem murine lung parenchyma in phase contrast X-ray tomographic microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Cremona, Tiziana P.; Lovric, Goran; Arcadu, Filippo; Stampanoni, Marco; Schittny, Johannes C.

    2017-06-01

    The acinus represents the functional unit of the mammalian lung. It is defined as the small tree of gas-exchanging airways, which is fed by the most distal purely conducting airway. Different hypotheses exist on how the fine structure of the acinus changes during ventilation and development. Since in classical 2-dimensional (2D) sections of the lung the borders of the acini are not detectable, every study of acini requires 3-dimensional (3D) datasets. As a basis for further studies of pulmonary acini we imaged rodent lungs as close to life as possible using phase contrast synchrotron radiation-based X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM), and developed a protocol for the segmentation of the alveolar septa. The method is based on a combined multilevel filtering approach. Seeds are automatically defined for separate regions of tissue and airspace during each 2D filtering level and then given as input to a 3D random walk segmentation. Thus, the different types of artifacts present in the images are treated separately, taking into account the sample’s structural complexity. The proposed procedure yields high-quality 3D segmentations of acinar microstructure that can be used for a reliable morphological analysis.

  1. The extent of the Cratonic keel underneath the Southern African region: A 3D image using Finite-Frequency Tomograph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Bezada, Max; Thybo, Hans

    2010-01-01

    a crustal model we derived from PdS receiver functions using H-K analysis (Zhu and Kanamori, J. Geophys. Res. 105, 2000), and varied with azimuth. We chose damping for the inversion by examining the model norm-data misfit L curve. Checkerboard resolution tests showed good model recovery for 8°x8° anomalies...... with Vp variations of ±1.5%; 4°X4° checkerboards showed moderately good recovery. To try to isolate the depth extent of anomalies in the model we ran two suites of squeezing tests: 1) We reduced the maximum depth of the model from 1000 to 700 to 410 km. 2) For a 1000 km deep model we increased the damping...... parameter in the deeper layers progressively and examined the rms misfit and the imaged structure. Visual inspection of the tomographic images produced from these inversions showed that the lateral distribution of structures remained unchanged as the depth of the model was reduced and deep structures...

  2. Off-line data processing and display for computed tomographic images (EMI brain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Masaomi; Maruyama, Kiyoshi; Yano, Kesato; Takenaka, Eiichi.

    1978-01-01

    Processing and multi-format display for the CT (EMI) scan data have been tried by using an off-line small computer and an analog memory. Four or six CT images after processing are displayed on the CRT by a small computer with a 16 kilo-words core memory and an analog memory. Multi-format display of the CT image can be selected as follows; multi-slice display, continuative multi-window display, separate multi-window display, and multi-window level display. Electronic zooming for the real size viewing can give magnified CT image with one of displayed images if necessary. Image substraction, edge enhancement, smoothing, non-linear gray scale display, and synthesized image for the plane tomography reconstracted by the normal CT scan data, have been tried by the off-line data processing. A possibility for an effective application of the data base with CT image was obtained by these trials. (auth.)

  3. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestari, Titik, E-mail: t2klestari@gmail.com [Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA), Jalan Angkasa I No.2 Kemayoran, Jakarta Pusat, 10720 (Indonesia); Faculty of Earth Science and Technology, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jalan Ganesa No.10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysical Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA’s) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 – April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  4. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  5. The use of transport and diffusion equations in the three-dimensional reconstruction of computerized tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Sandrerley Ramos, E-mail: sandrerley@eee.ufg.br [Escola de Engenharia Eletrica e de Computacao - EEEC, Universidade Federal de Goias - UFG, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Flores, Edna Lucia; Pires, Dulcineia Goncalves F.; Carrijo, Gilberto Arantes; Veiga, Antonio Claudio Paschoarelli [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica - FEELT, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia - UFU, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Barcelos, Celia Aparecida Z. [Faculdade de Matematica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia - UFU, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    The visualization of a computerized tomographic (TC) exam in 3D increases the quality of the medical diagnosis and, consequently, the success probability in the treatment. To obtain a high quality image it is necessary to obtain slices which are close to one another. Motivated towards the goal of reaching an improved balance between quantity of slices and visualization quality, this research work presents a digital inpainting technique of 3D interpolation for CT slices used in the visualization of human body structures. The inpainting is carried out via non-linear partial differential equations (PDE). The PDE's have been used, in the image-processing context to fill in the damaged regions in a digital 2D image. Inspired by this idea, this article proposes an interpolation method for the filling in of the empty regions between the CT slices. To do it, considering the high similarity between two consecutive real slice, the first step of the proposed method is to create the virtual slices. The virtual slices contain all similarity between the intercalated slices and, when there are not similarities between real slices, the virtual slices will contain indefinite portions. In the second step of the proposed method, the created virtual slices will be used together with the real slices images, in the reconstruction of the structure in three dimensions, mapped onto the exam. The proposed method is capable of reconstructing the curvatures of the patient's internal structures without using slices that are close to one another. The experiments carried out show the proposed method's efficiency. (author)

  6. Statistical analysis of nonlinearly reconstructed near-infrared tomographic images: Part I--Theory and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W; Song, Xiaomei; Tosteson, Tor D; McBride, Troy O; Jiang, Shudong; Paulsen, Keith D

    2002-07-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) diffuse tomography is an emerging method for imaging the interior of tissues to quantify concentrations of hemoglobin and exogenous chromophores non-invasively in vivo. It often exploits an optical diffusion model-based image reconstruction algorithm to estimate spatial property values from measurements of the light flux at the surface of the tissue. In this study, mean-squared error (MSE) over the image is used to evaluate methods for regularizing the ill-posed inverse image reconstruction problem in NIR tomography. Estimates of image bias and image standard deviation were calculated based upon 100 repeated reconstructions of a test image with randomly distributed noise added to the light flux measurements. It was observed that the bias error dominates at high regularization parameter values while variance dominates as the algorithm is allowed to approach the optimal solution. This optimum does not necessarily correspond to the minimum projection error solution, but typically requires further iteration with a decreasing regularization parameter to reach the lowest image error. Increasing measurement noise causes a need to constrain the minimum regularization parameter to higher values in order to achieve a minimum in the overall image MSE.

  7. Tomographic imaging of the cervical spine of horses; Aspectos tomograficos da coluna cervical de equinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, L.P.; Machado, V.M.V.; Santos, R.V.; Evangelista, F.C.; Vulcano, L.C. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia

    2012-09-15

    The anatomy of the cervical spine of mature horses based on images obtained with a helical computed tomography examination performed on anatomic specimens was studied. Computed tomography was the diagnostic imaging method of choice and allowed three-dimensional reconstructions of images and other anatomical planes, such as coronal and sagittal. All images were acquired and evaluated in the filter and window to bone tissue. It was possible to demonstrate the anatomical differences and peculiarities of the normal vertebrae, particularly the occipito-atlantoaxial region, which has a higher incidence of changes to assist in the visualization of any change of the bone pattern on CT studies. (author)

  8. Guidance for Methods Descriptions Used in Preclinical Imaging Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stout

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical molecular imaging is a rapidly growing field, where new imaging systems, methods, and biological findings are constantly being developed or discovered. Imaging systems and the associated software usually have multiple options for generating data, which is often overlooked but is essential when reporting the methods used to create and analyze data. Similarly, the ways in which animals are housed, handled, and treated to create physiologically based data must be well described in order that the findings be relevant, useful, and reproducible. There are frequently new developments for metabolic imaging methods. Thus, specific reporting requirements are difficult to establish; however, it remains essential to adequately report how the data have been collected, processed, and analyzed. To assist with future manuscript submissions, this article aims to provide guidelines of what details to report for several of the most common imaging modalities. Examples are provided in an attempt to give comprehensive, succinct descriptions of the essential items to report about the experimental process.

  9. Development of a new automatic nuclear emulsion scanning system, S-UTS, with continuous 3D tomographic image read-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, K.; Nakano, T.

    2010-04-01

    The previous version of the automatic nuclear emulsion scanning system had a limit on read-out speed of several microscope views per second (views/s). This was due to unavoidable mechanical vibration when microscope stage was stopped to acquire tomographic images along the optical axis in emulsion. To overcome this limit, we succeeded in developing optics synchronized to stage movement so that tomographic images can be acquired without stopping a stage. This new system, S-UTS, is now operative with scanning speed of 50 views/s, or 72 cm2/h, with high efficiency and sub-μm precision. It plays an essential role in the OPERA experiment at CERN.

  10. Tomographic mammography using a limited number of low-dose cone-beam projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Tao; Stewart, Alexander; Stanton, Martin; McCauley, Thomas; Phillips, Walter; Kopans, Daniel B.; Moore, Richard H.; Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Opsahl-Ong, Beale; Niklason, Loren; Williams, Mark B.

    2003-01-01

    A method is described for using a limited number (typically 10-50) of low-dose radiographs to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of x-ray attenuation in the breast. The method uses x-ray cone-beam imaging, an electronic digital detector, and constrained nonlinear iterative computational techniques. Images are reconstructed with high resolution in two dimensions and lower resolution in the third dimension. The 3D distribution of attenuation that is projected into one image in conventional mammography can be separated into many layers (typically 30-80 1-mm-thick layers, depending on breast thickness), increasing the conspicuity of features that are often obscured by overlapping structure in a single-projection view. Schemes that record breast images at nonuniform angular increments, nonuniform image exposure, and nonuniform detector resolution are investigated in order to reduce the total x-ray exposure necessary to obtain diagnostically useful 3D reconstructions, and to improve the quality of the reconstructed images for a given exposure. The total patient radiation dose can be comparable to that used for a standard two-view mammogram. The method is illustrated with images from mastectomy specimens, a phantom, and human volunteers. The results show how image quality is affected by various data-collection protocols

  11. X-ray diagnostic installation for X-ray tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haendle, J.; Sklebitz, H.

    1984-01-01

    An exemplary embodiment includes at least one x-ray tube for the generation of an x-ray beam, a patient support, an image detector, and a control generator-connected with the x-ray tube and the image detector-for the purpose of moving the x-ray beam, and in opposition thereto, the image field of the image detector. There is connected to the control generator a layer height computer which calculates the enlargement from the geometric data for the tomogram. The image detector has a circuit-connected with the layer height computer-for the purpose of fading-in a marking for the dimensions in the layer plane

  12. Tomographic method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    A tomographic x-ray machine has a camera and film-plane section which move about a primary axis for imaging a selected cross-section of an anatomical member onto the film. A ''scout image'' of the member is taken at right angles to the plane of the desired cross-section to indicate the cross-section's angle with respect to the primary axis. The film plane is then located at the same angle with respect to a film cassette axis as the selected cross-section makes with the primary axis. The film plane and the cross-section are then maintained in parallel planes throughout motion of the camera and film plane during tomographic radiography. (author)

  13. Positron emission tomographic images and expectation maximization: A VLSI architecture for multiple iterations per second

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.F.; Byars, L.G.; Casey, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    A digital electronic architecture for parallel processing of the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm for Positron Emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction is proposed. Rapid (0.2 second) EM iterations on high resolution (256 x 256) images are supported. Arrays of two very large scale integration (VLSI) chips perform forward and back projection calculations. A description of the architecture is given, including data flow and partitioning relevant to EM and parallel processing. EM images shown are produced with software simulating the proposed hardware reconstruction algorithm. Projected cost of the system is estimated to be small in comparison to the cost of current PET scanners

  14. Image-guided microneurosurgical management of small cerebral arteriovenous malformations: the value of navigated computed tomographic angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenen, V.A.; Reinges, M.H.T.; Gilsbach, J.M.; Rohde, V.; Dammert, S.; Mull, M.

    2005-01-01

    In small arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with large hematomas, surgery remains the main therapeutic option. However, intraoperative identification of the AVM, feeders, and draining veins could be difficult in the environment of substantial intracerebral blood. In those selected cases, we use navigated computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for the microneurosurgical management. It is our objective to report our initial experiences. Prior to operation a conventional CTA with superficial skin fiducials placed on a patient's head was acquired for diagnostic and neuronavigation purposes. Image data were transferred to a neuronavigation device with integrated volume rendering capacities which allows a three-dimensional reconstruction of the vascular tree and the AVM to be created. In all patients the AVM was removed successfully after having been localized with CTA-based neuronavigation. Navigated CTA is helpful for the operative management of small AVMs with large hematomas. The technique allows feeding arteries to be distinguished from draining veins thereby allowing the nidus of the AVM to be identified despite the presence of substantial intracerebral blood. CTA can be easily implemented into commercial neuronavigation systems. (orig.)

  15. Tomographic image of crust and upper mantle off the Boso Peninsula using data from an ocean-bottom seismograph array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Aki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Hino, Ryota; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Sugioka, Hiroko; Nakano, Masaru; Obana, Koichiro; Nakahigashi, Kazuo; Shinohara, Masanao

    2017-08-01

    We determined the three-dimensional structure of the crust and upper mantle off the Boso Peninsula, Japan, by analyzing seismograms recorded by ocean-bottom seismometers and land stations between 2011 and 2013. We employed seismic tomography to determine the P- and S-wave velocity structures and earthquake locations simultaneously. The tomographic image shows that the mantle parts of the Pacific and the Philippine Sea plates have high-velocity anomalies. The upper boundary of the Philippine Sea plate is delineated as approximately 2-6 km shallower than that previously estimated from land-based data for the area 140.5°E-141.5°E and 35°N-35.5°N. A pronounced low-velocity anomaly in P- and S-waves with low- V p/ V s ratio (1.5-1.6) was observed at depths shallower than 20 km in the overriding North American plate. This anomaly may be caused by the presence of rocks with a low- V p/ V s ratio, such as quartzite, and the water expelled from the subducted Pacific and Philippine Sea plates.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Experimental device, corresponding forward model and processing of the experimental data using wavelet analysis for tomographic image reconstruction applied to eddy current nondestructive evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, P.Y.; Madaoui, N.

    1999-01-01

    In the context of eddy current non destructive evaluation using a tomographic image reconstruction process, the success of the reconstruction depends not only on the choice of the forward model and of the inversion algorithms, but also on the ability to extract the pertinent data from the raw signal provided by the sensor. We present in this paper, an experimental device designed for imaging purposes, the corresponding forward model, and a pre-processing of the experimental data using wavelet analysis. These three steps implemented with an inversion algorithm, will allow in the future to perform image reconstruction of 3-D flaws. (authors)

  17. Elastic Velocity Updating through Image-Domain Tomographic Inversion of Passive Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, B.; Shragge, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic monitoring at injection sites (e.g., CO2sequestration, waste water disposal, hydraulic fracturing) has become an increasingly important tool for hazard identification and avoidance. The information obtained from this data is often limited to seismic event properties (e.g., location, approximate time, moment tensor), the accuracy of which greatly depends on the estimated elastic velocity models. However, creating accurate velocity models from passive array data remains a challenging problem. Common techniques rely on picking arrivals or matching waveforms requiring high signal-to-noise data that is often not available for the magnitude earthquakes observed over injection sites. We present a new method for obtaining elastic velocity information from earthquakes though full-wavefield wave-equation imaging and adjoint-state tomography. The technique exploits images of the earthquake source using various imaging conditions based upon the P- and S-wavefield data. We generate image volumes by back propagating data through initial models and then applying a correlation-based imaging condition. We use the P-wavefield autocorrelation, S-wavefield autocorrelation, and P-S wavefield cross-correlation images. Inconsistencies in the images form the residuals, which are used to update the P- and S-wave velocity models through adjoint-state tomography. Because the image volumes are constructed from all trace data, the signal-to-noise in this space is increased when compared to the individual traces. Moreover, it eliminates the need for picking and does not require any estimation of the source location and timing. Initial tests show that with reasonable source distribution and acquisition array, velocity anomalies can be recovered. Future tests will apply this methodology to other scales from laboratory to global.

  18. Computed tomographic imaging of dogs with primary laryngeal or tracheal airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Krystina; Hartman, Susan; Matheson, Jodi; O'Brien, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Seventeen dogs with clinical signs attributable to nonneoplastic obstruction of the larynx, trachea, or large bronchi underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging. In 16 of the 17 dogs, CT was performed without general anesthesia using a positioning device. Fifteen of these 16 dogs were imaged without sedation or general anesthesia. Three-dimensional (3D) internal rendering was performed on each image set based on lesion localization determined by routine image planes. Visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, video fluoroscopy, and necropsy were used for achieving the cause of the upper airway obstruction. The CT and 3D internal rendering accurately indicated the presence and cause of upper airway obstruction in all dogs. CT findings indicative of laryngeal paralysis included failure to abduct the arytenoid cartilages, narrowed rima glottis, and air-filled laryngeal ventricles. Laryngeal collapse findings depended on the grade of collapse and included everted laryngeal saccules, collapse of the cuneiform processes and corniculate processes, and narrowed rima glottis. Trachea abnormalities included hypoplasia, stenosis, or collapse syndrome. The CT findings in tracheal hypoplasia consisted of a severely narrowed lumen throughout the entire length. Tracheal stenosis was represented by a circumferential decrease in tracheal lumen size limited to one region. Tracheal collapse syndrome was diagnosed by severe asymmetric narrowing. Lobar bronchi collapse appeared in CT images as a narrowed asymmetric lumen diameter. CT imaging of unanesthetized dogs with upper airway obstruction compares favorably with traditional definitive diagnostic methods. © 2011 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  19. Optical tomographic imaging of the hemodynamic response to a breath hold in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Khalil, Michael A.; Al Abdi, Rabah M.; Reig, Beatriu; Fong, Christopher J.; Hershman, Dawn; Desperito, Elise; Barbour, Randall L.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-02-01

    Continuous wave optical tomography is non-ionizing, uses endogenous contrast, and can be performed quickly and at low cost which makes it a suitable imaging modality for breast cancer screening. Using multiple wavelengths of light to illuminate the breast at various angles, three-dimensional images of the distribution of chromophores such as oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin can help identify cancerous tissue. Dynamic optical imaging can provide additional insight into cancer characteristics such as angiogenesis and metabolism. Here we present the first clinical data acquired with our novel digital breast imaging system. This system is based upon a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) architecture that leverages the immediate digitization of acquired analog data to reduce noise and quickly process large amounts of data. Employing this new instrument we have investigated the dynamic changes due to a breath hold and its potential for use in breast cancer screening. Over the course of a breath hold, images have been collected simultaneously from both breasts at a rate of 1.7 frames per second with 32 sources and 64 detectors per breast and four wavelengths of light at 765, 805, 827, and 905nm. Initial results involving one healthy volunteer and one breast cancer patient support the potential use of dynamic imaging for breast cancer detection.

  20. Performance comparison of different compact NIR fluorescent imaging systems with goggle display for intraoperative image-guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shengkui; Mondal, Suman; Zhu, Nan; Liang, Rongguang; Achilefu, Samuel; Gruev, Viktor

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent imaging system has been widely used for intraoperative image-guided application. In this paper, we present performance comparison from three compact NIR fluorescence imaging system prototypes with goggle display that we developed for intraoperative guidance: threshold detection based two camera system, feature matching based three cameras system and miniature beam-splitter single camera system. Their performance is evaluated according to sensitivity regarding different ICG concentrations, accuracy of image overlay between NIR-visible channels, compactness and practicability in intraoperative use. The comparison results show great potentials of using these NIR fluorescence imaging systems to improve user experience and surgical outcomes in intraoperative use.

  1. Prevalence of Apical Bone Defects and Evaluation of Associated Factors Detected with Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemagner, Fabien; Maret, Delphine; Peters, Ove A; Arias, Ana; Coudrais, Elisabeth; Georgelin-Gurgel, Marie

    2015-07-01

    Cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging has been shown to be accurate for detecting apical bone defects (ABDs). Medium field of view CBCT imaging may provide apical images of the whole oral cavity at a resolution that is sufficient to allow ABDs to be located and measured. The aim of the work presented was to calculate the prevalence of ABDs from CBCT images as well as to assess some associated factors and their measurement. One hundred CBCT data sets with a voxel size of 0.2 mm were analyzed by 2 evaluators according to a standardized reading protocol. The number of maxillary and mandibular teeth, the presence of endodontic treatment, and the presence of ABDs associated with endodontic treatment were identified, and the presence of intraradicular posts was documented. The size of ABDs detected was measured, and they were classified according to the Cone Beam Computed Tomography Periapical Index. A total of 2368 teeth and 100 subjects were analyzed. The prevalence of ABDs in subjects was 78%; in 8.6% of the sample teeth, ABDs were present, and 38.2% of endodontically treated maxillary molars were affected by it. Endodontic treatment was significantly associated with an increased risk for the presence of an ABD (P = .0001); 40.8% of endodontically treated teeth were associated with an ABD. This rate increased to 85.9% in endodontically treated maxillary molars. Placement of a post was significantly associated with the presence of an ABD (P = .003). The most frequent lesions were those with diameters between 2 and 4 mm (39.2%). There are only few studies on the prevalence of ABDs using CBCT analysis. This study in a French population shows a high prevalence of ABDs, especially on endodontically treated molars. The most effective way to exhaustively detect such defects is with CBCT imaging. Moreover, CBCT images show details of the extent of bone loss, thus providing information valuable for the therapeutic decision and details that could help with the prognosis

  2. Spiral (Helical) computed tomographic imaging for the diagnosis of bile duct cancer. Vascular and pancreatic invasions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kon, Masanori

    1997-01-01

    The development of several imaging techniques for diagnosing bile duct cancer have improved, however, its diagnosis at the early stage is still difficult. We discuss the significance of the spiral (helical) computed tomography (SCT) imaging for the diagnosis of bile duct cancer at an early stage. We performed, as a preoperative examination, SCT under intravenous angiography (IV-SCT) for all cases, which included 233 cases of benign bile duct diseases, 42 cases of gallbladder cancer and 22 cases of bile duct cancer. The accuracy rate of diagnosis ability of 42 cases of gallbladder cancer by IV-SCT was 91%, and that of portal vein invasion was 91%. In the cases of bile duct cancer, IV-SCT showed destructive images of the bile duct wall and the tumor images invaded into the pancreatic parenchyma, in the cases of invasion at the splenic vein and confluence site of the portal vein, IV-SCT gave clearer 3D images than conventional angiography. The accuracy rate of diagnosing pancreatic invasion in bile duct cancer by IV-SCT was 80%. However, it is still difficult to determine completely the layer structures of the bile duct and the invasion into the walls along the long axis. As the future development of SCT for the diagnosis of bile duct cancer, we expect further progression of diagnosis ability of bile duct cancer and the invasion level by the applying high resolution thin-section CT images or endoscopical images of the luminal organs in examining the bile duct. (K.H.)

  3. Three dimensional reconstruction of computed tomographic images by computer graphics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, Toru; Kimura, Kazufumi.

    1986-01-01

    A three dimensional computer reconstruction system for CT images has been developed in a commonly used radionuclide data processing system using a computer graphics technique. The three dimensional model was constructed from organ surface information of CT images (slice thickness: 5 or 10 mm). Surface contours of the organs were extracted manually from a set of parallel transverse CT slices in serial order and stored in the computer memory. Interpolation was made between a set of the extracted contours by cubic spline functions, then three dimensional models were reconstructed. The three dimensional images were displayed as a wire-frame and/or solid models on the color CRT. Solid model images were obtained as follows. The organ surface constructed from contours was divided into many triangular patches. The intensity of light to each patch was calculated from the direction of incident light, eye position and the normal to the triangular patch. Firstly, this system was applied to the liver phantom. Reconstructed images of the liver phantom were coincident with the actual object. This system also has been applied to human various organs such as brain, lung, liver, etc. The anatomical organ surface was realistically viewed from any direction. The images made us more easily understand the location and configuration of organs in vivo than original CT images. Furthermore, spacial relationship among organs and/or lesions was clearly obtained by superimposition of wire-frame and/or different colored solid models. Therefore, it is expected that this system is clinically useful for evaluating the patho-morphological changes in broad perspective. (author)

  4. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepideh Shokouhi,1 Baxter P Rogers,1 Hakmook Kang,2 Zhaohua Ding,1 Daniel O Claassen,3 John W Mckay,1 William R Riddle1On behalf of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative1Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: Amyloid-beta (Aβ imaging with positron emission tomography (PET holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2, have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation.Methods: We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2 to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR. For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures.Results: Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2

  5. Analysis of stability of tomographic reconstruction of x-ray medical images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л. А. Булавін

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Slice reconstruction in X-ray computed tomography is reduced to the solution of integral equations, or a system of algebraic equations in discrete case. It is considered to be an ill-posed problem due to the inconsistencies in the number of equations and variables and due to errors in the experimental data. Therefore, determination of the best method of the slice reconstruction is of great interest. Furthermore, all available methods give approximate results. The aim of this article was two-fold: i to compare two methods of image reconstruction, viz. inverse projection and variation, using the numerical experiment; ii to obtain the relationship between image accuracy and experimental error. It appeared that the image obtained by inverse projection is unstable: there was no convergence of the approximate image to the accurate one, when the experimental error reached zero. In turn, the image obtained by variational method was accurate at zero experimental error. Finally, the latter showed better slice reconstruction, despite the low number of projections and the experimental errors.

  6. Limited angle tomographic breast imaging: A comparison of parallel beam and pinhole collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessell, D.E.; Kadrmas, D.J.; Frey, E.C.

    1996-01-01

    Results from clinical trials have suggested no improvement in lesion detection with parallel hole SPECT scintimammography (SM) with Tc-99m over parallel hole planar SM. In this initial investigation, we have elucidated some of the unique requirements of SPECT SM. With these requirements in mind, we have begun to develop practical data acquisition and reconstruction strategies that can reduce image artifacts and improve image quality. In this paper we investigate limited angle orbits for both parallel hole and pinhole SPECT SM. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is used to analyze the artifacts associated with the limited angle orbits. Maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstructions are then used to examine the effects of attenuation compensation on the quality of the reconstructed image. All simulations are performed using the 3D-MCAT breast phantom. The results of these simulation studies demonstrate that limited angle SPECT SM is feasible, that attenuation correction is needed for accurate reconstructions, and that pinhole SPECT SM may have an advantage over parallel hole SPECT SM in terms of improved image quality and reduced image artifacts

  7. A new tomographic image on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo - Implication to seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, N.; Sakai, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Sato, H.; Kasahara, K.; Kimura, H.; Honda, R.

    2012-12-01

    region. Based on elastic wave velocities of rocks and minerals, we interpreted the tomographic images as petrologic images. Tomographic images revealed the presence of two stepwise velocity increase of the top layer of the subducting PSP slab. Rock velocity data reveals that subducting PSP crust transforms from blueschists to amphibolites at depth of 30km and amphibolites to eclogites at depth of 50km, which suggest that dehydration reactions occurs in subducting crust of basaltic compositions during prograde metamorphism and water is released from the subducting PSP crust. Tomograms show evidence for a low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the area just north of Tokyo bay. We interpret the LVZ as a serpentinized region in the forearc mantle of Honshu arc, resulting from hydration by water derived from subducting PSP crust. The P- and S-wave velocities within the serpentinized zone represent a degree of serpentinization as high as 10-40% for the LVZ with 20-km-long in noth-south and 90-km-long in east-west just above PSP, which is approximately eastern half or less of the previously estimated serpentinized area (Kamiya and Kobayashi, 2000). Because strength of the serpentinized preidotite is not large enough for brittle fracture, if the area is smaller than previously estimated, a possible area of the large thrusting fault on the upper surface of PSP can be larger than previously thought.

  8. Roentgen and X-ray computerized tomographic (CT) imaging of cysts in the maxilla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmatulla, M

    1999-01-01

    Two cysts in the maxilla were subjected to routine roentgen imaging followed by CT scanning. Roentgen investigation included periapical, occlusal, and panoramic views. CT imaging included axial and coronal scans. While roentgen views were adequate in establishing the diagnosis of the cystic lesions, CT scan was useful in understanding the precise antero-posterior expansion and depth of the lesion. Interpretation of CT scan of cystic jaw lesions without con-ventional radiographs can be misleading. Hence, the CT procedure may be used only as supplement to the routine radiographic investigations particularly in cystic lesions of the jaws. (author)

  9. Urinary Metabolomic Analysis to Detect Changes After Intravenous, Non-ionic, Low Osmolar Iodinated Radiocontrast for Computerized Tomographic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah B Diercks

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast-induced nephropathy is a result of injury to the proximal tubules caused by oxidative stress and ischemia. Metabolomics is a novel technique that has been used to identify renal damage from drug toxicities. The objective of this study is to analyze the metabolic changes in the urine after dosing with intravenous (IV contrast for computed tomograph (CT of the chest Methods: A convenience sample of patients undergoing a chest CT with IV contrast who had at least one of the following: age ≥50 years, diabetes, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, or diastolic blood pressure >90 mmHg -- were eligible for enrollment. Urine samples were collected prior to imaging and 4-6 hours post imaging. Samples underwent gas chromography/mass spectrometry profiling. We measured peak metabolite values and log transformed data. Paired T tests were calculated. We used significance analysis of microarrays (SAM to determine the most significant metabolites. Results: The cohort comprised 14 patients with matched samples; 9 /14 (64.3 were males, and the median age was 61 years (IQR 50-68. A total of 158 metabolites were identified. Using SAM we identified 9 metabolites that were identified as significant using a delta of 1.6. Conclusion: Changes in urinary metabolites are present soon after contrast administration. This change in urinary metabolites may be potential early identifiers of contrast-induced nephropathy and could identify patients at high-risk for developing this condition. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:152–157.

  10. Diffusion in Altered Tonalite Sample Using Time Domain Diffusion Simulations in Tomographic Images Combined with Lab-scale Diffusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, M.; Sardini, P.; Togneri, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Timonen, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work an effect of rock heterogeneity on diffusion was investigated. Time domain diffusion simulations were used to compare behavior of diffusion in homogeneous and heterogeneous 3D media. Tomographic images were used as heterogeneous rock media. One altered tonalite sample from Sievi, Finland, was chosen as test case for introduced analysis procedure. Effective diffusion coefficient of tonalite sample was determined with lab-scale experiments and the same coefficient was used also for homogeneous media. Somewhat technically complicated mathematical solution for analysis of through diffusion experiment is shortly described. Computed tomography (CT) is already quite widely used in many geological, petrological, and paleontological applications when the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the material is of interest, and is an excellent method for gaining information especially about its heterogeneity, grain size, or porosity. In addition to offering means for quantitative characterization, CT provides a lot of qualitative information [1]. A through -diffusion laboratory experiment using radioactive tracer was fitted using the Time Domain Diffusion (TDD) method. This rapid particle tracking method allows simulation of the heterogeneous diffusion based on pore-scale images and local values of diffusivities [2]. As a result we found out that heterogeneity has only a small effect to diffusion coefficient and in-diffusion profile for used geometry. Also direction dependency was tested and was found to be negligible. Whereas significant difference between generally accepted value and value obtained from simulations for constant m in Archie’s law was found. [1] Voutilainen, M., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Sardini, P., and Timonen, J., (2010). On pore-space characterization of an altered tonalite by X-ray µCT and the 14C-PMMA method (in progress). [2] Sardini, P., Robinet, J., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Delay, F., and Hellmuth, K-H, (2007). On direct simulation of heterogeneous

  11. Computed tomographic, magnetic resonance imaging, and cross-sectional anatomic features of the manus in a normal American black bear (Ursus americanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, C P; Freeman, L E

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a detailed description of cross-sectional anatomic structures of the manus of a black bear cadaver and correlate anatomic findings with corresponding features in computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. CT, MR imaging, and transverse sectioning were performed on the thoracic limb of a cadaver female black bear which had no evidence of lameness or thoracic limb abnormality prior to death. Features in CT and MR images corresponding to clinically important anatomic structures in anatomic sections were identified. Most of the structures identified in transverse anatomic sections were also identified using CT and MR imaging. Bones, muscles and tendons were generally easily identified with both imaging modalities, although divisions between adjacent muscles were rarely visible with CT and only visible sometimes with MR imaging. Vascular structures could not be identified with either imaging modality.

  12. Enhanced Automated Guidance System for Horizontal Auger Boring Based on Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lingling; Wen, Guojun; Wang, Yudan; Huang, Lei; Zhou, Jiang

    2018-02-15

    Horizontal auger boring (HAB) is a widely used trenchless technology for the high-accuracy installation of gravity or pressure pipelines on line and grade. Differing from other pipeline installations, HAB requires a more precise and automated guidance system for use in a practical project. This paper proposes an economic and enhanced automated optical guidance system, based on optimization research of light-emitting diode (LED) light target and five automated image processing bore-path deviation algorithms. An LED light target was optimized for many qualities, including light color, filter plate color, luminous intensity, and LED layout. The image preprocessing algorithm, direction location algorithm, angle measurement algorithm, deflection detection algorithm, and auto-focus algorithm, compiled in MATLAB, are used to automate image processing for deflection computing and judging. After multiple indoor experiments, this guidance system is applied in a project of hot water pipeline installation, with accuracy controlled within 2 mm in 48-m distance, providing accurate line and grade controls and verifying the feasibility and reliability of the guidance system.

  13. Tectonic implications of tomographic images of subducted lithosphere beneath northwestern South America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, R.D. van der; Mann, P.

    1994-01-01

    We used seismic tomography to investigate the complex structure of the upper mantle below northwestern South America. Images of slab structure not delineated by previous seismicity studies help us to refine existing tectonic models of subducted Caribbean-Pacific lithosphere beneath the study area.

  14. Device for generation of transversal tomographic images of a body by penetrating radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hounsfield, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    An improvement of equipment for the examination of patients using penetrating radiation (e.g. gamma or X-ray radiation) is proposed, in particular of equipment as under US patent 3778614, which avoids undesirable patterns on the reconstructed image. The invention is explained by several models. (orig./PW)

  15. A tensor-based dictionary learning approach to tomographic image reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Kilmer, Misha E.; Hansen, Per Christian

    2016-01-01

    coefficients in that dictionary. Our approach differs from past approaches in that (a) we use a third-order tensor representation for our images and (b) we recast the reconstruction problem using the tensor formulation. The dictionary learning problem is presented as a non-negative tensor factorization problem...

  16. Industrial dynamic tomographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eric Ferreira de

    2016-01-01

    The state of the art methods applied to industrial processes is currently based on the principles of classical tomographic reconstructions developed for tomographic patterns of static distributions, or is limited to cases of low variability of the density distribution function of the tomographed object. Noise and motion artifacts are the main problems caused by a mismatch in the data from views acquired in different instants. All of these add to the known fact that using a limited amount of data can result in the presence of noise, artifacts and some inconsistencies with the distribution under study. One of the objectives of the present work is to discuss the difficulties that arise from implementing reconstruction algorithms in dynamic tomography that were originally developed for static distributions. Another objective is to propose solutions that aim at reducing a temporal type of information loss caused by employing regular acquisition systems to dynamic processes. With respect to dynamic image reconstruction it was conducted a comparison between different static reconstruction methods, like MART and FBP, when used for dynamic scenarios. This comparison was based on a MCNPx simulation as well as an analytical setup of an aluminum cylinder that moves along the section of a riser during the process of acquisition, and also based on cross section images from CFD techniques. As for the adaptation of current tomographic acquisition systems for dynamic processes, this work established a sequence of tomographic views in a just-in-time fashion for visualization purposes, a form of visually disposing density information as soon as it becomes amenable to image reconstruction. A third contribution was to take advantage of the triple color channel necessary to display colored images in most displays, so that, by appropriately scaling the acquired values of each view in the linear system of the reconstruction, it was possible to imprint a temporal trace into the regularly

  17. Visual tracking for multi-modality computer-assisted image guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basafa, Ehsan; Foroughi, Pezhman; Hossbach, Martin; Bhanushali, Jasmine; Stolka, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    With optical cameras, many interventional navigation tasks previously relying on EM, optical, or mechanical guidance can be performed robustly, quickly, and conveniently. We developed a family of novel guidance systems based on wide-spectrum cameras and vision algorithms for real-time tracking of interventional instruments and multi-modality markers. These navigation systems support the localization of anatomical targets, support placement of imaging probe and instruments, and provide fusion imaging. The unique architecture - low-cost, miniature, in-hand stereo vision cameras fitted directly to imaging probes - allows for an intuitive workflow that fits a wide variety of specialties such as anesthesiology, interventional radiology, interventional oncology, emergency medicine, urology, and others, many of which see increasing pressure to utilize medical imaging and especially ultrasound, but have yet to develop the requisite skills for reliable success. We developed a modular system, consisting of hardware (the Optical Head containing the mini cameras) and software (components for visual instrument tracking with or without specialized visual features, fully automated marker segmentation from a variety of 3D imaging modalities, visual observation of meshes of widely separated markers, instant automatic registration, and target tracking and guidance on real-time multi-modality fusion views). From these components, we implemented a family of distinct clinical and pre-clinical systems (for combinations of ultrasound, CT, CBCT, and MRI), most of which have international regulatory clearance for clinical use. We present technical and clinical results on phantoms, ex- and in-vivo animals, and patients.

  18. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging of ameloblastoma: 2 case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oder, P.; Royster, A. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gibbons, D. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Pathology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mulligan, N.; Kavanagh, P.; Eustace, S. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Cysts of the mandible are uncommon. Most arise from epithelium lining the alveolus or root of the tooth (tooth derivatives), and the rest arise from the cortical and cancellous osseous matrix of the mandible. Of cysts arising from the alveolus (odontogenic epithelium), radicular cysts are the most common, accounting for almost 90% of cases. They are almost always found either in association with a dental cavity or at the base of a devitalized, amalgam-filled tooth. Of the remaining 10% of cases, most are dentigerous cysts, arising from the outer epithelial lining of the developing tooth, which is displaced to the base of the cyst as the lesion grows. Ameloblastoma, which also arises from odontogenic epithelium, accounts for less than 1% of cases. In this case report, we review the imaging appearance, histology and management of this uncommon tumour. In doing so, we highlight signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may allow noninvasive characterization of ameloblastoma before surgical resection. (author)

  19. A SIMPLE METHODOLOGY TO SEGMENT X-RAY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGES OF A MULTIPHASIC BUILDING STONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Le Trong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the weathering of a particular limestone, the tuffeau, used in historical monuments requires an accurate description of its microstructure. An efficient tools to obtain such a description is X-ray microtomography. However the segmentation of the images of this multiphasic material is not trivial. As the identification of pertinent markers of the structural components to extract is difficult, a two steps filtering approach is chosen. Alternate sequential filters are shown to efficiently remove the noise but, as they destroy the structural components smaller than the structuring element used, they cannot be carried out far enough. Hence as a second step in the filtering process, a mosaic operator, relying on a pragmatic yet efficient marker determination, is implemented to simplify further the images.

  20. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging of ameloblastoma: 2 case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oder, P.; Royster, A.; Gibbons, D.; Mulligan, N.; Kavanagh, P.; Eustace, S.

    1999-01-01

    Cysts of the mandible are uncommon. Most arise from epithelium lining the alveolus or root of the tooth (tooth derivatives), and the rest arise from the cortical and cancellous osseous matrix of the mandible. Of cysts arising from the alveolus (odontogenic epithelium), radicular cysts are the most common, accounting for almost 90% of cases. They are almost always found either in association with a dental cavity or at the base of a devitalized, amalgam-filled tooth. Of the remaining 10% of cases, most are dentigerous cysts, arising from the outer epithelial lining of the developing tooth, which is displaced to the base of the cyst as the lesion grows. Ameloblastoma, which also arises from odontogenic epithelium, accounts for less than 1% of cases. In this case report, we review the imaging appearance, histology and management of this uncommon tumour. In doing so, we highlight signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may allow noninvasive characterization of ameloblastoma before surgical resection. (author)

  1. Deep Interior: Radio Reflection Tomographic Imaging of Earth-Crossing Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E.; Belton, M.; Safaeinili, A.; Klaasen, K.; Ostro, S.; Yeomans, D.; Plaut, J.

    2004-12-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) present an important scientific question and an intriguing space hazard. They are scrutinized by a number of large, dedicated groundbased telescopes, and their diverse compositions are represented by thousands of well-studied meteorites. A successful program of NEO spacecraft exploration has begun, and we are proposing Deep Interior as the next logical step. Our mission objective is to image the deep interior structure of two NEOs using radio reflection tomography (RRT), in order to explore the record of asteroid origin and impact evolution, and to test the fundamental hypothesis that these important members of the solar system are rubble piles rather than consolidated bodies. Asteroid Interiors. Our mission's RRT technique is like a CAT scan from orbit. Closely sampled radar echoes yield volumetric maps of mechanical and compositional boundaries, and measure interior material dielectric properties. Exteriors. We use color imaging to explore the surface expressions of unit boundaries, in order to relate interior radar imaging to what is observable from spacecraft imaging and from Earth. Gravity and high fidelity geodesy are used to explore how interior structure is expressed in shape, density, mass distribution and spin. Diversity. We first visit a common, primitive, S-type asteroid. We next visit an asteroid that was perhaps blasted from the surface of a differentiated asteroid. We attain an up-close and inside look at two taxonomic archetypes spanning an important range of NEO mass and spin rate. Scientific focus is achieved by keeping our payload simple: Radar. A 30-m (tip-to-tip) cross-dipole antenna system operates at 5 and 15-MHz, with electronics heritage from JPL's MARSIS contribution to Mars Express, and antenna heritage from IMAGE and LACE. The 5-MHz channel is designed to penetrate >1 km of basaltic rock, and 15-MHz penetrates a few 100 m or more. They bracket the diversity of solar system materials that we are likely to

  2. Development of NMR tomographs for dedicated applications - Dedicated NMR Imaging Systems (DIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.; Knuettel, B.

    1989-12-01

    For the application of MR in medicine three different magnet systems have been developed. a) A superconducting magnet system with a field strength of 3 Tesla and a room temperature bore diameter of 600 mm. b) A resistive magnet system with a field strength of 0.35 Tesla and a free access of 480 mm. c) A resistive magnet with a field strength of 0.47 Tesla and a free access of 140 mm. The superconducting magnet system is capable of performing spectroscopy as well as imaging. The resistive magnet systems are basically suited for imaging, whereby the system with a free access of 140 mm can be used especially for orthopaedic studies. (orig.) [de

  3. Quantitative beam-deflection optical tomographic imaging of fluid flows and flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, G.W.; Byer, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previously described the application of beam-deflection optical tomography to density measurements in a supersonic jet. They showed that the technique can give very accurate quantitative 2-D images of density. In this work they describe extension of this technique to 3-D measurements in a flame, supersonic jet, and subsonic jet. Near-diffraction-limited measurements also are reported. The experiment apparatus is discussed

  4. Evaluation of Positron Emission Tomographic Tracers for Imaging of Papillomavirus-Induced Tumors in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Probst

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET/magnetic resonance (MR imaging was employed to evaluate the feasibility of the PET tracers 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG, 11C-choline, and 18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT to detect papillomavirus-induced tumors in an established rabbit model system. The combined PET/MR allowed the analysis of tracer uptake of the tumors using the morphologic information acquired by MR. New Zealand White rabbits were infected with cottontail rabbit papillomavirus genomes and were imaged for up to 10 months with a simultaneous PET/MR system during the course of infection. The uptake characteristics of the PET tracers 11C-choline and 18F-FLT of tumors and reference tissues were examined relative to the clinical standard, 18F-FDG. Tracer biodistribution of various organs was measured by gamma-counting after the last PET scan and compared to the in vivo PET/MR 18F-FDG uptake. Increased tracer uptake was found 2 months postinfection in primary tumors with 18F-FDG and 11C-choline, whereas 18F-FLT failed to detect the tumors at all measured time points. Our data show that the PET tracer 18F-FDG is superior for imaging papillomavirus-induced tumors in rabbits compared to 11C-choline and 18F-FLT. However, 11C-choline imaging, which has previously been applied to detect various tumor entities in patients, appears to be an alternative to 18F-FDG.

  5. MRT letter: Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic imaging of soft callus formation in fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Lauren Nicole Miller; de Bakker, Chantal Marie-Jeanne; Lusic, Hrvoje; Gerstenfeld, Louis Charles; Grinstaff, Mark W; Morgan, Elise Feng-I

    2012-01-01

    Formation of a cartilaginous soft callus at the site of a bone fracture is a pivotal stage in the healing process. Noninvasive, or even nondestructive, imaging of soft callus formation can be an important tool in experimental and pre-clinical studies of fracture repair. However, the low X-ray attenuation of cartilage renders the soft callus nearly invisible in radiographs. This study utilized a recently developed, cationic, iodinated contrast agent in conjunction with micro-computed tomography to identify cartilage in fracture calluses in the femora of C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ mice. Fracture calluses were scanned before and after incubation in the contrast agent. The set of pre-incubation images was registered against and then subtracted from the set of post-incubation images, resulting in a three-dimensional map of the locations of cartilage in the callus, as labeled by the contrast agent. This map was then compared to histology from a previous study. The results showed that the locations where the contrast agent collected in relatively high concentrations were similar to those of the cartilage. The contrast agent also identified a significant difference between the two strains of mice in the percentage of the callus occupied by cartilage, indicating that this method of contrast-enhanced computed tomography may be an effective technique for nondestructive, early evaluation of fracture healing. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Anthropomorphic thorax phantom for cardio-respiratory motion simulation in tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolwin, Konstantin; Czekalla, Björn; Frohwein, Lynn J.; Büther, Florian; Schäfers, Klaus P.

    2018-02-01

    Patient motion during medical imaging using techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), or single emission computed tomography (SPECT) is well known to degrade images, leading to blurring effects or severe artifacts. Motion correction methods try to overcome these degrading effects. However, they need to be validated under realistic conditions. In this work, a sophisticated anthropomorphic thorax phantom is presented that combines several aspects of a simulator for cardio-respiratory motion. The phantom allows us to simulate various types of cardio-respiratory motions inside a human-like thorax, including features such as inflatable lungs, beating left ventricular myocardium, respiration-induced motion of the left ventricle, moving lung lesions, and moving coronary artery plaques. The phantom is constructed to be MR-compatible. This means that we can not only perform studies in PET, SPECT and CT, but also inside an MRI system. The technical features of the anthropomorphic thorax phantom Wilhelm are presented with regard to simulating motion effects in hybrid emission tomography and radiotherapy. This is supplemented by a study on the detectability of small coronary plaque lesions in PET/CT under the influence of cardio-respiratory motion, and a study on the accuracy of left ventricular blood volumes.

  7. Usefulness of hook wire localization biopsy under imaging guidance for nonpalpable breast lesions detected radiologically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masroor I

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Imrana Masroor,1 Shaista Afzal,1 Gulnaz Shafqat,1 Hasan Rehman21Department of Radiology, 2Medical College, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, PakistanBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of hook wire localization biopsy under imaging guidance for nonpalpable breast lesions detected radiologically.Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted at the Department of Radiology, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. All patients undergoing needle localization biopsy of a nonpalpable breast lesion under mammographic or ultrasound guidance between January 2009 to December 2010 were included in the study. Patients with incomplete medical records were excluded. All patients’ mammograms or ultrasound were categorized using BI-RADS® assessment categories. The percentages of benign and malignant lesions were determined by pathological examination of surgically removed specimens. A correlation was sought between preoperative imaging assessment and the final diagnosis. The complications associated with the procedure were also recorded.Results: A total of 151 biopsies were carried out, of which 80 were performed under mammographic guidance and 71 were performed under ultrasound guidance. The mean age of the patients was 51.89 years. The overall malignancy rate was 25.16%. Of 93 cases reported radiologically as malignant, 60 turned out to be malignant, and of the 58 cases reported as benign on imaging, three proved to be malignant on histopathology. The sensitivity of imaging findings was 95% and the specificity was 62%. The malignancy rate was 5% for benign lesions and 64% for malignant lesions, respectively. There were no complications related to wire localization, and only two patients had minor complications following surgical excision, giving a complication rate of 1.32%.Conclusion: Hook wire localization biopsy is a safe and effective procedure for definitive diagnosis of suspicious lesions on imaging, and is more

  8. Improving appropriate use of echocardiography and single-photon emission computed tomographic myocardial perfusion imaging: a continuous quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas V; Rose, Geoffrey A; Fenner, Deborah J; Rozario, Nigel L

    2014-07-01

    Appropriate use criteria for cardiovascular imaging have been published, but compliance in practice has been incomplete, with persistent high rates of inappropriate use. The aim of this study was to show the efficacy of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) initiative to favorably influence the appropriate use of outpatient transthoracic echocardiography and single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in a large cardiovascular practice. In this prospective study, a multiphase CQI initiative was implemented, and its impact on ordering patterns for outpatient transthoracic echocardiography and SPECT MPI was assessed. Between November and December 2010, a baseline analysis of the application of appropriate use criteria to indications for outpatient transthoracic echocardiographic studies (n = 203) and SPECT MPI studies (n = 205) was performed, with studies categorized as "appropriate," "inappropriate," "uncertain," or "unclassified." The CQI initiative was then begun, with (1) clinician education, including didactic lectures and case-based presentations with audience participation; (2) system changes in ordering processes, with redesigned image ordering forms; and (3) peer review and feedback. A follow-up analysis was then performed between June and August 2012, with categorization of indications for transthoracic echocardiographic studies (n = 206) and SPECT MPI studies (n = 206). At baseline, 73.9% of echocardiographic studies were categorized as appropriate, 16.7% as inappropriate, 5.9% as uncertain, and 3.4% as unclassified. Similarly, for SPECT MPI studies 71.7% were categorized as appropriate, 18.5% as inappropriate, 7.8% as uncertain, and 1.9% as unclassified. Separate analysis of the two most important categories, appropriate and inappropriate, demonstrated a significant improvement after the CQI initiative, with a 63% reduction in inappropriate echocardiographic studies (18.5% vs 6.9%, P = .0010) and a 46% reduction

  9. TH-CD-207A-08: Simulated Real-Time Image Guidance for Lung SBRT Patients Using Scatter Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redler, G; Cifter, G; Templeton, A; Lee, C; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Zhen, H; Turian, J; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive Monte Carlo-based model for the acquisition of scatter images of patient anatomy in real-time, during lung SBRT treatment. Methods: During SBRT treatment, images of patient anatomy can be acquired from scattered radiation. To rigorously examine the utility of scatter images for image guidance, a model is developed using MCNP code to simulate scatter images of phantoms and lung cancer patients. The model is validated by comparing experimental and simulated images of phantoms of different complexity. The differentiation between tissue types is investigated by imaging objects of known compositions (water, lung, and bone equivalent). A lung tumor phantom, simulating materials and geometry encountered during lung SBRT treatments, is used to investigate image noise properties for various quantities of delivered radiation (monitor units(MU)). Patient scatter images are simulated using the validated simulation model. 4DCT patient data is converted to an MCNP input geometry accounting for different tissue composition and densities. Lung tumor phantom images acquired with decreasing imaging time (decreasing MU) are used to model the expected noise amplitude in patient scatter images, producing realistic simulated patient scatter images with varying temporal resolution. Results: Image intensity in simulated and experimental scatter images of tissue equivalent objects (water, lung, bone) match within the uncertainty (∼3%). Lung tumor phantom images agree as well. Specifically, tumor-to-lung contrast matches within the uncertainty. The addition of random noise approximating quantum noise in experimental images to simulated patient images shows that scatter images of lung tumors can provide images in as fast as 0.5 seconds with CNR∼2.7. Conclusions: A scatter imaging simulation model is developed and validated using experimental phantom scatter images. Following validation, lung cancer patient scatter images are simulated. These simulated

  10. Image quality on dual-source computed-tomographic coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rixe, Johannes; Rolf, Andreas; Conradi, Guido; Elsaesser, Albrecht; Moellmann, Helge; Nef, Holger M.; Hamm, Christian W.; Dill, Thorsten; Bachmann, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Multi-detector CT reliably permits visualization of coronary arteries, but due to the occurrence of motion artefacts at heart rates >65 bpm caused by a temporal resolution of 165 ms, its utilisation has so far been limited to patients with a preferably low heart rate. We investigated the assessment of image quality on computed tomography of coronary arteries in a large series of patients without additional heart rate control using dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). DSCT (Siemens Somatom Definition, 83-ms temporal resolution) was performed in 165 consecutive patients (mean age 64±11.4 years) after injection of 60-80 ml of contrast. Data sets were reconstructed in 5% intervals of the cardiac cycle and evaluated by two readers in consensus concerning evaluability of the coronary arteries and presence of motion and beam-hardening artefacts using the AHA 16-segment coronary model. Mean heart rate during CT was 65±10.5 bpm; visualisation without artefacts was possible in 98.7% of 2,541 coronary segments. Only two segments were considered unevaluable due to cardiac motion; 30 segments were unassessable due to poor signal-to-noise ratio or coronary calcifications (both n=15). Data reconstruction at 65-70% of the cardiac cycle provided for the best image quality. For heart rates >85 bpm, a systolic reconstruction at 45% revealed satisfactory results. Compared with earlier CT generations, DSCT provides for non-invasive coronary angiography with diagnostic image quality even at heart rates >65 bpm and thus may broaden the spectrum of patients that can be investigated non-invasively. (orig.)

  11. Preclinical Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of Acute Hyperoxia Therapy of Chronic Hypoxia during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zheleznyak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to study the efficacy of the positron emission tomography (PET tracers 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG and 64Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone ([64Cu]ATSM and in monitoring placental and fetal functional response to acute hyperoxia in late-term pregnant mice subjected to experimentally induced chronic hypoxia. E15 mice were maintained at 12% inspired oxygen for 72 hours and then imaged during oxygen inhalation with either [18F]FDG to monitor nutrient transport or 64Cu-ATSM to establish the presence of hypoxia. Computed tomography (CT with contrast allowed clear visualization of both placentas and fetuses. The average ratio of fetal to placental [18F]FDG uptake was 0.45 ± 0.1 for the hypoxic animals and 0.55 ± 0.1 for the normoxic animals, demonstrating a significant decrease (p = .0002 in placental function in dams exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions. Hypoxic placentas and fetuses retained more 64Cu-ATSM compared to normoxic placentas and fetuses. Herein we report first-in-mouse PET imaging of fetuses employing both tracers [18F]FDG (metabolism and 64Cu-ATSM (hypoxia. [18F]FDG PET/CT imaging allowed clear visualization of placental-fetal structures and supported quantification of tracer uptake, making this a sensitive tool for monitoring placental function in preclinical rodent models. These measurements illustrate the potentially irreversible damage generated by chronic exposure to hypoxia, which cannot be corrected by acute exposure to hyperoxia.

  12. Tracking Stress and Hydrothermal Activity Along Oceanic Spreading Centers Using Tomographic Images of Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R. A.; Conder, J. A.; Canales, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Marine controlled-source seismic tomography experiments now utilize 50+ ocean-bottom seismographs and source grids consisting of many tens of seismic lines with shot spacing. These dense experiments focus on the upper 10 km of the lithosphere over areas approaching 9000 sq-km. Because of the dense sampling and large azimuthal coverage of ray paths (200,000+ travel time measurements possible), it is now feasible to solve for 3-D images of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy with resolving lengths approaching 1km. Recent examples include the L-SCAN and MARINER experiments, performed at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Mid-Atlantic Ridge (36N), respectively. In each case, background anisotropy of ~4% is found in the upper 3-4 km of lithosphere and is consistent with pervasive stress-aligned cracks and microcracks. The fast axes are generally oriented parallel to the trend of the spreading center, as expected for cracks that form in association with seafloor spreading. Three-dimensional images of anisotropy magnitude and orientation reveal variations interpreted as arising from changes in the ambient stress field. Near the ends of ridge segments, where the ridge axis jumps from one spreading center to the next, anisotropy is high with orientations that are out of alignment relative to the background trend. This agrees with numerical models and seafloor morphology that suggest tensile stress concentration and brittle crack formation in these areas. Anisotropy also increases in areas along the ridges where the underlying magma supply and hydrothermal output are greater. This is opposite the trend expected if simple tectonic stress models govern anisotropy. Increased hydrothermal activity, due to increased magma supply, can explain higher anisotropy via increased pore pressure and hydrofracturing. These studies provide the first evidence that images of seismic anisotropy can be used to map variations in hydrologic activity along the crests of oceanic spreading centers.

  13. Tomographic imaging of 12 fracture samples selected from Olkiluoto deep drillholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuva, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Timonen, J.; Aaltonen, I.

    2010-06-01

    Rock samples from Olkiluoto were imaged with X-ray tomography to analyze distributions of mineral components and alteration of rock around different fracture types. Twelve samples were analyzed, which contained three types of fractures, and each sample was scanned with two different resolutions. Three dimensional reconstructions of the samples with four or five distinct mineral components displayed changes in the mineral distribution around previously water conducting fractures, which extended to a depth of several millimeters away from fracture surfaces. In addition, structure of fracture filling minerals is depicted. (orig.)

  14. Experimental study of vorticity-strain rate interaction in turbulent partially premixed jet flames using tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coriton, Bruno; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-02-01

    In turbulent flows, the interaction between vorticity, ω, and strain rate, s, is considered a primary mechanism for the transfer of energy from large to small scales through vortex stretching. The ω-s coupling in turbulent jet flames is investigated using tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). TPIV provides a direct measurement of the three-dimensional velocity field from which ω and s are determined. The effects of combustion and mean shear on the ω-s interaction are investigated in turbulent partially premixed methane/air jet flames with high and low probabilities of localized extinction as well as in a non-reacting isothermal air jet with Reynolds number of approximately 13 000. Results show that combustion causes structures of high vorticity and strain rate to agglomerate in highly correlated, elongated layers that span the height of the probe volume. In the non-reacting jet, these structures have a more varied morphology, greater fragmentation, and are not as well correlated. The enhanced spatiotemporal correlation of vorticity and strain rate in the stable flame results in stronger ω-s interaction characterized by increased enstrophy and strain-rate production rates via vortex stretching and straining, respectively. The probability of preferential local alignment between ω and the eigenvector of the intermediate principal strain rate, s2, which is intrinsic to the ω-s coupling in turbulent flows, is larger in the flames and increases with the flame stability. The larger mean shear in the flame imposes a preferential orientation of ω and s2 tangential to the shear layer. The extensive and compressive principal strain rates, s1 and s3, respectively, are preferentially oriented at approximately 45° with respect to the jet axis. The production rates of strain and vorticity tend to be dominated by instances in which ω is parallel to the s1 ¯-s2 ¯ plane and orthogonal to s3 ¯.

  15. Comparison of Computed Tomographic Images of Hepatic VX2 Carcinoma Experimentally Induced in Different Methods: Correlated with Histopathologic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YI Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare characteristics of computed tomographic images of hepatic tumors induced by intra-mesenteric venous and intraparenchymal injection of VX2 carcinoma in rabbits. Thirty two New Zealand White rabbit were divided into two groups; group I for metastatic tumor model (n=8 by injection of 0.1 ml tumor homogenate into mesenteric vein, and group II for solitary tumor model (n=24 by direct intraparenchymal injection of 1 mm tumor cubes. Dual-phase computed tomography (CT was performed on day 10, 17, and 24 post-tumor implantation. On day of each CT follow-up, 2 or 3 rabbits in both groups were sacrificed for histopathologic examinations which were correlated with CT findings. Tumor creation rates were 100% in Group I, and 87.5% in Group II. In group I, arterial phase showed multiple tiny lesions on day 10, and hypodense lesions with peripheral rim enhancement and central hyperdensity (target appearance on day 17 and 24 post-implantation. Target appearance of group I was more distinctive on portal phase, and was correlated with the viable tumor tissue core surrounded by cystic spaces in histopathologic findings. In group II, arterial phase revealed ill-defined hypodense lesions with peripheral rim enhancement during entire follow-up periods, and rim enhancement was disappeared on portal phase. Viable tumor cells in group II were mainly found in periphery of tumor with apparent central necrosis, and these observations were well correlated with CT findings. This study showed specific characteristics corresponding to each implantation method, and will provide beneficial information for experimental studies using hepatic VX2 carcinoma.

  16. Frequency-domain optical tomographic image reconstruction algorithm with the simplified spherical harmonics (SP3) light propagation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Keol; Montejo, Ludguier D; Jia, Jingfei; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2017-06-01

    We introduce here the finite volume formulation of the frequency-domain simplified spherical harmonics model with n -th order absorption coefficients (FD-SP N ) that approximates the frequency-domain equation of radiative transfer (FD-ERT). We then present the FD-SP N based reconstruction algorithm that recovers absorption and scattering coefficients in biological tissue. The FD-SP N model with 3 rd order absorption coefficient (i.e., FD-SP 3 ) is used as a forward model to solve the inverse problem. The FD-SP 3 is discretized with a node-centered finite volume scheme and solved with a restarted generalized minimum residual (GMRES) algorithm. The absorption and scattering coefficients are retrieved using a limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithm. Finally, the forward and inverse algorithms are evaluated using numerical phantoms with optical properties and size that mimic small-volume tissue such as finger joints and small animals. The forward results show that the FD-SP 3 model approximates the FD-ERT (S 12 ) solution within relatively high accuracy; the average error in the phase (<3.7%) and the amplitude (<7.1%) of the partial current at the boundary are reported. From the inverse results we find that the absorption and scattering coefficient maps are more accurately reconstructed with the SP 3 model than those with the SP 1 model. Therefore, this work shows that the FD-SP 3 is an efficient model for optical tomographic imaging of small-volume media with non-diffuse properties both in terms of computational time and accuracy as it requires significantly lower CPU time than the FD-ERT (S 12 ) and also it is more accurate than the FD-SP 1 .

  17. Neuronal uptake and metabolism of 2- and 6-fluorodopamine: false neurotransmitters for positron emission tomographic imaging of sympathetically innervated tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhofer, G.; Hovevey-Sion, D.; Kopin, I.J.; Miletich, R.; Kirk, K.L.; Finn, R.; Goldstein, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The neuronal uptake and metabolism of 2-fluorodopamine (2F-dopamine), 6-fluorodopamine (6F-dopamine) and tritium-labeled dopamine were compared in heart, submaxillary gland and spleen of rats to assess the utility of 18F-labeled 2F- or 6F-dopamine for positron emission tomographic imaging of sympathetically innervated tissues. Tritiated dopamine with and without 2F- or 6F-dopamine, or tritiated 2F-dopamine alone, were injected i.v. into rats that were or were not pretreated with desipramine to block catecholamine neuronal uptake or with reserpine to block vesicular translocation of catecholamines. Tissue and plasma samples were obtained at intervals up to 1 hr after injections. At 1 hr after injection of tritiated dopamine, tritium-labeled norepinephrine, dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglucol accounted for less than 2% of the tritium in plasma but up to 92% of that in tissues; tritiated norepinephrine accounted for 70% or more of the tritium in tissues. In contrast, at 1 hr after injection of tritiated 2F-dopamine, tritiated 2F-norepinephrine accounted for 30 to 46% of the tritium in tissues. Desipramine and reserpine pretreatment blocked the tissue accumulation of tritiated and fluorinated dopamine as well as their dihydroxy-metabolites, indicating that accumulation of exogenous norepinephrine and dopamine analogs was within sympathetic storage vesicles. Relative to the doses of dopamine precursors, less 2F- and 6F-norepinephrine accumulated in tissues than tritiated norepinephrine, due largely to inefficient beta-hydroxylation of fluorinated dopamine.

  18. Neuronal uptake and metabolism of 2- and 6-fluorodopamine: false neurotransmitters for positron emission tomographic imaging of sympathetically innervated tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhofer, G.; Hovevey-Sion, D.; Kopin, I.J.; Miletich, R.; Kirk, K.L.; Finn, R.; Goldstein, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The neuronal uptake and metabolism of 2-fluorodopamine (2F-dopamine), 6-fluorodopamine (6F-dopamine) and tritium-labeled dopamine were compared in heart, submaxillary gland and spleen of rats to assess the utility of 18F-labeled 2F- or 6F-dopamine for positron emission tomographic imaging of sympathetically innervated tissues. Tritiated dopamine with and without 2F- or 6F-dopamine, or tritiated 2F-dopamine alone, were injected i.v. into rats that were or were not pretreated with desipramine to block catecholamine neuronal uptake or with reserpine to block vesicular translocation of catecholamines. Tissue and plasma samples were obtained at intervals up to 1 hr after injections. At 1 hr after injection of tritiated dopamine, tritium-labeled norepinephrine, dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglucol accounted for less than 2% of the tritium in plasma but up to 92% of that in tissues; tritiated norepinephrine accounted for 70% or more of the tritium in tissues. In contrast, at 1 hr after injection of tritiated 2F-dopamine, tritiated 2F-norepinephrine accounted for 30 to 46% of the tritium in tissues. Desipramine and reserpine pretreatment blocked the tissue accumulation of tritiated and fluorinated dopamine as well as their dihydroxy-metabolites, indicating that accumulation of exogenous norepinephrine and dopamine analogs was within sympathetic storage vesicles. Relative to the doses of dopamine precursors, less 2F- and 6F-norepinephrine accumulated in tissues than tritiated norepinephrine, due largely to inefficient beta-hydroxylation of fluorinated dopamine

  19. Guided-wave tomographic imaging of plate defects by laser-based ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junpil; Lim, Ju Young; Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Contact-guided-wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and rough surfaces or complex geometric features. A non-contact setup with a laser-ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is quite attractive for guided-wave inspection. In the present work, we developed a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique using the laser-ultrasonic technique in a plate. A method for Lamb-wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulsed laser-ultrasonic transmitter and Michelson-interferometer receiver was developed. The defect shape and area in the images obtained using laser scanning, showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact online inspection and monitoring technique.

  20. A study on laser-based ultrasonic technique by the use of guided wave tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junpil, E-mail: jpp@pusan.ac.kr; Lim, Juyoung, E-mail: jpp@pusan.ac.kr [Graduate school, School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Younho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Krishnaswamy, Sridhar [Center for Quality Engineering and Failure Prevention, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Guided wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and coarse surfaces or geometrically complicated features. A non-contact setup with a laser ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is the classic attractive for guided wave inspection. The present work was done to develop a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique by laser ultrasonic technique in a plate-like structure. A method for Lam wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulse laser ultrasonic transmitter and a Michelson interferometer receiver has been developed. In the images obtained by laser scanning, the defect shape and area showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact-based online inspection and monitoring technique.

  1. Correlation between computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of parenchymal lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rafful, Patricia Piazza [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rodrigues, Rosana Souza [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); D’Or Institute for Research and Education, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zanetti, Gláucia [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Complexo Hospitalar Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Souza, Arthur Soares [Department of Radiology, Medical School of Rio Preto (FAMERP) and Ultra X, São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Guimarães, Marcos Duarte [Department of Imaging, Hospital AC Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be the gold standard method for the assessment of morphological changes in the pulmonary parenchyma. Although its spatial resolution is lower than that of CT, MRI offers the advantage of characterizing different aspects of tissue based on the degree of contrast on T1-weighted image (WI) and T2-WI. In this article, we describe and correlate the MRI and CT features of several common patterns of parenchymal lung disease (air trapping, atelectasis, bronchiectasis, cavitation, consolidation, emphysema, ground-glass opacities, halo sign, interlobular septal thickening, masses, mycetoma, nodules, progressive massive fibrosis, reverse halo sign and tree-in-bud pattern). MRI may be an alternative modality for the collection of morphological and functional information useful for the management of parenchymal lung disease, which would help reduce the number of chest CT scans and radiation exposure required in patients with a variety of conditions.

  2. X-ray Tomographic Imaging of Tensile Deformation Modes of Electrospun Biodegradable Polyester Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jekaterina Maksimcuka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning allows the production of fibrous networks for tissue engineering, drug delivery, and wound healing in health care. It enables the production of constructs with large surface area and a fibrous morphology that closely resembles the extracellular matrix of many tissues. A fibrous structure not only promotes cell attachment and tissue formation but could also lead to very interesting mechanical properties. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate (P(3HB-co-4HB is a biodegradable polyester that exhibits a large (>400% elongation before failure. In this study, synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging was performed during tensile deformation to failure on a non-woven fiber mat of P(3HB-co-4HB fibers. Significant reorientation of the fibers in the straining direction was observed, followed by localized necking and eventual failure. From an original average fiber diameter of 4.3 µm, a bimodal distribution of fiber diameter (modal diameters of 1.9 and 3.7 µm formed after tensile deformation. Extensive localized necking (thinning of fibers between (thicker fiber–fiber contacts was found to be the cause for non-uniform thinning of the fibers, a phenomenon that is expected but has not been observed in 3D previously. The data presented here have implications not only in tissue regeneration but for fibrous materials in general.

  3. Quantitative and morphological analysis of the computed tomographic images in experimental myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, Yasuaki

    1984-12-01

    Experimental myocardial infarction in the dog was evaluated by the cardiac scan system developed together by the Department of Radiology, Dokkyo University Hospital, and Toshiba Co. Ltd. Analysis of the CT image of myocardial infarction treated by ligating the coronary arteries demonstrated the following: 1) In perfusion phase representing initial 4 min after injection of the contrast material, infarcted areas were shown as areas of low density. Pattern of these low dense areas appeared homogeneous and correlated quite well with the infarcted areas proved on necropsy. 2) In delayed scan performed between 8-12 min after the infusion of the contrast material, delayed enhancement occurred, for which visual pattern was quite variable from case to case. 3) In gated scan, time-related to ECG cycle, pictures of end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) in cardiac cycle were aquired. And alteration rates of endocardial space, (ED-ES/ED) x 100%, were obtained by dividing CT sliced endocardial space into 16 segments. By using these rates, abnormal motion of the infarcted area and compensatory motion of the normal myocardium were analyzed quantitatively. (author).

  4. Orthogonal Rings, Fiducial Markers, and Overlay Accuracy When Image Fusion is Used for EVAR Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutouzi, G; Sandström, C; Roos, H; Henrikson, O; Leonhardt, H; Falkenberg, M

    2016-11-01

    Evaluation of orthogonal rings, fiducial markers, and overlay accuracy when image fusion is used for endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). This was a prospective single centre study. In 19 patients undergoing standard EVAR, 3D image fusion was used for intra-operative guidance. Renal arteries and targeted stent graft positions were marked with rings orthogonal to the respective centre lines from pre-operative computed tomography (CT). Radiopaque reference objects attached to the back of the patient were used as fiducial markers to detect patient movement intra-operatively. Automatic 3D-3D registration of the pre-operative CT with an intra-operative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as well as 3D-3D registration after manual alignment of nearby vertebrae were evaluated. Registration was defined as being sufficient for EVAR guidance if the deviation of the origin of the lower renal artery was less than 3 mm. For final overlay registration, the renal arteries were manually aligned using aortic calcification and vessel outlines. The accuracy of the overlay before stent graft deployment was evaluated using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as direct comparison. Fiducial markers helped in detecting misalignment caused by patient movement during the procedure. Use of automatic intensity based registration alone was insufficient for EVAR guidance. Manual registration based on vertebrae L1-L2 was sufficient in 7/19 patients (37%). Using the final adjusted registration as overlay, the median alignment error of the lower renal artery marking at pre-deployment DSA was 2 mm (0-5) sideways and 2 mm (0-9) longitudinally, mostly in a caudal direction. 3D image fusion can facilitate intra-operative guidance during EVAR. Orthogonal rings and fiducial markers are useful for visualization and overlay correction. However, the accuracy of the overlaid 3D image is not always ideal and further technical development is needed. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery

  5. Imaging in blunt cardiac injury: Computed tomographic findings in cardiac contusion and associated injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Mark M; Raptis, Demetrios A; Cummings, Kristopher W; Mellnick, Vincent M; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Schuerer, Douglas J; Raptis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    Blunt cardiac injury (BCI) may manifest as cardiac contusion or, more rarely, as pericardial or myocardial rupture. Computed tomography (CT) is performed in the vast majority of blunt trauma patients, but the imaging features of cardiac contusion are not well described. To evaluate CT findings and associated injuries in patients with clinically diagnosed BCI. We identified 42 patients with blunt cardiac injury from our institution's electronic medical record. Clinical parameters, echocardiography results, and laboratory tests were recorded. Two blinded reviewers analyzed chest CTs performed in these patients for myocardial hypoenhancement and associated injuries. CT findings of severe thoracic trauma are commonly present in patients with severe BCI; 82% of patients with ECG, cardiac enzyme, and echocardiographic evidence of BCI had abnormalities of the heart or pericardium on CT; 73% had anterior rib fractures, and 64% had pulmonary contusions. Sternal fractures were only seen in 36% of such patients. However, myocardial hypoenhancement on CT is poorly sensitive for those patients with cardiac contusion: 0% of right ventricular contusions and 22% of left ventricular contusions seen on echocardiography were identified on CT. CT signs of severe thoracic trauma are frequently present in patients with severe BCI and should be regarded as indirect evidence of potential BCI. Direct CT findings of myocardial contusion, i.e. myocardial hypoenhancement, are poorly sensitive and should not be used as a screening tool. However, some left ventricular contusions can be seen on CT, and these patients could undergo echocardiography or cardiac MRI to evaluate for wall motion abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimation of water saturated permeability of soils, using 3D soil tomographic images and pore-level transport phenomena modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorski, Krzysztof; Sławiński, Cezary; Barna, Gyöngyi

    2014-05-01

    There are some important macroscopic properties of the soil porous media such as: saturated permeability and water retention characteristics. These soil characteristics are very important as they determine soil transport processes and are commonly used as a parameters of general models of soil transport processes used extensively for scientific developments and engineering practise. These characteristics are usually measured or estimated using some statistical or phenomenological modelling, i.e. pedotransfer functions. On the physical basis, saturated soil permeability arises from physical transport processes occurring at the pore level. Current progress in modelling techniques, computational methods and X-ray micro-tomographic technology gives opportunity to use direct methods of physical modelling for pore level transport processes. Physically valid description of transport processes at micro-scale based on Navier-Stokes type modelling approach gives chance to recover macroscopic porous medium characteristics from micro-flow modelling. Water microflow transport processes occurring at the pore level are dependent on the microstructure of porous body and interactions between the fluid and the medium. In case of soils, i.e. the medium there exist relatively big pores in which water can move easily but also finer pores are present in which water transport processes are dominated by strong interactions between the medium and the fluid - full physical description of these phenomena is a challenge. Ten samples of different soils were scanned using X-ray computational microtomograph. The diameter of samples was 5 mm. The voxel resolution of CT scan was 2.5 µm. Resulting 3D soil samples images were used for reconstruction of the pore space for further modelling. 3D image threshholding was made to determine the soil grain surface. This surface was triangulated and used for computational mesh construction for the pore space. Numerical modelling of water flow through the

  7. 3D/3D registration of coronary CTA and biplane XA reconstructions for improved image guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibildox, Gerardo, E-mail: g.dibildox@erasmusmc.nl; Baka, Nora; Walsum, Theo van [Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Punt, Mark; Aben, Jean-Paul [Pie Medical Imaging, 6227 AJ Maastricht (Netherlands); Schultz, Carl [Department of Cardiology, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Niessen, Wiro [Quantitative Imaging Group, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft, The Netherlands and Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors aim to improve image guidance during percutaneous coronary interventions of chronic total occlusions (CTO) by providing information obtained from computed tomography angiography (CTA) to the cardiac interventionist. To this end, the authors investigate a method to register a 3D CTA model to biplane reconstructions. Methods: The authors developed a method for registering preoperative coronary CTA with intraoperative biplane x-ray angiography (XA) images via 3D models of the coronary arteries. The models are extracted from the CTA and biplane XA images, and are temporally aligned based on CTA reconstruction phase and XA ECG signals. Rigid spatial alignment is achieved with a robust probabilistic point set registration approach using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs). This approach is extended by including orientation in the Gaussian mixtures and by weighting bifurcation points. The method is evaluated on retrospectively acquired coronary CTA datasets of 23 CTO patients for which biplane XA images are available. Results: The Gaussian mixture model approach achieved a median registration accuracy of 1.7 mm. The extended GMM approach including orientation was not significantly different (P > 0.1) but did improve robustness with regards to the initialization of the 3D models. Conclusions: The authors demonstrated that the GMM approach can effectively be applied to register CTA to biplane XA images for the purpose of improving image guidance in percutaneous coronary interventions.

  8. What is the value of Image guidance in external beam radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kron, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Image guided radiation therapy (lGRT) has become available in many radiotherapy centres in Australia. It is intuitive that frequent imaging of the patient with a modality that identifies the target directly at the time of treatment delivery should benefit patients. However, TGRT is also associated with increased cost for equipment, associated training, quality assurance and imaging time. The Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) has been contracted by the Australian Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing (DoHA) to investigate a framework that could be applied to establish a cost/utility assessment of IGRT. The present work aims to develop a study that can test this for daily image guidance of prostate cancer patients. Approach Thirty intermediate risk prostate cancer patients treated at ten or more radiotherapy centres in Australia will be invited to participate. Their treatment as per local practice will not be modified; however two additional treatment plans will be created with margins that would reflect a typical margin appropriate for a treatment delivery with and without daily image guidance. Patients will be stratified for volumetric versus planar orthogonal imaging and for IMRT or conformal approaches. The outcome will be a comparison of dose volume histograms for critical structures based on equal target coverage in all plans.

  9. Differentiation of constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy: the case for high-resolution dynamic tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Robert M.; Otoadese, Eramosele A.; Oren, Ron M.

    1995-05-01

    The syndrome of constrictive pericarditis (CP) presents a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. This study was undertaken to determine whether cine computed tomography (CT), a cardiac imaging technique with excellent temporal and spatial resolution, can reliably demonstrate the unique abnormalities of pericardial anatomy and ventricular physiology present in patients with this condition. A second goal of this study was to determine whether the presence of diseased thickened pericardium, by itself, imparts cardiac impairment due to abnormalities of ventricular diastolic function. Methods: Twelve patients with CP suspected clinically, in whom invasive hemodynamic study was consistent with the diagnosis of CP, underwent cine CT. They were subdivided into Group 1 (CP, N equals 5) and Group 2 (No CP, N equals 7) based on histopathologic evaluation of tissue obtained at the time of surgery or autopsy. A third group consisted of asymptomatic patients with incidentally discovered thickened pericardium at the time of cine CT scanning: Group 3 (ThP, N equals 7). Group 4 (Nl, N equals 7) consisted of healthy volunteer subjects. Results: Pericardial thickness measurements with cine CT clearly distinguished Group 1 (mean equals 10 +/- 2 mm) from Group 2 (mean equals 2 +/- 1 mm), with diagnostic accuracy of 100% compared to histopathological findings. In addition, patients in Group 1 had significantly more brisk early diastolic filling of both left and right ventricles than those in Group 2, which clearly distinguished all patients with, from all patients without CP. Patients in Group 3 had pericardial thicknesses similar to those in Group 1 (mean equals 9 +/- 1 mm, p equals NS), but had patterns of diastolic ventricular filling that were nearly identical to Group 4 (Nl). Conclusions: The abnormalities of anatomy and ventricular function present in the syndrome of constrictive pericarditis are clearly and decisively identified by cine CT. This allows a reliable distinction

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery for intradural spine tumors using cone-beam CT image guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrate, Andrés; Zussman, Benjamin; Ozpinar, Alp; Niranjan, Ajay; Flickinger, John C; Gerszten, Peter C

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance technology has been widely adopted for spine radiosurgery delivery. There is relatively little experience with spine radiosurgery for intradural tumors using CBCT image guidance. This study prospectively evaluated a series of intradural spine tumors treated with radiosurgery. Patient setup accuracy for spine radiosurgery delivery using CBCT image guidance for intradural spine tumors was determined. METHODS Eighty-two patients with intradural tumors were treated and prospectively evaluated. The positioning deviations of the spine radiosurgery treatments in patients were recorded. Radiosurgery was delivered using a linear accelerator with a beam modulator and CBCT image guidance combined with a robotic couch that allows positioning correction in 3 translational and 3 rotational directions. To measure patient movement, 3 quality assurance CBCTs were performed and recorded in 30 patients: before, halfway, and after the radiosurgery treatment. The positioning data and fused images of planning CT and CBCT from the treatments were analyzed to determine intrafraction patient movements. From each of 3 CBCTs, 3 translational and 3 rotational coordinates were obtained. RESULTS The radiosurgery procedure was successfully completed for all patients. Lesion locations included cervical (22), thoracic (17), lumbar (38), and sacral (5). Tumor histologies included schwannoma (27), neurofibromas (18), meningioma (16), hemangioblastoma (8), and ependymoma (5). The mean prescription dose was 17 Gy (range 12-27 Gy) delivered in 1-3 fractions. At the halfway point of the radiation, the translational variations and standard deviations were 0.4 ± 0.5, 0.5 ± 0.8, and 0.4 ± 0.5 mm in the lateral (x), longitudinal (y), and anteroposterior (z) directions, respectively. Similarly, the variations immediately after treatment were 0.5 ± 0.4, 0.5 ± 0.6, and 0.6 ± 0.5 mm along x, y, and z directions, respectively. The mean rotational angles were 0

  11. Augmented image guidance improves skull base navigation and reduces task workload in trainees: a preclinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Benjamin J; Daly, Michael J; Chan, Harley; Vescan, Allan; Witterick, Ian J; Irish, Jonathan C

    2011-10-01

    Our group has developed an augmented image guidance system that incorporates intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), virtual or augmented displays, and image registration. We assessed the potential benefits of augmented endoscopy derived from this system for use during skull base navigation. Specifically, we wished to evaluate target localization accuracy and the effect on task workload and confidence. Prospective, sequential, paired preclinical trial. A single cadaver head underwent computed tomography, and critical structures were contoured. The specimen was reimaged after endoscopic dissection and deformable registration allowed contours to be displayed on postablation CBCT imaging. A real-time virtual view including anatomical contours was provided parallel to the real endoscopic image. Twelve subjects were asked to endoscopically localize seven skull base landmarks in a conventional manner. The same exercise was then performed with augmented endoscopy. Precise three-dimensional (3D) localization was recorded with a tracked probe. The NASA task load index was completed after each exercise. A short questionnaire was also administered. The real-time augmented image guidance system aided localization in 85% of responses and increased confidence in 97%. There was a significant reduction in mental demand, effort, and frustration when the technology was employed, with an increase in perceived performance (P surgery increases accuracy and confidence in trainee surgeons and decreases task workload during skull base navigation. This technology shows great promise in assisting in skull base surgery even for experienced surgeons. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Correlation Reconstruction Tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Foy, Roderick; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2017-11-01

    A new volumetric Particle Image Velocimetry technique was developed that outputs accurate velocity measurements up to very high seeding densities while requiring lower computational expenditure. This technique combines the tomographic and cross-correlation steps by directly reconstructing the 3D cross-correlation volumes. Since many particles contribute to a single correlation peak, this decreases the noise contributions from ghost reconstructions, allowing accurate velocity measurements to be made at exceptionally high seeding densities. Additionally the overall computational cost is lowered by combining the reconstruction and cross-correlation steps. Results comparing the errors of the new technique applied to both simulated and experimental data will be presented.

  13. Respiration-correlated image guidance is the most important radiotherapy motion management strategy for most lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine; Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), 4D image guidance (4D-IG), and beam gating on calculated treatment field margins in a lung cancer patient population....

  14. Paleoseismologic data and seismic tomographic images of the 1992 Erzincan Earthquake along the North Anatolian Fault Zone, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, A.; Kaypak, B.; Isik, V.; Saber, R.; Yasar, I.

    2014-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ), spanning over 1200 km from Karliova in eastern Turkey to the Aegean Sea, defines complex active fault zone. The zone consists of network of subfaults, each of varying geometry, and associated failure properties. The Erzincan basin, one of a series basins along the NAFZ, is active basin surrounding bedrock which is Mesozoic and Tertiary units. Available geophysical data constrain the total thickness of Pliocene and Quaternary sediments in the Erzincan basin to more than 2 km. The basin was affected by the 1992 March 13 Erzincan earthquake (Ms=6.8) showing weakly developed surface ruptures. We excavated 6 paleoseismic trenches along the southeastern termination of the 1992 rupture in Üzümlü area. A total of trenches is 294 m long and trends N20°-30°E. Exposed lithology in trenches is made up of alluvial fan deposites and fluvial facies with rare flood-plain sediments, which are characterized by stratified and/or lens-shaped pebble gravel to coarse-grained sand, silt, and clay. Our preliminary interpretation of trenches reveals evidence of 1992 earthquake features. Trench logs showing structural elements including normal faults, which are parallel to the strike of the trace of the NAFZ and dipping 40°-75° to the northeast and the southwest, and network of almost vertical fractures with a few centimeters displacement. Some of trenches contain well-developed flame structures, suggesting liquefaction of water-saturated sediments during earthquake. Seismic velocity (VP and VP/VS) images obtained from the 3-D local earthquake tomography using the arrival time data of aftershocks of the 13 March 1992 Erzincan earthquake show several anomalies related to geological features of the Erzincan basin. The tomographic results indicate that (1) the major fault zones control the regional tectonics and the geometry of the Erzincan basin, (2) sediments of the basin show low seismic velocity, and (3) The high velocity units characterized by

  15. Four-dimensional sonography with spatiotemporal image correlation and tomographic ultrasound imaging in the prenatal diagnosis of anomalous pulmonary venous connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ruan; Xie, Hong-Ning; Du, Liu; Shi, Hui-Juan; Zheng, Ju; Zhu, Yun-Xiao

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether the use of 4-dimensional (4D) sonography with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) and tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) can provide additional information with respect to 2-dimensional (2D) echocardiography in the prenatal diagnosis of anomalous pulmonary venous connections. The study population consisted of 10 cases that were initially suspected to have total or partial anomalous pulmonary venous connections by prenatal 2D echocardiography between January 2008 and April 2011. All 10 cases were further examined and analyzed by 4D sonography with STIC-TUI. Detailed postnatal surgery or autopsy was performed on all 10 fetuses. Total anomalous pulmonary venous connections were found in 5 cases, and a partial connection was diagnosed in 1 fetus postnatally. The remaining 4 cases were confirmed to have normal pulmonary venous connections. Four of the 5 fetuses with anomalous pulmonary venous connections had an additional major cardiac defect; 1 fetus had an isolated connection. Anomalous drainage was supracardiac to the superior vena cava in 2 cases, cardiac to the coronary sinus in 3, and partially infracardiac to the portal vein in remaining case. The pulmonary venous connections were completely and correctly visualized with 2D echocardiography in 2 of the 10 cases, partially identified in 4, and not distinguished completely in 4. Four-dimensional sonography imaging with STIC-TUI clearly visualized the connections in 9 of the 10 cases, and the remaining case was partially identified. Four-dimensional sonography with STIC-TUI facilitates visualization of pulmonary venous connections, thus supplying additional information with respect to 2D echocardiography in the prenatal diagnosis of anomalous pulmonary venous connections.

  16. Caveats on tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulger, Gillian R.; Panza, Giuliano F.; Artemieva, Irina

    2014-01-01

    )CNR – Istituto di Geologia Ambientale e Geoingegneria (IGAG) c/o Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degliStudi di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy, (10) Dept. Physics of the Earth, Sankt-Petersburg State University, Sankt-Petersburg,RussiaGeological models of the mantle and its geodynamic...

  17. Calibration technique for monoplane stereo x-ray system in imaging guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hang-yi; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2000-05-01

    A simple calibration technique for monoplane stereo x-ray imaging system in stereotactic breast biopsy was developed. According to the principle of perspective projection, a monoplane stereo imaging model was established, the geometric parameters for the purpose of 3D point reconstruction were described. The parameters are source- imager-distance and the x-ray tube positions with respect to the imaging receptor. These parameters are calculated using a phantom consisting of three radio-opaque calibration lines of known length and orientation in 3D space and applying the concepts of similar triangles. Two line segments are parallel to the image detector and another one is perpendicular to the image detector. The computer simulations and experiments were carried out which determines these parameters for our CCD based monoplane stereotactic prototype. The results were in agreement with the theoretical prediction. This calibration technique is applied to the stereo imaging system where the final calibration error is within 1.5 percent. The method is simple and reliable. One promising application of this technique for the calibration lies in digital mammography imaging guidance, but applications in other forms of radiographic imaging are possible also.

  18. Four-dimensional modeling of the heart for image guidance of minimally invasive cardiac surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, Marcin; Drangova, Maria; Guiraudon, Gerard; Peters, Terry

    2004-05-01

    Minimally invasive surgery of the beating heart can be associated with two major limitations: selecting port locations for optimal target coverage from x-rays and angiograms, and navigating instruments in a dynamic and confined 3D environment using only an endoscope. To supplement the current surgery planning and guidance strategies, we continue developing VCSP - a virtual reality, patient-specific, thoracic cavity model derived from 3D pre-procedural images. In this work, we apply elastic image registration to 4D cardiac images to model the dynamic heart. Our method is validated on two image modalities, and for different parts of the cardiac anatomy. In a helical CT dataset of an excised heart phantom, we found that the artificial motion of the epicardial surface can be extracted to within 0.93 +/- 0.33 mm. For an MR dataset of a human volunteer, the error for different heart structures such as the myocardium, right and left atria, right ventricle, aorta, vena cava, and pulmonary artery, ranged from 1.08 +/- 0.18 mm to 1.14 +/- 0.22 mm. These results indicate that our method of modeling the motion of the heart is not only easily adaptable but also sufficiently accurate to meet the requirements for reliable cardiac surgery training, planning, and guidance.

  19. MO-AB-BRA-02: A Novel Scatter Imaging Modality for Real-Time Image Guidance During Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redler, G; Bernard, D; Templeton, A; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Nair, C Kumaran [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Turian, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Rush Radiosurgery LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    approach, employing multiple simulation techniques and experiments, is taken to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel scatter imaging modality for the necessary real-time image guidance.

  20. Screen-imaging guidance using a modified portable video macroscope for middle cerebral artery occlusion☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xingbao; Luo, Junli; Liu, Yun; Chen, Guolong; Liu, Song; Ruan, Qiangjin; Deng, Xunding; Wang, Dianchun; Fan, Quanshui; Pan, Xinghua

    2012-01-01

    The use of operating microscopes is limited by the focal length. Surgeons using these instruments cannot simultaneously view and access the surgical field and must choose one or the other. The longer focal length (more than 1 000 mm) of an operating telescope permits a position away from the operating field, above the surgeon and out of the field of view. This gives the telescope an advantage over an operating microscope. We developed a telescopic system using screen-imaging guidance and a modified portable video macroscope constructed from a Computar MLH-10 × macro lens, a DFK-21AU04 USB CCD Camera and a Dell laptop computer as monitor screen. This system was used to establish a middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rats. Results showed that magnification of the modified portable video macroscope was appropriate (5–20 ×) even though the Computar MLH-10 × macro lens was placed 800 mm away from the operating field rather than at the specified working distance of 152.4 mm with a zoom of 1–40 ×. The screen-imaging telescopic technique was clear, life-like, stereoscopic and matched the actual operation. Screen-imaging guidance led to an accurate, smooth, minimally invasive and comparatively easy surgical procedure. Success rate of the model establishment evaluated by neurological function using the modified neurological score system was 74.07%. There was no significant difference in model establishment time, sensorimotor deficit and infarct volume percentage. Our findings indicate that the telescopic lens is effective in the screen surgical operation mode referred to as “long distance observation and short distance operation” and that screen-imaging guidance using an modified portable video macroscope can be utilized for the establishment of a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and micro-neurosurgery. PMID:25722675

  1. Screen-imaging guidance using a modified portable video macroscope for middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xingbao; Luo, Junli; Liu, Yun; Chen, Guolong; Liu, Song; Ruan, Qiangjin; Deng, Xunding; Wang, Dianchun; Fan, Quanshui; Pan, Xinghua

    2012-04-25

    The use of operating microscopes is limited by the focal length. Surgeons using these instruments cannot simultaneously view and access the surgical field and must choose one or the other. The longer focal length (more than 1 000 mm) of an operating telescope permits a position away from the operating field, above the surgeon and out of the field of view. This gives the telescope an advantage over an operating microscope. We developed a telescopic system using screen-imaging guidance and a modified portable video macroscope constructed from a Computar MLH-10 × macro lens, a DFK-21AU04 USB CCD Camera and a Dell laptop computer as monitor screen. This system was used to establish a middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rats. Results showed that magnification of the modified portable video macroscope was appropriate (5-20 ×) even though the Computar MLH-10 × macro lens was placed 800 mm away from the operating field rather than at the specified working distance of 152.4 mm with a zoom of 1-40 ×. The screen-imaging telescopic technique was clear, life-like, stereoscopic and matched the actual operation. Screen-imaging guidance led to an accurate, smooth, minimally invasive and comparatively easy surgical procedure. Success rate of the model establishment evaluated by neurological function using the modified neurological score system was 74.07%. There was no significant difference in model establishment time, sensorimotor deficit and infarct volume percentage. Our findings indicate that the telescopic lens is effective in the screen surgical operation mode referred to as "long distance observation and short distance operation" and that screen-imaging guidance using an modified portable video macroscope can be utilized for the establishment of a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and micro-neurosurgery.

  2. Computed tomography image guidance for more accurate repair of anterior table frontal sinus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Justine C; Andrews, Brian T; Abdollahi, Hamid; Lambi, Alex G; Pereira, Clifford T; Bradley, James P

    2015-01-01

    Anterior table frontal sinus fractures accompanied by nasofrontal duct injury require surgical correction. Extracranial approaches for anterior table osteotomies have traditionally used plain radiograph templates or a "cut-as-you-go" technique. We compared these methods with a newer technique utilizing computed tomography (CT)-guided imaging. Data of patients with acute, traumatic anterior table frontal sinus fractures and nasofrontal duct injury between 2009 and 2013 were reviewed (n = 29). Treatment groups compared were as follows: (1) CT image guidance, (2) plain radiograph template, and (3) cut-as-you-go. Frontal sinus obliteration was performed in all cases. Demographics, operative times, length of stay, complications, and osteotomy accuracy were recorded. Similar demographics, concomitant injuries, operative times, and length of stay among groups were noted. No patients in the CT-guided group had perioperative complications including intraoperative injury of the dura, cerebrum, or orbital structures. In the plain radiograph template group, 25% of patients had inadvertent dural exposure, and 12.5% required take-back to the operating room for cranial bone graft donor site hematoma. In the cut-as-you-go group, 11% required hardware removal for exposure. There were no cases of cerebrospinal fluid leak, meningitis, or mucocele in any group (follow-up, 29.2 months). The CT image guidance group had the most accuracy of the osteotomies (95%) compared with plain radiograph template (85%) and the cut-as-you-go group (72.5%). A new technique using CT image guidance for traumatic frontal sinus fractures repair offers more accurate osteotomy and elevation of the anterior table without increased operative times or untoward sequelae.

  3. Same day injections of Tc-99m methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (hexamibi) for myocardial tomographic imaging: Comparison between rest-stress and stress-rest injection sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taillefer, R.; Gagnon, A.; Laflamme, L.; Leveille, J.; Phaneuf, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    It has been shown that both rest and stress 99m Tc-hexamibi myocardial perfusion imaging can be performed on the same day using two different doses injected within few h (the first one at rest followed by a second at stress). In order to evaluate and compare 2 sequences (rest-stress and stress-rest) of 99m Tc-hexamibi injections performed the same day, 18 patients with either abnormal 201 Tl myocardial scan or abnormal coronary angiography were studied with 2 99m Tc-hexamibi injections protocols. The rest-stress study was performed as follows: 7 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi was injected at rest. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed 60 min later. Immediately after the rest study, patients were injected at peak stress with 25 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi. Tomographic imaging was repeated 1 h later. Patients were submitted to the stress-rest protocol within 3 days. Tomographic imaging was done 1 h after a 7 mCi injection at stress. This study was followed by an injection of 25 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi at rest, a tomographic study was performed 60 min later. Myocardial sections were reconstructed in horizontal long, vertical long, and short axes. Data analysis also included polar map representation. A total of 324 segments were interpreted blind by 3 observers, there was an agreement in 283/324 (87.3%) segments between the 2 protocols. However, 24 segments (7.4%) judged ischemic on rest-stress were called scars on stress-rest. In three patients, myocardial segments were judged normal on the rest image of the rest-stress protocol while they were found abnormal (false positive images) on the stress-rest sequence. Stress images from both protocols were judged similar in 17 patients. In conclusion, when using a short time interval (less than 2 h) between two 99m Tc-hexamibi injections, it is preferable to do a rest-stress sequence since the rest image performed initially represents a true rest study, which is not necessarily the case with the stress-rest sequence

  4. Focal Laser Ablation of Prostate Cancer: Feasibility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Ultrasound Fusion for Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Shyam; Jones, Tonye A; Priester, Alan M; Geoghegan, Rory; Lieu, Patricia; Delfin, Merdie; Felker, Ely; Margolis, Daniel J A; Sisk, Anthony; Pantuck, Allan; Grundfest, Warren; Marks, Leonard S

    2017-10-01

    Focal laser ablation is a potential treatment in some men with prostate cancer. Currently focal laser ablation is performed by radiologists in a magnetic resonance imaging unit (in bore). We evaluated the safety and feasibility of performing focal laser ablation in a urology clinic (out of bore) using magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion for guidance. A total of 11 men with intermediate risk prostate cancer were enrolled in this prospective, institutional review board approved pilot study. Magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion was used to guide laser fibers transrectally into regions of interest harboring intermediate risk prostate cancer. Thermal probes were inserted for real-time monitoring of intraprostatic temperatures during laser activation. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (3 Tesla) was done immediately after treatment and at 6 months along with comprehensive fusion biopsy. Ten of 11 patients were successfully treated while under local anesthesia. Mean procedure time was 95 minutes (range 71 to 105). Posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging revealed a confined zone of nonperfusion in all 10 men. Mean zone volume was 4.3 cc (range 2.1 to 6.0). No CTCAE grade 3 or greater adverse events developed and no changes were observed in urinary or sexual function. At 6 months magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion biopsy of the treatment site showed no cancer in 3 patients, microfocal Gleason 3 + 3 in another 3 and persistent intermediate risk prostate cancer in 4. Focal laser ablation of prostate cancer appears safe and feasible with the patient under local anesthesia in a urology clinic using magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion for guidance and thermal probes for monitoring. Further development is necessary to refine out of bore focal laser ablation and additional studies are needed to determine appropriate treatment margins and oncologic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  5. Evaluation of image-guidance protocols in the treatment of head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeidan, Omar A.; Langen, Katja M.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Manon, Rafael R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Jenkins, D. Wayne; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the residual setup error of different image-guidance (IG) protocols in the alignment of patients with head and neck cancer. The protocols differ in the percentage of treatment fractions that are associated with image guidance. Using data from patients who were treated with daily IG, the residual setup errors for several different protocols are retrospectively calculated. Methods and Materials: Alignment data from 24 patients (802 fractions) treated with daily IG on a helical tomotherapy unit were analyzed. The difference between the daily setup correction and the setup correction that would have been made according to a specific protocol was used to calculate the residual setup errors for each protocol. Results: The different protocols are generally effective in reducing systematic setup errors. Random setup errors are generally not reduced for fractions that are not image guided. As a consequence, if every other treatment is image guided, still about 11% of all treatments (IG and not IG) are subject to three-dimensional setup errors of at least 5 mm. This frequency increases to about 29% if setup errors >3 mm are scored. For various protocols that require 15% to 31% of the treatments to be image guided, from 50% to 60% and from 26% to 31% of all fractions are subject to setup errors >3 mm and >5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Residual setup errors reduce with increasing frequency of IG during the course of external-beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer patients. The inability to reduce random setup errors for fractions that are not image guided results in notable residual setup errors

  6. The first clinical treatment with kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM): A real-time image guidance method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keall, Paul J.; Aun Ng, Jin; O'Brien, Ricky

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM) is a real-time image guidance method that uses widely available radiotherapy technology, i.e., a gantry-mounted x-ray imager. The authors report on the geometric and dosimetric results of the first patient treatment using KIM which occurred...... on September 16, 2014. Methods: KIM uses current and prior 2D x-ray images to estimate the 3D target position during cancer radiotherapy treatment delivery. KIM software was written to process kilovoltage (kV) images streamed from a standard C-arm linear accelerator with a gantry-mounted kV x-ray imaging...... system. A 120° pretreatment kV imaging arc was acquired to build the patient-specific 2D to 3D motion correlation. The kV imager was activated during the megavoltage (MV) treatment, a dual arc VMAT prostate treatment, to estimate the 3D prostate position in real-time. All necessary ethics, legal...

  7. Evaluation of tomographic image quality of extended and conventional parallel hole collimators using maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm by Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Vahid; Ashoor, Mansour

    2017-10-01

    One of the major problems associated with parallel hole collimators (PCs) is the trade-off between their resolution and sensitivity. To solve this problem, a novel PC - namely, extended parallel hole collimator (EPC) - was proposed, in which particular trapezoidal denticles were increased upon septa on the side of the detector. In this study, an EPC was designed and its performance was compared with that of two PCs, PC35 and PC41, with a hole size of 1.5 mm and hole lengths of 35 and 41 mm, respectively. The Monte Carlo method was used to calculate the important parameters such as resolution, sensitivity, scattering, and penetration ratio. A Jaszczak phantom was also simulated to evaluate the resolution and contrast of tomographic images, which were produced by the EPC6, PC35, and PC41 using the Monte Carlo N-particle version 5 code, and tomographic images were reconstructed by using maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm. Sensitivity of the EPC6 was increased by 20.3% in comparison with that of the PC41 at the identical spatial resolution and full-width at tenth of maximum here. Moreover, the penetration and scattering ratio of the EPC6 was 1.2% less than that of the PC41. The simulated phantom images show that the EPC6 increases contrast-resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio compared with those of PC41 and PC35. When compared with PC41 and PC35, EPC6 improved trade-off between resolution and sensitivity, reduced penetrating and scattering ratios, and produced images with higher quality. EPC6 can be used to increase detectability of more details in nuclear medicine images.

  8. Development of a 30-week-pregnant female tomographic model from computed tomography (CT) images for Monte Carlo organ dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengyu; Xu, X. George

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of radiation dose and risk to a pregnant woman and her fetus is an important task in radiation protection. Although tomographic models for male and female patients of different ages have been developed using medical images, such models for pregnant women had not been developed to date. This paper reports the construction of a partial-body model of a pregnant woman from a set of computed tomography (CT) images. The patient was 30 weeks into pregnancy, and the CT scan covered the portion of the body from above liver to below pubic symphysis in 70 slices. The thickness for each slice is 7 mm, and the image resolution is 512x512 pixels in a 48 cmx48 cm field; thus, the voxel size is 6.15 mm 3 . The images were segmented to identify 34 major internal organs and tissues considered sensitive to radiation. Even though the masses are noticeably different from other models, the three-dimensional visualization verified the segmentation and its suitability for Monte Carlo calculations. The model has been implemented into a Monte Carlo code, EGS4-VLSI (very large segmented images), for the calculations of radiation dose to a pregnant woman. The specific absorbed fraction (SAF) results for internal photons were compared with those from a stylized model. Small and large differences were found, and the differences can be explained by mass differences and by the relative geometry differences between the source and the target organs. The research provides the radiation dosimetry community with the first voxelized tomographic model of a pregnant woman, opening the door to future dosimetry studies

  9. Accuracy of daily image guidance for hypofractionated liver radiotherapy with active breathing control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Laura A.; Eccles, Cynthia; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Brock, Kristy K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A six-fraction, high-precision radiotherapy protocol for unresectable liver cancer has been developed in which active breathing control (ABC) is used to immobilize the liver and daily megavoltage (MV) imaging and repositioning is used to decrease geometric uncertainties. We report the accuracy of setup in the first 20 patients consecutively treated using this approach. Methods and materials: After setup using conventional skin marks and lasers, orthogonal MV images were acquired with the liver immobilized using ABC. The images were aligned to reference digitally reconstructed radiographs using the diaphragm for craniocaudal (CC) alignment and the vertebral bodies for anterior-posterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) alignment. Adjustments were made for positioning errors >3 mm. Verification imaging was repeated after repositioning to assess for residual positioning error. Offline image matching was conducted to determine the setup accuracy using this approach compared with the initial setup error before repositioning. Real-time beam's-eye-view MV movies containing an air-diaphragm interface were also evaluated. Results: A total of 405 images were evaluated from 20 patients. Repositioning occurred in 109 of 120 fractions because of offsets >3 mm. Three to eight beam angles, with up to four segments per field, were used for each isocenter. Breath holds of up to 27 s were used for imaging and treatment. The average time from the initial verification image to the last treatment beam was 21 min. Image guidance and repositioning reduced the population random setup errors (σ) from 6.5 mm (CC), 4.2 mm (ML), and 4.7 mm (AP) to 2.5 mm (CC), 2.8 mm (ML), and 2.9 mm (AP). The average individual random setup errors (σ) were reduced from 4.5 mm (CC), 3.2 mm (AP), and 2.5 mm (ML) to 2.2 mm (CC), 2.0 mm (AP), and 2.0 mm (ML). The standard deviation of the distribution of systematic deviations (Σ) was also reduced from 5.1 mm (CC), 3.4 mm (ML), and 3.1 mm (AP) to 1.4 mm (CC

  10. Optical flow based guidance system design for semi-strapdown image homing guided missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses mainly on semi-strapdown image homing guided (SSIHG system design based on optical flow for a six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF axial-symmetric skid-to-turn missile. Three optical flow algorithms suitable for large displacements are introduced and compared. The influence of different displacements on computational accuracy of the three algorithms is analyzed statistically. The total optical flow of the SSIHG missile is obtained using the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT algorithm, which is the best among the three for large displacements. After removing the rotational optical flow caused by rotation of the gimbal and missile body from the total optical flow, the remaining translational optical flow is smoothed via Kalman filtering. The circular navigation guidance (CNG law with impact angle constraint is then obtained utilizing the smoothed translational optical flow and position of the target image. Simulations are carried out under both disturbed and undisturbed conditions, and results indicate the proposed guidance strategy for SSIHG missiles can result in a precise target hit with a desired impact angle without the need for the time-to-go parameter.

  11. Accuracy evaluation of a 3-dimensional surface imaging system for guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam

  12. WE-D-BRB-03: Current State of Volumetric Image Guidance for Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, C.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  13. An x-ray image guidance system for small animal stereotactic irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, K. H.; Pidikiti, R.; Stojadinovic, S.; Speiser, M.; Seliounine, S.; Saha, D.; Solberg, T. D.

    2010-12-01

    An x-ray image-guided small animal stereotactic irradiator was developed and characterized to enable tumor visualization and accurate target localization for small field, high dose irradiation. The system utilizes a custom collimation system, a motorized positioning system (x, y, θ), a digital imaging panel and operating software, and is integrated with a commercial x-ray unit. The essential characteristics of the irradiator include small radiation fields (1-10 mm), high dose rate (>10 Gy min-1) and submillimeter target localization. The software enables computer-controlled image acquisition, stage motion and target localization providing simple and precise automated target localization. The imaging panel was characterized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution. Overall localization accuracy and precision were assessed. SNR, CNR and spatial resolution are 24 dB, 21 dB and 2.8 lp mm-1, respectively, and localization accuracy is approximately 65 µm with 6 µm precision. With the aid of image guidance, system performance was subsequently used to evaluate radiation response in a rat orthotopic lung tumor effectively sparing normal tissues and in a mouse normal lung. The capabilities of 3D treatment and cone-beam computed tomography are presented for 3D localization and delivery as a work in progress.

  14. A case series on the technical use of three-dimensional image guidance in subaxial anterior cervical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirris, Stephen M; Nottmeier, Eric W

    2015-03-01

    Three dimensional (3D) image guidance has been used to improve the safety of complex spine surgeries, but its use has been limited in anterior cervical spine approaches. Twenty-two patients underwent complex anterior cervical spine surgeries in which 3D image guidance provided intraoperative assistance with the dissection, decompression and implant placement. One of two paired systems, the BrainLAB (BrainLAB, Westchester, Illinois) system, or Stealth (Medtronic Inc., Littleton, Massachusetts) system was used for 3D image guidance in this study. Image guidance was able to reliably locate pertinent anatomical structures in complex anterior cervical spine surgery involving re-exploration, dissection around vertebral arteries or deformity correction. No complications occurred, and no patients required a revision anterior surgery. This technical note describes the setup and technique for the use of cone beam computed tomography (cbCT)-based, 3D image guidance in subaxial anterior cervical surgery. The authors have found this technique to be a useful adjunct in revision anterior cervical procedures, as well as anterior cervical procedures involving corpectomy or tumor removal. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Tomographic bremsstrahlung imaging with yttrium-90 in the context of radioembolisation of liver tumors; Tomografische Bildgebung mit Yttrium-90-Bremsstrahlung im Rahmen der Radioembolisation von Lebertumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosser, Oliver Stephan

    2013-04-12

    Establish tomographic Bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging (BSPECT) for the clinical validation of Selective Internal Radiotherapy (SIRT) with Yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) labelled microspheres. Various energy ranges (75 ± 3.8 keV; 135 ± 6.8 keV; 167 ± 8.4 keV) and the summation window were studied to see if they were suitable for BSPECT. To this end, clinically available reconstruction techniques were analysed for their suitability for BSPECT. The tomographic examinations were performed on a cylindrical phantom filled with spheres of different diameters d = [28; 35; 40; 50; 60] mm in a non-active waterfilled background. The spheres were filled with identical {sup 90}Y activity concentration (AC). Measurements were conducted at AC = [14.58; 5.20; 1.98; 0.66] MBq/cm{sup 3}. The BSPECT were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP), a 2D Ordered-Subset Expectation Maximisation Algorithm (2D-OSEM) and a 3D Geometric Mean Algorithm (3D-GMA). Evaluation was made visually and on the basis of objective performance parameters such as contrast, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image noise. While the 75 keV ± 3.8 keV window was identified as suitable for the BSPECT, limitations were revealed as to use of different implementations of the Point Spread Function (PSF). It was found for all reconstruction techniques that, at a given sphere diameter, there existed a linear relationship between the AC in the spheres and the reconstructed pulse rate per volume element. The recovery effect was verified for small spheres. The iterative techniques were found to be suitable for the BSPECT at all AC. At low AC, the 3D-GMA exhibited the least noise and the highest SNR. The FBP turned out to be entirely inappropriate for the BSPECT. The narrow energy window in which the bremsstrahlung interferes with the characteristic X-radiation of lead can be used for BSPECT. In this approach, the tomographic data reconstructed with different algorithms exhibited a varying image quality, with the iterative

  16. Determining optimal planning target volume and image guidance policy for post-prostatectomy intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Linda J; Cox, Jennifer; Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Herschtal, Alan; Kneebone, Andrew

    2015-07-26

    There is limited information available on the optimal Planning Target Volume (PTV) expansions and image guidance for post-prostatectomy intensity modulated radiotherapy (PP-IMRT). As the prostate bed does not move in a uniform manner, there is a rationale for anisotropic PTV margins with matching to soft tissue. The aim of this study is to find the combination of PTV expansion and image guidance policy for PP-IMRT that provides the best balance of target coverage whilst minimising dose to the organs at risk. The Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images (n = 377) of 40 patients who received PP-IMRT with daily online alignment to bony anatomy (BA) were reviewed. Six different PTV expansions were assessed: 3 published PTV expansions (0.5 cm uniform, 1 cm uniform, and 1 + 0.5 cm posterior) and 3 further anisotropic PTV expansions (Northern Sydney Cancer Centre (NSCC), van Herk, and smaller anisotropic). Each was assessed for size, bladder and rectum coverage and geographic miss. Each CBCT was rematched using a superior soft tissue (SST) and averaged soft tissue (AST) match. Potential geographic miss was assessed using all PTV expansions except the van Herk margin. The 0.5 cm uniform expansion yielded the smallest PTV (median volume = 222.3 cc) and the 1 cm uniform expansion yielded the largest (361.7 cc). The Van Herk expansion includes the largest amount of bladder (28.0 %) and rectum (36.0 %) and the 0.5 cm uniform expansion the smallest (17.1 % bladder; 10.2 % rectum). The van Herk PTV expansion had the least geographic miss with BA matching (4.2 %) and the 0.5 cm uniform margin (28.4 %) the greatest. BA matching resulted in the highest geographic miss rate for all PTVs, followed by SST matching and AST matching. Changing from BA to an AST match decreases potential geographic miss by half to two thirds, depending on the PTV expansion, to image guidance policy for PP-IMRT is daily average soft tissue matching using CBCT scans with a small anisotropic PTV expansion of 0

  17. Radiation exposure to patients from image guidance procedures and techniques to reduce the imaging dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X; Munro, Peter

    2013-07-01

    To compare imaging doses from MV images, kV radiographs, and kV-CBCT and describe methods to reduce the dose to patient's organs using existing on-board imaging devices. Monte Carlo techniques were used to simulate kV X-ray sources. The kV image doses to a variety of patient anatomies were calculated by using the simulated realistic sources to deposit dose in patient CT images. For MV imaging, the doses for the same patients were calculated using a commercial treatment planning system. Portal imaging results in the largest dose to anatomic structures, followed by Varian OBI CBCT, Varian TrueBeam CBCT and then kV radiographs. The imaging doses for the 50% volume from the DVHs, D50, to the eyes for representative head images are 4.3-4.8cGy; 0.05-0.06cGy; 0.04-0.05cGy; and, 0.12cGy; D50 to the bladder for representative pelvis images are 3.3cGy; 1.6cGy; 1.0cGy; and, 0.07cGy; while D50 to the heart for representative thorax images are 3.5cGy; 0.42cGy; 0.2cGy; and, 0.07cGy; when using portal imaging, OBI kV-CBCT scans, TrueBeam kV-CBCT scans and kV radiographs, respectively. The orientation of the kV beam can affect organ dose. For example, D50 to the eyes can be reduced from 0.12cGy using AP and right lateral radiographs to 0.008-0.017cGy when using PA and right lateral radiographs. In addition, organ exposures can be further reduced to 15-70% of their original values with the use of a full-fan, bow-tie filter for kV radiographs. In contrast, organ doses increase by a factor of ∼2-4 if bow-tie filters are not used during kV-CBCT acquisitions. Current on-board kV imaging devices result in much lower imaging doses compared to MV imagers even taking into account of higher bone dose from kV X-rays. And a variety of approaches are available to significantly reduce the image doses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An image-guidance system for dynamic dose calculation in prostate brachytherapy using ultrasound and fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Mian, Omar Y.; Le, Yi; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor; Prince, Jerry L.; Song, Danny Y.; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is a standard option of care for prostate cancer patients but may be improved by dynamic dose calculation based on localized seed positions. The American Brachytherapy Society states that the major current limitation of intraoperative treatment planning is the inability to localize the seeds in relation to the prostate. An image-guidance system was therefore developed to localize seeds for dynamic dose calculation. Methods: The proposed system is based on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and mobile C-arm fluoroscopy, while using a simple fiducial with seed-like markers to compute pose from the nonencoded C-arm. Three or more fluoroscopic images and an ultrasound volume are acquired and processed by a pipeline of algorithms: (1) seed segmentation, (2) fiducial detection with pose estimation, (3) seed matching with reconstruction, and (4) fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration. Results: The system was evaluated on ten phantom cases, resulting in an overall mean error of 1.3 mm. The system was also tested on 37 patients and each algorithm was evaluated. Seed segmentation resulted in a 1% false negative rate and 2% false positive rate. Fiducial detection with pose estimation resulted in a 98% detection rate. Seed matching with reconstruction had a mean error of 0.4 mm. Fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration had a mean error of 1.3 mm. Moreover, a comparison of dose calculations between the authors’ intraoperative method and an independent postoperative method shows a small difference of 7% and 2% forD90 and V100, respectively. Finally, the system demonstrated the ability to detect cold spots and required a total processing time of approximately 1 min. Conclusions: The proposed image-guidance system is the first practical approach to dynamic dose calculation, outperforming earlier solutions in terms of robustness, ease of use, and functional completeness. PMID:25186387

  19. Planning, guidance, and quality assurance of pelvic screw placement using deformable image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerres, J.; Uneri, A.; Jacobson, M.; Ramsay, B.; De Silva, T.; Ketcha, M.; Han, R.; Manbachi, A.; Vogt, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Osgood, G.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Percutaneous pelvic screw placement is challenging due to narrow bone corridors surrounded by vulnerable structures and difficult visual interpretation of complex anatomical shapes in 2D x-ray projection images. To address these challenges, a system for planning, guidance, and quality assurance (QA) is presented, providing functionality analogous to surgical navigation, but based on robust 3D-2D image registration techniques using fluoroscopy images already acquired in routine workflow. Two novel aspects of the system are investigated: automatic planning of pelvic screw trajectories and the ability to account for deformation of surgical devices (K-wire deflection). Atlas-based registration is used to calculate a patient-specific plan of screw trajectories in preoperative CT. 3D-2D registration aligns the patient to CT within the projective geometry of intraoperative fluoroscopy. Deformable known-component registration (dKC-Reg) localizes the surgical device, and the combination of plan and device location is used to provide guidance and QA. A leave-one-out analysis evaluated the accuracy of automatic planning, and a cadaver experiment compared the accuracy of dKC-Reg to rigid approaches (e.g. optical tracking). Surgical plans conformed within the bone cortex by 3-4 mm for the narrowest corridor (superior pubic ramus) and  >5 mm for the widest corridor (tear drop). The dKC-Reg algorithm localized the K-wire tip within 1.1 mm and 1.4° and was consistently more accurate than rigid-body tracking (errors up to 9 mm). The system was shown to automatically compute reliable screw trajectories and accurately localize deformed surgical devices (K-wires). Such capability could improve guidance and QA in orthopaedic surgery, where workflow is impeded by manual planning, conventional tool trackers add complexity and cost, rigid tool assumptions are often inaccurate, and qualitative interpretation of complex anatomy from 2D projections is prone to trial

  20. Image guidance based on MRI for spinal interstitial laser thermotherapy: technical aspects and accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsui, Claudio E; Nascimento, Clarissa N G; Suki, Dima; Amini, Behrang; Li, Jing; Ghia, Amol J; Thomas, Jonathan G; Stafford, R Jason; Rhines, Laurence D; Cata, Juan P; Kumar, Ashok J; Rao, Ganesh

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Image guidance for spinal procedures is based on 3D-fluoroscopy or CT, which provide poor visualization of soft tissues, including the spinal cord. To overcome this limitation, the authors developed a method to register intraoperative MRI (iMRI) of the spine into a neuronavigation system, allowing excellent visualization of the spinal cord. This novel technique improved the accuracy in the deployment of laser interstitial thermal therapy probes for the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression. METHODS Patients were positioned prone on the MRI table under general anesthesia. Fiducial markers were applied on the skin of the back, and a plastic cradle was used to support the MRI coil. T2-weighted MRI sequences of the region of interest were exported to a standard navigation system. A reference array was sutured to the skin, and surface matching of the fiducial markers was performed. A navigated Jamshidi needle was advanced until contact was made with the dorsal elements; its position was confirmed with intraoperative fluoroscopy prior to advancement into a target in the epidural space. A screenshot of its final position was saved, and then the Jamshidi needle was exchanged for an MRI-compatible access cannula. MRI of the exact axial plane of each access cannula was obtained and compared with the corresponding screenshot saved during positioning. The discrepancy in millimeters between the trajectories was measured to evaluate accuracy of the image guidance RESULTS Thirteen individuals underwent implantation of 47 laser probes. The median absolute value of the discrepancy between the location predicted by the navigation system and the actual position of the access cannulas was 0.7 mm (range 0-3.2 mm). No injury or adverse event occurred during the procedures. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates the feasibility of image guidance based on MRI to perform laser interstitial thermotherapy of spinal metastasis. The authors' method permits excellent

  1. A tomographic image of upper crustal structure using P and S wave seismic refraction data in the southern granulite terrain (SGT), India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendra Prasad, B.; Behera, Laxmidhar; Rao, P. Koteswara

    2006-07-01

    We present a 2-D tomographic P and S wave velocity (Vp and Vs) image with Vp/Vs ratios along N-S trending 220 km long deep seismic profile acquired in 2005, which traverses across major shear and tectonically disturbed zones in southern granulite terrain (SGT), India. The 2-D velocity model constrained down to maximum 8 km depth shows velocity anomalies (>0.2 km/s) beneath major shear zones with good spatial resolution (>0.05 km/s). The presence of high Vp (6.3-6.5 km/s), Vs (3.5-3.8 km/s), Vp/Vs (>1.75) and Poisson's ratio (0.25-0.29) indicate significant compositional changes of rocks at shallow depths (0.5 to 8 km) reveal rapid crustal exhumation of mid to lower crustal rocks. This crustal exhumation could be responsible due to Pan-African tectonothermal activity during Neoproterozoic period.

  2. Computerized tomographic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbarsen, R.; Barrett, D.M.; Garrott, P.M.; Foley, L.E.; Redington, R.W.; Lambert, T.W.; Edelheit, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    A computerized tomographic system for examining human breasts is described in detail. Conventional X-ray scanning apparatus has difficulty in achieving the levels of image definition and examination speeds required for mass screening. A novel method of scanning successive layers of the breast with a rotating X-ray beam is discussed and details of the control circuitry and sequence steps are given. The method involves immersing the breast in an inner fluid (e.g. water) filled container which is stationary during an examination and is surrounded by a large outer container which is also filled with the fluid; the inner and outer containers are always maintained at a constant height and the X-ray absorption across the fan-shaped beam is as close as possible to constant. (U.K.)

  3. Tomographic examination table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redington, R.W.; Henkes, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Equipment is described for positioning and supporting patients during tomographic mammography using X-rays. The equipment consists of a table and fabric slings which permit the examination of a downward, pendant breast of a prone patient by allowing the breast to pass through a aperture in the table into a fluid filled container. The fluid has an X-ray absorption coefficient similar to that of soft human tissue allowing high density resolution radiography and permitting accurate detection of breast tumours. The shape of the equipment and the positioning of the patient allow the detector and X-ray source to rotate 360 0 about a vertical axis through the breast. This permits the use of relatively simple image reconstruction algorithms and a divergent X-ray geometry. (UK)

  4. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS: COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN A CASE OF ADENOSQUAMOUS CARCINOMA OF THE HEAD AND NECK IN A CAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Kathleen Ella; Krockenberger, Mark; Collins, David

    2016-01-01

    A 15-year-old female spayed domestic long-haired cat was referred for trismus, hypersalivation, and bilateral ocular discharge. On examination, the cat showed pain on palpation of the left zygomatic arch, palpable crepitus of the frontal region, and limited retropulsion of both globes. A contrast-enhanced sinonasal computed tomographic study was performed, showing facial distortion and extensive osteolysis of the skull, extending beyond the confines of the sinonasal and paranasal cavities. Additionally, soft tissue and fluid accumulation were observed in the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses. Postmortem biopsy samples acquired from the calvarium yielded a histologic diagnosis of sinonasal adenosquamous carcinoma, a rare and particularly aggressive neoplasm previously only reported in the esophagus of one cat. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  5. Tomographic imaging of Central Java, Indonesia: Preliminary result of joint inversion of the MERAMEX and MCGA earthquake data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohadi, Supriyanto; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Masturyono

    2013-01-01

    The realization of local earthquake tomography is usually conducted by removing distant events outside the study region, because these events may increase errors. In this study, tomographic inversion has been conducted using the travel time data of local and regional events in order to improve the structural resolution, especially for deep structures. We used the local MERapi Amphibious EXperiments (MERAMEX) data catalog that consists of 292 events from May to October 2004. The additional new data of regional events in the Java region were taken from the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) of Indonesia, which consist of 882 events, having at least 10 recording phases at each seismographic station from April 2009 to February 2011. We have conducted joint inversions of the combined data sets using double-difference tomography to invert for velocity structures and to conduct hypocenter relocation simultaneously. The checkerboard test results of Vp and Vs structures demonstrate a significantly improved spatial resolution from the shallow crust down to a depth of 165 km. Our tomographic inversions reveal a low velocity anomaly beneath the Lawu - Merapi zone, which is consistent with the results from previous studies. A strong velocity anomaly zone with low Vp, low Vs and low Vp/Vs is also identified between Cilacap and Banyumas. We interpret this anomaly as a fluid content material with large aspect ratio or sediment layer. This anomaly zone is in a good agreement with the existence of a large dome containing sediment in this area as proposed by previous geological studies. A low velocity anomaly zone is also detected in Kebumen, where it may be related to the extensional oceanic basin toward the land

  6. Uniaxial Compression of Cellular Materials at a 10-1 s-1 Strain Rate Simultaneously with Synchrotron X-ray Computed Tomographic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Brian M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The topic is presented as a series of slides. Motivation for the work included the following: X-ray tomography is a fantastic technique for characterizing a material’s starting structure as well as for non-destructive, in situ experiments to investigate material response; 3D X-ray tomography is needed to fully characterize the morphology of cellular materials; and synchrotron micro-CT can capture 3D images without pausing experiment. Among the conclusions reached are these: High-rate radiographic and tomographic imaging (0.25 s 3D frame rate) using synchrotron CT can capture full 3D images of hyper-elastic materials at a 10-2 strain rate; dynamic true in situ uniaxial loading can be accurately captured; the three stages of compression can be imaged: bending, buckling, and breaking; implementation of linear modeling is completed; meshes have been imported into LANL modeling codes--testing and validation is underway and direct comparison and validation between in situ data and modeled mechanical response is possible.

  7. Physics aspects of prostate tomotherapy: Planning optimization and image-guidance issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Broggi, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To review planning and image-guidance aspects of more than 3 years experience in the treatment of prostate cancer with Helical Tomotherapy (HT). Methods and materials. Planning issues concerning two Phase I-II clinical studies were addressed: in the first one, 58 Gy in 20 fractions were delivered to the prostatic bed for post-prostatectomy patients: in the second one, a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach was applied for radical treatment, delivering 71.4-74.2 Gy to the prostate in 28 fractions. On-line daily MVCT image guidance was applied: bone match was used for post-operative patients while prostate match was applied for radically treated patients. MVCT data of a large sample of both categories of patients were reviewed. Results. At now, more than 250 patients were treated. Planning data show the ability of HT in creating highly homogeneous dose distributions within PTVs. Organs at risk (OAR) sparing also showed to be excellent. HT was also found to favorably compare to inversely-optimized IMAT in terms of PTVs coverage and dose distribution homogeneity. In the case of pelvic nodes irradiation, a large sparing of bowel was evident compared to 3DCRT and conventional 5-fields IMRT. The analysis of MVCT data showed a limited motion of the prostate (about 5% of the fractions show a deviation =3 mm in posterior-anterior direction), due to the careful application of rectal emptying procedures. Based on phantom measurements and on the comparison with intra-prostatic calcification-based match, direct visualization prostate match seems to be sufficiently reliable in assessing shifts =3 mm. Conclusions. HT offers excellent planning solutions for prostate cancer, showing to be highly efficient in a SIB scenario. Daily MVCT information showed evidence of a limited motion of the prostate in the context of rectal filling control obtained by instructing patients in self-administrating a rectal enema

  8. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  9. Dosimetric comparison of image guidance by megavoltage computed tomography versus bone alignment for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalz, Joern; Sterzing, Florian; Schubert, Kai; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    Daily image guidance in irradiation of prostate cancer can be based on simple portal images or on soft-tissue imaging. This study compares daily bone alignment with daily pretreatment megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT). Ten patients with a total of 356 fractions were analyzed. Before each fraction, the patient was positioned to match the prostate on pretreatment MVCT and planning CT. In seven fractions, rectum distension prevented a satisfactory match and the fraction was restarted after the patient went to the restroom. After treatment, organs were manually contoured on each daily MVCT and doses recalculated. Bone alignment was simulated by a software that matches the bones on MVCT and planning CT. In the seven interrupted fractions, median improvement of rectum volume receiving full fraction dose was 14 cm{sup 3} between simulated treatment before and actual treatment after the patient went to the restroom. In the 349 noninterrupted fractions, the average difference of the isodose that covers 95% of the prostate between actual treatment position and simulated bone match position was < 1% and there was no significant change in the rectum volume with a fraction dose {>=} 2 Gy. Full fraction dose rectum irradiation can be avoided with daily MVCT by interruption of single fractions. There was no relevant benefit of daily MVCT in the noninterrupted fractions with the margins used in this study. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging guidance for the optimization of ventricular tachycardia ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Rahul K; Whitaker, John; Williams, Steven E; Razavi, Reza; O'Neill, Mark D

    2018-03-23

    Catheter ablation has an important role in the management of patients with ventricular tachycardia (VT) but is limited by modest long-term success rates. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide valuable anatomic and functional information as well as potentially improve identification of target sites for ablation. A major limitation of current MRI protocols is the spatial resolution required to identify the areas of tissue responsible for VT but recent developments have led to new strategies which may improve substrate assessment. Potential ways in which detailed information gained from MRI may be utilized during electrophysiology procedures include image integration or performing a procedure under real-time MRI guidance. Image integration allows pre-procedural magnetic resonance (MR) images to be registered with electroanatomical maps to help guide VT ablation and has shown promise in preliminary studies. However, multiple errors can arise during this process due to the registration technique used, changes in ventricular geometry between the time of MRI and the ablation procedure, respiratory and cardiac motion. As isthmus sites may only be a few millimetres wide, reducing these errors may be critical to improve outcomes in VT ablation. Real-time MR-guided intervention has emerged as an alternative solution to address the limitations of pre-acquired imaging to guide ablation. There is now a growing body of literature describing the feasibility, techniques, and potential applications of real-time MR-guided electrophysiology. We review whether real-time MR-guided intervention could be applied in the setting of VT ablation and the potential challenges that need to be overcome.

  11. Use of a Diagnostic Score to Prioritize Computed Tomographic (CT) Imaging for Patients Suspected of Ischemic Stroke Who May Benefit from Thrombolytic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, Michiel L.; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    Background A shortage of computed tomographic (CT) machines in low and middle income countries often results in delayed CT imaging for patients suspected of a stroke. Yet, time constraint is one of the most important aspects for patients with an ischemic stroke to benefit from thrombolytic therapy. We set out to assess whether application of the Siriraj Stroke Score is able to assist physicians in prioritizing patients with a high probability of having an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. Methods From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we selected patients aged 18 years and over with clinical features suggesting of a stroke, who arrived in the hospital 4.5 hours or less from ictus. The prioritization of receiving CT imaging was left to the discretion of the treating physician. We applied the Siriraj Stroke Score to all patients, refitted the score and defined a cut-off value to best distinguish an ischemic stroke from a hemorrhagic stroke. Results Of the 2176 patients included, 73% had an ischemic stroke. Only 33% of the ischemic stroke patients had CT imaging within 4.5 hours. The median door-to-scan time for these patients was 4 hours (IQR: 1;16). With the recalibrated score, it would have been possible to prioritize 95% (95% CI: 94%–96%) of patients with an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. Conclusions In settings where CT imaging capacity is limited, we propose the use of the Siriraj Stroke Score to prioritize patients with a probable ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. PMID:27768752

  12. Use of a Diagnostic Score to Prioritize Computed Tomographic (CT Imaging for Patients Suspected of Ischemic Stroke Who May Benefit from Thrombolytic Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Yea Hwong

    Full Text Available A shortage of computed tomographic (CT machines in low and middle income countries often results in delayed CT imaging for patients suspected of a stroke. Yet, time constraint is one of the most important aspects for patients with an ischemic stroke to benefit from thrombolytic therapy. We set out to assess whether application of the Siriraj Stroke Score is able to assist physicians in prioritizing patients with a high probability of having an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging.From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we selected patients aged 18 years and over with clinical features suggesting of a stroke, who arrived in the hospital 4.5 hours or less from ictus. The prioritization of receiving CT imaging was left to the discretion of the treating physician. We applied the Siriraj Stroke Score to all patients, refitted the score and defined a cut-off value to best distinguish an ischemic stroke from a hemorrhagic stroke.Of the 2176 patients included, 73% had an ischemic stroke. Only 33% of the ischemic stroke patients had CT imaging within 4.5 hours. The median door-to-scan time for these patients was 4 hours (IQR: 1;16. With the recalibrated score, it would have been possible to prioritize 95% (95% CI: 94%-96% of patients with an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging.In settings where CT imaging capacity is limited, we propose the use of the Siriraj Stroke Score to prioritize patients with a probable ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging.

  13. Comparison of two cone beam computed tomographic systems versus panoramic imaging for localization of impacted maxillary canines and detection of root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqerban, Ali; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Fieuws, Steffen; Willems, Guy

    2011-02-01

    The diagnostic accuracy for the localization of impacted canines and the detection of canine-induced root resorption of maxillary incisors were compared between conventional radiographic procedures using one two-dimensional (2D) panoramic radiograph with that of two three-dimensional (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The clinical records of 60 consecutive patients who had impacted or ectopically erupting maxillary canines were identified from those seeking orthodontic treatment. For each case, two sets of radiographic information were obtained. The study sample was divided into two groups: group A (n = 30) included those for whom a dental pantomograph (DPT) and CBCT obtained with a 3D Accuitomo-XYZ Slice View Tomograph were available and group B (n = 30) who had a DPT and CBCT obtained with a Scanora. The DPT and CBCT images were subsequently analysed by 11 examiners. Statistical analysis included an evaluation of the agreement between observers based on the standard error of the measurement, kappa statistics and coefficient of concordance, as well as an assessment of the differences between 2D and 3D imaging employing Wilcoxon signed rank and McNemar tests. There was a highly significant difference between the 2D and 3D images in the width of the canine crown (P radiography for both canine localization and identification of root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  14. Beyond the Black Box: Coupling x-ray tomographic imaging of multi-phase flow processes to numerical models and traditional laboratory measurements (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildenschild, D.; Porter, M. L.; Schaap, M. G.; Joekar-Niasar, V.; Schjonning, P.; Wollesen de Jonge, L.; Moldrup, P.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative non-invasive imaging has evolved rapidly in the last decade, and is now being used to assess a variety of problems in vadose zone research, including unsaturated flow and transport of water and contaminants, macropore-dominated processes, soil-water-root interactions, more recent work on colloidal processes, and significant work on NAPL-water interactions . We are now able to use non-invasive imaging to probe processes that could not previously be quantified because of lack of opacity, resolution, or accurate techniques for quantitative measurement. This work presents an overview of recent advances in x-ray microtomography techniques that can generate high-resolution image-based data for (1) validation of pore-scale multi-phase flow models such as the lattice-Boltzmann technique and pore network models (with respect to fluid saturations, fluid distribution, and relationships among capillary pressure, saturation, fluid-fluid interfacial area, etc.), and (2) making the link between tomographic data and more traditional laboratory-based soil/vadose zone characterization such as hydraulic conductivity, air permeability, and pycnometer-based porosity measurements). Finally, limitations and advantages of these various approaches, as well as tomography specific issues such as resolution vs. REV requirement, access to the different types of equipment, etc. will be discussed.

  15. Voxel-based model construction from colored tomographic images; Construcao de simuladores baseados em elementos de volume a partir de imagens tomograficas coloridas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    2002-07-01

    This work presents a new approach in the construction of voxel-based phantoms that was implemented to simplify the segmentation process of organs and tissues reducing the time used in this procedure. The segmentation process is performed by painting tomographic images and attributing a different color for each organ or tissue. A voxel-based head and neck phantom was built using this new approach. The way as the data are stored allows an increasing in the performance of the radiation transport code. The program that calculates the radiation transport also works with image files. This capability allows image reconstruction showing isodose areas, under several points of view, increasing the information to the user. Virtual X-ray photographs can also be obtained allowing that studies could be accomplished looking for the radiographic techniques optimization assessing, at the same time, the doses in organs and tissues. The accuracy of the program here presented, called MCvoxEL, that implements this new approach, was tested by comparison to results from two modern and well-supported Monte Carlo codes. Dose conversion factors for parallel X-ray exposure were also calculated. (author)

  16. New tomographic images of P- , S- wave velocity and Q on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo: Implication to seismotectonics and seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Naoshi; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Panayotopoulos, Yannis; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Keiji; Kimura, Hisanor; Honda, Ryou

    2013-04-01

    The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates the next great M7+ earthquake in the Tokyo metropolitan region will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (1 trillion US) economic loss at worst case if it occur beneath northern Tokyo bay with M7.3. However, the estimate is based on a source fault model by conventional studies about the PSP geometry. To evaluate seismic hazard due to the great quake we need to clarify the geometry of PSP and also the Pacific palate (PAP) that subducs beneath PSP. We identify those plates with use of seismic tomography and available deep seismic reflection profiling and borehole data in southern Kanto area. We deployed about 300 seismic stations in the greater Tokyo urban region under the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We obtain clear P- and S- wave velocity (Vp and Vs) and Q tomograms which show a clear image of PSP and PAP. A depth to the top of PSP, 20 to 30 kilometer beneath northern part of Tokyo bay, is about 10 km shallower than previous estimates based on the distribution of seismicity (Ishida, 1992). This shallower plate geometry changes estimations of strong ground motion for seismic hazards analysis within the Tokyo region. Based on elastic wave velocities of rocks and minerals, we interpreted the tomographic images as petrologic images. Tomographic images revealed the presence of two stepwise velocity increase of the top layer of the subducting PSP slab. Rock velocity data reveals that subducting PSP crust transforms from blueschists to amphibolites at depth of 30km and amphibolites to eclogites at depth of 50km, which suggest that dehydration reactions occurs in subducting crust of basaltic compositions during prograde metamorphism and water is released from the subducting PSP crust. Tomograms show evidence for a low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the area just north of Tokyo bay. A Q tomogram show a low Q zone in PSP slab. We interpret the LVZ as a

  17. Getting the most out of additional guidance information in deformable image registration by leveraging multi-objective optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Alderliesten (Tanja); P.A.N. Bosman (Peter); A. Bel (Arjan)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractIncorporating additional guidance information, e.g., landmark/contour correspondence, in deformable image registration is often desirable and is typically done by adding constraints or cost terms to the optimization function. Commonly, deciding between a “hard” constraint and a “soft”

  18. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a (60)Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. METHODS AND MATERIALS...

  19. Iodine-123 N-methyl-4-iododexetimide: a new radioligand for single-photon emission tomographic imaging of myocardial muscarinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; Kassiou, M.; Eu, P.; Katsifis, A.G.; Garra, M.; Power, J.; Najdovski, L.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Cardiac muscarinic receptor ligands suitable for positron emission tomography have previously been characterised. Attempts to develop radioligands of these receptors suitable for single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) imaging have not been successful due to high lung retention and high non-specific binding of previously investigated potential tracers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution and in vivo imaging characteristics of a new radiopharmaceutical, [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide. Biodistribution studies performed in rats showed high cardiac uptake (2.4% ID/g) 10 min after injection with a heart to lung activity ratio of 5:1. Specificity and stereoselectivity of cardiac binding were demonstrated using blocking experiments in rats. Dynamic imaging studies in anaesthetised greyhounds demonstrated rapid and high myocardial uptake and low lung binding with stable heart to lung activity ratios of >2.5:1 between 10 and 30 min, making SPET imaging feasible. Administration of an excess of an unlabelled muscarinic antagonist, methyl-quinuclidinyl benzylate rapidly displaced myocardial activity to background levels and the pharmacologically inactive enantiomer, [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iodolevetimide, had no detectable cardiac uptake, indicating specific and stereoselective muscarinic receptor binding. SPET revealed higher activity in the inferior than in the anterior wall, this being consistent with previously described regional variation of cardiac parasympathetic innervation. [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide shows promise as an imaging agent for muscarinic receptor distribution in the heart and may be helpful in evaluating diverse cardiac diseases associated with altered muscarinic receptor function, including heart failure and diabetic heart disease. (orig.)

  20. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomographic imaging for the provision of both anatomical and functional information about biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Tanikawa, Yukari; Homma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Yukio

    2005-04-01

    We present in vivo images of near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) of human lower legs and forearm to validate the dual functions of a time-resolved (TR) NIR DOT in clinical diagnosis, i.e., to provide anatomical and functional information simultaneously. The NIR DOT system is composed of time-correlated single-photon-counting channels, and the image reconstruction algorithm is based on the modified generalized pulsed spectral technique, which effectively incorporates the TR data with reasonable computation time. The reconstructed scattering images of both the lower legs and the forearm revealed their anatomies, in which the bones were clearly distinguished from the muscles. In the absorption images, some of the blood vessels were observable. In the functional imaging, a subject was requested to do handgripping exercise to stimulate physiological changes in the forearm tissue. The images of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentration changes in the forearm were obtained from the differential images of the absorption at three wavelengths between the exercise and the rest states, which were reconstructed with a differential imaging scheme. These images showed increases in both blood volume and oxyhemoglobin concentration in the arteries and simultaneously showed hypoxia in the corresponding muscles. All the results have demonstrated the capability of TR NIR DOT by reconstruction of the absolute images of the scattering and the absorption with a high spatial resolution that finally provided both the anatomical and functional information inside bulky biological tissues.

  1. Thickness of the Descending Philippine Sea Plate Estimated from Tomographic Images beneath the Kumano Basin, along the Nankai Trough, Southwestern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, S.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Philippine Sea plate subducts northwestward beneath the Japanese islands from the south. The average thickness of the overall Philippine Sea plate has been investigated in the oceanic area using surface wave analyses [e.g. Abe and Kanamori, 1970], suggesting a thin (30-40 km thick) plate. On the other hand, several studies have indicated a thicker Philippine Sea plate based on source mechanisms and seismicity in the eastern rim of the plate [Seno, 1987; Moriyama et al., 1989]. From tomographic images, Kamiya and Kobayashi [2007] pointed out that the subducting Philippine Sea slab has thickness variation with a stepwise offset east of Izu Peninsula. The eastern (the Kanto district) and western (north of Izu Peninsula and the Tokai district) regions have respective thicknesses of 60 and 25 km. In the Kumano basin, the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) developed the Dense Oceanfloor Network System for Earthquakes and Tsunami (DONET) in order to monitor seismic activity [Kaneda et al., 2009; Kawaguchi et al., 2010]. DONET ocean-bottom stations are connected with an optical fiber cable, and data are transferred in real time to our laboratory at JAMSTEC. The present study obtains three-dimensional P-wave and S-wave seismic velocity models beneath the Kumano basin by employing an travel time tomography technique. We pick arrival times of P and S waves from the waveform data recorded by the DONET system during the period from January 2011 to December 2014. In order to improve the resolution in the deeper regions than the seismic area inside of the descending slab, we also pick arrival times from the seismic events occurred outside of this district. We use these picked arrival times adding to the JMA catalogue data in seismic tomography. From the obtained tomographic images, we find high velocity anomalies corresponding to the descending Philippine Sea slab. We also find low velocity anomalies under the high velocity slab clearly. There

  2. EPA guidance on how to improve the image of psychiatry and of the psychiatrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhugra, D; Sartorius, N; Fiorillo, A; Evans-Lacko, S; Ventriglio, A; Hermans, M H M; Vallon, P; Dales, J; Racetovic, G; Samochowiec, J; Roca Bennemar, M; Becker, T; Kurimay, T; Gaebel, W

    2015-03-01

    Stigma against mental illness and the mentally ill is well known. However, stigma against psychiatrists and mental health professionals is known but not discussed widely. Public attitudes and also those of other professionals affect recruitment into psychiatry and mental health services. The reasons for this discriminatory attitude are many and often not dissimilar to those held against mentally ill individuals. In this Guidance paper we present some of the factors affecting the image of psychiatry and psychiatrists which is perceived by the public at large. We look at the portrayal of psychiatry, psychiatrists in the media and literature which may affect attitudes. We also explore potential causes and explanations and propose some strategies in dealing with negative attitudes. Reduction in negative attitudes will improve recruitment and retention in psychiatry. We recommend that national psychiatric societies and other stakeholders, including patients, their families and carers, have a major and significant role to play in dealing with stigma, discrimination and prejudice against psychiatry and psychiatrists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Polymeric micelles for apoptosis-targeted optical imaging of cancer and intraoperative surgical guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunah Cho

    Full Text Available In a two-step strategy, an intraperitoneal (IP injection of poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly(ε-caprolactone (PEG-b-PCL micelles containing paclitaxel (PTX, cyclopamine (CYP, and gossypol (GSP at 30, 30, and 30 mg/kg, respectively, debulked tumor tissues by 1.3-fold, based on loss of bioluminescence with <10% body weight change, and induced apoptosis in peritoneal tumors when used as neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT in an ES-2-luc-bearing xenograft model for ovarian cancer. In a second step, a single intravenous (i.v. injection of apoptosis-targeting GFNFRLKAGAKIRFGS-PEG-b-PCL micelles containing a near-infrared (NIR fluorescence probe, DiR (1,1'-dioctadecyltetramethyl indotricarbocyanine iodide, resulted in increased peritoneal DiR accumulation in apoptosis-induced ES-2-luc tumor tissues (ex vivo by 1.5-fold compared with DiR molecules delivered by methoxy PEG-b-PCL micelles (non-targeted at 48 h after i.v. injection in a second step. As a result, a tandem of PEG-b-PCL micelles enabled high-resolution detection of ca. 1 mm diameter tumors, resulting in resection of approximately 90% of tumors, and a low peritoneal cancer index (PCI of ca. 7. Thus, a tandem of PEG-b-PCL micelles used for NCAT and NIR fluorescence imaging of therapy-induced apoptosis for intraoperative surgical guidance may be a promising treatment strategy for metastatic ovarian cancer.

  4. Accuracy of cranial coplanar beam therapy using an oblique, stereoscopic x-ray image guidance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinci, Justin P.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Neck, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    A system for measuring two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions in orthogonal anatomical planes in the cranium was developed and used to evaluate the accuracy of coplanar conformal therapy using ExacTrac image guidance. Dose distributions were measured in the axial, sagittal, and coronal planes using a CIRS (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc.) anthropomorphic head phantom with a custom internal film cassette. Sections of radiographic Kodak EDR2 film were cut, processed, and digitized using custom templates. Spatial and dosimetric accuracy and precision of the film system were assessed. BrainScan planned a coplanar-beam treatment to conformally irradiate a 2-cm-diameterx2-cm-long cylindrical planning target volume. Prior to delivery, phantom misalignments were imposed in combinations of ±8 mm offsets in each of the principal directions. ExacTrac x-ray correction was applied until the phantom was within an acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. (first two measurement sets) or 0.4 mm/0.4 deg. (last two measurement sets). Measured dose distributions from film were registered to the treatment plan dose calculations and compared. Alignment errors, displacement between midpoints of planned and measured 70% isodose contours (Δc), and positional errors of the 80% isodose line were evaluated using 49 2D film measurements (98 profiles). Comparison of common, but independent measurements of Δc showed that systematic errors in the measurement technique were 0.2 mm or less along all three anatomical axes and that random error averaged (σ±σ σ ) 0.29±0.06 mm for the acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. and 0.15±0.02 mm for the acceptance criteria of 0.4 mm/0.4 deg. . The latter was consistent with independent estimates that showed the precision of the measurement system was 0.3 mm (2σ). Values of Δc were as great as 0.9, 0.3, and 1.0 mm along the P-A, R-L, and I-S axes, respectively. Variations in Δc along the P-A axis were correlated to misalignments between laser

  5. Image guidance doses delivered during radiotherapy: Quantification, management, and reduction: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group 180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X; Alaei, Parham; Curran, Bruce; Flynn, Ryan; Gossman, Michael; Mackie, T Rock; Miften, Moyed; Morin, Richard; Xu, X George; Zhu, Timothy C

    2018-02-22

    With radiotherapy having entered the era of image guidance, or image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging procedures are routinely performed for patient positioning and target localization. The imaging dose delivered may result in excessive dose to sensitive organs and potentially increase the chance of secondary cancers and, therefore, needs to be managed. This task group was charged with: a) providing an overview on imaging dose, including megavoltage electronic portal imaging (MV EPI), kilovoltage digital radiography (kV DR), Tomotherapy MV-CT, megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) and kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT), and b) providing general guidelines for commissioning dose calculation methods and managing imaging dose to patients. We briefly review the dose to radiotherapy (RT) patients resulting from different image guidance procedures and list typical organ doses resulting from MV and kV image acquisition procedures. We provide recommendations for managing the imaging dose, including different methods for its calculation, and techniques for reducing it. The recommended threshold beyond which imaging dose should be considered in the treatment planning process is 5% of the therapeutic target dose. Although the imaging dose resulting from current kV acquisition procedures is generally below this threshold, the ALARA principle should always be applied in practice. Medical physicists should make radiation oncologists aware of the imaging doses delivered to patients under their care. Balancing ALARA with the requirement for effective target localization requires that imaging dose be managed based on the consideration of weighing risks and benefits to the patient. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Image-guided radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): Is MR guidance more effective than CT guidance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clasen, Stephan; Rempp, Hansjörg; Hoffmann, Rüdiger; Graf, Hansjörg; Pereira, Philippe L.; Claussen, Claus D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to retrospectively compare technique effectiveness of computed tomography (CT)-guided versus magnetic resonance (MR)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods: In 35 consecutive patients 53 CT-guided (n = 29) or MR-guided (n = 24) ablation procedures were performed in the treatment of 56 (CT: 29; MR: 27) HCC. The entire ablation procedure was performed at a multislice CT-scanner or an interventional 0.2-Tesla MR-scanner. Assessment of treatment response was based on dynamic MR imaging at 1.5 Tesla. The mean follow-up was 22.9 months. Primary technique effectiveness was assessed 4 months after ablation therapy. Secondary technique effectiveness was assessed 4 months after a facultative second ablation procedure. Primary and secondary technique effectiveness of CT-guided and MR-guided RF ablation was compared by using Chi-Square (likelihood ratio) test. Results: Primary technique effectiveness after a single session was achieved in 26/27 (96.3%) HCC after MR-guided RF ablation and 23/29 (79.3%) HCC after CT-guided RF ablation (Chi-Square: p = 0.04). Secondary technique effectiveness was achieved in 26/27 (96.3%) HCC after MR-guided RF ablation and in 26/29 (89.7%) HCC after CT-guided RF ablation (Chi-Square: p = 0.32). A local tumor progression was detected in 8/52 (15.4%) tumors after initial technique effectiveness. Major complications were detected after 3/53 (5.7%) ablation procedures. Conclusions: CT-guided and MR-guided RF ablations are locally effective therapies in the treatment of HCC. Due to a higher rate of primary technique effectiveness MR-guided RF ablation may reduce the number of required sessions for complete tumor treatment

  7. Volumetric Image Guidance Using Carina vs Spine as Registration Landmarks for Conventionally Fractionated Lung Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavoie, Caroline; Higgins, Jane; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Le, Lisa W. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Sun, Alexander; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.bezjak@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative accuracy of 2 image guided radiation therapy methods using carina vs spine as landmarks and then to identify which landmark is superior relative to tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: For 98 lung patients, 2596 daily image-guidance cone-beam computed tomography scans were analyzed. Tattoos were used for initial patient alignment; then, spine and carina registrations were performed independently. A separate analysis assessed the adequacy of gross tumor volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume coverage on cone-beam computed tomography using the initial, middle, and final fractions of radiation therapy. Coverage was recorded for primary tumor (T), nodes (N), and combined target (T+N). Three scenarios were compared: tattoos alignment, spine registration, and carina registration. Results: Spine and carina registrations identified setup errors {>=}5 mm in 35% and 46% of fractions, respectively. The mean vector difference between spine and carina matching had a magnitude of 3.3 mm. Spine and carina improved combined target coverage, compared with tattoos, in 50% and 34% (spine) to 54% and 46% (carina) of the first and final fractions, respectively. Carina matching showed greater combined target coverage in 17% and 23% of fractions for the first and final fractions, respectively; with spine matching, this was only observed in 4% (first) and 6% (final) of fractions. Carina matching provided superior nodes coverage at the end of radiation compared with spine matching (P=.0006), without compromising primary tumor coverage. Conclusion: Frequent patient setup errors occur in locally advanced lung cancer patients. Spine and carina registrations improved combined target coverage throughout the treatment course, but carina matching provided superior combined target coverage.

  8. Volumetric Image Guidance Using Carina vs Spine as Registration Landmarks for Conventionally Fractionated Lung Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoie, Caroline; Higgins, Jane; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Le, Lisa W.; Sun, Alexander; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John; Bezjak, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative accuracy of 2 image guided radiation therapy methods using carina vs spine as landmarks and then to identify which landmark is superior relative to tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: For 98 lung patients, 2596 daily image-guidance cone-beam computed tomography scans were analyzed. Tattoos were used for initial patient alignment; then, spine and carina registrations were performed independently. A separate analysis assessed the adequacy of gross tumor volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume coverage on cone-beam computed tomography using the initial, middle, and final fractions of radiation therapy. Coverage was recorded for primary tumor (T), nodes (N), and combined target (T+N). Three scenarios were compared: tattoos alignment, spine registration, and carina registration. Results: Spine and carina registrations identified setup errors ≥5 mm in 35% and 46% of fractions, respectively. The mean vector difference between spine and carina matching had a magnitude of 3.3 mm. Spine and carina improved combined target coverage, compared with tattoos, in 50% and 34% (spine) to 54% and 46% (carina) of the first and final fractions, respectively. Carina matching showed greater combined target coverage in 17% and 23% of fractions for the first and final fractions, respectively; with spine matching, this was only observed in 4% (first) and 6% (final) of fractions. Carina matching provided superior nodes coverage at the end of radiation compared with spine matching (P=.0006), without compromising primary tumor coverage. Conclusion: Frequent patient setup errors occur in locally advanced lung cancer patients. Spine and carina registrations improved combined target coverage throughout the treatment course, but carina matching provided superior combined target coverage.

  9. On-line cone beam CT image guidance for vocal cord tumor targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Gangsaas, Anne; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We are developing a technique for highly focused vocal cord irradiation in early glottic carcinoma to optimally treat a target volume confined to a single cord. This technique, in contrast with the conventional methods, aims at sparing the healthy vocal cord. As such a technique requires sub-mm daily targeting accuracy to be effective, we investigate the accuracy achievable with on-line kV-cone beam CT (CBCT) corrections. Materials and methods: CBCT scans were obtained in 10 early glottic cancer patients in each treatment fraction. The grey value registration available in X-ray volume imaging (XVI) software (Elekta, Synergy) was applied to a volume of interest encompassing the thyroid cartilage. After application of the thus derived corrections, residue displacements with respect to the planning CT scan were measured at clearly identifiable relevant landmarks. The intra- and inter-observer variations were also measured. Results: While before correction the systematic displacements of the vocal cords were as large as 2.4 ± 3.3 mm (cranial-caudal population mean ± SD Σ), daily CBCT registration and correction reduced these values to less than 0.2 ± 0.5 mm in all directions. Random positioning errors (SD σ) were reduced to less than 1 mm. Correcting only for translations and not for rotations did not appreciably affect this accuracy. The residue random displacements partly stem from intra-observer variations (SD = 0.2-0.6 mm). Conclusion: The use of CBCT for daily image guidance in combination with standard mask fixation reduced systematic and random set-up errors of the vocal cords to <1 mm prior to the delivery of each fraction dose. Thus, this facilitates the high targeting precision required for a single vocal cord irradiation.

  10. Analysis of the priority of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic task in cone-beam computed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study was designed to evaluate differences in the required visibility of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic tasks of implant planning and periapical diagnosis. Images of a real skull phantom were acquired under 24 combinations of different exposure conditions in a cone-beam computed tomography scanner (60, 70, 80, 90, 100, and 110 kV and 4, 6, 8, and 10 mA). Five radiologists evaluated the visibility of anatomic structures and the image quality for diagnostic tasks using a 6-point scale. The visibility of the periodontal ligament space showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for periapical diagnosis in both jaws. The visibility of the sinus floor and canal wall showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for implant planning. Variations in tube voltage were associated with significant differences in image quality for all diagnostic tasks. However, tube current did not show significant associations with the ability to use an image for implant planning. The required visibility of anatomic structures varied depending on the diagnostic task. Tube voltage was a more important exposure parameter for image quality than tube current. Different settings should be used for optimization and image quality evaluation depending on the diagnostic task.

  11. Analysis of the priority of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic task in cone-beam computed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate differences in the required visibility of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic tasks of implant planning and periapical diagnosis. Images of a real skull phantom were acquired under 24 combinations of different exposure conditions in a cone-beam computed tomography scanner (60, 70, 80, 90, 100, and 110 kV and 4, 6, 8, and 10 mA). Five radiologists evaluated the visibility of anatomic structures and the image quality for diagnostic tasks using a 6-point scale. The visibility of the periodontal ligament space showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for periapical diagnosis in both jaws. The visibility of the sinus floor and canal wall showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for implant planning. Variations in tube voltage were associated with significant differences in image quality for all diagnostic tasks. However, tube current did not show significant associations with the ability to use an image for implant planning. The required visibility of anatomic structures varied depending on the diagnostic task. Tube voltage was a more important exposure parameter for image quality than tube current. Different settings should be used for optimization and image quality evaluation depending on the diagnostic task

  12. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun; Pan, Tinsu; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling

  13. SU-E-P-41: Imaging Coordination of Cone Beam CT, On-Board Image Conjunction with Optical Image Guidance for SBRT Treatment with Respiratory Motion Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y; Campbell, J [INTEGRIS Cancer Institute of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To spare normal tissue for SBRT lung/liver patients, especially for patients with significant tumor motion, image guided respiratory motion management has been widely implemented in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate imaging coordination of cone beam CT, on-board X-ray image conjunction with optical image guidance for SBRT treatment with motion management. Methods: Currently in our clinic a Varian Novlis Tx was utilized for treating SBRT patients implementing CBCT. A BrainLAB X-ray ExacTrac imaging system in conjunction with optical guidance was primarily used for SRS patients. CBCT and X-ray imaging system were independently calibrated with 1.0 mm tolerance. For SBRT lung/liver patients, the magnitude of tumor motion was measured based-on 4DCT and the measurement was analyzed to determine if patients would be beneficial with respiratory motion management. For patients eligible for motion management, an additional CT with breath holding would be scanned and used as primary planning CT and as reference images for Cone beam CT. During the SBRT treatment, a CBCT with pause and continuing technology would be performed with patients holding breath, which may require 3–4 partially scanned CBCT to combine as a whole CBCT depending on how long patients capable of holding breath. After patients being setup by CBCT images, the ExactTrac X-ray imaging system was implemented with patients’ on-board X-ray images compared to breath holding CT-based DRR. Results: For breath holding patients SBRT treatment, after initially localizing patients with CBCT, we then position patients with ExacTrac X-ray and optical imaging system. The observed deviations of real-time optical guided position average at 3.0, 2.5 and 1.5 mm in longitudinal, vertical and lateral respectively based on 35 treatments. Conclusion: The respiratory motion management clinical practice improved our physician confidence level to give tighter tumor margin for sparing normal

  14. SU-E-P-41: Imaging Coordination of Cone Beam CT, On-Board Image Conjunction with Optical Image Guidance for SBRT Treatment with Respiratory Motion Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y; Campbell, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To spare normal tissue for SBRT lung/liver patients, especially for patients with significant tumor motion, image guided respiratory motion management has been widely implemented in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate imaging coordination of cone beam CT, on-board X-ray image conjunction with optical image guidance for SBRT treatment with motion management. Methods: Currently in our clinic a Varian Novlis Tx was utilized for treating SBRT patients implementing CBCT. A BrainLAB X-ray ExacTrac imaging system in conjunction with optical guidance was primarily used for SRS patients. CBCT and X-ray imaging system were independently calibrated with 1.0 mm tolerance. For SBRT lung/liver patients, the magnitude of tumor motion was measured based-on 4DCT and the measurement was analyzed to determine if patients would be beneficial with respiratory motion management. For patients eligible for motion management, an additional CT with breath holding would be scanned and used as primary planning CT and as reference images for Cone beam CT. During the SBRT treatment, a CBCT with pause and continuing technology would be performed with patients holding breath, which may require 3–4 partially scanned CBCT to combine as a whole CBCT depending on how long patients capable of holding breath. After patients being setup by CBCT images, the ExactTrac X-ray imaging system was implemented with patients’ on-board X-ray images compared to breath holding CT-based DRR. Results: For breath holding patients SBRT treatment, after initially localizing patients with CBCT, we then position patients with ExacTrac X-ray and optical imaging system. The observed deviations of real-time optical guided position average at 3.0, 2.5 and 1.5 mm in longitudinal, vertical and lateral respectively based on 35 treatments. Conclusion: The respiratory motion management clinical practice improved our physician confidence level to give tighter tumor margin for sparing normal

  15. Implementation of vibration correction schemes to the evaluation of a turbulent flow in an open channel by tomographic particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earl, T A; Thomas, L; David, L; Cochard, S; Tremblais, B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate and quantify the effect of vibration on experimental tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV) measurements. The experiment consisted of turbulence measurements in an open channel flow. Specifically, five trash rack assemblies, composed of regular grids, divided a 5 m long flume into four sequential, identical pools. This set-up established a globally stationary flow, with each pool generating a controlled amount of turbulence that is reset at every trash rack. TPIV measurements were taken in the central pool. To eliminate the vibration from the measurements, three vibration correction regimes are proposed and compared to a global volume self-calibration (Wieneke 2008 Exp. Fluids 45 549–56), a now standard calibration procedure in TPIV. As the amplitude of the vibrations was small, it was possible to extract acceptable reconstruction re-projection qualities (Q I  > 75%) and velocity fields from the standard treatment. This paper investigates the effect of vibration on the cross-correlation signal and turbulence statistics, and shows the improvement to velocity field data by several correction schemes. A synthetic model was tested that simulated camera vibration to demonstrate its effects on key velocity parameters and to observe the effects on reconstruction and cross-correlation metrics. This work has implications for experimental measurements where vibrations are unavoidable and seemingly undetectable such as those in large open channel flows. (paper)

  16. 99mTc-DMSA renal uptake in urological diseases measured from renal tomographic images using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Yukihiko; Tashiro, Kazuya; Kishimoto, Koichi; Wada, Tetsuro; Torii, Shinichiro; Yoshigoe, Fukuo; Machida, Toyohei; Yamada, Hideo; Toyama, Hinako.

    1987-01-01

    To determine renal function, 99m Tc-DMSA renal uptake was measured from renal tomographic images obtained by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A total of 77 tests was conducted on 73 patients with various diseases in the kidneys and urinary tract to determine renal uptake. The correlation coefficient(r) between total renal volume and total renal uptake was 0.3509 and that between renal volume and uptake of 143 kidneys was 0.5433. In 62 patients whose creatinine clearance could be measured, the correlation coefficient between creatinine clearance and total renal volume was 0.2352, and that between creatinine clearance and total renal uptake was 0.8854, that is, creatinine clearance correlated well with renal uptake. Renal volume and uptake determined in 10 normal male and 10 normal female adults were 220 ml and 26.8 % for the right kidney and 239 ml and 27.6 % for the left kidney for the males and 206 ml and 26.4 % (right) and 237 ml and 27.9 % (left) for the females. This method, which requires no blood or urine collection, is very useful as an individual kidney function test to evaluate individual kidney function and to understand kidney function before and after operation in patients with renal and urinary diseases. (author)

  17. Functional optoacoustic imaging of moving objects using microsecond-delay acquisition of multispectral three-dimensional tomographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Bay, Erwin; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The breakthrough capacity of optoacoustics for three-dimensional visualization of dynamic events in real time has been recently showcased. Yet, efficient spectral unmixing for functional imaging of entire volumetric regions is significantly challenged by motion artifacts in concurrent acquisitions at multiple wavelengths. Here, we introduce a method for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral volumetric datasets by introducing a microsecond-level delay between excitation laser pulses at different wavelengths. Robust performance is demonstrated by real-time volumetric visualization of functional blood parametrers in human vasculature with a handheld matrix array optoacoustic probe. This approach can avert image artifacts imposed by velocities greater than 2 m/s, thus, does not only facilitate imaging influenced by respiratory, cardiac or other intrinsic fast movements in living tissues, but can achieve artifact-free imaging in the presence of more significant motion, e.g. abrupt displacements during handheld-mode operation in a clinical environment. PMID:25073504

  18. Mandibular canal branches supplying the mandibular third molar observed on cone beam computed tomographic images: Reports of four cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seo; Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol

    2009-01-01

    Bifid mandibular canal can be an anatomic variation. This condition can lead to complication when performing mandibular anesthesia or during extraction of lower third molar, placement of implants and surgery in the mandible. Four patients underwent preoperative imaging for extraction of third molars using CBCT (CB Mercuray, Hitachi, Japan). The axial images were processed with CBworks program 2.1 (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). The branches for supplying the lower third molar were identified mainly on cross-sectional and panoramic images of CBCT. Since the location and configuration of mandibular canal variations are important in any mandibular surgical procedures, we report 4 cases of bifid mandibular canal with panoramic and the CBCT images.

  19. Mandibular canal branches supplying the mandibular third molar observed on cone beam computed tomographic images: Reports of four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seo; Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Bifid mandibular canal can be an anatomic variation. This condition can lead to complication when performing mandibular anesthesia or during extraction of lower third molar, placement of implants and surgery in the mandible. Four patients underwent preoperative imaging for extraction of third molars using CBCT (CB Mercuray, Hitachi, Japan). The axial images were processed with CBworks program 2.1 (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). The branches for supplying the lower third molar were identified mainly on cross-sectional and panoramic images of CBCT. Since the location and configuration of mandibular canal variations are important in any mandibular surgical procedures, we report 4 cases of bifid mandibular canal with panoramic and the CBCT images.

  20. A Test of the Transdiagnostic Dopamine Hypothesis of Psychosis Using Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging in Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhar, Sameer; Nour, Matthew M; Veronese, Mattia; Rogdaki, Maria; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Azis, Matilda; Turkheimer, Federico; McGuire, Philip; Young, Allan H; Howes, Oliver D

    2017-12-01

    The dopamine hypothesis suggests that dopamine abnormalities underlie psychosis, irrespective of diagnosis, implicating dopamine dysregulation in bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia, in line with the research domain criteria approach. However, this hypothesis has not been directly examined in individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder with psychosis. To test whether dopamine synthesis capacity is elevated in bipolar disorder with psychosis and how this compares with schizophrenia and matched controls and to examine whether dopamine synthesis capacity is associated with psychotic symptom severity, irrespective of diagnostic class. This cross-sectional case-control positron emission tomographic study was performed in the setting of first-episode psychosis services in an inner-city area (London, England). Sixty individuals participated in the study (22 with bipolar psychosis [18 antipsychotic naive or free], 16 with schizophrenia [14 antipsychotic naive or free], and 22 matched controls) and underwent fluorodihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine ([18F]-DOPA) positron emission tomography to examine dopamine synthesis capacity. Standardized clinical measures, including the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning, were administered. The study dates were March 2013 to November 2016. Dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) and clinical measures (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning). The mean (SD) ages of participants were 23.6 (3.6) years in 22 individuals with bipolar psychosis (13 male), 26.3 (4.4) years in 16 individuals with schizophrenia (14 male), and 24.5 (4.5) years in controls (14 male). There was a significant group difference in striatal dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) (F2,57 = 6.80, P = .002). Kicer was significantly elevated in both the bipolar group (mean [SD], 13.18 [1.08] × 10-3 min-1; P = .002) and the schizophrenia

  1. Imaging of Archaeological Remains at Barcombe Roman Villa using Microwave Tomographic Depictions of Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, F.; Utsi, E.; Alani, A.; Persico, R.

    2012-04-01

    to 600MHz (the frequency range of the antennas used). The 2-dimensional plots were formed into a 3-dimensional cube and time slices extracted, on the basis of maximum signal return, at 16ns, 25ns and 29ns. In this work, we show the reprocessing of the GPR data via a microwave tomographic approach based on a linear approximation of the inverse scattering problem [4]. In particular, the effectiveness of this approach ensures a reliable and high resolution representation/visualization of the scene very large in terms of probing wavelength. This has been made possible thanks to the adoption of the approach presented in [5] where the 3D representation was achieved by performing 2D reconstruction and after obtaining the 3D Cube from these 2D reconstructed profiles. In particular, the re-examination of GPR data using microwave tomography has allowed to improve definition of the villa outline and to detect earlier prehistoric remains. [1] Rudling, D., & Butler, C. "Roundhouse to Villa" in Sussex Past & Present 95, pp 6 - 7, 2001. [2] Utsi, E., Wortley Villa paper currently in preparation of EAGE special issue. [3] Utsi, E., & Alani, A. "Barcombe Roman Villa: An Exercise in GPR Time Slicingand Comparative Geophysics", in Koppenjan, S., & Hua, L. (eds) Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar, 2002. [4] F. Soldovieri, R. Persico, E. Utsi, V. Utsi, "The application of inverse scattering techniques with ground penetrating radar to the problem of rebar location in concrete", NDT & E International, Vol. 39, Issue 7, October 2006, Pages 602-607. [5] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, E. Utsi, "Microwave tomography for processing of GPR data at Ballachulish", Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, vol.7, no. 2, pp. 164-173, June 2010

  2. Myocardial infarction in rats: High-resolution single-photon emission tomographic imaging with a pinhole collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukihiro, Masashi; Inoue, Tomio; Iwasaki, Tsutomu; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi; Erlandsson, K.; Endo, Keigo

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of myocardial imaging by means of high-resolution single-photon emission tomography (SPET) with a pinhole collimator in rats with experimental infarction. Myocardial infarctions were induced in male Wistar rats by ligation of the left coronary artery for 30 min, followed by reperfusion. Two days after the reperfusion, pinhole SPET was performed after the intravenous administration of 111 MBq of thallium-201 chloride, using a rotating gamma camera equipped with a pinhole insert (2.0-mm aperature) in a low-energy pinhole collimator. SPET projection data were collected at 6 increments over 360 using a 4-cm radius of rotation to reconstruct the short- and long-axis images. Projection data were acquired in 15 or 30 s, the SPET imaging being accomplished within 40 min after the injection of 201 Tl. After SPET, the rats were sacrificed to remove the hearts for autoradiography (ARG) and nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) staining as a visual correlative study. Quantitative correlative studies between pinhole SPET and ARG were performed with linear regression analysis for infarct size and distribution properties (relative counts on SPET images and relative density on autoradiographs) on the short-axis sections. All infarcts (4 mm in minimum diameter) in seven rats were detected by pinhole SPET. The SPET images in rats with or without myocardial infarction were consistent within the findings of ARG and NBT staining. There were significant correlations between pinhole SPET and ARG with respect to the infarct size (r=0.933, P<0.001; n=15) and the relative radiotracer distribution (r=0.931, P<0.001; n=68). This study therefore confirmed the accuracy of myocardial pinhole SPET imaging in rats with myocardial infarction. This method may partially substitute for ARG and prove useful for assessing new myocardial imaging agents in vivo in small laboratory animals. (orig.)

  3. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are presented of a tomographic scanning apparatus, its rotational assembly, and the control and circuit elements, with particular reference to the amplifier and multiplexing circuits enabling detector signal calibration. (U.K.)

  4. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification relates to a tomographic scanning apparatus using a fan beam and digital output signal, and particularly to the design of the gas-pressurized ionization detection system. (U.K.)

  5. In vivo X-Ray Computed Tomographic Imaging of Soft Tissue with Native, Intravenous, or Oral Contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathen, Connor A.; Foje, Nathan; van Avermaete, Tony; Miramontes, Bernadette; Chapaman, Sarah E.; Sasser, Todd A.; Kannan, Raghuraman; Gerstler, Steven; Leevy, W. Matthew

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the most commonly utilized anatomical imaging modalities for both research and clinical purposes. CT combines high-resolution, three-dimensional data with relatively fast acquisition to provide a solid platform for non-invasive human or specimen imaging. The primary limitation of CT is its inability to distinguish many soft tissues based on native contrast. While bone has high contrast within a CT image due to its material density from calcium phosphate, soft tissue is less dense and many are homogenous in density. This presents a challenge in distinguishing one type of soft tissue from another. A couple exceptions include the lungs as well as fat, both of which have unique densities owing to the presence of air or bulk hydrocarbons, respectively. In order to facilitate X-ray CT imaging of other structures, a range of contrast agents have been developed to selectively identify and visualize the anatomical properties of individual tissues. Most agents incorporate atoms like iodine, gold, or barium because of their ability to absorb X-rays, and thus impart contrast to a given organ system. Here we review the strategies available to visualize lung, fat, brain, kidney, liver, spleen, vasculature, gastrointestinal tract, and liver tissues of living mice using either innate contrast, or commercial injectable or ingestible agents with selective perfusion. Further, we demonstrate how each of these approaches will facilitate the non-invasive, longitudinal, in vivo imaging of pre-clinical disease models at each anatomical site. PMID:23711461

  6. Comparison of Amino Acid Positron Emission Tomographic Radiotracers for Molecular Imaging of Primary and Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Juhász

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an imaging technology that can detect and characterize tumors based on their molecular and biochemical properties, such as altered glucose, nucleoside, or amino acid metabolism. PET plays a significant role in the diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment of various cancers, including brain tumors. In this article, we compare uptake mechanisms and the clinical performance of the amino acid PET radiotracers (L-[methyl-11C]methionine [MET], 18F-fluoroethyl-tyrosine [FET], 18F-fluoro-L- dihydroxy-phenylalanine [FDOPA], and 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan [AMT] most commonly used for brain tumor imaging. First, we discuss and compare the mechanisms of tumoral transport and accumulation, the basis of differential performance of these radioligands in clinical studies. Then we summarize studies that provided direct comparisons among these amino acid tracers and to clinically used 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose [FDG] PET imaging. We also discuss how tracer kinetic analysis can enhance the clinical information obtained from amino acid PET images. We discuss both similarities and differences in potential clinical value for each radioligand. This comparative review can guide which radiotracer to favor in future clinical trials aimed at defining the role of these molecular imaging modalities in the clinical management of brain tumor patients.

  7. Motion compensation in a tomographic ultrasound imaging system: Toward volumetric scans of a limb for prosthetic socket design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranger, Bryan J; Feigin, Micha; Pestrov, Nikita; Zhang, Xiang; Lempitsky, Victor; Herr, Hugh M; Anthony, Brian W

    2015-08-01

    Current methods of prosthetic socket fabrication remain subjective and ineffective at creating an interface to the human body that is both comfortable and functional. Though there has been recent success using methods like magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical modeling, a low-cost, streamlined, and repeatable process has not been fully demonstrated. Medical ultrasonography, which has significant potential to expand its clinical applications, is being pursued to acquire data that may quantify and improve the design process and fabrication of prosthetic sockets. This paper presents a new multi-modal imaging approach for acquiring volumetric images of a human limb, specifically focusing on how motion of the limb is compensated for using optical imagery.

  8. Image Guidance Based on Prostate Position for Prostate Cancer Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Wagner, Marcus; Indelicato, Daniel; Fryer, Amber; Horne, David; Chellini, Angela; McKenzie, Craig; Lawlor, Paula; Mahajan, Chaitali; Li Zuofeng; Lin Liyong; Keole, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the target coverage for proton therapy with and without image guidance and daily prebeam reorientation. Methods and Materials: A total of 207 prostate positions were analyzed for 9 prostate cancer patients treated using our low-risk prostate proton therapy protocol (University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute 001). The planning target volume was defined as the prostate plus a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superoinferior extension. The prostate was repositioned using 5- and 10-mm shifts (anteriorly, inferiorly, posteriorly, and superiorly) and for Points A-D using a combination of 10-mm multidimensional movements (anteriorly or inferiorly; posteriorly or superiorly; and left or right). The beams were then realigned using the new prostate position. The prescription dose was 78 Gray equivalent (GE) to 95% of the planning target volume. Results: For small movements in the anterior, inferior, and posterior directions within the planning target volume (≤5 mm), treatment realignment demonstrated small, but significant, improvements in the clinical target volume (CTV) coverage to the prescribed dose (78 GE). The anterior and posterior shifts also significantly increased the minimal CTV dose (Δ +1.59 GE). For prostate 10-mm movements in the inferior, posterior, and superior directions, the beam realignment produced larger and significant improvements for both the CTV V 78 (Δ +6.4%) and the CTV minimal dose (Δ +8.22 GE). For the compounded 10-mm multidimensional shifts, realignment significantly improved the CTV V 78 (Δ +11.8%) and CTV minimal dose (Δ +23.6 GE). After realignment, the CTV minimal dose was >76.6 GE (>98%) for all points (A-D). Conclusion: Proton beam realignment after target shift will enhance CTV coverage for different prostate positions

  9. Tomographic PIV: principles and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarano, F

    2013-01-01

    A survey is given of the major developments in three-dimensional velocity field measurements using the tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The appearance of tomo-PIV dates back seven years from the present review (Elsinga et al 2005a 6th Int. Symp. PIV (Pasadena, CA)) and this approach has rapidly spread as a versatile, robust and accurate technique to investigate three-dimensional flows (Arroyo and Hinsch 2008 Topics in Applied Physics vol 112 ed A Schröder and C E Willert (Berlin: Springer) pp 127–54) and turbulence physics in particular. A considerable number of applications have been achieved over a wide range of flow problems, which requires the current status and capabilities of tomographic PIV to be reviewed. The fundamental aspects of the technique are discussed beginning from hardware considerations for volume illumination, imaging systems, their configurations and system calibration. The data processing aspects are of uppermost importance: image pre-processing, 3D object reconstruction and particle motion analysis are presented with their fundamental aspects along with the most advanced approaches. Reconstruction and cross-correlation algorithms, attaining higher measurement precision, spatial resolution or higher computational efficiency, are also discussed. The exploitation of 3D and time-resolved (4D) tomographic PIV data includes the evaluation of flow field pressure on the basis of the flow governing equation. The discussion also covers a-posteriori error analysis techniques. The most relevant applications of tomo-PIV in fluid mechanics are surveyed, covering experiments in air and water flows. In measurements in flow regimes from low-speed to supersonic, most emphasis is given to the complex 3D organization of turbulent coherent structures. (topical review)

  10. Transorbital Glue Embolization of a Recurrent Venous Varix Using Real-Time Image Guidance in the Neuroangiography Suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Sophia F; Brunozzi, Denise; Setabutr, Pete; Hussein, Ahmed E; Charbel, Fady T; Alaraj, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Orbital lesions are challenging to access due to their location amid critical anatomic structures. Here, we demonstrate direct transorbital cannulation of an orbital venous varix using image guidance. A 36-year-old male was diagnosed with a left orbital venous varix approximately 5 years ago at an outside institution. He subsequently underwent surgery for direct intraoperative embolization of the venous varix followed by surgical resection. The patient recently presented to us with left eye pain, proptosis, double vision, and conjunctival hemorrhage precipitated by straining or lying flat. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging showed recurrence of the venous varix, which was then confirmed with digital subtraction angiography and intraprocedural computed tomography (DynaCT, Siemens Healthineers, Erlangen, Germany). Due to scarring from the previous surgery, percutaneous transorbital embolization of the venous varix was planned. The needle trajectory was determined and also visualized in real-time using image guidance (Needle Guidance, Siemens Healthineers). Once the needle reached the desired target, n-butyl cyanoacrylate glue (Codman Neuro, San Jose, California) was injected until nearly the entire venous varix was occluded. There were no complications, and at his postoperative visit the patient reported resolution of all symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. COMBINATION OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING CHARACTERISTICS OF MEDIAL RETROPHARYNGEAL LYMPH NODES AND NASAL PASSAGES AIDS DISCRIMINATION BETWEEN RHINITIS AND NEOPLASIA IN CATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemanic, Sarah; Hollars, Katelyn; Nelson, Nathan C; Bobe, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Feline nasal diseases are a diagnostic challenge. The objective of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to determine whether computed tomography (CT) imaging characteristics of the medial retropharyngeal lymph nodes (MRPLN), alone or in combination with CT imaging characteristics of the nasal passages, could aid in differentiation between rhinitis and nasal neoplasia. Cats were recruited from record archives at two veterinary facilities during the period of 2008-2012. Selection criteria were presentation for chronic nasal discharge, contrast-enhanced CT of the head that included the MRPLN, and rhinoscopic nasal biopsy resulting in diagnosis of rhinitis or neoplasia. For each CT scan, two board-certified veterinary radiologists recorded MRPLN size, attenuation, heterogeneity, contrast-medium enhancement, margination, shape, presence of a lymph node hilus, perinodal fat, turbinate lysis, paranasal bone lysis, and nasal mass. Both readers were unaware of patient information at the time of CT interpretation. Thirty-four cats with rhinitis and 22 cats with neoplasia were included. Computed tomographic characteristics significantly associated with neoplasia included abnormal MRPLN hilus (OR 5.1), paranasal bone lysis (OR 5.6), turbinate lysis (5.6), mass (OR 26.1), MRPLN height asymmetry (OR 4.5), and decreased MRPLN precontrast heterogeneity (OR 7.0). The combined features predictive of neoplasia were a nasal mass with abnormal hilus (OR 47.7); lysis of turbinates/paranasal bones with abnormal MRPLN hilus (OR 16.2). Findings supported the hypothesis that combining CT features of the nasal passages and MRPLN aided in differentiating rhinitis from neoplasia in cats. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  12. Impact of respiratory movement on the computed tomographic images of small lung tumors in three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Shinichi; Shirato, Hiroki; Kagei, Kenji; Nishioka, Takeshi; Bo Xo; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Hashimoto, Seiko; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning has often been performed while patients breathe freely, under the assumption that the computed tomography (CT) images represent the average position of the tumor. We investigated the impact of respiratory movement on the free-breathing CT images of small lung tumors using sequential CT scanning at the same table position. Methods: Using a preparatory free-breathing CT scan, the patient's couch was fixed at the position where each tumor showed its maximum diameter on image. For 16 tumors, over 20 sequential CT images were taken every 2 s, with a 1-s acquisition time occurring during free breathing. For each tumor, the distance between the surface of the CT table and the posterior border of the tumor was measured to determine whether the edge of the tumor was sufficiently included in the planning target volume (PTV) during normal breathing. Results: In the sequential CT scanning, the tumor itself was not visible in the examination slice in 21% (75/357) of cases. There were statistically significant differences between lower lobe tumors (39.4%, 71/180) and upper lobe tumors (0%, 0/89) (p < 0.01) and between lower lobe tumors and middle lobe tumor (8.9%, 4/45) (p < 0.01) in the incidence of the disappearance of the tumor from the image. The mean difference between the maximum and minimum distances between the surface of the CT table and the posterior border of the tumor was 6.4 mm (range 2.1-24.4). Conclusion: Three-dimensional treatment planning for lung carcinoma would significantly underdose many lesions, especially those in the lower lobe. The excess 'safety margin' might call into question any additional benefit of 3D treatment. More work is required to determine how to control respiratory movement

  13. In vivo X-Ray Computed Tomographic Imaging of Soft Tissue with Native, Intravenous, or Oral Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Matthew Leevy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available X-ray Computed Tomography (CT is one of the most commonly utilized anatomical imaging modalities for both research and clinical purposes. CT combines high-resolution, three-dimensional data with relatively fast acquisition to provide a solid platform for non-invasive human or specimen imaging. The primary limitation of CT is its inability to distinguish many soft tissues based on native contrast. While bone has high contrast within a CT image due to its material density from calcium phosphate, soft tissue is less dense and many are homogenous in density. This presents a challenge in distinguishing one type of soft tissue from another. A couple exceptions include the lungs as well as fat, both of which have unique densities owing to the presence of air or bulk hydrocarbons, respectively. In order to facilitate X-ray CT imaging of other structures, a range of contrast agents have been developed to selectively identify and visualize the anatomical properties of individual tissues. Most agents incorporate atoms like iodine, gold, or barium because of their ability to absorb X-rays, and thus impart contrast to a given organ system. Here we review the strategies available to visualize lung, fat, brain, kidney, liver, spleen, vasculature, gastrointestinal tract, and liver tissues of living mice using either innate contrast, or commercial injectable or ingestible agents with selective perfusion. Further, we demonstrate how each of these approaches will facilitate the non-invasive, longitudinal, in vivo imaging of pre-clinical disease models at each anatomical site.

  14. Validation of 3'-deoxy-3'-fluorine-18-fluorothymidine positron emission tomography for image-guidance in biologically adaptive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axente, Marian

    Accelerated tumor cell repopulation during radiation therapy is one of the leading causes for low survival rates of head-and-neck cancer patients. The therapeutic effectiveness of radiotherapy could be improved by selectively targeting proliferating tumor subvolumes with higher doses of radiation. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 3'-deoxy-3 '-18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) has shown great potential as a non-invasive approach to characterizing the proliferation status of tumors. This thesis focuses on histopathological validation of FLT PET imaging specifically for image-guidance applications in biologically adaptive radiotherapy. The lack of experimental data supporting the use of FLT PET imaging for radiotherapy guidance is addressed by developing a novel methodology for histopathological validation of PET imaging. Using this new approach, the spatial concordance between the intratumoral pattern of FLT uptake and the spatial distribution of cell proliferation is demonstrated in animal tumors. First, a two-dimensional analysis is conducted comparing the microscopic FLT uptake as imaged with autoradiography and the distribution of active cell proliferation markers imaged with immunofluorescent microscopy. It was observed that when tumors present a pattern of cell proliferation that is highly dispersed throughout the tumor, even high-resolution imaging modalities such as autoradiography could not accurately determine the extent and spatial distribution of proliferative tumor subvolumes. While microscopic spatial coincidence between high FLT uptake regions and actively proliferative subvolumes was demonstrated in tumors with highly compartmentalized/aggregated features of cell proliferation, there were no conclusive results across the entire set of utilized tumor specimens. This emphasized the need for addressing the limited resolution of FLT PET when imaging microscopic patterns of cell proliferation. This issue was emphasized in the second part of the

  15. Algorithm for three dimension reconstruction of magnetic resonance tomographs and X-ray images based on Fast Fourier Transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, Josiane M.; Traina, Agma Juci M.; Cruvinel, Paulo E.

    1995-01-01

    This work presents an algorithm for three-dimensional digital image reconstruction. Such algorithms based on the combination of both a Fast Fourier Transform method with Hamming Window and the use of a tri-linear interpolation function. The algorithm allows not only the generation of three-dimensional spatial spin distribution maps for Magnetic Resonance Tomography data but also X and Y-rays linear attenuation coefficient maps for CT scanners. Results demonstrates the usefulness of the algorithm in three-dimensional image reconstruction by doing first two-dimensional reconstruction and rather after interpolation. The algorithm was developed in C++ language, and there are two available versions: one under the DOS environment, and the other under the UNIX/Sun environment. (author)

  16. Image reconstruction for tomographic mapping of cerebral hemodynamics using time-domain detection: simulation and phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Tanikawa, Yukari; Yamada, Yukio

    2003-10-01

    One of the primary applications of diffuse optical imaging is to localize the changes in the cerebral oxygenation during physical or mental activities. Up to now, data from an optical imager is simply presented as a two-dimensional (2-D) topographic map using the modified Beer-Lambert law that assumes the homogeneous optical properties beneath each optode. Due to the highly heterogeneous nature of the optical properties in the brain, the assumption are evidently invalid, leading to both low spatial resolution and inaccurate quantification in the assessment of hemodynamic changes. To cope with the difficulties, we propose a nonlinear image reconstruction algorithm for a two-layered slab geometry using time-resolved reflected light. The algorithm is based on the previously developed generalized pulse spectrum technique, and implemented within a semi three-dimensional (3-D) framework to conform to the topographic visualization and to reduce computational load. We demonstrate the advantages of the algorithm in quantifying simulated changes in hemoglobin concentrations and investigate its robustness to the uncertainties in the cortical structure and optical properties. The methodology is also validated with experiments on a layered phantom.

  17. A method for reconstructing tomographic images of evoked neural activity with electrical impedance tomography using intracranial planar arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristovich, Kirill Y; dos Santos, Gustavo Sato; Packham, Brett C; Holder, David S

    2014-06-01

    A method is presented for reconstructing images of fast neural evoked activity in rat cerebral cortex recorded with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and a 6 × 5 mm(2) epicortical planar 30 electrode array. A finite element model of the rat brain and inverse solution with Tikhonov regularization were optimized in order to improve spatial resolution and accuracy. The optimized FEM mesh had 7 M tetrahedral elements, with finer resolution (0.05 mm) near the electrodes. A novel noise-based image processing technique based on t-test significance improved depth localization accuracy from 0.5 to 0.1 mm. With the improvements, a simulated perturbation 0.5 mm in diameter could be localized in a region 4 × 5 mm(2) under the centre of the array to a depth of 1.4 mm, thus covering all six layers of the cerebral cortex with an accuracy of brain hippocampal or thalamic activity could be localized with an accuracy of 0.5 mm with a 256 electrode array covering the brain. Parallel studies have achieved a temporal resolution of 2 ms for imaging fast neural activity by EIT during evoked activity; this encourages the view that fast neural EIT can now resolve the propagation of depolarization-related fast impedance changes in cerebral cortex and deeper in the brain with a resolution equal or greater to the dimension of a cortical column.

  18. Emerging tomographic methods within the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Geir Anton

    2013-01-01

    Since industrial process tomography was introduced as a concept almost two decades ago, the considerable progress within a large variety of sensing modalities has to a large extent been technology driven. Industrial tomography applications may be divided into three categories: 1) Laboratory systems, 2) Field equipment for diagnostics and mapping purposes, and 3) Permanently installed systems. Examples on emerging methods on all categories will be presented, either from R and D at the University of Bergen and/or our industrial partners. Most developments are within the first category, where tomographs are used to provide better understanding of various processes such as pipe flow, separators, mixers and reactors. Here tomographic data is most often used to provide better process knowledge, for reference measurements and validation and development of process models, and finally for development for instruments and process equipment. The requirement here may be either high spatial resolution or high temporal resolution, or combinations of these. Tomographic field measurements are applied to either to inspect processes or equipment on a regular base or at faulty or irregular operation, or to map multicomponent systems such petroleum reservoirs, their structure and the distribution gas, oil and water within them. The latter will only be briefly touched upon here. Tomographic methods are increasingly being used for process and equipment diagnostics. The requirements vary and solutions based on repetition of single measurements, such as in column scanning, to full tomographic systems where there is sufficiently space or access. The third category is tomographic instruments that are permanently installed in situ in a process. These need not provide full tomographic images and instruments with fewer views are often preferred to reduce complexity and increase the instrument reliability. (author)

  19. Emerging tomographic methods within the petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Geir Anton, E-mail: geir.johansen@ift.uib.no [University of Bergen (UiB), Bergen, (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    Since industrial process tomography was introduced as a concept almost two decades ago, the considerable progress within a large variety of sensing modalities has to a large extent been technology driven. Industrial tomography applications may be divided into three categories: 1) Laboratory systems, 2) Field equipment for diagnostics and mapping purposes, and 3) Permanently installed systems. Examples on emerging methods on all categories will be presented, either from R and D at the University of Bergen and/or our industrial partners. Most developments are within the first category, where tomographs are used to provide better understanding of various processes such as pipe flow, separators, mixers and reactors. Here tomographic data is most often used to provide better process knowledge, for reference measurements and validation and development of process models, and finally for development for instruments and process equipment. The requirement here may be either high spatial resolution or high temporal resolution, or combinations of these. Tomographic field measurements are applied to either to inspect processes or equipment on a regular base or at faulty or irregular operation, or to map multicomponent systems such petroleum reservoirs, their structure and the distribution gas, oil and water within them. The latter will only be briefly touched upon here. Tomographic methods are increasingly being used for process and equipment diagnostics. The requirements vary and solutions based on repetition of single measurements, such as in column scanning, to full tomographic systems where there is sufficiently space or access. The third category is tomographic instruments that are permanently installed in situ in a process. These need not provide full tomographic images and instruments with fewer views are often preferred to reduce complexity and increase the instrument reliability. (author)

  20. Decomposition of time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, P.J.; Violato, D.; Scarano, F.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on a transitional water jet at a Reynolds number of Re = 5,000. Flow fields have been obtained by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry capturing all relevant spatial and temporal scales. The measured threedimensional flow fields have

  1. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of a water-jet for low volume harvesting of fat tissue for regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobek Christoph

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV measurements of a water-jet for water-assisted liposuction (WAL are carried out to investigate the distribution of velocity and therefore momentum and acting force on the human sub-cutaneous fat tissue. These results shall validate CFD simulations and force sensor measurements of the water-jet and support the development of a new WAL device that is able to harvest low volumes of fat tissue for regenerative medicine even gentler than regular WAL devices.

  2. Assessment of the exercise electrocardiogram in women versus men using tomographic myocardial perfusion imaging as the reference standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T D; Roger, V L; Milavetz, J J; Hopfenspirger, M R; Milavetz, D L; Hodge, D O; Gibbons, R J

    2001-04-01

    The exercise electrocardiogram (ECG) is widely believed to be less accurate in women, primarily due to a high prevalence of false-positive tests. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative accuracy of the exercise ECG in women versus men in 8,671 patients (3,213 women, 5,458 men) using myocardial perfusion imaging as the reference standard. More women (14%) than men (10%) had a false-positive ECG (p women (17% vs 32%, p men, women had lower test sensitivity (30% vs 42%, p higher specificity (82% vs 78%, p = 0.002), negative predictive value (78% vs 52%, p accuracy (69% vs 58%, p women (12% vs 19%, p women, 838 men), the false-positive electrocardiographic rate was again higher in women (13% vs 7%, p = 0.003), but neither specificity (69% vs 74%, p = NS) nor accuracy (60% vs 66%, p = NS) was different between the sexes. Thus, the percentage of patients with a false-positive exercise ECG was higher in women than men but low in absolute terms (women. These results suggest that gender should not be a major determinant for selecting stress imaging over standard treadmill testing.

  3. Quantification of normative ranges and baseline predictors of aortoventricular interface dimensions using multi-detector computed tomographic imaging in patients without aortic valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gooley, Robert P.; Cameron, James D.; Soon, Jennifer; Loi, Duncan; Chitale, Gauri; Syeda, Rifath; Meredith, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • MDCT imaging of the aortoventricular interface is increasingly common. • We present normative ranges for aortoventricular interface dimensions. • Such techniques and ranges should be used to standardise reporting and research. - Abstract: Background: Multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) assessment of the aortoventricular interface has gained increased importance with the advent of minimally invasive treatment modalities for aortic and mitral valve disease. This has included a standardised technique of identifying a plane through the nadir of each coronary cusp, the basal plane, and taking further measurements in relation to this plane. Despite this there is no published data defining normal ranges for these aortoventricular metrics in a healthy cohort. This study seeks to quantify normative ranges for MDCT derived aortoventricular dimensions and evaluate baseline demographic and anthropomorphic associates of these measurements in a normal cohort. Methods: 250 consecutive patients undergoing MDCT coronary angiography were included. Aortoventricular dimensions at multiple levels of the aortoventricular interface were assessed and normative ranges quantified. Multivariate linear regression was performed to identify baseline predictors of each metric. Results: The mean age was 59 ± 12 years. The basal plane was eccentric (EI = 0.22 ± 0.06) while the left ventricular outflow tract was more eccentric (EI = 0.32 ±0.06), with no correlation to gender, age or hypertension. Male gender, height and body mass index were consistent independent predictors of larger aortoventricular dimensions at all anatomical levels, while age was predictive of supra-annular measurements. Conclusions: Male gender, height and BMI are independent predictors of all aortoventricular dimensions while age predicts only supra-annular dimensions. Use of defined metrics such as the basal plane and formation of normative ranges for these metrics allows reference for clinical

  4. Quantification of normative ranges and baseline predictors of aortoventricular interface dimensions using multi-detector computed tomographic imaging in patients without aortic valve disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooley, Robert P., E-mail: robert.gooley@monashhealth.org [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Cameron, James D., E-mail: james.cameron@monash.edu [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Soon, Jennifer, E-mail: jenn.sa@gmail.com [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Loi, Duncan, E-mail: dloi2@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Chitale, Gauri, E-mail: gchi21@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Syeda, Rifath, E-mail: rssye1@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Meredith, Ian T., E-mail: ian.meredith@myheart.id.au [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • MDCT imaging of the aortoventricular interface is increasingly common. • We present normative ranges for aortoventricular interface dimensions. • Such techniques and ranges should be used to standardise reporting and research. - Abstract: Background: Multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) assessment of the aortoventricular interface has gained increased importance with the advent of minimally invasive treatment modalities for aortic and mitral valve disease. This has included a standardised technique of identifying a plane through the nadir of each coronary cusp, the basal plane, and taking further measurements in relation to this plane. Despite this there is no published data defining normal ranges for these aortoventricular metrics in a healthy cohort. This study seeks to quantify normative ranges for MDCT derived aortoventricular dimensions and evaluate baseline demographic and anthropomorphic associates of these measurements in a normal cohort. Methods: 250 consecutive patients undergoing MDCT coronary angiography were included. Aortoventricular dimensions at multiple levels of the aortoventricular interface were assessed and normative ranges quantified. Multivariate linear regression was performed to identify baseline predictors of each metric. Results: The mean age was 59 ± 12 years. The basal plane was eccentric (EI = 0.22 ± 0.06) while the left ventricular outflow tract was more eccentric (EI = 0.32 ±0.06), with no correlation to gender, age or hypertension. Male gender, height and body mass index were consistent independent predictors of larger aortoventricular dimensions at all anatomical levels, while age was predictive of supra-annular measurements. Conclusions: Male gender, height and BMI are independent predictors of all aortoventricular dimensions while age predicts only supra-annular dimensions. Use of defined metrics such as the basal plane and formation of normative ranges for these metrics allows reference for clinical

  5. Added value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound on biopsies of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Mimi; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Seong Hyun; Ha, Sang Yun

    2017-01-01

    To assess whether contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid can improve the lesion conspicuity and feasibility of percutaneous biopsies for focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging of real-time ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography/magnetic resonance images, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision making. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study. Between June 2013 and January 2015, 711 US-guided percutaneous biopsies were performed for focal hepatic lesions. Biopsies were performed using CEUS for guidance if lesions were invisible on fusion imaging. We retrospectively evaluated the number of target lesions initially invisible on fusion imaging that became visible after applying CEUS, using a 4-point scale. Technical success rates of biopsies were evaluated based on histopathological results. In addition, the occurrence of changes in clinical decision making was assessed. Among 711 patients, 16 patients (2.3%) were included in the study. The median size of target lesions was 1.1 cm (range, 0.5–1.9 cm) in pre-procedural imaging. After CEUS, 15 of 16 (93.8%) focal hepatic lesions were visualized. The conspicuity score was significantly increased after adding CEUS, as compared to that on fusion imaging (p < 0.001). The technical success rate of biopsy was 87.6% (14/16). After biopsy, there were changes in clinical decision making for 11 of 16 patients (68.8%). The addition of CEUS could improve the conspicuity of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging. This dual guidance using CEUS and fusion imaging may affect patient management via changes in clinical decision-making

  6. Added value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound on biopsies of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Mimi; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Seong Hyun; Ha, Sang Yun [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    To assess whether contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid can improve the lesion conspicuity and feasibility of percutaneous biopsies for focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging of real-time ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography/magnetic resonance images, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision making. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study. Between June 2013 and January 2015, 711 US-guided percutaneous biopsies were performed for focal hepatic lesions. Biopsies were performed using CEUS for guidance if lesions were invisible on fusion imaging. We retrospectively evaluated the number of target lesions initially invisible on fusion imaging that became visible after applying CEUS, using a 4-point scale. Technical success rates of biopsies were evaluated based on histopathological results. In addition, the occurrence of changes in clinical decision making was assessed. Among 711 patients, 16 patients (2.3%) were included in the study. The median size of target lesions was 1.1 cm (range, 0.5–1.9 cm) in pre-procedural imaging. After CEUS, 15 of 16 (93.8%) focal hepatic lesions were visualized. The conspicuity score was significantly increased after adding CEUS, as compared to that on fusion imaging (p < 0.001). The technical success rate of biopsy was 87.6% (14/16). After biopsy, there were changes in clinical decision making for 11 of 16 patients (68.8%). The addition of CEUS could improve the conspicuity of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging. This dual guidance using CEUS and fusion imaging may affect patient management via changes in clinical decision-making.

  7. Comparison of computed tomographic urography, magnetic resonance urography and the combination of diffusion weighted imaging in diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guang-yu; Lu, Qing; Wu, Lian-ming [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Zhang, Jin [Department of Urinary Surgery, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Chen, Xiao-xi [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Xu, Jian-rong, E-mail: renjixujr@163.com [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of computed tomographic urography (CTU), static-fluid magnetic resonance urography (static-fluid MRU) and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Material and Methods: Between January 2010 and June 2011, patients with suspected UUT cancer underwent CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) within a 1-week period. The diagnostic performances of CTU, static-fluid MRU and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI for upper urinary tract cancer were prospectively evaluated. The ureteroscopic and histopathologic findings were compared with the imaging findings. Results: Compared to static-fluid MRU alone (sensitivity: 76/75%, reader 1/reader 2), combining DWI with MRI can increase the sensitivity (sensitivity: 84/84%, p = 0.031/p = 0.016) of upper urinary tract cancer diagnosis. CTU had greater sensitivity (95/94%) and accuracy (92/91%) than both static-fluid MRU (sensitivity: p < 0.001/p < 0.001 and accuracy: 83/81%, p = 0.001/p < 0.001) and static-fluid MRU with DWI (sensitivity: p = 0.023/p = 0.039 and accuracy: 87/85%, p = 0.042/p = 0.049) for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancers. Compared with CTU alone, CTU with DWI did not significantly increase sensitivity, specificity or accuracy. However, the diagnostic confidence was improved when the combined technique was used (p = 0.031/p = 0.024). Moreover, there was no significant change in sensitivity, specificity, accuracy or diagnostic confidence when static-fluid MRU was used in combination with CTU and DWI. Conclusion: Although there is a potential role for static-fluid MRU and static-fluid MRU with DWI in urinary tract imaging, CTU is still the better choice for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Combining DWI with CTU can help improve confidence in upper urinary tract cancer diagnoses.

  8. Tumour extent and T stage of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, P.Y. [deceased, Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Tsang, V.H. [Vancouver Cancer Centre and British Columbia Cancer Agency, Div of Radiation Oncology, BC (Canada); Munk, P.L. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Radiology and Surgery, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, Dept. of Radiology, BC (Canada)

    2000-10-01

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in defining the T stage and full tumour extent of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Forty-eight patients with pathologically proven nasopharyngeal carcinoma underwent MRI and CT examinations within 2 weeks of each other. Contrast medium was used in both examinations. The T stage and full tumour extent according to MRI and CT were compared. In 32 patients MRI and CT findings agreed completely. MRI findings resulted in assignment of a higher stage than CT findings in another 8 patients. In the remaining 8 patients MRI showed wider tumour spread than CT, although there was no discordance in the T stage assigned. When compared with CT in defining the full tumour extent and assigning the T stage in 48 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, MRI showed more extensive disease in 16 patients, including 8 in whom the T stage was revised upward. Therapy was altered as a result of the MRI findings. (author)

  9. Radioiodinated diacylglycerol analogue: a potential imaging agent for single-photon emission tomographic investigations of cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmori, Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Imahori, Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Ueda, S. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Fujii, R. [Nishijin Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Wakita, K. [Nishijin Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Inoue, M. [Daiichi Radioisotope Laboratories, Chiba (Japan); Tazawa, S. [Daiichi Radioisotope Laboratories, Chiba (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Phospholipid metabolism is closely related to membrane perturbation in cerebral ischaemia. We investigated in vivo topographical lipid metabolism using an iodine-123-labelled diacylglycerol analogue, (1-(15-(4-iodine-123-iodophenyl)-pentadecanoyl)-2-stearoyl-rac-glycerol) ({sup 123}I-labelled DAG), in a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model with the aim of positive imaging of ischaemic insult. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent coagulation of the MCA to induce permanent occlusion. MCA occlusion times prior to injection of {sup 123}I-labelled DAG ranged from 15 min to 14 days. Each rat was injected with 11-37 MBq of {sup 123}I-labelled DAG. After 30 min, in vivo autoradiographs were reconstructed. Scanning of the living rat brain in this MCA occlusion model was performed. Cerebral infarctions were recognized in the frontal cortex, the parietal cortex and the lateral portion of the caudate-putamen by 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium hydrochloride staining. In infarcted regions (region 1), {sup 123}I-labelled DAG incorporation showed a decrease up to 12 h; it then increased up to 6 days and decreased thereafter. In peri-infarcted regions (region 2), the incorporation showed almost no change up to 12 h, then increased up to 5-6 days and decreased thereafter. In other regions (region 3), the incorporation showed no change. Lipid analysis showed that {sup 123}I-labelled DAG was metabolized to 15-(4-iodine-123-iodophenyl)-pentadecanoic acid by DAG lipase and to {sup 123}I-labelled phosphatidylcholine. Scanning of the ischaemic region showed higher accumulation than on the non-lesioned side. We established a method to visualize ischaemic foci as positive images. The early changes in {sup 123}I-labelled DAG incorporation were related to DAG lipase, which degraded the accumulated intrinsic DAG, and increased {sup 123}I-labelled DAG incorporation in the chronic stage involves several aspects of neural destruction in the process of autolysis.

  10. Study of preparation of radioiodinated allyl diprenorphine as an single photon emission computed tomographic imaging agent for mapping opioid receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaokun; Wang Rongfu; Zhang Chunli

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To prepare and evaluate radioiodinated allyl diprenorphine (DPN) as a new opioid receptor imaging agent for SPECT study. Methods: 7α-O-stannyl-DPN was obtained from DPN by acetylated it to protect the phenolic 3-OH group of DPN and then introduced the vinylstannane into the tertiary alcohol of the 7α-side chain. [ 125 I]-7α-O-iodoallyl diprenorphine (7α-O-IA-DPN) was prepared by radioiododestannylation under acidic condition using iodobead as an oxidant reagent, and in vitro and in vivo opioid receptor binding assays, metabolism were performed with Kunming mouse brains. Study of distribution in the Wistar rat's brain and naloxone inhibition was carried out. The data were analyzed by statistical method. Results: The radiochemical yields of I-125-7α-O-IA-DPN were more than 90%. In TLC, Rf of 7α-O-IA-DPN and I-125-7α-O-IA-DPN was 0.83 and 0.93, respectively. In ambient temperature the radiochemical purity of I-125-7α-O-IA-DPN in rats showed higher in anterior and posterior colliculi, striatum and hippocampus. It was low in frontal lobe, temporal lobe and brain stem and was low in cerebellum and the other parts of the brain. Among the clearance from the structures in brain, it was fastest in cerebellum. At 20 min when the uptake reached to the peak, the ratio of anterior and posterior colliculi, striatum and hippocampus to the cerebellum was 4.36, 3.7 and 3.12, respectively. There were significant differences between the inhibition experimental group using the naloxone and control. Conclusions: I-125-7α-O-IA-DPN appears to be a potential opioid receptor imaging agent for SPECT study. (authors)

  11. Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guidance Improves the Diagnostic Yield of Endomyocardial Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Rogers, BM BCh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic yield of endomyocardial biopsy is low, particularly in disease that affects the myocardium in a nonuniform distribution. The authors hypothesized that real-time MRI guidance could improve the yield through targeted biopsy of focal myocardial pathology. They tested this hypothesis in an animal model of focal myocardial pathology using intracoronary ethanol and microspheres. The authors compared real-time MRI-guided endomyocardial biopsy in swine using a custom actively visualized MRI bioptome against x-ray–guided biopsy using a commercial bioptome by skilled operators. Real-time MRI guidance significantly increased the diagnostic yield of endomyocardial biopsy.

  12. SU-G-BRA-03: PCA Based Imaging Angle Optimization for 2D Cine MRI Based Radiotherapy Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T; Yue, N; Jabbour, S; Zhang, M [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an imaging angle optimization methodology for orthogonal 2D cine MRI based radiotherapy guidance using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of target motion retrieved from 4DCT. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 4DCT of 6 patients with lung tumor. A radiation oncologist manually contoured the target volume at the maximal inhalation phase of the respiratory cycle. An object constrained deformable image registration (DIR) method has been developed to track the target motion along the respiration at ten phases. The motion of the center of the target mass has been analyzed using the PCA to find out the principal motion components that were uncorrelated with each other. Two orthogonal image planes for cineMRI have been determined using this method to minimize the through plane motion during MRI based radiotherapy guidance. Results: 3D target respiratory motion for all 6 patients has been efficiently retrieved from 4DCT. In this process, the object constrained DIR demonstrated satisfactory accuracy and efficiency to enable the automatic motion tracking for clinical application. The average motion amplitude in the AP, lateral, and longitudinal directions were 3.6mm (min: 1.6mm, max: 5.6mm), 1.7mm (min: 0.6mm, max: 2.7mm), and 5.6mm (min: 1.8mm, max: 16.1mm), respectively. Based on PCA, the optimal orthogonal imaging planes were determined for cineMRI. The average angular difference between the PCA determined imaging planes and the traditional AP and lateral imaging planes were 47 and 31 degrees, respectively. After optimization, the average amplitude of through plane motion reduced from 3.6mm in AP images to 2.5mm (min:1.3mm, max:3.9mm); and from 1.7mm in lateral images to 0.6mm (min: 0.2mm, max:1.5mm), while the principal in plane motion amplitude increased from 5.6mm to 6.5mm (min: 2.8mm, max: 17mm). Conclusion: DIR and PCA can be used to optimize the orthogonal image planes of cineMRI to minimize the through plane motion during radiotherapy

  13. The application of vertical seismic profiling and cross-hole tomographic imaging for fracture characterization at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Tura, M.A.; McEvilly, T.V.

    1990-01-01

    In order to obtain the necessary characterization for the storage of nuclear waste, much higher resolution of the features likely to affect the transport of radionuclides will be required than is normally achieved in conventional surface seismic reflection used in the exploration and characterization of petroleum and geothermal resources. Because fractures represent a significant mechanical anomaly seismic methods using are being investigated as a means to image and characterize the subsurface. Because of inherent limitations in applying the seismic methods solely from the surface, state-of-the-art borehole methods are being investigated to provide high resolution definition within the repository block. Therefore, Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) and cross-hole methods are being developed to obtain maximum resolution of the features that will possible affect the transport of fluids. Presented here will be the methods being developed, the strategy being pursued, and the rational for using VSP and crosshole methods at Yucca Mountain. The approach is intended to be an integrated method involving improvements in data acquisition, processing, and interpretation as well as improvements in the fundamental understanding of seismic wave propagation in fractured rock. 33 refs., 4 figs

  14. Positron emission tomography/computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging in a murine model of progressive atherosclerosis using (64)Cu-labeled glycoprotein VI-Fc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Boris; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Andia, Marcelo E; Cooper, Margaret S; Schuster, Andreas; Schönberger, Tanja; Griessinger, Christoph M; Wurster, Thomas; Onthank, David; Ungerer, Martin; Gawaz, Meinrad; Nagel, Eike; Botnar, Rene M

    2013-11-01

    (-1); P=0.028). (64)Cu-GPVI-Fc positron emission tomographic imaging allows identification of exposed subendothelial collagen in injured WT and high-fat diet-fed ApoE(-/-) mice.

  15. Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of the Serotonergic System and Prediction of Risk and Lethality of Future Suicidal Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquendo, Maria A; Galfalvy, Hanga; Sullivan, Gregory M; Miller, Jeffrey M; Milak, Matthew M; Sublette, M Elizabeth; Cisneros-Trujillo, Sebastian; Burke, Ainsley K; Parsey, Ramin V; Mann, J John

    2016-10-01

    Biomarkers that predict suicidal behavior, especially highly lethal behavior, are urgently needed. In cross-sectional studies, individuals with depression who attempt suicide have lower midbrain serotonin transporter binding potential compared with those who do not attempt suicide, and higher serotonin1A binding potential in the raphe nuclei (RN) is associated with greater lethality of past suicide attempts and suicidal intent and ideation. To determine whether serotonin transporter binding potential in the lower midbrain predicts future suicide attempts and whether higher RN serotonin1A binding potential predicts future suicidal ideation and intent and lethality of future suicide attempts. In this prospective 2-year observational study, a well-characterized cohort of 100 patients presenting for treatment of a major depressive episode of at least moderate severity underwent positron emission tomography using carbon 11-labeled N-(2-(1-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl)ethyl))-N-(2-pyridyl)-cyclohexanecarboxamide ([11C]WAY-100635), a serotonin1A antagonist; a subset of 50 patients also underwent imaging with carbon 11-labeled 3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)- benzonitrile ([11C]DASB), a serotonin transporter radioligand. Imaging was performed at Columbia University Medical Center from May 3, 1999, to March 11, 2008. Follow-up was completed on May 28, 2010, and data were analyzed from August 1, 2013, to March 1, 2016. Patients were treated naturalistically in the community and followed up for 2 years with documentation of suicidal behavior, its lethality, and suicidal ideation and intent. Suicide attempt or suicide. Of the 100 patients undergoing follow-up for more than 2 years (39 men; 61 women; mean [SD] age, 40.2 [11.2] years), 15 made suicide attempts, including 2 who died by suicide. Higher RN serotonin1A binding potential predicted more suicidal ideation at 3 (b = 0.02; t = 3.45; P = .001) and 12 (b = 0.02; t = 3.63; P

  16. A Study on GPU-based Iterative ML-EM Reconstruction Algorithm for Emission Computed Tomographic Imaging Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Woo Seok; Kim, Soo Mee; Park, Min Jae; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung

    2009-01-01

    The maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) is the statistical reconstruction algorithm derived from probabilistic model of the emission and detection processes. Although the ML-EM has many advantages in accuracy and utility, the use of the ML-EM is limited due to the computational burden of iterating processing on a CPU (central processing unit). In this study, we developed a parallel computing technique on GPU (graphic processing unit) for ML-EM algorithm. Using Geforce 9800 GTX+ graphic card and CUDA (compute unified device architecture) the projection and backprojection in ML-EM algorithm were parallelized by NVIDIA's technology. The time delay on computations for projection, errors between measured and estimated data and backprojection in an iteration were measured. Total time included the latency in data transmission between RAM and GPU memory. The total computation time of the CPU- and GPU-based ML-EM with 32 iterations were 3.83 and 0.26 sec, respectively. In this case, the computing speed was improved about 15 times on GPU. When the number of iterations increased into 1024, the CPU- and GPU-based computing took totally 18 min and 8 sec, respectively. The improvement was about 135 times and was caused by delay on CPU-based computing after certain iterations. On the other hand, the GPU-based computation provided very small variation on time delay per iteration due to use of shared memory. The GPU-based parallel computation for ML-EM improved significantly the computing speed and stability. The developed GPU-based ML-EM algorithm could be easily modified for some other imaging geometries

  17. Diagnostic yield of conventional radiographic and cone-beam computed tomographic images in patients with atypical odontalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigg, M; List, T; Petersson, K; Lindh, C; Petersson, A

    2011-12-01

    To investigate whether the additional diagnostic yield of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) examination over conventional radiographs in patients primarily suspected of having atypical odontalgia (AO) improves differentiation between AO and symptomatic apical periodontitis (SAP) in patients with severe chronic intraoral pain. In this clinical study, 25 patients (mean age 54 ± 11 years, range 34-72) participated; 20 were diagnosed with AO and 5 with SAP. All patients were recruited from the clinics of the Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University. AO inclusion criteria were chronic pain (>6 months) in a region where a tooth had been endodontically or surgically treated, with no pathological cause detectable in clinical or radiologic examinations. SAP inclusion criteria were recurrent pain from a tooth diagnosed with apical periodontitis in clinical and radiographic examinations. Assessments comprised a self-report questionnaire on pain characteristics, a comprehensive clinical examination and a radiographic examination including panoramic and intraoral radiographs and CBCT images. The main outcome measure was periapical bone destruction. Sixty per cent of patients with AO had no periapical bone destructions detectable with any radiographic method. Overall, CBCT rendered 17% more periapical bone destructions than conventional radiography. Average pain intensity in patients with AO was 5.6 (± 1.8) on a 0-10 numerical rating scale, and average pain duration was 4.3 (± 5.2) years. Cone-beam computed tomography improves identification of patients without periapical bone destruction, which may facilitate differentiation between AO and SAP. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  18. Cone beam computed tomography and its image guidance technology during percutaneous nucleoplasty procedures at L5/S1 lumbar level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Piacentino, Filippo; Giorlando, Francesca [University of Insubria, Unit of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Varese (Italy); Magenta Biasina, Alberto; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo [University of Milan, San Paolo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Milan (Italy); Bacuzzi, Alessandro [University of Insubria, Anaesthesia and Palliative Care, Varese (Italy); Novario, Raffaele [University of Insubria, Medical Physics Department, Varese (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of percutaneous nucleoplasty procedures at L5/S1 level using cone beam CT (CBCT) and its associated image guidance technology for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). We retrospectively reviewed 25 cases (20 men, 5 women) of LDH at L5/S1 levels. CBCT as guidance imaging was chosen after a first unsuccessful fluoroscopy attempt that was related to complex anatomy (n = 15), rapid pathological changes due to degenerative diseases (n = 7) or both (n = 3). Technical success, defined as correct needle positioning in the target LDH, and safety were evaluated; overall procedure time and radiation dose were registered. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to evaluate pain and discomfort pre-intervention after 1 week and 1, 3, and 6 months after the procedure. Technical success was 100 %; using CBCT as guidance imaging the needle was correctly positioned at the first attempt in 20 out of 25 patients. Neither major nor minor complications were registered during or after the procedure. The average procedure time was 11 min and 56 s (range, 9-15 min), whereas mean procedural radiation dose was 46.25 Gy.cm{sup 2} (range 38.10-52.84 Gy.cm{sup 2}), and mean fluoroscopy time was 5 min 34 s (range 3 min 40 s to 6 min 55 s). The VAS pain score decreased significantly from 7.6 preoperatively to 3.9 at 1 week, 2.8 at 1 month, 2.1 at 3 months, and 1.6 at 6 months postoperatively. CBCT-guided percutaneous nucleoplasty is a highly effective technique for LDH with acceptable procedure time and radiation dose. (orig.)

  19. Prototype volumetric ultrasound tomography image guidance system for prone stereotactic partial breast irradiation: proof-of-concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Tsuicheng D.; Parsons, David; Zhang, Yue; Hrycushko, Brian; Zhao, Bo; Chopra, Rajiv; Kim, Nathan; Spangler, Ann; Rahimi, Asal; Timmerman, Robert; Jiang, Steve B.; Lu, Weiguo; Gu, Xuejun

    2018-03-01

    Accurate dose delivery in stereotactic partial breast irradiation (S-PBI) is challenging because of the target position uncertainty caused by breast deformation, the target volume changes caused by lumpectomy cavity shrinkage, and the target delineation uncertainty on simulation computed tomography (CT) images caused by poor soft tissue contrast. We have developed a volumetric ultrasound tomography (UST) image guidance system for prone position S-PBI. The system is composed of a novel 3D printed rotation water tank, a patient-specific resin breast immobilization cup, and a 1D array ultrasound transducer. Coronal 2D US images were acquired in 5° increments over a 360° range, and planes were acquired every 2 mm in elevation. A super-compounding technique was used to reconstruct the image volume. The image quality of UST was evaluated with a BB-1 breast phantom and BioZorb surgical marker, and the results revealed that UST offered better soft tissue contrast than CT and similar image quality to MR. In the evaluated plane, the size and location of five embedded objects were measured and compared to MR, which is considered as the ground truth. Objects’ diameters and the distances between objects in UST differ by approximately 1 to 2 mm from those in MR, which showed that UST offers the image quality required for S-PBI. In future work we will develop a robotic system that will be ultimately implemented in the clinic.

  20. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational

  1. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  2. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  3. Respiration-Correlated Image Guidance Is the Most Important Radiotherapy Motion Management Strategy for Most Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korreman, Stine; Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte; Brink, Carsten; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), 4D image guidance (4D-IG), and beam gating on calculated treatment field margins in a lung cancer patient population. Materials and Methods: Images were acquired from 46 lung cancer patients participating in four separate protocols at three institutions in Europe and the United States. Seven patients were imaged using fluoroscopy, and 39 patients were imaged using 4DCT. The magnitude of respiratory tumor motion was measured. The required treatment field margins were calculated using a statistical recipe (van Herk M, et al. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2000;474:1121–1135), with magnitudes of all uncertainties, except respiratory peak-to-peak displacement, the same for all patients, taken from literature. Required margins for respiratory motion management were calculated using the residual respiratory tumor motion for each patient for various motion management strategies. Margin reductions for respiration management were calculated using 4DCT, 4D-IG, and gated beam delivery. Results: The median tumor motion magnitude was 4.4 mm for the 46 patients (range 0–29.3 mm). This value corresponded to required treatment field margins of 13.7 to 36.3 mm (median 14.4 mm). The use of 4DCT, 4D-IG, and beam gating required margins that were reduced by 0 to 13.9 mm (median 0.5 mm), 3 to 5.2 mm (median 5.1 mm), and 0 to 7 mm (median 0.2 mm), respectively, to a total of 8.5 to 12.4 mm (median 8.6 mm). Conclusion: A respiratory management strategy for lung cancer radiotherapy including planning on 4DCT scans and daily image guidance provides a potential reduction of 37% to 47% in treatment field margins. The 4D image guidance strategy was the most effective strategy for >85% of the patients.

  4. Accuracy evaluation of a 3-dimensional surface imaging system for guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty patients treated with DIBH-RT after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Before the start of treatment, each patient underwent a breath-hold CT scan for planning purposes. During treatment, dose delivery was preceded by setup verification using CBCT of the left breast. 3D surfaces were captured by a surface imaging system concurrently with the CBCT scan. Retrospectively, surface registrations were performed for CBCT to CT and for a captured 3D surface to CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors, group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement were calculated. Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Good correlation between setup errors was found: R(2)=0.70, 0.90, 0.82 in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Systematic errors were ≤0.17 cm in all directions. Random errors were ≤0.15 cm. The limits of agreement were -0.34-0.48, -0.42-0.39, and -0.52-0.23 cm in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. ROC analysis showed that a threshold between 0.4 and 0.8 cm corresponds to promising true positive rates (0.78-0.95) and false positive rates (0.12-0.28). The results support the application of 3D surface imaging for image guidance in DIBH-RT after BCS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3-Dimensional Surface Imaging System for Guidance in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients treated with DIBH-RT after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Before the start of treatment, each patient underwent a breath-hold CT scan for planning purposes. During treatment, dose delivery was preceded by setup verification using CBCT of the left breast. 3D surfaces were captured by a surface imaging system concurrently with the CBCT scan. Retrospectively, surface registrations were performed for CBCT to CT and for a captured 3D surface to CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors, group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement were calculated. Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Results: Good correlation between setup errors was found: R 2 =0.70, 0.90, 0.82 in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Systematic errors were ≤0.17 cm in all directions. Random errors were ≤0.15 cm. The limits of agreement were −0.34-0.48, −0.42-0.39, and −0.52-0.23 cm in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. ROC analysis showed that a threshold between 0.4 and 0.8 cm corresponds to promising true positive rates (0.78-0.95) and false positive rates (0.12-0.28). Conclusions: The results support the application of 3D surface imaging for image guidance in DIBH-RT after BCS.

  6. Cervix Motion in 50 Cervical Cancer Patients Assessed by Daily Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Imaging of a New Type of Marker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langerak, Thomas, E-mail: t.langerak@erasmusmc.nl; Mens, Jan Willem; Quint, Sandra; Bondar, Luiza; Heijkoop, Sabrina; Heijmen, Ben; Hoogeman, Mischa

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a new type of marker and a new method of marker implantation and to assess interfraction cervix motion for a large population of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer by daily cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging. Methods and Materials: We investigated the position of markers in 50 patients treated in prone position during at least 23 fractions. To reduce streaking artifacts in the planning CT scan, a new type of polymeric marker was used and compared with conventional gold markers. In addition, a new method of implantation was used in an attempt to reduce marker loss. In each fraction, a CT scan was acquired before dose delivery and aligned to the bony anatomy of the planning CT scan, simulating the clinical setup protocol. First, sufficient visibility of the markers was verified. Then, systematic and random displacement of the marker centroids was recorded and analyzed in 3 directions with regard to the planning CT and the first CBCT (to evaluate the presence of a vaginal catheter in the planning CT). Streaking artifacts were quantified with the standard deviation of the mean squared intensity difference in a radius around the marker. Results: Marker loss was minimal during treatment: in only 3 of the 50 patients 1 marker was lost. Streaking artifacts for the new markers were reduced compared with conventional gold markers. For the planning CT, M/Σ/σ were 0.4/3.4/2.2 mm, 1.0/5.5/4.5 mm, and −3.9/5.1/3.6 mm for the left-right, anterior-posterior, and cranial-caudal directions, respectively. With regard to the first CBCT scan, M/Σ/σ were 0.8/2.8/2.1, 0.6/4.4/4.4, and −1.3/4.5/3.6 mm. Conclusions: A new type of marker and implantation method was shown to have significantly reduced marker loss and streaking artifacts compared with gold fiducial markers. The recorded marker displacement confirms results reported in the existing literature but for a larger dataset.

  7. Dye-conjugated single-walled carbon nanotubes induce photothermal therapy under the guidance of near-infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyuan; Shang, Wenting; Chi, Chongwei; Zeng, Chaoting; Wang, Kun; Fang, Chihua; Chen, Qingshan; Liu, Huiyu; Fan, Yingfang; Tian, Jie

    2016-12-28

    Recently, photothermal therapy (PTT) has become viewed as an ideal auxiliary therapeutic treatment for cancers. However, the development of safe, convenient, and highly effective photothermal agents remains a great challenge. In this study, we prepared single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for PTT against breast tumors under the guidance of infrared fluorescent cyanines. Tumors were accurately located using near-infrared imaging (NIR) and then exposed to laser irradiation. Both the in vivo and in vitro results showed that the SWNTs have high stability and low cytotoxicity. Introducing polyethylene glycol into our nanoparticles increased the blood-circulation time. Our in vivo results further showed that Cy5.5-conjugated SWNTs mediated PTT, resulting in efficient tumor suppression in mice under the guidance of near-infrared imaging. Due to the small amount of absorption at 808-nm, Cy5.5 increased the efficiency of PTT. Breast tumors significantly shrunk after irradiation under the 808-nm near-infrared laser. The treated mice developed scabs, but otherwise recovered after 15 days, and their physical conditions restored gradually. These data indicate that our unique photothermal-responsive SWNT-Cy5.5-based theranostic agent can serve as a promising candidate for PTT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Achievement report on research and development of medical and welfare equipment technology. Optical tomographic imaging method; Iryo fukushi kiki gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Hikari danso imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The aim is to develop a method of processing oxygen concentration distribution in human organs into an image by computed tomography using near infrared rays capable of transmitting through living tissues. Since the photoabsorption spectra of hemoglobin etc. in blood vary according to the degree of their oxidation, an oxygen concentration level is determined by measuring the magnitude of the variation. In the imaging method named in the title, the object is irradiated with picosecond-level near infrared pulses from all directions successively, the pulses after transmission through the object are measured at all directions at a picosecond-level time resolution, and the distribution of pulse scattering and absorption characteristics are subjected to algorithmic calculation, the outcome is converted into oxygen concentration levels, and an image is obtained. A 64-channel time resolution measurement system is constructed, and is applied to living tissue models (phantoms) and animals, and an image is obtained and evaluated. On the basis of the result, a patient is examined for clinical evaluation, and an image reflecting the distribution of variations in hemoglobin oxygen concentration is obtained for the head of the adult patient. A spatial resolution of 1cm is achieved in case of a phantom 10cm in diameter. In the case of 64 channels, measurement takes approximately 20 minutes and mapping image data measurement takes approximately 7 minutes. (NEDO)

  9. SU-C-207B-07: Deep Convolutional Neural Network Image Matching for Ultrasound Guidance in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, N; Najafi, M; Hancock, S; Hristov, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Robust matching of ultrasound images is a challenging problem as images of the same anatomy often present non-trivial differences. This poses an obstacle for ultrasound guidance in radiotherapy. Thus our objective is to overcome this obstacle by designing and evaluating an image blocks matching framework based on a two channel deep convolutional neural network. Methods: We extend to 3D an algorithmic structure previously introduced for 2D image feature learning [1]. To obtain the similarity between two 3D image blocks A and B, the 3D image blocks are divided into 2D patches Ai and Bi. The similarity is then calculated as the average similarity score of Ai and Bi. The neural network was then trained with public non-medical image pairs, and subsequently evaluated on ultrasound image blocks for the following scenarios: (S1) same image blocks with/without shifts (A and A_shift_x); (S2) non-related random block pairs; (S3) ground truth registration matched pairs of different ultrasound images with/without shifts (A_i and A_reg_i_shift_x). Results: For S1 the similarity scores of A and A_shift_x were 32.63, 18.38, 12.95, 9.23, 2.15 and 0.43 for x=ranging from 0 mm to 10 mm in 2 mm increments. For S2 the average similarity score for non-related block pairs was −1.15. For S3 the average similarity score of ground truth registration matched blocks A_i and A_reg_i_shift_0 (1≤i≤5) was 12.37. After translating A_reg_i_shift_0 by 0 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm, 8 mm, and 10 mm, the average similarity scores of A_i and A_reg_i_shift_x were 11.04, 8.42, 4.56, 2.27, and 0.29 respectively. Conclusion: The proposed method correctly assigns highest similarity to corresponding 3D ultrasound image blocks despite differences in image content and thus can form the basis for ultrasound image registration and tracking.[1] Zagoruyko, Komodakis, “Learning to compare image patches via convolutional neural networks", IEEE CVPR 2015,pp.4353–4361.

  10. A system dedicated to the viewing and handling of tomographic images obtained by magnetic resonance; Um sistema dedicado a visualizacao e manipulacao de imagens tomograficas obtidas por ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaets, Joan F.W.; Almeida, Lirio O.B. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica; Traina, Agma J.M. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Matematicas

    1992-12-31

    The present work describes the development of a dedicated system to be used in visualization and manipulation of a MR images. The graphics environment as well as the tool kit were developed for the dedicated TMS34010 based hardware. The developed software offers a compact kernel with primitives to support the creation and manipulation windows and menus directly in `C` language. This work is fundamental for the implementation of a user friendly interface build to operate and visualize tomographic images. This tools are essential for the selection an archiving of images planes as used in clinical applications. (author) 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 photo; e-mail: jan, agma and lirio at uspfsc.ifqsc..usp.ansp.br

  11. Active Breathing Control in Combination With Ultrasound Imaging: A Feasibility Study of Image Guidance in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Liver Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Meer, Skadi van der; Hendry, Janet; Buijsen, Jeroen; Visser, Peter; Fontanarosa, Davide; Lachaine, Martin; Lammering, Guido; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate tumor positioning in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of liver lesions is often hampered by motion and setup errors. We combined 3-dimensional ultrasound imaging (3DUS) and active breathing control (ABC) as an image guidance tool. Methods and Materials: We tested 3DUS image guidance in the SBRT treatment of liver lesions for 11 patients with 88 treatment fractions. In 5 patients, 3DUS imaging was combined with ABC. The uncertainties of US scanning and US image segmentation in liver lesions were determined with and without ABC. Results: In free breathing, the intraobserver variations were 1.4 mm in left-right (L-R), 1.6 mm in superior-inferior (S-I), and 1.3 mm anterior-posterior (A-P). and the interobserver variations were 1.6 mm (L-R), 2.8 mm (S-I), and 1.2 mm (A-P). The combined uncertainty of US scanning and matching (inter- and intraobserver) was 4 mm (1 SD). The combined uncertainty when ABC was used reduced by 1.7 mm in the S-I direction. For the L-R and A-P directions, no significant difference was observed. Conclusion: 3DUS imaging for IGRT of liver lesions is feasible, although using anatomic surrogates in the close vicinity of the lesion may be needed. ABC-based breath-hold in midventilation during 3DUS imaging can reduce the uncertainty of US-based 3D table shift correction

  12. Computed Tomographic Perfusion Improves Diagnostic Power of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography in Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penagaluri, Ashritha; Higgins, Angela Y.; Vavere, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    Background-Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and myocardial perfusion imaging (CTP) is a validated approach for detection and exclusion of flow-limiting coronary artery disease (CAD), but little data are available on gender-specific performance of these modalities. In this study, we...

  13. 4D cone-beam CT imaging for guidance in radiation therapy: setup verification by use of implanted fiducial markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; van Wieringen, Niek; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    The use of 4D cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and fiducial markers for guidance during radiation therapy of mobile tumors is challenging due to the trade-off between image quality, imaging dose, and scanning time. We aimed to investigate the visibility of markers and the feasibility of marker-based 4D registration and manual respiration-induced marker motion quantification for different CBCT acquisition settings. A dynamic thorax phantom and a patient with implanted gold markers were included. For both the phantom and patient, the peak-to-peak amplitude of marker motion in the cranial-caudal direction ranged from 5.3 to 14.0 mm, which did not affect the marker visibility and the associated marker-based registration feasibility. While using a medium field of view (FOV) and the same total imaging dose as is applied for 3D CBCT scanning in our clinic, it was feasible to attain an improved marker visibility by reducing the imaging dose per projection and increasing the number of projection images. For a small FOV with a shorter rotation arc but similar total imaging dose, streak artifacts were reduced due to using a smaller sampling angle. Additionally, the use of a small FOV allowed reducing total imaging dose and scanning time (~2.5 min) without losing the marker visibility. In conclusion, by using 4D CBCT with identical or lower imaging dose and a reduced gantry speed, it is feasible to attain sufficient marker visibility for marker-based 4D setup verification. Moreover, regardless of the settings, manual marker motion quantification can achieve a high accuracy with the error <1.2 mm.

  14. Axial tomographic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    An axial tomographic system is described comprising axial tomographic means for collecting sets of data corresponding to the transmission or absorption of a number of beams of penetrating radiation through a planar slice of an object. It includes means to locate an object to be analyzed, a source and detector for directing one or more beams of penetrating radiation through the object from the source to the detector, and means to rotate (and optionally translate) the source as well as means to process the collected sets of data. Data collection, data processing, and data display can each be conducted independently of each other. An additional advantage of the system described is that the raw data (i.e., the originally collected data) are not destroyed by the data processing but instead are retained intact for further reference or use, if needed

  15. Automatic identification of regions of interest on renal tomographic images;Identification automatique des regions d'interets sur des images tomographiques renales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukerroui, D.; Cocquerez, J.P. [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, CNRS UMR 6599 Heudiasyc, 60 (France); Touhami, W. [Ecole Nationale d' ingenieurs de Tunis (Tunisia)

    2009-07-01

    We propose in this paper, an original approach in a statistical framework, for fully automatic delineation of kidneys (healthy and pathological) in 2 dimension CT images. Our approach has 2 main steps: a localisation step followed by a delineation step. The localisation step is guided by a statistically learned prior spatial model in one hand and a grey level prior model in a second hand. The second step, utilizes the localization results in order to precisely delineate the kidney's regions using a set of learned IF-THEN rues. The proposed approach is tested on clinically acquired images and promising results are obtained. (authors)

  16. Geometric and dosimetric evaluations of an online image-guidance strategy for 3D-CRT of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Ivaldi, Giovanni; Liang Jian; Lockman, David; Yan Di; Martinez, Alvaro

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate an online image-guidance strategy for conformal treatment of prostate cancer and to estimate margin-reduction benefits. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with at least 16 helical computed tomography scans were each used in this study. Two prostate soft-tissue registration methods, including sagittal rotation, were evaluated. Setup errors and rigid organ motion were corrected online; non-rigid and intrafraction motion were included in offline analysis. Various clinical target volume-planning target volume (CTV-PTV) margins were applied. Geometrical evaluations included analyses of isocenter shifts and rotations and overlap index. Dosimetric evaluations included minimum dose and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for prostate and gEUD for rectum. Results: Average isocenter shift and rotation were (dX,dY,dZ,θ) = (0.0 ± 0.7,-1.1 ± 4.0,-0.1 ± 2.5,0.7 o ± 2.0 o ) mm. Prostate motion in anterior-posterior (AP) direction was significantly higher than superior-inferior and left-right (LR) directions. This observation was confirmed by isocenter shift in perspectives AP (1.8 ± 1.8 mm) and RL (3.7 ± 3.0 mm). Organ motion degrades target coverage and reduces doses to rectum. If 2% dose reduction on prostate D 99 is allowed for 90% patients, then minimum 3 mm margins are necessary with ideal image registration. Conclusions: Significant margin reduction can be achieved through online image guidance. Certain margins are still required for nonrigid and intrafraction motion. To further reduce margin, a strategy that combines online geometric intervention and offline dose replanning is necessary

  17. Development of a real time imaging-based guidance system of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingming; Le, Tuan-Anh; Yoon, Jungwon

    2017-04-01

    Targeted drug delivery using magnetic nanoparticles is an efficient technique as molecules can be directed toward specific tissues inside a human body. For the first time, we implemented a real-time imaging-based guidance system of nanoparticles using untethered electro-magnetic devices for simultaneous guiding and tracking. In this paper a low-amplitude-excitation-field magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is introduced. Based on this imaging technology, a hybrid system comprised of an electromagnetic actuator and MPI was used to navigate nanoparticles in a non-invasive way. The real-time low-amplitude-excitation-field MPI and electromagnetic actuator of this navigation system are achieved by applying a time-division multiplexing scheme to the coil topology. A one dimensional nanoparticle navigation system was built to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach and it could achieve a 2 Hz navigation update rate with the field gradient of 3.5 T/m during the imaging mode and 8.75 T/m during the actuation mode. Particles with both 90 nm and 5 nm diameters could be successfully manipulated and monitored in a tube through the proposed system, which can significantly enhance targeting efficiency and allow precise analysis in a real drug delivery.

  18. Tomographic PIV: particles versus blobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champagnat, Frédéric; Cornic, Philippe; Besnerais, Guy Le; Plyer, Aurélien; Cheminet, Adam; Leclaire, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We present an alternative approach to tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) that seeks to recover nearly single voxel particles rather than blobs of extended size. The baseline of our approach is a particle-based representation of image data. An appropriate discretization of this representation yields an original linear forward model with a weight matrix built with specific samples of the system’s point spread function (PSF). Such an approach requires only a few voxels to explain the image appearance, therefore it favors much more sparsely reconstructed volumes than classic tomo-PIV. The proposed forward model is general and flexible and can be embedded in a classical multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) or a simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (SMART) inversion procedure. We show, using synthetic PIV images and by way of a large exploration of the generating conditions and a variety of performance metrics, that the model leads to better results than the classical tomo-PIV approach, in particular in the case of seeding densities greater than 0.06 particles per pixel and of PSFs characterized by a standard deviation larger than 0.8 pixels. (paper)

  19. Exercise gated planar myocardial perfusion imaging using technetium-99m sestamibi for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease: an alternative to exercise tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamar, F.; Topcuoglu, R.; Cauwe, F.; Coster, P. de; Roelants, V.; Beckers, C.; Wijns, W.; Melin, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    This prospective study was designed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 99m Tc-sestamibi exercise gated planar myocardial imaging by comparison with both visual and quantitative analyses of SPET. The study was conducted in 115 consecutive patients with known or suspected CAD, including 54 patients with a previous myocardial infarction (MI), referred for exercise testing prior to coronary angiography. Multi-gated planar imaging and SPET were performed after bicycle exercise. The end-diastolic (ED) and SPET images were visually scored (SVi). Myocardial uptake was quantitated on SPET slices using maximum count circumferential profiles (SQu) and defect extent was measured by comparison with gender-matched data sets obtained from 27 controls ( 50% and/or regional wall motion abnormality. The cut-off criteria for positivity of the three procedures were determined from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves derived from the data of patients without previous MI. The area under the ROC curves was similar for ED, SVi and SQu. This was confirmed by the analysis of sensitivity performed using the ROC curve-derived cut-off criteria, in patients with or without previous MI. SVi was more sensitive than ED in identifying the diseased vessel(s) (ED: 41% vs SVi: 80%); but ED was more specific in this respect (ED: 79% vs SVi: 61%). (orig.)

  20. 2D to 3D fusion of echocardiography and cardiac CT for TAVR and TAVI image guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Azira; Faisal, Amir; Lai, Khin Wee; Ng, Siew Cheok; Liew, Yih Miin

    2017-08-01

    This study proposed a registration framework to fuse 2D echocardiography images of the aortic valve with preoperative cardiac CT volume. The registration facilitates the fusion of CT and echocardiography to aid the diagnosis of aortic valve diseases and provide surgical guidance during transcatheter aortic valve replacement and implantation. The image registration framework consists of two major steps: temporal synchronization and spatial registration. Temporal synchronization allows time stamping of echocardiography time series data to identify frames that are at similar cardiac phase as the CT volume. Spatial registration is an intensity-based normalized mutual information method applied with pattern search optimization algorithm to produce an interpolated cardiac CT image that matches the echocardiography image. Our proposed registration method has been applied on the short-axis "Mercedes Benz" sign view of the aortic valve and long-axis parasternal view of echocardiography images from ten patients. The accuracy of our fully automated registration method was 0.81 ± 0.08 and 1.30 ± 0.13 mm in terms of Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance for short-axis aortic valve view registration, whereas for long-axis parasternal view registration it was 0.79 ± 0.02 and 1.19 ± 0.11 mm, respectively. This accuracy is comparable to gold standard manual registration by expert. There was no significant difference in aortic annulus diameter measurement between the automatically and manually registered CT images. Without the use of optical tracking, we have shown the applicability of this technique for effective fusion of echocardiography with preoperative CT volume to potentially facilitate catheter-based surgery.

  1. Tips and Tricks of Percutaneous Gastrostomy Under Image Guidance in Patients with Limited Access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Figl, Andrea; Thariat, Juliette [Sophia Antipolis University, Nice cedex (France); Lacout, Alexis [Centre Me' dico-Chirurgical, Aurillac (France)

    2011-10-15

    We read with great interest the article by Chan et al. (1) in the March issue of Korean Journal of Radiology on their experience of modified radiology-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (MRPG). The authors proposed a technique to access the stomach in patients with upper digestive tract obstruction (UDTO). Following marking a patient's left liver inferior margin and room air-colonography, the authors punctured the gastric area using a 21G fine needle under X-ray guidance and withdrew their syringe gradually while injecting contrast medium. We noted that the gastrostomy may be performed using a 0.0035-inch hydrophilic guide wire and a 6.5-Fr angled catheter in almost 100% of patients contraindicated for endoscopy gastrostomy, including those with tortuous or tight cervical stenosis (2). In patients with a collapsed stomach, orally administered effervescent sodium bicarbonate powder can produce sufficient gas in the stomach to allow for a percutaneous needle puncture. In UDTO patients, diatrizoate meglumine can be directly injected into the gastric lumen under ultrasound (US) guidance, as reported by Pugash et al. (3) in 1995. Since the stomach appears collapsed with apposed multi-layer walls and virtual lumen on US, the needle tip is hardly seen. In such circumstances, after having transfixed the stomach with a 21G Chiba needle, further gradual needle withdrawing is performed under fluoroscopic guidance while injecting small amounts of diatrizoate meglumine until a ruga pattern is seen. Moreover, a cancer patient's subcutaneous fat is often absent and the anterior gastric wall is close to the abdominal wall. High frequency US monitoring does improve needle visualization in such a circumstance. Conversely, in obese patients, back- and forth motions of the needle stylet under Doppler color US guidance clearly improves needle visualization. We noted that by using this technique we successfully performed percutaneous fluoroscopy gastrostomy (PFG) in two partially

  2. Tips and Tricks of Percutaneous Gastrostomy Under Image Guidance in Patients with Limited Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Figl, Andrea; Thariat, Juliette; Lacout, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    We read with great interest the article by Chan et al. (1) in the March issue of Korean Journal of Radiology on their experience of modified radiology-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (MRPG). The authors proposed a technique to access the stomach in patients with upper digestive tract obstruction (UDTO). Following marking a patient's left liver inferior margin and room air-colonography, the authors punctured the gastric area using a 21G fine needle under X-ray guidance and withdrew their syringe gradually while injecting contrast medium. We noted that the gastrostomy may be performed using a 0.0035-inch hydrophilic guide wire and a 6.5-Fr angled catheter in almost 100% of patients contraindicated for endoscopy gastrostomy, including those with tortuous or tight cervical stenosis (2). In patients with a collapsed stomach, orally administered effervescent sodium bicarbonate powder can produce sufficient gas in the stomach to allow for a percutaneous needle puncture. In UDTO patients, diatrizoate meglumine can be directly injected into the gastric lumen under ultrasound (US) guidance, as reported by Pugash et al. (3) in 1995. Since the stomach appears collapsed with apposed multi-layer walls and virtual lumen on US, the needle tip is hardly seen. In such circumstances, after having transfixed the stomach with a 21G Chiba needle, further gradual needle withdrawing is performed under fluoroscopic guidance while injecting small amounts of diatrizoate meglumine until a ruga pattern is seen. Moreover, a cancer patient's subcutaneous fat is often absent and the anterior gastric wall is close to the abdominal wall. High frequency US monitoring does improve needle visualization in such a circumstance. Conversely, in obese patients, back- and forth motions of the needle stylet under Doppler color US guidance clearly improves needle visualization. We noted that by using this technique we successfully performed percutaneous fluoroscopy gastrostomy (PFG) in two partially

  3. Endovascular Catheter for Magnetic Navigation under MR Imaging Guidance: Evaluation of Safety in Vivo at 1.5T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetts, S.W.; Saeed, M.; Martin, A.J.; Evans, L.; Bernhardt, A.F.; Malba, V.; Settecase, F.; Do, L.; Yee, E.J.; Losey, A.; Sincic, R.; Roy, S.; Arenson, R.L.; Wilson, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Endovascular navigation under MR imaging guidance can be facilitated by a catheter with steerable microcoils on the tip. Not only do microcoils create visible artifacts allowing catheter tracking, but also they create a small magnetic moment permitting remote-controlled catheter tip deflection. A side product of catheter tip electrical currents, however, is the heat that might damage blood vessels. We sought to determine the upper boundary of electrical currents safely usable at 1.5T in a coil-tipped microcatheter system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Alumina tubes with solenoid copper coils were attached to neurovascular microcatheters with heat shrink-wrap. Catheters were tested in carotid arteries of 8 pigs. The catheters were advanced under x-ray fluoroscopy and MR imaging. Currents from 0 mA to 700 mA were applied to test heating and potential vascular damage. Postmortem histologic analysis was the primary endpoint. RESULTS: Several heat-mitigation strategies demonstrated negligible vascular damage compared with control arteries. Coil currents ≤300 mA resulted in no damage (0/58 samples) compared with 9 (25%) of 36 samples for > 300-mA activations (P = .0001). Tip coil activation ≤1 minute and a proximal carotid guide catheter saline drip > 2 mL/minute also had a nonsignificantly lower likelihood of vascular damage. For catheter tip coil activations ≤300 mA for ≤1 minute in normal carotid flow, 0 of 43 samples had tissue damage. CONCLUSIONS: Activations of copper coils at the tip of microcatheters at low currents in 1.5T MR scanners can be achieved without significant damage to blood vessel walls in a controlled experimental setting. Further optimization of catheter design and procedure protocols is necessary for safe remote control magnetic catheter guidance. PMID:23846795

  4. Endodontic Working Length Measurement Using Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Images Obtained at Different Voxel Sizes and Field of Views, Periapical Radiography, and Apex Locator: A Comparative Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Funda; Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Şenel, Buğra

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of working length determination by using an electronic apex locator, periapical radiography, and cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging obtained at different voxel sizes and field of views (FOVs) in extracted human teeth. Thirty extracted human mandibular premolar teeth were used. The electronic working length measurements were performed by using an electronic apex locator (Root ZX; J Morita Corp, Kyoto, Japan). Five different image sets were obtained as follows: (1) CBCT imaging: 40 × 40 mm FOV, 0.080 mm 3 (FOV 40 ); (2) CBCT imaging: 60 × 60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm 3 (FOV 60 ); (3) CBCT imaging: 80 × 80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm 3 (FOV 80 ); (4) CBCT imaging: 100 × 100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm 3 (FOV 100 ); and (5) periapical digital radiography. Direct measurements performed with an electronic digital caliper were considered as the gold standard and compared with the electronic apex locator, CBCT, and periapical image measurements. Data were analyzed using a 2-way analysis of variance test. Significance level was set at P  .05 and the Gage R&R value was 30%). There were significant differences in the methods in terms of mean differences from the gold standard (P < .05). This study showed that available CBCT scans with different FOVs can be used for working length measurement. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veit, R.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi, N.; Mannweiler, E.; Drexler, G.; Williams, G.

    1989-01-01

    The first generation of heterogenoeous anthropomorphic mathematical models to be used in dose calculations was the MIRD-5 adult phantom, followed by the pediatric MIRD-type phantoms and by the GSF sex-specific phantoms ADAM and EVA. A new generation of realistic anthropomorphic models is now introduced. The organs and tissues of these models consist of a well defined number of volume elements (voxels), derived from computer tomographic (CT) data; consequently, these models were named voxel or tomographic models. So far two voxel models of real patients are available: one of an 8 week old baby and of a 7 year old child. For simplicity, the model of the baby will be referred to as BABY and that of the child as CHILD. In chapter 1 a brief literature review is given on the existing mathematical models and their applications. The reasons that lead to the construction of the new CT models is discussed. In chapter 2 the technique is described which allows to convert any physical object into computer files to be used for dose calculations. The technique which produces three dimensional reconstructions of high resolution is discussed. In chapter 3 the main characteristics of the models of the baby and child are given. Tables of organ masses and volumes are presented together with three dimensional images of some organs and tissues. A special mention is given to the assessment of bone marrow distribution. Chapter 4 gives a short description of the Monte Carlo code used in conjunction with the models to calculate organ and tissue doses resulting from photon exposures. Some technical details concerning the computer files which describe the models are also given. (orig./HP)

  6. Evaluation of Online/Offline Image Guidance/Adaptation Approaches for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, An; Sun, Ying; Liang, Jian; Yan, Di

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate online/offline image-guided/adaptive treatment techniques for prostate cancer radiation therapy with daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Methods and Materials: Three treatment techniques were evaluated retrospectively using daily pre- and posttreatment CBCT images on 22 prostate cancer patients. Prostate, seminal vesicles (SV), rectal wall, and bladder were delineated on all CBCT images. For each patient, a pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan with clinical target volume (CTV) = prostate + SV and planning target volume (PTV) = CTV + 3 mm was created. The 3 treatment techniques were as follows: (1) Daily Correction: The pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan was delivered after online CBCT imaging, and position correction; (2) Online Planning: Daily online inverse plans with 3-mm CTV-to-PTV margin were created using online CBCT images, and delivered; and (3) Hybrid Adaption: Daily Correction plus an offline adaptive inverse planning performed after the first week of treatment. The adaptive plan was delivered for all remaining 15 fractions. Treatment dose for each technique was constructed using the daily posttreatment CBCT images via deformable image registration. Evaluation was performed using treatment dose distribution in target and critical organs. Results: Treatment equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the CTV was within [85.6%, 100.8%] of the pretreatment planned target EUD for Daily Correction; [98.7%, 103.0%] for Online Planning; and [99.2%, 103.4%] for Hybrid Adaptation. Eighteen percent of the 22 patients in Daily Correction had a target dose deficiency >5%. For rectal wall, the mean ± SD of the normalized EUD was 102.6% ± 2.7% for Daily Correction, 99.9% ± 2.5% for Online Planning, and 100.6% ± 2.1% for Hybrid Adaptation. The mean ± SD of the normalized bladder EUD was 108.7% ± 8.2% for Daily Correction, 92.7% ± 8.6% for Online Planning, and 89.4% ± 10.8% for Hybrid

  7. Development of a real time imaging-based guidance system of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xingming [School of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, Shandong (China); School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering & ReCAPT, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Le, Tuan-Anh [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering & ReCAPT, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jungwon, E-mail: jwyoon@gnu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering & ReCAPT, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    Targeted drug delivery using magnetic nanoparticles is an efficient technique as molecules can be directed toward specific tissues inside a human body. For the first time, we implemented a real-time imaging-based guidance system of nanoparticles using untethered electro-magnetic devices for simultaneous guiding and tracking. In this paper a low-amplitude-excitation-field magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is introduced. Based on this imaging technology, a hybrid system comprised of an electromagnetic actuator and MPI was used to navigate nanoparticles in a non-invasive way. The real-time low-amplitude-excitation-field MPI and electromagnetic actuator of this navigation system are achieved by applying a time-division multiplexing scheme to the coil topology. A one dimensional nanoparticle navigation system was built to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach and it could achieve a 2 Hz navigation update rate with the field gradient of 3.5 T/m during the imaging mode and 8.75 T/m during the actuation mode. Particles with both 90 nm and 5 nm diameters could be successfully manipulated and monitored in a tube through the proposed system, which can significantly enhance targeting efficiency and allow precise analysis in a real drug delivery. - Highlights: • A real-time system comprised of an electromagnetic actuator and a low-amplitude-excitation-field MPI can navigate magnetic nanoparticles. • The imaging scheme is feasible to enlarge field of view size. • The proposed navigation system can be cost efficient, compact, and optimized for targeting of the nanoparticles.

  8. Improved Debulking of Peritoneal Tumor Implants by Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanobody Image Guidance in an Experimental Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debie, Pieterjan; Vanhoeij, Marian; Poortmans, Natalie; Puttemans, Janik; Gillis, Kris; Devoogdt, Nick; Lahoutte, Tony; Hernot, Sophie

    2017-10-31

    Debulking followed by combination chemotherapy is currently regarded as the most effective treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. Prognosis depends drastically on the degree of debulking. Accordingly, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has been proposed to revolutionize cancer surgery by acting as a sensitive, specific, and real-time tool enabling visualization of cancer lesions. We have previously developed a NIR-labeled nanobody that allows fast, specific, and high-contrast imaging of HER2-positive tumors. In this study, we applied this tracer during fluorescence-guided surgery in a mouse model and investigated the effect on surgical efficiency. 0.5 × 10 6 SKOV3.IP1-Luc+ cells were inoculated intraperitoneally in athymic mice and were allowed to grow for 30 days. Two nanomoles of IRDye800CW-anti-HER2 nanobody was injected intravenously. After 1h30, mice were killed, randomized in two groups, and subjected to surgery. In the first animal group (n = 7), lesions were removed by a conventional surgical protocol, followed by excision of remaining fluorescent tissue using a NIR camera. The second group of mice (n = 6) underwent directly fluorescence-guided surgery. Bioluminescence imaging was performed before and after surgery. Resected tissue was categorized as visualized during conventional surgery or not, fluorescent or not, and bioluminescent positive or negative. Fluorescence imaging allowed clear visualization of tumor nodules within the abdomen, up to submillimeter-sized lesions. Fluorescence guidance resulted in significantly reduced residual tumor as compared to conventional surgery. Moreover, sensitivity increased from 59.3 to 99.0 %, and the percentage of false positive lesions detected decreased from 19.6 to 7.1 %. This study demonstrates the advantage of intraoperative fluorescence imaging using nanobody-based tracers on the efficiency of debulking surgery.

  9. Benchtop and Animal Validation of a Projective Imaging System for Potential Use in Intraoperative Surgical Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qi; Wang, Dong; Ye, Jian; Zhang, Zeshu; Wang, Xinrui; Hu, Chuanzhen; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X

    2016-01-01

    We propose a projective navigation system for fluorescence imaging and image display in a natural mode of visual perception. The system consists of an excitation light source, a monochromatic charge coupled device (CCD) camera, a host computer, a projector, a proximity sensor and a Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera. With perspective transformation and calibration, our surgical navigation system is able to achieve an overall imaging speed higher than 60 frames per second, with a latency of 330 ms, a spatial sensitivity better than 0.5 mm in both vertical and horizontal directions, and a projection bias less than 1 mm. The technical feasibility of image-guided surgery is demonstrated in both agar-agar gel phantoms and an ex vivo chicken breast model embedding Indocyanine Green (ICG). The biological utility of the system is demonstrated in vivo in a classic model of ICG hepatic metabolism. Our benchtop, ex vivo and in vivo experiments demonstrate the clinical potential for intraoperative delineation of disease margin and image-guided resection surgery.

  10. Intraoperative Image Guidance in Neurosurgery: Development, Current Indications, and Future Trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Ch.; Mauer, U.M.; Waldeck, S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. As minimally invasive surgery becomes the standard of care in neurosurgery, it is imperative that surgeons become skilled in the use of image-guided techniques. The development of image-guided neurosurgery represents a substantial improvement in the microsurgical treatment of tumors, vascular malformations, and other intracranial lesions. Objective. There have been numerous advances in neurosurgery which have aided the neurosurgeon to achieve accurate removal of pathological tissue with minimal disruption of surrounding healthy neuronal matter including the development of microsurgical, endoscopic, and endovascular techniques. Neuro navigation systems and intraoperative imaging should improve success in cranial neurosurgery. Additional functional imaging modalities such as PET, SPECT, DTI (for fiber tracking), and fMRI can now be used in order to reduce neurological deficits resulting from surgery; however the positive long-term effect remains questionable for many indications. Method. Pub Med database search using the search term “image guided neurosurgery.” More than 1400 articles were published during the last 25 years. The abstracts were scanned for prospective comparative trials. Results and Conclusion. 14 comparative trials are published. To date significant data amount show advantages in intraoperative accuracy influencing the perioperative morbidity and long-term outcome only for cerebral glioma surgery.

  11. Volumetric-based image guidance is superior to marker-based alignments for stereotactic body radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Lu, Lan; Stephans, Kevin L; Sharma, Naveen; Vassil, Andrew; Shen, Zhilei Liu; Stockham, Abigail; Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D; Xia, Ping

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a dual marker-based and soft-tissue based image guidance for inter-fractional corrections in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of prostate cancer. We reviewed 18 patients treated with SBRT for prostate cancer. An endorectal balloon was inserted at simulation and each treatment. Planning margins were 3 mm/0 mm posteriorly. Prior to each treatment, a dual image guidance protocol was applied to align three makers using stereoscopic x ray images and then to the soft tissue using kilo-voltage cone beam CT (kV-CBCT). After treatment, prostate (CTV), rectal wall, and bladder were delineated on each kV-CBCT, and delivered dose was recalculated. Dosimetric endpoints were analyzed, including V 36.25 Gy for prostate, and D 0.03 cc for bladder and rectal wall. Following initial marker alignment, additional translational shifts were applied to 22 of 84 fractions after kV-CBCT. Among the 22 fractions, ten fractions exceeded 3 mm shifts in any direction, including one in the left-right direction, four in the superior-inferior direction, and five in the anterior-posterior direction. With and without the additional kV-CBCT shifts, the average V 36.25 Gy of the prostate for the 22 fractions was 97.6 ± 2.6% with the kV x ray image alone, and was 98.1 ± 2.4% after applying the additional kV-CBCT shifts. The improvement was borderline statistical significance using Wilcoxon signed-rank test (P = 0.007). D 0.03 cc was 45.8 ± 6.3 Gy vs. 45.1 ± 4.9 Gy for the rectal wall; and 49.5 ± 8.6 Gy vs. 49.3 ± 7.9 Gy for the bladder before and after applying kV-CBCT shifts. Marker-based alignment alone is not sufficient. Additional adjustments are needed for some patients based kV-CBCT. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abele, M.

    1983-01-01

    A computerized tomographic scanning apparatus suitable for diagnosis and for improving target identification in stereotactic neurosurgery is described. It consists of a base, a source of penetrating energy, a detector which produces scanning signals and detector positioning means. A frame with top and bottom arms secures the detector and source to the top and bottom arms respectively. A drive mechanism rotates the frame about an axis along which the frame may also be moved. Finally, the detector may be moved relative to the bottom arm in a direction contrary to the rotation of the frame. (U.K.)

  13. Flexible transbronchial optical frequency domain imaging smart needle for biopsy guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, K. M.; Chee, A.; Shishkov, M.; Hariri, L. P.; Applegate, M. B.; Bouma, B. E.; Suter, M. J.

    2013-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death. Macroscopic imaging techniques such as computed tomography are highly sensitivity at detecting small, ≤ 2cm, peripheral pulmonary lesions (PPLs) in the lung but lack the specificity necessary for diagnosis. Bronchoscopy is a procedure routinely performed to diagnose PPLs but is hindered with a low diagnostic yield due to challenging lesion localization. We have developed a flexible transbronchial optical frequency domain imaging (TB-OFDI) catheter that functions as a `smart needle' to confirm the needle placement within the target lesion prior to biopsy. The TB-OFDI smart needle consists of a flexible and removable OFDI catheter that operates within a 21-gauge transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) needle. The OFDI catheter can be easily removed from the needle to facilitate subsequent aspiration or biopsy acquisition. The OFDI imaging core consists of an angled-polished ball lens with a spot size of 25 μm at a working distance of 160 μm from the catheter sheath. The ball-lens was designed to have an ellipsoid shape in order to compensate for the astigmatism caused by encasing the optics within a protective sheath. Transbronchial imaging of inflated excised swine lung parenchyma with the TB-OFDI smart needle yielded clear images of alveoli. In-vivo transbronchial imaging was also performed on three swine with artificial lesions injected transthoracially. Our results suggest that the TB-OFDI smart needle may be a useful tool for guiding biopsy acquisition to increase the diagnostic yield of PPLs.

  14. Process for guidance, containment, treatment, and imaging in a subsurface environment utilizing ferro-fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moridis, George J.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed are processes for monitoring and control of underground contamination, which involve the application of ferrofluids. Two broad uses of ferrofluids are described: (1) to control liquid movement by the application of strong external magnetic fields; and (2) to image liquids by standard geophysical methods.

  15. Wide-field spectrally resolved quantitative fluorescence imaging system: toward neurosurgical guidance in glioma resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yijing; Thom, Maria; Ebner, Michael; Wykes, Victoria; Desjardins, Adrien; Miserocchi, Anna; Ourselin, Sebastien; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Vercauteren, Tom

    2017-11-01

    In high-grade glioma surgery, tumor resection is often guided by intraoperative fluorescence imaging. 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) provides fluorescent contrast between normal brain tissue and glioma tissue, thus achieving improved tumor delineation and prolonged patient survival compared with conventional white-light-guided resection. However, commercially available fluorescence imaging systems rely solely on visual assessment of fluorescence patterns by the surgeon, which makes the resection more subjective than necessary. We developed a wide-field spectrally resolved fluorescence imaging system utilizing a Generation II scientific CMOS camera and an improved computational model for the precise reconstruction of the PpIX concentration map. In our model, the tissue's optical properties and illumination geometry, which distort the fluorescent emission spectra, are considered. We demonstrate that the CMOS-based system can detect low PpIX concentration at short camera exposure times, while providing high-pixel resolution wide-field images. We show that total variation regularization improves the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed quantitative concentration map by approximately twofold. Quantitative comparison between the estimated PpIX concentration and tumor histopathology was also investigated to further evaluate the system.

  16. Integration of image guidance and rapid prototyping technology in craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, P; Dunaway, D; McGurk, L; Richards, R

    2013-08-01

    This technical note demonstrates the benefits of preoperative planning, involving the use of rapid prototype models and rehearsal of the surgical procedure, using image-guided navigational surgery. Optimum reconstruction of large defects can be achieved with this technique. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 76 FR 51993 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Standards for Clinical Trial Imaging Endpoints; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... assist sponsors in the use of imaging endpoints in clinical trials of therapeutic drugs and biological... therapeutic drug or biological product, especially for an efficacy endpoint. As part of the reauthorization of... from the Secretary of Health and Human Services to the Chairman of ] the Committee on Health, Education...

  18. Tomographic Techniques for Radar Ice Sounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik

    challenge. This dissertation deals with tomographic techniques based on multiphase-center radars that represent state-of-the-art technology within thefield of ice sounding. The use of advanced tomographic processing forclutter suppression is investigated, which up to this point has beenlargely unexplored...... in the literature. The investigation also includes atheoretical study of beamforming and direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimationtechniques. In addition to the primary treatment of clutter suppression,additional novel applications of tomography are also explored. Based on an experimental multi-phase-center dataset...... discrimination of the desired bed return from strong surface clutter ispresented. The technique is applied to data from the channel of the challengingJakobshavn Glacier acquired with the Multi-channel CoherentiiiRadar Depth Sounder/Imager (MCoRDS/I), where it is shown how thetechnique can be used to close some...

  19. Tomographic reconstruction of quantum metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudato, Marco; Marmo, Giuseppe; Mele, Fabio M.; Ventriglia, Franco; Vitale, Patrizia

    2018-02-01

    In the framework of quantum information geometry we investigate the relationship between monotone metric tensors uniquely defined on the space of quantum tomograms, once the tomographic scheme is chosen, and monotone quantum metrics on the space of quantum states, classified by operator monotone functions, according to the Petz classification theorem. We show that different metrics can be related through a change in the tomographic map and prove that there exists a bijective relation between monotone quantum metrics associated with different operator monotone functions. Such a bijective relation is uniquely defined in terms of solutions of a first order second degree differential equation for the parameters of the involved tomographic maps. We first exhibit an example of a non-linear tomographic map that connects a monotone metric with a new one, which is not monotone. Then we provide a second example where two monotone metrics are uniquely related through their tomographic parameters.

  20. The role of Cobalt-60 in modern radiation therapy: Dose delivery and image guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiner L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in modern radiation therapy with techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy and image-guid-ed radiation therapy (IMRT and IGRT have been limited almost exclusively to linear accel-erators. Investigations of modern Cobalt-60 (Co-60 radiation delivery in the context of IMRT and IGRT have been very sparse, and have been limited mainly to computer-modeling and treatment-planning exercises. In this paper, we report on the results of experiments using a tomotherapy benchtop apparatus attached to a conventional Co-60 unit. We show that conformal dose delivery is possible and also that Co-60 can be used as the radiation source in megavoltage computed tomography imaging. These results complement our modeling studies of Co-60 tomotherapy and provide a strong motivation for continuing development of modern Cobalt-60 treatment devices.

  1. TU-EF-210-00: Therapeutic Strategies and Image Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound to provide targeted therapy is an active research area that has a broad application scope. The invited talks in this session will address currently implemented strategies and protocols for both hyperthermia and ablation applications using therapeutic ultrasound. The role of both ultrasound and MRI in the monitoring and assessment of these therapies will be explored in both pre-clinical and clinical applications. Katherine Ferrara: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Drug Delivery, and Immunotherapy Rajiv Chopra: Translating Localized Doxorubicin Delivery to Pediatric Oncology using MRI-guided HIFU Elisa Konofagou: Real-time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification using Harmonic Motion Imaging Keyvan Farahani: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy Learning Objectives: Understand the role of ultrasound in localized drug delivery and the effects of immunotherapy when used in conjunction with ultrasound therapy. Understand potential targeted drug delivery clinical applications including pediatric oncology. Understand the technical requirements for performing targeted drug delivery. Understand how radiation-force approaches can be used to both monitor and assess high intensity focused ultrasound ablation therapy. Understand the role of AAPM task groups in ultrasound imaging and therapies. Chopra: Funding from Cancer Prevention and Research Initiative of Texas (CPRIT), Award R1308 Evelyn and M.R. Hudson Foundation; Research Support from Research Contract with Philips Healthcare; COI are Co-founder of FUS Instruments Inc Ferrara: Supported by NIH, UCDavis and California (CIRM and BHCE) Farahani: In-kind research support from Philips Healthcare.

  2. TU-EF-210-00: Therapeutic Strategies and Image Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound to provide targeted therapy is an active research area that has a broad application scope. The invited talks in this session will address currently implemented strategies and protocols for both hyperthermia and ablation applications using therapeutic ultrasound. The role of both ultrasound and MRI in the monitoring and assessment of these therapies will be explored in both pre-clinical and clinical applications. Katherine Ferrara: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Drug Delivery, and Immunotherapy Rajiv Chopra: Translating Localized Doxorubicin Delivery to Pediatric Oncology using MRI-guided HIFU Elisa Konofagou: Real-time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification using Harmonic Motion Imaging Keyvan Farahani: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy Learning Objectives: Understand the role of ultrasound in localized drug delivery and the effects of immunotherapy when used in conjunction with ultrasound therapy. Understand potential targeted drug delivery clinical applications including pediatric oncology. Understand the technical requirements for performing targeted drug delivery. Understand how radiation-force approaches can be used to both monitor and assess high intensity focused ultrasound ablation therapy. Understand the role of AAPM task groups in ultrasound imaging and therapies. Chopra: Funding from Cancer Prevention and Research Initiative of Texas (CPRIT), Award R1308 Evelyn and M.R. Hudson Foundation; Research Support from Research Contract with Philips Healthcare; COI are Co-founder of FUS Instruments Inc Ferrara: Supported by NIH, UCDavis and California (CIRM and BHCE) Farahani: In-kind research support from Philips Healthcare

  3. Clinical Utility of Magnetic Resonance Thermal Imaging (MRTI) For Realtime Guidance of Deep Hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, PR; Craciunescu, OI; Maccarini, P; Wyatt, C; Arunachalam, K; Arabe, O; Stakhursky, V; Li, Z; Soher, B; MacFall, J; Rangarao, S.; Cheng, KS; Das, S; Martins, CD; Charles, C; Dewhirst, MW; Wong, T; Jones, E; Vujaskovic, Z

    2013-01-01

    A critical need has emerged for volumetric thermometry to visualize 3D temperature distributions in real time during deep hyperthermia treatments used as an adjuvant to radiation or chemotherapy for cancer. For the current effort, magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI) is used to measure 2D temperature rise distributions in four cross sections of large extremity soft tissue sarcomas during hyperthermia treatments. Novel hardware and software techniques are described which improve the signal to noise ratio of MR images, minimize motion artifact from circulating coupling fluids, and provide accurate high resolution volumetric thermal dosimetry. For the first 10 extremity sarcoma patients, the mean difference between MRTI region of interest and adjacent interstitial point measurements during the period of steady state temperature was 0.85°C. With 1min temporal resolution of measurements in four image planes, this non-invasive MRTI approach has demonstrated its utility for accurate monitoring and realtime steering of heat into tumors at depth in the body. PMID:24224074

  4. Intrafractional Tracking Accuracy of a Transperineal Ultrasound Image Guidance System for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Amy S; Najafi, Mohammad; Hristov, Dimitre H; Phillips, Tiffany

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the tracking accuracy of a commercial ultrasound system under relevant treatment conditions and demonstrate its clinical utility for detecting significant treatment deviations arising from inadvertent intrafractional target motion. A multimodality male pelvic phantom was used to simulate prostate image-guided radiotherapy with the system under evaluation. Target motion was simulated by placing the phantom on a motion platform. The tracking accuracy of the ultrasound system was evaluated using an independent optical tracking system under the conditions of beam-on, beam-off, poor image quality with an acoustic shadow introduced, and different phantom motion cycles. The time delay between the ultrasound-detected and actual phantom motion was investigated. A clinical case example of prostate treatment is presented as a demonstration of the utility of the system in practice. Time delay between the motion phantom and ultrasound tracking system is 223 ± 45.2 milliseconds including video and optical tracking system frame rates. The tracking accuracy and precision were better with a longer period. The precision of ultrasound tracking performance in the axial (superior-inferior) direction was better than that in the lateral (left-right) direction (root mean square errors are 0.18 and 0.25 mm, respectively). The accuracy of ultrasound tracking performance in the lateral direction was better than that in the axial direction (the mean position errors are 0.23 and 0.45 mm, respectively). Interference by radiation and image quality do not affect tracking ability significantly. Further, utilizing the tracking system as part of a clinical study for prostate treatment further verified the accuracy and clinical appropriateness. It is feasible to use transperineal ultrasound daily to monitor prostate motion during treatment. Our results verify the accuracy and precision of an ultrasound system under typical external beam treatment conditions and

  5. A tomograph VMEbus parallel processing data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, N.A.; Rogers, J.G.; Atkins, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a VME based data acquisition system suitable for the development of Positron Volume Imaging tomographs which use 3-D data for improved image resolution over slice-oriented tomographs. the data acquisition must be flexible enough to accommodate several 3-D reconstruction algorithms; hence, a software-based system is most suitable. Furthermore, because of the increased dimensions and resolution of volume imaging tomographs, the raw data event rate is greater than that of slice-oriented machines. These dual requirements are met by our data acquisition system. Flexibility is achieved through an array of processors connected over a VMEbus, operating asynchronously and in parallel. High raw data throughput is achieved using a dedicated high speed data transfer device available for the VMEbus. The device can attain a raw data rate of 2.5 million coincidence events per second for raw events which are 64 bits wide

  6. Image-based guidance for minimally invasive surgical atrial fibrillation ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastenteufel, Mark; Yang, Siwei; Christoph, Carsten; Vetter, Marcus; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Wolf, Ivo

    2006-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and results in an increased risk of ischaemic stroke. Recently, a European consortium has developed a new ablation device for minimally invasive surgical AF treatment. The device is controlled by a medical robot. Due to the minimal invasive usage, surgery using the new device needs appropriate navigation support. In this paper, we describe an image-based navigation application to guide the new device intraoperatively. The navigation procedure is based on intraoperative ultrasound. Variations in the position of the ablation device are transferred from the software controlling the robot to the navigation system. Due to the flexibility of the ablation device, a deformation model predicts the behaviour during repositioning. Ablation lines are interactively planned. Actually burned ablation lines are visualized during surgery. Several in vitro and ex vivo experimental set-ups were built up to test the feasibility. The navigation workflow was implemented into navigation software using well-known open-source software toolkits. The navigation system has been integrated and tested successfully within the overall system. The ablation device could be localized on in vitro and ex vivo ultrasound images. The performed trials proved the applicability of the navigation procedure. More in vivo tests are currently being performed to make the new device and the described navigation procedure ready for clinical use. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Yu; Wu Qiuwen

    2010-01-01

    Offline adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been used to effectively correct and compensate for prostate motion and reduce the required margin. The efficacy depends on the characteristics of the patient setup error and interfraction motion through the whole treatment; specifically, systematic errors are corrected and random errors are compensated for through the margins. In online image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, the translational setup error and inter-fractional prostate motion are corrected through pre-treatment imaging and couch correction at each fraction. However, the rotation and deformation of the target are not corrected and only accounted for with margins in treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the offline ART strategy is necessary for an online IGRT protocol and to evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy. First, to investigate the rationale of the hybrid strategy, 592 cone-beam-computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before and after each fraction for an online IGRT protocol from 16 patients were analyzed. Specifically, the characteristics of prostate rotation were analyzed. It was found that there exist systematic inter-fractional prostate rotations, and they are patient specific. These rotations, if not corrected, are persistent through the treatment fraction, and rotations detected in early fractions are representative of those in later fractions. These findings suggest that the offline adaptive replanning strategy is beneficial to the online IGRT protocol with further margin reductions. Second, to quantitatively evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy, 412 repeated helical CT scans from 25 patients during the course of treatment were included in the replanning study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, clinical target volume, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles) were included in the simulation. The contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were

  8. Tomographic extreme-ultraviolet spectrographs: TESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D M; Stephan, A; Cook, T; Vickers, J; Taylor, V; Chakrabarti, S

    2000-08-01

    We describe the system of Tomographic Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) SpectrographS (TESS) that are the primary instruments for the Tomographic Experiment using Radiative Recombinative Ionospheric EUV and Radio Sources (TERRIERS) satellite. The spectrographs were designed to make high-sensitivity {80 counts/s)/Rayleigh [one Rayleigh is equivalent to 10(6) photons/(4pi str cm(2)s)}, line-of-sight measurements of the oi 135.6- and 91.1-nm emissions suitable for tomographic inversion. The system consists of five spectrographs, four identical nightglow instruments (for redundancy and added sensitivity), and one instrument with a smaller aperture to reduce sensitivity and increase spectral resolution for daytime operation. Each instrument has a bandpass of 80-140 nm with approximately 2- and 1-nm resolution for the night and day instruments, respectively. They utilize microchannel-plate-based two-dimensional imaging detectors with wedge-and-strip anode readouts. The instruments were designed, fabricated, and calibrated at Boston University, and the TERRIERS satellite was launched on 18 May 1999 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

  9. Intraprostatic fiducials for image guidance: Workflow implications in a single linac department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, Mark; See, Andrew; Rolfo, Aldo; Medwell, Steve; Joon, Michael Lim; Joon, Daryl Lim; Martin, Jarad; Khoo, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy and implications on workflow of an online correction electronic portal imaging (EPI) protocol utilising bony anatomy in the online environment and an assessment of three implanted gold seed fiducial markers in the offline environment. This paper summarises an initial trial to establish the range of systematic and random errors present in patient set-up for both bony anatomy and fiducial markers, and to calculate optimal clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins. The impact of the introduction of such a technique was also assessed in terms of impact on workflow and resource management in a single machine unit (SMU). Methods and materials: Pre treatment electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired and bony anatomy was matched with CT derived digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Intervention in field placement was made if field placement fell outside the range of 4 mm on any of the orthogonal axes. In the offline environment the position of the implanted gold seed fiducials was aligned with that of the DRRs. An analysis of set-up error, total error and internal organ motion was then undertaken, with full statistical analysis of systematic and random errors. Results: Eleven patients completed treatment as specified, with 1006 EPIs available for analysis. Treatment times were in the order of 10.4 min. Set-up errors were in the order of 2.7 mm right-left, 2.4 mm sup-inf and 1.6 mm ant-pst. These were reduced to 1.2 mm, 0.7 mm and 0.9 mm respectively utilising an online correction protocol. However there was minimal impact on total error and internal organ motion. Using the data obtained in both the online and offline environments optimal CTV-PTV margins were calculated for correcting to bone, correcting to gold seed fiducials and also the possibility of EPI malfunction. Conclusions: Daily targeting of the prostate is both technically feasible and can be carried out in an efficient and accurate manner. An

  10. Biomedical Optoacoustic Tomograph Based on a Cylindrical Focusing PVDF Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subochev, P. V.; Postnikova, A. S.; Koval'chuk, A. V.; Turchin, I. V.

    2017-08-01

    We developed an optoacoustic tomograph with hand-held probe designed for optoacoustic imaging of biological tissues. The hand-held probe consists of a fiber-optic bundle for delivery of pulsed laser radiation to the studied object and a cylindrical focusing 64-element antenna for the detection of optoacoustic pulses. The capabilities of the tomograph to visualize the model blood vessels were studied experimentally using electronic and electronic-mechanical scanning. The achieved axial/lateral spatial resolution is 200/400 μm, the imaging depth is 18 mm, and the maximum B-scan acquisition rate is 10 Hz.

  11. Optical tomograph optimized for tumor detection inside highly absorbent organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Jérôme; Koenig, Anne; Hervé, Lionel; Berger, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a tomograph for small animal fluorescence imaging. The compact and cost-effective system described in this article was designed to address the problem of tumor detection inside highly absorbent heterogeneous organs, such as lungs. To validate the tomograph's ability to detect cancerous nodules inside lungs, in vivo tumor growth was studied on seven cancerous mice bearing murine mammary tumors marked with Alexa Fluor 700. They were successively imaged 10, 12, and 14 days after the primary tumor implantation. The fluorescence maps were compared over this time period. As expected, the reconstructed fluorescence increases with the tumor growth stage.

  12. The accuracy of computed tomographic angiography for mapping the perforators of the DIEA: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Warren M; Ashton, Mark W; Stella, Damien L; Phillips, Timothy J; Taylor, G Ian

    2008-08-01

    The deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) perforator flap is increasingly used for breast reconstruction, with preoperative imaging sought as a means of improving operative outcome. Computed tomographic angiography has been recently described as the preferred imaging modality; however, formal evaluation of computed tomographic angiography has not been described. A cadaveric study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of computed tomographic angiography for perforator mapping. Ten cadaveric hemiabdominal walls from five fresh cadavers underwent contrast injection of each DIEA and subsequent computed tomographic scanning, with each DIEA and all perforating branches documented. Dissection was then performed, with the recording of the course of the DIEA and the course of all perforators in each specimen. The concordance of computed tomographic angiography with dissection findings was evaluated. Cadaveric computed tomographic angiography identified 154 perforators in 10 hemiabdominal walls. Computed tomographic angiography was highly accurate, with eight false-positives and six false-negatives on cadaveric computed tomographic angiography, establishing an overall sensitivity of 96 percent and a positive predictive value of 95 percent for mapping perforators. For perforators greater than 1 mm in diameter, the sensitivity was 100 percent and the positive predictive value was 100 percent. Computed tomographic angiography is a highly accurate tool for identifying the perforators of the DIEA before DIEA perforator flaps for breast reconstruction. Preoperative identification of these vessels can aid planning for the preferred hemiabdomen for dissection, and may save operative time, angst, and potentially complications.

  13. Spine radiosurgery for the local treatment of spine metastases: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance, clinical aspects and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Taunk, Neil Kanth; Yamada, Yoshiya [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Laufer, Ilya, E-mail: fymoraes@gmail.com [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurosurgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Many cancer patients will develop spinal metastases. Local control is important for preventing neurologic compromise and to relieve pain. Stereotactic body radiotherapy or spinal radiosurgery is a new radiation therapy technique for spinal metastasis that can deliver a high dose of radiation to a tumor while minimizing the radiation delivered to healthy, neighboring tissues. This treatment is based on intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance and rigid immobilization. Spinal radiosurgery is an increasingly utilized treatment method that improves local control and pain relief after delivering ablative doses of radiation. Here, we present a review highlighting the use of spinal radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic tumors of the spine. The data used in the review were collected from both published studies and ongoing trials. We found that spinal radiosurgery is safe and provides excellent tumor control (up to 94% local control) and pain relief (up to 96%), independent of histology. Extensive data regarding clinical outcomes are available; however, this information has primarily been generated from retrospective and non randomized prospective series. Currently, two randomized trials are enrolling patients to study clinical applications of fractionation schedules spinal Radiosurgery. Additionally, a phase I clinical trial is being conducted to assess the safety of concurrent stereotactic body radiotherapy and ipilimumab for spinal metastases. Clinical trials to refine clinical indications and dose fractionation are ongoing. The concomitant use of targeted agents may produce better outcomes in the future. (author)

  14. Resolving vorticity and dissipation in a turbulent boundary layer by tomographic PTV and VIC+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneiders, J.F.G.; Scarano, F.; Elsinga, G.E.

    2017-01-01

    The existing time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements by Jodai and Elsinga (J Fluid Mech 795:611–633; Jodai, Elsinga, J Fluid Mech 795:611–633, 2016) in a turbulent boundary layer (Reθ = 2038) are reprocessed using tomographic particle tracking

  15. The effect of augmented real-time image guidance on task workload during endoscopic sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Benjamin J; Chan, Harley; Daly, Michael J; Vescan, Allan D; Witterick, Ian J; Irish, Jonathan C

    2012-01-01

    Due to proximity to critical structures, the need for spatial awareness during endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is essential. We have developed an augmented, real-time image-guided surgery (ART-IGS) system that provides live navigational data and proximity alerts to the operating surgeon during ablation. We wished to test the hypothesis that task workload would be reduced when using this technology. A trial involved 8 otolaryngology residents and fellows performing ESS on cadaveric specimens; 1 side in a conventional method (control) and 1 side with ART-IGS. After computed tomography scanning, anatomical contouring, and registration of the head, a three-dimensional (3D) virtual endoscopic view, ablative tool tracking, and proximity alerts were enabled. Each subject completed ESS tasks and rated their workload during and after the exercise using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Task Load Index (TLX). A questionnaire and open feedback interview were completed after the procedure. There was a significant reduction in mental demand, temporal demand, effort, and frustration when using the ART-IGS system in comparison to the control (p < 0.02). Perceived performance was increased (p = 0.02). Most subjects agreed that the system was sufficiently accurate, caused minimal interruption, and increased confidence. Optical tracking line-of-sight issues were frequently cited as the main limitation early in the study; however, this was largely resolved. ART-IGS reduces task workload for trainees performing ESS. Live navigation and alert zones may be a valuable intraoperative teaching aid. Copyright © 2012 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  16. Simultaneous tomographic reconstruction and segmentation with class priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanov, Mikhail; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Dong, Yiqiu

    2015-01-01

    We consider tomographic imaging problems where the goal is to obtain both a reconstructed image and a corresponding segmentation. A classical approach is to first reconstruct and then segment the image; more recent approaches use a discrete tomography approach where reconstruction and segmentatio...... approach can produce better results than the classical two-step approach.......We consider tomographic imaging problems where the goal is to obtain both a reconstructed image and a corresponding segmentation. A classical approach is to first reconstruct and then segment the image; more recent approaches use a discrete tomography approach where reconstruction and segmentation...... are combined to produce a reconstruction that is identical to the segmentation. We consider instead a hybrid approach that simultaneously produces both a reconstructed image and segmentation. We incorporate priors about the desired classes of the segmentation through a Hidden Markov Measure Field Model, and we...

  17. Relationship between lung-to-heart uptake ratio of technetium-99m-tetrofosmin during exercise myocardial single photon emission computed tomographic imaging and the number of diseased coronary arteries in patients with effort angina pectoris without myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Toshiya; Ueshima, Kenji; Nishiyama, Osamu; Ogawa, Muneyoshi; Ohuchi, Mami; Saitoh, Masahiko; Hiramori, Katsuhiko

    2004-01-01

    Increased lung uptake of thallium-201 in exercise myocardial perfusion imaging is a reliable marker of multivessel disease in patients with ischemic heart disease. This study investigated whether the lung-to-heart uptake ratio with technetium-99m ( 99m Tc)-tetrofosmin also provides valuable information to detect patients with multivessel disease. Fifty-three consecutive patients (35 men, 18 women, mean age 66±11 years; single-vessel disease: 29, double-vessel disease: 16, triple-vessel disease: 8) with stable effort angina pectoris without prior myocardial infarction and 17 control subjects (12 men, 5 women, mean age 62±9 years) underwent exercise myocardial perfusion imaging with 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and coronary angiography in January 2000 to December 2002. The lung-to-heart uptake ratio was calculated on an anterior projection before reconstruction of the exercise single photon emission computed tomographic images. The mean lung-to-heart uptake ratio was 0.34±0.04, 0.38±0.07, 0.41±0.05, and 0.46±0.09, in patients with normal coronary, single-vessel disease, double-vessel disease, and triple-vessel disease, respectively. Significantly higher lung-to-heart uptake ratio was associated with more diseased vessels (p 99m Tc-tetrofosmin can provide clinically useful information to detect multivessel disease in patients with ischemic heart disease. (author)

  18. Dose–response relationship with clinical outcome for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered via online image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestin, Larry; Grills, Inga; Guckenberger, Matthias; Belderbos, Jose; Hope, Andrew J.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Xiao, Ying; Yan, Di

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine potential dose–response relationships with various non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) SBRT fractionation regimens delivered with online CT-based image guidance. Methods: 505 tumors in 483 patients with clinical stage T1-T2N0 NSCLC were treated with SBRT using on-line cone-beam-CT-based image guidance at 5 institutions (1998–2010). Median maximum tumor dimension was 2.6 cm (range 0.9–8.5 cm). Dose fractionation prescription was according to each institution’s protocol with the most common schedules of 18–20 GyX3, 12 GyX4, 12 GyX5, 12.5 GyX3, 7.5 GyX8 (median = 54 Gy, 3 fractions). Median prescription (Rx) BED 10 = 132 Gy (50.4–180). Median values (Gy) of 3D planned doses for BED 10 were GTV min = 164.1, GTV mean = 188.4, GTV max = 205.9, PTV min = 113.9, PTV D99 = 123.9, PTV mean = 164.7, PTV D1 = 197.3, PTV max = 210.7. Mean follow-up = 1.6 years. Results: 26 cases (5%) had local recurrence (LR) for a 2-year rate of 6% and 3-year rate of 9%. All BED 10 GTV and PTV endpoints were associated with LR as continuous variables on univariate analysis (p < 0.05). Rx and PTV mean dose appeared to have the highest correlation with LR with area under ROC curve of 0.69 and 0.65 respectively and optimal cut points of 105 and 125 Gy, respectively. 2-year LR was 4% for PTV mean > 125 vs 17% for <125 Gy (p < 0.01) with sensitivity = 84% and specificity = 57% for predicting LR. 2-year LR for Rx BED 10 > 105 was 4% vs 15% for <105 Gy (p < 0.01). Longer treatment duration (⩾11 elapsed days) demonstrated a 2-year LR of 14% vs 4% for ⩽10 days (p < 0.01). GTV size was associated with LR on univariate analysis as a continuous variable (p = 0.02) with 2-year LR = 3% for <2.7 cm vs 9% for ⩾2.7 cm (p = 0.03). BED 10 (p = 0.01) and elapsed days during RT (p = 0.05) were independent predictors on multivariate analysis as continuous variables. Conclusions: There is a substantial dose–response relationship for local control of NSCLC following image

  19. Tomographic multiphase flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sætre, C.; Johansen, G.A.; Tjugum, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of multiphase flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain (). These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. This work focuses on the first two issues using multi gamma beam (MGB) measurements for identification of the type of flow regime. Further gamma ray tomographic measurements are used for reference of the gas/liquid distribution. For the MGB method one Am-241 source with principal emission at 59.5 keV is used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second is positioned to the side so that this beam is close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward to compare the measured intensities of these detectors and through that identify the flow pattern, i.e. the instantaneous cross-sectional gas-liquid distribution. The measurement setup also includes Compton scattering measurements, which can provide information about the changes in the water salinity for flow segments with high water liquid ratio and low gas fractions. By measuring the transmitted intensity in short time slots (<100ms), rapid regime variations are revealed. From this we can select the time sections suitable for salinity measurements. Since the salinity variations change at the time scale of hours, a running average can be performed to increase the accuracy of the measurements. Recent results of this work will be presented here. - Highlights: ► Multiphase flow gas-fraction and flow regime measurements by multi gamma ray beams. ► High-speed gamma ray tomograph as reference for the flow pattern and gas fraction. ► Dual modality

  20. Tomographic Heating Holder for In Situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel C.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Fernández, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    A tomographic heating holder for transmission electron microscopy that can be used to study supported catalysts at temperatures of up to ~1,500°C is described. The specimen is placed in direct thermal contact with a tungsten filament that is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the holder without...... distributions and changes in active surface area are quantified from tilt series of images acquired after subjecting the specimens to increasing temperatures. The porosity of the alumina support and the sintering mechanisms of the catalysts are shown to depend on distance from the heating filament....

  1. Computerized tomographic in non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    The process of computerized tomography has been developed for medical imaging purposes using tomographs with X-ray, and little attention has been given to others possibles applications of technique, because of its cost. As an alternative for the problem, we constructed a Tomographic System (STAC-1), using gamma-rays, for nonmedical applications. In this work we summarize the basic theory of reconstructing images using computerized tomography and we describe the considerations leading to the development of the experimental system. The method of reconstruction image implanted in the system is the filtered backprojection or convolution, with a digital filters system to carried on a pre-filtering in the projections. The experimental system is described, with details of control and the data processing. An alternative and a complementary system, using film as a detector is shown in preliminary form . This thesis discuss and shows the theorical and practical aspects, considered in the construction of the STAC-1, and also its limitations and apllications [pt

  2. A clinico-radiographic analysis of sagittal condylar guidance determined by protrusive interocclusal registration and panoramic radiographic images in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Krishna Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between sagittal condylar guidance obtained by protrusive interocclusal records and panoramic radiograph tracing methods in human dentulous subjects. Materials and Methods: The sagittal condylar guidance was determined in 75 dentulous subjects by protrusive interocclusal records using Aluwax through a face bow transfer (HANAU™ Spring Bow, Whip Mix Corporation, USA to a semi-adjustable articulator (HANAU™ Wide-Vue Articulator, Whip Mix Corporation, USA. In the same subjects, the sagittal outline of the articular eminence and glenoid fossa was traced in panoramic radiographs. The sagittal condylar path inclination was constructed by joining the heights of curvature in the glenoid fossa and the corresponding articular eminence. This was then related to the constructed Frankfurt′s horizontal plane to determine the radiographic angle of sagittal condylar guidance. Results: A strong positive correlation existed between right and left condylar guidance by the protrusive interocclusal method (P 0.000 and similarly by the radiographic method (P 0.013. The mean difference between the condylar guidance obtained using both methods were 1.97° for the right side and 3.18° for the left side. This difference between the values by the two methods was found to be highly significant for the right (P 0.003 and left side (P 0.000, respectively. The sagittal condylar guidance obtained from both methods showed a significant positive correlation on right (P 0.000 and left side (P 0.015, respectively. Conclusion: Panoramic radiographic tracings of the sagittal condylar path guidance may be made relative to the Frankfurt′s horizontal reference plane and the resulting condylar guidance angles used to set the condylar guide settings of semi-adjustable articulators.

  3. Survey of image quality and patient dose in simple radiographic examinations: establishing guidance levels and comparison with international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manatrakul, N.; Bunsoong, T.; Krisanachinda, A.; Suwanpradit, P.; Rungruengthanakit, P.; Kanchart, S.; Chaiwong, Rajikorn; Tsapakig, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate image quality and patient dose for commonly radiographic examinations in Thailand, to establish national reference or guidance levels (GL) and compare with international standards, as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project on Radiation Protection of Patients and Medical Exposure Control (RAS/9/034 and RAS/9/047). Materials and Methods: Film reject rate analysis, image quality and patient dose assessment before and after Quality Control (QC) implementation were investigated in 8 X-ray machines in 4 hospitals. Air kerma (in mGy) at 1 meter focus-detector-distance for different kVp settings for each X-ray machines were measured using an ionization chamber under standardized condition. The entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) for Chest PA, Lumbar spine AP, Lumbar spine LAT, Pelvis AP, Abdomen AP, Skull AP and Skull LAT were calculated for at least 10 adult patients of average body mass (60 to 80 kg) for each projection. The obtained values were compared with international standards. Results: The highest film rejection rate reduction recorded after corrective actions from 9.15% to 6.8%. Mean ESAK values were less than international standards both before and after QC implementation in all projections but Chest PA projection. Maximum ESAK in Chest PA projection before corrective action was 0.55 mGy which was higher than the IAEA GL of 0.2 mGy. However, it was reduced to 0.25 mGy after QC tests on X- ray machine and using high kilovoltage (kV) technique. Conclusion: Proposed national GL of Thailand were obtained by estimating the 3rd quartile of the whole sample: Chest PA: 0.1 mGy, Lumbar Spine AP: 2.1 mGy, Lumbar Spine LAT: 6.3 mGy, Pelvis AP: 1.8 mGy, Abdomen: 1.5 mGy, Skull PA: 1.3 mGy and Skull LAT: 0.9 mGy. (author)

  4. SU-E-T-406: Online Image-Guidance for Prostate SBRT: Dosimetric Benefits and Margin Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T; Yuan, L; Lee, W; Yin, F; Wu, Q J

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric benefits of online image guidance during prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and the potential on margin reduction. 28 prostate SBRT patients were retrospectively studied, each treated with 37Gy in 5 fractions. RTOG recently opened a similar protocol (0938). During treatments, per-beam couch corrections were made based on the actual target motion provided by dynamic tracking with either Calypso or per-beam OBI imaging. Dosimetric benefits of online correction were evaluated by comparing delivered dose distributions with and without such correction. The dose distribution without correction was generated in the same treatment planning system by accumulating doses without online correction from the each beam and each fraction. Quantitative analyses include the dosimetric difference between delivered doses with and without correction; the correction magnitude and frequency; and the potential on margin reduction based on the margin recipe by Van Herk et al. (1) Delivery without online correction results in small reduction on target mean dose (0.03±0.05Gy), maximal dose (0.01±0.06Gy), and conformity index (<0.06). (2) Delivery without online correction has small impact on OAR dose: 26 out of 28 patients have <1%/1.5cc differences in V18.5Gy/V24Gy/V28Gy/V33Gy/V37Gy for both the bladder and the rectum. Maximal differences are 4cc of the bladder and 1.6cc of the rectum in mid-dose regions (V18.5Gy). (3) For femoral heads, <1cc/1Gy differences are observed in V20Gy/Dmean/D1cc.(4) Average number of couch corrections per fraction is 0.49. The magnitudes are: (-0.2±2)mm vertically, (-0.1±2.1)mm longitudinally, and (-0.2±1.4)mm laterally. (5) Margin determined by actual target motion in this patient population is 2.5mm isotropic. For both target coverage and OAR sparing, overall small benefit is seen from per-beam couch correction under dynamic tracking. The target motion between beams is small and random, and indicates a population

  5. Tomographic techniques for safeguards measurements of nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist Saleh, Tobias

    2007-10-15

    Nuclear power is currently experiencing increased interest over the world. New nuclear reactors are being built and techniques for taking care of the nuclear waste are being developed. This development puts new demands and standards to safeguards, i.e. the international efforts for ensuring the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. New measuring techniques and devices are continuously being developed for enhancing the ability to detect diversion of fissile material. In this thesis, tomographic techniques for application in safeguards are presented. Tomographic techniques can non-destructively provide information of the inner parts of an object and may thus be used to control that no material is missing from a nuclear fuel assembly. When using the tomographic technique described in this thesis, the radiation field around a fuel assembly is first recorded. In a second step, the internal source distribution is mathematically reconstructed based on the recorded data. In this work, a procedure for tomographic safeguards measurements is suggested and the design of a tomographic measuring device is presented. Two reconstruction algorithms have been specially developed and evaluated for the application on nuclear fuel; one algorithm for image reconstruction and one for reconstructing conclusive data on the individual fuel rod level. The combined use of the two algorithms is suggested. The applicability for detecting individual removed or replaced rods has been demonstrated, based on experimental data

  6. Synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON): A statistical model based iterative image reconstruction method to eliminate limited-view artifacts and to mitigate the temporal-average artifacts in time-resolved CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Yinsheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In x-ray computed tomography (CT), a violation of the Tuy data sufficiency condition leads to limited-view artifacts. In some applications, it is desirable to use data corresponding to a narrow temporal window to reconstruct images with reduced temporal-average artifacts. However, the need to reduce temporal-average artifacts in practice may result in a violation of the Tuy condition and thus undesirable limited-view artifacts. In this paper, the authors present a new iterative reconstruction method, synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON), to eliminate limited-view artifacts using data acquired within an ultranarrow temporal window that severely violates the Tuy condition. Methods: In time-resolved contrast enhanced CT acquisitions, image contrast dynamically changes during data acquisition. Each image reconstructed from data acquired in a given temporal window represents one time frame and can be denoted as an image vector. Conventionally, each individual time frame is reconstructed independently. In this paper, all image frames are grouped into a spatial–temporal image matrix and are reconstructed together. Rather than the spatial and/or temporal smoothing regularizers commonly used in iterative image reconstruction, the nuclear norm of the spatial–temporal image matrix is used in SMART-RECON to regularize the reconstruction of all image time frames. This regularizer exploits the low-dimensional structure of the spatial–temporal image matrix to mitigate limited-view artifacts when an ultranarrow temporal window is desired in some applications to reduce temporal-average artifacts. Both numerical simulations in two dimensional image slices with known ground truth and in vivo human subject data acquired in a contrast enhanced cone beam CT exam have been used to validate the proposed SMART-RECON algorithm and to demonstrate the initial performance of the algorithm. Reconstruction errors and temporal fidelity

  7. A SPICE synthetic dataset to benchmark global tomographic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y.; Capdeville, Y.; Maupin, V.; Montagner, J.

    2005-12-01

    The different existing global tomographic methods result in different models of the Earth. Within SPICE (Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network), we have decided to perform a benchmark experiment of global tomographic techniques. A global model has been constructed. It includes 3D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy and attenuation, as well as topography of discontinuities. Simplified versions of the model will also be used. Synthetic seismograms will be generated at low frequency by the Spectral Element Method, for a realistic distribution of sources and stations. The synthetic seismograms will be made available to the scientific community at the SPICE website www.spice-rtn.org. Any group wishing to test his tomographic algorithm is encouraged to download the synthetic data.

  8. NOTE: Hybrid echo and x-ray image guidance for cardiac catheterization procedures by using a robotic arm: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, YingLiang; Penney, Graeme P.; Bos, Dennis; Frissen, Peter; Aldo Rinaldi, C.; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.

    2010-07-01

    We present a feasibility study on hybrid echocardiography (echo) and x-ray image guidance for cardiac catheterization procedures. A self-tracked, remotely operated robotic arm with haptic feedback was developed that attached to a standard x-ray table. This was used to safely manipulate a three-dimensional (3D) trans-thoracic echo probe during simultaneous x-ray fluoroscopy and echo acquisitions. By a combination of calibration and tracking of the echo and x-ray systems, it was possible to register the 3D echo images with the 2D x-ray images. Visualization of the combined data was achieved by either overlaying triangulated surfaces extracted from segmented echo data onto the x-ray images or by overlaying volume rendered 3D echo data. Furthermore, in order to overcome the limited field of view of the echo probe, it was possible to create extended field of view (EFOV) 3D echo images by co-registering multiple tracked echo data to generate larger roadmaps for procedure guidance. The registration method was validated using a cross-wire phantom and showed a 2D target registration error of 3.5 mm. The clinical feasibility of the method was demonstrated during two clinical cases for patients undergoing cardiac pacing studies. The EFOV technique was demonstrated using two healthy volunteers.

  9. Computed tomographic features of canine nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shoko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Robertson, Ian D; Oshima, Fukiko; Fukazawa, Eri; Nakano, Yuko; Ono, Shin; Thrall, Donald E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe pre- and postcontrast computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of confirmed nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma in a group of dogs. Medical records were searched during the period of July 2003 and October 2011 and dogs with histologically confirmed nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma and pre- and postcontrast CT images were recruited. Two observers recorded a consensus opinion for the following CT characteristics for each dog: largest transverse tumor diameter, number of masses, general tumor shape, character of the tumor margin, precontrast appearance, presence of dystrophic calcification, presence of postcontrast enhancement, pattern of postcontrast enhancement, presence of regional lymphadenopathy, and presence of associated cavitary fluid. A total of 17 dogs met inclusion criteria. Tumors were located in the nasal cavity, muscle, mandible, mesentery, subcutaneous tissue, and retroperitoneal space. Computed tomographic features of nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma were similar to those of other soft tissue sarcomas, with most tumors being heterogeneous in precontrast images, invasive into adjacent tissue, and heterogeneously contrast enhancing. One unexpected finding was the presence of intense foci of contrast enhancement in 13 of the 17 tumors (76%). This appearance, which is not typical of other soft tissue sarcomas, was consistent with contrast medium residing in vascular channels. Findings indicated that there were no unique distinguishing CT characteristics for nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma in dogs; however, the presence of highly attenuating foci of contrast enhancement may warrant further investigation in prospective diagnostic sensitivity and treatment outcome studies. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  10. Semi-automatic segmentation of gated blood pool emission tomographic images by watersheds: application to the determination of right and left ejection fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariano-Goulart, D.; Collet, H.; Kotzki, P.-O.; Zanca, M.; Rossi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Tomographic multi-gated blood pool scintigraphy (TMUGA) is a widely available method which permits simultaneous assessment of right and left ventricular ejection fractions. However, the widespread clinical use of this technique is impeded by the lack of segmentation methods dedicated to an automatic analysis of ventricular activities. In this study we evaluated how a watershed algorithm succeeds in providing semi-automatic segmentation of ventricular activities in order to measure right and left ejection fractions by TMUGA. The left ejection fractions of 30 patients were evaluated both with TMUGA and with planar multi-gated blood pool scintigraphy (PMUGA). Likewise, the right ejection fractions of 25 patients were evaluated with first-pass scintigraphy (FP) and with TMUGA. The watershed algorithm was applied to the reconstructed slices in order to group together the voxels whose activity came from one specific cardiac cavity. First, the results of the watershed algorithm were compared with manual drawing around left and right ventricles. Left ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA with the watershed procedure were not significantly different (p=0.30) from manual outlines whereas a small but significant difference was found for right ejection fractions (p=0.004). Then right and left ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA (with the semi-automatic segmentation procedure) were compared with the results obtained by FP or PMUGA. Left ventricular ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA showed an excellent correlation with those evaluated by PMUGA (r=0.93; SEE=5.93%; slope=0.99; intercept = 4.17%). The measurements of these ejection fractions were significantly higher with TMUGA than with PMUGA (P<0.01). The interoperator variability for the measurement of left ejection fractions by TMUGA was 4.6%. Right ventricular ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA showed a good correlation with those evaluated by FP (r = 0.81; SEE = 6.68%; slope = 1.00; intercept = 0.85%) and were not

  11. Computer tomographic diagnosis of echinococcosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertel, M.; Fretz, C.; Fuchs, W.A.

    1980-08-01

    The computer tomographic appearances and differential diagnosis in 22 patients with echinococcosis are described; of these, twelve were of the cystic and ten of the alveolar type. The computer tomographic appearances are characterised by the presence of daughter cysts (66%) within the sharply demarkated parasitic cyst of water density. In the absence of daughter cysts, a definite aetiological diagnosis cannot be made, although there is a tendency to clasification of the occassionally multiple echinococcus cysts. The computer tomographic appearances of advanced alveolar echinococcosis are characterised by partial collequative necrosis, with clacification around the necrotic areas (90%). The absence of CT evidence of partial necrosis and calsification of the pseudotumour makes it difficult to establish a specific diagnosis. The conclusive and non-invasive character of the procedure and its reproducibility makes computer tomography the method of choice for the diagnosis and follow-up of echinococcosis.

  12. C-arm cone-beam computed tomography with stereotactic needle guidance for percutaneous adrenal biopsy: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Dechao; Xie, Na; Wu, Gang; Ren, JianZhuang; Han, Xinwei

    2017-05-01

    Background Metastasis to the adrenal glands is frequent in patients with various cancers and adrenal gland biopsy is routinely performed using ultrasound or computed tomographic (CT) guidance. However, this method is technically challenging, especially in the case of small masses. Purpose To determine whether the new real-time stereotactic needle guidance technique C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) allows safe and accurate biopsy of adrenal gland masses, especially those in hard-to-reach anatomical locations. Material and Methods CBCT guidance was used to perform 60 stereotactic biopsy procedures of lesions that were inaccessible with ultrasound or CT guidance. The needle path was carefully planned and calculated on the CBCT virtual navigation guidance system, which acquired 3D CT-like cross-sectional images. The adrenal biopsy procedures were performed with fluoroscopic feedback. Technical success rate, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and complications were investigated. Results The technical success rate of adrenal biopsy under CBCT virtual navigation was 100%, with a mean total procedure time of 14.6 ± 3.6 min. Of the 60 lesions, 46 were malignant, 11 were benign, and three were non-diagnostic. The three non-diagnostic lesions proved to be malignant. Thus, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 93.8%, 100%, and 95.0%, respectively. Minor bleeding occurred in two (3.3%) cases. Conclusion CBCT guidance allows safe and accurate biopsy of adrenal gland masses and may be especially useful for hard-to-reach anatomical locations.

  13. Dual in vivo Photoacoustic and Fluorescence Imaging of HER2 Expression in Breast Tumors for Diagnosis, Margin Assessment, and Surgical Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Maeda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker-specific imaging probes offer ways to improve molecular diagnosis, intraoperative margin assessment, and tumor resection. Fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging probes are of particular interest for clinical applications because the combination enables deeper tissue penetration for tumor detection while maintaining imaging sensitivity compared to a single optical imaging modality. Here we describe the development of a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-targeting imaging probe to visualize differential levels of HER2 expression in a breast cancer model. Specifically, we labeled trastuzumab with Black Hole Quencher 3 (BHQ3 and fluorescein for photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging of HER2 overexpression, respectively. The dual-labeled trastuzumab was tested for its ability to detect HER2 overexpression in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated an over twofold increase in the signal intensity for HER2-overexpressing tumors in vivo, compared to low–HER2-expressing tumors, using photoacoustic imaging. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility of detecting tumors and positive surgical margins by fluorescence imaging. These results suggest that multimodal HER2-specific imaging of breast cancer using the BHQ3-fluorescein trastuzumab enables molecular-level detection and surgical margin assessment of breast tumors in vivo. This technique may have future clinical impact for primary lesion detection, as well as intraoperative molecular-level surgical guidance in breast cancer.

  14. SU-D-BRF-05: A Novel System to Provide Real-Time Image-Guidance for Intrauterine Tandem Insertion and Placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, M; Fontenot, J [pF Biomedical Solutions LLC, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a system that provides real-time image-guidance for intrauterine tandem insertion and placement for brachytherapy. Methods: The conceptualized system consists of an intrauterine tandem with a transparent, lensed tip, a flexible miniature fiber optic scope, light source and interface for CCD coupling. The tandem tip was designed to act as a lens providing a wide field-of-view (FOV) with minimal image distortion and focus length appropriate for the application. The system is designed so that once inserted, the image-guidance component of the system can be removed and brachytherapy can be administered without interfering with source transport or disturbing tandem placement. Proof-of-principle studies were conducted to assess the conceptualized system's (1) lens functionality (clarity, focus and FOV) (2) and ability to visualize the cervical os of a female placed in the lithotomy position. Results: A prototype of this device was constructed using a commercial tandem modified to incorporate a transparent tip that internally coupled with a 1.9mm diameter fiber optic cable. The 900mm-long cable terminated at an interface that provided illumination as well as facilitated visualization of patient anatomy on a computer. The system provided a 23mm FOV with a focal length of 1cm and provided clear visualization of the cervix, cervical fornix and cervical os. The optical components of the system are easily removed without perturbing the position of a tandem placed in a common fixation clamp. Conclusion: Clinicians frequently encounter difficulty inserting an intrauterine tandem through the cervical os, circumventing fibrotic tissue or masses within the uterus, and positioning the tandem without perforating the uterus. To mitigate these challenges, we have designed and conducted proof-of- principle studies to discern the utility of a prototype device that provides real-time image-guidance for intrauterine tandem placement using fiber optic components.

  15. SU-D-BRF-05: A Novel System to Provide Real-Time Image-Guidance for Intrauterine Tandem Insertion and Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, M; Fontenot, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a system that provides real-time image-guidance for intrauterine tandem insertion and placement for brachytherapy. Methods: The conceptualized system consists of an intrauterine tandem with a transparent, lensed tip, a flexible miniature fiber optic scope, light source and interface for CCD coupling. The tandem tip was designed to act as a lens providing a wide field-of-view (FOV) with minimal image distortion and focus length appropriate for the application. The system is designed so that once inserted, the image-guidance component of the system can be removed and brachytherapy can be administered without interfering with source transport or disturbing tandem placement. Proof-of-principle studies were conducted to assess the conceptualized system's (1) lens functionality (clarity, focus and FOV) (2) and ability to visualize the cervical os of a female placed in the lithotomy position. Results: A prototype of this device was constructed using a commercial tandem modified to incorporate a transparent tip that internally coupled with a 1.9mm diameter fiber optic cable. The 900mm-long cable terminated at an interface that provided illumination as well as facilitated visualization of patient anatomy on a computer. The system provided a 23mm FOV with a focal length of 1cm and provided clear visualization of the cervix, cervical fornix and cervical os. The optical components of the system are easily removed without perturbing the position of a tandem placed in a common fixation clamp. Conclusion: Clinicians frequently encounter difficulty inserting an intrauterine tandem through the cervical os, circumventing fibrotic tissue or masses within the uterus, and positioning the tandem without perforating the uterus. To mitigate these challenges, we have designed and conducted proof-of- principle studies to discern the utility of a prototype device that provides real-time image-guidance for intrauterine tandem placement using fiber optic components

  16. Rapid volumetric photoacoustic tomographic imaging with a Fabry-Perot ultrasound sensor depicts peripheral arteries and microvascular vasomotor responses to thermal stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, Andrew A; Huynh, Nam Trung; Guggenheim, Jamie; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul

    2018-03-01

    To determine if a new photoacoustic imaging (PAI) system successfully depicts (1) peripheral arteries and (2) microvascular circulatory changes in response to thermal stimuli. Following ethical permission, 8 consenting subjects underwent PAI of the dorsalis pedis (DP) artery, and 13 completed PAI of the index fingertip. Finger images were obtained after immersion in warm (30-35 °C) or cold (10-15 °C) water to promote vasodilation or vasoconstriction. The PAI instrument used a Fabry-Perot interferometeric ultrasound sensor and a 30-Hz 750-nm pulsed excitation laser. Volumetric images were acquired through a 14 × 14 × 14-mm volume over 90 s. Images were evaluated subjectively and quantitatively to determine if PAI could depict cold-induced vasoconstriction. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of resolvable vessels was measured. Fingertip vessels were visible in all participants, with mean FWHM of 125 μm. Two radiologists used PAI to correctly identify vasoconstricted fingertip capillary beds with 100% accuracy (95% CI 77.2-100.0%, p thermal stimuli. • Fabry-Perot interferometer-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) generates volumetric, high-resolution images of the peripheral vasculature. • The system reliably detects thermally induced peripheral vasoconstriction (100% correct identification rate, p < 0.001). • Vessels measuring less than 100 μm in diameter can be depicted in vivo.

  17. Synthetic Dataset To Benchmark Global Tomographic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yilong; Capdeville, Yann; Maupin, Valerie; Montagner, Jean-Paul

    2006-11-01

    A new set of global synthetic seismograms calculated in a three-dimensional (3-D), heterogeneous, anisotropic, anelastic model of the Earth using the spectral element method has been released by the European network SPICE (Seismic Wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex Media: a European Network). The set consists of 7424 three-component records with a minimum period of 32 seconds, a sampling rate of one second, and a duration of 10,500 seconds. The aim of this synthetic data set is to conduct a blind test of existing global tomographic methods based on long-period data, in order to test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and by the inadequacy of data quality and coverage.

  18. Collimated trans-axial tomographic scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The principal problem in trans-axial tomographic radioisotope scanning is the length of time required to obtain meaningful data. Patient movement and radioisotope migration during the scanning period can cause distortion of the image. The object of this invention is to reduce the scanning time without degrading the images obtained. A system is described in which a scintillation camera detector is moved to an orbit about the cranial-caudal axis relative to the patient. A collimator is used in which lead septa are arranged so as to admit gamma rays travelling perpendicular to this axis with high spatial resolution and those travelling in the direction of the axis with low spatial resolution, thus increasing the rate of acceptance of radioactive events to contribute to the positional information obtainable without sacrificing spatial resolution. (author)

  19. Advanced Ultrasonic Tomograph of Children's Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasaygues, Philippe; Lefebvre, Jean-Pierre; Guillermin, Régine; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Berteau, Jean-Philippe; Pithioux, Martine; Petit, Philippe

    This study deals with the development of an experimental device for performing ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT) on bone in pediatric degrees. The children's bone tomographs obtained in this study, were based on the use of a multiplexed 2-D ring antenna (1 MHz and 3 MHz) designed for performing electronic and mechanical scanning. Although this approach is known to be a potentially valuable means of imaging objects with similar acoustical impedances, problems arise when quantitative images of more highly contrasted media such as bones are required. Various strategies and various mathematical procedures for modeling the wave propagation based on Born approximations have been developed at our laboratory, which are suitable for use with pediatric cases. Inversions of the experimental data obtained are presented.

  20. Original circuitry for TOHR tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuzon, J.C.; Pinot, L.

    1999-01-01

    Having industrialization in mind, a specific electronics for a high resolution tomograph is designed out of the usual standards of nuclear physics. All the information are converted in the time domain and a fast processor, in front of the data acquisition, carries out the time and energy coincidences. (authors)