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Sample records for tolerant phenol degrading

  1. Isolation and characterization of phenol degrading yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Riddhi; Rajkumar, Shalini

    2009-04-01

    A phenol degrading yeast isolate was identified and characterized from the soil sample collected from a landfill site, in Ahmedabad, India, by plating the soil dilutions on Sabouraud's Dextrose Agar. The microscopic studies and biochemical tests indicated the isolate to be Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phenol degrading potential of the isolate was measured by inoculation of pure culture in the mineral medium containing various phenol concentrations ranging from 100 to 800 mg l(-1 )and monitoring phenol disappearance rate at regular intervals of time. Growth of the isolate in mineral medium with various phenol concentrations was monitored by measuring the turbidity (OD(600) nm). The results showed that the isolated yeast was tolerant to phenol up to 800 mg(-1). The phenol degradation ranged from 8.57 to 100% for the concentration of phenol from 800 mg l(-1 )to 200 mg l(-1), respectively. ((c) 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  2. High-Throughput Screening for a Moderately Halophilic Phenol-Degrading Strain and Its Salt Tolerance Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhi-Yan; Guo, Xiao-Jue; Li, Hui; Huang, Zhong-Zi; Lin, Kuang-Fei; Liu, Yong-Di

    2015-01-01

    A high-throughput screening system for moderately halophilic phenol-degrading bacteria from various habitats was developed to replace the conventional strain screening owing to its high efficiency. Bacterial enrichments were cultivated in 48 deep well microplates instead of shake flasks or tubes. Measurement of phenol concentrations was performed in 96-well microplates instead of using the conventional spectrophotometric method or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The high-throughput screening system was used to cultivate forty-three bacterial enrichments and gained a halophilic bacterial community E3 with the best phenol-degrading capability. Halomonas sp. strain 4-5 was isolated from the E3 community. Strain 4-5 was able to degrade more than 94% of the phenol (500 mg·L−1 starting concentration) over a range of 3%–10% NaCl. Additionally, the strain accumulated the compatible solute, ectoine, with increasing salt concentrations. PCR detection of the functional genes suggested that the largest subunit of multicomponent phenol hydroxylase (LmPH) and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C12O) were active in the phenol degradation process. PMID:26020478

  3. Physiological and functional diversity of phenol degraders isolated from phenol-grown aerobic granules: Phenol degradation kinetics and trichloroethylene co-metabolic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Aerobic granule is a novel form of microbial aggregate capable of degrading toxic and recalcitrant substances. Aerobic granules have been formed on phenol as the growth substrate, and used to co-metabolically degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), a synthetic solvent not supporting aerobic microbial growth. Granule formation process, rate limiting factors and the comprehensive toxic effects of phenol and TCE had been systematically studied. To further explore their potential at the level of microbial population and functions, phenol degraders were isolated and purified from mature granules in this study. Phenol and TCE degradation kinetics of 15 strains were determined, together with their TCE transformation capacities and other physiological characteristics. Isolation in the presence of phenol and TCE exerted stress on microbial populations, but the procedure was able to preserve their diversity. Wide variation was found with the isolates' kinetic behaviors, with the parameters often spanning 3 orders of magnitude. Haldane kinetics described phenol degradation well, and the isolates exhibited actual maximum phenol-dependent oxygen utilization rates of 9-449 mg DO g DW(-1) h(-1), in phenol concentration range of 4.8-406 mg L(-1). Both Michaelis-Menten and Haldane types were observed for TCE transformation, with the actual maximum rate of 1.04-21.1 mg TCE g DW(-1) h(-1) occurring between TCE concentrations of 0.42-4.90 mg L(-1). The TCE transformation capacities and growth yields on phenol ranged from 20-115 mg TCE g DW(-1) and 0.46-1.22 g DW g phenol(-1), respectively, resulting in TCE transformation yields of 10-70 mg TCE g phenol(-1). Contact angles of the isolates were between 34° and 82°, suggesting both hydrophobic and hydrophilic cell surface. The diversity in the isolates is a great advantage, as it enables granules to be versatile and adaptive under different operational conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Degradation of phenol and TCE using suspended and chitosan-bead immobilized Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Min; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Huang, Chih; Lin, Jui-Che; Hsieh, Feng-Ming

    2007-09-30

    The degradability of phenol and trichloroethene (TCE) by Pseudomonas putida BCRC 14349 in both suspended culture and immobilized culture systems are investigated. Chitosan beads at a size of about 1-2mm were employed to encapsulate the P. putida cells, becoming an immobilized culture system. The phenol concentration was controlled at 100 mg/L, and that of TCE was studied from 0.2 to 20 mg/L. The pH, between 6.7 and 10, did not affect the degradation of either phenol or TCE in the suspended culture system. However, it was found to be an important factor in the immobilized culture system in which the only significant degradation was observed at pH >8. This may be linked to the surface properties of the chitosan beads and its influence on the activity of the bacteria. The transfer yield of TCE on a phenol basis was almost the same for the suspended and immobilized cultures (0.032 mg TCE/mg phenol), except that these yields occurred at different TCE concentrations. The transfer yield at a higher TCE concentration for the immobilized system suggested that the cells immobilized in carriers can be protected from harsh environmental conditions. For kinetic rate interpretation, the Monod equation was employed to describe the degradation rates of phenol, while the Haldane's equation was used for TCE degradation. Based on the kinetic parameters obtained from the two equations, the rate for the immobilized culture systems was only about 1/6 to that of the suspended culture system for phenol degradation, and was about 1/2 for TCE degradation. The slower kinetics observed for the immobilized culture systems was probably due to the slow diffusion of substrate molecules into the beads. However, compared with the suspended cultures, the immobilized cultures may tolerate a higher TCE concentration as much less inhibition was observed and the transfer yield occurred at a higher TCE concentration.

  5. Self-bioremediation of cork-processing wastewaters by (chloro)phenol-degrading bacteria immobilised onto residual cork particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo, I; Hernández, P; Lafuente, A; Rodríguez-Llorente, I D; Caviedes, M A; Pajuelo, E

    2012-04-15

    Cork manufacturing is a traditional industry in Southern Europe, being the main application of this natural product in wine stoppers and insulation. Cork processing begins at boiling the raw material. As a consequence, great volumes of dark wastewaters, with elevated concentrations of chlorophenols, are generated, which must be depurated through costly physicochemical procedures before discarding them into public water courses. This work explores the potential of bacteria, isolated from cork-boiling waters storage ponds, in bioremediation of the same effluent. The bacterial population present in cork-processing wastewaters was analysed by DGGE; low bacterial biodiversity was found. Aerobic bacteria were isolated and investigated for their tolerance against phenol and two chlorophenols. The most tolerant strains were identified by sequencing 16S rDNA. The phenol-degrading capacity was investigated by determining enzyme activities of the phenol-degrading pathway. Moreover, the capacity to form biofilms was analysed in a microtitre plate assay. Finally, the capacity to form biofilms onto the surface of residual small cork particles was evaluated by acridine staining followed by epifluorescence microscopy and by SEM. A low-cost bioremediation system, using phenol-degrading bacteria immobilised onto residual cork particles (a by-product of the industry) is proposed for the remediation of this industrial effluent (self-bioremediation). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification and genetic characterization of phenol- degrading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAURABH

    2013-02-20

    Feb 20, 2013 ... this paper, we reported about the new strain of Acinetobacter sp. ... characteristics of an efficient phenol-degrading microorganism. ... compounds are widespread in the environment. The problem is compounded by the fact that phenol is toxic, ... The phenol biodegradation ability of this bacterium was.

  7. VUV/UV light inducing accelerated phenol degradation with a low electric input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Wen, Dong; Qiang, Zhimin; Kiwi, John

    2017-01-23

    This study presents the first evidence for the accelerated degradation of phenol by Fenton's reagent in a mini-fluidic VUV/UV photoreaction system (MVPS). A low-pressure mercury lamp used in the MVPS led to a complete degradation of phenol within 4-6 min. The HO˙ and HO 2 ˙ originating from both Fenton's reagent and VUV photolysis of water were identified with suitable radical scavengers. The effects of initial concentrations of phenol, H 2 O 2 and Fe 3+ as well as solution pH on phenol degradation kinetics were examined. Increasing the initial phenol concentration slowed down the phenol degradation, whereas increasing the initial H 2 O 2 or Fe 3+ concentration accelerated the phenol degradation. The optimal solution pH was 3.7. At both 254 and 185 nm, increasing phenol concentration enhanced its absorption for the incident photons. The reaction mechanism for the degradation of phenol was suggested consistent with the results obtained. This study indicates that the VUV/UV photo-Fenton process has potential applications in the treatment of industrial wastewater containing phenol and related aromatic pollutants.

  8. Isolation and Identification of Phenol Degrader Bacteria from Sirjan Golgohar Mine Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Hassanshhian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenol and phenolic compounds are highly toxic substances that are found as monoaromatic compounds in various industrial effluents from oil refineries, petrochemical plants, (coal mines, and phenol resin plants. Their discharge into the environment, especially in water resources, causes serious toxicity. Traditionally, physicochemical methods have been used for the removal of phenol and phenolic compounds. Nowadays, bioremediation is known to be the best method for phenol removal from wastewater. The objective of the present study was twofold: isolation and identification of phenol degrading bacteria in the effluent from Golgohar Mine in Sirjan. For this purpose, samples were collected from different sections at Golgohar Mine and its effluent. Phenol degrading bacteria were isolated via enrichment of the samples in the Bushnell Hass medium with phenol used as the only source of carbon and energy. The predominant phenol degrader bacteria were selected by measuring turbidity at 600 nm. The bacteria were subsequently identified by amplification of 16S rRNA with specific primers and PCR sequencing. In this study, 17 strains of phenol degrader bacteria were isolated in soil and wastewater samples collected from different zones of the mine. Screening methods confirmed that 4 strains exhibit a better capability for phenol degradation as evidenced by their capability to degrade 0.4 g/l of phenol. Molecular identification showed that these bacteria belong to the species Pesudomonas sp, Nitrratireductor sp., and Salegentibacter sp. The results also show that the effluent from Golgohar Mine in Sirjan contains many phenol degrading bacteria. The use of these bacteria in the treatment process may lead to a significant reduction in phenol pollution in the mineral effluent.

  9. Degradation of phenolic compounds by using advanced oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M. [Univ. de los Andes, Escuela Basica de Ingenieria, La Hechicera, Merida (Venezuela); Hincapie, M. [Dept. de Ingenieria Sanitaria y Ambiental, Univ. de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia); Curco, D.; Contreras, S.; Gimenez, J.; Esplugas, S. [Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Quimica, Univ. de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    A new empirical kinetic equation [r = k{sub 1}c - k{sub 2} (c{sub 0} - c)] is proposed for the photocatalytic degradation of phenolic compounds. This equation considers the influence of the intermediates in the degradation of the pollutant. The correct formulation of the contaminant mass balance in the experimental device that operates in recycle mode was done. The proposed empirical kinetic equation fitted quite well with the experimental results obtained in the TiO{sub 2}-photocatalytic degradation of phenol. (orig.)

  10. Lag phase and biomass determination of Rhodococcus pyridinivorans GM3 for degradation of phenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Defiery, M. E. J.; Reddy, G.

    2018-05-01

    Among various techniques available for removal of phenol, biodegradation is an eco-friendly and cost effective method. Thus, it is required to understand the process of biodegradation of phenol, such as investigate on lag phase and biomass concentration. Phenol degrading bacteria were isolated from soil samples of industrial sites in enriched mineral salts medium (MSM) with phenol as a sole source of energy and carbon. One isolate of potential phenol degradation from consortium for phenol degrading studies was identified as Rhodococcus pyridinivorans GM3. Lag phase and biomass determination of R. pyridinivorans GM3 was studied with different phenol concentrations under pH 8.5 at temperature 32 Co and 200 rpm. Microbial biomass was directly proportional to increasing phenol concentration between 1.0 to 2.0 g/L with a maximum dry biomass of 1.745 g/L was noted after complete degradation of 2.0 g/L phenol in 48 hours.

  11. Kinetics of phenol degradation in water solutions under gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guliyeva, U.A.; Gurbanov, M.A.; Abdullayev, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : In this work the chemical oxygen demand and change of phenol concentration at the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of phenol was studied. Irradiation conducted under gamma-irradiation of 60Co at static conditions and at room temperature. The main component is water, therefore the radiolysis process of water plays an important role in radiolytic degradation of phenol

  12. Efficient photocatalytic degradation of phenol in aqueous solution by SnO2:Sb nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hamdi, Abdullah M.; Sillanpää, Mika; Bora, Tanujjal; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Sb doped SnO 2 nanoparticles were synthesized using sol–gel process. • Photocatalytic degradation of phenol were studies using SnO 2 :Sb nanoparticles. • Under solar light phenol was degraded within 2 h. • Phenol mineralization and intermediates were investigated by using HPLC. - Abstract: Photodegradation of phenol in the presence of tin dioxide (SnO 2 ) nanoparticles under UV light irradiation is known to be an effective photocatalytic process. However, phenol degradation under solar light is less effective due to the large band gap of SnO 2 . In this study antimony (Sb) doped tin dioxide (SnO 2 ) nanoparticles were prepared at a low temperature (80 °C) by a sol–gel method and studied for its photocatalytic activity with phenol as a test contaminant. The catalytic degradation of phenol in aqueous media was studied using high performance liquid chromatography and total organic carbon measurements. The change in the concentration of phenol affects the pH of the solution due to the by-products formed during the photo-oxidation of phenol. The photoactivity of SnO 2 :Sb was found to be a maximum for 0.6 wt.% Sb doped SnO 2 nanoparticles with 10 mg L −1 phenol in water. Within 2 h of photodegradation, more than 95% of phenol could be removed under solar light irradiation.

  13. Comparison of AOPs Efficiencies on Phenolic Compounds Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Hurtado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a comparison of the performances of different AOPs in the phenol and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP degradation at lab and pilot scale is presented. It was found that, in the degradation of phenol, the performance of a coupled electro-oxidation/ozonation process is superior to that observed by a photo-Fenton process. Phenol removal rate was determined to be 0.83 mg L−1 min−1 for the coupled process while the removal rate for photo-Fenton process was only 0.52 mg L−1 min−1. Regarding 4-CP degradation, the complete disappearance of the molecule was achieved and the efficiency decreasing order was as follows: coupled electro-oxidation/ozonation > electro-Fenton-like process > photo-Fenton process > heterogeneous photocatalysis. Total organic carbon was completely removed by the coupled electro-oxidation/ozonation process. Also, it was found that oxalic acid is the most recalcitrant by-product and limits the mineralization degree attained by the technologies not applying ozone. In addition, an analysis on the energy consumption per removed gram of TOC was conducted and it was concluded that the less energy consumption is achieved by the coupled electro-oxidation/ozonation process.

  14. Kinetics of Phenol Degradation in Aqueous Solution Oxidized under Low Frequency Ultrasonic Irradiation

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    Marwan Marwan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenol is categorized as a refractory pollutant and its presence in water stream is strictly limited according to the government regulation. The present study investigated the degra-dation of phenol in aqueous solution by the effect of ultrasound. The process took place in a 500 ml glass reactor equipped with magnetic stirring and irradiated by low frequency (28 kHz ultrasound from a horn type probe. Ultrasonic irradiation was found to enhance oxidation rates at ambient conditions, compared to other approaches. Optimum conditions were observed at a stirring speed of 400 rpm and temperature of 30 C in acidic solution. It was revealed that the phenol degradation was the first order kinetics with respect to phenol. A low value of the activation energy 6.04 kcal/mol suggested that diffusional steps were rate determining during the phenol decomposition. It also confirmed that phenol was mostly degraded in the film region and less occurred in the bulk solution.

  15. Potential impact of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) on phenols degradation in an UASB reactor and its degradation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Kai; Sierra, Julian Muñoz; Zhang, Xuedong; Yuan, Shoujun; Hu, Zhenhu

    2017-07-05

    Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) as a solvent is extensively used for the phenols extraction from the wastewater, so it is unavoidable to expose in the effluent due to the solubility and leakage problem. The present study evaluated the impact of MIBK on phenols degradation in an UASB reactor and analyzed its degradation properties. The results indicated that the continuous dosing (0.1gL -1 ) and impact (10gL -1 ) of MIBK had limited effect on phenols removal (1-2% reduction) in the UASB reactor, but the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) values of sludge decreased by 45-75% after MIBK exposure. Anaerobic degradation rate of MIBK fitted well to a pseudo-first-order kinetic equation with respect to the initial concentration of 35mgL -1 (k=0.0115h -1 , R 2 =0.9664). Furthermore, the relative methane generation rate constants of MIBK were 0.00816, 0.00613, 0.00273, and 0.00207d -1 at the initial concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 5, and 10gL -1 , respectively. MIBK showed higher inhibitory effect on the methanogenesis than on phenols degradation. This study pointed out that the industrial installations should consider the influence of solvent on anaerobic treatment of phenolic wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Toxicity of Phenol and Salt on the Phenol-Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacterium

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    Samaei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Phenolic compounds, phenol and phenol derivatives are environmental contaminants in some industrial effluents. Entrance of such substances into the environment causes severe environmental pollution, especially pollution of water resources. Biological treatment is a method that uses the potential of microorganisms to clean up contaminated environments. Among microorganisms, bacteria play an important role in treating wastewater contaminated with phenol. Objectives This study aimed to examine the effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on degradation of phenol in wastewater contaminated with this pollutant. Methods In this method, the growth rate of P. aeruginosa bacteria was investigated using different concentrations of salt and phenol. This is an experimental study conducted as a pilot in a batch reactor with different concentrations of phenol (25, 50, 100, 150, 300 and 600 mg L-1 and salt (0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2.5% and 5% during 9, 12 and 15 hours. During three days, from 5 experimental and 3 control samples, 18 samples were taken a day forming a sample size of 54 samples for each phenol concentration. Given the number of phenol concentrations (n = 6, a total of 324 samples were analyzed using a spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 600 nm. Results The phenol concentration of 600 mg L-1 was toxic for P. aeruginosa. However, at a certain concentration, it acts as a carbon source for P. aeruginosa. During investigations, it was found that increasing the concentration of phenol increases the rate of bacteria growth. The highest bacteria growth rate occurred was at the salt concentration of zero and phenol concentration of 600 mg L-1. Conclusions The findings of the current study indicate that at high concentrations of salt, the growth of bacteria reduces so that it stops at a concentration of 50 mg L-1 (5%. Thus, the bacterium is halotolerant or halophilic. With an increase in phenol concentration, the growth rate increased. Phenol toxicity appears

  17. Effect of various gases and chemical catalysts on phenol degradation pathways by pulsed electrical discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yongjun [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028 (China); Lei Lecheng [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028 (China)], E-mail: lclei@zju.edu.cn; Zhang Xingwang; Zhou Minghua; Zhang Yi [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028 (China)

    2008-02-11

    The processes of phenol degradation by pulsed electrical discharges were investigated under several kinds of discharge atmospheres (oxygen, argon, nitrogen and ozone) and chemical catalysts (ferrous ion and hydrogen peroxide). The temporal variations of the concentrations of phenol and the intermediate products were monitored by HPLC and GC-MS, respectively. It has been found that the effect of various gases bubbling on phenol degradation rate ranked in the following order: oxygen-containing ozone > oxygen > argon > nitrogen. The high gas bubbling flow rate was beneficial to the removal of phenol. It was found that the degradation proceeded differently when in the presence and absence of catalysts. The phenol removal rate was increased when ferrous ion was added. This considerable enhancement may be due to the Fenton's reaction. What's more, putting the chemical additives hydrogen peroxide into the reactor led to a dramatic increase in phenol degradation rate. The mechanism was due to the direct or indirect photolysis and pyrolysis destruction in plasma channel. Furthermore, the intermediate products were monitored by GC-MS under three degradation conditions. More THBs were generated under degradation conditions without gases bubbling or adding any catalyst, and more DHBs under the condition of adding ferrous ion, and more carboxylic acids under the condition of oxygen-containing ozone gas bubbling. Consequently, three distinct degradation pathways based on different conditions were proposed.

  18. Effect of various gases and chemical catalysts on phenol degradation pathways by pulsed electrical discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yongjun; Lei, Lecheng; Zhang, Xingwang; Zhou, Minghua; Zhang, Yi

    2008-02-11

    The processes of phenol degradation by pulsed electrical discharges were investigated under several kinds of discharge atmospheres (oxygen, argon, nitrogen and ozone) and chemical catalysts (ferrous ion and hydrogen peroxide). The temporal variations of the concentrations of phenol and the intermediate products were monitored by HPLC and GC-MS, respectively. It has been found that the effect of various gases bubbling on phenol degradation rate ranked in the following order: oxygen-containing ozone>oxygen>argon>nitrogen. The high gas bubbling flow rate was beneficial to the removal of phenol. It was found that the degradation proceeded differently when in the presence and absence of catalysts. The phenol removal rate was increased when ferrous ion was added. This considerable enhancement may be due to the Fenton's reaction. What's more, putting the chemical additives hydrogen peroxide into the reactor led to a dramatic increase in phenol degradation rate. The mechanism was due to the direct or indirect photolysis and pyrolysis destruction in plasma channel. Furthermore, the intermediate products were monitored by GC-MS under three degradation conditions. More THBs were generated under degradation conditions without gases bubbling or adding any catalyst, and more DHBs under the condition of adding ferrous ion, and more carboxylic acids under the condition of oxygen-containing ozone gas bubbling. Consequently, three distinct degradation pathways based on different conditions were proposed.

  19. Effect of various gases and chemical catalysts on phenol degradation pathways by pulsed electrical discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yongjun; Lei Lecheng; Zhang Xingwang; Zhou Minghua; Zhang Yi

    2008-01-01

    The processes of phenol degradation by pulsed electrical discharges were investigated under several kinds of discharge atmospheres (oxygen, argon, nitrogen and ozone) and chemical catalysts (ferrous ion and hydrogen peroxide). The temporal variations of the concentrations of phenol and the intermediate products were monitored by HPLC and GC-MS, respectively. It has been found that the effect of various gases bubbling on phenol degradation rate ranked in the following order: oxygen-containing ozone > oxygen > argon > nitrogen. The high gas bubbling flow rate was beneficial to the removal of phenol. It was found that the degradation proceeded differently when in the presence and absence of catalysts. The phenol removal rate was increased when ferrous ion was added. This considerable enhancement may be due to the Fenton's reaction. What's more, putting the chemical additives hydrogen peroxide into the reactor led to a dramatic increase in phenol degradation rate. The mechanism was due to the direct or indirect photolysis and pyrolysis destruction in plasma channel. Furthermore, the intermediate products were monitored by GC-MS under three degradation conditions. More THBs were generated under degradation conditions without gases bubbling or adding any catalyst, and more DHBs under the condition of adding ferrous ion, and more carboxylic acids under the condition of oxygen-containing ozone gas bubbling. Consequently, three distinct degradation pathways based on different conditions were proposed

  20. Efficient photocatalytic degradation of phenol in aqueous solution by SnO{sub 2}:Sb nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hamdi, Abdullah M., E-mail: Abdullah.Al.Hamdi@lut.fi [Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Chemistry Department, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 17, 123 Al-Khoudh (Oman); Chair in Nanotechnology, Water Research Center, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 17, 123 Al-Khoudh (Oman); Sillanpää, Mika [Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Bora, Tanujjal [Chair in Nanotechnology, Water Research Center, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 17, 123 Al-Khoudh (Oman); Dutta, Joydeep [Chair in Nanotechnology, Water Research Center, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 17, 123 Al-Khoudh (Oman); Functional Materials Division, ICT, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Isafjordsgatan 22, SE-164 40 KistaStockholm (Sweden)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • Sb doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized using sol–gel process. • Photocatalytic degradation of phenol were studies using SnO{sub 2}:Sb nanoparticles. • Under solar light phenol was degraded within 2 h. • Phenol mineralization and intermediates were investigated by using HPLC. - Abstract: Photodegradation of phenol in the presence of tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) nanoparticles under UV light irradiation is known to be an effective photocatalytic process. However, phenol degradation under solar light is less effective due to the large band gap of SnO{sub 2}. In this study antimony (Sb) doped tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were prepared at a low temperature (80 °C) by a sol–gel method and studied for its photocatalytic activity with phenol as a test contaminant. The catalytic degradation of phenol in aqueous media was studied using high performance liquid chromatography and total organic carbon measurements. The change in the concentration of phenol affects the pH of the solution due to the by-products formed during the photo-oxidation of phenol. The photoactivity of SnO{sub 2}:Sb was found to be a maximum for 0.6 wt.% Sb doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles with 10 mg L{sup −1} phenol in water. Within 2 h of photodegradation, more than 95% of phenol could be removed under solar light irradiation.

  1. Application of green fluorescent protein for monitoring phenol-degrading strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Milena Valderrama F.

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Several methods have been developed for detecting microorganisms in environmental samples. Some systems for incorporating reporter genes, such as lux or the green fluorescent protein (GFP gene, have been developed recently This study describes gfp gene marking of a phenol degrading strain, its evaluation and monitoring in a bioreactor containing refinery sour water. Tagged strains were obtained having the same physiological and metabolic characteristics as the parent strain. Fluorescent expression was kept stable with no selection for more than 50 consecutive generations and tagged strains were recovered from the bioreactor after forty-five days of phenol-degradation treatment.

  2. Photocatalytic degradation of phenol by iodine doped tin oxide nanoparticles under UV and sunlight irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hamdi, Abdullah M.; Sillanpää, Mika [Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Dutta, Joydeep, E-mail: dutta@squ.edu.om [Chair in Nanotechnology, Water Research Center, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 17, 123 Al-Khoudh (Oman)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • A sol–gel method used to synthesize tin oxide nanoparticles. • Nanoparticles of tin oxide doped with different iodine concentrations. • Degradation studies carried up with UV–vis, TOC, HPLC and GC instruments. • 1% iodine doped tin dioxide showed maximum photodegradation efficiency. - Abstract: Iodine doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}:I) nanoparticles were prepared by sol–gel synthesis and their photocatalytic activities with phenol as a test contaminant were studied. In the presence of the catalysts, phenol degradation under direct sunlight was comparable to what was achieved under laboratory conditions. Photocatalytic oxidation reactions were studied by varying the catalyst loading, light intensity, illumination time, pH of the reactant and phenol concentration. Upon UV irradiation in the presence of SnO{sub 2}:I nanoparticles, phenol degrades very rapidly within 30 min, forming carboxylic acid which turns the solution acidic. Phenol degradation rate with 1% iodine doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles is at least an order of magnitude higher compared to the degradation achieved through undoped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles under similar illumination conditions.

  3. Photocatalytic degradation of phenol by iodine doped tin oxide nanoparticles under UV and sunlight irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hamdi, Abdullah M.; Sillanpää, Mika; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A sol–gel method used to synthesize tin oxide nanoparticles. • Nanoparticles of tin oxide doped with different iodine concentrations. • Degradation studies carried up with UV–vis, TOC, HPLC and GC instruments. • 1% iodine doped tin dioxide showed maximum photodegradation efficiency. - Abstract: Iodine doped tin oxide (SnO 2 :I) nanoparticles were prepared by sol–gel synthesis and their photocatalytic activities with phenol as a test contaminant were studied. In the presence of the catalysts, phenol degradation under direct sunlight was comparable to what was achieved under laboratory conditions. Photocatalytic oxidation reactions were studied by varying the catalyst loading, light intensity, illumination time, pH of the reactant and phenol concentration. Upon UV irradiation in the presence of SnO 2 :I nanoparticles, phenol degrades very rapidly within 30 min, forming carboxylic acid which turns the solution acidic. Phenol degradation rate with 1% iodine doped SnO 2 nanoparticles is at least an order of magnitude higher compared to the degradation achieved through undoped SnO 2 nanoparticles under similar illumination conditions

  4. Aerobic Degradation of Trichloroethylene by Co-Metabolism Using Phenol and Gasoline as Growth Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26 × 107 cell/mL, initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE/mg (biomass and 5.1 μg (TCE/mg (phenol, respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%. When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively. This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline.

  5. Effect of phenolic compounds released during degradation of Coir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    www.bioline.org.br/ja. Effect of phenolic compounds released during degradation of Coir pith by ... of the culture filtrate appears to be non toxic in the tested animals @ JASEM. Coir pith is a highly ... degradation of coir pith by fungi and bacteria were already reported, ... no.1 filter paper and used as feed for the experimental ...

  6. Phenol degradation catalyzed by a peroxidase mimic constructed through the grafting of heme onto metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Yang, Jiebing; Wang, Xinghuo; Han, Haobo; Yang, Yan; Tang, Jun; Li, Quanshun

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a peroxidase mimic for achieving the phenol degradation through Fenton reaction. The enzyme mimic was synthesized through the conjugation of heme with the amino group of 2-amino-1,4-benzene dicarboxylate in UiO-66-NH 2 (ZrMOF), namely Heme-ZrMOF. Compared to free heme, the composite Heme-ZrMOF exhibited an obviously enhanced ability for phenol degradation with up to 97.3% of phenol removal after 2h. Meanwhile, it could achieve the easy separation of catalyst from the system and the elimination of iron residues in the process of phenol degradation. Finally, the catalyst Heme-ZrMOF was observed to possess good recyclability in the phenol degradation with still 76.2% of phenol removal after 4 cycles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Degradation and Mineralization of Phenol Compounds with Goethite Catalyst and Mineralization Prediction Using Artificial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisa, Farhana; Davoody, Meysam; Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of phenol degradation via Fenton reaction using mixture of heterogeneous goethite catalyst with homogeneous ferrous ion was analyzed as a function of three independent variables, initial concentration of phenol (60 to 100 mg /L), weight ratio of initial concentration of phenol to that of H2O2 (1: 6 to 1: 14) and, weight ratio of initial concentration of goethite catalyst to that of H2O2 (1: 0.3 to 1: 0.7). More than 90 % of phenol removal and more than 40% of TOC removal were achieved within 60 minutes of reaction. Two separate models were developed using artificial neural networks to predict degradation percentage by a combination of Fe3+ and Fe2+ catalyst. Five operational parameters were employed as inputs while phenol degradation and TOC removal were considered as outputs of the developed models. Satisfactory agreement was observed between testing data and the predicted values (R2 Phenol = 0.9214 and R2TOC= 0.9082). PMID:25849556

  8. Degradation and mineralization of phenol compounds with goethite catalyst and mineralization prediction using artificial intelligence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Tisa

    Full Text Available The efficiency of phenol degradation via Fenton reaction using mixture of heterogeneous goethite catalyst with homogeneous ferrous ion was analyzed as a function of three independent variables, initial concentration of phenol (60 to 100 mg /L, weight ratio of initial concentration of phenol to that of H2O2 (1: 6 to 1: 14 and, weight ratio of initial concentration of goethite catalyst to that of H2O2 (1: 0.3 to 1: 0.7. More than 90 % of phenol removal and more than 40% of TOC removal were achieved within 60 minutes of reaction. Two separate models were developed using artificial neural networks to predict degradation percentage by a combination of Fe3+ and Fe2+ catalyst. Five operational parameters were employed as inputs while phenol degradation and TOC removal were considered as outputs of the developed models. Satisfactory agreement was observed between testing data and the predicted values (R2Phenol = 0.9214 and R2TOC= 0.9082.

  9. Investigation of optimum conditions and costs estimation for degradation of phenol by solar photo-Fenton process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gar Alalm, Mohamed; Tawfik, Ahmed; Ookawara, Shinichi

    2017-03-01

    In this study, solar photo-Fenton reaction using compound parabolic collectors reactor was assessed for removal of phenol from aqueous solution. The effect of irradiation time, initial concentration, initial pH, and dosage of Fenton reagent were investigated. H2O2 and aromatic intermediates (catechol, benzoquinone, and hydroquinone) were quantified during the reaction to study the pathways of the oxidation process. Complete degradation of phenol was achieved after 45 min of irradiation when the initial concentration was 100 mg/L. However, increasing the initial concentration up to 500 mg/L inhibited the degradation efficiency. The dosage of H2O2 and Fe+2 significantly affected the degradation efficiency of phenol. The observed optimum pH for the reaction was 3.1. Phenol degradation at different concentration was fitted to the pseudo-first order kinetic according to Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Costs estimation for a large scale reactor based was performed. The total costs of the best economic condition with maximum degradation of phenol are 2.54 €/m3.

  10. Phenol degradation by advanced Fenton process in combination with ultrasonic irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Z. Yehia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a successful degradation of phenol was achieved by means of coupling nano-sized zero-valent iron (NZVI, H2O2 and 20 kHz ultrasound irradiation. The effect of H2O2 concentration, initial pH, ultrasonic irradiation time and NZVI addition on the degradation efficiency was investigated and the kinetics of the process was discussed. The results showed that the degradation rate increased by increasing the H2O2 concentration and the irradiation time but decreased with the increase of the initial pH value. These results clearly indicate that the degradation of phenol is intensified in the presence of NZVI and H2O2, which can be attributed to enhanced production of ·−OH radicals in the system. The degradation rate in the presence of NZVI was faster than in its absence. Thus, an appropriate selection of operating conditions will lead to an economical and highly efficient technology with eventual large-scale commercial applications for the degradation of organic pollutants in aqueous effluents.

  11. Inhibition and kinetic studies of lignin degrading enzymes of Ganoderma boninense by naturally occurring phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Arthy; Siddiqui, Yasmeen; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Ali, Nusaibah Syd; Manickam, Sivakumar

    2018-05-22

    Lignolytic (Lignin degrading) enzyme, from oil palm pathogen Ganoderma boninense Pat. (Syn G. orbiforme (Ryvarden), is involved in the detoxification and the degradation of lignin in the oil palm and is the rate-limiting step in the infection process of this fungus. Active inhibition of lignin degrading enzymes secreted by G. boninense by various naturally occurring phenolic compounds and estimation of efficiency on pathogen suppression was aimed at. In our work, ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory potential towards the lignolytic enzymes of G.boninense. Additionally, the lignin degrading enzymes were characterised. Most of the peholic compounds exhibited an uncompetitive inhibition towards the lignin degrading enzymes. Benzoic acid was the superior inhibitor to the production of lignin degrading enzymes, when compared between the ten phenolic compounds. The inhibitory potential of the phenolic compounds toward the lignin degrading enzymes are higher than that of the conventional metal ion inhibitor. The lignin degrading enzymes were stable in a wide range of pH but were sensitive to higher to temperature. The study demonstrated the inhibitor potential of ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds toward the lignin degrading enzymes of G. boninense with different efficacies. The study has shed a light towards a new management strategy to control BSR in oil palm. It serves as replacement for the existing chemical control. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Enzymes of Candida tropicalis yeast biodegrading phenol

    OpenAIRE

    Koubková, Zuzana

    2011-01-01

    Effluents of industrial wastewaters from oil refineries, paper mills, dyes, ceramic factories, resins, textiles and plastic contain high concentrations of aromatic compounds, which are toxic to organisms. Degradation of these compounds to tolerant limits before releasing them into the environment is an urgent requirement. Candida tropicalis yeast is an important representative of eucaryotic microorganisms that are able to utilize phenol. During the first phase of phenol biodegradation, cytopl...

  13. Cometabolic degradation kinetics of TCE and phenol by Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Min; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Huang, Chih; Lin, Jui-Che

    2008-08-01

    Modeling of cometabolic kinetics is important for better understanding of degradation reaction and in situ application of bio-remediation. In this study, a model incorporated cell growth and decay, loss of transformation activity, competitive inhibition between growth substrate and non-growth substrate and self-inhibition of non-growth substrate was proposed to simulate the degradation kinetics of phenol and trichloroethylene (TCE) by Pseudomonas putida. All the intrinsic parameters employed in this study were measured independently, and were then used for predicting the batch experimental data. The model predictions conformed well to the observed data at different phenol and TCE concentrations. At low TCE concentrations (TCE concentrations (>6 mg l(-1)), only the model considering self-inhibition can describe the experimental data, suggesting that a self-inhibition of TCE was present in the system. The proposed model was also employed in predicting the experimental data conducted in a repeated batch reactor, and good agreements were observed between model predictions and experimental data. The results also indicated that the biomass loss in the degradation of TCE below 2 mg l(-1) can be totally recovered in the absence of TCE for the next cycle, and it could be used for the next batch experiment for the degradation of phenol and TCE. However, for higher concentration of TCE (>6 mg l(-1)), the recovery of biomass may not be as good as that at lower TCE concentrations.

  14. Alkoxyl- and carbon-centered radicals as primary agents for degrading non-phenolic lignin-substructure model compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yasunori; Uno, Yukiko; Amirta, Rudianto; Watanabe, Takahito; Honda, Yoichi; Watanabe, Takashi

    2011-04-07

    Lignin degradation by white-rot fungi proceeds via free radical reaction catalyzed by oxidative enzymes and metabolites. Basidiomycetes called selective white-rot fungi degrade both phenolic and non-phenolic lignin substructures without penetration of extracellular enzymes into the cell wall. Extracellular lipid peroxidation has been proposed as a possible ligninolytic mechanism, and radical species degrading the recalcitrant non-phenolic lignin substructures have been discussed. Reactions between the non-phenolic lignin model compounds and radicals produced from azo compounds in air have previously been analysed, and peroxyl radical (PR) is postulated to be responsible for lignin degradation (Kapich et al., FEBS Lett., 1999, 461, 115-119). However, because the thermolysis of azo compounds in air generates both a carbon-centred radical (CR) and a peroxyl radical (PR), we re-examined the reactivity of the three radicals alkoxyl radical (AR), CR and PR towards non-phenolic monomeric and dimeric lignin model compounds. The dimeric lignin model compound is degraded by CR produced by reaction of 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), which under N(2) atmosphere cleaves the α-β bond in 1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1,3-propanediol to yield 4-ethoxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde. However, it is not degraded by the PR produced by reaction of Ce(4+)/tert-BuOOH. In addition, it is degraded by AR produced by reaction of Ti(3+)/tert-BuOOH. PR and AR are generated in the presence and absence of veratryl alcohol, respectively. Rapid-flow ESR analysis of the radical species demonstrates that AR but not PR reacts with the lignin model compound. Thus, AR and CR are primary agents for the degradation of non-phenolic lignin substructures.

  15. Combined electrochemical degradation and activated carbon adsorption treatments for wastewater containing mixed phenolic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkumar, D.; Palanivelu, K.; Balasubramanian, N. [Anna University, Madras (India). Center for Environmental Studies

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical degradation of mixed phenolic compounds present in coal conversion wastewater was investigated in the presence of chloride as supporting electrolyte. Initially, the degradation experiments were conducted separately with 300 mg/L of individual phenolic compound in the presence of 2500 mg/L chloride using Ti/TiO{sub 2}-RuO{sub 2}-IrO{sub 2} anode at 5.4 A/dm{sup 2} current density. Comparison of the experimental results of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal versus charge indicated that the order of decreasing COD removal for various phenolic compounds as catechol {gt} resorcinol {gt} m-cresol {gt} o-cresol {gt} phenol {gt} p-cresol. Degradation of the mixture of phenolic compounds and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) determinations at various stages of electrolysis showed that phenolic compounds were initially converted into benzoquinone and then to lower molecular weight aliphatic compounds. The COD and the total organic carbon (TOC) removal were 83 and 58.9% after passing 32 Ah/L with energy consumption of 191.6 kWh/kg of COD removal. Experiments were also conducted to remove adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) content in the treated solution using granular activated carbon. The optimum conditions for the removal of AOX was at pH 3.0, 5 mL/min flow rate and 31.2 cm bed height. Based on the investigation, a general scheme of treatment of mixed phenolic compounds by combined electrochemical and activated carbon adsorption treatment is proposed.

  16. Controlled Defects of Zinc Oxide Nanorods for Efficient Visible Light Photocatalytic Degradation of Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Al-Sabahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution from human and industrial activities has received much attention as it adversely affects human health and bio-diversity. In this work we report efficient visible light photocatalytic degradation of phenol using supported zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods and explore the role of surface defects in ZnO on the visible light photocatalytic activity. ZnO nanorods were synthesized on glass substrates using a microwave-assisted hydrothermal process, while the surface defect states were controlled by annealing the nanorods at various temperatures and were characterized by photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used for the evaluation of phenol photocatalytic degradation. ZnO nanorods with high surface defects exhibited maximum visible light photocatalytic activity, showing 50% degradation of 10 ppm phenol aqueous solution within 2.5 h, with a degradation rate almost four times higher than that of nanorods with lower surface defects. The mineralization process of phenol during degradation was also investigated, and it showed the evolution of different photocatalytic byproducts, such as benzoquinone, catechol, resorcinol and carboxylic acids, at different stages. The results from this study suggest that the presence of surface defects in ZnO nanorods is crucial for its efficient visible light photocatalytic activity, which is otherwise only active in the ultraviolet region.

  17. Phylogenetic and functional diversity of metagenomic libraries of phenol degrading sludge from petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cynthia C; Hayden, Helen; Sawbridge, Tim; Mele, Pauline; Kruger, Ricardo H; Rodrigues, Marili Vn; Costa, Gustavo Gl; Vidal, Ramon O; Sousa, Maíra P; Torres, Ana Paula R; Santiago, Vânia Mj; Oliveira, Valéria M

    2012-03-27

    In petrochemical refinery wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), different concentrations of pollutant compounds are received daily in the influent stream, including significant amounts of phenolic compounds, creating propitious conditions for the development of particular microorganisms that can rapidly adapt to such environment. In the present work, the microbial sludge from a refinery WWTP was enriched for phenol, cloned into fosmid vectors and pyrosequenced. The fosmid libraries yielded 13,200 clones and a comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of the sequence data set revealed a complex and diverse bacterial community in the phenol degrading sludge. The phylogenetic analyses using MEGAN in combination with RDP classifier showed a massive predominance of Proteobacteria, represented mostly by the genera Diaphorobacter, Pseudomonas, Thauera and Comamonas. The functional classification of phenol degrading sludge sequence data set generated by MG-RAST showed the wide metabolic diversity of the microbial sludge, with a high percentage of genes involved in the aerobic and anaerobic degradation of phenol and derivatives. In addition, genes related to the metabolism of many other organic and xenobiotic compounds, such as toluene, biphenyl, naphthalene and benzoate, were found. Results gathered herein demonstrated that the phenol degrading sludge has complex phylogenetic and functional diversities, showing the potential of such community to degrade several pollutant compounds. This microbiota is likely to represent a rich resource of versatile and unknown enzymes which may be exploited for biotechnological processes such as bioremediation.

  18. A Comprehensive Study on Chlorella pyrenoidosa for Phenol Degradation and its Potential Applicability as Biodiesel Feedstock and Animal Feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bhaskar; Mandal, Tapas K; Patra, Sanjukta

    2015-07-01

    The present work evaluates the phenol degradative performance of microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that C. pyrenoidosa degrades phenol completely up to 200 mg/l. It could also metabolize phenol in refinery wastewater. Biokinetic parameters obtained are the following: growth kinetics, μ max (media) > μ max (refinery wastewater), K s(media) refinery wastewater), K I(media) > K I(refinery wastewater); degradation kinetics, q max (media) > q max (refinery wastewater), K s(media) refinery wastewater), K I(media) > K I(refinery wastewater). The microalgae could cometabolize the alkane components present in refinery wastewater. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) fingerprinting of biomass indicates intercellular phenol uptake and breakdown into its intermediates. Phenol was metabolized as an organic carbon source leading to higher specific growth rate of biomass. Phenol degradation pathway was elucidated using HPLC, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectrophotometry. It involved both ortho- and meta-pathway with prominence of ortho-pathway. SEM analysis shows that cell membrane gets wrinkled on phenol exposure. Phenol degradation was growth and photodependent. Infrared analysis shows increased intracellular accumulation of neutral lipids opening possibility for utilization of spent biomass as biodiesel feedstock. The biomass after lipid extraction could be used as protein supplement in animal feed owing to enhanced protein content. The phenol remediation ability coupled with potential applicability of the spent biomass as biofuel feedstock and animal feed makes it a potential candidate for an environmentally sustainable process.

  19. Variability of Biological Degradation of Phenolic Hydrocarbons in an Aerobic Aquifer Determined by Laboratory Batch Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1994-01-01

    The biological aerobic degradation of 7 phenolic hydrocarbons (phenol, o-cresol, o-nitrophenol, p-nitrophenol, 2,6-dichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 4,6-o-dichlorocresol) and 1 aromatic hydrocarbon (nitrobenzene) was studied for 149 days in replicate laboratory batch microcosms with sediment...... and groundwater from 8 localities representing a 15 m × 30 m section of an aerobic aquifer. Three patterns of variation were found: (1) phenol, o-cresol and in most cases p-nitrophenol showed very fast degradation with no or only short lag phases and with very little variation among localities; (2) 2...

  20. Effect of temperature on the anaerobic degradation of phenol and the microbial community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leven, L.; Schnurer, A.

    2009-01-01

    The residue produced during anaerobic digestion of organic waste is rich in nutrient and can be used as fertiliser However, one concern is the content of organic pollutants, as these may influence the soil fertility negatively and should therefore only occur at low levels. In this study, the effect of the process temperature on the anaerobic degradation of different phenolic compounds was investigated. Phenols have been shown to have a negative impact on soil microbial activity and can appear in anaerobic bioreactors both as components of the in-going substrate, and as intermediates during degradation of different complex aromatic compounds. (Author)

  1. Photo-assisted Fenton type processes for the degradation of phenol: A kinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusic, Hrvoje; Koprivanac, Natalija; Bozic, Ana Loncaric; Selanec, Iva

    2006-01-01

    In this study the application of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), dark Fenton and photo-assisted Fenton type processes; Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 , Fe 3+ /H 2 O 2 , Fe 0 /H 2 O 2 , UV/Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 , UV/Fe 3+ /H 2 O 2 and UV/Fe 0 /H 2 O 2 , for degradation of phenol as a model organic pollutant in the wastewater was investigated. A detail kinetic modeling which describes the degradation of phenol was performed. Mathematical models which predict phenol decomposition and formation of primary oxidation by-products: catechol, hydroquinone and benzoquinone, by applied processes were developed. The study also consist the modeling of mineralization kinetic of the phenol solution by applied AOPs. This part, besides well known reactions of Fenton and photo-Fenton chemistry, involves additional reactions which describe removal of iron from catalytic cycle through formation of ferric complexes and its regeneration induced by UV radiation. Phenol decomposition kinetic was monitored by HPLC analysis and total organic carbon content measurements (TOC). Complete phenol removal was obtained by all applied processes. Residual TOC by applied Fenton type processes ranged between 60.2 and 44.7%, while the efficiency of those processes was significantly enhanced in the presence of UV light, where residual TOC ranged between 15.2 and 2.4%

  2. Phenol degradation by TiO2 photocatalysts combined with different pulsed discharge systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Lu, Jiani; Wang, Xiaoping; Xin, Qing; Cong, Yanqing; Wang, Qi; Li, Chunjuan

    2013-11-01

    Films of TiO2 nanotubes distributed over the inner surface of a discharge reactor cylinder (CTD) or adhered to a stainless steel electrode surface (PTD) in a discharge reactor were compared with a single-discharge (SD) system to investigate their efficiencies in phenol degradation. Morphology studies indicated that the TiO2 film was destroyed in the PTD system, but that there was no change in the CTD system after discharge. X-ray diffraction results revealed that the anatase phase of the original sample was preserved in the CTD system, but that an anatase-to-rutile phase transformation occurred in the PTD system after discharge. The highest efficiencies of phenol degradation and total organic carbon (TOC) mineralization were observed in the CTD system, and there was no decrease in phenol degradation efficiency upon reuse of a TiO2 film, indicating high catalysis activity and stability of the TiO2 photocatalysts in the combined treatment. TiO2 photocatalysts favored the formation of hydrogen peroxide and disfavored the formation of ozone. A greater degree of oxidation of intermediates and higher energy efficiency in phenol oxidation were observed with the TiO2-plasma systems, especially in the CTD system, compared to those with the SD system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The impact of ColRS two-component system and TtgABC efflux pump on phenol tolerance of Pseudomonas putida becomes evident only in growing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivisaar Maia

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently found that Pseudomonas putida deficient in ColRS two-component system is sensitive to phenol and displays a serious defect on solid glucose medium where subpopulation of bacteria lyses. The latter phenotype is significantly enhanced by the presence of phenol in growth medium. Here, we focused on identification of factors affecting phenol tolerance of the colR-deficient P. putida. Results By using transposon mutagenesis approach we identified a set of phenol-tolerant derivatives of colR-deficient strain. Surprisingly, half of independent phenol tolerant clones possessed miniTn5 insertion in the ttgABC operon. However, though inactivation of TtgABC efflux pump significantly enhanced phenol tolerance, it did not affect phenol-enhanced autolysis of the colR mutant on glucose medium indicating that phenol- and glucose-caused stresses experienced by the colR-deficient P. putida are not coupled. Inactivation of TtgABC pump significantly increased the phenol tolerance of the wild-type P. putida as well. Comparison of phenol tolerance of growing versus starving bacteria revealed that both ColRS and TtgABC systems affect phenol tolerance only under growth conditions and not under starvation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that phenol strongly inhibited cell division and to some extent also caused cell membrane permeabilization to propidium iodide. Single cell analysis of populations of the ttgC- and colRttgC-deficient strains revealed that their membrane permeabilization by phenol resembles that of the wild-type and the colR mutant, respectively. However, cell division of P. putida with inactivated TtgABC pump seemed to be less sensitive to phenol than that of the parental strain. At the same time, cell division appeared to be more inhibited in the colR-mutant strain than in the wild-type P. putida. Conclusions ColRS signal system and TtgABC efflux pump are involved in the phenol tolerance of P. putida. However, as

  4. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as a metabolite fingerprinting tool for monitoring the phenotypic changes in complex bacterial communities capable of degrading phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharfe, Emma S; Jarvis, Roger M; Winder, Catherine L; Whiteley, Andrew S; Goodacre, Royston

    2010-12-01

    The coking process produces great volumes of wastewater contaminated with pollutants such as cyanides, sulfides and phenolics. Chemical and physical remediation of this wastewater removes the majority of these pollutants; however, these processes do not remove phenol and thiocyanate. The removal of these compounds has been effected during bioremediation with activated sludge containing a complex microbial community. In this investigation we acquired activated sludge from an industrial bioreactor capable of degrading phenol. The sludge was incubated in our laboratory and monitored for its ability to degrade phenol over a 48 h period. Multiple samples were taken across the time-course and analysed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. FT-IR was used as a whole-organism fingerprinting approach to monitor biochemical changes in the bacterial cells during the degradation of phenol. We also investigated the ability of the activated sludge to degrade phenol following extended periods (2-131 days) of storage in the absence of phenol. A reduction was observed in the ability of the microbial community to degrade phenol and this was accompanied by a detectable biochemical change in the FT-IR fingerprint related to cellular phenotype of the microbial community. In the absence of phenol a decrease in thiocyanate vibrations was observed, reflecting the ability of these communities to degrade this substrate. Actively degrading communities showed an additional new band in their FT-IR spectra that could be attributed to phenol degradation products from the ortho- and meta-cleavage of the aromatic ring. This study demonstrates that FT-IR spectroscopy when combined with chemometric analysis is a very powerful high throughput screening approach for assessing the metabolic capability of complex microbial communities. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Strategy of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes C70 for effective degradation of phenol and salicylate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merike Jõesaar

    Full Text Available Phenol- and naphthalene-degrading indigenous Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes strain C70 has great potential for the bioremediation of polluted areas. It harbours two chromosomally located catechol meta pathways, one of which is structurally and phylogenetically very similar to the Pseudomonas sp. CF600 dmp operon and the other to the P. stutzeri AN10 nah lower operon. The key enzymes of the catechol meta pathway, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O from strain C70, PheB and NahH, have an amino acid identity of 85%. The metabolic and regulatory phenotypes of the wild-type and the mutant strain C70ΔpheB lacking pheB were evaluated. qRT-PCR data showed that in C70, the expression of pheB- and nahH-encoded C23O was induced by phenol and salicylate, respectively. We demonstrate that strain C70 is more effective in the degradation of phenol and salicylate, especially at higher substrate concentrations, when these compounds are present as a mixture; i.e., when both pathways are expressed. Moreover, NahH is able to substitute for the deleted PheB in phenol degradation when salicylate is also present in the growth medium. The appearance of a yellow intermediate 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde was followed by the accumulation of catechol in salicylate-containing growth medium, and lower expression levels and specific activities of the C23O of the sal operon were detected. However, the excretion of the toxic intermediate catechol to the growth medium was avoided when the growth medium was supplemented with phenol, seemingly due to the contribution of the second meta pathway encoded by the phe genes.

  6. Gamma irradiation-induced complete degradation and mineralization of phenol in aqueous solution: Effects of reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkhuraiji, Turki S., E-mail: khuraiji@kacst.edu.sa [King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology—KACST, Nuclear Science Research Institute, National Center for Irradiation Technology, P. O. BOX 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Boukari, Sahidou O.B. [Université de Poitiers (France); Alfadhl, Fadhl S. [King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology—KACST, Nuclear Science Research Institute, National Center for Irradiation Technology, P. O. BOX 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Ionizing radiation effectively mineralizes phenol in aqueous solution. • Radiolytic system improves when O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, or S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} is combined with γ-rays. • Radiation chemical yield, dose constant, and dose for 90% degradation are discussed. • Removal/mineralization yields increase with initial concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−}. • Initial pH and inorganic salts have an impact on phenol degradation. - Abstract: This study aims to gain new insight into phenol degradation and mineralization in aqueous solution using ionizing radiation to control its radiolytic elimination under various experimental conditions and to present the different radical reactions involved in water radiolysis. The most obvious finding of this study is that the combination of a reagent, i.e., O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, O{sub 2,} or S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−}, with γ-rays effectively enhances the radiolytic system for phenol degradation or mineralization. Radiolytic yield is higher with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} than with S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−}. For the γ-ray/free O{sub 2}, γ-ray/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, γ-ray/S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−}, γ-ray/N{sub 2}O, and γ-ray/N{sub 2} systems, the absorbed doses for 90% phenol elimination are 1.7, 0.85, 1.65, 1.2, and 6.4 kGy, respectively; in contrast, phenol can be decomposed totally and directly via reaction with molecular ozone. The lowest dose constant for phenol removal is determined for γ-ray/HCO{sub 3}{sup −}. 89% of mineralization is reached for an absorbed dose of 10 kGy with a γ-ray/S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} combination.

  7. Oxidative Degradation of Phenol containing Wastewater using Fenton Reagent, Permanganate and Ultraviolet Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Rahman, N.M.; Talaat, H.A.; Sorour, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Phenol containing wastewaters are generated by numerous industrial units including integrated steel mills, textile mills, plastic production, etc. The present work is targeted to explore the viable oxidation techniques for degradation of phenolic wastewater. Three modes of treatment have been adopted in this study, namely, sole oxidant mode using Fenton reagent or permanganate, UV-assisted oxidation and two consequent chemical oxidation steps. Results indicated the superiority of fenton reagent over KMnO 4 oxidation in the sole oxidant mode. On the other hand, UV-assisted KMnO 4 oxidation enables almost complete COD reduction. Dual chemical oxidation mode employing KMnO 4 oxidation followed by Fenton reagent is also an efficient oxidative degradation system

  8. Degradation of phenol and Cr (VI) wastewater with contact glow discharge electrolysis method and the addition of Fe2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Raden Ridzki Aditya; Saksono, Nelson

    2017-11-01

    Phenol and Cr (VI) are an organic waste and dangerous heavy metals which generated from a wide variety of industrial processes such as textiles, paints, dyes, and others. For that reason, we need effective waste treatment technologies, one of them is Contact Glow Discharge Electrolysis (CGDE). This method produce reactive species such as radical hidroxyl so as to be able to degradate phenol and Cr(VI) wastewater effectively. This research aims to obtain the effect of Fe 2+ and air bubbles in degradation of phenol and Cr (VI) waste simultaneously. Waste degradation is measured its absorbance with UV-Vis spectrophotometer. In the conditions of 600 Volt voltage, Na2SO4 0.02 M, anode depth of 1.5 cm, the addition of Fe2+ 40 ppm and the addition of air bubbles for 30 minutes was obtained a percentage degradation of phenol 99.47%, Cr (VI) 76.75% and specific energy of 344.473 kJ / mmol.

  9. Cloning, Characterization and Analysis of cat and ben Genes from the Phenol Degrading Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas organivorans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Maria de Lourdes; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Piubeli, Francine; Frias, Luciana; García, María Teresa; Mellado, Encarnación

    2011-01-01

    Background Extensive use of phenolic compounds in industry has resulted in the generation of saline wastewaters that produce significant environmental contamination; however, little information is available on the degradation of phenolic compounds in saline conditions. Halomonas organivorans G-16.1 (CECT 5995T) is a moderately halophilic bacterium that we isolated in a previous work from saline environments of South Spain by enrichment for growth in different pollutants, including phenolic compounds. PCR amplification with degenerate primers revealed the presence of genes encoding ring-cleaving enzymes of the β-ketoadipate pathway for aromatic catabolism in H. organivorans. Findings The gene cluster catRBCA, involved in catechol degradation, was isolated from H. organivorans. The genes catA, catB, catC and the divergently transcribed catR code for catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (1,2-CTD), cis,cis-muconate cycloisomerase, muconolactone delta-isomerase and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, respectively. The benzoate catabolic genes (benA and benB) are located flanking the cat genes. The expression of cat and ben genes by phenol and benzoic acid was shown by RT-PCR analysis. The induction of catA gene by phenol and benzoic acid was also probed by the measurement of 1,2-CTD activity in H. organivorans growth in presence of these inducers. 16S rRNA and catA gene-based phylogenies were established among different degrading bacteria showing no phylogenetic correlation between both genes. Conclusions/Significance In this work, we isolated and determined the sequence of a gene cluster from a moderately halophilic bacterium encoding ortho-pathway genes involved in the catabolic metabolism of phenol and analyzed the gene organization, constituting the first report characterizing catabolic genes involved in the degradation of phenol in moderate halophiles, providing an ideal model system to investigate the potential use of this group of extremophiles in the decontamination of

  10. Phenol degradation in an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor packed with low density support materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Sancinetti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study phenol degradation in anaerobic fluidized bed reactors (AFBR packed with polymeric particulate supports (polystyrene - PS, polyethylene terephthalate - PET, and polyvinyl chloride - PVC. The reactors were operated with a hydraulic retention time (HRT of 24 h. The influent phenol concentration in the AFBR varied from 100 to 400 mg L-1, resulting in phenol removal efficiencies of ~100%. The formation of extracellular polymeric substances yielded better results with the PVC particles; however, deformations in these particles proved detrimental to reactor operation. PS was found to be the best support for biomass attachment in an AFBR for phenol removal. The AFBR loaded with PS was operated to analyze the performance and stability for phenol removal at feed concentrations ranging from 50 to 500 mg L-1. The phenol removal efficiency ranged from 90-100%.

  11. Rapid establishment of phenol- and quinoline-degrading consortia driven by the scoured cake layer in an anaerobic baffled ceramic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shun; Ren, Xuesong; Hu, Zhenhu; Yuan, Shoujun

    2017-11-01

    Although toxic and refractory organics, such as phenol and quinoline, are decomposed by anaerobic bacteria, the establishment of specific degrading consortia is a relatively slow process. An anaerobic membrane bioreactor allows for complete biomass retention that can aid the establishment of phenol- and quinoline-degrading consortia. In this study, the anaerobic digestion of phenol (500 mg L -1 ) and quinoline (50 mg L -1 ) was investigated using an anaerobic baffled ceramic membrane bioreactor (ABCMBR). The results showed that, within 30 days, 99% of phenol, 98% of quinoline and 88% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) were removed. The substrate utilisation rates of the cake layer for phenol and quinoline, and specific methanogenic activity of the cake layer, were 7.58 mg phenol g -1  mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) day -1 , 8.23 mg quinoline g -1  MLVSS day -1 and 0.55 g COD CH4  g -1  MLVSS day -1 , respectively. The contribution of the cake layer to the removals of phenol and quinoline was extremely underestimated because the uncounted scoured cake layer was disregarded. Syntrophus was the key population for phenol and quinoline degradation, and it was more abundant in the cake layer than in the bulk sludge. The highly active scattered cake layer sped up the establishment of phenol- and quinoline-degrading consortia in the ABCMBR.

  12. Degradation of phenol using a combination of granular activated carbon adsorption and bipolar pulse dielectric barrier discharge plasma regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoufeng, TANG; Na, LI; Jinbang, QI; Deling, YUAN; Jie, LI

    2018-05-01

    A combined method of granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and bipolar pulse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma regeneration was employed to degrade phenol in water. After being saturated with phenol, the GAC was filled into the DBD reactor driven by bipolar pulse power for regeneration under various operating parameters. The results showed that different peak voltages, air flow rates, and GAC content can affect phenol decomposition and its major degradation intermediates, such as catechol, hydroquinone, and benzoquinone. The higher voltage and air support were conducive to the removal of phenol, and the proper water moisture of the GAC was 20%. The amount of H2O2 on the GAC was quantitatively determined, and its laws of production were similar to phenol elimination. Under the optimized conditions, the elimination of phenol on the GAC was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the total removal of organic carbons achieved 50.4%. Also, a possible degradation mechanism was proposed based on the HPLC analysis. Meanwhile, the regeneration efficiency of the GAC was improved with the discharge treatment time, which attained 88.5% after 100 min of DBD processing.

  13. Degradation of phenol via phenylphosphate and carboxylation to 4-hydroxybenzoate by a newly isolated strain of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfobacterium anilini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Young-Beom; Chae, Jong-Chan; Zylstra, Gerben J; Häggblom, Max M

    2009-07-01

    A sulfate-reducing phenol-degrading bacterium, strain AK1, was isolated from a 2-bromophenol-utilizing sulfidogenic estuarine sediment enrichment culture. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and DNA homology, strain AK1 is most closely related to Desulfobacterium anilini strain Ani1 (= DSM 4660(T)). In addition to phenol, this organism degrades a variety of other aromatic compounds, including benzoate, 2-hydroxybenzoate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, 4-hydroxyphenylacetate, 2-aminobenzoate, 2-fluorophenol, and 2-fluorobenzoate, but it does not degrade aniline, 3-hydroxybenzoate, 4-cyanophenol, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate, monohalogenated phenols, or monohalogenated benzoates. Growth with sulfate as an electron acceptor occurred with acetate and pyruvate but not with citrate, propionate, butyrate, lactate, glucose, or succinate. Strain AK1 is able to use sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate as electron acceptors. A putative phenylphosphate synthase gene responsible for anaerobic phenol degradation was identified in strain AK1. In phenol-grown cultures inducible expression of the ppsA gene was verified by reverse transcriptase PCR, and 4-hydroxybenzoate was detected as an intermediate. These results suggest that the pathway for anaerobic degradation of phenol in D. anilini strain AK1 proceeds via phosphorylation of phenol to phenylphosphate, followed by carboxylation to 4-hydroxybenzoate. The details concerning such reaction pathways in sulfidogenic bacteria have not been characterized previously.

  14. Simultaneous enhancement of phenolic compound degradations by Acinetobacter strain V2 via a step-wise continuous acclimation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Johnson; Sharma, Vikas; Milase, Ridwaan; Mbhense, Ntuthuko

    2016-06-01

    Phenol degradation enhancement of Acinetobacter strain V2 by a step-wise continuous acclimation process was investigated. At the end of 8 months, three stable adapted strains, designated as R, G, and Y, were developed with the sub-lethal concentration of phenol at 800, 1100, and 1400 mg/L, respectively, from 400 mg/L of V2 parent strain. All strains degraded phenol at their sub-lethal level within 24 h, their growth rate increased as the acclimation process continued and retained their degradation properties even after storing at -80 °C for more than 3 years. All adapted strains appeared coccoid with an ungranulated surface under electron microscope compared to typical rod-shaped parental strain V2 . The adapted Y strain also possessed superior degradation ability against aniline, benzoate, and toluene. This study demonstrated the use of long term acclimation process to develop efficient and better pollutant degrading bacterial strains with potentials in industrial and environmental bioremediation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Olea Europea-derived phenolic products attenuate antinociceptive morphine tolerance: an innovative strategic approach to treat cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscoli, C; Lauro, F; Dagostino, C; D'Agostino, C; Ilari, S; Giancotti, L A; Gliozzi, M; Costa, N; Carresi, C; Musolino, V; Casale, F; Ventrice, D; Oliverio, M; Oliverio, E; Palma, E; Nisticò, S; Nistico', S; Procopio, A; Rizzo, M; Mollace, V

    2014-01-01

    Morphine and related opioid drugs are currently the major drugs for severe pain. Their clinical utility is limited in the management of severe cancer pain due to the rapid development of tolerance. Restoring opioid efficacy is therefore of great clinical importance. A great body of evidence suggests the key role of free radicals and posttranslational modulation in the development of tolerance to the analgesic activity of morphine. Epidemiological studies have shown a relationship between the Mediterranean diet and a reduced incidence of pathologies such as coronary heart disease and cancer. A central hallmark of this diet is the high consumption of virgin olive oil as the main source of fat which contains antioxidant components in the non-saponifiable fraction, including phenolic compounds absent in seed oils. Here, we show that in a rodent model of opiate tolerance, removal of the free radicals with phenolic compounds of olive oil such as hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein reinstates the analgesic action of morphine. Chronic injection of morphine in mice led to the development of tolerance and this was associated with increased nitrotyrosin and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation together with nitration and deactivation of MnSOD in the spinal cord. Removal of free radicals by hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein blocked morphine tolerance by inhibiting nitration and MDA formation and replacing the MnSOD activity. The phenolic fraction of virgin olive oil exerts antioxidant activities in vivo and free radicals generation occurring during chronic morphine administration play a crucial role in the development of opioid tolerance. Our data suggest novel therapeutic approach in the management of chronic cancer pain, in particular for those patients who require long-term opioid treatment for pain relief without development of tolerance.

  16. Cloning, characterization and analysis of cat and ben genes from the phenol degrading halophilic bacterium Halomonas organivorans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Moreno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extensive use of phenolic compounds in industry has resulted in the generation of saline wastewaters that produce significant environmental contamination; however, little information is available on the degradation of phenolic compounds in saline conditions. Halomonas organivorans G-16.1 (CECT 5995(T is a moderately halophilic bacterium that we isolated in a previous work from saline environments of South Spain by enrichment for growth in different pollutants, including phenolic compounds. PCR amplification with degenerate primers revealed the presence of genes encoding ring-cleaving enzymes of the β-ketoadipate pathway for aromatic catabolism in H. organivorans. FINDINGS: The gene cluster catRBCA, involved in catechol degradation, was isolated from H. organivorans. The genes catA, catB, catC and the divergently transcribed catR code for catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (1,2-CTD, cis,cis-muconate cycloisomerase, muconolactone delta-isomerase and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, respectively. The benzoate catabolic genes (benA and benB are located flanking the cat genes. The expression of cat and ben genes by phenol and benzoic acid was shown by RT-PCR analysis. The induction of catA gene by phenol and benzoic acid was also probed by the measurement of 1,2-CTD activity in H. organivorans growth in presence of these inducers. 16S rRNA and catA gene-based phylogenies were established among different degrading bacteria showing no phylogenetic correlation between both genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this work, we isolated and determined the sequence of a gene cluster from a moderately halophilic bacterium encoding ortho-pathway genes involved in the catabolic metabolism of phenol and analyzed the gene organization, constituting the first report characterizing catabolic genes involved in the degradation of phenol in moderate halophiles, providing an ideal model system to investigate the potential use of this group of extremophiles in

  17. Degradation of phenolic compounds with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by enzyme from Serratia marcescens AB 90027.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ri-Sheng; Sun, Min; Wang, Chun-Ling; Deng, Sheng-Song

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, the degradation of phenolic compounds using hydrogen peroxide as oxidizer and the enzyme extract from Serratia marcescens AB 90027 as catalyst was reported. With such an enzyme/H2O2 combination treatment, a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was achieved, e.g., degradation of hydroquinone exceeded 96%. From UV-visible and IR spectra, the degradation mechanisms were judged as a process of phenyl ring cleavage. HPLC analysis shows that in the degradation p-benzoquinone, maleic acid and oxalic acid were formed as intermediates and that they were ultimately converted to CO2 and H2O. With the enzyme/H2O2 treatment, vanillin, hydroquinone, catechol, o-aminophenol, p-aminophenol, phloroglucinol and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde were readily degraded, whereas the degradation of phenol, salicylic acid, resorcinol, p-cholorophenol and p-nitrophenol were limited. Their degradability was closely related to the properties and positions of their side chain groups. Electron-donating groups, such as -OH, -NH2 and -OCH3 enhanced the degradation, whereas electron-withdrawing groups, such as -NO2, -Cl and -COOH, had a negative effect on the degradation of these compounds in the presence of enzyme/H2O2. Compounds with -OH at ortho and para positions were more readily degraded than those with -OH at meta positions.

  18. High Phenolics Rutgers Scarlet Lettuce Improves Glucose Metabolism in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Diana M.; Roopchand, Diana E.; Poulev, Alexander; Kuhn, Peter; Armas, Isabel; Johnson, William D.; Oren, Andrew; Ribnicky, David; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Raskin, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Scope The ability of high phenolic Rutgers Scarlet Lettuce (RSL) to attenuate metabolic syndrome and gut dysbiosis was studied in very high fat diet (VHFD)-fed mice. Phenolic absorption was assessed in vivo and in a gastrointestinal tract model. Methods and results Mice were fed VHFD, VHFD supplemented with RSL (RSL-VHFD) or store-purchased green lettuce (GL-VHFD), or low-fat diet (LFD) for 13 weeks. Compared to VHFD or GL-VHFD-fed groups, RSL-VHFD group showed significantly improved oral glucose tolerance (p<0.05). Comparison of VHFD, RSL-VHFD, and GL-VHFD groups revealed no significant differences with respect to insulin tolerance, hepatic lipids, body weight gain, fat mass, plasma glucose, triglycerides, free fatty acid, and lipopolysaccharide levels, as well as relative abundances of major bacterial phyla from 16S rDNA amplicon data sequences (from fecal and cecal samples). However, RSL and GL-supplementation increased abundance of several taxa involved in plant polysaccharide degradation/fermentation. RSL phenolics chlorogenic acid, quercetin-3-glucoside, and quercetin-malonyl-glucoside were bioaccessible in the TIM-1 digestion model, but had relatively low recovery. Conclusions RSL phenolics contributed to attenuation of postprandial hyperglycemia. Changes in gut microbiota were likely due to microbiota accessible carbohydrates in RSL and GL rather than RSL phenolics, which may be metabolized, absorbed, or degraded before reaching the colon. PMID:27529448

  19. Physiological changes of Candida tropicalis population degrading phenol in fed batch reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliska Komarkova

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Candida tropicalis can use phenol as the sole carbon and energy source. Experiments regarding phenol degradations from the water phase were carried out. The fermentor was operated as a fed-batch system with oxistat control. Under conditions of nutrient limitation and an excess of oxygen the respiration activity of cells was suppressed and some color metabolites (black-brown started to be formed. An accumulation of these products inhibited the cell growth under aerobic conditions. Another impact was a decrease of the phenol hydroxylase activity as the key enzyme of the phenol degradation pathway at the end of the cell respiration activity. This decrease is linked with the above mentioned product inhibition. The cell death studied by fluorescent probe proceeded very slowly after the loss of the respiration activity. The starvation stress induced an increase of the endogenous respiration rate at the expense of phenol oxidation.Candida tropicalis pode utilizar fenol como única fonte de carbono e de energia. O fermentador foi operado em um sistema ''batelada-alimentada'' e controle oxidativo. Em condições limitantes de nutrientes e excesso de oxigênio a atividade respiratória das células foi suprimida e o calor do metabolismo pode ser formado. Uma acumulação desses produtos inibiu o crescimento das células em condições aeróbicas. Outro impacto foi um decréscimo da atividade fenol hidroxilase como enzima chave da degradação do fenol no final da atividade respirométrica. Essa redução está relacionada com os fatos acima mencionados. A morte da célula estudada por sonda de fluorescência ocorreu lentamente após a perda da atividade respiratória. O ''stress'' celular induziu um aumento na taxa de respiração endógena devido à oxidação fenólica.

  20. Limnobacter spp. as newly detected phenol-degraders among Baltic Sea surface water bacteria characterised by comparative analysis of catabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedler, Eve; Heinaru, Eeva; Jutkina, Jekaterina; Viggor, Signe; Koressaar, Triinu; Remm, Maido; Heinaru, Ain

    2013-12-01

    A set of phenol-degrading strains of a collection of bacteria isolated from Baltic Sea surface water was screened for the presence of two key catabolic genes coding for phenol hydroxylases and catechol 2,3-dioxygenases. The multicomponent phenol hydroxylase (LmPH) gene was detected in 70 out of 92 strains studied, and 41 strains among these LmPH(+) phenol-degraders were found to exhibit catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) activity. Comparative phylogenetic analyses of LmPH and C23O sequences from 56 representative strains were performed. The studied strains were mostly affiliated to the genera Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. However, the study also widened the range of phenol-degraders by including the genus Limnobacter. Furthermore, using a next generation sequencing approach, the LmPH genes of Limnobacter strains were found to be the most prevalent ones in the microbial community of the Baltic Sea surface water. Four different Limnobacter strains having almost identical 16S rRNA gene sequences (99%) and similar physiological properties formed separate phylogenetic clusters of LmPH and C23O genes in the respective phylogenetic trees. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological degradation of the phenol for activated sludge. Answer of the system to the load increment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil V, Luis Hernando

    1998-01-01

    Initially, a literature review about the general behaviour of the biological decomposition of phenol by the activated-sludge system is presented, where discrepancies seem to appear among researchers due to different operation conditions Worked by them. The degradation velocity depends on phenol concentration in a high level and on the charge used because its potential toxicity. Experiments were carryon in a pilot plant, using a mixture of low molecular weight alcohols, highly biodegradable, with a solution of pure phenol, increasing the phenol concentration from 33 % to 60 % in relation to DQO. Charges of phenol between 0,2 and 0,8 g of phenol /day/litter were applied, the initial concentration of phenol was changed between 200- 2000 mg/L and hydraulic retention times between 0,9 and 1,5 days were handled. The results have shown that the phenol concentration in the downstream has an exponential behaviour with the charge of phenol applied. In general, high efficiency in phenol removability is presented, reaching phenol concentration below 0,2 mg/1 downstream, with an average of 1,5 days in THR and average charges between 0,5-0,6 g phenol/day/ litter and a micro organism relation feed (arm) of 0,4- 0,5 g DBO 5 /day/g. SS

  2. The use of silica gel prepared by sol-gel method and polyurethane foam as microbial carriers in the continuous degradation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brányik, T; Kuncová, G; Páca, J

    2000-08-01

    A mixed microbial culture was immobilized by entrapment into silica gel (SG) and entrapment/ adsorption on polyurethane foam (PU) and ceramic foam. The phenol degradation performance of the SG biocatalyst was studied in a packed-bed reactor (PBR), packed-bed reactor with ceramic foam (PBRC) and fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). In continuous experiments the maximum degradation rate of phenol (q(s)max) decreased in the order: PBRC (598 mg l(-1) h(-1)) > PBR (PU, 471 mg l(-1)h(-1)) > PBR(SG, 394 mg l(-1) h(-1)) > FBR (PU, 161 mg l(-1) h(-1)) > FBR (SG, 91 mg l(-1) h(-1)). The long-term use of the SG biocatalyst in continuous phenol degradation resulted in the formation of a 100-200 microm thick layer with a high cell density on the surface of the gel particles. The abrasion of the surface layer in the FBR contributed to the poor degradation performance of this reactor configuration. Coating the ceramic foam with a layer of cells immobilized in colloidal SiO2 enhanced the phenol degradation efficiency during the first 3 days of the PBRC operation, in comparison with untreated ceramic packing.

  3. Continuous aerobic phenol degradation by defined mixed immobilized cultutre in packed bed reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Páca jr., J.; Páca, J.; Kostečková, A.; Stiborová, M.; Sobotka, Miroslav; Gerrard, A. M.; Soccol, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 4 (2005), s. 301-308 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/03/0407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : phenol degradation * pseudomonas putida * commamonas testosteroni Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2005

  4. Phenol Photocatalytic Degradation by Advanced Oxidation Process under Ultraviolet Radiation Using Titanium Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nickheslat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The main objective of this study was to examine the photocatalytic degradation of phenol from laboratory samples and petrochemical industries wastewater under UV radiation by using nanoparticles of titanium dioxide coated on the inner and outer quartz glass tubes. Method. The first stage of this study was conducted to stabilize the titanium dioxide nanoparticles in anatase crystal phase, using dip-coating sol-gel method on the inner and outer surfaces of quartz glass tubes. The effect of important parameters including initial phenol concentration, TiO2 catalyst dose, duration of UV radiation, pH of solution, and contact time was investigated. Results. In the dip-coat lining stage, the produced nanoparticles with anatase crystalline structure have the average particle size of 30 nm and are uniformly distributed over the tube surface. The removal efficiency of phenol was increased with the descending of the solution pH and initial phenol concentration and rising of the contact time. Conclusion. Results showed that the light easily passes through four layers of coating (about 105 nm. The highest removal efficiency of phenol with photocatalytic UV/TiO2 process was 50% at initial phenol concentration of 30 mg/L, solution pH of 3, and 300 min contact time. The comparison of synthetic solution and petrochemical wastewater showed that at same conditions the phenol removal efficiency was equal.

  5. LOGICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN FOR PHENOL DEGRADATION USING IMMOBILIZED ACINETOBACTER SP. CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amro Abd Al Fattah Amara

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenol degradation processes were conducted through a series of enzymatic reactions effects and is affect by different components of the microbial metabolic flux. Using different optimization strategies like mutagenesis could lead to a successful optimization but also lead to lost of some important microbial features or to release a new virulence or unexpected characters. Plackett-Burman closes much gab between optimization, safety, time, cost, Man/hr, the complexity of the metabolic flux etc. Using Plackett-Burman experimental design lead to map the points affect in the optimization process by well understanding their request from nutrient and the best environmental condition required. In this study nine variables include pH (X1, oC (X2, glucose (X3, yeast extract (X4, meat extract (X5, NH4NO3 (X6, K-salt (X7, Mg-salt (X8 and trace element (X9 are optimized during phenol degradation by Acinetobacter sp., using Plackett-Burman design method. Plackett-Burman included 16 experiments, each was used in two levels, [-1] low and high [+1]. According to Blackett-Burman design experiments the maximum degradation rate was 31.25 mg/l/h. Logical and statistical analysis of the data lead to select pH, Temperature and Meat extract as three factors affecting on phenol degradation rate. These three variables have been used in Box-Behnken experimental design for further optimization. Meat extract, which is not statistically recommended for optimization has been used while it can substitute trace element, which is statistically significant. Glucose, which is statistically significant, did not included while it has a negative effect and gave the best result at 0 g/l amount. Glucose has been completely omitted from the media.  pH, temperature and meat extract were used in fifteen experiments each was used in three levels, –1, 0, and +1 according to Box-Behnken design. Microsoft Excel 2002 solver tool was used to optimize the model created from Box-Behnken. The

  6. Reductive degradation of polychlorinated phenols by Pd/C-formate: an ecoefficient remediation method for aqueous chlorinated phenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartung, Rainer; Lenoir, Dieter; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Schulte-Hostede, Sigurd; Schramm, Karl-Werner [Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, GSF Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Neuherberg bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    A new catalytic dehydrohalogenation method for chlorinated phenols is described, which can be used to break down chlorinated pollutants in wastewater. It uses a system of Pd-C as catalyst with sodium formate as reducing agent. This economic method is easy to perform with a complete degradation of the pollutant within 12 to 30 h at room temperature. The ecoefficieny of the procedure is compared with eleven alternative methods showing the special advantages of the method. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Identification of genes and pathways related to phenol degradation in metagenomic libraries from petroleum refinery wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia C Silva

    Full Text Available Two fosmid libraries, totaling 13,200 clones, were obtained from bioreactor sludge of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system. The library screening based on PCR and biological activity assays revealed more than 400 positive clones for phenol degradation. From these, 100 clones were randomly selected for pyrosequencing in order to evaluate the genetic potential of the microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plant for biodegradation, focusing mainly on novel genes and pathways of phenol and aromatic compound degradation. The sequence analysis of selected clones yielded 129,635 reads at an estimated 17-fold coverage. The phylogenetic analysis showed Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the most abundant orders among the selected fosmid clones. The MG-RAST analysis revealed a broad metabolic profile with important functions for wastewater treatment, including metabolism of aromatic compounds, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus. The predicted 2,276 proteins included phenol hydroxylases and cathecol 2,3- dioxygenases, involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, such as phenol, byphenol, benzoate and phenylpropanoid. The sequencing of one fosmid insert of 33 kb unraveled the gene that permitted the host, Escherichia coli EPI300, to grow in the presence of aromatic compounds. Additionally, the comparison of the whole fosmid sequence against bacterial genomes deposited in GenBank showed that about 90% of sequence showed no identity to known sequences of Proteobacteria deposited in the NCBI database. This study surveyed the functional potential of fosmid clones for aromatic compound degradation and contributed to our knowledge of the biodegradative capacity and pathways of microbial assemblages present in refinery wastewater treatment system.

  8. [Screening of harmine tolerance/degrading bacteria from camel rumen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Dengdi; Zhu, Yanlei; Tang, Jing; Ye, Yongxia; Zeng, Xianchun

    2010-08-01

    Peganum harmala, a famous traditional Chinese drug, contains a variety of alkaloids and toxic for many animals. Camels mainly live in desert or semi-desert areas, with the robust gastrointestine system in digesting various feed including toxic plants without disease symptoms. Camel rumen content was used as the inoculant to inoculate medium M98-5 which contains 100 mg x L(-1) harmin and cultivated for 5 days. Upto 5 subculturings, strains that could degrading or tolerant harmine were isolated. Their conversion activity was determined by thin-layer chromatography. The taxonomic position of the strains were identified based on 16S rRNA sequences analysis. 15 out of the 29 isolates have harmine degrading activity. Most of the isolates are identified as the members of the Genera Lactobacillus (16 strains, 55%), Shigella (7 strains, 24%) and Bacillus (4 strains, 13.8%). Only one strain belong to genus Enterococcus and one belong to genus Megasphaera. The results indicated that the harmine tolerance/degrading communities of camel rumen are limited and only Lactobacillus have harmine-degrading activity.

  9. Integrated phospholipidomics and transcriptomics analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced tolerance to a mixture of acetic acid, furfural, and phenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    A mixture of acetic acid, furfural and phenol (AFP), three representative lignocellulose derived inhibitors, significantly inhibited the growth and bioethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to uncover mechanisms behind the enhanced tolerance of an inhibitor-tolerant S.cerevisiae s...

  10. Biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas fluorescens growing on molasses and its application in phenol degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryantia, Venty; Marliyana, Soerya Dewi; Wulandari, Astri

    2015-12-01

    A molasses based medium for the biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas fluorescens was developed, where the effect of pre-treated of molasses and medium composition were evaluated. Biosurfactant production was followed by measuring optical density (OD), surface tension and emulsifying index (E24) over 12 days of fermentation. The optimum condition for the biosurfactant production was obtained when a medium containing of 8 g/L nutrient broth, 5 g/L NaCl, 1 g/L NH4NO3 and 5% v/v pre-treated molasses with centrifugation was used as media with 3 days of fermentation. The biosurfactant was identified as a rhamnolipid type biosurfactant which had critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 801 mg/L and was able to reduce the surface tension of the water from 80 mN/m to 51 mN/m. The biosurfactants had water in oil (w/o) emulsion type. Biosurfactant was able to emulsify various hydrocarbons, which were able to decrase the interfacial tension about 50-75% when benzyl chloride, anisaldehyde and palm oil were used as immiscible compounds. The biosurfactant exhibited the E24 value of about 50% and the stable emulsion was reached up to 30 days when lubricant was used as an immiscible compound. Up to 68% of phenol was degraded in the presence of biosurfactant within 15 days, whereas only 56% of phenol was degraded in the absence of biosurfactant. Overall, the results exhibited that molasses are recommended for the rhamnolipids production which possessed good surface-active properties and had potential application in the enhancement of phenol degradation.

  11. Biochemical, transcriptional and translational evidences of the phenol-meta-degradation pathway by the hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Comte

    Full Text Available Phenol is a widespread pollutant and a model molecule to study the biodegradation of monoaromatic compounds. After a first oxidation step leading to catechol in mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms, two main routes have been identified depending on the cleavage of the aromatic ring: ortho involving a catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C12D and meta involving a catechol 2,3 dioxygenase (C23D. Our work aimed at elucidating the phenol-degradation pathway in the hyperthermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2. For this purpose, the strain was cultivated in a fermentor under different substrate and oxygenation conditions. Indeed, reducing dissolved-oxygen concentration allowed slowing down phenol catabolism (specific growth and phenol-consumption rates dropped 55% and 39%, respectively and thus, evidencing intermediate accumulations in the broth. HPLC/Diode Array Detector and LC-MS analyses on culture samples at low dissolved-oxygen concentration (DOC  =  0.06 mg x L(-1 suggested, apart for catechol, the presence of 2-hydroxymuconic acid, 4-oxalocrotonate and 4-hydroxy-2-oxovalerate, three intermediates of the meta route. RT-PCR analysis on oxygenase-coding genes of S. solfataricus 98/2 showed that the gene coding for the C23D was expressed only on phenol. In 2D-DIGE/MALDI-TOF analysis, the C23D was found and identified only on phenol. This set of results allowed us concluding that S. solfataricus 98/2 degrade phenol through the meta route.

  12. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A MOLYBDENUM-REDUCING, PHENOL- AND CATECHOL-DEGRADING PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA STRAIN AMR-12 IN SOILS FROM EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abd. AbdEl-Mongy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sites contaminated with both heavy metals and organic xenobiotic pollutants warrants the effective use of either a multitude of bacterial degraders or bacteria having the capacity to detoxify numerous toxicants simultaneously. A molybdenum-reducing bacterium with the capacity to degrade phenolics is reported. Molybdenum (sodium molybdate reduction was optimum between pH 6.0 and 7.0 and between 20 and 30 °C. The most suitable electron donor was glucose. A narrow range of phosphate concentrations between 5.0 and 7.5 mM was required for optimal reduction, while molybdate between 20 and 30 mM were needed for optimal reduction. The scanning absorption spectrum of the molybdenum blue produced indicated that Mo-blue is a reduced phosphomolybdate. Molybdenum reduction was inhibited by the heavy metals mercury, silver and chromium. Biochemical analysis identified the bacterium as Pseudomonas putida strain Amr-12. Phenol and phenolics cannot support molybdenum reduction. However, the bacterium was able to grow on the phenolic compounds (phenol and catechol with observable lag periods. Maximum growth on phenol and catechol occurred around the concentrations of 600 mg∙L-1. The ability of this bacterium to detoxify molybdenum and grown on toxic phenolic makes this bacterium an important tool for bioremediation.

  13. Degradation of phenolics, nitrogen-heterocyclics and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in a rotating biological contactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeswani, Hansa; Mukherji, Suparna

    2012-05-01

    The degradation of phenolics, heterocyclics and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a synthetic biomass gasifier wastewater with average COD of 1388 mg/L was studied in a three stage rotating biological contactor (RBC) using the pyrene degrader, Exiguobacterium aurantiacum and activated sludge consortia (1:3 v/v). As the organic loading rate (OLR) was varied from 3.3 to 14 g/m(2)/d, the COD removal ranged from 63.3% to 92.6%. Complete removal of all the constituents was observed at the lowest OLR of 3.3g/m(2)/d. At 24h hydraulic retention time (HRT) and OLR of 6.6g/m(2)/d complete removal of pyridine, quinoline and benzene and 85-96% removal of phenol, naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene was observed. E. aurantiacum was found to be the dominant bacteria in the biofilm. Clark's model provided good fits to data for all the three stages of the RBC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biological activity of anthocyanins and their phenolic degradation products and metabolites in human vascular endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Human, animal, and in vitro data indicate significant vasoprotective activity of anthocyanins. However, few studies have investigated the activity of anthocyanin degradation products and metabolites which are likely to mediate bioactivity in vivo. The present thesis therefore examined the vascular bioactivity in vitro of anthocyanins, their phenolic degradants, and the potential for interactions between dietary bioactive compounds. Seven treatment compounds (cyanidin-, peonidin-, petunidin- &...

  15. VUV/UV light inducing accelerated phenol degradation with a low electric input† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ra26043h Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Wen, Dong

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the first evidence for the accelerated degradation of phenol by Fenton's reagent in a mini-fluidic VUV/UV photoreaction system (MVPS). A low-pressure mercury lamp used in the MVPS led to a complete degradation of phenol within 4–6 min. The HO˙ and HO2˙ originating from both Fenton's reagent and VUV photolysis of water were identified with suitable radical scavengers. The effects of initial concentrations of phenol, H2O2 and Fe3+ as well as solution pH on phenol degradation kinetics were examined. Increasing the initial phenol concentration slowed down the phenol degradation, whereas increasing the initial H2O2 or Fe3+ concentration accelerated the phenol degradation. The optimal solution pH was 3.7. At both 254 and 185 nm, increasing phenol concentration enhanced its absorption for the incident photons. The reaction mechanism for the degradation of phenol was suggested consistent with the results obtained. This study indicates that the VUV/UV photo-Fenton process has potential applications in the treatment of industrial wastewater containing phenol and related aromatic pollutants. PMID:28496972

  16. Immobilized TiO2 for Phenol Degradation in a Pilot-Scale Photocatalytic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Mozia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenol degradation was carried out in a photocatalytic pilot plant reactor equipped with a UV/vis mercury lamp. The total volume of treated water was equal to 1.35 m3. TiO2 P25 was used as a photocatalyst and it was immobilized on two different supports: (i a steel mesh and (ii a fiberglass cloth. Moreover, the performance of commercially available Photospheres-40 was examined. In addition, an experiment in the absence of a photocatalyst was conducted. The commercially available Photospheres-40 were found to be inadequate for the presented application due to their fragility, which in connection with vigorous mixing and pumping led to their mechanical destruction and loss of floating abilities. The highest effectiveness of phenol decomposition and mineralization was observed in the presence of TiO2 supported on the fiberglass cloth. After 15 h of the process, phenol and total organic carbon concentrations decreased by ca. 80% and 50%, respectively.

  17. Enhanced degradation and mineralization of 4-chloro-3-methyl phenol by Zn-CNTs/O3 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Anlan; Liu, Yanlan; Wang, Jianlong

    2018-01-01

    A novel zinc-carbon nanotubes (Zn-CNTs) composite was prepared, characterized and used in O 3 system for the enhanced degradation and mineralization of chlorinated phenol. The Zn-CNTs was characterized by SEM, BET and XRD, and the degradation of 4-chloro-3-methyl phenol (CMP) in aqueous solution was investigated using Zn-CNTs/O 3 system. The experimental results showed that the rate constant of total organic carbon (TOC) removal was 0.29 min -1 , much higher than that of only O 3 system (0.059 min -1 ) because Zn-CNTs/O 2 system could generate H 2 O 2 in situ, the concentration of H 2 O 2 could reach 156.14 mg/L within 60 min at pH 6.0. The high mineralization ratio of CMP by Zn-CNTs/O 3 occurred at wide pH range (3.0-9.0). The increase of Zn-CNTs dosage or gas flow rate contributed to the enhancement of CMP mineralization. The intermediates of CMP degradation were identified and the possible degradation pathway was tentatively proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Phenol oxidation with hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramiez Cortina, R.C.; Hernadez Perez, I. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco, Div. de CBI, Dept. de Energia, Azcapotzalco (Mexico); Ortiz Lozoya, C.E. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco, Div. de CBI, Dept. de Energia, Azcapotzalco (Mexico)]|[Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexico); Alonso Gutierrez, M.S. [Inst. National Polytechnique, ENSCT, Lab. of Chimie Agro-Industrielle, Toulouse (France)

    2003-07-01

    In this work the process application of advanced oxidation is investigated with hydrogen peroxide, for the phenol destruction. The experiments were carried out in a glass reactor of 750 mL. Three phenol concentrations were studied (2000, 1000 and 500 ppm) being oxidized with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (1, 2 and 3 M). The tests of oxidation had a reaction time of 48 h at ambient temperature and pressure. The phenol degradation was determined as COD at different reaction times and intermediate oxidation products were analyzed by chromatography. The results of this study show that it is possible to degrade phenol (1000 ppm) until 90% with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} 2M. Being achieved the best efficiency with a good molar relationship of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/phenol. Intends a reaction outline in the degradation of the phenol. (orig.)

  19. HETEROGENEOUS PHOTOCATALYTIC DEGRADATION OF PHENOL IN AQUEOUS SUSPENSION OF PERIWINKLE SHELL ASH CATALYST IN THE PRESENCE OF UV FROM SUNLIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OSARUMWENSE, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The batch photocatalytic degradation of phenol in aqueous solution wasinvestigated using periwinkle shell ash (PSA as photocatalyst. Chemical characterisation of the PSA revealed that the major oxides present were calcium oxide (CaO, silica (SiO2 and aluminium oxide (Al2O3 which accounted for 41.3, 33.2 and 9.2% of the weight of PSA characterised. The major elements in PSA were iron (19.2% and zinc (16.5%. FTIR results revealed absorption peaks of 3626.59 cm−1, 1797.58 cm−1, 1561.43 cm−1 and 1374.34 cm−1 in the infrared spectrum of PSA corresponding to O–H, C= O, C= C and C–H bonds respectively. Increasing the initial phenol concentration resulted in a decrease in the degradation efficiency of PSA. Lower catalyst loadings favoured the degradation process. Maximum degradation efficiency was obtained when the initial phenol concentration and catalyst loading were set as 50 g/L and 5 g/L respectively. The kinetics of the degradation process was well described by the pseudo first order equation while the diffusion mechanism was well represented by the intra particle diffusion model (R2>0.90. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm equation with an R2 value of 0.997.

  20. Efficient degradation of phenol using iron-montmorillonite as a Fenton catalyst: Importance of visible light irradiation and intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Xipeng; Wu, Honghai, E-mail: wuhonghai@scnu.edu.cn; He, Guangping, E-mail: hegp@scnu.edu.cn; Guan, Yufeng

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Iron-montmorillonite has excellent catalytic activity on phenol Fenton degradation. • Phenol Fenton reaction follows the two-stage pseudo first order kinetic equations. • Role of visible light irradiation is more evident during induction reaction period. • Hydroquinone and catechol have a significant effect on the second-stage kinetics. - Abstract: Iron-montmorillonite (Fe-Mt) with delaminated structures was synthesized via the introduction of iron oxides into Na-montmorillonite. Fe-Mt showed significant increases in the available iron content, surface area and pore volume, along with a slight increase in the basal spacing from d{sub 001} = 1.26 (Na-Mt) to 1.53 nm (Fe-Mt). The Fenton process was efficient for phenol removal using Fe-Mt as a catalyst under visible light irradiation, and the process had two-stage pseudo-first order kinetics. The overall reaction had a higher degradation rate even when it was only irradiated with visible light for the first 40 min period. Further investigation confirmed that the irradiation increased the presence of certain intermediates. Among them, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol all enhanced the Fenton reaction rates. Either catechol or hydroquinone was added to the Fenton system with Fe-Mt/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with or without visible light irradiation, and they both accelerated phenol degradation because catechol and hydroquinone are capable of reductively and effectively transforming Fe(III) into Fe(II). The concentrations of dissolved total Fe increased with the increase in the oxalic acid concentration, which can strongly chelate Fe(III). Hence, iron was released from Fe-Mt, and reductive transformation played an important role in promoting the Fenton reaction process for phenol removal.

  1. Efficient degradation of phenol using iron-montmorillonite as a Fenton catalyst: Importance of visible light irradiation and intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xipeng; Wu, Honghai; He, Guangping; Guan, Yufeng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Iron-montmorillonite has excellent catalytic activity on phenol Fenton degradation. • Phenol Fenton reaction follows the two-stage pseudo first order kinetic equations. • Role of visible light irradiation is more evident during induction reaction period. • Hydroquinone and catechol have a significant effect on the second-stage kinetics. - Abstract: Iron-montmorillonite (Fe-Mt) with delaminated structures was synthesized via the introduction of iron oxides into Na-montmorillonite. Fe-Mt showed significant increases in the available iron content, surface area and pore volume, along with a slight increase in the basal spacing from d_0_0_1 = 1.26 (Na-Mt) to 1.53 nm (Fe-Mt). The Fenton process was efficient for phenol removal using Fe-Mt as a catalyst under visible light irradiation, and the process had two-stage pseudo-first order kinetics. The overall reaction had a higher degradation rate even when it was only irradiated with visible light for the first 40 min period. Further investigation confirmed that the irradiation increased the presence of certain intermediates. Among them, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol all enhanced the Fenton reaction rates. Either catechol or hydroquinone was added to the Fenton system with Fe-Mt/H_2O_2 with or without visible light irradiation, and they both accelerated phenol degradation because catechol and hydroquinone are capable of reductively and effectively transforming Fe(III) into Fe(II). The concentrations of dissolved total Fe increased with the increase in the oxalic acid concentration, which can strongly chelate Fe(III). Hence, iron was released from Fe-Mt, and reductive transformation played an important role in promoting the Fenton reaction process for phenol removal.

  2. Oxidative degradation of phenols in sono-Fenton-like systems upon high-frequency ultrasound irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseev, D. G.; Sizykh, M. R.; Batoeva, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The kinetics of oxidative degradation of phenol and chlorophenols upon acoustic cavitation in the megahertz range (1.7 MHz) is studied experimentally in model systems, and the involvement of in situ generated reactive oxygen species (ROSs) is demonstrated. The phenols subjected to high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) are ranked in terms of their rate of conversion: 2,4,6-trichlorophenol > 2,4-dichlorophenol 2-chlorophenol > 4-chlorophenol phenol. Oxidative degradation upon HFUS irradiation is most efficient at low concentrations of pollutants, due to the low steady-state concentrations of the in situ generated ROSs. A dramatic increase is observed in the efficiency of oxidation in several sonochemical oxidative systems (HFUS in combination with other chemical oxidative factors). The system with added Fe2+ (a sono-Fenton system) derives its efficiency from hydrogen peroxide generated in situ as a result of the recombination of OH radicals. The S2O8 2-/Fe2+/HFUS system has a synergetic effect on substrate oxidation that is attributed to a radical chain mechanism. In terms of the oxidation rates, degrees of conversion, and specific energy efficiencies of 4-chlorophenol oxidation based on the amount of oxidized substance per unit of expended energy the considered sonochemical oxidative systems form the series HFUS < S2O8 2-/HFUS < S2O8 2-/Fe2+/HFUS.

  3. Microbial Degradation of Phenols and Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Creosote-contaminated Groundwater Under Nitrate-reducing Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, John; Arvin, Erik; Jensen, Bjørn K.

    1993-01-01

    of toluene, 2,4-DMP, 3,4-DMP and p-cresol depended on nitrate or nitrite as electron acceptors. 40–80% of the nitrate consumed during degradation of the aromatic compounds was recovered as nitrite, and the consumption of nitrate was accompanied by a production of ATP. Stoichiometric calculations indicated......Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the biodegradation of phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons under anaerobic, nitrate-reducing conditions in groundwater from a creosote-contaminated site at Fredensborg, Denmark. The bacteria in the creosote-contaminated groundwater degraded a mixture...... that in addition to the phenols are toluene other carbon sources present in the groundwater contributed to the consumption of nitrate. If the groundwater was incubated under anaerobic conditions without nitrate, sulphate-reducing conditions evolved after ∼ 1 month at 20°C and ∼2 months at 10°C. In the sulphate...

  4. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase catalysts enables effective degradation of cyanide and phenol in coking wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínková, Ludmila; Chmátal, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to design an effective method for the bioremediation of coking wastewaters, specifically for the concurrent elimination of their highly toxic components - cyanide and phenols. Almost full degradation of free cyanide (0.32-20 mM; 8.3-520 mg L(-1)) in the model and the real coking wastewaters was achieved by using a recombinant cyanide hydratase in the first step. The removal of cyanide, a strong inhibitor of tyrosinase, enabled an effective degradation of phenols by this enzyme in the second step. Phenol (16.5 mM, 1,552 mg L(-1)) was completely removed from a real coking wastewater within 20 h and cresols (5.0 mM, 540 mg L(-1)) were removed by 66% under the same conditions. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase open up new possibilities for the bioremediation of wastewaters with complex pollution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Syntrophorhabdus aromaticivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., the first cultured anaerobe capable of degrading phenol to acetate in obligate syntrophic associations with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yan-Ling; Hanada, Satoshi; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Harada, Hideki; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2008-04-01

    Phenol degradation under methanogenic conditions has long been studied, but the anaerobes responsible for the degradation reaction are still largely unknown. An anaerobe, designated strain UI(T), was isolated in a pure syntrophic culture. This isolate is the first tangible, obligately anaerobic, syntrophic substrate-degrading organism capable of oxidizing phenol in association with an H(2)-scavenging methanogen partner. Besides phenol, it could metabolize p-cresol, 4-hydroxybenzoate, isophthalate, and benzoate. During the degradation of phenol, a small amount of 4-hydroxybenzoate (a maximum of 4 microM) and benzoate (a maximum of 11 microM) were formed as transient intermediates. When 4-hydroxybenzoate was used as the substrate, phenol (maximum, 20 microM) and benzoate (maximum, 92 microM) were detected as intermediates, which were then further degraded to acetate and methane by the coculture. No substrates were found to support the fermentative growth of strain UI(T) in pure culture, although 88 different substrates were tested for growth. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain UI(T) belongs to an uncultured clone cluster (group TA) at the family (or order) level in the class Deltaproteobacteria. Syntrophorhabdus aromaticivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed for strain UI(T), and the novel family Syntrophorhabdaceae fam. nov. is described. Peripheral 16S rRNA gene sequences in the databases indicated that the proposed new family Syntrophorhabdaceae is largely represented by abundant bacteria within anaerobic ecosystems mainly decomposing aromatic compounds.

  6. Kinetics of the Degradation of Anthocyanins, Phenolic Acids and Flavonols During Heat Treatments of Freeze-Dried Sour Cherry Marasca Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Zorić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heating temperature (80–120 °C and processing time (5–50 min on the stability of anthocyanins (cyanidin-3-glucosylrutinoside, cyanidin-3-rutinoside and cyanidin- 3-glucoside, quercetin-3-glucoside and phenolic acids (chlorogenic, neochlorogenic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids in freeze-dried Marasca sour cherry pastes was studied. The degradation rates of individual anthocyanins, quercetin-3-glucoside and phenolic acids followed the first order reaction kinetics. Cyanidin-3-glucoside was found to be the most unstable among the anthocyanins, together with p-coumaric and neochlorogenic acids among other phenols. Activation energies for anthocyanin degradation ranged from 42 (cyanidin-3-glucosylrutinoside to 55 kJ/mol (cyanidin-3-glucoside, and for other phenols from 8.12 (chlorogenic acid to 27 kJ/mol (neochlorogenic acid. By increasing the temperature from 80 to 120 °C, the reaction rate constant of cyanidin-3-glucosylrutinoside increased from 2.2·10–2 to 8.5·10–2 min–1, of p-coumaric acid from 1.12·10–2 to 2.5·10–2 min–1 and of quercetin-3-glucoside from 1.5·10–2 to 2.6·10–2 min–1. The obtained results demonstrate that at 80°C the half-life of anthocyanins ranges from 32.10 min for cyanidin-3-glucosylrutinoside to 45.69 min for cyanidin-3-rutinoside, and of other phenolic compounds from 43.39 for neochlorogenic acid to 66.99 min for chlorogenic acid. The results show that the heating temperature and duration affect the anthocyanins considerably more than the other phenols in terms of degradation.

  7. Intimate Coupling of Photocatalysis and Biodegradation for Degrading Phenol Using Different Light Types: Visible Light vs UV Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dandan; Xu, Zhengxue; Dong, Shanshan; Huo, Mingxin; Dong, Shuangshi; Tian, Xiadi; Cui, Bin; Xiong, Houfeng; Li, Tingting; Ma, Dongmei

    2015-07-07

    Intimate coupling of photocatalysis and biodegradation (ICPB) technology is attractive for phenolic wastewater treatment, but has only been investigated using UV light (called UPCB). We examined the intimate coupling of visible-light-induced photocatalysis and biodegradation (VPCB) for the first time. Our catalyst was prepared doping both of Er(3+) and YAlO3 into TiO2 which were supported on macroporous carriers. The macroporous carriers was used to support for the biofilms as well. 99.8% removal efficiency of phenol was achieved in the VPCB, and this was 32.6% higher than that in the UPCB. Mineralization capability of UPCB was even worse, due to less adsorbable intermediates and cell lysis induced soluble microbial products release. The lower phenol degradation in the UPCB was due to the serious detachment of the biofilms, and then the microbes responsible for phenol degradation were insufficient due to disinfection by UV irradiation. In contrast, microbial communities in the carriers were well protected under visible light irradiation and extracellular polymeric substances secretion was enhanced. Thus, we found that the photocatalytic reaction and biodegradation were intimately coupled in the VPCB, resulting in 64.0% removal of dissolved organic carbon. Therefore, we found visible light has some advantages over UV light in the ICPB technology.

  8. Characteristics of supported nano-TiO2/ZSM-5/silica gel (SNTZS): Photocatalytic degradation of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainudin, Nor Fauziah; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2010-01-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of phenol was investigated using the supported nano-TiO 2 /ZSM-5/silica gel (SNTZS) as a photocatalyst in a batch reactor. The prepared photocatalyst was characterized using XRD, TEM, FT-IR and BET surface area analysis. The synthesized photocatalyst composition was developed using nano-TiO 2 as the photoactive component and zeolite (ZSM-5) as the adsorbents, all supported on silica gel using colloidal silica gel binder. The optimum formulation of SNTZS catalyst was observed to be (nano-TiO 2 :ZSM-5:silica gel:colloidal silica gel = 1:0.6:0.6:1) which giving about 90% degradation of 50 mg/L phenol solution in 180 min. The SNTZS exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than that of the commercial Degussa P25 which only gave 67% degradation. Its high photocatalytic activity was due to its large specific surface area (275.7 m 2 /g), small particle size (8.1 nm), high crystalline quality of the synthesized catalyst and low electron-hole pairs recombination rate as ZSM-5 adsorbent was used. The SNTZS photocatalyst synthesized in this study also has been proven to have an excellent adhesion and reusability.

  9. Kinetic study of adsorption and degradation of aniline, benzoic acid, phenol, and diuron in soil suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.H.; Lavy, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the effects of low temperature and accelerated soil-solution contact on soil adsorption of labile organic chemicals. The authors measured the kinetics of adsorption and degradation of 14 C-aniline, 14 C-benzoic acid, 14 C-phenol, and 14 C-diuron in the solution phase at 3 and 22 0 C. In the initial stages of reactions, the adsorption of all four chemicals was instantaneous at both temperatures under accelerated soil and solution mixing. A steady state was observed after the onset of equilibrium for the adsorption reaction for all compounds within 10 to 30 min. Its length varied according to the expected order of susceptibility to microbial degradation, i.e., diuron > aniline > phenol ≥ benzoate. It was apparent that the steady-state period without or in combination with low temperature could be advantageously used to obtain adsorption measurements in microbially active systems. A mechanistic sorption-catalyzed degradation model was evaluated to uncouple mathematically these processes. The model described satisfactorily the disappearance of labile chemicals in soil suspensions. Numerical analysis allowed the concurrent determination of adsorption, desorption, and biodegradation rate coefficients

  10. Identification and characterization of phenol hydroxylase from phenol-degrading Candida tropicalis strain JH8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yan; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Zhixiong; Cheng, Li

    2014-09-01

    The gene phhY encoding phenol hydroxylase from Candida tropicalis JH8 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene phhY contained an open reading frame of 2130 bp encoding a polypeptide of 709 amino acid residues. From its sequence analysis, it is a member of a family of flavin-containing aromatic hydroxylases and shares 41% amino acid identity with phenol hydroxylase from Trichosporon cutaneum. The recombinant phenol hydroxylase exists as a homotetramer structure with a native molecular mass of 320 kDa. Recombinant phenol hydroxylase was insensitive to pH treatment; its optimum pH was at 7.6. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 30 °C, and its activity was rapidly lost at temperatures above 60 °C. Under the optimal conditions with phenol as substrate, the K(m) and V(max) of recombinant phenol hydroxylase were 0.21 mmol·L(-1) and 0.077 μmol·L(-1)·min(-1), respectively. This is the first paper presenting the cloning and expression in E. coli of the phenol hydroxylase gene from C. tropicalis and the characterization of the recombinant phenol hydroxylase.

  11. Phenol Is the Initial Product Formed during Growth and Degradation of Bromobenzene by Tropical Marine Yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589 via an Early Dehalogenation Step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsal, Aakanksha A; Zinjarde, Smita S; RaviKumar, Ameeta

    2017-01-01

    Bromobenzene (BrB), a hydrophobic, recalcitrant organic compound, is listed by the environmental protection agencies as an environmental and marine pollutant having hepatotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic effects. The tropical marine yeast Yarrowia lipolytica 3589 was seen to grow aerobically on BrB and displayed a maximum growth rate (μ max ) of 0.04 h -1 . Furthermore, we also observed an increase in cell size and sedimentation velocity for the cells grown on BrB as compared to the glucose grown cells. The cells attached to the hydrophobic bromobenzene droplets through its hydrophobic and acid-base interactions. The BrB (0.5%, 47.6 mM) was utilized by the cells with the release of a corresponding amount of bromide (12.87 mM) and yielded a cell mass of 1.86 g/L after showing 34% degradation in 96 h. Maximum dehalogenase activity of 16.16 U/mL was seen in the cell free supernatant after 24 h of growth. Identification of metabolites formed as a result of BrB degradation, namely, phenol, catechol, cis, cis muconic acid, and carbon dioxide were determined by LC-MS and GC-MS. The initial attack on bromobenzene by Y. lipolytica cells lead to the transient accumulation of phenol as an early intermediate which is being reported for the first time. Degradation of phenol led to catechol which was degraded by the ortho- cleavage pathway forming cis, cis muconic acid and then to Krebs cycle intermediates eventually leading to CO 2 production. The study shows that dehalogenation via an extracellular dehalogenase occurs prior to ring cleavage with phenol as the preliminary degradative compound being produced. The yeast was also able to grow on the degradative products, i.e., phenol and catechol, to varying degrees which would be of potential relevance in the degradation and remediation of xenobiotic environmental bromoaromatic pollutants such as bromobenzene.

  12. Degradation behavior of carbon nanotubes/phenol-furfuryl alcohol multifunctional composites with aerospace application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conejo, L. S.; Costa, M. L.; Oishi, S. S.; Botelho, E. C.

    2017-10-01

    Lightweight and highly conductive composite associated with good impact and tribological properties could be used in the aerospace industry to replace metal for an aircraft skin and still provide effective shielding against electromagnetic interference (EMI). Also, phenol-furfuryl alcohol resins (PFA) are excellent candidates to replace existing thermoset matrices used for obtaining glassy carbon, both in its pure form and reinforced with nanoscale structures. The synthesis of PFA allow obtaining a resin with better properties than that showed by conventional phenolic resins and with synthesis and cure processes more controlled than observed for the furfuryl alcohol resin. This work has as main purpose the synthesis and thermal characterization of PFA resin and its nanostructured composites with different concentrations of carbon nanotubes (0, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 wt%). PFA resin was synthesized with 1:2:1 molar ratio of phenol/formaldehyde/furfuryl alcohol, according to the more appropriate condition obtained previously. The specimens were evaluated by thermogravimetry (TGA) to knowledge of the temperature of thermal degradation, either by actual analyses as simulated by simulation heating rate conversion software (known as Highway Simulation). The introduction of CNT in PFA sample does not affect its thermal stability. The values of residual weight found for samples with CNT additions are close to the values of the phenolic resin in the literature (about 60% residual weight).

  13. Degradation of 4-Chloro phenol by gamma radiation of 137Cs and X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez J, J. C.; Jimenez B, J.; Cejudo A, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of radiolytic degradation of 4-chloro phenol in the presence of TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 , using different radiation sources than 60 Co, which is so common in this type of experiment. The radiation sources used were X-rays with energy of 100 keV and radiation from 137 Cs (662 keV). After irradiation with a dose of 50 c Gy X-ray and TiO 2 obtained a degradation of about 5%, no degradation was obtained with 137 Cs source and other oxides. This may be due to the fact that X-rays have a linear energy transfer greater value, and in the case of TiO 2 present a crystalline structure, whereas the other two oxides are amorphous. Both characteristics result in better formation of a reactive species that allows the degradation of the compound. (Author)

  14. Degradation of Phenol via Phenylphosphate and Carboxylation to 4-Hydroxybenzoate by a Newly Isolated Strain of the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfobacterium anilini▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Young-Beom; Chae, Jong-Chan; Zylstra, Gerben J.; Häggblom, Max M.

    2009-01-01

    A sulfate-reducing phenol-degrading bacterium, strain AK1, was isolated from a 2-bromophenol-utilizing sulfidogenic estuarine sediment enrichment culture. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and DNA homology, strain AK1 is most closely related to Desulfobacterium anilini strain Ani1 (= DSM 4660T). In addition to phenol, this organism degrades a variety of other aromatic compounds, including benzoate, 2-hydroxybenzoate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, 4-hydroxyphenylacetate, 2-aminob...

  15. Microbial degradation of plant leachate alters lignin phenols and trihalomethane precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Brian A.; Hernes, Peter J.; Saraceno, John Franco; Spencer, Robert G.M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the importance of vascular plant-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in freshwater systems has been studied, the role of leached DOC as precursors of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment is not well known. Here we measured the propensity of leachates from four crops and four aquatic macrophytes to form trihalomethanes (THMs)—a regulated class of DBPs—before and after 21 d of microbial degradation. We also measured lignin phenol content and specific UV absorbance (SUVA254) to test the assumption that aromatic compounds from vascular plants are resistant to microbial degradation and readily form DBPs. Leaching solubilized 9 to 26% of total plant carbon, which formed 1.93 to 6.72 mmol THM mol C-1 However, leachate DOC concentrations decreased by 85 to 92% over the 21-d incubation, with a concomitant decrease of 67 to 92% in total THM formation potential. Carbon-normalized THM yields in the residual DOC pool increased by 2.5 times on average, consistent with the preferential uptake of nonprecursor material. Lignin phenol concentrations decreased by 64 to 96% over 21 d, but a lack of correlation between lignin content and THM yields or SUVA254 suggested that lignin-derived compounds are not the source of increased THM precursor yields in the residual DOC pool. Our results indicate that microbial carbon utilization alters THM precursors in ecosystems with direct plant leaching, but more work is needed to identify the specific dissolved organic matter components with a greater propensity to form DBPs and affect watershed management, drinking water quality, and human health.

  16. Fe1-xZnxS ternary solid solution as an efficient Fenton-like catalyst for ultrafast degradation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Liu, Yutang; Xia, Xinnian; Wang, Longlu; Dong, Wanyue

    2018-07-05

    Heterogeneous Fenton-like system has been proved to be an promising alternative to Fenton system due to its easy separation. However, it's a challenge to design heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts with high activity and great durability. Here, ternary solid solution Fe 1-x Zn x S were prepared via hydrothermal synthesis as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts. The Fe 0.7 Zn 0.3 S sample exhibited state of the art activity for yielding OH by H 2 O 2 decomposition, and the ultrafast degradation of phenol was achieved in 4 min at initial acidic condition under room temperature. The phenol degradation rate constant of Fe 0.7 Zn 0.3 S was 99 and 70 times of ZnS and FeS, respectively. Further, we show that the unique structural configuration of iron atoms, the formation of FeS 2 -pyrite with (200) plane, are responsible for the excellent activity. The intermediate products were identified by LC-MS and a possible pathway was accordingly proposed to elucidate the mechanism of phenol degradation by OH. Overall, this work provides an idea for the rational design of the relevant heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Technological Potential of Lactobacillus Strains Isolated from Fermented Green Olives: In Vitro Studies with Emphasis on Oleuropein-Degrading Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Iorizzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological properties of two strains of Lactobacillus plantarum (B3 and B11 and one of Lactobacillus pentosus (B4, previously isolated from natural fermented green olives, have been studied in vitro. Acidifying ability, salt, temperature, and pH tolerances of all strains were found in the range reported for similar strains produced in Italy and optimal growth conditions were found to be 6.0–8.0 pH, 15–30°C temperature, and less than 6% NaCl. Moreover, all strains showed very good tolerance to common olive phenol content (0.3% total phenol and high oleuropein-degrading capability. It was found that medium composition affected the bacterial oleuropein degradation. B11 strain grown in a nutrient-rich medium showed a lower oleuropein-degrading action than when it was cultivated in nutrient-poor medium. Furthermore, enzymatic activity assays revealed that oleuropein depletion did not correspond to an increase of hydroxytyrosol, evidencing that bacterial strains could efficiently degrade oleuropein via a mechanism different from hydrolysis.

  18. Fast gradient HPLC/MS separation of phenolics in green tea to monitor their degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šilarová, Petra; Česlová, Lenka; Meloun, Milan

    2017-12-15

    The degradation of catechins and other phenolics in green tea infusions were monitored using fast HPLC/MS separation. The final separation was performed within 2.5min using Ascentis Express C18 column (50mm×2.1mm i.d.) packed with 2μm porous shell particles. Degradation was studied in relation to the temperature of water (70, 80, 90°C) and the standing time of the infusion (up to 6h). Along with chromatographic separation, the antioxidant properties of the infusions were monitored using two spectrophotometric methods. During staying of green tea infusion, the degradation of some catechins probably to gallic acid was observed. Finally, the influence of tea bag storage on antioxidant properties of green tea was evaluated. Rapid degradation of antioxidants after 3weeks was observed. The principal component analysis, factor analysis and discriminant analysis were used for the statistical evaluation of obtained experimental data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characteristics of supported nano-TiO{sub 2}/ZSM-5/silica gel (SNTZS): Photocatalytic degradation of phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zainudin, Nor Fauziah; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Rahman, E-mail: chrahman@eng.usm.my [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2010-02-15

    Photocatalytic degradation of phenol was investigated using the supported nano-TiO{sub 2}/ZSM-5/silica gel (SNTZS) as a photocatalyst in a batch reactor. The prepared photocatalyst was characterized using XRD, TEM, FT-IR and BET surface area analysis. The synthesized photocatalyst composition was developed using nano-TiO{sub 2} as the photoactive component and zeolite (ZSM-5) as the adsorbents, all supported on silica gel using colloidal silica gel binder. The optimum formulation of SNTZS catalyst was observed to be (nano-TiO{sub 2}:ZSM-5:silica gel:colloidal silica gel = 1:0.6:0.6:1) which giving about 90% degradation of 50 mg/L phenol solution in 180 min. The SNTZS exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than that of the commercial Degussa P25 which only gave 67% degradation. Its high photocatalytic activity was due to its large specific surface area (275.7 m{sup 2}/g), small particle size (8.1 nm), high crystalline quality of the synthesized catalyst and low electron-hole pairs recombination rate as ZSM-5 adsorbent was used. The SNTZS photocatalyst synthesized in this study also has been proven to have an excellent adhesion and reusability.

  20. Application of a Novel Semiconductor Catalyst, CT, in Degradation of Aromatic Pollutants in Wastewater: Phenol and Catechol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble phenol and phenolic compounds were generally removed via advanced oxidation processes. A novel semiconductor catalyst, CT, was the first-time employed in the present study to degrade phenol and catechol. The phenolic compounds (initial concentration of 88 mg L−1 were completely mineralized by the CT catalytic nanoparticles (1% within 15 days, under acidic condition and with the presence of mild UV radiation (15 w, the emitted wavelength is 254 nm and the light intensity <26 μw/cm2. Under the same reaction condition, 1% TiO2 (mixture of rutile and anatase, nanopowder, <100 nm and H2O2 had lower removal efficiency (phenol: <42%; catechol: <60%, whereas the control (without addition of catalysts/H2O2 only showed <12% removal. The processes of phenol/catechol removal by CT followed pseudo-zero-order kinetics. The aromatic structures absorbed the UV energy and passed to an excited state, which the CT worked on. The pollutants were adsorbed on the CT’s surface and oxidized via charge-transfer and hydroxyl radical generation by CT. Given low initial concentrations, a circumstance encountered in wastewater polishing, the current set-up should be an efficient and less energy- and chemical-consumptive treatment method.

  1. Phenol Is the Initial Product Formed during Growth and Degradation of Bromobenzene by Tropical Marine Yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589 via an Early Dehalogenation Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakanksha A. Vatsal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bromobenzene (BrB, a hydrophobic, recalcitrant organic compound, is listed by the environmental protection agencies as an environmental and marine pollutant having hepatotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic effects. The tropical marine yeast Yarrowia lipolytica 3589 was seen to grow aerobically on BrB and displayed a maximum growth rate (μmax of 0.04 h-1. Furthermore, we also observed an increase in cell size and sedimentation velocity for the cells grown on BrB as compared to the glucose grown cells. The cells attached to the hydrophobic bromobenzene droplets through its hydrophobic and acid–base interactions. The BrB (0.5%, 47.6 mM was utilized by the cells with the release of a corresponding amount of bromide (12.87 mM and yielded a cell mass of 1.86 g/L after showing 34% degradation in 96 h. Maximum dehalogenase activity of 16.16 U/mL was seen in the cell free supernatant after 24 h of growth. Identification of metabolites formed as a result of BrB degradation, namely, phenol, catechol, cis, cis muconic acid, and carbon dioxide were determined by LC–MS and GC–MS. The initial attack on bromobenzene by Y. lipolytica cells lead to the transient accumulation of phenol as an early intermediate which is being reported for the first time. Degradation of phenol led to catechol which was degraded by the ortho- cleavage pathway forming cis, cis muconic acid and then to Krebs cycle intermediates eventually leading to CO2 production. The study shows that dehalogenation via an extracellular dehalogenase occurs prior to ring cleavage with phenol as the preliminary degradative compound being produced. The yeast was also able to grow on the degradative products, i.e., phenol and catechol, to varying degrees which would be of potential relevance in the degradation and remediation of xenobiotic environmental bromoaromatic pollutants such as bromobenzene.

  2. Implementation of ozonation process in degradation of the phenols present in petrochemistry effluents; Aplicacao do processo de ozonizacao na degradacao de fenois presentes em efluentes petroquimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Fernanda Batista de; Souza, Antonio Augusto Ulson de; Souza, Selene Maria Arruda Guelli Ulson de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The water contamination by the petrochemical pollutants with high toxicity, such as phenols, is a subject of interest of several researchers. The ozone is an alternative for the effluents treatment, being effective in environmental decontamination, reducing the COD and degrading the phenols. The ozone stability depends on the water pH, the type and content of organic matter. This study aimed to investigate in the phenol ozonation, evaluating the phenol and COD removal at different pHs. Ozone as injected in 5 L of phenol solution of 50 mg L-1 at pH = 2, 7 and 10, from 1 to 25 minutes, and then was measured the quantity of COD and phenol. It was found that in acid pH the ozone has increased the stability, because 82.19% of the ozone that enters in the column remains in solution. The phenol degradation was faster in alkaline solution (pH=10), where in 15 minutes of treatment, 99.7% of phenol was consumed. The COD removal increased from 7.3% in 6 minutes to 87.8% in 30 minutes, but the COD removal increases more slowly than that of phenol which was 53, 8% in 6 min, increasing to 99.2% at 25 min for pH=7. (author)

  3. Immobilization of Bacillus sp. in mesoporous activated carbon for degradation of sulphonated phenolic compound in wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekaran, G., E-mail: ganesansekaran@gmail.com [Environmental Technology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai-600 020 (India); Karthikeyan, S. [Environmental Technology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai-600 020 (India); Gupta, V.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee-247 667 (India); Department of Chemistry, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Boopathy, R.; Maharaja, P. [Environmental Technology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai-600 020 (India)

    2013-03-01

    Xenobiotic compounds are used in considerable quantities in leather industries besides natural organic and inorganic compounds. These compounds resist biological degradation and thus they remain in the treated wastewater in the unaltered molecular configurations. Immobilization of organisms in carrier matrices protects them from shock load application and from the toxicity of chemicals in bulk liquid phase. Mesoporous activated carbon (MAC) has been considered in the present study as the carrier matrix for the immobilization of Bacillus sp. isolated from Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) employed for the treatment of wastewater containing sulphonated phenolic (SP) compounds. Temperature, pH, concentration, particle size and mass of MAC were observed to influence the immobilization behavior of Bacillus sp. The percentage immobilization of Bacillus sp. was the maximum at pH 7.0, temperature 20 Degree-Sign C and at particle size 300 {mu}m. Enthalpy, free energy and entropy of immobilization were - 46.9 kJ mol{sup -1}, - 1.19 kJ mol{sup -1} and - 161.36 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1} respectively at pH 7.0, temperature 20 Degree-Sign C and particle size 300 {mu}m. Higher values of {Delta}H{sup 0} indicate the firm bonding of the Bacillus sp. in MAC. Degradation of aqueous sulphonated phenolic compound by Bacillus sp. immobilized in MAC followed pseudo first order rate kinetics with rate constant 1.12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} min{sup -1}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation on phenolic syntan using immobilized activated carbon as catalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bacillus sp. immobilized cell reactor removed all refractory organic loads. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The removal mechanism is due to co-metabolism between carbon and organisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The organics are completely metabolized rather than adsorption.

  4. Increased degradation of ATP is driven by memory regulatory T cells in kidney transplantation tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Maxim; Dubois, Florian; Dejou, Cécile; Durand, Eugénie; Danger, Richard; Chesneau, Mélanie; Brosseau, Carole; Guerif, Pierrick; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Degauque, Nicolas; Eliaou, Jean-François; Giral, Magali; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Brouard, Sophie

    2018-05-01

    Regulatory T cells were recently proposed as the central actor in operational tolerance after renal transplantation. Tolerant patients harbor increased FoxP3hi memory Treg frequency and increased demethylation in the Foxp3 Treg-specific demethylated region when compared to stable kidney recipients and exhibit greater memory Treg suppressive capacities and higher expression of the ectonucleotidase CD39. However, in this particular and unique situation the mechanisms of action of Tregs were not identified. Thus, we analyzed the ability of memory Tregs to degrade extracellular ATP in tolerant patients, healthy volunteers, and patients with stable graft function under immunosuppression and determined the role of immunosuppressive drugs on this process. The conserved proportion of memory Tregs leads to the establishment of a pro-tolerogenic balance in operationally tolerant patients. Memory Tregs in tolerant patients display normal capacity to degrade extracellular ATP/ADP. In contrast, memory Tregs from patients with stable graft function do not have this ability. Finally, in vitro, immunosuppressive drugs may favor the lower proportion of memory Tregs in stable patients, but they have no effect on CD39-dependent ATP degradation and do not explain memory Treg lack of extracellular ATP/ADP degradation ability. Thus, intrinsic active regulatory mechanisms may act long after immunosuppressive drug arrest in operationally tolerant patients and may contribute to kidney allograft tolerance via the maintenance of CD39 Treg function. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ruminal degradability of organic matter of varieties of drought tolerant Cenchrus purpureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Leonardo Ledea Rodríguez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The main limitation of tropical grasses is their high content of structural carbohydrates, which determine the use of grass by animals. When pastures or forages grow in adverse ecosystems there are important changes in the ruminal degradability of the compounds of interest. The objective was to characterize, at different ages of regrowth, the in situ ruminal degradability of the organic matter of different varieties of Cenchrus purpureus genetically improved to tolerate dry environments. Three drought tolerant varieties (CT-601, CT-603, and CT-605 were taken at different regrowth ages (60, 80, 100, and 120 days. Two fistulated Creole cows of 400 ± 50 kg of live weight were used. The bags were introduced in the rumen for 0, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours, the estimation of the rumen degradation was made fitting the data to the exponential equation (a + b * (1-e (-c * t. The best performance in situ ruminal degradability of the potentially degradable fraction (a + b of leaves was observed at the age of eighty days, while the effect of the degradation dynamics due to the effect of regrowth age was common for leaves and stems. Fraction degradation values did not exceed 10% for leaves and stems; however, the degradation of b showed values that exceeded 71% for leaves and 30% for stems. The new varieties showed a ruminal fermentation pattern close to 50%, characteristic of tropical grasses.

  6. Individual or synchronous biodegradation of di-n-butyl phthalate and phenol by Rhodococcus ruber strain DP-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhixing; Niu, Chengzhen; Lu, Zhenmei, E-mail: lzhenmei@zju.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • A Rhodococcus ruber strain degraded DBP and phenol. • Degradation kinetics of DBP or phenol fit modified first-order models. • Degradation interaction between DBP and phenol was studied by strain DP-2. • The degradation genes transcriptional were quantified by RT-qPCR. - Abstract: The bacterial strain DP-2, identified as Rhodococcus ruber, is able to effectively degrade di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and phenol. Degradation kinetics of DBP and phenol at different initial concentrations revealed DBP and phenol degradation to fit modified first-order models. The half-life of DBP degradation ranged from 15.81 to 27.75 h and phenol degradation from 14.52 to 45.52 h under the initial concentrations of 600–1200 mg/L. When strain DP-2 was cultured with a mixture of DBP (800 mg/L) and phenol (700 mg/L), DBP degradation rate was found to be only slightly influenced; however, phthalic acid (PA) accumulated, and phenol degradation was clearly inhibited during synchronous degradation. Transcriptional levels of degradation genes, phenol hydroxylase (pheu) and phthalate 3,4-dioxygenase (pht), decreased significantly more during synchronous degradation than during individual degradation. Quantitative estimation of individual or synchronous degradation kinetics is essential to manage mixed hazardous compounds through biodegradation in industrial waste disposal.

  7. Degradation of 4-Chloro phenol by gamma radiation of {sup 137}Cs and X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez J, J. C. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Jimenez B, J.; Cejudo A, J., E-mail: jaime.jimenez@inin.gob.m [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents results of radiolytic degradation of 4-chloro phenol in the presence of TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}, using different radiation sources than {sup 60}Co, which is so common in this type of experiment. The radiation sources used were X-rays with energy of 100 keV and radiation from {sup 137}Cs (662 keV). After irradiation with a dose of 50 c Gy X-ray and TiO{sub 2} obtained a degradation of about 5%, no degradation was obtained with {sup 137}Cs source and other oxides. This may be due to the fact that X-rays have a linear energy transfer greater value, and in the case of TiO{sub 2} present a crystalline structure, whereas the other two oxides are amorphous. Both characteristics result in better formation of a reactive species that allows the degradation of the compound. (Author)

  8. Degradation kinetics of peroxidase enzyme, phenolic content, and physical and sensorial characteristics in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. ssp. Italica) during blanching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Elsa M; Pinheiro, Joaquina; Alegria, Carla; Abreu, Marta; Brandão, Teresa R S; Silva, Cristina L M

    2009-06-24

    The effects of water blanching treatment on peroxidase inactivation, total phenolic content, color parameters [-a*/b* and hue (h degrees*)], texture (maximum shear force), and sensory attributes (color and texture, evaluated by a trained panel) of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. ssp. Italica) were studied at five temperatures (70, 75, 80, 85, and 90 degrees C). Experimental results showed that all studied broccoli quality parameters suffered significative changes due to blanching treatments. The vegetal total phenolic content showed a marked decline. Degradation on objective color and texture measurements and alterations in sensorial attributes were detected. Correlations between sensory and instrumental measurements have been found. Under the conditions 70 degrees C and 6.5 min or 90 degrees C and 0.4 min, 90% of the initial peroxidase activity was reduced. At these conditions, no significant alterations were detected by panelists, and a small amount of phenolic content was lost (ca. 16 and 10%, respectively). The peroxidase inactivation and phenolic content degradation were found to follow first-order reaction models. The zero-order reaction model showed a good fit to the broccoli color (-a*/b* and h degrees*), texture, and sensory parameters changes. The temperature effect was well-described by the Arrhenius law.

  9. Computational consideration on advanced oxidation degradation of phenolic preservative, methylparaben, in water: mechanisms, kinetics, and toxicity assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yanpeng [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); An, Taicheng, E-mail: antc99@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Fang, Hansun [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ji, Yuemeng; Li, Guiying [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Computational approach is effective to reveal the transformation mechanism of MPB. • MPB degradation was more dependent on the [{sup •} OH] than temperature during AOPs. • O{sub 2} could enhance MPB degradation, but more harmful products were formed. • The risks of MPB products in natural waters should be considered seriously. • The risks of MPB products can be overlooked in AOPs due to short half-time. - Abstract: Hydroxyl radicals ({sup •} OH) are strong oxidants that can degrade organic pollutants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The mechanisms, kinetics, and toxicity assessment of the {sup •} OH-initiated oxidative degradation of the phenolic preservative, methylparaben (MPB), were systematically investigated using a computational approach, as the supplementary information for experimental data. Results showed that MPB can be initially attacked by {sup •} OH via OH-addition and H-abstraction routes. Among these routes, the {sup •} OH addition to the C atom at the ortho-position of phenolic hydroxyl group was the most significant route. However, the methyl-H-abstraction route also cannot be neglected. Further, the formed transient intermediates, OH-adduct ({sup •} MPB-OH{sub 1}) and dehydrogenated radical ({sup •} MPB(-H)α), could be easily transformed to several stable degradation products in the presence of O{sub 2} and {sup •} OH. To better understand the potential toxicity of MPB and its products to aquatic organisms, both acute and chronic toxicities were assessed computationally at three trophic levels. Both MPB and its products, particularly the OH-addition products, are harmful to aquatic organisms. Therefore, the application of AOPs to remove MPB should be carefully performed for safe water treatment.

  10. Degradation of formaldehyde at high concentrations by phenol-adapted Ralstonia eutropha closely related to pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Alireza; Vahabzadeh, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    The ability of the phenol-adapted Ralstonia eutropha to utilize formaldehyde (FD) as the sole source of carbon and energy was studied. Adaptation to FD was accomplished by substituting FD for glucose in a stepwise manner. The bacterium in the liquid test culture could tolerate concentrations of FD up to 900 mg L(-1). Degradation of FD was complete in 528 h at 30°C with shaking at 150 rpm (r = 1.67 mg L(-1) h(-1)), q = 0.035 g(FD) g(cell) (-1) h(-1). Substrate inhibition kinetics (Haldane and Luong equations) are used to describe the experimental data. At non-inhibitory concentrations of FD, the Monod equation was used. According to the Luong model, the values of the maximum specific growth rate (μ(max)), half-saturation coefficient (k(S)), the maximum allowable formaldehyde concentration (S(m)), and the shape factor (n) were 0.117 h(-1), 47.6 mg L(-1), 900 mg L(-1), and 2.2, respectively. The growth response of the test bacterium to consecutive FD feedings was examined, and the FD-adapted R. eutropha cells were able to degrade 1000 mg L(-1) FD in 150 h through 4 cycles of FD feeds. During FD degradation, formic acid metabolite was formed. Assimilation of FD, methanol, formic acid, and oxalate by the test bacterium was accompanied by the formation of a pink pigment. The carotenoid nature of the cellular pigment has been confirmed and the test bacterium appeared to be closely related to pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophs (PPFM). The extent of harm to soil exposed to biotreated wastewaters containing FD may be moderated due to the association between methylotrophic/oxalotrophic bacteria and plants.

  11. Quick photo-Fenton degradation of phenolic compounds by Cu/Al2O3-MCM-41 under visible light irradiation: small particle size, stabilization of copper, easy reducibility of Cu and visible light active material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Amaresh C; Nanda, Binita; Parida, K M; Das, Mira

    2013-01-14

    The present study reports the photo-Fenton degradation of phenolic compounds (phenol, 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol and 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol) in aqueous solution using mesoporous Cu/Al(2)O(3)-MCM-41 nanocomposite as a heterogeneous photo-Fenton-like catalyst. The in situ incorporation of mesoporous Al(2)O(3) (MA) into the framework of MCM-41 (sol-gel method) forms Al(2)O(3)-MCM-41 and wetness impregnation of Cu(II) on Al(2)O(3)-MCM-41 generates mesoporous Cu/Al(2)O(3)-MCM-41 composite. The effects of pH and H(2)O(2) concentration on degradation of phenol, 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol and 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol are studied. Kinetics analysis shows that the photocatalytic degradation reaction follows a first-order rate equation. Mesoporous 5 Cu/Al(2)O(3)-MCM-41 is found to be an efficient photo-Fenton-like catalyst for the degradation of phenolic compounds. It shows nearly 100% degradation in 45 min at pH 4. The combined effect of small particle size, stabilization of Cu(2+) on the support Al(2)O(3)-MCM-41, ease reducibility of Cu(2+) and visible light activeness are the key factors for quick degradation of phenolic compounds by Cu/Al(2)O(3)-MCM-41.

  12. Biodegradation of high concentrations of phenol by baker’s yeast in anaerobic sequencing batch reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Najafpoor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Phenol, as a pure substance, is used in many fields because of its disinfectant, germicidal, local anesthetic, and peptizing properties. Aqueous solutions of phenol are produced as waste in industries and discharged into the environment. Therefore, elevated concentrations of phenol may be found in air or water because of industrial discharge or the use of phenolic products. Method: The strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae used in this project were natural strains previously purchased from Razavy company. They were grown at 30°C on Petri plates containing yeast extract glucose (YGC and then purified by being spread onto new plates, and isolated colonies were obtained. These colonies provided the basis of selection. Prepared strains were applied in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs as first seed. The experiment conditions were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM. After the determined runs were performed using Design-Expert software, data were analyzed using mentioned software as well. Results: This study evaluated the capability of baker’s yeast to remove phenol in high concentrations. The tested strains showed excellent tolerance to phenol toxicity at concentrations up to 6100 mg/L. Study of the batch degradation process showed that the phenol removal rate could exceed 99.9% in 24 hours at a concentration of 1000 mg/L. The results showed catechol is the first intermediate product of phenol degradation. In survey results of the Design–Expert software, R2 and Adeq precision were 0.97 and 25.65, respectively. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that ASBR performs robustly under variable influent concentrations of inhibitory compounds. The high removal performance despite the high phenol concentration may be a result of reactor operating strategies. Based on the progressive increase of inlet phenol concentration, allowing for an enhanced biomass acclimation in a short time, results at the microbiological levels

  13. Enhanced tolerance to stretch-induced performance degradation of stretchable MnO2-based supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Huang, Yang; Meng, Wenjun; Zhu, Minshen; Xue, Hongtao; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-02-04

    The performance of many stretchable electronics, such as energy storage devices and strain sensors, is highly limited by the structural breakdown arising from the stretch imposed. In this article, we focus on a detailed study on materials matching between functional materials and their conductive substrate, as well as enhancement of the tolerance to stretch-induced performance degradation of stretchable supercapacitors, which are essential for the design of a stretchable device. It is revealed that, being widely utilized as the electrode material of the stretchable supercapacitor, metal oxides such as MnO2 nanosheets have serious strain-induced performance degradation due to their rigid structure. In comparison, with conducting polymers like a polypyrrole (PPy) film as the electrochemically active material, the performance of stretchable supercapacitors can be well preserved under strain. Therefore, a smart design is to combine PPy with MnO2 nanosheets to achieve enhanced tolerance to strain-induced performance degradation of MnO2-based supercapacitors, which is realized by fabricating an electrode of PPy-penetrated MnO2 nanosheets. The composite electrodes exhibit a remarkable enhanced tolerance to strain-induced performance degradation with well-preserved performance over 93% under strain. The detailed morphology and electrochemical impedance variations are investigated for the mechanism analyses. Our work presents a systematic investigation on the selection and matching of electrode materials for stretchable supercapacitors to achieve high performance and great tolerance to strain, which may guide the selection of functional materials and their substrate materials for the next-generation of stretchable electronics.

  14. Ammonia-modified graphene sheets decorated with magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles for the photocatalytic and photo-Fenton degradation of phenolic compounds under sunlight irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boruah, Purna K. [Advanced Materials Group, Materials Sciences and Technology Division, CSIR-North East Institute of Science & Technology, Jorhat 785006 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR) (India); Sharma, Bhagyasmeeta [Advanced Materials Group, Materials Sciences and Technology Division, CSIR-North East Institute of Science & Technology, Jorhat 785006 (India); Karbhal, Indrapal; Shelke, Manjusha V. [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR) (India); Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, Pune-11008, Maharashtra (India); Das, Manash R., E-mail: mnshrdas@yahoo.com [Advanced Materials Group, Materials Sciences and Technology Division, CSIR-North East Institute of Science & Technology, Jorhat 785006 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR) (India)

    2017-03-05

    Highlights: • Ammonia-modified graphene sheets decorated with magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • Photocatalytic and photo-Fenton degradation of phenolic compounds. • An excellent reusability of the nanocomposite was observed up to ten cycles. - Abstract: Synthesis of easily separable and eco-friendly efficient catalyst with both photocatalytic and photo-Fenton degradation properties is of great importance for environment remediation application. Herein, ammonia-modified graphene (AG) sheets decorated with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (AG/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) as a magnetically recoverable photocatalyst by a simple in situ solution chemistry approach. First, we have functionalized graphene oxide (GO) sheets by amide functional group and then Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) are doped onto the functionalized GO surface. The AG/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposite showed efficient photocatalytic activity towards degradation of phenol (92.43%), 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) (98%) and 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) (97.15%) within 70–120 min. Consequently, in case of photo-Fenton degradation phenomenon, 93.56% phenol, 98.76% 2-NP and 98.06% of 2-CP degradation were achieved within 50–80 min using AG/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposite under sunlight irradiation. The synergistic effect between amide functionalized graphene and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) enhances the photocatalytic activity by preventing the recombination rate of electron-hole-pair in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. Furthermore, the remarkable reusability of the AG/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposite was observed up to ten cycles during the photocatalytic degradation of these phenolic compounds.

  15. Bioelectricity generation from coconut husk retting wastewater in fed batch operating microbial fuel cell by phenol degrading microorganism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayashree, C.; Arulazhagan, P.; Adish Kumar, S.; Kaliappan, S.; Yeom, Ick Tae; Rajesh Banu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Dual chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) operated at fed batch mode for the treatment of retting wastewater has potently achieved both current generation and phenol removal. Hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the reactor was varied from 40 days to 10 days. COD (chemical oxygen demand) removal was 91% at 40 days HRT, with an initial COD concentration of 530 ± 50 g m −3 . Retting wastewater with an initial phenol concentration of 320 ± 60 g m −3 procured a highest phenol removal of 93% at 40 days HRT of the microbial fuel cell. Maximum power density of 362 mW m −2 was achieved using retting wastewater at HRT of 20 days with an internal resistance of 150 Ω in a dual chambered MFC. The bacterial strains in anode region, reported to be responsible for potential phenol removal, were identified as Ochrobactrum sp. RA1 (KJ408266), Ochrobactrum sp. RA2 (KJ408267) and Pesudomonas aeruginosa RA3 (KJ408268) using phylogenetic analysis. The study reveals that, dual chambered MFC effectively removed the phenol from retting wastewater along with power generation. - Highlights: • Maximum power density of 362 mW m −2 (150 Ω) was achieved at HRT of 20 days. • 91% COD removal and 93% phenol removal was observed at HRT of 40 days. • 25% coulombic efficiency was achieved in treatment of retting wastewater with MFC. • Phylogenetic analysis detect phenol degrading Ochrobactrum sp.RA1 in anode biofilm. • In addition, Ochrobactrum sp.RA2 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa RA3 were also isolated

  16. Sorption of phenol and phenol derivatives in hydrotalcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avina G, E.I.

    2002-01-01

    One of the main problems in Mexico and in the World is the waste water pollution of a great variety of industrial processes by organic compounds. Among those ones the phenol compounds which are highly toxic, refractories (to the chemical degradation) and poorly biodegradable. This is due in a large extent to the problem created by the accelerated increase in the environmental pollution in the cities and industrial centers. The phenol compounds are used in a great variety of industries such as the production of resins, plasticizers, antioxidants, pesticides, colourings, disinfectants, etc. These phenol compounds are specially harmful, since they have repercussions on the flora of plants of biological treatment of water affecting its operation. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the capacities of phenol detention and its derivatives in an hydrotalcite type compound and diminishing with it the presence in water, in this case, of solutions prepared in the laboratory. In order to analyse this elimination process was used a methodology based in the carrying out in batch experiments and in the elaboration of a sorption isotherm. It is worth pointing out that this work was realized at laboratory scale, at relatively high phenol concentration ratio. With the obtained results when the sorption properties are evaluated the calcined hydrotalcite (HTC) for detaining phenol and p-chloro phenol it was observed that it is detained greater quantity of p-chloro phenol than phenol in the HTC. The detention of these phenol compounds in the HTC is due to the memory effect by the hydrotalcite regeneration starting from the oxides which are formed by the burning material. (Author)

  17. Characterization of phenols biodegradation by compound specific stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xi; Gilevska, Tetyana; Wenzig, Felix; Hans, Richnow; Vogt, Carsten

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradation of phenol and alkylphenols has been described under both oxic and anoxic conditions. In the absence of molecular oxygen, the degradation of phenolic compounds is initiated by microorganisms through carboxylation, fumarate addition to the methyl moiety or anoxic hydroxylation of the methyl moiety. Comparatively, under aerobic condition, the initiation mechanisms are revealed to be monoxygenation or dihydroxylation for phenol and ring hydroxylation or methyl group oxidation for cresols. While several studies biochemically characterized the enzymes and reaction mechanisms in the relevant degradation pathways, isotope fractionation patterns were rarely reported possibly due to constraints in current analytical methods. In this study, the carbon isotope fractionation patterns upon the degradation of phenol and cresols by several strains were analyzed by using isotope ratio mass spectrometry connected with liquid chromatography (LC-IRMS). The corresponding enrichment factors for carbon (ƐC) have been obtained. Cresols degradation by various strains showed generally moderate carbon isotope fractionation patterns with notable differences. For p-cresol degradation, five strains were examined. The aerobic strain Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIMB8250 exploits ring hydroxylation by molecular oxygen as initial reaction, and a ƐC value of -1.4±0.2‰ was obtained. Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NCIMB 9867, an aerobic strain initiating cresols degradation via oxygen-dependent side chain hydroxylation, yielded a ƐC value of -2.3±0.2‰. Under nitrate-reducing conditions, Geobacter metallireducens DSM 7210 and Azoarcus buckelii DSM 14744 attacks p-cresol at the side chain by monohydroxylation using water as oxygen source; the two strains produced ƐC values of -3.6±0.4‰ and -2±0.1‰, accordingly. The sulfate-reducing Desulfosarcina cetonica DSM 7267 activating cresols by fumarate addition to the methyl moiety yielded ƐC values of -1.9±0.2‰ for p

  18. Bacterial removal of toxic phenols from an industrial effluent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... Chlorinated phenols, widely used in industries, are of growing concern owing to their high toxicity, .... phenol-degradation ability of bacterial isolate at the high phenol .... ed virtually no decrease in the respiratory response over.

  19. Copper tolerance mediated by polyphosphate degradation and low-affinity inorganic phosphate transport system in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo-Puertas, Mariana; Schurig-Briccio, Lici Ariane; Rodríguez-Montelongo, Luisa; Rintoul, María Regina; Rapisarda, Viviana Andrea

    2014-03-19

    Metal tolerance in bacteria has been related to polyP in a model in which heavy metals stimulate the polymer hydrolysis, forming metal-phosphate complexes that are exported. As previously described in our laboratory, Escherichia coli cells grown in media containing a phosphate concentration >37 mM maintained an unusually high polyphosphate (polyP) level in stationary phase. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the influence of polyP levels as the involvement of low-affinity inorganic phosphate transport (Pit) system in E. coli copper tolerance. PolyP levels were modulated by the media phosphate concentration and/or using mutants in polyP metabolism. Stationary phase wild-type cells grown in high phosphate medium were significantly more tolerant to copper than those grown in sufficient phosphate medium. Copper addition to tolerant cells induced polyP degradation by PPX (an exopolyphosphatase), phosphate efflux and membrane polarization. ppk-ppx- (unable to synthesize/degrade polyP), ppx- (unable to degrade polyP) and Pit system mutants were highly sensitive to metal even in high phosphate media. In exponential phase, CopA and polyP-Pit system would act simultaneously to detoxify the metal or one could be sufficient to safeguard the absence of the other. Our results support a mechanism for copper detoxification in exponential and stationary phases of E. coli, involving Pit system and degradation of polyP. Data reflect the importance of the environmental phosphate concentration in the regulation of the microbial physiological state.

  20. Ultrasound-assisted MnO2 catalyzed homolysis of peracetic acid for phenol degradation: The assessment of process chemistry and kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rokhina, E.V.; Makarova, K.; Lathinen, M.; Golovina, E.A.; As, van H.; Virkutyte, J.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of peracetic acid (PAA) and heterogeneous catalyst (MnO2) was used for the degradation of phenol in an aqueous solution in the presence of ultrasound irradiation (US). As a relevant source of free radicals (e.g. OH), peracetic acid was comprehensively studied by means of electron

  1. Bifunctional composite from spent "Cyprus coffee" for tetracycline removal and phenol degradation: Solar-Fenton process and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladipo, Akeem Adeyemi; Abureesh, Mosab Ali; Gazi, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    Removals of tetracycline and photocatalytic degradation of phenol by Fe3O4/coffee residue (MCC) were investigated. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Boehm titration were employed to characterize MCC. Artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed to predict the tetracycline (TC) concentration in the column effluent. Maximum tetracycline adsorption capacity of 285.6mg/g was observed in a batch system. High removal efficiency (87%) was obtained at 3.3mL/min flow rate, 8.0cm bed height and 50mg/L influent TC concentration in a column system. Complete degradation of phenol by solar-Fenton was attained at 60min irradiation time. Total organic carbon (TOC) removal increased to 63.3% in the presence of 1.0g/L MCC, 1.2g/L H2O2 and solar irradiation. MCC showed remarkable potential to remove antibiotics from wastewater even in the presence of heavy metal (Ni(2+)) via magnetic separation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Phenol Removal by a Novel Non-Photo-Dependent Semiconductor Catalyst in a Pilot-Scaled Study: Effects of Initial Phenol Concentration, Light, and Catalyst Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel non-photo-dependent semiconductor catalyst (CT was employed to degrade phenol in the present pilot-scaled study. Effect of operational parameters such as phenol initial concentration, light area, and catalyst loading on phenol degradation, was compared between CT catalyst and the conventional photocatalyst titanium dioxide. CT catalyst excelled titanium dioxide in treating and mineralizing low-level phenol, under both mild UV radiation and thunder conditions of nonphoton. The result suggested that CT catalyst could be applied in circumstances when light is not easily accessible in pollutant-carrying media (e.g., particles, cloudy water, and colored water.

  3. PREVENTION OF POLYURETHANE OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION WITH PHENOLIC-ANTIOXIDANTS COVALENTLY ATTACHED TO THE HARD SEGMENTS: STRUCTURE FUNCTION RELATIONSHIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachelek, Stanley J; Alferiev, Ivan; Ueda, Masako; Eckels, Edward C.; Gleason, Kevin T.; Levy, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative degradation of the polyurethane elastomeric (PU) components greatly reduces the efficacy of PU containing cardiovascular devices. Covalently appending the phenol-based antioxidant, 4-substituted 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol (DBP), to PU hard segments effectively reduced oxidative degradation of the PU in vivo and in vitro in prior studies by our group. In these experiments we analyze the contribution of the tethering molecule to the antioxidant capabilities of the DBP modified PU. Bromoalkylation chemistry was used to link DBP to the hard segment of the polyether polyurethane, Tecothane, via our original linker (PU-DBP), or variants containing side chains with 1 (PU-C-DBP) or 3 (PU-3C-DBP) carbons. Two additional DBP variants were fabricated in which the DBP group was appended to the alkyl chain via an oxygen atom (PU-O-DBP) or an amide linkage in the middle of the tether (PU-NHCO-DBP). All DBP variant films and unmodified control films were subject to oxidative degradation via 15 day immersion in a solution of 20% H2O2 + 0.1 M CoCl2. At the end of the oxidation protocol films were analyzed for the presence of oxidation related endpoints via scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurements and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All DBP containing variants resisted oxidation damage significantly better than the unmodified control PU. SEM analysis of oxidized PU-C-DBP and PU-O-DBP showed evidence of surface cracking consistent with oxidative degradation of the PU surfaces. Similarly there was a trend in increased ether cross-linking, a marker for oxidative degradation, in PU-C-DBP and PU-NHCO-DBP films. Consistent with these FTIR results, both PU-C-DBP and PU-NHCO-DBP had significant reductions in measured surface hydrophobicity as a result of oxidation. These data show for the first time that the choice of linker molecule significantly affects the efficiency of the linked phenolic antioxidant. PMID:20306526

  4. Novel electrode structure in a DBD reactor applied to the degradation of phenol in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Cabrera, Antonio; Peña-Eguiluz, Rosendo; López-Callejas, Régulo; Jaramillo-Sierra, Bethsabet; Valencia-Alvarado, Raúl; Rodríguez-Méndez, Benjamín; Muñoz-Castro, Arturo E.

    2017-07-01

    Phenol degradation experimental results are presented in a similar wastewater aqueous solution using a non-thermal plasma reactor in a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge. The novelty of the work is that one of the electrodes of the reactor has the shape of a hollow screw which shows an enhanced efficiency compared with a traditional smooth structure. The experimentation was carried out with gas mixtures of 90% Ar-10% O2, 80% Ar-20% O2 and 0% Ar-100% O2. After one hour of treatment the removal efficiency was 76%, 92%, and 97%, respectively, assessed with a gas chromatographic mass spectrometry technique. For both reactors used, the ozone concentration was measured. The screw electrode required less energy, for all gas mixtures, than the smooth electrode, to maintain the same ozone concentration. On the other hand, it was also observed that in both electrodes the electrical conductivity of the solution changed slightly from ˜0.0115 S m-1 up to ˜0.0430 S m-1 after one hour of treatment. The advantages of using the hollow screw electrode structure compared with the smooth electrode were: (1) lower typical power consumption, (2) the generation of a uniform plasma throughout the reactor benefiting the phenol degradation, (3) a relatively lower temperature of the aqueous solution during the process, and (4) the plasma generation length is larger.

  5. Phenols in anaerobic digestion processes and inhibition of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leven, Lotta; Nyberg, Karin; Korkea-aho, Lena; Schnuerer, Anna

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the presence of phenols in digestate from seven Swedish large-scale anaerobic digestion processes and their impact on the activity of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) in soil. In addition, the importance of feedstock composition and phenol degradation capacity for the occurrence of phenols in the digestate was investigated in the same processes. The results revealed that the content of phenols in the digestate was related to the inhibition of the activity of AOB in soil (EC 5 = 26 μg phenols g -1 d.w. soil). In addition, five pure phenols (phenol, o-, p-, m-cresol and 4-ethylphenol) inhibited the AOB to a similar extent (EC 5 = 43-110 μg g -1 d.w. soil). The phenol content in the digestate was mainly dependent on the composition of the feedstock, but also to some extent by the degradation capacity in the anaerobic digestion process. Swine manure in the feedstock resulted in digestate containing higher amounts of phenols than digestate from reactors with less or no swine manure in the feedstock. The degradation capacity of phenol and p-cresol was studied in diluted small-scale batch cultures and revealed that anaerobic digestion at mesophilic temperatures generally exhibited a higher degradation capacity compared to digestion at thermophilic temperature. Although phenol, p-cresol and 4-ethylphenol were quickly degraded in soil, the phenols added with the digestate constitute an environmental risk according to the guideline values for contaminated soils set by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. In conclusion, the management of anaerobic digestion processes is of decisive importance for the production of digestate with low amounts of phenols, and thereby little risks for negative effects of the phenols on the soil ecosystem

  6. A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical study of the hydroxylation of phenol and halogeneted derivatives by phenol hydroxylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, L.; Mulholland, A.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Vervoort, J.

    2000-01-01

    A combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method (AM1/CHARMM) was used to investigate the mechanism of the aromatic hydroxylation of phenol by a flavin dependent phenol hydroxylase (PH), an essential reaction in the degradation of a wide range of aromatic compounds. The model

  7. Polyphasic bacterial community analysis of an aerobic activated sludge removing phenols and thiocyanate from coke plant effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felfoldi, T.; Szekely, A.J.; Goral, R.; Barkacs, K.; Scheirich, G.; Andras, J.; Racz, A.; Marialigeti, K. [Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Microbiology

    2010-05-15

    Biological purification processes are effective tools in the treatment of hazardous wastes such as toxic compounds produced in coal coking. In this study, the microbial community of a lab-scale activated sludge system treating coking effluent was assessed by cultivation-based (strain isolation and identification, biodegradation tests) and culture-independent techniques (sequence-aided T-RFLP, taxon-specific PCR). The results of the applied polyphasic approach showed a simple microbial community dominated by easily culturable heterotrophic bacteria. Comamonas badia was identified as the key microbe of the system, since it was the predominant member of the bacterial community, and its phenol degradation capacity was also proved. Metabolism of phenol, even at elevated concentrations (up to 1500 mg/L), was also presented for many other dominant (Pseudomonas, Rhodanobacter, Oligella) and minor (Alcaligenes, Castellaniella, Microbacterium) groups, while some activated sludge bacteria (Sphingomonas, Rhodopseudomonas) did not tolerate it even in lower concentrations (250 mg/L). In some cases, closely related strains showed different tolerance and degradation properties. Members of the genus Thiobacillus were detected in the activated sludge, and were supposedly responsible for the intensive thiocyanate biodegradation observed in the system. Additionally, some identified bacteria (e.g. C. badia and the Ottowia-related strains) might also have had a significant impact on the structure of the activated sludge due to their floc-forming abilities.

  8. Radiation-induced degradation of organic pollutants in wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagyo, A.N.M.; Lindu, W.A.; Sadjirun, S.; Winarno, E.K.; Widayat, E.; Aryanti; Winarno, H.

    2001-01-01

    The degradation and decolouration of organic pollutants, i.e. dye stuffs and phenolic compounds, by gamma irradiation have been studied. First, samples from effluent of textile industry were taken to be irradiated at a certain condition. Irradiation was done after dissolving the samples five times with distilled water in laboratory scale, followed by upscaling those samples into 5 litre in volume. Irradiation was done at a dose of 0- 25 kGy, aerated and a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The parameters examined were the change of absorption spectra. COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand), the percentage of the degradation, the change of pH and degradation product using HPLC. It was demonstrated that the dilution of sample enhanced the degradation and decreased the COD values. The degradation product of textile wastewater is mainly oxalic acid. Second, the effects of radiation on aerated phenolic compounds mixture, i.e. resorcinol, o-cresol and m- cresol were done. Individual phenol was studied followed by mixture of the phenolic compounds. Irradiation was done in aerated condition with doses of 0-10 kGy, dose rate of 5 kGy/h and pH range from 3 to 12. The initial concentration of resorcinol, o-cresol and w-cresol were 50 ppm and 60 ppm for phenolic compounds mixture, respectively. Parameters examined were absorption spectrum, pH, and degradation products. The uv-vis absorption of the solution were observed before and after irradiation. HPLC was used to determine the products of degradation. Degradation of resorcinol, w-cresol and o-cresol could be achieved at dose of 6 kGy at pH 9, while o-cresol in acid condition (pH 3). The degree of degradation for resorcinol, w-cresol and o-cresol at above conditions were 90%, 88% and 45%, respectively. Degradation of phenolic compound mixture occurred at a dose of 7.5 kGy and pH 9', at this condition almost 99% of phenolic compounds degraded. Oxalic acid was the main degradation product. (author)

  9. Biodegradation of phenol by a newly isolated marine bacterial strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-26

    Dec 26, 2011 ... Full Length Research Paper. Biodegradation of phenol ... screen bacteria with potential for phenol degradation from sea water, mud and sand. .... poisonous compound media, such as phenol (Santos et al., 2001). For instance ...

  10. The reactivity of phenolic and non-phenolic residual kraft lignin model compounds with Mn(II)-peroxidase from Lentinula edodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestini, C; D'Annibale, A; Sermanni, G G; Saladino, R

    2000-02-01

    Three phenolic model compounds representing bonding patterns of residual kraft lignin were incubated with manganese peroxidase from Lentinula edodes. Extensive degradation of all the phenolic models, mainly occurring via side-chain benzylic oxidation, was observed. Among the tested model compounds the diphenylmethane alpha-5 phenolic model was found to be the most reactive, yielding several products showing oxidation and fragmentation at the bridging position. The non-phenolic 5-5' biphenyl and 5-5' diphenylmethane models were found unreactive.

  11. Potentialities of a Membrane Reactor with Laccase Grafted Membranes for the Enzymatic Degradation of Phenolic Compounds in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorleak Chea

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the degradation of phenolic compounds by laccases from Trametes versicolor in an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR. The enzymatic membranes were prepared by grafting laccase on a gelatine layer previously deposited onto α-alumina tubular membranes. The 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP was selected  from among the three different phenolic compounds tested (guaiacol, 4-chlorophenol and DMP to study the performance of the EMR in dead end configuration. At the lowest feed substrate concentration tested (100 mg·L−1, consumption increased with flux (up to 7.9 × 103 mg·h−1·m−2 at 128 L·h−1·m−2, whereas at the highest substrate concentration (500 mg·L−1, it was shown that the reaction was limited by the oxygen content.

  12. Extracellular laccase production and phenolic degradation by an olive mill wastewater isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Olive mill wastewater (OMWW presents a challenge to the control of effluents due to the presence of a high organic load, antimicrobial agents (monomeric-polymeric phenols, volatile acids, polyalcohols, and tannins, salinity and acidity. In this study, the production of extracellular laccase, monomeric or polymeric phenol, from an OMWW isolate based on its ability to biodegrade phenols and gallic acid as a model of phenolic compounds in OMWW was investigated. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S RNA gene sequences identified the bacterial isolate (Acinetobacter REY as being closest to Acinetobacter pittii. This isolate exhibited a constitutive production of extracellular laccase with an activity of 1.5 and 1.3 U ml/L when supplemented with the inducers CuSO4 and CuSO4+phenols, respectively. Batch experiments containing minimal media supplemented with phenols or gallic acid as the sole carbon and energy source were performed in order to characterize their phenolic biodegradability. Acinetobacter REY was capable of biodegrading up to 200 mg/L of phenols and gallic acid both after 10 h and 72 h, respectively.

  13. Immobilization of Bacillus sp. in mesoporous activated carbon for degradation of sulphonated phenolic compound in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekaran, G; Karthikeyan, S; Gupta, V K; Boopathy, R; Maharaja, P

    2013-03-01

    Xenobiotic compounds are used in considerable quantities in leather industries besides natural organic and inorganic compounds. These compounds resist biological degradation and thus they remain in the treated wastewater in the unaltered molecular configurations. Immobilization of organisms in carrier matrices protects them from shock load application and from the toxicity of chemicals in bulk liquid phase. Mesoporous activated carbon (MAC) has been considered in the present study as the carrier matrix for the immobilization of Bacillus sp. isolated from Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) employed for the treatment of wastewater containing sulphonated phenolic (SP) compounds. Temperature, pH, concentration, particle size and mass of MAC were observed to influence the immobilization behavior of Bacillus sp. The percentage immobilization of Bacillus sp. was the maximum at pH 7.0, temperature 20 °C and at particle size 300 μm. Enthalpy, free energy and entropy of immobilization were -46.9 kJ mol(-1), -1.19 kJ mol(-1) and -161.36 JK(-1)mol(-1) respectively at pH 7.0, temperature 20 °C and particle size 300 μm. Higher values of ΔH(0) indicate the firm bonding of the Bacillus sp. in MAC. Degradation of aqueous sulphonated phenolic compound by Bacillus sp. immobilized in MAC followed pseudo first order rate kinetics with rate constant 1.12 × 10(-2) min(-1). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Synergetic effect of Ag_2O as co-catalyst for enhanced photocatalytic degradation of phenol on N-TiO_2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Haipeng; Liu, Xinjuan; Liu, Junying; Li, Jinliang; Wu, Tianyang; Li, Haokun; Lei, Wenyan; Xu, Yan; Pan, Likun

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Ag_2O/N-TiO_2 composites were synthesized via a co-precipitation method for visible light photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutions with excellent photocatalytic activity. - Highlights: • Ag_2O/N-TiO_2 composites were synthesized via a facile precipitation method. • Ag_2O/N-TiO_2 composites exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity. • Ag_2O acts as co-catalyst to separate the photo-generated electron-hole pairs. - Abstract: A facile precipitation method was developed to synthesize the Ag_2O/N-TiO_2 composites. Their morphology, structure and photocatalytic performance in the degradation of methylene blue (MB) and phenol under visible light irradiation were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence spectroscopy and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the Ag_2O/N-TiO_2 composites exhibit excellent photocatalytic performance. The maximum degradation rates of MB and phenol are about 8.9 and 2.9 times that of pure N-TiO_2, respectively. The excellent photocatalytic performance is mainly ascribed to the synergetic effects of Ag_2O and N-TiO_2 including the increased light absorption and the reduced electron-hole pair recombination in N-TiO_2 with the presence of Ag_2O.

  15. Dynamics of Phenol Degrading-Iron ReducingBacteria{1mm in Intensive Rice Cropping System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate theeffects of cropping season, nitrogen fertilizer input and aeratedfallow on the dynamics of phenol degrading-iron reducingbacteria (PD-IRB) in tropical irrigated rice ({ Oryza sativa L.)systems. The PD-IRB population density was monitored at different stagesof rice growth in two cropping seasons (dry and early wet) in acontinuous annual triple rice cropping system under irrigated condition.In this system, the high nitrogen input (195 and 135 kg N ha-1 indry and wet seasons, respectively) plots and control plots receiving noN fertilizer were compared to investigate the effect of nitrogen rate onpopulation size. The phenol degrading-iron reducing bacteria (PD-IRB)were abundant in soils under cropping systems of tropical irrigatedrice. However, density of the bacterial populations varied with ricegrowth stages. Cropping seasons, rhizosphere, and aerated fallow couldaffect the dynamics of PD-IRB. In the field trial, viable counts ofPD-IRB in the topsoil layer (15 cm) ranged between 102 and 108cells per gram of dry soil. A steep increase in viable counts during thesecond half of the cropping season suggested that the population densityof PD-IRB increased at advanced crop-growth stages. Population growth ofPD-IRB was accelerated during the dry season compared to the wet season.In the greenhouse experiment, the adjacent aerated fallow revealed 1-2orders of magnitude higher in most probable number (MPN) of PD-IRB thanthe wet fallow treated plots. As a prominent group of Fe reducingbacteria, PD-IRB predominated in the rhizosphere of rice, since maximumMPN of PD-IRB (2.62108 g-1 soil) was found in rhizospheresoil. Mineral N fertilizer rates showed no significant effect on PD-IRBpopulation density.

  16. Methylene blue and 4-chloro phenol degradation by photo catalysis with ultraviolet light, using TiO2 as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez H, A.

    2010-01-01

    Within the decontamination and remediation processes of the contaminated waters, as the refining or tertiary processes are the Advanced Oxidation Technologies. Among this technology is the heterogeneous photo catalysis, which is the object of this work to de grate 4-chloro phenol and methylene blue, using as semiconductor commercial titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ). On the degradation the combination is exposed in the use of TiO 2 under gamma irradiation of 60 Co at different doses 400, 500, 800, 1000 and 1500 kGy. The organic compounds degradation was determined and the results show that to more radiation dose, the material is modified in such way that shows a major absorption of the organic compound, in the same way it is determined that to more dose which undergoes the TiO 2 generally a major degradation is observed, but also it is has to give a more time of previous stabilization, for that the degradation is observed of better way. (Author)

  17. Cellobiose Dehydrogenase Inhibition of Polymerization of Phenolic Compounds and Enhancing Lignin Degradation by Lignina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Liu, Wen; Gao, Pei-Ji

    1999-01-01

    The kinetic behavior of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) was investigated by steady-state initial velocity studies. Variation in the concentration of one substrate led to changes in K(m) and V(max) of the other substrate. The results were consistent with a ping-pong mechanism. In the presence of cellobiose, CDH could reduce many oxidized products catalyzed by soybean hull peroxidase (SHP). The oxidation product of 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT) catalyzed by SHP inactivated the enzyme itself however, CDH could prevent SHP from inactivation by reducing the oxidation product of HBT. CDH could also inhibit the polymerization of phenolic compounds catalyzed by SHP. It was found that the addition of CDH could enhance kraft pulp lignin degradation by ligninases.

  18. RESPONSE OF PHENOLIC METABOLISM INDUCED BY ALUMINIUM TOXICITY IN FAGOPYRUM ESCULENTUM MOENCH. PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, O E; Kosyan, A M; Kosyk, O I; Taran, N Yu

    2015-01-01

    Buckwheat genus (Fagopyrum Mill.) is one of the aluminium tolerant taxonomic units of plants. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the aluminium (50 μM effect on phenolic accumulation in various parts of buckwheat plants (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench). Detection of increasing of total phenolic content, changes in flavonoid and anthocyanin content and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity (PAL) were revealed over a period of 10 days of exposure to aluminium. The most significant effects of aluminium treatment on phenolic compounds accumulation were total phenolic content increasing (by 27.2%) and PAL activity rising by 2.5 times observed in leaves tissues. Received data could be helpful to understand the aluminium tolerance principles and relationships of phenolic compounds to aluminium phytotoxicity.

  19. DEGRADATION AND TOXICITY REDUCTION OF PHENOL BY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    Ultrasonic energy dissipated in the reactor was set at 2.5 W cm-2 through the calorimetric method. ... temperature-controlled condition of 22 ± 2 ºC and a 12/12 light-dark cycle. Culture ... Plot of Ln C/Co vs. time for sonodegradation of phenol.

  20. Influence of power supply on the generation of ozone and degradation of phenol in a surface discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yan; Shang, Kefeng; Duan, Lijuan; Li, Yue; An, Jiutao; Zhang, Chunyang; Lu, Na; Wu, Yan; Li, Jie

    2013-01-01

    A surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) reactor was utilized to degrade phenol in water. Different power supplies applied to the DBD reactor affect the discharge modes, the formation of chemically active species and thus the removal efficiency of pollutants. It is thus important to select an optimized power supply for the DBD reactor. In this paper, the influence of the types of power supplies including alternate current (AC) and bipolar pulsed power supply on the ozone generation in a surface discharge reactor was measured. It was found that compared with bipolar pulsed power supply, higher energy efficiency of O 3 generation was obtained when DBD reactor was supplied with 50Hz AC power supply. The highest O 3 generation was approximate 4 mg kJ −1 ; moreover, COD removal efficiency of phenol wastewater reached 52.3% after 3 h treatment under an AC peak voltage of 2.6 kV.

  1. Influence of power supply on the generation of ozone and degradation of phenol in a surface discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Shang, Kefeng; Duan, Lijuan; Li, Yue; An, Jiutao; Zhang, Chunyang; Lu, Na; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    A surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) reactor was utilized to degrade phenol in water. Different power supplies applied to the DBD reactor affect the discharge modes, the formation of chemically active species and thus the removal efficiency of pollutants. It is thus important to select an optimized power supply for the DBD reactor. In this paper, the influence of the types of power supplies including alternate current (AC) and bipolar pulsed power supply on the ozone generation in a surface discharge reactor was measured. It was found that compared with bipolar pulsed power supply, higher energy efficiency of O3 generation was obtained when DBD reactor was supplied with 50Hz AC power supply. The highest O3 generation was approximate 4 mg kJ-1 moreover, COD removal efficiency of phenol wastewater reached 52.3% after 3 h treatment under an AC peak voltage of 2.6 kV.

  2. Optimization of phenol biodegradation by efficient bacteria isolated from petrochemical effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahriari Moghadam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenol is an environmental pollutant present in industrial wastewaters such as refineries, coal processing and petrochemicals products. In this study three phenol degrading bacteria from Arak Petrochemical Complex effluent were isolated which consume phenol. Molecular analysis was used to identify bacteria and isolated bacteria were identified as Rhodococcus pyridinivorans (NS1, Advenella faeciporci (NS2 and Pseudomonas aeroginosa (NS3. Among the isolated strains, NS1 had the highest ability to degrade phenol. In order to observe the best yield in phenol biodegradation using NS1, optimization was performed using one factor at a time of experimental design to investigate the effect of four factors, including pH, temperature, phosphate and urea concentration. The optimal biodegradation condition through or tho pathway was pH = 8, urea = 1 g/L, temperature = 30°C and K2HPO4 = 0.5 g/L. Under the suggested condition, a biodegradation efficiency of 100% was achieved. Moreover, NS1 has shown growth and phenol degradation in concentrations between 250 to 2000 mg/L. In a nutshell, the results revealed thatphenol efficiently consumed by NS1 as the sole carbon source. Obviously, the isolate strain may be seen as an important tool in the bioremediation of wastewater effluent, petrochemical complex.

  3. Biodegradation of high strength phenolic wastewater in a modified external loop inversed fluidized bed airlift bioreactor (EIFBAB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aye, T. T.; Loh, K-C. [National University of Singapore, Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, (Singapore)

    2003-12-01

    Phenol degradation at high concentrations was investigated in both batch and continuous mode, using a modified external loop inversed fluidized bed airlift bioreactor (EIFBAB). It was found that the modified EIFBAB, when operated at five litres/hour was capable of degrading 3,000 mg/L phenol. Under continuous operation the bioreactor was capable of degrading up to 5,000 mg/L phenol, with gradual acclimatization of the biofilm on the expanded polystyrene beads. Response of the system under shock loading was also evaluated. Results showed that the system was able to absorb the shock well up to 5,000 mg/L phenol. Although phenol breakthrough was evident in the effluent beyond 4,500 mg/L., the increase in effluent phenol concentration was gradual, and the effluent concentration did not increase beyond 1,000 mg/L phenol. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  4. Oxidation Degradation Study And Use Of Phenol And Amina Antioxidant Compounds In Natural Rubber Cyclical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arofah Megasari Siregar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted research into the use of commercial antioxidants Irganox 1010 wingstay to inhibit the oxidative degradation of cyclic polymers of natural rubber and polypropylene nanocomposite with commercial montmorillonite PP MMT-Clay. Proces mixing nanocomposit PPMMT using commercial compatibiliser PP-g-MA PB3200 made in an internal mixer at a temperature of 180 C for 10 minutes and 65 rpm rotor speed. Hyndered phenol antioxidant effectiveness was analyzed using Fourier Transform Infra Red FTIR. Analysis of infrared is done by measuring the broad index absorption of the carbonyl group CO at a wavelength of 1700 cm-1 and a broad index uptake hydroxyl group at a wavelength of 3400 cm-1 before and after heated in an oven temperature of 125oC with variations in exposure time. The results indicate the use of antioxidant Irganox 1010 in nanocomposite PP MMT with a stabilizing factor of 5.5. Further commercial antioxidants will be used to restrain the rate of oxidation degradation of the natural rubber products cyclical CNR.

  5. Batch phenol biodegradation study and application of factorial experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hellal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATTC27853, was investigated for its ability to grow and to degrade phenol as solecarbon source, in aerobic batch culture. The parameters which affect the substrate biodegradation such as the adaptation ofbacteria to phenol, the temperature, and the nature of the bacteria were investigated. The results show that for a range oftemperature of 30 to 40°C, the best degradation of phenol for a concentration of 100mg/l was observed at 30°C. The regenerationof the bacterium which allows the reactivation of its enzymatic activity, shows that the degradation of 100 mg/ l ofsubstrate at 30° C required approximately 50 hours with revivified bacteria, while it only starts after 72 hours for those norevivified. Adapted to increasing concentrations, allows the bacteria to degrade a substrate concentration of about 400mg/l in less than 350 hours.A second part was consisted in the determination of a substrate degradation model using the factorial experiment design,as a function of temperature (30-40°C and of the size of the inoculums (260.88 - 521.76mg/ l. The results were analyzedstatistically using the Student’s t-test, analysis of variance, and F-test. The value of R2 (0.99872 and adjusted R2 (0.9962close to 1.0, verifies the good correlation between the observed and the predicted values, and provides the excellent relationshipbetween the independent variables (factors and the response (the time of the phenol degradation. F-value found above200, indicates that the considered model is statistically significant.

  6. Continuous phenol removal using Nocardia hydrocarbonoxydans in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shock load studies are essential to investigate the suitability of biocontactors in degradation of pollutants. In the present work, the degradation of phenol by immobilized Nocardia hydrocarbonoxydans in a spouted bed contactor was conducted. Granular activated carbon (GAC) and polymer beads were tested for the ...

  7. Degradation of phenol with using of Fenton-like Processes from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Yazdanbakhsh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenol is one of the serious pollutants from the chemical and petrochemical industries. This pollutant due to its convoluted structure is resistant to biodegradation. One of the methods that are useful to remove this pollutant is advanced oxidation (AOP. A laboratory scale study was done on a synthetic wastewater containing phenol. All experiments were done in batch conditions and effect of variables pH, amount of hydrogen peroxide, iron dosage, contact time and an initial concentration on the phenol removal were tested. The remaining phenol concentration was evaluated using the DR-5000 device. In order to effect of these parameters, the experiment was performance at pH 2 to 6, 5 to 45 ml/ml of peroxide, and time of 5 to 60 minutes with 2 to 15 g/ml iron (Fe˚. The optimum pH, the ratio of hydrogen, Fe˚and time were 3, 15 ml, 8g and 5 minutes respectively. Chemical oxygen demand (COD index was chosen as the parameter for evaluation in this study. Result showed that mineralization of phenol was not complete. The COD removal efficiency was obtained 71%. According to the results of this study, Fenton-like process can be used for conversion organic resistant compounds to other compounds with lower toxicity.

  8. Exploring the potential of high resolution mass spectrometry for the investigation of lignin-derived phenol substitutes in phenolic resin syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dier, Tobias K F; Fleckenstein, Marco; Militz, Holger; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2017-05-01

    Chemical degradation is an efficient method to obtain bio-oils and other compounds from lignin. Lignin bio-oils are potential substitutes for the phenol component of phenol formaldehyde (PF) resins. Here, we developed an analytical method based on high resolution mass spectrometry that provided structural information for the synthesized lignin-derived resins and supported the prediction of their properties. Different model resins based on typical lignin degradation products were analyzed by electrospray ionization in negative ionization mode. Utilizing enhanced mass defect filter techniques provided detailed structural information of the lignin-based model resins and readily complemented the analytical data from differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. Relative reactivity and chemical diversity of the phenol substitutes were significant determinants of the outcome of the PF resin synthesis and thus controlled the areas of application of the resulting polymers. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  9. High chemoselectivity in the phenol synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stephen K. Hashmi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to trap early intermediates of the gold-catalyzed phenol synthesis failed. Neither inter- nor intramolecularly offered vinyl groups, ketones or alcohols were able to intercept the gold carbenoid species. This indicates that the competing steps of the gold-catalyzed phenol synthesis are much faster than the steps of the interception reaction. In the latter the barrier of activation is higher. At the same time this explains the high tolerance of this very efficient and general reaction towards functional groups.

  10. In-liquid arc plasma jet and its application to phenol degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jing-Lin Lin

    2018-02-07

    We present a new method for achieving chemical reactions induced by plasmas with liquids—an in-liquid arc plasma jet system—designed to have a few advantages over the existing methods. High-speed imaging and optical emission spectroscopy were adopted to highlight the physical aspects of the in-liquid arc plasma jet system, and the feasibility of the system was investigated in a wastewater treatment case with phenol as the model contaminant. We found that the specific energy input is a reasonable parameter by which to characterize the overall process. The phenol removal reaction could be modeled as a pseudo-first-order reaction, and the reaction constant became smaller as the phenol concentration increased. However, complete decomposition of the phenol into water and carbon dioxide required very high energy because the final intermediate, oxalic acid, is relatively stable. Detailed chemical and physical analyses, including byproducts, ions, solution acidity, and conductivity, were conducted to evaluate this new method for use in the appropriate applications.

  11. Limited uptake, translocation and enhanced metabolic degradation contribute to glyphosate tolerance in Mucuna pruriens var. utilis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojano-Delgado, Antonia María; Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo; De Prado, Rafael; Luque de Castro, María Dolores; Franco, Antonio Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens, Fabaceae) plants exhibits an innate, very high resistance (i.e., tolerance) to glyphosate similar to that of plants which have acquired resistance to this herbicide as a trait. We analyzed the uptake of [(14)C]-glyphosate by leaves and its translocation to meristematic tissues, and used scanning electron micrographs to further analyze the cuticle and 3D capillary electrophoresis to investigate a putative metabolism capable of degrading the herbicide. Velvet bean exhibited limited uptake of glyphosate and impaired translocation of the compound to meristematic tissues. Also, for the first time in a higher plant, two concurrent pathways capable of degrading glyphosate to AMPA, Pi, glyoxylate, sarcosine and formaldehyde as end products were identified. Based on the results, the innate tolerance of velvet bean to glyphosate is possibly a result of the combined action of the previous three traits, namely: limited uptake, impaired translocation and enhanced degradation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Catalytic Ozonation of Phenolic Wastewater: Identification and Toxicity of Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Farzadkia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new strategy in catalytic ozonation removal method for degradation and detoxification of phenol from industrial wastewater was investigated. Magnetic carbon nanocomposite, as a novel catalyst, was synthesized and then used in the catalytic ozonation process (COP and the effects of operational conditions such as initial pH, reaction time, and initial concentration of phenol on the degradation efficiency and the toxicity assay have been investigated. The results showed that the highest catalytic potential was achieved at optimal neutral pH and the removal efficiency of phenol and COD is 98.5% and 69.8%, respectively. First-order modeling demonstrated that the reactions were dependent on the initial concentration of phenol, with kinetic constants varying from 0.038 min−1  ([phenol]o = 1500 mg/L to 1.273 min−1 ([phenol]o = 50 mg/L. Bioassay analysis showed that phenol was highly toxic to Daphnia magna (LC50 96 h=5.6 mg/L. Comparison of toxicity units (TU of row wastewater (36.01 and the treated effluent showed that TU value, after slightly increasing in the first steps of ozonation for construction of more toxic intermediates, severely reduced at the end of reaction (2.23. Thus, COP was able to effectively remove the toxicity of intermediates which were formed during the chemical oxidation of phenolic wastewaters.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Au/Pd Modified-TiO2 Photocatalysts for Phenol and Toluene Degradation under Visible Light—The Effect of Calcination Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Cybula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rutile loaded with Au/Pd nanoparticles was prepared using a water-in-oil microemulsion system of water/AOT/cyclohexane followed by calcination. The effect of calcination temperature (from 350 to 700°C on the structure of Au/Pd nanoparticles deposited at rutile matrix and the photocatalytic properties of Au/Pd-TiO2 was investigated in two model reactions (toluene degradation in gas phase and phenol degradation in aqueous phase. Toluene was irradiated over Au/Pd-TiO2 using light emitting diodes (LEDs, λmax⁡ = 415 nm. The sample 0.5 mol% Pd/TiO2 exhibited the highest activity under visible light irradiation in gas and aqueous phase reaction among all photocatalysts calcined at 350°C, while the sample modified only with gold nanoparticles showed the lowest activity. The Au/Pd-TiO2 sample calcinated at 350°C possesses the highest photocatalytic activity when degrading phenol under visible light, which is 14 times higher than that of the one calcinated at 450°C. It was observed that increasing temperature from 350 to 700°C during calcination step caused segregation of metals and finally resulted in photoactivity drop.

  14. Biological removal of phenol from wastewaters: a mini review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, N. V.; Anupama, S.; Navya, K.; Shalini, H. N.; Idris, M.; Hampannavar, U. S.

    2015-06-01

    Phenol and its derivatives are common water pollutants and include wide variety of organic chemicals. Phenol poisoning can occur by skin absorption, inhalation, ingestion and various other methods which can result in health effects. High exposures to phenol may be fatal to human beings. Accumulation of phenol creates toxicity both for flora and fauna. Therefore, removal of phenol is crucial to perpetuate the environment and individual. Among various treatment methods available for removal of phenols, biodegradation is environmental friendly. Biological methods are gaining importance as they convert the wastes into harmless end products. The present work focuses on assessment of biological removal (biodegradation) of phenol. Various factors influence the efficiency of biodegradation of phenol such as ability of the microorganism, enzymes involved, the mechanism of degradation and influencing factors. This study describes about the sources of phenol, adverse effects on the environment, microorganisms involved in the biodegradation (aerobic and anaerobic) and enzymes that polymerize phenol.

  15. Cometabolic degradation of ethyl mercaptan by phenol-utilizing Ralstonia eutropha in suspended growth and gas-recycling trickle-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Mahsa; Zamir, Seyed Morteza; Vahabzadeh, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    The degradability of ethyl mercaptan (EM), by phenol-utilizing cells of Ralstonia eutropha, in both suspended and immobilized culture systems, was investigated in the present study. Free-cells experiments conducted at EM concentrations ranging from 1.25 to 14.42 mg/l, showed almost complete removal of EM at concentrations below 10.08 mg/l, which is much higher than the maximum biodegradable EM concentration obtained in experiments that did not utilize phenol as the primary substrate, i.e. 2.5 mg/l. The first-order kinetic rate constant (kSKS) for EM biodegradation by the phenol-utilizing cells (1.7 l/g biomass/h) was about 10 times higher than by cells without phenol utilization. Immobilized-cells experiments performed in a gas recycling trickle-bed reactor packed with kissiris particles at EM concentrations ranging from 1.6 to 36.9 mg/l, showed complete removal at all tested concentrations in a much shorter time, compared with free cells. The first-order kinetic rate constant (rmaxKs) for EM utilization was 0.04 l/h for the immobilized system compared to 0.06 for the suspended-growth culture, due to external mass transfer diffusion. Diffusion limitation was decreased by increasing the recycling-liquid flow rate from 25 to 65 ml/min. The removed EM was almost completely mineralized according to TOC and sulfate measurements. Shut down and starvation experiments revealed that the reactor could effectively handle the starving conditions and was reliable for full-scale application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Diuron tolerance and potential degradation by pelagic microbiomes in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent E. Angly

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diuron is a herbicide commonly used in agricultural areas where excess application causes it to leach into rivers, reach sensitive marine environments like the Great Barrier Reef (GBR lagoon and pose risks to marine life. To investigate the impact of diuron on whole prokaryotic communities that underpin the marine food web and are integral to coral reef health, GBR lagoon water was incubated with diuron at environmentally-relevant concentration (8 µg/L, and sequenced at specific time points over the following year. 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiling revealed no significant short- or long-term effect of diuron on microbiome structure. The relative abundance of prokaryotic phototrophs was not significantly altered by diuron, which suggests that they were largely tolerant at this concentration. Assembly of a metagenome derived from waters sampled at a similar location in the GBR lagoon did not reveal the presence of mutations in the cyanobacterial photosystem that could explain diuron tolerance. However, resident phages displayed several variants of this gene and could potentially play a role in tolerance acquisition. Slow biodegradation of diuron was reported in the incubation flasks, but no correlation with the relative abundance of heterotrophs was evident. Analysis of metagenomic reads supports the hypothesis that previously uncharacterized hydrolases carried by low-abundance species may mediate herbicide degradation in the GBR lagoon. Overall, this study offers evidence that pelagic phototrophs of the GBR lagoon may be more tolerant of diuron than other tropical organisms, and that heterotrophs in the microbial seed bank may have the potential to degrade diuron and alleviate local anthropogenic stresses to inshore GBR ecosystems.

  17. Diuron tolerance and potential degradation by pelagic microbiomes in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantos, Olga; Morgan, Thomas C.; Rich, Virginia; Tonin, Hemerson; Bourne, David G.; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P.; Tyson, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    Diuron is a herbicide commonly used in agricultural areas where excess application causes it to leach into rivers, reach sensitive marine environments like the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon and pose risks to marine life. To investigate the impact of diuron on whole prokaryotic communities that underpin the marine food web and are integral to coral reef health, GBR lagoon water was incubated with diuron at environmentally-relevant concentration (8 µg/L), and sequenced at specific time points over the following year. 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiling revealed no significant short- or long-term effect of diuron on microbiome structure. The relative abundance of prokaryotic phototrophs was not significantly altered by diuron, which suggests that they were largely tolerant at this concentration. Assembly of a metagenome derived from waters sampled at a similar location in the GBR lagoon did not reveal the presence of mutations in the cyanobacterial photosystem that could explain diuron tolerance. However, resident phages displayed several variants of this gene and could potentially play a role in tolerance acquisition. Slow biodegradation of diuron was reported in the incubation flasks, but no correlation with the relative abundance of heterotrophs was evident. Analysis of metagenomic reads supports the hypothesis that previously uncharacterized hydrolases carried by low-abundance species may mediate herbicide degradation in the GBR lagoon. Overall, this study offers evidence that pelagic phototrophs of the GBR lagoon may be more tolerant of diuron than other tropical organisms, and that heterotrophs in the microbial seed bank may have the potential to degrade diuron and alleviate local anthropogenic stresses to inshore GBR ecosystems. PMID:26989611

  18. Diuron tolerance and potential degradation by pelagic microbiomes in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angly, Florent E; Pantos, Olga; Morgan, Thomas C; Rich, Virginia; Tonin, Hemerson; Bourne, David G; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Diuron is a herbicide commonly used in agricultural areas where excess application causes it to leach into rivers, reach sensitive marine environments like the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon and pose risks to marine life. To investigate the impact of diuron on whole prokaryotic communities that underpin the marine food web and are integral to coral reef health, GBR lagoon water was incubated with diuron at environmentally-relevant concentration (8 µg/L), and sequenced at specific time points over the following year. 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiling revealed no significant short- or long-term effect of diuron on microbiome structure. The relative abundance of prokaryotic phototrophs was not significantly altered by diuron, which suggests that they were largely tolerant at this concentration. Assembly of a metagenome derived from waters sampled at a similar location in the GBR lagoon did not reveal the presence of mutations in the cyanobacterial photosystem that could explain diuron tolerance. However, resident phages displayed several variants of this gene and could potentially play a role in tolerance acquisition. Slow biodegradation of diuron was reported in the incubation flasks, but no correlation with the relative abundance of heterotrophs was evident. Analysis of metagenomic reads supports the hypothesis that previously uncharacterized hydrolases carried by low-abundance species may mediate herbicide degradation in the GBR lagoon. Overall, this study offers evidence that pelagic phototrophs of the GBR lagoon may be more tolerant of diuron than other tropical organisms, and that heterotrophs in the microbial seed bank may have the potential to degrade diuron and alleviate local anthropogenic stresses to inshore GBR ecosystems.

  19. Synergetic effect of Ag{sub 2}O as co-catalyst for enhanced photocatalytic degradation of phenol on N-TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Haipeng [Institute of Coordination Bond Metrology and Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Liu, Xinjuan, E-mail: lxj669635@126.com [Institute of Coordination Bond Metrology and Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Liu, Junying [Research Center for Combustion and Environment Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Jinliang [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics & Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Materials Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Wu, Tianyang; Li, Haokun; Lei, Wenyan; Xu, Yan [Institute of Coordination Bond Metrology and Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Pan, Likun, E-mail: lkpan@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics & Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Materials Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Ag{sub 2}O/N-TiO{sub 2} composites were synthesized via a co-precipitation method for visible light photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutions with excellent photocatalytic activity. - Highlights: • Ag{sub 2}O/N-TiO{sub 2} composites were synthesized via a facile precipitation method. • Ag{sub 2}O/N-TiO{sub 2} composites exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity. • Ag{sub 2}O acts as co-catalyst to separate the photo-generated electron-hole pairs. - Abstract: A facile precipitation method was developed to synthesize the Ag{sub 2}O/N-TiO{sub 2} composites. Their morphology, structure and photocatalytic performance in the degradation of methylene blue (MB) and phenol under visible light irradiation were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence spectroscopy and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the Ag{sub 2}O/N-TiO{sub 2} composites exhibit excellent photocatalytic performance. The maximum degradation rates of MB and phenol are about 8.9 and 2.9 times that of pure N-TiO{sub 2}, respectively. The excellent photocatalytic performance is mainly ascribed to the synergetic effects of Ag{sub 2}O and N-TiO{sub 2} including the increased light absorption and the reduced electron-hole pair recombination in N-TiO{sub 2} with the presence of Ag{sub 2}O.

  20. Degradation of phenolic acids and relief of consecutive monoculture obstacle of rehmannia glutinosa by the combination of bacillus sp. and pichia pastoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, R.; Miao, Y.; Kang, C.

    2017-01-01

    Rehmannia glutinosa (R. glutinosa) is a high demand traditional Chinese medicine, but it suffers serious consecutive monoculture obstacle (CMO). The disability of root swelling is one of the negative impacts caused by the R. glutinosa CMO and is related to allelopathy exudates, such as phenolic acids. It is thought that a microbe agent could improve plant health by eliminating the unfavorable effect of allelopathy exudates. In previous research, we isolated two phenolic acid-degrading microbes from rhizosphere soil surrounding R. glutinosa. These were Bacillus sp. and Pichia pastoris. This study found that Bacillus sp. combined with Pichia pastoris could degrade 97.19% ferulic acid and 98.73% hydroxybenzoic acid over 15 days. R. glutinosa takes a long growth time (7-8 months) under field conditions. We set up a modified tissue culture model to rapidly detect whether Bacillus sp. and Pichia pastoris combination could relieve the CMO. The results showed that our tissue culture model effectively simulated the R. glutinosa growing process in unplanted or second-year monoculture field. Furthermore, the combination of Bacillus sp. and Pichia pastoris can significantly relieve the CMO-induced suppression of root swelling. All these results suggested that: 1) The combination of Bacillus sp. and Pichia pastoris has considerable potential to degrade allelopathy exudates and alleviate the CMO of R. glutinosa; 2) Our tissue culture model could be used to quickly screen effective microbes that could alleviate CMO in plants. (author)

  1. The regulation by phenolic compounds of soil organic matter dynamics under a changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyungjin; Freeman, Chris; Kang, Hojeong; Choi, Sung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Phenolics are the most abundant plant metabolites and are believed to decompose slowly in soils compared to other soil organic matter (SOM). Thus, they have often been considered as a slow carbon (C) pool in soil dynamics models. Here, however, we review changes in our concept about the turnover rate of phenolics and quantification of different types of phenolics in soils. Also, we synthesize current research on the degradation of phenolics and their regulatory effects on decomposition. Environmental changes, such as elevated CO2, warming, nitrogen (N) deposition, and drought, could influence the production and form of phenolics, leading to a change in SOM dynamics, and thus we also review the fate of phenolics under environmental disturbances. Finally, we propose the use of phenolics as a tool to control rates of SOM decomposition to stabilize organic carbon in ecosystems. Further studies to clarify the role of phenolics in SOM dynamics should include improving quantification methods, elucidating the relationship between phenolics and soil microorganisms, and determining the interactive effects of combinations of environmental changes on the phenolics production and degradation and subsequent impact on SOM processing.

  2. Bioassay of Phenol and its Intermediate Products Using Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Maleki

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenol is one of the most common compounds found in many industrial effluents such as petroleum refining and petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, paint and dye industries, organic chemicals manufacturing, etc. The contamination of bodies of water with phenol is a serious problem in terms of environmental considerations due to its high toxicity. In this study, toxicity of phenol and its degradation mixtures by sonochemical, photochemical, and photosonochemical processes were investigated. Toxicity assay tests were carried out using Daphnia magna as a bio-indicator. The sonochemical and photochemical experiments were carried out using a bath sonicator (500 W working at 35 and 130 kHz frequencies and with a 400 W medium pressure mercury lamp, respectively. Experiments were performed at initial concentrations of 100 mg L-1. Bioassay tests showed that phenol was toxic to D.magna and so resulted in quite low LC50 values. Comparison of toxicity units (TU between phenol and effluent toxicity showed that TU value for photosonochemical effluent was lower than that obtained for phenol, photochemical effluent, and sonochemical effluent. It was found that the toxicity unit of photochemical effluent was lower than that obtained for sonochemical effluent. According to the D.magna acute toxicity test, it is concluded that photosonolysis and photolysis are capable of decreasing the toxicity of by-products formed during the degradation of phenol aqueous solutions. Photosonic and photolytic processes can, therefore, be recommended as a potential approach to the treatment of phenolic wastewater.

  3. Isolation of the phe-operon from G. stearothermophilus comprising the phenol degradative meta-pathway genes and a novel transcriptional regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiss Monika

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacillus stearothermophilus is able to utilize phenol as a sole carbon source. A DNA fragment encoding a phenol hydroxylase catalyzing the first step in the meta-pathway has been isolated previously. Based on these findings a PCR-based DNA walk was performed initially to isolate a catechol 2,3-dioxygenase for biosensoric applications but was continued to elucidate the organisation of the genes encoding the proteins for the metabolization of phenol. Results A 20.2 kb DNA fragment was isolated as a result of the DNA walk. Fifteen open reading frames residing on a low-copy megaplasmid were identified. Eleven genes are co-transcribed in one polycistronic mRNA as shown by reverse transcription-PCR. Ten genes encode proteins, that are directly linked with the meta-cleavage pathway. The deduced amino acid sequences display similarities to a two-component phenol hydroxylase, a catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, a 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase, a 2-oxopent-4-dienoate hydratase, a 4-oxalocrotonate decarboxylase, a 4-hydroxy-2-oxovalerate aldolase, an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, a plant-type ferredoxin involved in the reactivation of extradiol dioxygenases and a novel regulatory protein. The only enzymes missing for the complete mineralization of phenol are a 2-hydroxymuconic acid-6-semialdehyde hydrolase and/or 2-hydroxymuconic acid-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase. Conclusion Research on the bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds on a sub-cellular level has been more intensively studied in gram-negative organisms than in gram-positive bacteria. Especially regulatory mechanisms in gram-positive (thermophilic prokaryotes remain mostly unknown. We isolated the first complete sequence of an operon from a thermophilic bacterium encoding the meta-pathway genes and analyzed the genetic organization. Moreover, the first transcriptional regulator of the phenol metabolism in gram-positive bacteria was identified. This is a first step to elucidate

  4. Effect of different concentrations of phenol on growth of some fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... refinery and petrochemical plants and other industries that produce ... Phenolic compounds degradation may be carried out by eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Aerobic biode- gradation of many classes of aromatic compounds is ... Phenol concentration was assayed in the wastewater collected from.

  5. Discriminated release of phenolic substances from red wine grape skins (Vitis vinifera L.) by multicomponent enzymes treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnous, Anis; Meyer, Anne S.

    2010-01-01

    Detailed insight into the effects of enzymatic treatments on grape phenolics is of significant importance for grape processing for wine making. This study examined the release of phenols during enzymatic (pectinolytic and cellulolytic) degradation of the cell wall polysaccharides in skins of Merlot...... the enzymatic treatment; phenolic acids, including hydroxybenzoic acids and hydroxycinnamic acids, were released as a function of monosaccharides liberation, i.e. as a function of the enzyme catalyzed cell wall degradation of the skins, and with some of the phenolic acids perhaps released from the lignin...

  6. Isolation and characterization of a novel nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium with high salinity tolerance: Micrococcus luteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunli; Qu, Baocheng; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Jing; Lu, Hong

    2009-06-15

    Strain Z3 was isolated from nitrobenzene-contaminated sludge. Strain Z3 was able to utilize nitrobenzene as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen and energy under aerobic condition. Based on the morphology, physiological biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA sequence, strain Z3 was identified as Micrococcus luteus. Strain Z3 completely degraded nitrobenzene with initial concentration of 100, 150, 200, and 250 mg L(-1) within 70, 96, 120 and 196 h, respectively. Kinetics of nitrobenzene degradation was described using the Andrews equation. The kinetic parameters were as follows: q(max)=1.19 h(-1), K(s)=29.11 mg L(-1), and K(i)=94.00 mg L(-1). Strain Z3 had a high salinity tolerance. It degraded 200 mg L(-1) nitrobenzene completely in 5% NaCl (w/w%). Strain Z3 therefore could be an excellent candidate for the bio-treatment of nitrobenzene industrial wastewaters with high salinity. This is the first report on the degradation of nitrobenzene by M. luteus and the degradation of nitrobenzene achieved in such a high salinity.

  7. Irradiation with benzene, toluene and phenol electron beams in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoyo O, E.L.; Lopez V, H.; Vazquez A, O.; Lizama S, B.E.; Garcia F, M.

    1998-01-01

    It is described a methodology for waste water treatment which is simulated doing a benzene-toluene-phenol mixture in aqueous solution. Three different concentrations of them ones were used which were irradiated with electron beams coming from a Pelletron Accelerator carrying out the degradation effect of these compounds in CO 2 and H 2 O. By mean of gas chromatography the analytical determinations were realized finding that in lower concentration of benzene and toluene performances of degradation higher than 95 % were obtained, but higher concentrations (100 ppm) the performance diminishes at 89 %, while for phenol in higher concentrations its degradation is over 60 % and in lower concentrations the degradation is under 80 %. The results are obtained with a constant irradiation time of 12 seconds and neutral pH. (Author

  8. Micellar solutions of PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymers for in situ phenol removal from fermentation broth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerema, L.D.; Cakali, D.; Roelands, C.P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Verdoes, D.; Keurentjes, J.

    2010-01-01

    The applicability of aqueous solutions of Pluronics for the removal of the model product phenol was evaluated. Phenol is a chemical that can be produced by a recombinant strain of the solvent tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12. However, the growth of the micro-organisms and the phenol

  9. Effects of fungal degradation on the CuO oxidation products of lignin: A controlled laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, John I.; Blanchette, Robert A.; Weliky, Karen; Devol, Allan H.

    1988-11-01

    Duplicate samples of birch wood were degraded for 0, 4, 8 and 12 weeks by the white-rot fungus, Phlebia tremellosus, and for 12 weeks by 6 other white-rot and brown-rot fungi. P. tremellosus caused progressive weight losses and increased the H/C and O/C of the remnant wood by preferentially degrading the lignin component of the middle lamellae. This fungus increased the absolute (weight loss-corrected) yield of the vanillic acid CuO reaction product above its initial level and exponentially decreased the absolute yields of all other lignin-derived phenols. Total yields of syringyl phenols were decreased 1.5 times as fast as total vanillyl phenol yields. Within both phenol families, aldehyde precursors were degraded faster than precursors of the corresponding ketones, which were obtained in constant proportion to the total phenol yield. Although two other white-rot fungi caused similar lignin compositional trends, a fourth white-rot species, Coriolus versicolor, simultaneously eroded all cell wall components and did not concentrate polysaccharides in the remnant wood. Wood degraded by the three brown-rot fungi exhibited porous cell walls with greatly reduced integrity. The brown-rot fungi also preferentially attacked syringyl structural units, but degraded all phenol precursors at a much slower rate than the white-rotters and did not produce excess vanillic acid. Degradation by P. tremellosus linearly increased the vanillic acid/vanillin ratio, (Ad/Al)v, of the remnant birch wood throughout the 12 week degradation study and exponentially decreased the absolute yields of total vanillyl phenols, total syringyl phenols and the syringyl/vanillyl phenol ratio, S/V. At the highest (Ad/Al)v of 0.50 (12 week samples), total yields of syringyl and vanillyl phenols were decreased by 65% and 80%, respectively, with a resulting reduction of 40% in the original S/V. Many of the diagenetically related compositional trends that have been previously reported for lignins in natural

  10. Simultaneous bond degradation and bond formation during phenol-formaldehyde curing with wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Bonding of wood using phenol–formaldehyde adhesive develops highly durable bonds. Phenol– formaldehyde is believed to form primary bonds with wood cell wall polymers (e.g., lignin). However, it is unclear how this adhesive interacts and bonds to lignin. Through wood solubilisation methodologies, earlywood and latewood bonded assemblies were characterized using two-...

  11. Enhanced degradation of phenolic compounds in coal gasification wastewater by a novel integration of micro-electrolysis with biological reactor (MEBR) under the micro-oxygen condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiwei; Han, Yuxing; Xu, Chunyan; Han, Hongjun; Ma, Wencheng; Zhu, Hao; Li, Kun; Wang, Dexin

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work was to study an integration of micro-electrolysis with biological reactor (MEBR) for strengthening removal of phenolic compounds in coal gasification wastewater (CGW). The results indicated MEBR achieved high efficiencies in removal of COD and phenolic compounds as well as improvement of biodegradability of CGW under the micro-oxygen condition. The integrated MEBR process was more favorable to improvement of the structural stability of activated sludge and biodiversity of specific functional microbial communities. Especially, Shewanella and Pseudomonas were enriched to accelerate the extracellular electron transfer, finally facilitating the degradation of phenolic compounds. Moreover, MEBR process effectively relieved passivation of Fe-C filler surface and prolonged lifespan of Fe-C filler. Accordingly, the synergetic effect between iron-carbon micro-electrolysis (ICME) and biological action played a significant role in performance of the integrated process. Therefore, the integrated MEBR was a promising practical process for enhancing CGW treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of Sonolysis, Photolysis, and Photosonolysis for the Degradation of Organic Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Maleki

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenol is one of the most common compounds found in the effluents of many industries such as petroleum refining and petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, paint and dye industries, organic chemicals manufacturing, etc. Due to the high toxicity of phenol, the contamination of bodies of water with this chemical is a serious problem for the environment and human health. In this study, the sonochemical, photochemical, and photosonochemical degradation of phenol in an aqueous solution were investigated. The sonochemical and photochemical experiments were carried out using a bath sonicator (500 W working at 35 and 130 kHz frequencies and a 400W medium pressure UV lamp. Experiments were performed at initial concentrations varying from 1 to 100 mg L-1. The effects of such parameters as pH, initial phenol concentration, and oxidation period have been determined. Results showed that the effects of ultrasound wave for phenol oxidation were mainly due to hydroxyl radical production during cavitation-induced water decomposition. However, low rates of sonochemical destruction of phenol in water solution obtained. In the sonochemical process, phenol underwent degradation at a faster rate at 130 kHz than 35 kHz. Besides, it was shown that reaction rates involving hydroxyl radicals (hydrogen peroxide formation and phenol oxidation had a maximum value at higher frequencies. The best yield was observed at 130 kHz for phenol degradation perhaps due to the greater availability of hydroxyl radical on the outer surface of cavitation bubbles. It was found that the rate of photochemical degradation of phenol was higher than sonochemical destruction. Also, the results showed that the combination of ultrasound wave and ultraviolet irradiation was considerably more effective than either ultrasound or ultraviolet light alone. Thus, based on the results of this study, the synergistic action of ultrasound and ultraviolet light is confirmed. This may be the result of

  13. Radiation induced decomposition of chlorinated phenols in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getoff, N.; Solar, S.

    Experiments with 4-Cl-phenol as a model compound for pesticides were performed under steady-state conditions using deoxygenated solutions as well as such saturated with air, oxygen or oxygen mixed with ozone. The yield of Cl -ions serviced as an indicator for the degradation process. As main products of the first step of decomposition were identified: polyhydroxybenzenes, aldehydes and acids. The yield of aldehydes was studied as a function of the absorbed dose and substrate concentration. In the presence of ozone a chain-reaction of the oxidative pollutant degradation takes place. Transient absorption spectra and kinetics obtained by preliminary pulse radiolysis studies of 4-Cl-phenol in the presence of oxygen as well as probable reaction mechanisms are also presented.

  14. Radiation induced decomposition of chlorinated phenols in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getoff, N.; Solar, S.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments with 4-Cl-phenol as a model compound for pesticides were performed under steady-state conditions using deoxygenated solutions as well as solutions saturated with air, oxygen or oxygen mixed with ozone. The yield of Cl - ions served as an indicator for the degradation process. As main products of the first step of decomposition were identified: polyhydroxybenzenes, aldehydes and acids. The yield of aldehydes was studied as a function of the absorbed dose and substrate concentration. In the presence of ozone a chain-reaction of the oxidative pollutant degradation takes place. Transient absorption spectra and kinetics obtained by preliminary pulse radiolysis studies of 4-Cl-phenol in the presence of oxygen as well as probable reaction mechanisms are also presented. (author)

  15. Effect of operational strategies on activated sludge’s acclimation to phenol, subsequent aerobic granulation, and accumulation of polyhydoxyalkanoates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wosman, Afrida; Lu, Yuhao; Sun, Supu; Liu, Xiang [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Yangpu District, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Wan, Chunli, E-mail: hitwan@163.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Yangpu District, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Zhang, Yi, E-mail: sybil_zhang@yahoo.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Yangpu District, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Lee, Duu-Jong [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tay, JooHwa [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Activated sludge was acclimated to phenol with 2 different strategies. • Acclimated sludge later underwent aerobic granulation process. • Sludge acclimated with phenol only degraded phenol and formed granules faster. • Sludge acclimated with phenol + acetate formed more stable and robust granules. • Both sludge exhibited significant PHA accumulation in early granulation stage. - Abstract: Aerobic granules, a relative novel form of microbial aggregate, are capable of degrading many toxic organic pollutants. Appropriate strategy is needed to acclimate seed sludge to the toxic compounds for successful granulation. In this study, two distinct strategies, i.e. mixed or single carbon sources, were experimented to obtain phenol-acclimated sludge. Their effects on reactor performance, biomass characteristics, microbial population and the granulation process were analyzed. Sludge fed with phenol alone exhibited faster acclimation and earlier appearance of granules, but possibly lower microbial diversity and reactor stability. Using a mixture of acetate and phenol in the acclimation stage, on the other hand, led to a reactor with slower phenol degradation and granulation, but eventual formation of strong and stable aerobic granules. In addition, the content of intracellular polyhydoxyakanoates (PHA) was also monitored, and significant accumulation was observed during the pre-granulation stage, where PHA >50% of dry weight was observed in both reactors.

  16. Effect of operational strategies on activated sludge’s acclimation to phenol, subsequent aerobic granulation, and accumulation of polyhydoxyalkanoates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wosman, Afrida; Lu, Yuhao; Sun, Supu; Liu, Xiang; Wan, Chunli; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Duu-Jong; Tay, JooHwa

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Activated sludge was acclimated to phenol with 2 different strategies. • Acclimated sludge later underwent aerobic granulation process. • Sludge acclimated with phenol only degraded phenol and formed granules faster. • Sludge acclimated with phenol + acetate formed more stable and robust granules. • Both sludge exhibited significant PHA accumulation in early granulation stage. - Abstract: Aerobic granules, a relative novel form of microbial aggregate, are capable of degrading many toxic organic pollutants. Appropriate strategy is needed to acclimate seed sludge to the toxic compounds for successful granulation. In this study, two distinct strategies, i.e. mixed or single carbon sources, were experimented to obtain phenol-acclimated sludge. Their effects on reactor performance, biomass characteristics, microbial population and the granulation process were analyzed. Sludge fed with phenol alone exhibited faster acclimation and earlier appearance of granules, but possibly lower microbial diversity and reactor stability. Using a mixture of acetate and phenol in the acclimation stage, on the other hand, led to a reactor with slower phenol degradation and granulation, but eventual formation of strong and stable aerobic granules. In addition, the content of intracellular polyhydoxyakanoates (PHA) was also monitored, and significant accumulation was observed during the pre-granulation stage, where PHA >50% of dry weight was observed in both reactors.

  17. Isolation and identification of phenol degrading bacteria from Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenol and its components are extremely toxic and can easily be isolated from different industrial sewage such as oil refinery, petrochemical industry and mines, especially collier and chemical factories. Hence the presence of these compounds in the environment could cause environmental pollution, especially in water ...

  18. Substrate inhibition kinetics of phenol degradation by binary mixed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Steady states of a continuous culture with an inhibitory substrate were used to estimate kinetic parameters under substrate limitation (chemo stat operation). Mixed cultures of an indigenous Pseudomonas fluorescence and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in continuous culture on phenol as the sole source of carbon ...

  19. Chemotaxis and degradation of organophosphate compound by a novel moderately thermo-halo tolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain BUR11: evidence for possible existence of two pathways for degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Pailan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An organophosphate (OP degrading chemotactic bacterial strain BUR11 isolated from an agricultural field was identified as a member of Pseudomonas genus on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The strain could utilize parathion, chlorpyrifos and their major hydrolytic intermediates as sole source of carbon for its growth and exhibited positive chemotactic response towards most of them. Optimum concentration of parathion for its growth was recorded to be 200 ppm and 62% of which was degraded within 96 h at 37 °C. Growth studies indicated the strain to be moderately thermo-halo tolerant in nature. Investigation based on identification of intermediates of parathion degradation by thin layer chromatography (TLC, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, gas chromatography (GC and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS provided evidence for possible existence of two pathways. The first pathway proceeds via 4-nitrophenol (4-NP while the second proceeds through formation of 4-aminoparathion (4-APar, 4-aminophenol (4-AP and parabenzoquinone (PBQ. This is the first report of chemotaxis towards organophosphate compound by a thermo-halo tolerant bacterium.

  20. Sorption of phenol and phenol derivatives in hydrotalcite; Sorcion de fenol y derivados de fenol en hidrotalcita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avina G, E I

    2002-07-01

    One of the main problems in Mexico and in the World is the waste water pollution of a great variety of industrial processes by organic compounds. Among those ones the phenol compounds which are highly toxic, refractories (to the chemical degradation) and poorly biodegradable. This is due in a large extent to the problem created by the accelerated increase in the environmental pollution in the cities and industrial centers. The phenol compounds are used in a great variety of industries such as the production of resins, plasticizers, antioxidants, pesticides, colourings, disinfectants, etc. These phenol compounds are specially harmful, since they have repercussions on the flora of plants of biological treatment of water affecting its operation. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the capacities of phenol detention and its derivatives in an hydrotalcite type compound and diminishing with it the presence in water, in this case, of solutions prepared in the laboratory. In order to analyse this elimination process was used a methodology based in the carrying out in batch experiments and in the elaboration of a sorption isotherm. It is worth pointing out that this work was realized at laboratory scale, at relatively high phenol concentration ratio. With the obtained results when the sorption properties are evaluated the calcined hydrotalcite (HTC) for detaining phenol and p-chloro phenol it was observed that it is detained greater quantity of p-chloro phenol than phenol in the HTC. The detention of these phenol compounds in the HTC is due to the memory effect by the hydrotalcite regeneration starting from the oxides which are formed by the burning material. (Author)

  1. Habitat degradation correlates with tolerance to climate-change related stressors in the green mussel Perna viridis from West Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Carolin Charlotte; Huhn, Mareike; Ayu, Nurina; Bachtiar, Ramadian; von Juterzenka, Karen; Lenz, Mark

    2013-06-15

    It is unclear whether habitat degradation correlates with tolerance of marine invertebrates to abiotic stress. We therefore tested whether resistance to climate change-related stressors differs between populations of the green mussel Perna viridis from a heavily impacted and a mostly pristine site in West Java, Indonesia. In laboratory experiments, we compared their oxygen consumption and mortality under lowered salinity (-13 and -18 units, both responses), hypoxia (0.5 mg/l, mortality only) and thermal stress (+7 °C, mortality only). Mussels from the eutrophied and polluted Jakarta Bay showed a significantly smaller deviation from their normal oxygen consumption and higher survival rates when stressed than their conspecifics from the unaffected Lada Bay. This shows that human induced habitat degradation correlates with mussel tolerance to environmental stress. We discuss possible mechanisms - e.g. the selection of tolerant genotypes or habitat-specific differences in the nutritional status of the mussels - that could explain our observation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Particulate pollutants are capable to 'degrade' epicuticular waxes and to decrease the drought tolerance of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Juergen; Pariyar, Shyam

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution causes the amorphous appearance of epicuticular waxes in conifers, usually called wax 'degradation' or 'erosion', which is often correlated with tree damage symptoms, e.g., winter desiccation. Previous investigations concentrated on wax chemistry, with little success. Here, we address the hypothesis that both 'wax degradation' and decreasing drought tolerance of trees may result from physical factors following the deposition of salt particles onto the needles. Pine seedlings were sprayed with dry aerosols or 50 mM solutions of different salts. The needles underwent humidity changes within an environmental scanning electron microscope, causing salt expansion on the surface and into the epistomatal chambers. The development of amorphous wax appearance by deliquescent salts covering tubular wax fibrils was demonstrated. The minimum epidermal conductance of the sprayed pine seedlings increased. Aerosol deposition potentially 'degrades' waxes and decreases tree drought tolerance. These effects have not been adequately considered thus far in air pollution research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Total phenol content and antioxidant activity of water solutions of plant extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Kopjar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Water solutions of extracts were investigated for total phenol content, flavonoid content and antioxidant activity. Susceptibility to degradation of water solutions of plant extracts, under light and in the dark, during storage at room temperature was investigated in order to determine their stability prior to their application for fortification of food products. Large dispersion of total phenol (TP content in the investigated model solutions of selected extracts (olive leaves, green tea, red grape, red wine, pine bark PE 5:1, pine bark PE 95 %, resveratrol, ranging from 11.10 mg GAE/100 mL to 92.19 mg GAE/100 mL was observed. Consequently, large dispersion of total flavonoids (TF content (8.89 mg to 61.75 mg CTE/100 mL was also observed. Since phenols have been mostly responsible for antioxidant activity of extracts, in most cases, antioxidant activity followed the TP content. That was proven by estimation of correlation coefficient between the total phenol content and antioxidant activity. Correlation coefficients between investigated parameters ranged from 0.5749 to 0.9604. During storage of 5 weeks at room temperature loss of phenols and flavonoids occurred. Antioxidant activity decreased with the decrease of TP and TF content. Degradations of phenols and flavonoids were more pronounced in samples stored at light.

  4. Degradation of Chlorinated Aromatic Compounds in UASB Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nina; Hendriksen, Hanne Vang; Järvinen, Kimmo T.

    1995-01-01

    Data on anaerobic degradation of chloroaromatic compounds in Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactors (UASB-reactor) are presented and compared. Special attention is given to the metabolic pathways for degradation of chlorinated phenols by granular sludge. Results indicate that PCP can be degraded...

  5. Effect of surface Fe2O3 clusters on the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 for phenol degradation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Qiong; Leng, Wenhua; Li, Zhen; Xu, Yiming

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Surface modified TiO 2 with iron oxide clusters through adsorption and decomposition of a large Fe(III) complex shows an enhanced activity for phenol degradation in water under UV light. But it was only observed with the clusters in a small size and at very low coverage on anatase. Highlights: ► Iron oxide clusters are made by decomposition of a large Fe(III) complex on TiO 2 . ► The modified anatase shows an enhanced activity for phenol photodegradation. ► The composite catalyst is very stable during four repeated experiments. - Abstract: Surface modification of TiO 2 with Fe 2 O 3 clusters was made through chemisorption of ferric phthalocyaninetetracarboxylate onto TiO 2 , followed by sintering in air to remove organic moiety. Solid characterization with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and other techniques showed that ferric oxides were highly dispersed on TiO 2 as a noncrystallized cluster, while TiO 2 phases remained unchanged. For phenol degradation in aerated aqueous suspension, only the sample containing less than 0.3 at.% Fe was more active than bare TiO 2 under UV light, whereas no activity was found under visible light. As anatase thermally transferred into rutile, the Fe-containing catalyst became less active than bare TiO 2 , mainly ascribed to the increased size of Fe 2 O 3 clusters. In the presence of H 2 O 2 , all Fe-containing catalysts were more active than bare TiO 2 . Moreover, similar trend in activity among different catalysts was also observed with the formation of hydroxyl radicals, and with the generation of photocurrent measured under N 2 with Fe/TiO 2 electrode. Present work clearly shows that only Fe 2 O 3 clusters in a small size and at low coverage on TiO 2 are beneficial to the photocatalytic reaction, while excess iron oxide is detrimental. Possible mechanism is discussed in the text.

  6. Changes in Phenolic Compounds and Phytotoxicity of the Spanish-Style Green Olive Processing Wastewaters by Aspergillus niger B60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Eugenia; Tsimidou, Maria Z; Mantzouridou, Fani Th

    2018-05-16

    This study systematically investigated the degradation kinetics and changes in the composition of phenolic compounds in Spanish-style Chalkidiki green olive processing wastewaters (TOPWs) during treatment using Aspergillus niger B60. The fungal growth and phenol degradation kinetics were described sufficiently by the Logistic and Edward models, respectively. The maximum specific growth rate (2.626 1/d) and the maximum degradation rate (0.690 1/h) were observed at 1500 mg/L of total polar phenols, indicating the applicability of the process in TOPWs with a high concentration of phenolic compounds. Hydroxytyrosol and the other simple phenols were depleted after 3-8 days. The newly formed secoiridoid derivatives identified by HPLC-DAD-FLD and LC-MS are likely produced by oleoside and oleuropein aglycon via the action of fungal β-glucosidase and esterase. The treated streams were found to be less phytotoxic with reduced chemical oxygen demand by up to 76%. Findings will provide useful information for the subsequent treatment of residual contaminants.

  7. Sinalbin degradation products in mild yellow mustard paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paunović Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinalbin degradation products in mild yellow mustard paste were investigated. The analyzed material consisted of a mild yellow mustard paste condiment and ground white mustard seeds which were originally used in the mustard paste production process. The samples were extracted in a Soxhlet extraction system and analyzed by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS technique. The only sinalbin degradation product in ground mustard seeds was 2-(4-hydroxyphenylacetonitrile. The most abundant sinalbin degradation product in yellow mustard paste was 4-(hydroxymethylphenol. Other compounds identified in this sample were: 4-methyl phenol, 4-ethyl phenol, 4-(2-hydroxyethylphenol and 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl ethanoic acid.

  8. Phenolic compounds as indicators of drought resistance in shrubs from Patagonian shrublands (Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, M Celeste; Arslan, Idris; Reginato, Mariana A; Cenzano, Ana M; Luna, M Virginia

    2016-07-01

    Plants exposed to drought stress, as usually occurs in Patagonian shrublands, have developed different strategies to avoid or tolerate the lack of water during their development. Production of phenolic compounds (or polyphenols) is one of the strategies used by some native species of adverse environments to avoid the oxidative damage caused by drought. In the present study the relationship between phenolic compounds content, water availability and oxidative damage were evaluated in two native shrubs: Larrea divaricata (evergreen) and Lycium chilense (deciduous) of Patagonian shrublands by their means and/or by multivariate analysis. Samples of both species were collected during the 4 seasons for the term of 1 year. Soil water content, relative water content, total phenols, flavonoids, flavonols, tartaric acid esters, flavan-3-ols, proanthocyanidins, antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation were measured. According to statistical univariate analysis, L. divaricata showed high production of polyphenols along the year, with a phenolic compound synthesis enhanced during autumn (season of greatest drought), while L. chilense has lower production of these compounds without variation between seasons. The variation in total phenols along the seasons is proportional to the antioxidant capacity and inversely proportional to lipid peroxidation. Multivariate analysis showed that, regardless their mechanism to face drought (avoidance or tolerance), both shrubs are well adapted to semi-arid regions and the phenolic compounds production is a strategy used by these species living in extreme environments. The identification of polyphenol compounds showed that L. divaricata produces different types of flavonoids, particularly bond with sugars, while L. chilense produces high amount of non-flavonoids compounds. These results suggest that flavonoid production and accumulation could be a useful indicator of drought tolerance in native species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson

  9. Recovery of phenol of industrial wastewaters with NaCl treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, Iveth; Torres, Jesus; Hoyos Bibian

    2003-01-01

    A technique for phenol recovery from residual wastewater, which has been made in an empiric way in some local industries, is explored in this work. It was carried out an experimental design that takes into account the concentration of NaCl as the entrance variable and the phenol recovery percentage as the exit variable. The statistical analysis of data determined that the best operation point is 25 Celsius degrade, with a initial ph between 2 and 3, an initial concentration of 6% and 21,5% for phenol and NaCl respectively, achieving a phenol recovery of 79 % with a phenol concentration in the organic phase of 83%. Besides the experimental part some theories are exposed dealing with the separation of a no electrolyte and water by salt addition

  10. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hongzhu; Zhang Xinhai; Ma Qingliang; Wang Bo

    2009-01-01

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  11. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Hongzhu, E-mail: hzmachem@snnu.edu.cn [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Zhang Xinhai [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Ma Qingliang [Department of Applied Physics, College of Sciences, Taiyuan University of Technology, 030024 Taiyuan (China); Wang Bo [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China)

    2009-06-15

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  12. Radiation degradation of aromatic pollutants exit in wastewater and ph dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Takriti, S

    2002-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on the degradation of phenol (hydroxybenzene), resorcinol (1,3 dihydroxybenzen) and hydroquinone (1,4 dihydroxybenzen) exit in waste water was investigated. The concentrations of these pollutants as well as the irradiated solution ph were studied. The results showed that the phenol is very resistance against the radiation doses comparing the other phenol compounds. Phenol was also a product of radiolysis of resorcinol and hydroquinone. On the other hand, the acid phase of the irradiation sample increased the degradation rate of pollutants. Spectrophotometer (UV-VIS) and chromatography (HPLC) were used to monitor the analysis of the radiation product solution. The results illustrated the existing of many substances such as organic alcohol, aldehyde, ketone and acidic functional groups as a final radiation products. The degradation of benzene, monochlorobenzene (CB) and 1,2 dichlorobenzene (1,2 DCB) exit in waste water by gamma irradiation was investigated. The effect of the irradi...

  13. Fenton-like Degradation of Phenol Catalyzed by a Series of Fe-Containing Mixed Oxides Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhmoud, T. T.; Mahmoud, S. S.; Hammoudeh, A. Y.

    2018-02-01

    In our attempts to develop a solid catalyst to degrade organic pollutants in wastewater via the Fenton-like reaction, six Fe-containing mixed oxide systems were prepared by means of the sol-gel auto-combustion method to have the following stoichiometries: CuFe1.2O2.8, BaFe7.2O11.8, BaFe7.2Cu2O13.8, BaFe5.4V3O16.6, BaFe4.8Cu2V3O17.7 and Ag2Fe5.4V3O16.6. The prepared systems were thermally treated at 550°C, 650°C, 800°C and 1100°C, and then characterized by XRD to identify the present phases. The systems were tested with respect to their catalytic efficiency in the degradation of phenol (200 ppm) in water where CuFe1.2O2.8 was found to be the most reactive one (80% removal in 60 min). It showed thereby first-order kinetics and an enhanced behavior under irradiation with a 30-W LED light source. The positive role of irradiation was most obvious in the case of Ag2Fe5.4V3O16.6 in which almost complete conversion was achieved in 120 min compared to only 45% in the same period but without irradiation. However, increasing the temperature at which thermal treatment is performed was found to suppress the catalytic activity of the system. Due to their high efficiency and rather low leaching rates of constituents, CuFe1.2O2.8 or Ag2Fe5.4V3O16.6 seem to be very promising in the Fenton-like degradation of organic pollutants.

  14. Phenolic profile and fermentation patterns of different commercial gluten-free pasta during in vitro large intestine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetti, Gabriele; Lucini, Luigi; Chiodelli, Giulia; Giuberti, Gianluca; Gallo, Antonio; Masoero, Francesco; Trevisan, Marco

    2017-07-01

    The fate of phenolic compounds, along with short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production kinetics, was evaluated on six different commercial gluten-free (GF) pasta samples varying in ingredient compositions, focussing on the in vitro faecal fermentation after the gastrointestinal digestion. A general reduction of both total phenolics and reducing power was observed in all samples, together with a substantial change in phenolic profile over 24h of faecal fermentation, with differences among GF pasta samples. Flavonoids, hydroxycinnamics and lignans degraded over time, with a concurrent increase in low-molecular-weight phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic acids), alkylphenols, hydroxybenzoketones and tyrosols. Interestingly, discriminant analysis also identified several alkyl derivatives of resorcinol as markers of the changes in phenolic profile during in vitro fermentation. Furthermore, degradation pathways of phenolics by intestinal microbiota have been proposed. Considering the total SCFAs and butyrate production during the in vitro fermentation, different fermentation kinetics were observed among GF pasta post-hydrolysis residues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Insights into lignin degradation and its potential industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M; Solbiati, Jose O; Cann, Isaac K O

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulose is an abundant biomass that provides an alternative source for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. The depolymerization of the carbohydrate polymers in lignocellulosic biomass is hindered by lignin, which is recalcitrant to chemical and biological degradation due to its complex chemical structure and linkage heterogeneity. The role of fungi in delignification due to the production of extracellular oxidative enzymes has been studied more extensively than that of bacteria. The two major groups of enzymes that are involved in lignin degradation are heme peroxidases and laccases. Lignin-degrading peroxidases include lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), versatile peroxidase (VP), and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP). LiP, MnP, and VP are class II extracellular fungal peroxidases that belong to the plant and microbial peroxidases superfamily. LiPs are strong oxidants with high-redox potential that oxidize the major non-phenolic structures of lignin. MnP is an Mn-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of various phenolic substrates but is not capable of oxidizing the more recalcitrant non-phenolic lignin. VP enzymes combine the catalytic activities of both MnP and LiP and are able to oxidize Mn(2+) like MnP, and non-phenolic compounds like LiP. DyPs occur in both fungi and bacteria and are members of a new superfamily of heme peroxidases called DyPs. DyP enzymes oxidize high-redox potential anthraquinone dyes and were recently reported to oxidize lignin model compounds. The second major group of lignin-degrading enzymes, laccases, are found in plants, fungi, and bacteria and belong to the multicopper oxidase superfamily. They catalyze a one-electron oxidation with the concomitant four-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Fungal laccases can oxidize phenolic lignin model compounds and have higher redox potential than bacterial laccases. In the presence of redox mediators, fungal laccases can oxidize non-phenolic

  16. [Effect of phenolic ketones on ethanol fermentation and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinlong; Cheng, Yichao; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Junjun; Chen, Tingting; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Lignin degradation products are toxic to microorganisms, which is one of the bottlenecks for fuel ethanol production. We studied the effects of phenolic ketones (4-hydroxyacetophenone, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-acetophenone) derived from lignin degradation on ethanol fermentation of xylose and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis NLP31. Ethanol and the cellular fatty acid of yeast were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Results indicate that phenolic ketones negatively affected ethanol fermentation of yeast and the lower molecular weight phenolic ketone compound was more toxic. When the concentration of 4-hydroxyacetophenone was 1.5 g/L, at fermentation of 24 h, the xylose utilization ratio, ethanol yield and ethanol concentration decreased by 42.47%, 5.30% and 9.76 g/L, respectively, compared to the control. When phenolic ketones were in the medium, the ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (UFA/SFA) of yeast cells was improved. When 1.5 g/L of three aforementioned phenolic ketones was added to the fermentation medium, the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast cells increased to 3.03, 3.06 and 3.61, respectively, compared to 2.58 of the control, which increased cell membrane fluidity and instability. Therefore, phenolic ketones can reduce the yeast growth, increase the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast and lower ethanol productivity. Effectively reduce or remove the content of lignin degradation products is the key to improve lignocellulose biorefinery.

  17. Evaluation of sunlight induced structural changes and their effect on the photocatalytic activity of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} for the degradation of phenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslam, M. [Centre of Excellence in Environmental Studies (CEES), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Ismail, Iqbal M.I. [Centre of Excellence in Environmental Studies (CEES), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Salah, Numan [Centre of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Chandrasekaran, S. [Centre of Excellence in Environmental Studies (CEES), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Qamar, M.Tariq [Centre of Excellence in Environmental Studies (CEES), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Hameed, A., E-mail: afmuhammad@kau.edu.sa [Centre of Excellence in Environmental Studies (CEES), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); National Centre for Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • The interaction of UV photons of sunlight induces defects in V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. • The photon induced defects promotes the trapping and transfer of excited electrons. • The nature of the substituent at 2-position affects the degradation process. • The formation of the intermediates is influenced by the nature of substituents. • The released ions are subjected further transformation. - Abstract: Despite knowing the fact that vanadium pentoxide is slightly soluble in aqueous medium, its photocatalytic activity was evaluated for the degradation of phenol and its derivatives (2-hydroxyphenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2-aminophenol and 2-nitrophenol) in natural sunlight exposure. The prime objective of the study was to differentiate between the homogeneous and heterogeneous photocatalysis incurred by dissolved and undissolved V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in natural sunlight exposure. V{sub 2}O{sub 5} was synthesized by chemical precipitation procedure using Triton X-100 as morphology mediator and characterized by DRS, PLS, Raman, FESEM and XRD. A lower solubility of ∼5% per 100 ml of water at 23 °C was observed after calcination at 600 °C. The study revealed no contribution of the dissolved V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in the photocatalytic process. In sunlight exposure, V{sub 2}O{sub 5} powder exhibited substantial activity for the degradation, however, a low mineralization of phenolic substrates was observed. The initial low activity of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} followed by a sharp increase both in degradation and mineralization in complete spectrum sunlight exposure, was further investigated that revealed the decrease in the bandgap and the reduction in the particle size with the interaction of UV photons (<420 nm) as this effect was not observable in the exposure of visible region of sunlight. The role of the chemically different substituents attached to an aromatic ring at 2-positions and the secondary interaction of released ions during the degradation process with the reactive

  18. Trichloroethylene degradation by two independent aromatic-degrading pathways in Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134.

    OpenAIRE

    Harker, A R; Kim, Y

    1990-01-01

    The bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134(pJP4) degrades trichloroethylene (TCE) by a chromosomal phenol-dependent pathway and by the plasmid-encoded 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid pathway. The two pathways were independent and exhibited different rates of removal and capacities for quantity of TCE removed. The phenol-dependent pathway was more rapid (0.2 versus 0.06 nmol of TCE removed per min per mg of protein) and consumed all detectable TCE. The 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-dependent p...

  19. Response of low-strength phenol-acclimated activated sludge to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-07

    Oct 7, 2013 ... initial phenol concentration was above 630 mg∙ℓ−1, the degradation results were indicative of both ... industries, including petroleum refining, resin and plastics, ... by the mixed culture containing various bacteria with specific.

  20. Phenolic compounds in Ross Sea water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangrando, Roberta; Barbaro, Elena; Gambaro, Andrea; Barbante, Carlo; Corami, Fabiana; Kehrwald, Natalie; Capodaglio, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    Phenolic compounds are semi-volatile organic compounds produced during biomass burning and lignin degradation in water. In atmospheric and paleoclimatic ice cores studies, these compounds are used as biomarkers of wood combustion and supply information on the type of combusted biomass. Phenolic compounds are therefore indicators of paleoclimatic interest. Recent studies of Antarctic aerosols highlighted that phenolic compounds in Antarctica are not exclusively attributable to biomass burning but also derive from marine sources. In order to study the marine contribution to aerosols we developed an analytical method to determine the concentration of vanillic acid, vanillin, p-coumaric acid, syringic acid, isovanillic acid, homovanillic acid, syringaldehyde, acetosyringone and acetovanillone present in dissolved and particle phases in Sea Ross waters using HPLC-MS/MS. The analytical method was validated and used to quantify phenolic compounds in 28 sea water samples collected during a 2012 Ross Sea R/V cruise. The observed compounds were vanillic acid, vanillin, acetovanillone and p-coumaric acid with concentrations in the ng/L range. Higher concentrations of analytes were present in the dissolved phase than in the particle phase. Sample concentrations were greatest in the coastal, surficial and less saline Ross Sea waters near Victoria Land.

  1. Acclimation of aerobic-activated sludge degrading benzene derivatives and co-metabolic degradation activities of trichloroethylene by benzene derivative-grown aerobic sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizong; Yang, Qi; Bai, Zhiyong; Wang, Shidong; Wang, Yeyao; Nowak, Karolina M

    2015-01-01

    The acclimation of aerobic-activated sludge for degradation of benzene derivatives was investigated in batch experiments. Phenol, benzoic acid, toluene, aniline and chlorobenzene were concurrently added to five different bioreactors which contained the aerobic-activated sludge. After the acclimation process ended, the acclimated phenol-, benzoic acid-, toluene-, aniline- and chlorobenzene-grown aerobic-activated sludge were used to explore the co-metabolic degradation activities of trichloroethylene (TCE). Monod equation was employed to simulate the kinetics of co-metabolic degradation of TCE by benzene derivative-grown sludge. At the end of experiments, the mixed microbial communities grown under different conditions were identified. The results showed that the acclimation periods of microorganisms for different benzene derivatives varied. The maximum degradation rates of TCE for phenol-, benzoic acid-, toluene-, aniline- and chlorobenzene-grown aerobic sludge were 0.020, 0.017, 0.016, 0.0089 and 0.0047 mg g SS(-1) h(-1), respectively. The kinetic of TCE degradation in the absence of benzene derivative followed Monod equation well. Also, eight phyla were observed in the acclimated benzene derivative-grown aerobic sludge. Each of benzene derivative-grown aerobic sludge had different microbial community composition. This study can hopefully add new knowledge to the area of TCE co-metabolic by mixed microbial communities, and further the understanding on the function and applicability of aerobic-activated sludge.

  2. Effect of phenol on germination capacity and polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase and catalase activities in lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadić Vojin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO and antioxidant enzymes, peroxidase (POX and catalase (CAT during lettuce seed germination at different concentrations of phenol. Out of eleven varieties of lettuce, four were chosen according to their germination tolerance to phenol as follows: plants exhibiting high (Ljubljanska ledenka - LJL and Nansen - N and low toleranace (Little Gem - LG and Majska kraljica - MK. A decrease in germination efficiency after exposure to LD50 of phenol was determined for these four varieties. The effects of phenol treatment on POX, CAT and PPO activities were determined after 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 days of growth at LD50 concentrations. A trend of increased peroxidase activity was observed in seeds grown on LD50 of phenol compared to control seeds. A significant increase in CAT activity was observed at the beginning of treatment for MK, LG and N in seeds grown on phenol as well as in control seeds. A trend of increased PPO activity was observed in all control seeds. We also investigated the affinity of PPO for two different substrates that were used for the determination of enzyme activity. Our results show that LJL and N are the varieties most tolerant to growth on phenol. Here we report on the activities of their antioxidant enzymes and PPO during seed germination. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON173017

  3. Variable Levels of Tolerance to Water Stress (Drought and Associated Biochemical Markers in Tunisian Barley Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Dbira

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to its high tolerance to abiotic stress, barley (Hordeum vulgare is cultivated in many arid areas of the world. In the present study, we evaluate the tolerance to water stress (drought in nine accessions of “Ardhaoui” barley landraces from different regions of Tunisia. The genetic diversity of the accessions is evaluated with six SSR markers. Seedlings from the nine accessions are subjected to water stress by completely stopping irrigation for three weeks. A high genetic diversity is detected among the nine accessions, with no relationships between genetic distance and geographical or ecogeographical zone. The analysis of growth parameters and biochemical markers in the water stress-treated plants in comparison to their respective controls indicated great variability among the studied accessions. Accession 2, from El May Island, displayed high tolerance to drought. Increased amounts of proline in water-stressed plants could not be correlated with a better response to drought, as the most tolerant accessions contained lower levels of this osmolyte. A good correlation was established between the reduction of growth and degradation of chlorophylls and increased levels of malondialdehyde and total phenolics. These biochemical markers may be useful for identifying drought tolerant materials in barley.

  4. Solistatinol, a novel phenolic compactin analogue from Penicillium solitum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Lange, Lene; Schnorr, Kirk

    2007-01-01

    Solistatinol, a novel phenolic compactin analogue, has been isolated from Penicillium solitum using a UV-guided strategy. The structure and relative stereochemistry were determined by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The absolute stereochemistry was determined by chemical degradation...

  5. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs for Refinery Wastewater Treatment Contains High Phenol Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah Alif Nurul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum Refinery wastewater is characterized by a high phenol content. Phenol is toxic and resistant to biological processes for treatment of the petroleum refinery wastewater. The combination of an AOP and a biological process can be used for treatment of the refinery wastewater. It is necessary to conduct a study to determine the appropriate condition of AOP to meet the phenol removal level. Two AOP configurations were investigated: H2O2 / UV and H2O2 / UV / O3. From each process samples, COD, phenol and pH were measured. The oxidation was carried out until the targeted phenol concentration of treated effluent were obtained. The better result obtained by using process H2O2 / UV / O3 with the H2O2 concentration 1000 ppm. After 120 minutes, the final target has been achieved in which phenol concentration of 37.5 mg/L or phenol degradation of 93.75%.

  6. Characterization of degradation products from alkaline wet oxidation of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Ahring, B.K.; Schmidt, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    to their chemical structure, e.g. diacids (oxalic and succinic acids), furan aldehydes, phenol aldehydes, phenol ketones and phenol acids. Aromatic aldehyde formation was correlated to severe conditions with high temperatures and low pH. Apart from CO2 and water, carboxylic acids were the main degradation products...... degreesC with addition of 12 bar oxygen and 6.5 g l(-1) Na2CO3. At these conditions the hemicellulose fraction from 100 g straw consisted of soluble hemicellulose (16 g), low molecular weight carboxylic acids (11 g), monomeric phenols (0.48 g) and 2-furoic acid (0.01 g). Formic acid and acetic acid...... constituted the majority of degradation products (8.5 g). The main phenol monomers were 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin, syringaldehyde, acetosyringone (4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-acetophenone), vanillic acid and syringic acid, occurring in 0.04-0.12 g per 100 g straw concentrations. High lignin removal from...

  7. In-liquid arc plasma jet and its application to phenol degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jing-Lin Lin; Park, Hyun-Woo; Hamdan, Ahmad; Cha, Min

    2018-01-01

    of the phenol into water and carbon dioxide required very high energy because the final intermediate, oxalic acid, is relatively stable. Detailed chemical and physical analyses, including byproducts, ions, solution acidity, and conductivity, were conducted

  8. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  9. Recycling of phenolic compounds in Borneo's tropical peat swamp forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Catherine M; Lim, Yau Yan; Lim, Tse Yuen

    2018-02-07

    Tropical peat swamp forests (TPSF) are globally significant carbon stores, sequestering carbon mainly as phenolic polymers and phenolic compounds (particularly as lignin and its derivatives) in peat layers, in plants, and in the acidic blackwaters. Previous studies show that TPSF plants have particularly high levels of phenolic compounds which inhibit the decomposition of organic matter and thus promote peat accumulation. The studies of phenolic compounds are thus crucial to further understand how TPSF function with respect to carbon sequestration. Here we present a study of cycling of phenolic compounds in five forests in Borneo differing in flooding and acidity, leaching of phenolic compounds from senescent Macaranga pruinosa leaves, and absorption of phenolics by M. pruinosa seedlings. The results of the study show that total phenolic content (TPC) in soil and leaves of three species of Macaranga were highest in TPSF followed by freshwater swamp forest and flooded limestone forest, then dry land sites. Highest TPC values were associated with acidity (in TPSF) and waterlogging (in flooded forests). Moreover, phenolic compounds are rapidly leached from fallen senescent leaves, and could be reabsorbed by tree roots and converted into more complex phenolics within the leaves. Extreme conditions-waterlogging and acidity-may facilitate uptake and synthesis of protective phenolic compounds which are essential for impeded decomposition of organic matter in TPSF. Conversely, the ongoing drainage and degradation of TPSF, particularly for conversion to oil palm plantations, reverses the conditions necessary for peat accretion and carbon sequestration.

  10. Supercritical water oxidation of ion exchange resins: Degradation mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leybros, A.; Roubaud, A. [CEA Marcoule, DEN DTCD SPDE LFSM, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Guichardon, P. [Ecole Cent Marseille, F-13451 Marseille 20 (France); Boutin, O. [Aix Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS 6181, F-13545 Aix En Provence 4 (France)

    2010-07-01

    Spent ion exchange resins are radioactive process wastes for which there is no satisfactory industrial treatment. Supercritical water oxidation could offer a viable treatment alternative to destroy the organic structure of resins and contain radioactivity. IER degradation experiments were carried out in a continuous supercritical water reactor. Total organic carbon degradation rates in the range of 95-98% were obtained depending on operating conditions. GC-MS chromatography analyses were carried out to determine intermediate products formed during the reaction. Around 50 species were identified for cationic and anionic resins. Degradation of poly-styrenic structure leads to the formation of low molecular weight compounds. Benzoic acid, phenol and acetic acid are the main compounds. However, other products are detected in appreciable yields such as phenolic species or heterocycles, for anionic IERs degradation. Intermediates produced by intramolecular rearrangements are also obtained. A radical degradation mechanism is proposed for each resin. In this overall mechanism, several hypotheses are foreseen, according to HOO center dot radical attack sites. (authors)

  11. The role of humic and fulvic acids in the phototransformation of phenolic compounds in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calza, P.; Vione, D.; Minero, C.

    2014-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) are known to act as photosensitizers toward the transformation of pollutants in the surface layer of natural waters. This study focused on the role played by HS toward the transformation of xenobiotics in seawater, with the purpose of assessing the prevailing degradation routes. Phenol was chosen as model xenobiotic and its transformation was investigated under simulated sunlight in the presence of terrestrial or marine humic and fulvic acids, in pure water at pH 8, artificial seawater (ASW) or natural seawater (NSW). The following parameters were determined: (1) the phenol degradation rate; (2) the variation in HS concentration with irradiation time; (3) the production of transformation products; (4) the influence of iron species on the transformation process. Faster transformation of phenol was observed with humic acids (HA) compared to fulvic acids (SRFA), and transformation induced by both HA and SRFA was faster in ASW than that in pure water. These observations can be explained by assuming an interplay between different competing and sometimes opposite processes, including the competition between chloride, bromide and dissolved oxygen for reaction with HS triplet states. The analysis of intermediates formed in the different matrices under study showed the formation of several hydroxylated (hydroquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone, resorcinol) and condensed compounds (2,2′-bisphenol, 4,4′-bisphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol). Although 1,4-benzoquinone was the main transformation product, formation of condensed molecules was significant with both HA and SRFA. Experiments on natural seawater spiked with HS confirmed the favored formation of condensed products, suggesting a key role of humic matter in dimerization reactions occurring in saline water. - Highlights: • Phenol transformation in seawater can be photosensitized by humic substances. • Dimeric species are peculiar intermediates formed in the process. • Phenol degradation occurred faster with

  12. The role of humic and fulvic acids in the phototransformation of phenolic compounds in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calza, P., E-mail: paola.calza@unito.it; Vione, D.; Minero, C.

    2014-09-15

    Humic substances (HS) are known to act as photosensitizers toward the transformation of pollutants in the surface layer of natural waters. This study focused on the role played by HS toward the transformation of xenobiotics in seawater, with the purpose of assessing the prevailing degradation routes. Phenol was chosen as model xenobiotic and its transformation was investigated under simulated sunlight in the presence of terrestrial or marine humic and fulvic acids, in pure water at pH 8, artificial seawater (ASW) or natural seawater (NSW). The following parameters were determined: (1) the phenol degradation rate; (2) the variation in HS concentration with irradiation time; (3) the production of transformation products; (4) the influence of iron species on the transformation process. Faster transformation of phenol was observed with humic acids (HA) compared to fulvic acids (SRFA), and transformation induced by both HA and SRFA was faster in ASW than that in pure water. These observations can be explained by assuming an interplay between different competing and sometimes opposite processes, including the competition between chloride, bromide and dissolved oxygen for reaction with HS triplet states. The analysis of intermediates formed in the different matrices under study showed the formation of several hydroxylated (hydroquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone, resorcinol) and condensed compounds (2,2′-bisphenol, 4,4′-bisphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol). Although 1,4-benzoquinone was the main transformation product, formation of condensed molecules was significant with both HA and SRFA. Experiments on natural seawater spiked with HS confirmed the favored formation of condensed products, suggesting a key role of humic matter in dimerization reactions occurring in saline water. - Highlights: • Phenol transformation in seawater can be photosensitized by humic substances. • Dimeric species are peculiar intermediates formed in the process. • Phenol degradation occurred faster with

  13. Phenol oxidation by mushroom waste extracts: a kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigatto, Gisele; Lodi, Alessandra; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Converti, Attilio; da Silva, Regildo Marcio Gonçalves; Palma, Mauri Sérgio Alves

    2013-09-01

    Tyrosinase activity of mushroom extracts was checked for their ability to degrade phenol. Phenol oxidation kinetics was investigated varying temperature from 10 to 60 °C and the initial values of pH, enzyme activity and phenol concentration in the ranges 4.5-8.5, 1.43-9.54 U/mL and 50-600 mg/L, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters of phenol oxidation and tyrosinase reversible inactivation were estimated. Tyrosinase thermostability was also investigated through residual activity tests after extracts exposition at 20-50 °C, whose results allowed exploring the thermodynamics of enzyme irreversible thermoinactivation. This study is the first attempt to separate the effects of reversible unfolding and irreversible denaturation of tyrosinase on its activity. Extracts were finally tested on a real oil mill wastewater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. DENTINE CARIES: ACID-TOLERANT MICROORGANISMS AND ASPECTS ON COLLAGEN DEGRADATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, Anders Hedenbjörk

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is a common disease all over the world, despite the fact that it can be both effectively prevented and treated. It is driven by acids produced by oral microorganisms as a consequence of their metabolism of dietary carbohydrates. Given enough acid challenge, eventually the tooth enamel barrier will be broken down, and the carious lesion will extend into underlying hard tissue, forming a macroscopic cavity in the dentine. In comparison to biofilm on enamel, a dentine carious lesion provides a vastly different environment for the residing microorganisms. The environment influences the types and numbers of microorganisms that can colonize the dentine caries lesion. The overall aims for this thesis are to enumerate and further study microorganisms found in established dentine caries lesions and also to illuminate how host-derived proteolytic enzymes might contribute to this degradation, not only to better understand the caries process in dentine but also to find incitements for new methods to influence the natural progression of caries lesions. In Paper I, the numbers of remaining viable microorganisms after completed excavation using two excavation methods were investigated. Samples of carious dentine tissue were collected before and after excavation and cultivated on different agar media in different atmospheres. Analysis was performed by counting the number of colony-forming units (CFUs). Key findings: The number of remaining microorganisms after excavation was low for both methods, but some microorganisms always remained in the cavity floors even when the cavities were judged as caries free using normal clinical criteria. In Paper II, the acid tolerant microbiota in established dentine caries lesions was investigated. Samples were taken as in Paper I, but on three levels (superficial, center of lesion, floor of lesion after completed excavation). The samples were cultivated in anaerobic conditions on solid pH-selective agar media of different acidity

  15. Superoxide radical-mediated photocatalytic oxidation of phenolic compounds over Ag"+/TiO_2: Influence of electron donating and withdrawing substituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Jiadong; Xie, Yongbing; Han, Qingzhen; Cao, Hongbin; Wang, Yujiao; Nawaz, Faheem; Duan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A weak EWG benefited photocatalytic oxidation of phenols the most. • Phenolic compounds were dominantly oxidized by ·O_2"−, rather than ·OH, "1O_2 or h"+. • ·O_2"− preferred to nucleophilically attack EDG substituted phenols. • ·O_2"− more likely electrophilically attacked EWG substituted phenols. • ·O_2"− simultaneously nucleophilically and electrophilically assaulted p-chlorophenol. - Abstract: A comparative study was constructed to correlate the electronic property of the substituents with the degradation rates of phenolic compounds and their oxidation pathways under UV with Ag"+/TiO_2 suspensions. It was verified that a weak electron withdrawing substituent benefited photocatalytic oxidation the most, while an adverse impact appeared when a substituent was present with stronger electron donating or withdrawing ability. The addition of p-benzoquinone dramatically blocked the degradation, confirming superoxide radicals (·O_2"−) as the dominant photooxidant, rather than hydroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen or positive holes, which was also independent of the substituent. Hammett relationship was established based on pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics, and it revealed two disparate reaction patterns between ·O_2"− and phenolic compounds, which was further verified by the quantum chemical computation on the frontier molecular orbitals and Mulliken charge distributions of ·O_2"− and phenolic compounds. It was found that electron donating group (EDG) substituted phenols were more likely nucleophilically attacked by ·O_2"−, while ·O_2"− preferred to electrophilically assault electron withdrawing group (EWG) substituted phenols. Exceptionally, electrophilic and nucleophilic attack by ·O_2"− could simultaneously occur in p-chlorophenol degradation, consequently leading to its highest rate constant. Possible reactive positions on the phenolic compounds were also detailedly uncovered.

  16. Inhibition of dehydrogenase activity in petroleum refinery wastewater bacteria by phenolic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon C. Okpokwasili

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of phenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 4-bromophenol and 3,5-dimethylphenol on Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Escherichia species isolated from petroleum refinery wastewater was assessed via inhibition of dehydrogenase enzyme activity. At low concentrations, 2-nitrophenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 4-bromophenol and 3,5-dimethylphenol stimulated dehydrogenase activity and at sufficient concentrations, phenolic compounds inhibited dehydrogenase activities. Generally, phenol is less toxic than substituted phenols. Estimations of the degree of inhibition/stimulation of dehydrogenase activities showed significant dose-dependent responses that are describable by logistic functions. The toxicity thresholds varied significantly (P < 0.05 among the bacterial strains and phenolic compounds. The median inhibitory concentrations (IC50s ranged from 4.118 ± 0.097 mg.L-1 for 4-nitrophenol against Pseudomonas sp. DAF1 to 1407.997 ± 7.091 mg.L-1 for phenol against Bacillus sp. DISK1. This study suggested that the organisms have moderate sensitivity to phenols and have the potential to be used as indicators for assessment of chemical toxicity. They could also be used as catalysts for degradation of phenols in effluents.

  17. Assessment of active bacteria metabolizing phenolic acids in the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinguang; Wang, Xingxiang; Zhang, Taolin; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-12-01

    Phenolic acids can enhance the mycotoxin production and activities of hydrolytic enzymes related to pathogenicity of soilborne fungus Fusarium oxysporum. However, characteristics of phenolic acid-degrading bacteria have not been investigated. The objectives of this study were to isolate and characterize bacteria capable of growth on benzoic and vanillic acids as the sole carbon source in the peanut rhizosphere. Twenty-four bacteria were isolated, and the identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that pre-exposure to phenolic acids before sowing shifted the dominant culturable bacterial degraders from Arthrobacter to Burkholderia stabilis-like isolates. Both Arthrobacter and B. stabilis-like isolates catalysed the aromatic ring cleavage via the ortho pathway, and Arthrobacter isolates did not exhibit higher C12O enzyme activity than B. stabilis-like isolates. The culture filtrate of Fusarium sp. ACCC36194 caused a strong inhibition of Arthrobacter growth but not B. stabilis-like isolates. Additionally, Arthrobacter isolates responded differently to the culture filtrates of B. stabilis-like isolates. The Arthrobacter isolates produced higher indole acetic acid (IAA) levels than B. stabilis-like isolates, but B. stabilis-like isolates were also able to produce siderophores, solubilize mineral phosphate, and exert an antagonistic activity against peanut root rot pathogen Fusarium sp. ACCC36194. Results indicate that phenolic acids can shift their dominant culturable bacterial degraders from Arthrobacter to Burkholderia species in the peanut rhizosphere, and microbial interactions might lead to the reduction of culturable Arthrobacter. Furthermore, increasing bacterial populations metabolizing phenolic acids in monoculture fields might be a control strategy for soilborne diseases caused by Fusarium spp. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Phenolic compounds participating in mulberry juice sediment formation during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bo; Xu, Yu-Juan; Wu, Ji-Jun; Yu, Yuan-Shan; Xiao, Geng-Sheng

    The stability of clarified juice is of great importance in the beverage industry and to consumers. Phenolic compounds are considered to be one of the main factors responsible for sediment formation. The aim of this study is to investigate the changes in the phenolic content in clarified mulberry juice during storage. Hence, separation, identification, quantification, and analysis of the changes in the contents of phenolic compounds, both free and bound forms, in the supernatant and sediments of mulberry juice, were carried out using high performance liquid chromatographic system, equipped with a photo-diode array detector (HPLC-PDA) and HPLC coupled with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometric (HPLC-QTOF-MS/MS) techniques. There was an increase in the amount of sediment formed over the period of study. Total phenolic content of supernatant, as well as free phenolic content in the extracts of the precipitate decreased, whereas the bound phenolic content in the sediment increased. Quantitative estimation of individual phenolic compounds indicated high degradation of free anthocyanins in the supernatant and sediment from 938.60 to 2.30 mg/L and 235.60 to 1.74 mg/g, respectively. A decrease in flavonoids in the supernatant was also observed, whereas the contents of bound forms of gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, caffeic acid, and rutin in the sediment increased. Anthocyanins were the most abundant form of phenolics in the sediment, and accounted for 67.2% of total phenolics after 8 weeks of storage. These results revealed that phenolic compounds, particularly anthocyanins, were involved in the formation of sediments in mulberry juice during storage.

  19. Effects of phenolic acid structures on meadow hay digestibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, M.A.M.; Guedes, C.M.; Cone, J.W.; Gelder, van A.H.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Sequeira, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives were to evaluate effects of phenolic acid content and composition on the digestibility of six meadow hays from Northern Portugal. Digestibility was assessed by gas production, in vitro and in situ degradation methods. Four cows fed diets at energy maintenance were used for in situ

  20. Biodegradation of phenolic waste liquors in stirred-tank, packed-bed, and fluidized-bed bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, D W; Hancher, G W; Chilcote, D D; Scott, C D

    1978-11-01

    The biological degradation of phenolic scrub liquors similar to those that arise in coal conversion processes was studied for symbiotic bacterial populations contained in a continuously stirred tank bioreactor, a three-phase packed-bed bioreactor, and a three-phase, fluidized-bed bioreactor. The conversions of phenol compounds were comparable in the three-phase, packed-bed bioreactor and the continuously stirred tank bioreactor; however, the packed-bed bioreactor degradation rates were as much as twice those in the continuously stirred tank bioreactor, and packed-bed bioreactor retention times were as low as one- tenth those of the continuously stirred tank bioreactors (minimum time was 12 hours).

  1. An architecture for fault tolerant controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    degradation in the sense of guaranteed degraded performance. A number of fault diagnosis problems, fault tolerant control problems, and feedback control with fault rejection problems are formulated/considered, mainly from a fault modeling point of view. The method is illustrated on a servo example including......A general architecture for fault tolerant control is proposed. The architecture is based on the (primary) YJBK parameterization of all stabilizing compensators and uses the dual YJBK parameterization to quantify the performance of the fault tolerant system. The approach suggested can be applied...

  2. Radiation degradation of aromatic pollutants exit in wastewater and ph dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takriti, S.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on the degradation of phenol (hydroxybenzene), resorcinol (1,3 dihydroxybenzen) and hydroquinone (1,4 dihydroxybenzen) exit in waste water was investigated. The concentrations of these pollutants as well as the irradiated solution ph were studied. The results showed that the phenol is very resistance against the radiation doses comparing the other phenol compounds. Phenol was also a product of radiolysis of resorcinol and hydroquinone. On the other hand, the acid phase of the irradiation sample increased the degradation rate of pollutants. Spectrophotometer (UV-VIS) and chromatography (HPLC) were used to monitor the analysis of the radiation product solution. The results illustrated the existing of many substances such as organic alcohol, aldehyde, ketone and acidic functional groups as a final radiation products. The degradation of benzene, monochlorobenzene (CB) and 1,2 dichlorobenzene (1,2 DCB) exit in waste water by gamma irradiation was investigated. The effect of the irradiated solution composition was studied. The results showed that the benzene is very resistance against the radiation doses comparing to other chlorobenzene. However, the existence of oxidizing substances in the irradiation phase leads to increase the degradation rate of pollutants. The dechlorination of CB and 1,2 DCB that is a result of the hydrated electron reaction with studied compounds was observed. Chromatography (HPLC) and spectrophotometer (UV-VIS) were used to monitor the analysis of the radiation product solution. The results illustrated the existing of many species as a final radiation product. On the other, the irradiation phase containing scavengers such as methanol and ethanol requires large doses to decompose the pollutants, while the oxidizing phase accelerates the degradation. (author)

  3. Optimization of chloroxylenol degradation by Aspergillus niger using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chloroxylenol is a very toxic phenolic derivative and it represents potential hazard towards human health and to the environment. Aspergillus niger, local isolate, is an efficient fungus to degrade 99.72% of 2 mg/L of chloroxylenol after 7 days of fermentation. It also has a high capacity to degrade 91.83% of higher ...

  4. Comparison of the degradation of 14C-labeled DHP and corn stalk lignins by micro- and macrofungi and bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, K.; Trojanowski, J.

    1980-01-01

    To what extent and by which mode microfungi and bacteria from soil are able to degrade lignin have been investigated and their activity compared with those of white and brown rot Basidiomycetes. The experiments were made by means of specifically 14C-labeled DHPs prepared by polymerization of correspondingly labeled coniferyl alcohol. Also, a corn stalk material was used which was specifically labeled in the lignin part. This material was prepared by infusion of specifically labeled cinnamic acid compounds into growing maize plants. The potential of the organisms to degrade several specifically labeled phenols was determined and compared. White and brown rot fungi, as well as several microscopic fungi, were able to degrade phenolcarboxylic and cinnamic acids and even some phenolic compounds with completely alkylated phenolic hydroxl groups. They could also introduce hydroxl groups into benzoic and pi-hydroxybenzoic acids before ring cleavage. As compared to brown rot, the white rot fungi released higher amounts of CO2 from the aromatic and side chain carbons of DHP and plant lignins. Some brown rot fungi, however, had similar capacities in degrading DHP lignin as white rot fungi. They especially released more CO2 from methoxyl groups. This release was dependent upon the added carbohydrate source and could be either repressed or enhanced. Several bacteria, especially Nocardia spp. and Pseudomonas spp., were tested for their potential to degrade the labeled lignins or phenols. Most of these bacteria did not appreciably degrade lignins, although they were highly active in the metabolization of phenols. Some Nocardia spp., however, were found to have a noteworthy capacity in the degradation of lignins and phenols. Preliminary studies of the potentials of the organisms to attack labeled lignin sulfonates either in liquid or soil cultures are presented. (Refs. 100)

  5. Radio catalysis application in degradation of complex organic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno L, A.

    2014-01-01

    The generation of wastewater is a consequence of human activities, industries to be the generators of a large part of these discharges. These contaminated waters can be processed for their remediation; however the recalcitrant organic compounds are hardly removed through conventional treatments applied, so that new technologies have been developed for disposal such as the advanced oxidation technologies or processes. With the aim of the study is to apply ionizing radiation as a method of remediation in wastewater, in this work were carried out experiments of radiolysis and radio catalysis, which are techniques considered advanced oxidation technologies, that consist in irradiate with 60 Co gamma radiation solutions of 4- chloro phenol and methylene blue, applied at different concentrations and using as process control measurements of the compound not degraded by UV-vis spectrophotometry at 507 and 664 nm for 4-chloro phenol and methylene blue respectively. At doses greater than 2.5 kGy were near-zero degradation. Degradation experiments were also conducted by photo catalysis by irradiation with a UV lamp of 354 nm wavelength. For 4-chloro phenol results showed that degradation is efficient (39%). With those previous results, these techniques were applied to degrade complex mixtures of organic compounds from samples of wastewater from a sewage treatment plant, where was considered as process control measurement of the dissolved organic carbon obtained by a spectrophotometric analysis at 254 nm, and a maximum of 26% degradation was obtained by applying 80 kGy. On the other hand, a series of experiments fractionating the irradiations at intervals of 20 kGy to obtain a cumulative dose of 80 kGy, which was 2.8 times greater with respect to degradation by radio catalysis with continuous irradiation. (Author)

  6. Toxicities of triclosan, phenol, and copper sulfate in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumegen, Rosalind A; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R; Chisti, Yusuf

    2005-04-01

    The effect of toxicants on the BOD degradation rate constant was used to quantitatively establish the toxicity of triclosan, phenol, and copper (II) against activated sludge microorganisms. Toxicities were tested over the following ranges of concentrations: 0-450 mg/L for phenol, 0-2 mg/L for triclosan, and 0-35 mg/L for copper sulfate (pentahydrate). According to the EC(50) values, triclosan was the most toxic compound tested (EC(50) = 1.82 +/- 0.1 mg/L), copper (II) had intermediate toxicity (EC(50) = 18.3 +/- 0.37 mg/L), and phenol was the least toxic (EC(50) = 270 +/- 0.26 mg/L). The presence of 0.2% DMSO had no toxic effect on the activated sludge. The toxicity evaluation method used was simple, reproducible, and directly relevant to activated sludge wastewater treatment processes.

  7. Tolerance of Antarctic soil fungi to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Kevin A.; Bridge, Paul; Clark, Melody S. [British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of hydrocarbons and fuel oil on Antarctic filamentous fungi in the terrestrial Antarctic environment. Growth of fungi and bacteria from soils around Rothera Research Station (Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula) was assessed in the presence of ten separate aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons [marine gas oil (MGO), dodecane, hexadecane, benzoic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, toluene, phenol, biphenyl, naphthalene and m- and p-xylenes with ethylbenzene]. Aromatic hydrocarbons inhibited soil microbial growth more than aliphatic hydrocarbons. Soil microorganisms from a moss patch, where little previous impact or hydrocarbon contamination had occurred, were less tolerant of hydrocarbons than those from high impact sites. Fungal growth rates of Mollisia sp., Penicillium commune, Mortierella sp., Trichoderma koningii, Trichoderma sp. and Phoma herbarum were assessed in the presence of hydrocarbons. Generally, aromatic hydrocarbons inhibited or stopped hyphal extension, though growth rates increased with some aliphatic hydrocarbons. Hyphal dry weight measurements suggested that Mortierella sp. may be able to use dodecane as sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading Antarctic fungi may have use in future hydrocarbon spill bioremediation. (author)

  8. Biodegradation of phenol using recombinant plasmid-carrying Rhodococcus erythropolis strains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zídková, L.; Szököl, Juraj; Rucká, Lenka; Pátek, Miroslav; Nešvera, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 84, OCT 2013 (2013), s. 179-184 ISSN 0964-8305 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Rhodococcus erythropolis * Phenol degradation * Wastewater Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2013

  9. Electrochemical Incineration of Phenolic Compounds from the Hydrocarbon Industry Using Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Medel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical incineration using boron-doped diamond electrodes was applied to samples obtained from a refinery and compared to the photo-electro-Fenton process in order to selectively eliminate the phenol and phenolic compounds from a complex matrix. Due to the complex chemical composition of the sample, a pretreatment to the sample in order to isolate the phenolic compounds was applied. The effects of the pretreatment and of pH on the degradation of the phenolic compounds were evaluated. The results indicate that the use of a boron-doped diamond electrode in an electrochemical incineration process mineralizes 99.5% of the phenolic sample content. Working in acidic medium (pH = 1, and applying 2 A at 298 K under constant stirring for 2 hours, also results in the incineration of the reaction intermediates reflected by 97% removal of TOC. In contrast, the photo-electro-Fenton process results in 99.9% oxidation of phenolic compounds with only a 25.69% removal of TOC.

  10. Effect of different concentrations of phenol on growth of some fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... that C. tropicalis could degrade 2,000 mg l-1 phenol alone and 350 mg l-1 ... sterile bottles (100 ml) and in plastic bags, respectively, transferred directly to ..... bolism of aromatic compounds in bacteria and fungi has revealed ...

  11. Phytoremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, anilines and phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Patricia J; Campanella, Bruno F; Castro, Paula M L; Harms, Hans; Lichtfouse, Eric; Schäffner, Anton R; Smrcek, Stanislav; Werck-Reichhart, Daniele

    2002-01-01

    Phytoremediation technologies based on the combined action of plants and the microbial communities that they support within the rhizosphere hold promise in the remediation of land and waterways contaminated with hydrocarbons but they have not yet been adopted in large-scale remediation strategies. In this review plant and microbial degradative capacities, viewed as a continuum, have been dissected in order to identify where bottle-necks and limitations exist. Phenols, anilines and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were selected as the target classes of molecule for consideration, in part because of their common patterns of distribution, but also because of the urgent need to develop techniques to overcome their toxicity to human health. Depending on the chemical and physical properties of the pollutant, the emerging picture suggests that plants will draw pollutants including PAHs into the plant rhizosphere to varying extents via the transpiration stream. Mycorrhizosphere-bacteria and -fungi may play a crucial role in establishing plants in degraded ecosystems. Within the rhizosphere, microbial degradative activities prevail in order to extract energy and carbon skeletons from the pollutants for microbial cell growth. There has been little systematic analysis of the changing dynamics of pollutant degradation within the rhizosphere; however, the importance of plants in supplying oxygen and nutrients to the rhizosphere via fine roots, and of the beneficial effect of microorganisms on plant root growth is stressed. In addition to their role in supporting rhizospheric degradative activities, plants may possess a limited capacity to transport some of the more mobile pollutants into roots and shoots via fine roots. In those situations where uptake does occur (i.e. only limited microbial activity in the rhizosphere) there is good evidence that the pollutant may be metabolised. However, plant uptake is frequently associated with the inhibition of plant growth and an

  12. Inhibition and kinetic studies of cellulose- and hemicellulose-degrading enzymes of Ganoderma boninense by naturally occurring phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, A; Siddiqui, Y; Ali, N S; Manickam, S

    2018-06-01

    Ganoderma sp, the causal pathogen of the basal stem rot (BSR) disease of oil palm, secretes extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. These play an important role in the pathogenesis of BSR by nourishing the pathogen through the digestion of cellulose and hemicellulose of the host tissue. Active suppression of hydrolytic enzymes secreted by Ganoderma boninense by various naturally occurring phenolic compounds and estimation of their efficacy on pathogen suppression is focused in this study. Ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds were assessed for their inhibitory effect on the hydrolytic enzymes of G. boninense. The enzyme kinetics (V max and K m ) and the stability of the hydrolytic enzymes were also characterized. The selected compounds had shown inhibitory effect at various concentrations. Two types of inhibitions namely uncompetitive and noncompetitive were observed in the presence of phenolic compounds. Among all the phenolic compounds tested, benzoic acid was the most effective compound suppressive to the growth and production of hydrolytic enzymes secreted by G. boninense. The phenolic compounds as inhibitory agents can be a better replacement for the metal ions which are known as conventional inhibitors till date. The three hydrolytic enzymes were stable in a wide range of pH and temperature. These findings highlight the efficacy of the applications of phenolic compounds to control Ganoderma. The study has proved a replacement for chemical controls of G. boninense with naturally occurring phenolic compounds. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. The comparison of mechanical and thermal properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene naonosheets enhanced phenol-formaldehyde resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, X.F.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, Y.Z.; Li, Y.J.W.H.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene naonosheets were prepared via one-pot hydrothermal process in a Teflon-lined autoclave. Moreover, the mechanical and thermal degradation behaviors of the phenol formaldehyde/carbon nanotubes and phenol formaldehyde/graphene naonosheets composites were discussed. Experimental results showed that the graphene naonosheets possessed better performances than that of carbon nanotubes. When the filler loading was 0.6wt%, tensile strength, Young's modulus, compressive strength and modulus of the as-prepared composites reached their maximum values, which were increased by 77.0, 141.3, 109.1 and 114.8% for graphene naonosheets and 54.7, 85.9, 61.7 and 45.2% for carbon nanotubes than those of pure sample, respectively. In addition, both of these two carbon materials could increase the thermo-stability of the matrix. When their usage amount was 0.6wt%, the thermal degradation temperature (at 10% weight loss) was increased to 255.6°C for phenol formaldehyde/graphene naonosheets composites and 253.5°C for phenol formaldehyde/carbon nanotubes composites from 233.6°C for pure sample. (author)

  14. 40 CFR 180.586 - Clothianidin; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clothianidin; tolerances for residues... § 180.586 Clothianidin; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for residues of the insecticide clothianidin, including its metabolites and degradates. Compliance with the tolerance...

  15. Stress tolerance of soil fungal communities from native Atlantic forests, reforestations, and a sand mining degraded area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Paulo C; Pupin, Breno; Rangel, Drauzio E N

    2018-06-01

    Microorganisms are essential to the functionality of the soil, particularly in organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling, which regulate plant productivity and shape the soil structure. However, biotic and abiotic stresses greatly disrupt soil fungal communities and, thereby, disturb the ecosystem. This study quantified seasonal tolerances to UV-B radiation and heat of fungal communities, which could be cultured, found in soil from two native Atlantic forest fragments called F1 and F2, five reforested areas (RA) planted in 1994, 1997, 2004, 2007, and 2009 with native species of the Atlantic forest, and one sand mining degraded soil (SMDS). The cold activity of the soil fungal communities (FC) from the eight different areas was also studied. Higher tolerance to UV-B radiation and heat was found in the FC from the SMDS and the 2009RA, where the incidence of heat and UV radiation from sun was more intense, which caused selection for fungal taxa that were more UV-B and heat tolerant in those areas. Conversely, the FC from the native forests and older reforested sites were very susceptible to heat and UV-B radiation. The cold activity of the soil FC from different areas of the study showed an erratic pattern of responses among the sampling sites. Little difference in tolerance to UV-B radiation and heat was found among the FC of soil samples collected in different seasons; in general soil FC collected in winter were less tolerant to UV-B radiation, but not for heat. In conclusion, FC from SMDS soil that receive intense heat and UV radiation, as well as with low nutrient availability, were more tolerant to both UV-B radiation and heat. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of foliar nutrients on phenol levels in leaves of Eugenia uniflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M. Santos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Eugenia uniflora L., Myrtaceae, leaves contain high amounts of phenolic compounds which are responsible for several pharmacological activities. In order to evaluate the phenolics seasonal variation leaves were analysed on a monthly basis during the period of two years for the contents of hydrolysable tannins, total phenols, flavonoids, and nutrients (N, P, K, S, Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn, Cu, and Fe. Results were correlated with climate conditions (rainfall, humidity, and mean temperature by Principal Component and ClusterAnalysis which allowed four groups to be distinguished with respect to the age of the leaves and the content of some metals. Young leaves were characterised by high levels of Zn and nitrogen whereas old leaves contained high levels of Fe and calcium, and both groups had moderate amounts of phenolics. Adult leaves were divided in two groups and results revealed that while one group had the highest levels of all phenols and lowest amounts of Mn and Cu, the other showed opposite quantities. The Canonical Correlation Analysis confirmed a highly significant negative correlation between phenol contents and Mn and Cu. These facts suggested that flavonoids and tannins production depends of the amounts of foliar nutrients, Cu and Mn in particular, which are cofactors of enzymes involved in phenol degradation and lignin biosynthesis. This knowledge can improve this specie cultivation in order to enhance the phenolic compounds concentration.

  17. Application of adsorption analysis to the investigation of phenols and bases in low-temperature tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalechts, I V; Salimgareeva, F G; Tumbusova, Z P

    1955-01-01

    The use of chromatographic adsorption for the separation of mono- and bicyclic phenols and bases from coal tar and from its hydrogenation products were studied with o-cresol, ..beta..-naphthol, pyridine, and quinoline. Experimental data show that Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was preferable for separating phenols, but that silica gel was better for the bases. The best order of use of the developers was as follows: C/sub 6/H/sub 6/, Et/sub 2/O, EtOH. The data show that the destructive hydrogenation process degrades the higher series phenols to lower ones.

  18. Interactions of β-Conglycinin (7S with Different Phenolic Acids—Impact on Structural Characteristics and Proteolytic Degradation of Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Gan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available p-Coumalic acid (PCA, caffeic acid (CA, gallic acid (GA and chlorogenic acid (CGA are the major phenolic acids that co-exist with soy protein components in foodstuffs. Surprisingly, there are only a handful of reports that describe their interaction with β-Conglycinin (7S, a major soy protein. In this report, we investigated the interaction between phenolic acids and soy protein 7S and observed an interaction between each of these phenolic acids and soy protein 7S, which was carried out by binding. Further analysis revealed that the binding activity of the phenolic acids was structure dependent. Here, the binding affinity of CA and GA towards 7S was found to be stronger than that of PCA, because CA and GA have one more hydroxyl group. Interestingly, the binding of phenolic acids with soy protein 7S did not affect protein digestion by pepsin and trypsin. These findings aid our understanding of the relationship between different phenolic acids and proteins in complex food systems.

  19. Superoxide radical-mediated photocatalytic oxidation of phenolic compounds over Ag{sup +}/TiO{sub 2}: Influence of electron donating and withdrawing substituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jiadong [National Engineering Laboratory for Hydrometallurgical Cleaner Production Technology, Beijing Engineering Research Center of Process Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xie, Yongbing, E-mail: ybxie@ipe.ac.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Hydrometallurgical Cleaner Production Technology, Beijing Engineering Research Center of Process Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Han, Qingzhen [State Key Laboratory of Multi-phase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao, Hongbin [National Engineering Laboratory for Hydrometallurgical Cleaner Production Technology, Beijing Engineering Research Center of Process Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Yujiao [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing (China); Nawaz, Faheem; Duan, Feng [National Engineering Laboratory for Hydrometallurgical Cleaner Production Technology, Beijing Engineering Research Center of Process Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • A weak EWG benefited photocatalytic oxidation of phenols the most. • Phenolic compounds were dominantly oxidized by ·O{sub 2}{sup −}, rather than ·OH, {sup 1}O{sub 2} or h{sup +}. • ·O{sub 2}{sup −} preferred to nucleophilically attack EDG substituted phenols. • ·O{sub 2}{sup −} more likely electrophilically attacked EWG substituted phenols. • ·O{sub 2}{sup −} simultaneously nucleophilically and electrophilically assaulted p-chlorophenol. - Abstract: A comparative study was constructed to correlate the electronic property of the substituents with the degradation rates of phenolic compounds and their oxidation pathways under UV with Ag{sup +}/TiO{sub 2} suspensions. It was verified that a weak electron withdrawing substituent benefited photocatalytic oxidation the most, while an adverse impact appeared when a substituent was present with stronger electron donating or withdrawing ability. The addition of p-benzoquinone dramatically blocked the degradation, confirming superoxide radicals (·O{sub 2}{sup −}) as the dominant photooxidant, rather than hydroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen or positive holes, which was also independent of the substituent. Hammett relationship was established based on pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics, and it revealed two disparate reaction patterns between ·O{sub 2}{sup −} and phenolic compounds, which was further verified by the quantum chemical computation on the frontier molecular orbitals and Mulliken charge distributions of ·O{sub 2}{sup −} and phenolic compounds. It was found that electron donating group (EDG) substituted phenols were more likely nucleophilically attacked by ·O{sub 2}{sup −}, while ·O{sub 2}{sup −} preferred to electrophilically assault electron withdrawing group (EWG) substituted phenols. Exceptionally, electrophilic and nucleophilic attack by ·O{sub 2}{sup −} could simultaneously occur in p-chlorophenol degradation, consequently leading to its highest rate

  20. Electrochemical sensor for predicting transformer overload by phenol measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosworth, Timothy; Setford, Steven; Saini, Selwayan [Cranfield Centre for Analytical Science, Cranfield University, Silsoe, Beds MK45 4DT (United Kingdom); Heywood, Richard [National Grid Company Plc, Kelvin Avenue, Leatherhead, Surrey KT22 7ST (United Kingdom)

    2003-03-10

    Transformer overload is a significant problem to the power transmission industry, with severe safety and cost implications. Overload may be predicted by measuring phenol levels in the transformer-insulating oil, arising from the thermolytic degradation of phenol-formaldehyde resins. The development of two polyphenol oxidase (PPO) sensors, based on monitoring the enzymatic consumption of oxygen using an oxygen electrode, or reduction of enzymatically generated o-quinone at a screen-printed electrode (SPE), for the measurement of phenol in transformer oil is reported. Ex-service oils were prepared either by extraction into aqueous electrolyte-buffer, or by direct dilution in propan-2-ol, the latter method being more amenable to simple at-line operation. The oxygen electrode, with a sensitivity of 2.87 nA {mu}g{sup -1} ml{sup -1}, RSD of 7.0-19.9% and accuracy of {+-}8.3% versus the industry standard International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) method, proved superior to the SPE (sensitivity: 3.02 nA {mu}g{sup -1} ml{sup -1}; RSD: 8.9-18.3%; accuracy: {+-}7.9%) and was considerably more accurate at low phenol concentrations. However, the SPE approach is more amenable to field-based usage for reasons of device simplicity. The method has potential as a rapid and simple screening tool for the at-site monitoring of phenol in transformer oils, thereby reducing incidences of transformer failure.

  1. Enhanced effect of suction-cavitation on the ozonation of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhilin; Franke, Marcus; Ondruschka, Bernd; Zhang, Yongchun; Ren Yanze; Braeutigam, Patrick; Wang, Weimin

    2011-01-01

    800 mL of 1.0 mM phenol-containing aqueous solution was circulated at 20 ° C for 30 min in a suction-reactor, while 3.2 mg min -1 ozone was introduced into the solution under the suction orifice. The removal rates of phenol vary polynomially with the orifice diameter as well as the suction pressure. The rate constant for the zero-order kinetics achieves the highest value at -0.070 MPa by using 5 mm orifice. Although the suction-cavitation alone cannot remove phenol in 30 min, it can considerably enhance the ozonation of phenol. The rate constants for the zero-order kinetics by the simple ozonation and the combined method are 0.018 and 0.028 min -1 , respectively. Furthermore, no ozone was observed in the tail gas during the first 15 min for the ozonation in the suction reactor, and then the concentration of unreacted ozone slowly increased, indicating that the utilization rate of ozone is significantly improved by the suction-cavitation. The increasing input concentration of ozone obviously accelerates the ozonation of phenol, but the total required quantities of ozone are very close by various ozone input concentrations to reach the same degradation rate, indicating the ozonation assisted by the suction-cavitation can be considered as a quantitative reaction.

  2. In situ and laboratory determined first-order degradation rate constants of specific organic compounds in an aerobic aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P.H.; Bjerg, P.L.; Nielsen, P.

    1996-01-01

    In situ microcosms (ISM) and laboratory batch microcosms (LBM) were used for determination of the first-order degradation rate constants of benzene, toluene, o-xylene, nitrobenzene, naphthalene, biphenyl, o- and p-dichlorobenzene, 1,1,1 -trichloroethane, tetrachlorometane, trichloroethene......, tetrachloroethene, phenol, o-cresol, 2,4- and 2,6-dichlorophenol, 4,6-o-dichlorocresol, and o- and p-nitrophenol in an aerobic aquifer, All aromatic hydrocarbons were degraded in ISM and LBM experiments. The phenolic hydrocarbons were ail degraded in ISM experiments, but some failed to degrade in LBM experiments....... Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons were degraded neither in ISM nor LBM experiments. Degradation rate constants were determined by a model accounting for kinetic sorption (bicontinuum model), lag phases, and first-order degradation. With a few exceptions, lag phases were less than 2 weeks in both ISM and LBM...

  3. Influence of physical and chemical parameters on the irradiation of aqueous solutions of phenol by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzari, Fabien

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was the study of the influence of different parameters by electron beam irradiation on the decomposition of phenol in aqueous solution. A simulation based on a simplified mechanism emphasized the importance of the oxygenation of the solutions in the removal of phenol by ionisation. A model of the reactor used was proposed from the study of the influence of the beam energy on the decomposition of phenol. Penetration depths of the electrons were determined. Phenol degradation was found to increase with the dose rate. The fraction of the dose into several passages under the electron beam improved the abatement of the phenol. The reoxygenation of the solutions between each passage and the kinetic expressions of irradiation could explain this effect. As expected, the first by-products identified were originated from the reaction of phenol with hydroxyl radicals. [fr

  4. Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene by Burkholderia cepacia G4 with poplar leaf homogenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jun Won; Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    2014-07-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a chlorinated organic solvent, is one of the most common and widespread groundwater contaminants worldwide. Among the group of TCE-degrading aerobic bacteria, Burkholderia cepacia G4 is the best-known representative. This strain requires the addition of specific substrates, including toluene, phenol, and benzene, to induce the enzymes to degrade TCE. However, the substrates are toxic and introducing them into the soil can result in secondary contamination. In this study, poplar leaf homogenate containing natural phenolic compounds was tested for the ability to induce the growth of and TCE degradation by B. cepacia G4. The results showed that the G4 strain could grow and degrade TCE well with the addition of phytochemicals. The poplar leaf homogenate also functioned as an inducer of the toluene-ortho-monooxygenase (TOM) gene in B. cepacia G4.

  5. Investigating Marine Dissolved Organic Matter Fluorescence Transformations with Organic Geochemical Proxies in a Growth and Degradation Experiment using Amino Acids, Amino Sugars, and Phenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, M. R.; Bianchi, T. S.; Osburn, C. L.; Kinsey, J. D.; Ziervogel, K.; Schnetzer, A.

    2017-12-01

    The origin and mechanisms driving the formation of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in the open ocean remain unclear. Although recent studies have attempted to deconvolve the chemical composition and source of marine FDOM, these studies have been qualitative in nature. Here, we investigate these transformations using a more quantitative biomarker approach in a controlled growth and degradation experiment. In this experiment, a natural assemblage of phytoplankton was collected off the coast of North Carolina and incubated within roller bottles containing 0.2 µm-filtered North Atlantic surface water amended with f/2 nutrients. Samples were collected at the beginning (day 0), during exponential growth (day 13), stationary (day 20), and degradation (day 62) phases of the phytoplankton incubation. Amino acids, amino sugars, and phenolic compounds of the dissolved (DOM) were measured in conjunction with enzyme assays and bacterial counts to track shifts in OM quality as FDOM formed and was then transformed throughout the experiment. The results from the chemical analyses showed that the OM composition changed significantly from the initial and exponential phases to the stationary and degradation phases of the experiment. The percentage of aromatic amino acids to the total amino acid pool increased significantly during the exponential phase of phytoplankton growth, but then decreased significantly during the stationary and degradation phases. This increase was positively correlated to the fractional contribution of the protein-like peak in fluorescence to the total FDOM fluorescence. An increase in the concentration of amino acid degradation products during the stationary and degradation phases suggests that compositional changes in OM were driven by microbial transformation. This was further supported by a concurrent increase in total enzyme activity and increase in "humic-like" components of the FDOM. These findings link the properties and formation of FDOM

  6. Optimization of process variables for the microbial degradation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... The optimum process conditions for maximizing phenol degradation (removal) ... cellular maintenance requirements on temperature makes it an important ..... the International Foundation for Science (IFS) for the financial ...

  7. Wine phenolics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2002-05-01

    Wine contains many phenolic substances, most of which originate in the grape berry. The phenolics have a number of important functions in wine, affecting the tastes of bitterness and astringency, especially in red wine. Second, the color of red wine is caused by phenolics. Third, the phenolics are the key wine preservative and the basis of long aging. Lastly, since phenolics oxidize readily, they are the component that suffers owing to oxidation and the substance that turns brown in wine (and other foods) when exposed to air. Wine phenolics include the non-flavonoids: hydroxycinnamates, hydroxybenzoates and the stilbenes; plus the flavonoids: flavan-3-ols, the flavonols, and the anthocyanins. While polymeric condensed tannins and pigmented tannins constitute the majority of wine phenolics, their large size precludes absorption and thus they are not likely to have many health effects (except, perhaps, in the gut). The total amount of phenols found in a glass of red wine is on the order of 200 mg versus about 40 mg in a glass of white wine.

  8. Optimizing Degradation of Olive Oil Mill Waste Water Using Paecilomyces variotii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatab, O.K.; El-Nasr, A.A.; Hassan, A.A.; Abdel El- Aziz, A.B.; Zaki, G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty six microbial isolates (ten fungal, nine yeast and seven bacterial isolates) were isolated from the Olive Oil Mill Waste Water (OOMW) which was extracted from effluent of olive oil industry factory. All isolates were tested for its growth on media containing 10% OOMW as sole carbon source. It was found that (three fungal, two yeast and two bacterial isolates) had the ability to grow on this concentration. These isolates were identified as Paecilomyces variotii, Ascopus stercoraris, Aspergillus terrus, Yarowia lipolytica, Candida tropicalis, Lactobacillus curvatus and Bacillus brevis. The identified isolates were tested for the biodegradation of phenolic compounds at high concentration of OOMW (25%). Paecilomyces variotii was the best isolate as it degraded 10.40 % of the phenolic compounds. The maximum degradation of phenolic compounds and chemical oxygen demand (COD) decrease percentage was (68.14 and 59.12, respectively) obtained at 50% dilution of OOMW for 12 days at 37±1 degree C, ph 6, supplement the degradation media with 150 mg/l sucrose, 2.5 g/l yeast extract and 0.070 mmol/l CuSO 4 concentration in aerobic conditions with aeration rate 4:1 (v air: v media), shaking at 150 rpm and 6 g/l inoculums size. In addition, 0.25 kGy was the best dose as it led to increase the phenolic compounds biodegradation percent 8.7% than the optimum conditions previously mentioned. Finally, the bio treated OOMW was lower toxicity to environment than untreated one.

  9. Capillary electrophoretic determination of selected phenolic compounds in humic substances of well waters and fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Ying; Chang, Yan-Zin; Lu, Fung-Jou; Chen, Jian-Lian

    2010-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) from well waters, fertilizers, and synthetic phenolic polymers were characterized by elemental and UV-VIS spectroscopic analyses. Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with UV absorption detection was used to analyze the lignin-derived phenolic distribution in the degradation residues after alkaline CuO oxidation of HS samples. Eleven phenols with p-acetyl, vanillyl and syringyl substituents were selected to optimize the CZE parameters. For well waters and fertilizers, the content of phenolic fragments was in agreement with the findings of the elemental and spectroscopic measurements. Additionally, parameters derived from the vanillic acid/vanilline, syringyl acid/syringaldehyde, p-hydroxyl/vanillyl and syringyl/vanillyl ratios matched analogous studies on dissolved organic matter from natural waters and on humic acids from terrestrial substances. The amount of phenolic monomer bonded within two synthetic HS polymers was found to be 25.9% protocatechuic acid and 71.3% gallic acid.

  10. Biodegradation of phenol and benzene by endophytic bacterial strains isolated from refinery wastewater-fed Cannabis sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Aneela; Arshad, Muhammad; Hashmi, Imran; Karthikeyan, Raghupathy; Gentry, Terry J; Schwab, Arthur Paul

    2017-06-13

    The presence of benzene and phenol in the environment can lead to serious health effects in humans and warrant development of efficient cleanup strategies. The aim of the present work was to assess the potential of indigenous endophytic bacterial strains to degrade benzene and phenol. Seven strains were successfully isolated from Cannabis sativa plants irrigated with oil refinery wastewater. Molecular characterization was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Phenol was biodegraded almost completely with Achromobacter sp. (AIEB-7), Pseudomonas sp. (AIEB-4), and Alcaligenes sp. (AIEB-6) at 250, 500, and 750 mg L -1 ; however, the degradation was only 81%, 72%, and 69%, respectively, when exposed to 1000 mg L -1 . Bacillus sp. (AIEB-1), Enterobacter sp. (AIEB-3), and Acinetobacter sp. (AIEB-2) degraded benzene significantly at 250, 500, and 750 mg L -1 . However, these strains showed 80%, 72%, and 68% benzene removal at 1000 mg L -1 exposure, respectively. Rates of degradation could be modeled with first-order kinetics with rate constant values of 1.86 × 10 -2 for Pseudomonas sp. (AIEB-4) and 1.80 × 10 -2  h -1 for Bacillus sp. (AIEB-1) and half-lives of 1.5 and 1.6 days, respectively. These results establish a foundation for further testing of the phytoremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in the presence of these endophytic bacteria.

  11. Iridium/Bipyridine-Catalyzed ortho-Selective C-H Borylation of Phenol and Aniline Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Liang; Kanai, Motomu; Kuninobu, Yoichiro

    2017-11-03

    An iridium-catalyzed ortho-selective C-H borylation of phenol and aniline derivatives has been successfully developed. Iridium/bipyridine-catalyzed C-H borylation generally occurred at the meta- and para-positions of aromatic substrates. Introduction of an electron-withdrawing substituent on the bipyridine-type ligand and a methylthiomethyl group on the hydroxy and amino groups of the phenol and aniline substrates, however, dramatically altered the regioselectivity, affording exclusively ortho-borylated products. The reaction proceeded in good to excellent yields with good functional group tolerance. C-H borylation was applied to the synthesis of a calcium receptor modulator.

  12. Electro oxidation of Phenol on a Ti/RuO{sub 2} anode: effect of some electrolysis parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Iranildes D. dos; Dutra, Achilles J.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEMM/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais; Afonso, Julio C., E-mail: julio@iq.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Analitica

    2011-07-01

    The influences of electrolysis time, anodic area, current density and supporting electrolyte on phenol and its byproducts degradation on a Ti/RuO{sub 2} anode were investigated. It was observed that phenol and its byproducts were rapidly broken down in the presence of chloride ions. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) data have shown that the presence of chloride ions lead to chlorophenols formation, due to reactions with Cl{sub 2} and/or OCl{sup -} generated during electrolysis. However, these intermediate products were also degraded later by the oxidizing agents. The standards established by the CONAMA (Brazilian National Council for the Environment) for phenols and chlorophenols in effluents were achieved after 360 min of electrolysis with a current density of 10 mA cm-2. Cyclic voltammograms obtained with the anodes before and after 436 h of electrolysis under severe salinity conditions (2 mol L-1) and current density (800 mA cm-2) showed that Ti/RuO{sub 2} did not lose its electrocatalytic properties. This fact indicates that Ti/RuO{sub 2} can be used for the treatment of effluents containing phenols in a chloride environment. (author)

  13. Inhibitor tolerance of a recombinant flocculating industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain during glucose and xylose co-fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Cheng Li

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have negative effects on the ethanol fermentation capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, the effects of eight typical inhibitors, including weak acids, furans, and phenols, on glucose and xylose co-fermentation of the recombinant xylose-fermenting flocculating industrial S. cerevisiae strain NAPX37 were evaluated by batch fermentation. Inhibition on glucose fermentation, not that on xylose fermentation, correlated with delayed cell growth. The weak acids and the phenols showed additive effects. The effect of inhibitors on glucose fermentation was as follows (from strongest to weakest: vanillin > phenol > syringaldehyde > 5-HMF > furfural > levulinic acid > acetic acid > formic acid. The effect of inhibitors on xylose fermentation was as follows (from strongest to weakest: phenol > vanillin > syringaldehyde > furfural > 5-HMF > formic acid > levulinic acid > acetic acid. The NAPX37 strain showed substantial tolerance to typical inhibitors and showed good fermentation characteristics, when a medium with inhibitor cocktail or rape straw hydrolysate was used. This research provides important clues for inhibitors tolerance of recombinant industrial xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae.

  14. Analysis of catRABC operon for catechol degradation from phenol-degrading Rhodococcus erythropolis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, Martin; Knoppová, Monika; Nešvera, Jan; Pátek, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 76, - (2007), s. 159-168 ISSN 0175-7598 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/04/0542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : rhodococcus erythropolis * catrabc operon * catechol degradation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.475, year: 2007

  15. Impact of phenolic substrate and growth temperature on the arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unell, Maria; Abraham, Paul E.; Shah, Manesh; Zhang, Bing; Ruckert, Christian; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2009-02-15

    We compared the Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome during growth on 4-chlorophenol, 4-nitrophenol or phenol at 5 C and 28 C; both for the wild type and a mutant strain with mass spectrometry based proteomics. A label free workflow employing spectral counting identified 3749 proteins across all growth conditions, representing over 70% of the predicted genome and 739 of these proteins form the core proteome. Statistically significant differences were found in the proteomes of cells grown under different conditions including differentiation of hundreds of unknown proteins. The 4-chlorophenol-degradation pathway was confirmed, but not that for phenol.

  16. Impact of curing time on ageing and degradation of phenol-urea-formaldehyde binder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okhrimenko, D. V.; Thomsen, A. B.; Ceccato, M.

    2018-01-01

    Phenol-urea-formaldehyde (PUF) resin is one of the most important thermosetting polymers. It is widely used in many industrial and construction applications as an organic coating and adhesive. For example, in production of mineral wool for insulation, PUF is used together with the coupling agent (3...

  17. Improvement of simultaneous Cr(VI) and phenol removal by an immobilised bacterial consortium and characterisation of biodegradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontañon, Ornella M; González, Paola S; Barros, Germán G; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2017-07-25

    Microbial bioremediation emerged some decades ago as an eco-friendly technology to restore polluted sites. Traditionally, the search for microorganisms suitable for bioremediation has been based on the selection of isolated strains able to remove a specific type of pollutant. However, this strategy has now become obsolete, since co-pollution is a global reality. Thus, current studies attempt to find bacterial cultures capable of coping with a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds. In this sense, the bacterial consortium SFC 500-1 has demonstrated efficiency for Cr(VI) and phenol removal, both of which are found in many industrial wastewaters. In the present study, the ability of SFC 500-1 for simultaneous removal was improved through its entrapment in a Ca-alginate matrix. This strategy led to an increased removal of Cr(VI), which was partially reduced to Cr(III). Immobilised cells were able to tolerate and degrade phenol up to 1,500mg/l at high rates, forming catechol and cis,cis-muconate as oxidation intermediates. Successful removal potential through 5 cycles of reuse, as well as after long-term storage, was another important advantage of the immobilised consortium. These characteristics make SFC 500-1 an interesting system for potential application in the biotreatment of co-polluted effluents. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Contribution of Polyphenol Oxidation, Chlorophyll and Vitamin C Degradation to the Blackening of Piper nigrum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fenglin; Huang, Feifei; Wu, Guiping; Zhu, Hongying

    2018-02-09

    Black pepper ( Piper nigrum L.) is the most widely used spice in the world. Blackening is considered to be beneficial and important in the processing of black pepper because it contributes to its color and flavor. The purpose of this paper is to investigate polyphenol oxidation as well as the chlorophyll and vitamin C (VC) degradation in the blackening of Piper nigrum L. Black pepper was produced by four methods, and changes in polyphenols, chlorophyll and VC were studied by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ultraviolet-visible and visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry. The results show that polyphenol oxidase activity significantly decreased during the preparation of black pepper, and the concentrations of phenolic compounds, VC, and chlorophyll a and b also significantly decreased. Polyphenol oxidation and chlorophyll and VC degradation contribute to the blackening. A crude extract of phenolic compounds from black pepper was prepared by the system solvent method. The greater the polarity of the extraction solvent, the higher the extraction rates of the phenolic compounds and the total phenol content. Pepper phenolic compounds were analyzed by HPLC analysis.

  19. Contribution of Polyphenol Oxidation, Chlorophyll and Vitamin C Degradation to the Blackening of Piper nigrum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglin Gu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Black pepper (Piper nigrum L. is the most widely used spice in the world. Blackening is considered to be beneficial and important in the processing of black pepper because it contributes to its color and flavor. The purpose of this paper is to investigate polyphenol oxidation as well as the chlorophyll and vitamin C (VC degradation in the blackening of Piper nigrum L. Black pepper was produced by four methods, and changes in polyphenols, chlorophyll and VC were studied by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and ultraviolet-visible and visible (UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The results show that polyphenol oxidase activity significantly decreased during the preparation of black pepper, and the concentrations of phenolic compounds, VC, and chlorophyll a and b also significantly decreased. Polyphenol oxidation and chlorophyll and VC degradation contribute to the blackening. A crude extract of phenolic compounds from black pepper was prepared by the system solvent method. The greater the polarity of the extraction solvent, the higher the extraction rates of the phenolic compounds and the total phenol content. Pepper phenolic compounds were analyzed by HPLC analysis.

  20. The role of nitrite and nitrate ions as photosensitizers in the phototransformation of phenolic compounds in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calza, P., E-mail: paola.calza@unito.it [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vione, D. [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Torino, Centro Interdipartimentale NatRisk, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy); Novelli, A. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Pelizzetti, E.; Minero, C. [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Nitrite and nitrate are known to be involved in photochemical processes occurring in natural waters. In this study we have investigated the role played by these photosensitizers towards the transformation of xenobiotic organic matter in marine water, with the goal of assessing the typical transformation routes induced in seawater by irradiated nitrite/nitrate. For this purpose, phenol was chosen as model molecule. Phenol transformation was investigated under simulated solar radiation in the presence of nitrite (in the range of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}-1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M) or nitrate ions, in pure water at pH 8, in artificial seawater (containing same dissolved salts as seawater but no organic matter), and in natural seawater. In all experiments, phenol degradation rate and formation of intermediates were assessed. As expected, phenol disappearance rate decreased with decreasing nitrite concentration and was slightly reduced by the presence of chloride. Other salts present in artificial seawater (e.g. HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} and Br{sup -}) had a more marked effect on phenol transformation. Analysis of intermediates formed in the different matrices under study showed generation of hydroxyl-, nitro- and chloroderivatives of phenol, to a different extent depending on experimental conditions. 1,4-Benzoquinone prevailed in all cases, nitroderivatives were only formed with nitrite but were not detected in nitrate-spiked solutions. Competition was observed between halogenation and nitration of phenol, with variable outcome depending on nitrite concentration. The most likely reason is competition between nitrating and halogenating species for reaction with the phenoxyl radical. A kinetic model able to justify the occurrence of different intermediates under the adopted conditions is presented and discussed. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrite and nitrate-mediated solar-driven transformations of pollutant in seawater were

  1. The role of nitrite and nitrate ions as photosensitizers in the phototransformation of phenolic compounds in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calza, P.; Vione, D.; Novelli, A.; Pelizzetti, E.; Minero, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite and nitrate are known to be involved in photochemical processes occurring in natural waters. In this study we have investigated the role played by these photosensitizers towards the transformation of xenobiotic organic matter in marine water, with the goal of assessing the typical transformation routes induced in seawater by irradiated nitrite/nitrate. For this purpose, phenol was chosen as model molecule. Phenol transformation was investigated under simulated solar radiation in the presence of nitrite (in the range of 1 × 10 −5 –1 × 10 −2 M) or nitrate ions, in pure water at pH 8, in artificial seawater (containing same dissolved salts as seawater but no organic matter), and in natural seawater. In all experiments, phenol degradation rate and formation of intermediates were assessed. As expected, phenol disappearance rate decreased with decreasing nitrite concentration and was slightly reduced by the presence of chloride. Other salts present in artificial seawater (e.g. HCO 3 − , CO 3 2− and Br − ) had a more marked effect on phenol transformation. Analysis of intermediates formed in the different matrices under study showed generation of hydroxyl-, nitro- and chloroderivatives of phenol, to a different extent depending on experimental conditions. 1,4-Benzoquinone prevailed in all cases, nitroderivatives were only formed with nitrite but were not detected in nitrate-spiked solutions. Competition was observed between halogenation and nitration of phenol, with variable outcome depending on nitrite concentration. The most likely reason is competition between nitrating and halogenating species for reaction with the phenoxyl radical. A kinetic model able to justify the occurrence of different intermediates under the adopted conditions is presented and discussed. -- Highlights: ► Nitrite and nitrate-mediated solar-driven transformations of pollutant in seawater were studied. ► Phenol degradation rate and formation of intermediates were assessed

  2. 40 CFR 180.511 - Buprofezin; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buprofezin; tolerances for residues... § 180.511 Buprofezin; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for residues of buprofezin, including its metabolites and degradates in or on the commodities in the table below. Compliance...

  3. Toxic and inhibitory effects of trichloroethylene aerobic co-metabolism on phenol-grown aerobic granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, JooHwa

    2015-04-09

    Aerobic granule, a form of microbial aggregate, exhibits good potential in degrading toxic and recalcitrant substances. In this study, the inhibitory and toxic effects of trichloroethylene (TCE), a model compound for aerobic co-metabolism, on phenol-grown aerobic granules were systematically studied, using respiratory activities after exposure to TCE as indicators. High TCE concentration did not exert positive or negative effects on the subsequent endogenous respiration rate or phenol dependent specific oxygen utilization rate (SOUR), indicating the absence of solvent stress and induction effect on phenol-hydroxylase. Phenol-grown aerobic granules exhibited a unique response to TCE transformation product toxicity, that small amount of TCE transformation enhanced the subsequent phenol SOUR. Granules that had transformed between 1.3 and 3.7 mg TCE gSS(-1) showed at most 53% increase in the subsequent phenol SOUR, and only when the transformation exceeded 6.6 mg TCE gSS(-1) did the SOUR dropped below that of the control. This enhancing effect was found to sustain throughout several phenol dosages, and TCE transformation below the toxicity threshold also lessened the granules' sensitivity to higher phenol concentration. The unique toxic effect was possibly caused by the granule's compact structure as a protection barrier against the diffusive transformation product(s) of TCE co-metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Food processing strategies to enhance phenolic compounds bioaccessibility and bioavailability in plant-based foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Agustí, Albert; Martín-Belloso, Olga; Soliva-Fortuny, Robert; Elez-Martínez, Pedro

    2017-06-13

    Phenolic compounds are important constituents of plant-based foods, as their presence is related to protective effects on health. To exert their biological activity, phenolic compounds must be released from the matrix during digestion in an absorbable form (bioaccessible) and finally absorbed and transferred to the bloodstream (bioavailable). Chemical structure and matrix interactions are some food-related factors that hamper phenolic compounds bioaccessibility and bioavailability, and that can be counteracted by food processing. It has been shown that food processing can induce chemical or physical modifications in food that enhance phenolic compounds bioaccessibility and bioavailability. These changes include: (i) chemical modifications into more bioaccessible and bioavailable forms; (ii) cleavage of covalent or hydrogen bonds or hydrophobic forces that attach phenolic compounds to matrix macromolecules; (iii) damaging microstructural barriers such as cell walls that impede the release from the matrix; and (iv) create microstructures that protect phenolic compounds until they are absorbed. Indeed, food processing can produce degradation of phenolic compounds, however, it is possible to counteract it by modulating the operating conditions in favor of increased bioaccessibility and bioavailability. This review compiles the current knowledge on the effects of processing on phenolic compounds bioaccessibility or bioavailability, while suggesting new guidelines in the search of optimal processing conditions as a step forward towards the design of healthier foods.

  5. Biodegradation Study of Nanocomposites of Phenol Novolac Epoxy/Unsaturated Polyester Resin/Egg Shell Nanoparticles Using Natural Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Mousavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite materials refer to those materials whose reinforcing phase has dimensions on a scale from one to one hundred nanometers. In this study, the nanocomposite biodegradation of the phenol Novolac epoxy and the unsaturated polyester resins was investigated using the egg shell nanoparticle as bioceramic as well as starch and glycerin as natural polymers to modify their properties. The phenol Novolac epoxy resin has a good compatibility with the unsaturated polyester resin. The prepared samples with different composition of materials for specified time were buried under soil and their biodegradation was studied using FTIR and SEM. The FTIR results before and after degradation showed that the presence of the hydroxyl group increased the samples degradation. Also adding the egg shell nanoparticle to samples had a positive effect on its degradation. The SEM results with and without the egg shell nanoparticle also showed that use of the egg shell nanoparticle increases the samples degradation. Additionally, increasing the amount of starch, and glycerol and the presence of egg shell nanoparticles can increase water adsorption.

  6. Application of two bacterial strains for wastewater bioremediation and assessment of phenolics biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisio, Cintia E; Quevedo, María R; Talano, Melina A; González, Paola S; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    The use of native bacteria is a useful strategy to decontaminate industrial effluents. In this work, two bacterial strains isolated from polluted environments constitutes a promising alternative since they were able to remove several phenolic compounds not only from synthetic solutions but also from effluents derived from a chemical industry and a tannery which are complex matrices. Acinetobacter sp. RTE 1.4 showed ability to completely remove 2-methoxyphenol (1000 mg/L) while Rhodococcus sp. CS 1 not only degrade the same concentration of this compound but also removed 4- chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol with high efficiency. Moreover, both bacteria degraded phenols naturally present or even exogenously added at high concentrations in effluents from the chemical industry and a tannery in short time (up to 5 d). In addition, a significant reduction of biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand values was achieved after 7 d of treatment for both effluents using Acinetobacter sp. RTE 1.4 and Rhodococcus sp. CS1, respectively. These results showed that Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4 and Rhodococcus sp. CS 1 might be considered as useful biotechnological tools for an efficient treatment of different effluents, since they showed wide versatility to detoxify these complex matrices, even supplemented with high phenol concentrations.

  7. Kinetic model describing the UV/H2O2 photodegradation of phenol from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio-Clemente Ainhoa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic model for phenol transformation through the UV/H2O2 system was developed and validated. The model includes the pollutant decomposition by direct photolysis and HO•, HO2• and O2 •- oxidation. HO• scavenging effects of CO3 2-, HCO3 -, SO4 2- and Cl- were also considered, as well as the pH changes as the process proceeds. Additionally, the detrimental action of the organic matter and reaction intermediates in shielding UV and quenching HO• was incorporated. It was observed that the model can accurately predict phenol abatement using different H2O2/phenol mass ratios (495, 228 and 125, obtaining an optimal H2O2/phenol ratio of 125, leading to a phenol removal higher than 95% after 40 min of treatment, where the main oxidation species was HO•. The developed model could be relevant for calculating the optimal level of H2O2 efficiently degrading the pollutant of interest, allowing saving in costs and time.

  8. METHODS OF REDUCTION OF FREE PHENOL CONTENT IN PHENOLIC FOAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruyako Mikhail Gerasimovich

    2012-12-01

    method aimed at reduction of toxicity of phenolic foams consists in the introduction of a composite mixture of chelate compounds. Raw materials applied in the production of phenolic foams include polymers FRB-1A and VAG-3. The aforementioned materials are used to produce foams FRP-1. Introduction of 1% aluminum fluoride leads to the 40% reduction of the free phenol content in the foam. Introduction of crystalline zinc chloride accelerates the foaming and curing of phenolic foams. The technology that contemplates the introduction of zeolites into the mixture includes pre-mixing with FRB -1A and subsequent mixing with VAG-3; thereafter, the composition is poured into the form, in which the process of foaming is initiated. The content of free phenol was identified using the method of UV spectroscopy. The objective of the research was to develop methods of reduction of the free phenol content in the phenolic foam.

  9. Visible-Light Degradation of Dyes and Phenols over Mesoporous Titania Prepared by Using Anthocyanin from Red Radish as Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiying Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous photocatalysis is able to operate effectively to eliminate organic compounds from wastewater in the presence of semiconductor photocatalyst and a light source. Although photosensitization of titania by organic dyes is one of the conventional ways for visible-light utilization of titania, previous studies have not yet addressed the use of natural food coloring agents as templates in the synthesis of mesostructured materials, let alone the simultaneous achievement of highly crystalline mesoscopic framework and visible-light photocatalytic activity. In this work, anthocyanin, a natural pigment from red radish was directly used as template in synthesis of highly crystalline mesoporous titania. The synthesized mesoporous titania samples were characterized by a combination of various physicochemical techniques, such as XRD, SEM, HRTEM, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, and diffuse reflectance UV-Vis. The prepared mesoporous titania photocatalyst exhibited significant activity under visible-light irradiation for the degradation of dyes and phenols due to its red shift of band-gap-absorption onset and visible-light response as a result of the incorporation of surface carbon species.

  10. Exploring Marine Environments To Unravel Tolerance Mechanisms To Relevant Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique; Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Nørholm, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Production of biofuels and chemicals using microorganisms has been a research driver in the last decades. The approach started with the engineering of metabolic pathways for production of compounds of interest, but it was soon realized that tolerance to the compounds being produced was one...... of interest, HPLC analyses were performed in order to distinguish between compound-degrading and tolerant bacteria. This led to the identification of seven tolerant and non-degrading isolates, the most interesting ones belonging to the genera Bacillus and Pseudomonas. These will be studied using genomic...... and transcriptomic approaches to identify the tolerance mechanisms used. Exploring new ecological niches, as contaminated marine environments allows the identification of naturally tolerant bacteria to the compounds of interest and most likely to the discovery of new mechanisms of tolerance....

  11. A Lactobacillus plantarum Esterase Active on a Broad Range of Phenolic Esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Torres, María; Landete, José María; Reverón, Inés; Santamaría, Laura; de las Rivas, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is the lactic acid bacterial species most frequently found in the fermentation of food products of plant origin on which phenolic compounds are abundant. L. plantarum strains showed great flexibility in their ability to adapt to different environments and growth substrates. Of 28 L. plantarum strains analyzed, only cultures from 7 strains were able to hydrolyze hydroxycinnamic esters, such as methyl ferulate or methyl caffeate. As revealed by PCR, only these seven strains possessed the est_1092 gene. When the est_1092 gene was introduced into L. plantarum WCFS1 or L. lactis MG1363, their cultures acquired the ability to degrade hydroxycinnamic esters. These results support the suggestion that Est_1092 is the enzyme responsible for the degradation of hydroxycinnamic esters on the L. plantarum strains analyzed. The Est_1092 protein was recombinantly produced and biochemically characterized. Surprisingly, Est_1092 was able to hydrolyze not only hydroxycinnamic esters, since all the phenolic esters assayed were hydrolyzed. Quantitative PCR experiments revealed that the expression of est_1092 was induced in the presence of methyl ferulate, an hydroxycinnamic ester, but was inhibited on methyl gallate, an hydroxybenzoic ester. As Est_1092 is an enzyme active on a broad range of phenolic esters, simultaneously possessing feruloyl esterase and tannase activities, its presence on some L. plantarum strains provides them with additional advantages to survive and grow on plant environments. PMID:25746986

  12. Digestibility of (Poly)phenols and Antioxidant Activity in Raw and Cooked Cactus Cladodes ( Opuntia ficus-indica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santiago, Elsy; Pereira-Caro, Gema; Moreno-Rojas, José Manuel; Cid, Concepción; De Peña, María-Paz

    2018-05-29

    This study aims to investigate whether heat treatment applied to cactus cladodes influences the bioaccessibility of their (poly)phenolic compounds after simulated gastric and intestinal digestion. A total of 45 (poly)phenols were identified and quantified in raw and cooked cactus cladodes by ultra high performance liquid chromatography photodiode array detector high resolution mass spectrometry. Both flavonoids (60-68% total), mainly isorhamnetin derivatives, and phenolic acids (32-40%) with eucomic acids as the predominant ones significantly ( p < 0.05) increased with microwaving and griddling processes. After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, 55-64% of the total (poly)phenols of cooked cactus cladodes remained bioaccessible versus 44% in raw samples. Furthermore, digestive conditions and enzymes degraded or retained more flavonoids (37-63% bioaccessibility) than phenolic acids (56-87% bioaccessibility). Microwaved cactus cladodes contributed the highest amount of (poy)phenols (143.54 mg/g dm) after gastrointestinal process, followed by griddled samples (133.98 mg/g dm), showing the highest antioxidant capacity. Additionally, gastrointestinal digestion induced isomerizations among the three stereoisomeric forms of piscidic and eucomic acids.

  13. Investigation of Phenol Removal in Aqueous Solutions Using Advanced Photochemical Oxidation (APO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Jamshidi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Most organic compounds are resistant to conven­tional chemical and biological treatments. For this reason, other methods are being studied as alter­natives to the biological and classical physico-chemical pro­cesses. In this study, advanced photochemical oxidation (APO processes (UV, UV/H2O2, UV/H2O2/Fe(II, andUV/H2O2/Fe(III were investigated in lab-scale experiments for the degradation of phenol in an aqueous solution. A medium-pressure 300 watt (UV-C mercury ultraviolet lamp was used as the radiation source and H2O2 30% as the oxidant. Phenol (initial concentration= 0.5 mmol/L was selected as the model due to its high use and application. Some important parameters such as pH, H2O2 input concentration, iron catalyst concentration, the type of iron salt, and duration of UV radiation were studied based on the standard methods. The results showed that the Photo-Fenton process was the most effective treatment under acidic conditions producing a higher rate of phenol degradation over a very short radiation time. The process accelerated the oxidation rate by 4-5 times the rate of the UV/H2O2 process. The optimum conditions were obtained at a pH value of 3, with a molar ratio of 11.61 for H2O2/Phenol and molar ratios of 0.083 and 0.067for Iron/H2O2 in the UV/H2O2/Fe (II and the UV/H2O2/Fe (III systems, respectively.

  14. Differential Gene Expression by Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in Response to Phenolic Compounds Reveals New Genes Involved in Tannin Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverón, Inés; Jiménez, Natalia; Curiel, José Antonio; Peñas, Elena; López de Felipe, Félix; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario

    2017-04-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a lactic acid bacterium that can degrade food tannins by the successive action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. In the L. plantarum genome, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of gallate decarboxylase ( lpdC , or lp_2945 ) is only 6.5 kb distant from the gene encoding inducible tannase ( L. plantarum tanB [ tanB Lp ], or lp_2956 ). This genomic context suggests concomitant activity and regulation of both enzymatic activities. Reverse transcription analysis revealed that subunits B ( lpdB , or lp_0271 ) and D ( lpdD , or lp_0272 ) of the gallate decarboxylase are cotranscribed, whereas subunit C ( lpdC , or lp_2945 ) is cotranscribed with a gene encoding a transport protein ( gacP , or lp_2943 ). In contrast, the tannase gene is transcribed as a monocistronic mRNA. Investigation of knockout mutations of genes located in this chromosomal region indicated that only mutants of the gallate decarboxylase (subunits B and C), tannase, GacP transport protein, and TanR transcriptional regulator ( lp_2942 ) genes exhibited altered tannin metabolism. The expression profile of genes involved in tannin metabolism was also analyzed in these mutants in the presence of methyl gallate and gallic acid. It is noteworthy that inactivation of tanR suppresses the induction of all genes overexpressed in the presence of methyl gallate and gallic acid. This transcriptional regulator was also induced in the presence of other phenolic compounds, such as kaempferol and myricetin. This study complements the catalog of L. plantarum expression profiles responsive to phenolic compounds, which enable this bacterium to adapt to a plant food environment. IMPORTANCE Lactobacillus plantarum is a bacterial species frequently found in the fermentation of vegetables when tannins are present. L. plantarum strains degrade tannins to the less-toxic pyrogallol by the successive action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. The genes encoding these enzymes are

  15. CHLOROPHENOL DEGRADATION BY ELECTROCATALYSIS COMBINED WITH UV RADIATION%电催化与紫外光辐射降解氯酚

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴祖成; 叶倩; 周明华; 丛燕青

    2002-01-01

    @@ Chlorinated organic compounds, especially chlorophenols are well-known water priority pollutant family due to their toxicity and potential health hazard. As biological treatment processes for the degradation of chlorinated phenols have not been effective, various technologies and processes such as activated carbon adsorption[1], chemical oxidation[2], have been conventionally attempted for phenolic waster treatment. Recently, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have attracted a great deal of attention for treatment of phenolic wastewater, among these chemical oxidation ultraviolet (UV) oxidation system[3], anodic oxidation and indirect electro-oxidation have been widely studied[4]. Though a number of researchers worked on the degradation of chlorophenol by UV radiation or electrochemical processes, there are few reports on both methods for organic wastewater treatment. If these two processes can operate in harmony, the degradation efficiency would be enhanced.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Bio-Oil Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Used to Fabricate Phenolic Based Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Hou, Xiaopeng; Wang, Wenliang; Chang, Jianmin

    2017-06-18

    In this study, bio-oil from the fast pyrolysis of renewable biomass was used as the raw material to synthesize bio-oil phenol formaldehyde (BPF) resin-a desirable resin for fabricating phenolic-based material. During the synthesis process, paraformaldehyde was used to achieve the requirement of high solid content and low viscosity. The properties of BPF resins were tested. Results indicated that BPF resin with the bio-oil addition of 20% had good performance on oxygen index and bending strength, indicating that adding bio-oil could modify the fire resistance and brittleness of PF resin. The thermal curing behavior and heat resistance of BPF resins were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Results showed that adding bio-oil had an impact on curing characteristics and thermal degradation process of PF resin, but the influence was insignificant when the addition was relatively low. The chemical structure and surface characteristics of BPF resins were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis demonstrated that adding bio-oil in the amount of 20% was able to improve the crosslinking degree and form more hydrocarbon chains in PF resin.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Bio-Oil Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Used to Fabricate Phenolic Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bio-oil from the fast pyrolysis of renewable biomass was used as the raw material to synthesize bio-oil phenol formaldehyde (BPF resin—a desirable resin for fabricating phenolic-based material. During the synthesis process, paraformaldehyde was used to achieve the requirement of high solid content and low viscosity. The properties of BPF resins were tested. Results indicated that BPF resin with the bio-oil addition of 20% had good performance on oxygen index and bending strength, indicating that adding bio-oil could modify the fire resistance and brittleness of PF resin. The thermal curing behavior and heat resistance of BPF resins were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. Results showed that adding bio-oil had an impact on curing characteristics and thermal degradation process of PF resin, but the influence was insignificant when the addition was relatively low. The chemical structure and surface characteristics of BPF resins were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The analysis demonstrated that adding bio-oil in the amount of 20% was able to improve the crosslinking degree and form more hydrocarbon chains in PF resin.

  18. Irradiation with benzene, toluene and phenol electron beams in aqueous solution; Irradiacion con haces de electrones de benceno, tolueno y fenol en solucion acuosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoyo O, E L; Lopez V, H; Vazquez A, O; Lizama S, B E; Garcia F, M [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    It is described a methodology for waste water treatment which is simulated doing a benzene-toluene-phenol mixture in aqueous solution. Three different concentrations of them ones were used which were irradiated with electron beams coming from a Pelletron Accelerator carrying out the degradation effect of these compounds in CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. By mean of gas chromatography the analytical determinations were realized finding that in lower concentration of benzene and toluene performances of degradation higher than 95 % were obtained, but higher concentrations (100 ppm) the performance diminishes at 89 %, while for phenol in higher concentrations its degradation is over 60 % and in lower concentrations the degradation is under 80 %. The results are obtained with a constant irradiation time of 12 seconds and neutral pH. (Author.

  19. Inhibitors degradation and microbial response during continuous anaerobic conversion of hydrothermal liquefaction wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Buchun; Li, Jiaming; Zhu, Zhangbing; Shen, Mengmeng; Lu, Jianwen; Duan, Na; Zhang, Yuanhui; Liao, Qiang; Huang, Yun; Liu, Zhidan

    2018-07-15

    One critical challenge of hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is its complex aqueous product, which has a high concentration of organic pollutants (up to 100gCOD/L) and diverse fermentation inhibitors, such as furfural, phenolics and N-heterocyclic compounds. Here we report continuous anaerobic digestion of HTL wastewater via an up-flow anaerobic sludge bed reactor (UASB) and packed bed reactor (PBR). Specifically, we investigated the transformation of fermentation inhibitors and microbial response. GC-MS identified the complete degradation of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), and partial degradation (54.0-74.6%) of organic nitrogen and phenolic compounds, including 3-hydroxypyridine, phenol and 4-ethyl-phenol. Illumina MiSeq sequencing revealed that the bacteria families related to detoxification increased in response to the HTL aqueous phase. In addition, the increase of acetate-oxidizing bacteria in UASB and acetogens in PBR showed a strengthened acetogenesis. As for the archaeal communities, an increase in hydrogenotrophic methanogens was observed. Based on GC-MS/HPLC and microbial analysis, we speculate that dominant fermentation inhibitors were transformed into intermediates (Acetyl-CoA and acetate), further contributing to biomethane formation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Organic amendments enhance Pb tolerance and accumulation during micropropagation of Daphne jasminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniewska, Alina; Muszyńska, Ewa; Hanus-Fajerska, Ewa; Smoleń, Sylwester; Dziurka, Michał; Dziurka, Kinga

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of organic amendments: pineapple pulp (PP) and agar hydrolyzate (AH), on micropropagation and Pb bioaccumulation and tolerance in a woody shrub Daphne jasminea cultured in vitro. The amendments were analyzed for their content of carbohydrates, phenolic acids, and phytohormones and added at a dose of 10 mL L -1 to the medium containing 1.0 mM lead nitrate. Micropropagation coefficient increased by 10.2-16.6 % in PP and AH variants, respectively. Growth tolerance index increased by 22.9-31.8 % for the shoots and by 60.1-82.4 % for the roots. In the absence of Pb, the additives inhibited multiplication and growth of microplantlets. PP and AH facilitated Pb accumulation in plant organs, especially in the roots. PP enhanced bioconcentration factor and AH improved Pb translocation to the shoots. Adaptation to Pb was associated with increased accumulation of phenolics and higher radical scavenging activity. Medium supplementation, particularly with AH, enhanced antiradical activity of Pb-adapted lines but reduced the content of phenolic compounds. The study results indicated that supplementation with organic amendments may be beneficial in in vitro selection against lead toxicity.

  1. Anaerobic biogranulation in a hybrid reactor treating phenolic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, Anushyaa; Gupta, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    Granulation was examined in four similar anaerobic hybrid reactors 15.5 L volume (with an effective volume of 13.5 L) during the treatment of synthetic coal wastewater at the mesophilic temperature of 27 ± 5 deg. C. The hybrid reactors are a combination of UASB unit at the lower part and an anaerobic filter at the upper end. Synthetic wastewater with an average chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 2240 mg/L, phenolics concentration of 752 mg/L and a mixture of volatile fatty acids was fed to three hybrid reactors. The fourth reactor, control system, was fed with a wastewater containing sodium acetate and mineral nutrients. Coal waste water contained phenol (490 mg/L); m-, o-, p-cresols (123.0, 58.6, 42 mg/L); 2,4-, 2,5-, 3,4- and 3,5-dimethyl phenols (6.3, 6.3, 4.4 and 21.3 mg/L) as major phenolic compounds. A mixture of anaerobic digester sludge and partially granulated sludge (3:1) were used as seed materials for the start up of the reactors. Granules were observed after 45 days of operation of the systems. The granules ranged from 0.4 to 1.2 mm in diameter with good settling characteristics with an SVI of 12 mL/g SS. After granulation, the hybrid reactor performed steadily with phenolics and COD removal efficiencies of 93% and 88%, respectively at volumetric loading rate of 2.24 g COD/L d and hydraulic retention time of 24 h. The removal efficiencies for phenol and m/p-cresols reached 92% and 93% (corresponding to 450.8 and 153 mg/L), while o-cresol was degraded to 88% (corresponding to 51.04 mg/L). Dimethyl phenols could be removed completely at all the organic loadings and did not contribute much to the residual organics. Biodegradation of o-cresol was obtained in the hybrid-UASB reactors

  2. Electrochemical Degradation of Phenol and Resorcinol Molecules through the Dissolution of Sacrificial Anodes of Macro-Corrosion Galvanic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boguslaw Pierozynski

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the processes of phenol and resorcinol electrodegradation carried-out through continuous anodic dissolution of aluminum alloy and carbon steel sacrificial anodes for artificially aerated Cu-Al alloy and Cu-Fe-based galvanic (macro-corrosion cells and synthetically prepared wastewater solutions. Electrochemical experiments were carried-out by means of a laboratory size, PMMA (Poly-methyl methacrylate-made electrolyser unit, where significant degrees of phenol (10–89% and resorcinol (13–37% decomposition were obtained and visualized through the respective chemical/spectroscopy analyses. In addition, quantitative determination of phenol, as well as resorcinol (and possible electrodegradation products for the selected experimental conditions was performed by means of instrumental high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis.

  3. Sorption of a phenols mixture in aqueous solution with activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia M, D.

    2004-01-01

    The constant population growth and the quick industrialization have caused severe damages to our natural aquifer resources for a great variety of organic and inorganic pollutants. Among these they are those phenol compounds that are highly toxic, resistant (to the degradation chemistry) and poorly biodegradable. The phenolic compounds is used in a great variety of industries, like it is the production of resins, nylon, plastifiers, anti-oxidants, oil additives, drugs, pesticides, colorants, explosives, disinfectants and others. The disseminated discharges or effluents coming from the industrial processes toward lakes and rivers are causing a growing adverse effect in the environment, as well as a risk for the health. Numerous studies exist on the phenols removal and phenols substituted for very varied techniques, among them they are the adsorption in activated carbon. This finishes it has been used successfully for the treatment of residual waters municipal and industrial and of drinking waters and it is considered as the best technique available to eliminate organic compounds not biodegradable and toxic present in aqueous solution (US EPA, 1991). However a little information exists on studies carried out in aqueous systems with more of a phenolic compound. The activated carbon is broadly used as adsorbent due to its superficial properties in the so much treatment of water as of aqueous wastes, adsorbent for the removal of organic pollutants. The main objective of this work is the adsorption of a aqueous mixture of phenol-4 chloro phenol of different concentrations in activated carbon of mineral origin of different meshes and to diminish with it their presence in water. The experiments were carried out for lots, in normal conditions of temperature and pressure. The experimental results show that the removal capacity depends so much of the superficial properties of the sorbent like of the physical properties and chemical of the sorbate. The isotherms were carried

  4. Aquatic pathways model to predict the fate of phenolic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaberg, R.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Mellinger, P.J.

    1983-04-01

    Organic materials released from energy-related activities could affect human health and the environment. To better assess possible impacts, we developed a model to predict the fate of spills or discharges of pollutants into flowing or static bodies of fresh water. A computer code, Aquatic Pathways Model (APM), was written to implement the model. The computer programs use compartmental analysis to simulate aquatic ecosystems. The APM estimates the concentrations of chemicals in fish tissue, water and sediment, and is therefore useful for assessing exposure to humans through aquatic pathways. The APM will consider any aquatic pathway for which the user has transport data. Additionally, APM will estimate transport rates from physical and chemical properties of chemicals between several key compartments. The major pathways considered are biodegradation, fish and sediment uptake, photolysis, and evaporation. The model has been implemented with parameters for distribution of phenols, an important class of compounds found in the water-soluble fractions of coal liquids. Current modeling efforts show that, in comparison with many pesticides and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the lighter phenolics (the cresols) are not persistent in the environment. The properties of heavier molecular weight phenolics (indanols, naphthols) are not well enough understood at this time to make similar judgements. For the twelve phenolics studied, biodegradation appears to be the major pathway for elimination from aquatic environments. A pond system simulation (using APM) of a spill of solvent refined coal (SRC-II) materials indicates that phenol, cresols, and other single cyclic phenolics are degraded to 16 to 25 percent of their original concentrations within 30 hours. Adsorption of these compounds into sediments and accumulation by fish was minor.

  5. Photoelectrochemical performance of multi-layered BiOx–TiO2/Ti electrodes for degradation of phenol and production of molecular hydrogen in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyunwoong; Bak, Ayoung; Ahn, Yong Yoon; Choi, Jina; Hoffmannn, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We demonstrated that the electrocatalytic performance of BiO x –TiO 2 anodes for the degradation of aqueous phenol could be highly boosted by light irradiation. ► Although BiO x –TiO 2 anodes have been originally developed as the electrocatalytic anodes that operate in the absence of light by degeneratively doping Bi in TiO 2 , the presence of TiO 2 made them retain photoelectrocatalytic activity as well. ► Such dual functionality of BiO x –TiO 2 electrodes with high synergy effects may be directly used for water treatment with simultaneous hydrogen production from water. - Abstract: Multi-layered BiO x –TiO 2 electrodes were used for the oxidation of chemical contaminants coupled with the production of H 2 characterized by a synergistic enhancement. The BiO x –TiO 2 electrodes were composed of a mixed-metal oxide array involving an under layer of TaO x –IrO x , a middle layer of BiO x –SnO 2 , and a top layer of BiO x –TiO 2 deposited in a series on both sides of Ti foil. Cyclic voltammograms showed that the BiO x –TiO 2 electrodes had an electrocatalytic activity for oxidation of phenol that was enhanced by 70% under illumination with AM 1.5 light. When the BiO x –TiO 2 anode was coupled with a stainless steel cathode in a Na 2 SO 4 electrolyte with phenol and irradiated with UV light at an applied DC voltage, the anodic phenol oxidation rate and the cathodic H 2 production rates were enhanced by factors of four and three, respectively, as compared to the sum of each light irradiation and direct DC electrolysis. These synergistic effects depend on the specific electrode composition and decrease on TaO x –IrO x and BiO x –SnO 2 anodes in the absence of a top layer of BiO x –TiO 2 . These results indicate that the BiO x –TiO 2 layer functions as the key photo-electrocatalyst. The heavy doping level of Bi (25 mol%) in TiO 2 increases the electric conductivity of the parent TiO 2 .

  6. Study on The Application of Composed TiO2-diatomite in The Removal of Phenol in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Li, J.

    2017-10-01

    As an environmentally friendly pollution control technology, TiO2 photocatalytic technology has a broad prospect in the field of environmental protection. In this paper, composed nano-TiO2-diatomite were prepared by depositing TiO2 nanoparticles on the surface of diatomite microparticles. The nano-TiO2/diatomite composed photocatalyst is used to remove phenol in water in a specific designed reaction box under 4 different operation factors such as different reaction time, different pollutant concentration, different UV light powers and different amount of catalytic powder. The experimental results indicate that the phenol removal percentages are influenced by the reaction time most significantly, the second is the phenol concentration, the next one is the photocatalyst amount and the UV light powers’ effect is quite limited. Tthe degradation of phenol typically slows down at the reaction time about 30 or 60 minutes. Besides that, the phenol removal kinetic removal rates were also investigated.

  7. 'Rare biosphere' bacteria as key phenanthrene degraders in coastal seawaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauret, Caroline; Séverin, Tatiana; Vétion, Gilles; Guigue, Catherine; Goutx, Madeleine; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Conan, Pascal; Fagervold, Sonja K; Ghiglione, Jean-François

    2014-11-01

    By coupling DNA-SIP and pyrosequencing approaches, we identified Cycloclasticus sp. as a keystone degrader of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) despite being a member of the 'rare biosphere' in NW Mediterranean seawaters. We discovered novel PAH-degrading bacteria (Oceanibaculum sp., Sneathiella sp.) and we identified other groups already known to possess this function (Alteromonas sp., Paracoccus sp.). Together with Cycloclasticus sp., these groups contributed to potential in situ phenanthrene degradation at a rate >0.5 mg l(-1) day(-1), sufficient to account for a considerable part of PAH degradation. Further, we characterized the PAH-tolerant bacterial communities, which were much more diverse in the polluted site by comparison to unpolluted marine references. PAH-tolerant bacteria were also members of the rare biosphere, such as Glaciecola sp. Collectively, these data show the complex interactions between PAH-degraders and PAH-tolerant bacteria and provide new insights for the understanding of the functional ecology of marine bacteria in polluted waters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Lactobacillus plantarum esterase active on a broad range of phenolic esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Torres, María; Landete, José María; Reverón, Inés; Santamaría, Laura; de las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario

    2015-05-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is the lactic acid bacterial species most frequently found in the fermentation of food products of plant origin on which phenolic compounds are abundant. L. plantarum strains showed great flexibility in their ability to adapt to different environments and growth substrates. Of 28 L. plantarum strains analyzed, only cultures from 7 strains were able to hydrolyze hydroxycinnamic esters, such as methyl ferulate or methyl caffeate. As revealed by PCR, only these seven strains possessed the est_1092 gene. When the est_1092 gene was introduced into L. plantarum WCFS1 or L. lactis MG1363, their cultures acquired the ability to degrade hydroxycinnamic esters. These results support the suggestion that Est_1092 is the enzyme responsible for the degradation of hydroxycinnamic esters on the L. plantarum strains analyzed. The Est_1092 protein was recombinantly produced and biochemically characterized. Surprisingly, Est_1092 was able to hydrolyze not only hydroxycinnamic esters, since all the phenolic esters assayed were hydrolyzed. Quantitative PCR experiments revealed that the expression of est_1092 was induced in the presence of methyl ferulate, an hydroxycinnamic ester, but was inhibited on methyl gallate, an hydroxybenzoic ester. As Est_1092 is an enzyme active on a broad range of phenolic esters, simultaneously possessing feruloyl esterase and tannase activities, its presence on some L. plantarum strains provides them with additional advantages to survive and grow on plant environments. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. [Branch-specific detection of phenols and assessment of ground water solubility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, F; Kerndorff, H; Kühn, S

    2000-01-01

    are possible. Input of phenols on agricultural lands can be caused by pesticides, sewage sludge or manure. The groundwater downstream of landfills often contains phenol, chlorophenols, cresols, and xylenols. The formation of phenol from other organic contaminants as benzene in groundwater has been reported. The potential for mobilization of phenols in the saturated zone can be estimated from their physical and chemical properties. Especially low molecular weight phenols are easily mobilized due to their high solubility in water and low potential for accumulation. These compounds are: phenol, cresols, xylenols, chlorophenols, hydroxybenzenes, nitrophenols, anisidines, aminophenols, anisol, 2-phenoxyethanol, and thiophenol. The stability of phenols under laboratory conditions varies. The complete mineralization depends mainly on the experimental set-up, i.e. nutrients, temperature, and type of inocula. The anaerobic degradation of phenols is generally slower than the aerobic. Phenol is readily biodegradable under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In general, the biodegradability depends on the type, number and position of substitutes. Phenols with nitro-, alkyl-, or chlorosubstitutes are more recalcitrant than phenol itself. Our biodegradability test show that the decomposition of alkylphenols is determined by the length and branching of the alcyllic chain. Phenols with high contamination potential are chlorophenols, xylenols, and nitrophenols. These compounds are both mobile and recalcitrant in the saturated zone. Phenolic compounds of a medium contamination risk are dichlorophenols, trichlorophenols, cresols, and phenol because they are mobile but less stable in groundwater. These compounds are known contaminants in the groundwater at gasworks, landfills, and ammunition factories. Aminophenols, anisidines, tert-butylphenols, ethylphenols, hydroxybenzenes, and 2-phenoxyethanol also constite a potential hazard for groundwater; however, no contaminations with these

  10. Reinvestigation of the role of humic acid in the oxidation of phenols by permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Jing; Du, Juanshan; Qiao, Junlian; Guan, Xiaohong

    2013-12-17

    Humic acid (HA) affects the oxidation of phenolic compounds by permanganate, but the role of HA in the oxidation of phenols by permanganate is far from clear. The mechanisms by which HA influences the oxidation of phenols by permanganate at pH 5.0-9.0 were systematically examined in this study. The presence of HA enhanced the oxidation of phenolic compounds by permanganate at pH ≤7.0, with greater enhancement at lower pH values. The presence of HA facilitated the in situ formation of MnO2, implying the importance of reductive moieties of HA in this reaction. This was supported by the finding that HA preoxidized by ozone showed enhancements in the oxidation of phenols by permanganate at pH 5.0-6.0 smaller than those seen with pristine HA. The good correlation between HA-induced improvement in the oxidation rates of phenols by permanganate and those by preformed colloidal MnO2 at pH 5.0 confirmed that contribution of MnO2 formed in situ for the oxidation of phenols under this condition. The differences in the influence of Na2S2O3 and HA on the oxidation of phenol by permanganate revealed the fact that the continuous generation of fresh MnO2 and stabilization of the MnO2 formed in situ by HA were crucial for the HA-induced enhancement of the oxidation of phenols by permanganate at pH ≤7.0. The consumption of permanganate by HA and the poor oxidation ability of in situ-generated MnO2 under alkaline conditions resulted in the slightly negative effect of HA on the degradation rates of phenols by permanganate at pH >7.0.

  11. Storage effects on anthocyanins, phenolics and antioxidant activity of thermally processed conventional and organic blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamaladevi, Roopesh M; Andrews, Preston K; Davies, Neal M; Walters, Thomas; Sablani, Shyam S

    2012-03-15

    Consumer demand for products rich in phytochemicals is increasing as a result of greater awareness of their potential health benefits. However, processed products are stored for long-term and the phytochemicals are susceptible to degradation during storage. The objective of this study was to assess the storage effects on phytochemicals in thermally processed blueberries. Thermally processed canned berries and juice/puree were analysed for phytochemicals during their long-term storage. The phytochemical retention of thermally processed blueberries during storage was not influenced by production system (conventional versus organic). During 13 months of storage, total anthocyanins, total phenolics and total antioxidant activity in canned blueberry solids decreased by up to 86, 69 and 52% respectively. In canned blueberry syrup, total anthocyanins and total antioxidant activity decreased by up to 68 and 15% respectively, while total phenolic content increased by up to 117%. Similar trends in phytochemical content were observed in juice/puree stored for 4 months. The extent of changes in phytochemicals of thermally processed blueberries during storage was significantly influenced by blanching. Long-term storage of thermally processed blueberries had varying degrees of influence on degradation of total anthocyanins, total phenolics and total antioxidant activity. Blanching before thermal processing helped to preserve the phytochemicals during storage of blueberries. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  13. Lignin phenols used to infer organic matter sources to Sepetiba Bay - RJ, Brasil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, C. E.; Pfeiffer, W. C.; Martinelli, L. A.; Tsamakis, E.; Hedges, J. I.; Keil, R. G.

    2010-04-01

    Lignin phenols were measured in the sediments of Sepitiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and in bedload sediments and suspended sediments of the four major fluvial inputs to the bay; São Francisco and Guandu Channels and the Guarda and Cação Rivers. Fluvial suspended lignin yields (Σ8 3.5-14.6 mgC 10 g dw -1) vary little between the wet and dry seasons and are poorly correlated with fluvial chlorophyll concentrations (0.8-50.2 μgC L -1). Despite current land use practices that favor grassland agriculture or industrial uses, fluvial lignin compositions are dominated by a degraded leaf-sourced material. The exception is the Guarda River, which has a slight influence from grasses. The Lignin Phenol Vegetation Index, coupled with acid/aldehyde and 3.5 Db/V ratios, indicate that degraded leaf-derived phenols are also the primary preserved lignin component in the bay. The presence of fringe Typha sp. and Spartina sp. grass beds surrounding portions of the Bay are not reflected in the lignin signature. Instead, lignin entering the bay appears to reflect the erosion of soils containing a degraded signature from the former Atlantic rain forest that once dominated the watershed, instead of containing a significant signature derived from current agricultural uses. A three-component mixing model using the LPVI, atomic N:C ratios, and stable carbon isotopes (which range between -26.8 and -21.8‰) supports the hypothesis that fluvial inputs to the bay are dominated by planktonic matter (78% of the input), with lignin dominated by leaf (14% of the input) over grass (6%). Sediments are composed of a roughly 50-50 mixture of autochthonous material and terrigenous material, with lignin being primarily sourced from leaf.

  14. Matrix evaluation for Pseudomonas spp. immobilisation in phenol bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Chitiva Urbina

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas spp. were cultivated in a free cell suspension and also immobilised in three different matrices to observe the influence of a contaminant like phenol on degradation velocity and compare each one's results. Polyurethane polymers, alginate (Manohar et al, 2001 and a mixture of alginate and polyvinyl alcohol (Doria et al, 2002 were selected and tested as matrices; all of them proved viable as matrices for cell immobilisation. Pseudomonas were cultivated in an initial 10 cfu/ml concentration in each one of the matrices for comparison purposes and in a medium without matrix; all mediums were supplemented with a minimum salt medium and 200 ppm phenol. A removal time of 23 days was observed in the medium without matrix, 15 days in the polyurethane matrix and 7 days in the alginate matrices. Improved removal times were observed in all matrices when compared to the free cell suspension.

  15. Oxidative degradation of chlorophenol derivatives promoted by microwaves or power ultrasound: a mechanism investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotto, Giancarlo; Binello, Arianna; Di Carlo, Stefano; Orio, Laura; Wu, Zhi-Lin; Ondruschka, Bernd

    2010-03-01

    Phenols are the most common pollutants in industrial wastewaters (particularly from oil refineries, resin manufacture, and coal processing). In the last two decades, it has become common knowledge that they can be effectively destroyed by nonconventional techniques such as power ultrasound (US) and/or microwave (MW) irradiation. Both techniques may strongly promote advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The present study aimed to shed light on the effect and mechanism of US- and MW-promoted oxidative degradation of chlorophenols; 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a pesticide widespread in the environment, was chosen as the model compound. 2,4-D degradation by AOPs was carried out either under US (20 and 300 kHz) in aqueous solutions (with and without the addition of Fenton reagent) or solvent-free under MW with sodium percarbonate (SPC). All these reactions were monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis and compared with the classical Fenton reaction in water under magnetic stirring. The same set of treatments was also applied to 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and phenol, the first two products that occur a step down in the degradation sequence. Fenton and Fenton-like reagents were employed at the lowest active concentration. The effects of US and MW irradiation were investigated and compared with those of conventional treatments. Detailed mechanisms of Fenton-type reactions were suggested for 2,4-D, 2,4-DCP, and phenol, underlining the principal degradation products identified. MW-promoted degradation under solvent-free conditions with solid Fenton-like reagents (viz. SPC) is extremely efficient and mainly follows pyrolytic pathways. Power US strongly accelerates the degradation of 2,4-D in water through a rapid generation of highly reactive radicals; it does not lead to the formation of more toxic dimers. We show that US and MW enhance the oxidative degradation of 2,4-D and that a considerable saving of oxidants and cutting down of

  16. Degradation of Synthetic Dyes by Laccases – A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legerská Barbora

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laccases provide a promising future as a tool to be used in the field of biodegradation of synthetic dyes with different chemical structures. These enzymes are able to oxidize a wide range of phenolic substrates without the presence of additional co-factors. Laccases have been confirmed for their potential of synthetic dye degradation from wastewater and degradation products of these enzymatic reactions become less toxic than selected dyes. This study discusses the potential of laccase enzymes as agents for laccase-catalyzed degradation in terms of biodegradation efficiency of synthetic dyes, specifically: azo dyes, triphenylmethane, indigo and anthraquinone dyes. Review also summarizes the laccase-catalyzed degradation mechanisms of the selected synthetic dyes, as well as the degradation products and the toxicity of the dyes and their degradation products.

  17. Effects of lignin-derived phenolic compounds on xylitol production and key enzyme activities by a xylose utilizing yeast Candida athensensis SB18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinming; Geng, Anli; Yao, Chuanyi; Lu, Yinghua; Li, Qingbiao

    2012-10-01

    Candida athensensis SB18 is potential xylitol producing yeast isolated in Singapore. It has excellent xylose tolerance and is able to produce xylitol in high titer and yield. However, by-products, such as phenolic compounds, derived in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysate might negatively influence the performance of this strain for xylitol production. In this work, four potential phenolic inhibitors, such as vanillin, syringaldehyde, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and phenol, were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on xylitol production by C. athensensis SB18. Phenol was shown to be the most toxic molecule on this microorganism followed by syringaldehyde. Vanillin and 4-hydroxylbenzaldehyde was less toxic than phenol and syringaldehyde, with vanillin being the least toxic. Inhibition was insignificant when the total content of inhibitors was below 1.0 g/L. The presence of phenolic compounds affected the activity of xylose reductase, however not on that of xylitol dehydrogenase. C. athensensis SB18 is therefore a potential xylitol producer from hemicellulosic hydrolysate due to its assimilation of such phenolic inhibitors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Improve the biodegradability of post-hydrothermal liquefaction wastewater with ozone: conversion of phenols and N-heterocyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Libin; Si, Buchun; Martins, Marcio Arêdes; Watson, Jamison; Chu, Huaqiang; Zhang, Yuanhui; Tan, Xiaobo; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei

    2017-04-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction is a promising technology to convert wet biomass into bio-oil. However, post-hydrothermal liquefaction wastewater (PHWW) is also produced during the process. This wastewater contains a high concentration of organic compounds, including phenols and N-heterocyclic compounds which are two main inhibitors for biological treatment. Thus, proper treatment is required. In this work, ozone was used to convert phenols and N-heterocyclic compounds with a dosage range of 0-4.64 mg O 3 /mL PHWW. After ozone treatment, the phenols were fully converted, and acids were produced. However, N-heterocyclic compounds were found to have a low conversion rate (21.7%). The kinetic analysis for the degradation of phenols and N-heterocyclic compounds showed that the substitute played an important role in determining the priority of ozone reactions. The OH moiety in the ring compounds (phenols and pyridinol) may form hydroxyl radical, which lead to an efficient reaction. A substantial improved biodegradability of PHWW was observed after ozone treatment. The ratio of BOD 5 /COD was increased by about 32.36%, and reached a maximum of 0.41. The improved biodegradability of PHWW was justified by the conversion of phenols and N-heterocyclic compounds.

  19. Bioremediation of high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons co-contaminated with metals in liquid and soil slurries by metal tolerant PAHs degrading bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2012-11-01

    Bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) contaminated soils in the presence of heavy metals have proved to be difficult and often challenging due to the ability of toxic metals to inhibit PAH degradation by bacteria. In this study, a mixed bacterial culture designated as consortium-5 was isolated from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. The ability of this consortium to utilise HMW PAHs such as pyrene and BaP as a sole carbon source in the presence of toxic metal Cd was demonstrated. Furthermore, this consortium has proven to be effective in degradation of HMW PAHs even from the real long term contaminated MGP soil. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate the great potential of this consortium for field scale bioremediation of PAHs in long term mix contaminated soils such as MGP sites. To our knowledge this is the first study to isolate and characterize metal tolerant HMW PAH degrading bacterial consortium which shows great potential in bioremediation of mixed contaminated soils such as MGP.

  20. Understanding the degree of condensation of phenolic and etherified C-9 units of in situ lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Bernadette; Manley-Harris, Merilyn; Suckling, Ian D

    2011-12-14

    A novel approach for the quantification of the degree of condensation at the C(5) position of etherified and phenolic phenylpropane (C-9) units of in situ lignin is described. This is achieved by degrading unmethylated and methylated wood by thioacidolysis and analyzing the resultant product mixtures by quantitative (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Applying this new method to compression wood and normal wood from Pinus radiata showed that, whereas 41-47% of etherified guaiacyl C-9 units are condensed at the C(5) position, almost all phenolic guaiacyl C-9 units exist as uncondensed moieties. Analysis of milled wood lignin (MWL) isolated from the same wood by (31)P NMR spectroscopy before and after thioacidolysis showed that the phenolic guaiacyl C-9 units were more condensed than those in the in situ lignin. This is likely due to partial cleavage of the more condensed etherified linkages during the lignin isolation, leading to a relative increase in condensed phenolic guaiacyl C-9 units.

  1. Degradation of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid by a Bacillus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Chen

    Full Text Available 3-Phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA is of great environmental concern with regards to endocrine disrupting activity and widespread occurrence in water and soil, yet little is known about microbial degradation in contaminated regions. We report here that a new bacterial strain isolated from soil, designated DG-02, was shown to degrade 95.6% of 50 mg·L(-1 3-PBA within 72 h in mineral salt medium (MSM. Strain DG-02 was identified as Bacillus sp. based on the morphology, physio-biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence. The optimum conditions for 3-PBA degradation were determined to be 30.9°C and pH 7.7 using response surface methodology (RSM. The isolate converted 3-PBA to produce 3-(2-methoxyphenoxy benzoic acid, protocatechuate, phenol, and 3,4-dihydroxy phenol, and subsequently transformed these compounds with a q(max, K(s and K(i of 0.8615 h(-1, 626.7842 mg·L(-1 and 6.7586 mg·L(-1, respectively. A novel microbial metabolic pathway for 3-PBA was proposed on the basis of these metabolites. Inoculation of strain DG-02 resulted in a higher degradation rate on 3-PBA than that observed in the non-inoculated soil. Moreover, the degradation process followed the first-order kinetics, and the half-life (t(1/2 for 3-PBA was greatly reduced as compared to the non-inoculated control. This study highlights an important potential application of strain DG-02 for the in situ bioremediation of 3-PBA contaminated environments.

  2. HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis of antioxidant degradation products migrating to drinking water from PE materials and PEX pipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Waul, Christopher Kevin; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    degradation products may leach and enter drinking water. The aim of this investigation was to develop a method for measuring these degradation products with a performance meeting the drinking water quality criteria of 20 µg L−1. Using headspace solid phase microextraction coupled to a gas chromatograph......Polyethylene (PE) and cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) pipes are frequently used in water supply systems. Such pipes contain added antioxidants with phenolic structures, e.g. Irgafos 168, Irganox 1010 and 1076, in order to improve durability. However, phenol, ketone and quinone antioxidant...

  3. Impact of Storage Conditions on the Stability of Predominant Phenolic Constituents and Antioxidant Activity of Dried Piper betle Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ameena; Chong, Chien Hwa; Mah, Siau Hui; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Choong, Thomas Shean Yaw; Chua, Bee Lin

    2018-02-23

    The phenolic constituents in Piper betle are well known for their antioxidant potential; however, current literature has very little information on their stability under the influence of storage factors. Present study evaluated the stability of total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity together with individual phenolic constituents (hydroxychavicol, eugenol, isoeugenol and allylpyrocatechol 3,4-diacetate) present in dried Piper betle 's extract under different storage temperature of 5 and 25 °C with and without light for a period of six months. Both light and temperature significantly influenced TPC and its corresponding antioxidant activity over time. More than 95% TPC and antioxidant activity was retained at 5 °C in dark condition after 180 days of storage. Hydroxychavicol demonstrated the best stability with no degradation while eugenol and isoeugenol displayed moderate stability in low temperature (5 °C) and dark conditions. 4-allyl-1,2-diacetoxybenzene was the only compound that underwent complete degradation. A new compound, 2,4-di- tert -butylphenol, was detected after five weeks of storage only in the extracts exposed to light. Both zero-order and first-order kinetic models were adopted to describe the degradation kinetics of the extract's antioxidant activity. Zero-order displayed better fit with higher correlation coefficients ( R ² = 0.9046) and the half-life was determined as 62 days for the optimised storage conditions (5 °C in dark conditions).

  4. Determination of biological activities and total phenolic contents of flowers of jasminum humile and roots of dorema aucheri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Farooq, U.; Ullah, F.; Iqbal, J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate in vitro antioxidant, NO scavenging, and antibacterial activities as well as total phenolic contents of different extracts of flowers of Jasminum humile and roots of Dorema aucheri. The plant extracts showed significant antioxidant activity, having IC50 values comparable to those of references used in each assay and also inhibited accumulation of nitrite in vitro. The plant extracts yielded phenolic contents and showed significant antibacterial activity. The observed antioxidant potential and phenolic contents of the extracts showed that flowers of J. humile and roots of D. aucheri are potential source of natural antioxidants that may help to retard oxidative degradation and microbial growth in food industry. (author)

  5. Degree of Fault Tolerance as a Comprehensive Parameter for Reliability Evaluation of Fault Tolerant Electric Traction Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Bolvashenkov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new approach and methodology of quantitative assessment of the fault tolerance of electric power drive consisting of the multi-phase traction electric motor and multilevel electric inverter. It is suggested to consider such traction drive as a system with several degraded states. As a comprehensive parameter for evaluating of the fault tolerance, it is proposed to use the criterion of degree of the fault tolerance. For the approbation of the proposed method, the authors carried out research and obtained results of its practical application for evaluating the fault tolerance of the power train of an electrical helicopter.

  6. Effect of the addition of different types of oenological commercial tannins on phenolic and sensorial red wine characteristics evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordão António M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to understand the effect of the addition of different commercial types of oenological tannins on red wine phenolic compounds and sensorial characteristics evolution. So, six different commercial oenological tannins obtained from different sources at an average dosage recommended by the manufactures were added to a red wine. During 120 wine aging days several phenolic parameters were analyzed (including several individual phenolic compounds by HPLC and also the sensorial characteristics of the wines. Wines treated with oenological tannins showed higher total phenols and flavonoid phenols and lesser color degradation during the aging time considered. After 120 aging days, wines aged with oenological tannins showed more total and individual anthocyanins and significantly more red color that induced significantly color differences in relation to the untreated wine (especially for the wines treated with condensed tannins. From a sensorial point of view it was also possible to detect a clear differentiation between the wines.

  7. Modulation of Mucosal Immune Response, Tolerance and Proliferation in Mice Colonized by the Mucin-Degrader Akkermansia muciniphila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel eDerrien

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cells of the mammalian intestine are covered with a mucus layer that prevents direct contact with intestinal microbes but also constitutes a substrate for mucus-degrading bacteria. To study the effect of mucus degradation on the host-response, germ-free mice were colonized with Akkermansia muciniphila. This anaerobic bacterium belonging to the Verrucomicrobia is specialized in the degradation of mucin, the glycoprotein present in mucus, and found in high numbers in the intestinal tract of human and other mammalian species. Efficient colonization of A. muciniphila was observed with highest numbers in the cecum, where most mucin is produced. In contrast, following colonization by Lactobacillus plantarum, a facultative anaerobe belonging to the Firmicutes that ferments carbohydrates, similar cell-numbers were found at all intestinal sites. Whereas A. muciniphila was located closely associated with the intestinal cells, L. plantarum was exclusively found in the lumen. The global transcriptional host response was determined in intestinal biopsies and revealed a consistent, site-specific and unique modulation of about 750 genes in mice colonized by A. muciniphila and over 1500 genes after colonization by L. plantarum. Pathway reconstructions showed that colonization by A. muciniphila altered mucosal gene expression profiles towards increased expression of genes involved in immune responses and cell fate determination, while colonization by L. plantarum led to up-regulation of lipid metabolism. These indicate that the colonizers induce host responses that are specific per intestinal location. In conclusion, we propose that A. muciniphila modulates pathways involved in establishing homeostasis for basal metabolism and immune tolerance towards commensal microbiota.

  8. Combined process of electrocoagulation and photocatalytic degradation for the treatment of olive washing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Hasan; Dizge, Nadir; Yatmaz, H Cengiz

    2017-01-01

    In this study, an electrocoagulation reactor (ECR) and photocatalytic reactor (PCR) were tested to understand the performance of combined electrocoagulation and photocatalytic-degradation of olive washing wastewater (OWW). The effects of initial pH (6.0, 6.9, 8.0, 9.0), applied voltage (10.0, 12.5, 15.0 V), and operating time (30, 60, 90, 120 min) were investigated in the electrocoagulation reactor when aluminum electrodes were used as both anode and cathode. The pH, conductivity, color, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and phenol were measured versus time to determine the efficiency of the ECR and PCR process. It was observed that electrocoagulation as a single treatment process supplied the COD removal of 62.5%, color removal of 98.1%, and total phenol removal of 87% at optimum conditions as pH 6.9, applied voltage of 12.5 V, and operating time of 120 min. Moreover, final pH and conductivity were 7.7 and 980 μS/cm, respectively. On the other hand, the effect of semiconductor catalyst type (TiO 2 and ZnO) and loading (1, 2, 3 g/L) were tested using PCR as a stand-alone technique. It was found that photocatalytic degradation as a single treatment process when using 1 g/L ZnO achieved the COD removal of 46%, color removal of 99% with a total phenol removal of 41% at optimum conditions. Final pH and conductivity were 6.2 and 915 μS/cm, respectively. Among semiconductor catalysts, TiO 2 and ZnO performed identical efficiencies for both COD and total phenol removal. Moreover, combination in which electrochemical degradation was employed as a pre-treatment to the photocatalytic degradation process obtained high COD removal of 88% and total phenol, as well as color removal of 100% for the OWW. The electrochemical treatment alone was not effective, but in combination with the photocatalytic process, led to a high-quality effluent. Finally, sludge collected from the electrocoagulation process was characterized by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared and X

  9. Phenols and aromatic amines as thermal stabilizers in polyolefin processing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšil, Jan; Habicher, W. D.; Al-Malaika, S.; Zweifel, H.; Nešpůrek, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 176, - (2001), s. 55-63 ISSN 1022-1360. [International Conference on Polymer Modification, Degradation and Stabilization /1./. Palermo , 03.09.2000-07.09.2000] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1050901; GA MŠk ME 184; GA MŠk ME 372; GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : thermal stabilizers * phenols * aromatic amines Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.634, year: 2001

  10. Dynamic model of organic pollutant degradation in three dimensional packed bed electrode reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Tianting; Wang, Yan; Yang, Hui; Wang, Tianlei; Cai, Wangfeng

    2018-04-21

    A dynamic model of semi-batch three-dimensional electrode reactor was established based on the limiting current density, Faraday's law, mass balance and a series of assumptions. Semi-batch experiments of phenol degradation were carried out in a three-dimensional electrode reactor packed with activated carbon under different conditions to verify the model. The factors such as the current density, the electrolyte concentration, the initial pH value, the flow rate of organic and the initial organic concentration were examined to know about the pollutant degradation in the three-dimensional electrode reactor. The various concentrations and logarithm of concentration of phenol with time were compared with the dynamic model. It was shown that the calculated data were in good agreement with experimental data in most cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Degradative capacities and bioaugmentation potential of an anaerobic benzene-degrading bacterium strain DN11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuki Kasai; Yumiko Kodama; Yoh Takahata; Toshihiro Hoaki; Kazuya Watanabe [Marine Biotechnology Institute, Kamaishi (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    Azoarcus sp. strain DN11 is a denitrifying bacterium capable of benzene degradation under anaerobic conditions. The present study evaluated strain DN11 for its application to bioaugmentation of benzene-contaminated underground aquifers. Strain DN11 could grow on benzene, toluene, m-xylene, and benzoate as the sole carbon and energy sources under nitrate-reducing conditions, although o- and p-xylenes were transformed in the presence of toluene. Phenol was not utilized under anaerobic conditions. Kinetic analysis of anaerobic benzene degradation estimated its apparent affinity and inhibition constants to be 0.82 and 11 {mu}M, respectively. Benzene-contaminated groundwater taken from a former coal-distillation plant site in Aichi, Japan was anaerobically incubated in laboratory bottles and supplemented with either inorganic nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and nitrate) alone, or the nutrients plus strain DN11, showing that benzene was significantly degraded only when DN11 was introduced. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, and quantitative PCR revealed that DN11 decreased after benzene was degraded. Following the decrease in DN11 16S rRNA gene fragments corresponding to bacteria related to Owenweeksia hongkongensis and Pelotomaculum isophthalicum, appeared as strong bands, suggesting possible metabolic interactions in anaerobic benzene degradation. Results suggest that DN11 is potentially useful for degrading benzene that contaminates underground aquifers at relatively low concentrations. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Phenolation of vegetable oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZORAN S. PETROVIĆ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Novel bio-based compounds containing phenols suitable for the syn­thesis of polyurethanes were prepared. The direct alkylation of phenols with different vegetable oils in the presence of superacids (HBF4, triflic acid as ca­talysts was studied. The reaction kinetics was followed by monitoring the de­crease of the double bond content (iodine value with time. In order to under­stand the mechanism of the reaction, phenol was alkylated with model com­pounds. The model compounds containing one internal double bond were 9-oc­tadecene and methyl oleate and those with three double bonds were triolein and high oleic safflower oil (82 % oleic acid. It was shown that the best structures for phenol alkylation are fatty acids with only one double bond (oleic acid. Fatty acids with two double bonds (linoleic acid and three double bonds (lino­lenic acid lead to polymerized oils by a Diels–Alder reaction, and to a lesser extent to phenol alkylated products. The reaction product of direct alkylation of phenol with vegetable oils is a complex mixture of phenol alkylated with poly­merized oil (30–60 %, phenyl esters formed by transesterification of phenol with triglyceride ester bonds (<10 % and unreacted oil (30 %. The phenolated vegetable oils are new aromatic–aliphatic bio-based raw materials suitable for the preparation of polyols (by propoxylation, ethoxylation, Mannich reactions for the preparation of polyurethanes, as intermediates for phenolic resins or as bio-based antioxidants.

  13. Properties and processing characteristics of low density carbon cloth phenolic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. Jeff

    1993-01-01

    Ply-lift and pocketing are two critical anomalies of carbon cloth phenolic composites (CCPC) in rocket nozzle applications. Ply lift occurs at low temperatures when the A/P and in-plane permeabilities of the composite materials are still very low and in-plane porous paths are blocked. Pocketing occurs at elevated temperatures when in-plane permeability is reduced by the A/P compressive stress. The thermostructural response of CCPC in a rapid heating environment involves simultaneous heat, mass, and momentum transfer along with the degradation of phenolic resin in a multiphase system with temperature- and time-dependent material properties as well as dynamic processing conditions. Three temperature regions represent the consequent chemical reactions, material transformations, and property transitions, and provide a quick qualitative method for characterizing the thermostructural behavior of a CCPC. In order to optimize the FM5939 LDCCP (low density carbon cloth phenolic) for the nozzle performance required in the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) program, a fundamental study on LDCCP materials was conducted. The cured composite has a density of 1.0 +/- 0.5 gm/cc which includes 10 to 25 percent void volume. The weight percent of carbon microballoon is low (7-15 percent). However, they account for approximately one third of the volume and historically their percentages have not been controlled very tightly. In addition, the composite properties show no correlation with microballoon weight percent or fiber properties (e.g. fiber density or fiber moisture adsorption capacity). Test results concerning the ply-lift anomaly in the MNASA motor firings were: (1) Steeper ply angle (shorter path lenght) designs minimized/eliminated by lifting, (2) material with higher void volume ply lifted less frequently, (3) materials with high (greater than 9 percent) microballoon content had a higher rate of ply lifting, and (4) LDCCP materials failed at microballoon-resin interfaces

  14. The influence of TiO2 and aeration on the kinetics of electrochemical oxidation of phenol in packed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lizhang; Zhao Yuemin; Fu Jianfeng

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of phenolic wastewater in a lab-scale reactor, packed into granular activated carbon (GAC) with Ti/SnO 2 anodes and stainless steel cathodes, was interpreted in this study. GAC saturated rapidly if it was only used as sorbent, but application of suitable electric energy for the system simultaneously could recover the adsorption ability of GAC and maintain the continuous running effectively. The titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) as catalyst and airflow were also applied to the electrochemical reactor to examine the enhancement for phenol oxidation process. Results revealed that the electrochemical degradation of phenol could be reasonably described by first-order kinetics. In addition, it was illustrated that acid region, increased voltage, more dosage of TiO 2 and higher aeration intensity were all beneficial parameters for phenol oxidation rates. By inspecting the relationship between the rate constants (k) and influencing factors, respectively, an overall kinetic model for phenol oxidation was proposed. The kinetics obtained from the experiments under corresponding electrochemical conditions could provide an accurate estimation of phenol concentration effluent and better design of the packed bed reactor

  15. Reactive transport modeling of processes controlling the distribution and natural attenuation of phenolic compounds in a deep sandstone aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, K. U.; Benner, S. G.; Frind, E. O.; Thornton, S. F.; Lerner, D. N.

    2001-12-01

    Reactive solute transport modeling was utilized to evaluate the potential for natural attenuation of a contaminant plume containing phenolic compounds at a chemical producer in the West Midlands, UK. The reactive transport simulations consider microbially mediated biodegradation of the phenolic compounds (phenols, cresols, and xylenols) by multiple electron acceptors. Inorganic reactions including hydrolysis, aqueous complexation, dissolution of primary minerals, formation of secondary mineral phases, and ion exchange are considered. One-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) simulations were conducted. Mass balance calculations indicate that biodegradation in the saturated zone has degraded approximately 1-5% of the organic contaminant plume over a time period of 47 years. Simulations indicate that denitrification is the most significant degradation process, accounting for approximately 50% of the organic contaminant removal, followed by sulfate reduction and fermentation reactions, each contributing 15-20%. Aerobic respiration accounts for less than 10% of the observed contaminant removal in the saturated zone. Although concentrations of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) mineral phases are high in the aquifer sediment, reductive dissolution is limited, producing only 5% of the observed mass loss. Mass balance calculations suggest that no more than 20-25% of the observed total inorganic carbon (TIC) was generated from biodegradation reactions in the saturated zone. Simulations indicate that aerobic biodegradation in the unsaturated zone, before the contaminant entered the aquifer, may have produced the majority of the TIC observed in the plume. Because long-term degradation is limited to processes within the saturated zone, use of observed TIC concentrations to predict the future natural attenuation may overestimate contaminant degradation by a factor of 4-5.

  16. Conversion of alkaline pretreated empty palm fruit bunch (EPFB) to phenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nor Aishah Saidina Amin; Roslindawati Haron

    2010-01-01

    Various efforts on green chemistry are being directed at producing renewable chemicals. Chemicals derived from biomass can be the basis for building blocks in the chemicals industry. Phenols, traditionally produced from petroleum, can be derived from biomass for naturally-sourced solvents. Lignocellulose biomass consists of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin. Lignocellulose components can be altered by various chemical pretreatment methods. EFB contains about 60% cellulose and almost equal portions of lignin and hemicelluloses. Pretreatment of EFB fragmentized and degraded the lignocellulose structure in order to produce chemicals under thermochemical process. In this work, EFB was chemically pretreated with different sodium hydroxide (NaOH) concentrations to concentrated lignocellulose before being pyrolyzed to produce solid, gas and liquid products. Pyrolysis was conducted after the pretreatment step to evaluate the effects of pretreatment process on production and compositions of the bio-oil. The conversions of EFB were reported to be 61wt%, 47wt% and 42 wt%, after pretreatment with 5 wt%, 15 wt% and 25 wt%,NaOH concentrations, respectively. GCMS analysis results revealed the crude bio-oil contained dominantly phenol. Pyrolysis of the alkaline pretreated EFB seemed potential to produce biomass-based phenols. (author)

  17. Impact of Storage Conditions on the Stability of Predominant Phenolic Constituents and Antioxidant Activity of Dried Piper betle Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameena Ali

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The phenolic constituents in Piper betle are well known for their antioxidant potential; however, current literature has very little information on their stability under the influence of storage factors. Present study evaluated the stability of total phenolic content (TPC and antioxidant activity together with individual phenolic constituents (hydroxychavicol, eugenol, isoeugenol and allylpyrocatechol 3,4-diacetate present in dried Piper betle’s extract under different storage temperature of 5 and 25 °C with and without light for a period of six months. Both light and temperature significantly influenced TPC and its corresponding antioxidant activity over time. More than 95% TPC and antioxidant activity was retained at 5 °C in dark condition after 180 days of storage. Hydroxychavicol demonstrated the best stability with no degradation while eugenol and isoeugenol displayed moderate stability in low temperature (5 °C and dark conditions. 4-allyl-1,2-diacetoxybenzene was the only compound that underwent complete degradation. A new compound, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, was detected after five weeks of storage only in the extracts exposed to light. Both zero-order and first-order kinetic models were adopted to describe the degradation kinetics of the extract’s antioxidant activity. Zero-order displayed better fit with higher correlation coefficients (R2 = 0.9046 and the half-life was determined as 62 days for the optimised storage conditions (5 °C in dark conditions.

  18. Degradation of aqueous phenol solutions by coaxial DBD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojcinovic, B. P.; Manojlovic, D.; Roglic, G. M.; Obradovic, B. M.; Kuraica, M. M.; Puric, J.

    2008-07-01

    Solutions of 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,6-dichlorophenol in bidistilled and water from the river Danube were treated in plasma reactor. In this reactor, based on coaxial dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure, plasma is formed over a thin layer of treated water. After one pass through the reactor, starting chlorophenols concentration of 20 mg/l was diminished up to 95 %. Kinetics of the chlorophenols degradation was monitored by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography method (HPLC).

  19. Methylene blue and 4-chloro phenol degradation by photo catalysis with ultraviolet light, using TiO{sub 2} as catalyst; Degradacion de azul de metileno y 4-clorofenol por fotocatalisis con luz ultravioleta, utilizando TiO{sub 2} como catalizador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez H, A.

    2010-07-01

    Within the decontamination and remediation processes of the contaminated waters, as the refining or tertiary processes are the Advanced Oxidation Technologies. Among this technology is the heterogeneous photo catalysis, which is the object of this work to de grate 4-chloro phenol and methylene blue, using as semiconductor commercial titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). On the degradation the combination is exposed in the use of TiO{sub 2} under gamma irradiation of {sup 60}Co at different doses 400, 500, 800, 1000 and 1500 kGy. The organic compounds degradation was determined and the results show that to more radiation dose, the material is modified in such way that shows a major absorption of the organic compound, in the same way it is determined that to more dose which undergoes the TiO{sub 2} generally a major degradation is observed, but also it is has to give a more time of previous stabilization, for that the degradation is observed of better way. (Author)

  20. Photo- and thermal degradation of olive oil measured using an optical fibre smartphone spectrofluorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Ast, Sandra; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2017-04-01

    Degradation of olive oil under light and heat are analysed using an optical fibre based low-cost portable smartphone spectrofluorimeter. Visible fluorescence bands associated with phenolic acids, vitamins and chlorophyll centred at λ 452, 525 and 670 nm respectively are generated using near-UV excitation (LED λex 370 nm), of extra virgin olive oil are degraded more likely than refined olive oil under light and heat exposure. Packaging is shown to be critical when assessing the origin of degradation.

  1. Enzyme-assisted extraction enhancing the phenolic release from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) outer leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Nguyen Thai; Smagghe, Guy; Gonzales, Gerard Bryan; Van Camp, John; Raes, Katleen

    2014-07-30

    Phenolic compounds are highly present in byproducts from the cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) harvest and are thus a valuable source for valorization toward phenolic-rich extracts. In this study, we aimed to optimize and characterize the release of individual phenolic compounds from outer leaves of cauliflower, using two commercially available polysaccharide-degrading enzymes, Viscozyme L and Rapidase. As major results, the optimal conditions for the enzyme treatment were: enzyme/substrate ratio of 0.2% for Viscozyme L and 0.5% for Rapidase, temperature 35 °C, and pH 4.0. Using a UPLC-HD-TOF-MS setup, the main phenolic compounds in the extracts were identified as kaempferol glycosides and their combinations with different hydroxycinnamic acids. The most abundant components were kaempferol-3-feruloyldiglucoside and kaempferol-3-glucoside (respectively, 37.8 and 58.4 mg rutin equiv/100 g dry weight). Incubation of the cauliflower outer leaves with the enzyme mixtures resulted in a significantly higher extraction yield of kaempferol-glucosides as compared to the control treatment.

  2. Studies on the physiology of microbial degradation of pentachlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valo, R.; Apajalahti, J.; Salkinoja-Salonen, M.

    1985-03-01

    The requirements and conditions for pentachlorophenol (PCP) biodegradation by a mixed bacterial culture was studied. The effects of oxygen, nutrients, additional carbon sources, pH and temperature are described. Up to 90% of PCP was degraded into CO/sub 2/ and inorganic chloride in 1 week at an input concentration of <600 ..mu..M. Degradation continued when pO/sub 2/ was lowered to 0.0002 atm but ceased when pO/sub 2/ was further decreased to 0.00002 atm. Supplementary carbon sources, such as phenol, hydroxybenzoic acids or complex nutrients did not affect the biodegradation, but the presence of ammonium salts enhanced the rate of PCP degradation without affecting the yield of CO/sub 2/. The degrading organisms were shown to be procaryotic mesophiles; no degradation was shown at temperatures below +8/sup 0/ and above +50/sup 0/C. The optimum pH for degradation was from 6.4 to 7.2 and at higher pH value (8.4) degradation was inhibited more than at lower pH (5.6).

  3. Radio catalysis application in degradation of complex organic samples; Aplicacion de radiocatalisis en degradacion de muestras organicas complejas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno L, A.

    2014-07-01

    The generation of wastewater is a consequence of human activities, industries to be the generators of a large part of these discharges. These contaminated waters can be processed for their remediation; however the recalcitrant organic compounds are hardly removed through conventional treatments applied, so that new technologies have been developed for disposal such as the advanced oxidation technologies or processes. With the aim of the study is to apply ionizing radiation as a method of remediation in wastewater, in this work were carried out experiments of radiolysis and radio catalysis, which are techniques considered advanced oxidation technologies, that consist in irradiate with {sup 60}Co gamma radiation solutions of 4- chloro phenol and methylene blue, applied at different concentrations and using as process control measurements of the compound not degraded by UV-vis spectrophotometry at 507 and 664 nm for 4-chloro phenol and methylene blue respectively. At doses greater than 2.5 kGy were near-zero degradation. Degradation experiments were also conducted by photo catalysis by irradiation with a UV lamp of 354 nm wavelength. For 4-chloro phenol results showed that degradation is efficient (39%). With those previous results, these techniques were applied to degrade complex mixtures of organic compounds from samples of wastewater from a sewage treatment plant, where was considered as process control measurement of the dissolved organic carbon obtained by a spectrophotometric analysis at 254 nm, and a maximum of 26% degradation was obtained by applying 80 kGy. On the other hand, a series of experiments fractionating the irradiations at intervals of 20 kGy to obtain a cumulative dose of 80 kGy, which was 2.8 times greater with respect to degradation by radio catalysis with continuous irradiation. (Author)

  4. Evaluation of copper slag to catalyze advanced oxidation processes for the removal of phenol in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huanosta-Gutiérrez, T.; Dantas, Renato F.; Ramírez-Zamora, R.M.; Esplugas, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We evaluate the use of an industrial residue (copper slag) as catalyst in water treatment. ► The copper slag was effective to remove organic pollutants (phenol) from water. ► During experimentation, Cu and Fe leaching were not higher than the acceptable levels. ► Slag/H 2 O 2 /UV and slag/H 2 O 2 treatments promoted biodegradability increment of the contaminated water. ► The control of the reaction time would minimize the environmental impact of the produced effluents in terms of acute toxicity. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of copper slag to catalyze phenol degradation in water by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Copper slag was tested in combination with H 2 O 2 (slag/H 2 O 2 ) and H 2 O 2 /UV (slag/H 2 O 2 /UV). The studied methods promoted the complete photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Besides, they were able to reduce about 50% the TOC content in the samples. Slag/H 2 O 2 /UV and slag/H 2 O 2 treatments have favored biodegradability increment along the reaction time. Nevertheless, the irradiated method achieved higher values of the biodegradability indicator (BOD 5 /TOC). The toxicity assessment indicated the formation of more toxic compounds in both treatments. However, the control of the reaction time would minimize the environmental impact of the effluents.

  5. Experimental Investigation on the Specific Heat of Carbonized Phenolic Resin-Based Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Te; Ye, Hong; Zhang, Lisong; Cai, Qilin

    2017-10-01

    As typical phenolic resin-based ablative materials, the high silica/phenolic and carbon/phenolic composites are widely used in aerospace field. The specific heat of the carbonized ablators after ablation is an important thermophysical parameter in the process of heat transfer, but it is rarely reported. In this investigation, the carbonized samples of the high silica/phenolic and carbon/phenolic were obtained through carbonization experiments, and the specific heat of the carbonized samples was determined by a 3D DSC from 150 °C to 970 °C. Structural and compositional characterizations were performed to determine the mass fractions of the fiber and the carbonized product of phenolic which are the two constituents of the carbonized samples, while the specific heat of each constituent was also measured by 3D DSC. The masses of the carbonized samples were reduced when heated to a high temperature in the specific heat measurements, due to the thermal degradation of the carbonized product of phenolic resin in the carbonized samples. The raw experimental specific heat of the two carbonized samples and the carbonized product of phenolic resin was modified according to the quality changes of the carbonized samples presented by TGA results. Based on the mass fraction and the specific heat of each constituent, a weighted average method was adopted to obtain the calculated results of the carbonized samples. Due to the unconsolidated property of the fiber samples which impacts the reliability of the DSC measurement, there is a certain deviation between the experimental and calculated results of the carbonized samples. Considering the similarity of composition and structure, the data of quartz glass and graphite were used to substitute the specific heat of the high silica fiber and carbon fiber, respectively, resulting in better agreements with the experimental ones. Furthermore, the accurate specific heat of the high silica fiber and carbon fiber bundles was obtained by

  6. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of the molecular structure of phenolic novolac precursor resins on the properties of phenolic fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Yong-Gang; Pan, Yan-Ping; Ren, Rui; Dang, Jiang-Min; Liu, Chun-Ling

    2013-01-01

    A series of phenolic resins with different weight-average molecular weights (M w ) and ortho/para (O/P) ratios were prepared. The effect of the phenolic precursor resin structure on the structure and properties of the resulting phenolic fibers was investigated. The structures of the resins and fibers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography, melt rheometry, dynamic mechanical analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. The results show that the O/P ratio, unsubstituted ortho and para carbon ratio (O u /P u ), and M w of the phenolic resins play an important role in determining the properties of the phenolic fibers. The tensile strength of the phenolic fibers increases with increasing novolac precursor O u /P u ratios, corresponding to low O/P ratios, at comparable resin M w values. Also, the tensile strength of the phenolic fibers increases with increasing novolac M w values at comparable O/P ratios. Phenolic fibers with high tensile strength and good flame resistance characteristics were generated from a phenolic precursor resin, possessing a high weight-average molecular weight and a low O/P value. - Highlights: • Phenolic resins with different weight-average molecular weights and ortho/para ratios have been prepared. • The tensile strength of the phenolic fibers increases with reducing novolac O/P ratio. • The tensile strength of the phenolic fibers increases with increasing novolac M w

  8. Intrinsic radiation tolerance of ultra-thin GaAs solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, L. C.; Yakes, M. K.; Warner, J. H.; Schmieder, K. J.; Walters, R. J.; Jenkins, P. P. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW., Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Bennett, M. F. [Sotera Defense Solutions, Inc., Annapolis Junction, Maryland 20701-1067 (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Radiation tolerance is a critical performance criterion of photovoltaic devices for space power applications. In this paper we demonstrate the intrinsic radiation tolerance of an ultra-thin solar cell geometry. Device characteristics of GaAs solar cells with absorber layer thicknesses 80 nm and 800 nm were compared before and after 3 MeV proton irradiation. Both cells showed a similar degradation in V{sub oc} with increasing fluence; however, the 80 nm cell showed no degradation in I{sub sc} for fluences up to 10{sup 14 }p{sup +} cm{sup −2}. For the same exposure, the I{sub sc} of the 800 nm cell had severely degraded leaving a remaining factor of 0.26.

  9. Mechanochemical transformation of an organic ligand on mineral surfaces: The efficiency of birnessite in catechol degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Leo, Paola, E-mail: pdileo@imaa.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto di Metodologie per l' Analisi Ambientale, C.da S. Loja, Zona Industriale, 85050 Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy); Pizzigallo, Maria Donata Rosa [Dipartimento di Biologia e Chimica Agroforestale e Ambientale, Universita di Bari Aldo Moro, Via Amendola 165/a, 70126 Bari (Italy); Ancona, Valeria [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto di Ricerca sulle Acque, Via F. De Blasio 5, 70132 Bari (Italy); Di Benedetto, Francesco [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia, 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Mesto, Ernesto; Schingaro, Emanuela; Ventruti, Gennaro [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Geoambientali, Universita di Bari Aldo Moro, Via Orabona, 4, 70125 Bari (Italy)

    2012-01-30

    Graphical abstract: . The efficiency of mechanochemical treatments in degrading CAT molecules in presence of the highly reactive phyllomanganate birnessite, and without using organic solvents, has been demonstrated in the present study. Integrating information from different techniques on solid let it possible to get a comprehensive picture of the most reliable reaction mechanism of degradation of CAT molecules onto KBi surfaces, thus allowing the individuation of specific sites in the synthesized oxides on which catechol molecules were preferentially adsorbed, and thus degraded. The degradation mechanism mainly occurs via a redox reaction. It implies the formation of a surface bidentate inner-sphere complex between the phenolic group of the organic molecules and the Mn(IV) from the birnessite structure. Structural changes occur on the MnO{sub 6} layers of birnessite as due to the mechanically induced surface reactions: reduction of Mn(IV), consequent formation of Mn(III) and new vacancies, and free Mn{sup 2+} ions production. The extent of the mechanochemical degradation of CAT onto birnessite surfaces is higher. This is a consequence of the two phenolic groups of catechol that easily reacts. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A basic insight at molecular scale of the mechanically induced transformations of CAT onto birnessite is obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The abiotic degradative mechanisms of CAT onto birnessite is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanically induced degradation of CAT mainly occurs via a redox reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanochemistry improves the efficiency of birnessite to degrade CAT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanochemical technique offer potentials in remediating contaminated sites. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to investigate the efficiency of the phyllomanganate birnessite in degrading catechol after mechanochemical treatments. A synthesized birnessite and the organic molecule were

  10. Efficiency of phenol biodegradation by planktonic Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes (a constructed wetland isolate) vs. root and gravel biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzbaum, Eyal; Kirzhner, Felix; Sela, Shlomo; Zimmels, Yoram; Armon, Robert

    2010-09-01

    In the last two decades, constructed wetland systems gained increasing interest in wastewater treatment and as such have been intensively studied around the world. While most of the studies showed excellent removal of various pollutants, the exact contribution, in kinetic terms, of its particular components (such as: root, gravel and water) combined with bacteria is almost nonexistent. In the present study, a phenol degrader bacterium identified as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes was isolated from a constructed wetland, and used in an experimental set-up containing: plants and gravel. Phenol removal rate by planktonic and biofilm bacteria (on sterile Zea mays roots and gravel surfaces) was studied. Specific phenol removal rates revealed significant advantage of planktonic cells (1.04 × 10(-9) mg phenol/CFU/h) compared to root and gravel biofilms: 4.59 × 10(-11)-2.04 × 10(-10) and 8.04 × 10(-11)-4.39 × 10(-10) (mg phenol/CFU/h), respectively. In batch cultures, phenol biodegradation kinetic parameters were determined by biomass growth rates and phenol removal as a function of time. Based on Haldane equation, kinetic constants such as μ(max) = 1.15/h, K(s) = 35.4 mg/L and K(i) = 198.6 mg/L fit well phenol removal by P. pseudoalcaligenes. Although P. pseudoalcaligenes planktonic cells showed the highest phenol removal rate, in constructed wetland systems and especially in those with sub-surface flow, it is expected that surface associated microorganisms (biofilms) will provide a much higher contribution in phenol and other organics removal, due to greater bacterial biomass. Factors affecting the performance of planktonic vs. biofilm bacteria in sub-surface flow constructed wetlands are further discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of ethanol-producing yeast and bacteria by degradation products produced during pre-treatment of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Thomsen, A.B.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2004-01-01

    for ethanol fermentation. The resulting hydrolyzsates contain substances inhibitory to fermentation-depending on both the raw material (biomass) and the pre-treatment applied. An overview of the inhibitory effect on ethanol production by yeast and bacteria is presented. Apart from furans formed by sugar......An overview of the different inhibitors formed by pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials and their inhibition of ethanol production in yeast and bacteria is given. Different high temperature physical pre-treatment methods are available to render the carbohydrates in lignocellulose accessible...... degradation, phenol monomers from lignin degradation are important co-factors in hydrolysate inhibition, and inhibitory effects of these aromatic compounds on different ethanol producing microorganisms is reviewed. The furans and phenols generally inhibited growth and ethanol production rate (Q...

  12. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Molecular-level analyses of neutral sugars and lignin-derived phenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Ronald; Weliky, Karen; Hedges, John I.

    1990-07-01

    Leaves of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, were collected from trees and submerged sediments in a tropical mangrove swamp in the Bahamas. Weight-to-area measurements indicated that the most highly degraded black-colored leaves had undergone a 36% loss in ash-free dry weight (AFDW). Green leaves were characterized by an abundance of cyclitols (8.5% AFDW), glucose-rich aldose mixtures (20% AFDW) and relatively low yields of lignin-derived phenols (2% AFDW). Cyclitols were rapidly lost from senescing and submerged decomposing leaves, whereas the overall yields of aldoses and lignin-derived phenols remained fairly constant throughout the various stages of leaf decay. Decomposition patterns were therefore unusual in that lignin was lost at about the same rate as polysaccharides. Variable loss rates were observed within the individual aldoses, indicating the following stability series (most to least stable) for submerged leaves: hemicelluloses > cellulose > pectins and gums. Compositional patterns of lignin-derived phenols remained fairly constant throughout decomposition and were characterized by unusually high acid-to-aldehyde ratios (0.4) in all leaf samples. A laboratory leaching experiment was conducted with senescent leaf material to estimate the contribution of leaching to the observed compositional patterns. Assuming the amounts and patterns of materials leached in the laboratory experiment were similar to those for field degraded leaves, we estimated that leaching could account for 58% of the mass loss, 97% of the cyclitol loss, 46% of the aldose polysaccharide loss and 74% of the lignin loss. Microbial degradation appeared to be responsible for about half of the overall mass and polysaccharide loss. Vanillyl phenols were leached in preference to syringyl phenols and the vanillic acid-to-vanillin ratio for the leachate was very high (0.7). These results indicate that high acid-to-aldehyde ratios are not necessarily indicative of microbial oxidation and

  13. Phenolic Compounds in Brassica Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Velasco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are a large group of phytochemicals widespread in the plant kingdom. Depending on their structure they can be classified into simple phenols, phenolic acids, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. Phenolic compounds have received considerable attention for being potentially protective factors against cancer and heart diseases, in part because of their potent antioxidative properties and their ubiquity in a wide range of commonly consumed foods of plant origin. The Brassicaceae family includes a wide range of horticultural crops, some of them with economic significance and extensively used in the diet throughout the world. The phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables has been recently investigated and, nowadays, the profile of different Brassica species is well established. Here, we review the significance of phenolic compounds as a source of beneficial compounds for human health and the influence of environmental conditions and processing mechanisms on the phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables.

  14. Selective defunctionalization by TiO2 of monomeric phenolics from lignin pyrolysis into simple phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mante, Ofei D; Rodriguez, Jose A; Babu, Suresh P

    2013-11-01

    This study is focused on defunctionalizing monomeric phenolics from lignin into simple phenols for applications such as phenol/formaldehyde resins, epoxidized novolacs, adhesives and binders. Towards this goal, Titanium dioxide (TiO2) was used to selectively remove hydroxyl, methoxy, carbonyl and carboxyl functionalities from the monomeric phenolic compounds from lignin to produce mainly phenol, cresols and xylenols. The results showed that anatase TiO2 was more selective and active compared to rutile TiO2. Catechols were found to be the most reactive phenolics and 4-ethylguaiacol the least reactive with anatase TiO2. An overall conversion of about 87% of the phenolics was achieved at 550°C with a catalyst-to-feed ratio of 5 w/w. Over 97% conversion of phenolics is achievable at moderate temperatures (550°C or ≤ 600°C) and a moderate catalyst-to-feed ratio of 6.5:1. The reactivity of catechols on TiO2 suggests that titania is a promising catalyst in the removal of hydroxyl moiety. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Metabolism of Fructophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from the Apis mellifera L. Bee Gut: Phenolic Acids as External Electron Acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Addante, Rocco; Pontonio, Erica; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) are strongly associated with the gastrointestinal tracts (GITs) of Apis mellifera L. worker bees due to the consumption of fructose as a major carbohydrate. Seventy-seven presumptive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from GITs of healthy A. mellifera L. adults, which were collected from 5 different geographical locations of the Apulia region of Italy. Almost all of the isolates showed fructophilic tendencies: these isolates were identified as Lactobacillus kunkeei (69%) or Fructobacillus fructosus (31%). A high-throughput phenotypic microarray targeting 190 carbon sources was used to determine that 83 compounds were differentially consumed. Phenotyping grouped the strains into two clusters, reflecting growth performance. The utilization of phenolic acids, such as p-coumaric, caffeic, syringic, or gallic acids, as electron acceptors was investigated in fructose-based medium. Almost all FLAB strains showed tolerance to high phenolic acid concentrations. p-Coumaric acid and caffeic acid were consumed by all FLAB strains through reductases or decarboxylases. Syringic and gallic acids were partially metabolized. The data collected suggest that FLAB require external electron acceptors to regenerate NADH. The use of phenolic acids as external electron acceptors by the 4 FLAB showing the highest phenolic acid reductase activity was investigated in glucose-based medium supplemented with p-coumaric acid. Metabolic responses observed through a phenotypic microarray suggested that FLAB may use p-coumaric acid as an external electron acceptor, enhancing glucose dissimilation but less efficiently than other external acceptors such as fructose or pyruvic acid. IMPORTANCE Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) remain to be fully explored. This study intends to link unique biochemical features of FLAB with their habitat. The quite unique FLAB phenome within the group lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may have practical relevance

  16. Weather ability studies of phenolic resin coated woods and glass fiber reinforced laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, A.; Hussain, R.; Rizvi, M.H.; Ahmed, F.

    1997-01-01

    Phenolic resins have made a major breakthrough in the field of high technology in 80's. These are now active participants of h igh tech' areas ranging from electronics, computers, communication, outer space, aerospace, advanced materials, bio materials and technology. A phenol - formaldehyde (1:1.5) resin having resin content of 70% synthesized in the laboratory has been applied for wood coating and reinforcing glass fiber. The weatherability and solvent resistance of these items have been studied and results discussed keeping in view the envisaged application for structural materials and chemical equipment. The toxic materials released during contact with solvents for chemical applications and during degradation general have been monitored. The results are discussed with reference to environmental pollution due to these resins and their composites under different conditions. (authors)

  17. Definition of tolerable soil erosion values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sparovek

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the criteria for defining erosion tolerance are well established, the limits generally used are not consistent with natural, economical and technological conditions. Rates greater than soil formation can be accepted only until a minimum of soil depth is reached, provided that they are not associated with environmental hazard or productivity losses. A sequence of equations is presented to calculate erosion tolerance rates through time. The selection of equation parameters permits the definition of erosion tolerance rates in agreement with environmental, social and technical needs. The soil depth change that is related to irreversible soil degradation can be calculated. The definition of soil erosion tolerance according to these equations can be used as a guideline for sustainable land use planning and is compatible with expert systems.

  18. Arylsulfotransferase from Clostridium innocuum-A new enzyme catalyst for sulfation of phenol-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozhaev, Vadim V; Khmelnitsky, Yuri L; Sanchez-Riera, Fernando; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Rosson, Reinhardt A; Grund, Alan D

    2002-06-05

    Arylsulfotransferase (AST, EC 2.8.2.22), an enzyme capable of sulfating a wide range of phenol-containing compounds was purified from a Clostridium innocuum isolate (strain 554). The enzyme has a molecular weight of 320 kDa and is composed of four subunits. Unlike many mammalian and plant arylsulfotransferases, AST from Clostridium utilizes arylsulfates, including p-nitrophenyl sulfate, as sulfate donors, and is not reactive with 3-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS). The enzyme possesses broad substrate specificity and is active with a variety of phenols, quinones and flavonoids, but does not utilize primary and secondary alcohols and sugars as substrates. Arylsulfotransferase tolerates the presence of 10 vol% of polar cosolvents (dimethyl formamide, acetonitrile, methanol), but loses significant activity at higher solvent concentrations of 30-40 vol%. The enzyme retains high arylsulfotransferase activity in biphasic systems composed of water and nonpolar solvents, such as cyclohexane, toluene and chloroform, while in biphasic systems with more polar solvents (ethyl acetate, 2-pentanone, methyl tert-butyl ether, and butyl acetate) the enzyme activity is completely lost. High yields of AST-catalyzed sulfation were achieved in reactions with several phenols and tyrosine-containing peptides. Overall, AST studied in this work is a promising biocatalyst in organic synthesis to afford efficient sulfation of phenolic compounds under mild reaction conditions. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 78: 567-575, 2002.

  19. Breeding of Freeze-tolerant Yeast and the Mechanisms of Stress-tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Akihiro

    Frozen dough method have been adopted in the baking industry to reduce labor and to produce fresh breads in stores. New freeze-tolerant yeasts for frozen dough preparations were isolated from banana peel and identified. To obtain strains that have fermentative ability even after several months of frozen storage in fermented dough, we attempted to breed new freeze-tolerantstrain. The hybrid between S.cerevisiae, which is a isolated freeze-tolerant strain, and a strain isolated from bakers' yeast with sexual conjugation gave a good quality bread made from frozen dough method. Freeze-tolerant strains showed higher surviving and trehalose accumulating abilities than freeze-sensitive strains. The freeze tolerance of the yeasts was associated with the basal amount of intracellular trehalose after rapid degradation at the onset of the prefermentation period. The complicated metabolic pathway and the regulation system of trehalose in yeast cells are introduced. The trehalose synthesis may act as a metabolic buffer system which contribute to maintain the intracellular inorganic phosphate and as a feedback regulation system in the glycolysis. However, it is not known enough how the trehalose protects yeast cells from stress.

  20. Mechanisms of tolerance and high degradation capacity of the herbicide mesotrione by Escherichia coli strain DH5-α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz R Olchanheski

    Full Text Available The intensive use of agrochemicals has played an important role in increasing agricultural production. One of the impacts of agrochemical use has been changes in population structure of soil microbiota. The aim of this work was to analyze the adaptive strategies that bacteria use to overcome oxidative stress caused by mesotrione, which inhibits 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase. We also examined antioxidative stress systems, saturation changes of lipid membranes, and the capacity of bacteria to degrade mesotrione. Escherichia coli DH5-á was chosen as a non-environmental strain, which is already a model bacterium for studying metabolism and adaptation. The results showed that this bacterium was able to tolerate high doses of the herbicide (10× field rate, and completely degraded mesotrione after 3 h of exposure, as determined by a High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Growth rates in the presence of mesotrione were lower than in the control, prior to the period of degradation, showing toxic effects of this herbicide on bacterial cells. Changes in the saturation of the membrane lipids reduced the damage caused by reactive oxygen species and possibly hindered the entry of xenobiotics in the cell, while activating glutathione-S-transferase enzyme in the antioxidant system and in the metabolizing process of the herbicide. Considering that E. coli DH5-α is a non-environmental strain and it had no previous contact with mesotrione, the defense system found in this strain could be considered non-specific. This bacterium system response may be a general adaptation mechanism by which bacterial strains resist to damage from the presence of herbicides in agricultural soils.

  1. The influence of TiO{sub 2} and aeration on the kinetics of electrochemical oxidation of phenol in packed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Lizhang [College of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, South Jiefang Road, Quanshan District, Xuzhou City, Jiangsu 221008 (China)], E-mail: wlzh0731@126.com; Zhao Yuemin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, China University of Mining and Technology, South Jiefang Road, Quanshan District, Xuzhou City, Jiangsu 221008 (China)], E-mail: ymzhao@cumt.edu.cn; Fu Jianfeng [Department of Environmental Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing City, Jiangsu 210096 (China)

    2008-12-30

    The electrochemical oxidation of phenolic wastewater in a lab-scale reactor, packed into granular activated carbon (GAC) with Ti/SnO{sub 2} anodes and stainless steel cathodes, was interpreted in this study. GAC saturated rapidly if it was only used as sorbent, but application of suitable electric energy for the system simultaneously could recover the adsorption ability of GAC and maintain the continuous running effectively. The titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) as catalyst and airflow were also applied to the electrochemical reactor to examine the enhancement for phenol oxidation process. Results revealed that the electrochemical degradation of phenol could be reasonably described by first-order kinetics. In addition, it was illustrated that acid region, increased voltage, more dosage of TiO{sub 2} and higher aeration intensity were all beneficial parameters for phenol oxidation rates. By inspecting the relationship between the rate constants (k) and influencing factors, respectively, an overall kinetic model for phenol oxidation was proposed. The kinetics obtained from the experiments under corresponding electrochemical conditions could provide an accurate estimation of phenol concentration effluent and better design of the packed bed reactor.

  2. Ferrate(VI) as a greener oxidant: Electrochemical generation and treatment of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuhui; Zhang, Qi; Liang, He; Ying, Li; Xiangxu, Meng; Sharma, Virender K

    2016-12-05

    Ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)) is a greener oxidant in the treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The electrochemical synthesis of Fe(VI) may be considered environmentally friendly because it involves one-step process to convert Fe(0) to Fe(VI) without using harmful chemicals. Electrolysis was performed by using a sponge iron as an anode in NaOH solution at different ionic strengths. The cyclic voltammetric (CV) curves showed that the sponge iron had higher electrical activity than the grey cast iron. The optimum current density was 0.054mAcm(-2) in 10M NaOH solution, which is much lower than the electrolyte concentrations used in other electrode materials. A comparison of current efficiency and energy consumption was conducted and is briefly discussed. The generated ferrate solution was applied to degrade phenol in water at two levels (2mgL(-1) and 5mgL(-1)). The maximum removal efficiency was ∼70% and the optimum pH for phenol treatment was 9.0. Experiments on phenol removal using conventional coagulants (ferric chloride (FeCl3) and polyaluminium chloride (PAC)) were performed independently to demonstrate that removal of phenol by Fe(VI) occurred mainly by oxidative transformation. A combination of Fe(VI) and coagulant may be advantageous in enhancing removal efficiency, adjusting pH, and facilitating flocculation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficient Enzymatic Synthesis of Phenolic Ester by Increasing Solubility of Phenolic Acids in Ionic Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Guo, Zheng; Xu, Xuebing

    Compounds from phenolic acid family are well known natural antioxidants, but the application of phenolic acids as antioxidants in industry is limited due to the relatively low solubility in oil-based media. The properties of phenolic acids can be modified through enzymatic lipophilization...... and modified phenolic acids will have amphiphilic property, therefore they can be localized at oil-water or water-oil phase where oxidation is considered to occur frequently. It had been reported that immobilized Candida Antarctica lipase B was the most effective biocatalyst for the various esterification...... reactions, and it had been widely used for esterification of various phenolic acids with fatty alcohol or triglycerides. However, the conversion of phenolic acids is low due to low solubility in hydrophobic solvents and hindrance effect of unsaturated side chain towards the enzyme. Our studies show...

  4. Biodegradation of phenol in static cultures by Penicillium chrysogenum ERK1: catalytic abilities and residual phototoxicity Biodegradación de fenol en cultivos estáticos por Penicillium chrysogenum ERK1: habilidades catalíticas y fitotoxicidad residual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika A Wolskm

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A phenol-degrading fungus was isolated from crop soils. Molecular characterization (using internal transcribed spacer, translation elongation factor and beta-tubulin gene sequences and biochemical characterization allowed to identify the fungal strain as Penicillium chrysogenum Thorn ERK1. Phenol degradation was tested at 25 °C under resting mycelium conditions at 6, 30, 60, 200, 350 and 400 mg/l of phenol as the only source of carbon and energy. The time required for complete phenol degradation increased at different initial phenol concentrations. Maximum specific degradation rate (0.89978 mg of phenol/day/mg of dry weight was obtained at 200 mg/l. Biomass yield decreased at initial phenol concentrations above 60 mg/l. Catechol was identified as an intermediate metabolite by HPLC analysis and catechol dioxygenase activity was detected in plate assays, suggesting that phenol metabolism could occur via ortho fission of catechol. Wheat seeds were used as phototoxicity indicators of phenol degradation products. It was found that these products were not phytotoxic for wheat but highly phytotoxic for phenol. The high specific degradation rates obtained under resting mycelium conditions are considered relevant for practical applications of this fungus in soil decontamination processes.Un aislamiento fúngico capaz de degradar fenol como única fuente de carbono y energía fue aislado de suelos agrícolas. La caracterización molecular (basada en el empleo de secuencias de espaciadores de transcriptos internos, de factores de la elongación de la traducción y del gen de la beta-tubulina y la caracterización bioquímica permitieron identificar a esta cepa como Penicillium chrysogenum Thom ERK1. Se estudió la degradación de fenol a 25 °C en cultivos estáticos con 6, 30, 60, 200, 350 y 400 mg/l de fenol inicial. El tiempo requerido para completar la degradación de fenol aumentó al elevarse las concentraciones iniciales de dicho compuesto. La m

  5. Stability and metabolism of Arbutus unedo bioactive compounds (phenolics and antioxidants) under in vitro digestion and colonic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosele, Juana I; Macià, Alba; Romero, Mari-Paz; Motilva, María-José

    2016-06-15

    The natural antioxidants of Arbutus unedo highlight the importance of this fruit as natural source of bioactive compounds. In the present study, to evaluate the stability of phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid and fat-soluble antioxidants (α-tocopherol, β-carotene and lutein), in vitro gastrointestinal digestion was applied to A. unedo fruit. After that, the non-absorbable fraction was anaerobically incubated with human faeces and the metabolic pathway for gallotannins, ellagitannins, flavan-3-ols and anthocyanins from A. unedo fruit was proposed. The results showed that the presence of pectin from the fruit hampered the solubilization of the phenolic compounds (with exception of gallic and ellagic acids) and fat-soluble vitamins during gastric digestion. Degradation of pectin-gel during the duodenal digestion favored the release of the phenolic compounds and fat-soluble antioxidants to the media. The catabolic activity of human microbiota led to the generation of a wide range of simple phenols, such as p-hydroxybenzoic acid and catechol, derived from the catabolism of gallotannins, ellagitannins, flavan-3-ols and anthocyanins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Self-assembly graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots anchored on TiO_2 nanotube arrays: An efficient heterojunction for pollutants degradation under solar light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Jingyang; Zhu, Lin; Geng, Ping; Chen, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon nitride quantum dots (CNQDs) were decorated onto TiO_2 nanotube arrays (NTAs). • The CNQDs/TiO_2 NTAs exhibits much improved photoelectrochemical activity. • The heterojunction displays efficient removal efficiencies for RhB and phenol. • Pollutants degradation mechanism over CNQDs/TiO_2 NTAs was clarified. - Abstract: In this study, an efficient heterojunction was constructed by anchoring graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots onto TiO_2 nanotube arrays through hydrothermal reaction strategy. The prepared graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots, which were prepared by solid-thermal reaction and sequential dialysis process, act as a sensitizer to enhance light absorption. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the charge transfer and separation in the formed heterojunction were significantly improved compared with pristine TiO_2. The prepared heterojunction was used as a photoanode, exhibiting much improved photoelectrochemical capability and excellent photo-stability under solar light illumination. The photoelectrocatalytic activities of prepared heterojunction were demonstrated by degradation of RhB and phenol in aqueous solution. The kinetic constants of RhB and phenol degradation using prepared photoelectrode are 2.4 times and 4.9 times higher than those of pristine TiO_2, respectively. Moreover, hydroxyl radicals are demonstrated to be dominant active radicals during the pollutants degradation.

  7. Influence of three different concentration techniques on evaporation rate, color and phenolics content of blueberry juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elik, Aysel; Yanık, Derya Koçak; Maskan, Medeni; Göğüş, Fahrettin

    2016-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the effects of three different concentration processes open-pan, rotary vacuum evaporator and microwave heating on evaporation rate, the color and phenolics content of blueberry juice. Kinetics model study for changes in soluble solids content (°Brix), color parameters and phenolics content during evaporation was also performed. The final juice concentration of 65° Brix was achieved in 12, 15, 45 and 77 min, for microwave at 250 and 200 W, rotary vacuum and open-pan evaporation processes, respectively. Color changes associated with heat treatment were monitored using Hunter colorimeter (L*, a* and b*). All Hunter color parameters decreased with time and dependently studied concentration techniques caused color degradation. It was observed that the severity of color loss was higher in open-pan technique than the others. Evaporation also affected total phenolics content in blueberry juice. Total phenolics loss during concentration was highest in open-pan technique (36.54 %) and lowest in microwave heating at 200 W (34.20 %). So, the use of microwave technique could be advantageous in food industry because of production of blueberry juice concentrate with a better quality and short time of operation. A first-order kinetics model was applied to modeling changes in soluble solids content. A zero-order kinetics model was used to modeling changes in color parameters and phenolics content.

  8. Biominerlization and possible endosulfan degradation pathway adapted by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalerao, Tejomyee S

    2013-11-28

    Endosulfan is a chlorinated pesticide; its persistence in the environment and toxic effects on biota are demanding its removal. This study aims at improving the tolerance of the previously isolated fungus Aspergillus niger (A. niger) ARIFCC 1053 to endosulfan. Released chloride, dehalogenase activity, and released proteins were estimated along with analysis of endosulfan degradation and pathway identification. The culture could tolerate 1,000 mg/ml of technical grade endosulfan. Complete disappearance of endosulfan was seen after 168 h of incubation. The degradation study could easily be correlated with increase in released chlorides, dehalogenase activity and protein released. Comparative infrared spectral analysis suggested that the molecule of endosulfan was degraded efficiently by A. niger ARIFCC 1053. Obtained mass ion values by GC-MS suggested a hypothetical pathway during endosulfan degradation by A. niger ARIFCC 1053. All these results provide a basis for the development of bioremediation strategies to remediate the pollutant under study in the environment.

  9. Optimization of laccase production by two strains of Ganoderma lucidum using phenolic and metallic inducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Kuhar

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis P. Karst is a white rot fungus that is able to degrade the lignin component in wood. The ability of two strains of this species to produce the ligninolytic enzyme laccase was assessed. After the evaluation of induction with heavy metals and phenolic compounds, it was found that among the tested substances, copper and ferulic acid are the best laccase inducers. It was also observed that the two types of inducers (phenolic and metallic produce different electrophoretic patterns of laccase activity. Optimized concentrations of inducers were obtained through a factorial design and the thermal stability of optimized supernatants was studied at a wide range of acidic pH. We found that the enzyme is more thermostable at higher pH values.

  10. Potassium and zinc increase tolerance to salt stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Amin Ullah; Hadi, Fazal; Midrarullah; Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Rahman, Khaista

    2017-07-01

    Potassium and zinc are essential elements in plant growth and metabolism and plays a vital role in salt stress tolerance. To investigate the physiological mechanism of salt stress tolerance, a pot experiment was conducted. Potassium and zinc significantly minimize the oxidative stress and increase root, shoot and spike length in wheat varieties. Fresh and dry biomass were significantly increased by potassium followed by zinc as compared to control C. The photosynthetic pigment and osmolyte regulator (proline, total phenolic, and total carbohydrate) were significantly enhanced by potassium and zinc. Salt stress increases MDA content in wheat varieties while potassium and zinc counteract the adverse effect of salinity and significantly increased membrane stability index. Salt stress decreases the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase) while the exogenous application of potassium and zinc significantly enhanced the activities of these enzymes. A significant positive correlation was found of spike length with proline (R 2  = 0.966 ∗∗∗ ), phenolic (R 2  = 0.741 ∗ ) and chlorophyll (R 2  = 0.853 ∗∗ ). The MDA content showed significant negative correlation (R 2  = 0.983 ∗∗∗ ) with MSI. It is concluded that potassium and zinc reduced toxic effect of salinity while its combine application showed synergetic effect and significantly enhanced salt tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Degradation of n-alkanes and PAHs from the heavy crude oil using salt-tolerant bacterial consortia and analysis of their catabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurav, Ranjit; Lyu, Honghong; Ma, Jianli; Tang, Jingchun; Liu, Qinglong; Zhang, Hairong

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, salt-tolerant strains, Dietzia sp. HRJ2, Corynebacterium variabile HRJ4, Dietzia cinnamea HRJ5 and Bacillus tequilensis HRJ6 were isolated from the Dagang oil field, China. These strains degraded n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) aerobically from heavy crude oil (HCO) in an experiment at 37 °C and 140 rpm. The GC/MS investigation for degradation of different chain lengths of n-alkanes (C8-C40) by individual strains showed the highest degradation of C8-C19 (HRJ5), C20-C30 (HRJ4) and C31-C40 (HRJ5), respectively. Moreover, degradation of 16 PAHs with individual strains demonstrated that the bicyclic and pentacyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs) were mostly degraded by HRJ5, tricyclic and tetracyclic AHs by HRJ6 and hexacyclic AHs by HRJ2. However, the highest degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), total saturated hydrocarbons (TSH), total aromatic hydrocarbons (TAH), n-alkanes (C8-C40) and 16 PAHs was achieved by a four-membered consortium (HRJ2 + 4 + 5 + 6) within 12 days, with the predominance of HRJ4 and HRJ6 strains which was confirmed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The abundance of alkB and nah genes responsible for catabolism of n-alkanes and PAHs was quantified using the qPCR. Maximum copy numbers of genes were observed in HRJ2 + 4 + 5 + 6 consortium (gene copies l -1 ) 2.53 × 10 4 (alkB) and 3.47 × 10 3 (nah) at 12 days, which corresponded to higher degradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbons. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) (total SOD (T-SOD), Cu 2+ Zn 2+ -SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities in Allium sativum and Triticum aestivum were lower in the HRJ2 + 4 + 5 + 6-treated HCO as compared to the plantlets exposed directly to HCO. The present results revealed the effective degradation of HCO-contaminated saline medium using the microbial consortium having greater metabolic diversity.

  12. Interactive effects of aluminum and cadmium on phenolic compounds, antioxidant enzyme activity and oxidative stress in blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) plantlets cultivated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manquián-Cerda, K; Cruces, E; Escudey, M; Zúñiga, G; Calderón, R

    2018-04-15

    To evaluate the potential role of phenolic compounds in Al and Cd stress tolerance mechanisms, Vaccinium corymbosum cv. Legacy plantlets were exposed to different metal concentrations. The present study used an in vitro plant model to test the effects of the following treatments: 100μM Al; 100μMAl + 50μMCd; and 100μMAl + 100μMCd during periods of 7, 14, 21 and 30 days. The oxidative damage was determined by the accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The antioxidant activity values were determined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazine (DPPH) and the ferric reducing antioxidant power test (FRAP). Additionally, the phenolic compound concentrations were determined using HPLC-DAD. The exposure to Al and Cd increased the MDA and H 2 O 2 contents differentially, while the antioxidant capacity values showed differences between DPPH and FRAP with the largest changes in FRAP relative to Cd. SOD had the highest activity in the first 7 days, leading to a significant increase in phenolic compounds observed after 14 days, and chlorogenic acid was the major compound identified. Our results revealed that phenolic compounds seem to play an important role in the response to ROS. Therefore, the mechanisms of tolerance to Al and Cd in V. corymbosum will be determined by the type of metal and time of exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced tolerance and remediation of anthracene by transgenic tobacco plants expressing a fungal glutathione transferase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Prachy; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Sherkhane, Pramod D.; Kale, Sharad P.; Eapen, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transgenic plants expressing a TvGST gene were tested for tolerance, uptake and degradation of anthracene. → Transgenic plants were more tolerant to anthracene and take up more anthracene from soil and solutions compared to control plants. → Using in vitro T 1 seedlings, we showed that anthracene-a three fused benzene ring compound was phytodegraded to naphthalene derivatives, having two benzene rings. → This is the first time that a transgenic plant was shown to have the potential to phytodegrade anthracene. - Abstract: Plants can be used for remediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, which are known to be a major concern for human health. Metabolism of xenobiotic compounds in plants occurs in three phases and glutathione transferases (GST) mediate phase II of xenobiotic transformation. Plants, although have GSTs, they are not very efficient for degradation of exogenous recalcitrant xenobiotics including polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Hence, heterologous expression of efficient GSTs in plants may improve their remediation and degradation potential of xenobiotics. In the present study, we investigated the potential of transgenic tobacco plants expressing a Trichoderma virens GST for tolerance, remediation and degradation of anthracene-a recalcitrant polyaromatic hydrocarbon. Transgenic plants with fungal GST showed enhanced tolerance to anthracene compared to control plants. Remediation of 14 C uniformly labeled anthracene from solutions and soil by transgenic tobacco plants was higher compared to wild-type plants. Transgenic plants (T 0 and T 1 ) degraded anthracene to naphthalene derivatives, while no such degradation was observed in wild-type plants. The present work has shown that in planta expression of a fungal GST in tobacco imparted enhanced tolerance as well as higher remediation potential of anthracene compared to wild-type plants.

  14. Relationship between red wine grades and phenolics. 1. Tannin and total phenolics concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Meagan D; Dambergs, Robert G; Cozzolino, Daniel; Herderich, Markus J; Smith, Paul A

    2010-12-08

    Measuring chemical composition is a common approach to support decisions about allocating foods and beverages to grades related to market value. Red wine is a particularly complex beverage, and multiple compositional attributes are needed to account for its sensory properties, including measurement of key phenolic components such as anthocyanins, total phenolics, and tannin, which are related to color and astringency. Color has been shown to relate positively to red wine grade; however, little research has been presented that explores the relationship between astringency-related components such as total phenolic or tannin concentration and wine grade. The aim of this research has been to investigate the relationship between the wine grade allocations of commercial wineries and total phenolic and tannin concentrations, respectively, in Australian Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon wines. Total phenolic and tannin concentrations were determined using the methyl cellulose precipitable (MCP) tannin assay and then compared to wine grade allocations made by winemaker panels during the companies' postvintage allocation process. Data were collected from wines produced by one Australian wine company over the 2005, 2006, and 2007 vintages and by a further two companies in 2007 (total wines = 1643). Statistical analysis revealed a positive trend toward higher wine grade allocation and wines that had higher concentrations of both total phenolics and tannin, respectively. This research demonstrates that for these companies, in general, Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz wines allocated to higher market value grades have higher total phenolics and higher tannin concentrations and suggests that these compositional parameters should be considered in the development of future multiparameter decision support systems for relevant commercial red wine grading processes. In addition, both tannin and total phenolics would ideally be included because although, in general, a positive relationship

  15. Cyanobacteria-mediated phenylpropanoids and phytohormones in rice (Oryza sativa) enhance plant growth and stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhananjaya P; Prabha, Ratna; Yandigeri, Mahesh S; Arora, Dilip K

    2011-11-01

    Phenylpropanoids, flavonoids and plant growth regulators in rice (Oryza sativa) variety (UPR 1823) inoculated with different cyanobacterial strains namely Anabaena oryzae, Anabaena doliolum, Phormidium fragile, Calothrix geitonos, Hapalosiphon intricatus, Aulosira fertilissima, Tolypothrix tenuis, Oscillatoria acuta and Plectonema boryanum were quantified using HPLC in pot conditions after 15 and 30 days. Qualitative analysis of the induced compounds using reverse phase HPLC and further confirmation with LC-MS/MS showed consistent accumulation of phenolic acids (gallic, gentisic, caffeic, chlorogenic and ferulic acids), flavonoids (rutin and quercetin) and phytohormones (indole acetic acid and indole butyric acid) in rice leaves. Plant growth promotion (shoot, root length and biomass) was positively correlated with total protein and chlorophyll content of leaves. Enzyme activity of peroxidase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase and total phenolic content was fairly high in rice leaves inoculated with O. acuta and P. boryanum after 30 days. Differential systemic accumulation of phenylpropanoids in plant leaves led us to conclude that cyanobacterial inoculation correlates positively with plant growth promotion and stress tolerance in rice. Furthermore, the study helped in deciphering possible mechanisms underlying plant growth promotion and stress tolerance in rice following cyanobacterial inoculation and indicated the less explored avenue of cyanobacterial colonization in stress tolerance against abiotic stress.

  16. The reactivity of natural phenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Evgenii T; Denisova, Taisa G [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-30

    This review surveys physicochemical data of natural phenols published in recent years. The structures of some compounds of this class are given. A complete set of the dissociation energies of the O-H bonds for 71 natural phenols is presented. Kinetic characteristics of the reactions of peroxyl, alkyl and thiyl radicals with natural phenols, exchange reactions of phenoxyl radicals with phenols and reactions of phenoxyl radicals with lipids, hydroperoxides, cysteine and ascorbic acid are compiled and described systematically. The reactivity of phenols in radical reactions and the factors that determine the reactivity (the enthalpy of reaction, triplet repulsion, the electronegativities of atoms at the reaction centre, the presence of pi-electrons adjacent to the reaction centre, the radii of atoms at the reaction centre, steric hindrance, the force constants of the reacting bonds) are discussed. An important role of hydrogen bonding between surrounding molecules and the OH groups of natural phenols in decreasing their reactivities is noted.

  17. Bromination of Phenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" examines the bromination of phenol, a reaction that is commonly taught at A-level and IB (International Baccalaureate) as an example of electrophilic substitution. Phenol undergoes bromination with bromine or bromine water at room temperature. A white precipitate of 2,4,6-tribromophenol is rapidly formed. This…

  18. Treatments of jute fibers aiming at improvement of fiber-phenolic matrix adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilce Aiko Tanaka Razera

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Composites based on a thermoset phenolic matrix and jute fibers were prepared and characterized. The fibers were alternatively treated with ionized air or aqueous alkaline solution (mercerization with the aim of introducing changes in the morphology, dispersive component of surface free energy, γS D (estimated by Inverse Gas Chromatography, IGC and the acid/base character of their surfaces, shown by their ANs/DNs ratio (estimated by IGC, and their degree of crystallinity. The final objective was to investigate the influence of these modifications on the adhesion at the jute fiber/phenolic matrix interface in the composites. The untreated jute fiber showed 50% crystallinity, γS D=18 mJ m- 2 and ANs/DNs= 0.9 (amphoteric surface, tensile strength = 460 MPa and maximum elongation = 0.7%, while the respective composite had an impact strength of 72.6 J m- 1. The treatments positively modified the fibers and the adhesion at the interface was better in the composites reinforced with treated fibers than with untreated fibers. The best set of results was exhibited by the fiber treated with 10% NaOH [46% crystallinity, γS D = 26 J m- 2 (phenolic matrix γS D = 32 J m- 2, ANs/DNs = 1.8 (surface predominantly acidic, similar to phenolic matrix, ANs/DNs = 1.4, tensile strength approximately 900 MPa, maximum elongation = 2%, impact strength of respective composite approximately 95 J m- 1]. The fibers treated for 5 h with ionized air exhibited favorable properties [(45% crystallinity, γS D = 27 J m- 2, ANs/DNs = 2.1 (acidic surface] for further use as reinforcement of a phenolic matrix, but their partial degradation during the treatment decreased their tensile properties (395 MPa and 0.5% for tensile strength and maximum elongation, respectively and their action as reinforcement (impact strength of the respective composite approximately 73 J m- 1.

  19. A Kinetic Degradation Study of Curcumin in Its Free Form and Loaded in Polymeric Micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naksuriya, Ornchuma; van Steenbergen, Mies J.; Sastre Torano, Javier; Okonogi, Siriporn; Hennink, Wim E.

    Curcumin, a phenolic compound, possesses many pharmacological activities and is under clinical evaluation to treat different diseases. However, conflicting data about its stability have been reported. In this study, the kinetic degradation of curcumin from a natural curcuminoid mixture under various

  20. Techniques for Analysis of Plant Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H. Roberts

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are well-known phytochemicals found in all plants. They consist of simple phenols, benzoic and cinnamic acid, coumarins, tannins, lignins, lignans and flavonoids. Substantial developments in research focused on the extraction, identification and quantification of phenolic compounds as medicinal and/or dietary molecules have occurred over the last 25 years. Organic solvent extraction is the main method used to extract phenolics. Chemical procedures are used to detect the presence of total phenolics, while spectrophotometric and chromatographic techniques are utilized to identify and quantify individual phenolic compounds. This review addresses the application of different methodologies utilized in the analysis of phenolic compounds in plant-based products, including recent technical developments in the quantification of phenolics.

  1. Degradation Capability of n-hexadecane Degrading Bacteria from Petroleum Contaminated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PENG Huai-li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Samplings were performed in the petroleum contaminated soils of Dongying, Shandong Province of China. Degrading bacteria was isolated through enrichment in a Bushnel-Hass medium, with n-hexadecane as the sole source of carbon and energy. Then the isolated strains were identified by amplification of 16S rDNA gene and sequencing. The strain TZSX2 was selected as the powerful bacteria with stronger degradation ability, which was then identified as Rhodococcus hoagii genera based on the constructing results of the phylogenetic tree. The optimum temperature that allowed both high growth and efficient degradation ratio was in the scope of 28~36 ℃, and gas chromatography results showed that approximately more than 30% of n-hexadecane could be degraded in one week of incubation within the temperature range. Moreover, the strain TZSX2 was able to grow in high concentrations of n-hexadecane. The degradation rate reached 79% when the initial n-hexadecane concentration was 2 mL·L-1,while it still achieved 12% with n-hexadecane concentration of 20 mL·L-1. The optimal pH was 9 that allowed the highest growth and the greatest degradation rate of 91%. Above all, the screened strain TZSX2 showed high capabilities of alkali tolerance with excellent degradation efficiency for even high concentration of n-hexadecane, and thus it would be quite suitable for the remediation of petroleum contaminated soils especially in the extreme environment.

  2. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catal, Tunc [Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, 116 Gilmore Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 102 97331, Corvallis, OR (United States); Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Istanbul Technical University, 34469-Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Fan, Yanzhen; Liu, Hong [Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, 116 Gilmore Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Li, Kaichang [Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 102 97331, Corvallis, OR (United States); Bermek, Hakan [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Istanbul Technical University, 34469-Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-05-15

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains. (author)

  3. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Tunc; Fan, Yanzhen; Li, Kaichang; Bermek, Hakan; Liu, Hong

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains.

  4. Phenolics and Plant Allelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-An Jiang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds arise from the shikimic and acetic acid (polyketide metabolic pathways in plants. They are but one category of the many secondary metabolites implicated in plant allelopathy. Phenolic allelochemicals have been observed in both natural and managed ecosystems, where they cause a number of ecological and economic problems, such as declines in crop yield due to soil sickness, regeneration failure of natural forests, and replanting problems in orchards. Phenolic allelochemical structures and modes of action are diverse and may offer potential lead compounds for the development of future herbicides or pesticides. This article reviews allelopathic effects, analysis methods, and allelopathic mechanisms underlying the activity of plant phenolic compounds. Additionally, the currently debated topic in plant allelopathy of whether catechin and 8-hydroxyquinoline play an important role in Centaurea maculata and Centaurea diffusa invasion success is discussed. Overall, the main purpose of this review is to highlight the allelopacthic potential of phenolic compounds to provide us with methods to solve various ecology problems, especially in regard to the sustainable development of agriculture, forestry, nature resources and environment conservation.

  5. Teenage patients with ingrown toenails: Treatment with partial matrix excision or segmental phenolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Korkmaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ingrown toenails (IT is a very common problem leading to significant associated morbidity. The articles related to phenolization for matrix removal in teenagers with IT are not enough in the foot surgery literature. Aims: To compare the postoperative recovery periods, complication rate, and tolerability of partial matrix excision and segmental phenolization in teenagers with IT. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine patients (13-17 years with 48 IT were randomly divided into two groups and were treated with partial matrix excision (Group I and segmental phenolization (Group II. We assessed the recurrence rates, postoperative complications, duration of analgesic usage, and time to return to daily activities. Results: There was no significant difference between the demographic and clinical data of the two groups. Three patients in Group I and two patients in Group II experienced moderate pain postoperatively. These patients used analgesics for 3 days. The rates of postoperative complications and recurrences between the two groups showed no statistically significant difference ( P = 0.688. The time to return to normal daily activities was significantly shorter in Group II patients than in Group I patients ( P < 0.05. Conclusions: Partial matrix excision is a very safe model of therapy in the surgical treatment of teenagers with IT. It has low recurrence rate and minimal postoperative morbidity. We concluded that segmental phenolization is also as safe as partial matrix excision in the treatment of IT and patients return to their daily activities in less time with this treatment modality.

  6. Bioavailability of dietary phenolic compounds: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Gutiérrez-Grijalva Paul Gutiérrez-Grijalva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are ubiquitous in plant-based foods. High dietary intake of fruits, vegetables and cereals is related to a decreased rate in chronic diseases. Phenolic compounds are thought to be responsible, at least in part, for those health effects. Nonetheless, phenolic compounds bioaccessibility and biotransformation is often not considered in these studies; thus, a precise mechanism of action of phenolic compounds is not known. In this review we aim to present a comprehensive knowledge of the metabolic processes through which phenolic compounds go after intake.

  7. Dechlorination of chlorinated phenols by subnanoscale Pd 0 /Fe 0 intercalated in smectite: pathway, reactivity, and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hanzhong; Wang, Chuanyi

    2015-12-30

    Smectite clay was employed as templated matrix to prepare subnanoscale Pd(0)/Fe(0) particles, and their components as well as intercalated architectures were well characterized by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (X-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, as-prepared Pd(0)/Fe(0) subnanoscale nanoparticles were evaluated for their dechlorination effect using chlorinated phenols as model molecules. As a result, pentachlorophenol (PCP) is selectively transformed to phenol in a stepwise dechlorination pathway within 6h, and the dechlorination rate constants show linearly relationship with contents of Pd as its loadings <0.065%. Comparing with PCP, other chlorinated phenols display similar degradation pattern but within much shorter time frame. The dechlorination rate of chlorinated phenols increases with decreasing in number of -Cl attached to aromatic ring, which can be predicted by the total charge of the aromatic ring, exhibiting an inversely linear relationship with the dechlorination rates. While the selectivity of dechlorination depends on the charges associated with the individual aromatic carbon. Chloro-functional groups at the ortho-position are easier to be dechlorinated than that at meta- and para- positions yielding primarily 3,4,5-TCP as intermediate from PCP, further to phenol. The effective dechlorination warrants their potential utilizations in development of in-situ remediation technologies for organic pollutants in contaminated water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhanced tolerance and remediation of anthracene by transgenic tobacco plants expressing a fungal glutathione transferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixit, Prachy; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Sherkhane, Pramod D.; Kale, Sharad P. [Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Eapen, Susan, E-mail: eapenhome@yahoo.com [Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Transgenic plants expressing a TvGST gene were tested for tolerance, uptake and degradation of anthracene. {yields} Transgenic plants were more tolerant to anthracene and take up more anthracene from soil and solutions compared to control plants. {yields} Using in vitro T{sub 1} seedlings, we showed that anthracene-a three fused benzene ring compound was phytodegraded to naphthalene derivatives, having two benzene rings. {yields} This is the first time that a transgenic plant was shown to have the potential to phytodegrade anthracene. - Abstract: Plants can be used for remediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, which are known to be a major concern for human health. Metabolism of xenobiotic compounds in plants occurs in three phases and glutathione transferases (GST) mediate phase II of xenobiotic transformation. Plants, although have GSTs, they are not very efficient for degradation of exogenous recalcitrant xenobiotics including polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Hence, heterologous expression of efficient GSTs in plants may improve their remediation and degradation potential of xenobiotics. In the present study, we investigated the potential of transgenic tobacco plants expressing a Trichoderma virens GST for tolerance, remediation and degradation of anthracene-a recalcitrant polyaromatic hydrocarbon. Transgenic plants with fungal GST showed enhanced tolerance to anthracene compared to control plants. Remediation of {sup 14}C uniformly labeled anthracene from solutions and soil by transgenic tobacco plants was higher compared to wild-type plants. Transgenic plants (T{sub 0} and T{sub 1}) degraded anthracene to naphthalene derivatives, while no such degradation was observed in wild-type plants. The present work has shown that in planta expression of a fungal GST in tobacco imparted enhanced tolerance as well as higher remediation potential of anthracene compared to wild-type plants.

  9. Evaluation of copper slag to catalyze advanced oxidation processes for the removal of phenol in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huanosta-Gutierrez, T. [Instituto de Ingenieria, Coordinacion de Ingenieria Ambiental, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacan 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Dantas, Renato F., E-mail: falcao@angel.qui.ub.es [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ramirez-Zamora, R.M. [Instituto de Ingenieria, Coordinacion de Ingenieria Ambiental, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacan 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Esplugas, S. [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluate the use of an industrial residue (copper slag) as catalyst in water treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The copper slag was effective to remove organic pollutants (phenol) from water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During experimentation, Cu and Fe leaching were not higher than the acceptable levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV and slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatments promoted biodegradability increment of the contaminated water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the reaction time would minimize the environmental impact of the produced effluents in terms of acute toxicity. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of copper slag to catalyze phenol degradation in water by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Copper slag was tested in combination with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV (slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV). The studied methods promoted the complete photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Besides, they were able to reduce about 50% the TOC content in the samples. Slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV and slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatments have favored biodegradability increment along the reaction time. Nevertheless, the irradiated method achieved higher values of the biodegradability indicator (BOD{sub 5}/TOC). The toxicity assessment indicated the formation of more toxic compounds in both treatments. However, the control of the reaction time would minimize the environmental impact of the effluents.

  10. Fermentation products of solvent tolerant marine bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and its biotechnological applications in salicylic acid bioconversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solimabi Wahidullah

    Full Text Available As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl with salicylic acid (3-8 were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9-12, metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13 and β-carbolines, norharman (14, harman (15 and methyl derivative (16, which are beneficial to the host and the environment.

  11. Anthocyanin, phenolics and antioxidant activity changes in purple waxy corn as affected by traditional cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harakotr, Bhornchai; Suriharn, Bhalang; Tangwongchai, Ratchada; Scott, Marvin Paul; Lertrat, Kamol

    2014-12-01

    Antioxidant components, including anthocyanins and phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity, and their changes during traditional cooking of fresh purple waxy corn were investigated. As compared to the raw corn, thermal treatment caused significant (p⩽0.05) decreases in each antioxidant compound and antioxidant activity. Steam cooking preserved more antioxidant compounds than boiling. Boiling caused a significant loss of anthocyanin and phenolic compounds into the cooking water. This cooking water is a valuable co-product because it is a good source of purple pigment. By comparing levels of antioxidant compounds in raw and cooked corn, we determined that degradation results in greater loss than leaching or diffusion into cooking water. Additionally, separation of kernels from the cob prior to cooking caused increased loss of antioxidant compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of RANEY Nickel on the Formation of Intermediates in the Degradation of Lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Forchheim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignin forms an important part of lignocellulosic biomass and is an abundantly available residue. It is a potential renewable source of phenol. Liquefaction of enzymatic hydrolysis lignin as well as catalytical hydrodeoxygenation of the main intermediates in the degradation of lignin, that is, catechol and guaiacol, was studied. The cleavage of the ether bonds, which are abundant in the molecular structure of lignin, can be realised in near-critical water (573 to 673 K, 20 to 30 MPa. Hydrothermal treatment in this context provides high selectivity in respect to hydroxybenzenes, especially catechol. RANEY Nickel was found to be an adequate catalyst for hydrodeoxygenation. Although it does not influence the cleavage of ether bonds, RANEY Nickel favours the production of phenol from both lignin and catechol. The main product from hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol with RANEY Nickel was cyclohexanol. Reaction mechanism and kinetics of the degradation of guaiacol were explored.

  13. Radiation-induced degradation of chlorophenols in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Wang Jianlong

    2005-01-01

    Radiation processing is a promising technology for applications in environmental protection, which includes wastewater treatment, micro-polluted drinking water treatment and the treatment of industrial wastewater containing various toxic and nonbiodegradable pollutants, municipal sewage and sludge disinfection, and flue gas desulfuration, etc. The paper reviews manly the recent progresses in radiolysis of chlorinated phenols in aqueous solution. Advantages and existing problems of the method in this particular application ar discussed. Mechanisms of radiation-induced degradation of chlorophenols, and the factors affecting the degradation efficiency, are discussed, too. It is concluded that combined approaches, such ozone oxidation and other methods, are of great help to the radiation processing application, in terms of lowering down the dose and increasing the efficient of pollutant removal. (authors)

  14. Alignment and focusing tolerance influences on optical performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, E.W.

    1982-01-01

    Alignment errors among components of an optical system may substantially degrade the image quality. Focus errors also affect system performance. The potential for serious degradation of image quality is substantial and requires that the tolerances for these errors receive significant attention early in system design. The image quality and reconnaissance performance of an all-reflecting Cassegrain is compared to an all-refractive optical system under conditions of zero and anticipated real world misalignments

  15. Comparative Study of the Use of Trichloroacetic Acid and Phenolic Acid in the Treatment of Atrophic-Type Acne Scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpizzol, Mariana; Weber, Magda B; Mattiazzi, Anna Paula F; Manzoni, Ana Paula D

    2016-03-01

    Many therapies involving varying degrees of complexity have been used to treat acne scars, but none is considered the gold standard treatment. A comparative evaluation of 88% phenol and 90% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) applied using the chemical reconstruction of skin scars (CROSS) technique. A nonrandomized, single-blinded self-controlled clinical trial was conducted among patients with ice pick-type and boxcar-type atrophic acne scars. Using 88% phenol on the left hemiface and 90% TCA on the right hemiface was adopted as the standard practice of the CROSS technique. The dermatological quality of life index (DLQI) questionnaire, acne scar grading scale Échelle d´Evaluation Clinique des Cicatrices d'Acne (ECCA), and evaluation of improvement were performed pretreatment and post-treatment. Regarding ECCA, significant differences were found in pretreatment and post-treatment (p < .001). Regarding tolerance to pain, it was found that the discomfort felt with 90% TCA was significantly less than that felt with 88% phenol (p = .020). Regarding the quality of life measured with the DLQI, the results showed that the mean score in post-treatment assessment was significantly lower than that in the pretreatment assessment (p < .05). Hypochromia and enlargement scar were only seen after the use of 90% TCA. This study confirmed the efficacy of both TCA and phenol for treating such scars, with less severe complications from the use of phenol.

  16. Radiation-induced degradation of 4-chloroaniline in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, M.; Wolfger, H.; Getoff, N.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation-induced decomposition of 4-chloroaniline (4-ClA) was studied under steady-state conditions using aqueous solutions saturated with air, pure oxygen, N 2 O, argon and argon in the presence of t-Butanol. Using HPLC-method, the initial G-values of the substrate degradation as well as of a number of radiolytic products were determined. The formation of aminophenols, chlorophenols, aniline and phenol in addition to chloride, ammonia, formaldehyde and mixture of aldehydes as well as carboxylic acids was studied as a function of absorbed dose. Based on the experimental data, probable reaction mechanisms for the degradation of 4-ClA by γ-rays and the formation of the identified products are presented

  17. THE EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR CREATING DEFENSIBLE, REPEATABLE, OBJECTIVE AND ACCURATE TOLERANCE VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the field of bioassessment, tolerance has traditionally referred to the degree to which organisms can withstand environmental degradation. This concept has been around for many years and its use is widespread. In numerous cases, tolerance values (TVs) have been assigned to i...

  18. Degradation of aromatic compounds by Pseudomonas putida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dluhy, M. (Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislavia (Slovenia). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering); Sefcik, J. (Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislavia (Slovenia). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering); Bales, V. (Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislavia (Slovenia). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    The influence of different process kinetics on the course of phenol degradation has been studied as well as the influence of axial dispersion in the liquid phase on the reactor height with relatively large biofilm thickness in a conventional fluidized bed and air-lift bioreactor. The object of this was to achieve a high conversion of substrate in a device of real size in real process time. For calculating the mathematical model, the method of orthogonal collocation with the STIFF integration routine has been used. (orig.)

  19. Wine phenolic compounds influence the production of volatile phenols by wine-related lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, I; Campos, F M; Hogg, T; Couto, J A

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of wine phenolic compounds on the production of volatile phenols (4-vinylphenol [4VP] and 4-ethylphenol [4EP]) from the metabolism of p-coumaric acid by lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus collinoides and Pediococcus pentosaceus were grown in MRS medium supplemented with p-coumaric acid, in the presence of different phenolic compounds: nonflavonoids (hydroxycinnamic and benzoic acids) and flavonoids (flavonols and flavanols). The inducibility of the enzymes involved in the p-coumaric acid metabolism was studied in resting cells. The hydroxycinnamic acids tested stimulated the capacity of LAB to synthesize volatile phenols. Growth in the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids, especially caffeic acid, induced the production of 4VP by resting cells. The hydroxybenzoic acids did not significantly affect the behaviour of the studied strains. Some of the flavonoids showed an effect on the production of volatile phenols, although strongly dependent on the bacterial species. Relatively high concentrations (1 g l(-1) ) of tannins inhibited the synthesis of 4VP by Lact. plantarum. Hydroxycinnamic acids were the main compounds stimulating the production of volatile phenols by LAB. The results suggest that caffeic and ferulic acids induce the synthesis of the cinnamate decarboxylase involved in the metabolism of p-coumaric acid. On the other hand, tannins exert an inhibitory effect. This study highlights the capacity of LAB to produce volatile phenols and that this activity is markedly influenced by the phenolic composition of the medium. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Data to DecisionsTerminate, Tolerate, Transfer, or Treat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-25

    and resources.  Degradation of current capability continues. Transfer – Opportunities and Consequences:  Requires a surgical knowledge of what...I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S Data to Decisions—Terminate, Tolerate, Transfer , or Treat Laura A...Data to Decisions—Terminate, Tolerate, Transfer , or Treat For more information Laura Odell(lodell@ida.org, 703-845-2009 The Department

  1. Octyl Phenol Synthesis Using Natural Clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Casuscelli

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of clay minerals, HB, NB and Al-PILC have been studied in the alkylation reactions of 2-octanol with phenol at 180°C, under conditions of alcohol/phenol = 1 (mole ratio and W/FAo °= 64,27 ghmol-1. The selectivity of Al-PILC was 77,12% for octyl phenol and 16,5% for dioctyl phenol.

  2. Levels, variability and determinants of environmental phenols in pairs of Norwegian mothers and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhi, Amrit Kaur; Sabaredzovic, Azemira; Papadopoulou, Eleni; Cequier, Enrique; Thomsen, Cathrine

    2018-05-01

    Exposure to environmental phenols including parabens, bisphenols (BPs), oxybenzone/benzophenone-3 (BP-3) and triclosan (TCS) is ubiquitous. Due to evidence of their estrogenic activity, they have been considered as chemicals of concern. The exposure of the Norwegian population to these compounds is presently unknown. To measure urinary levels of twelve different environmental phenols including four emerging bisphenols: S, F, B and AF (abbreviated as BPS, BPF, BPB and BPAF, respectively) in a healthy Norwegian population. We have calculated short-term variability, estimated daily intakes and investigated important determinants of exposure. Urine samples were collected from mothers (n = 48) and their children (n = 56) during spring/summer 2012 in two counties in Norway. Six environmental phenols namely methyl, ethyl and propyl paraben, BPA, BP-3 and TCS were detected in almost 100% of the urine samples. Among the emerging bisphenols, BPS was detected most frequently in the urine samples (42-48%) followed by BPF (4-15%). Parabens were positively and significantly correlated to each other in both mothers and children. Levels of parabens and BP-3 were higher in mothers compared to children. All mothers and children had lower estimated daily intakes (back calculated from the urinary concentrations) of parabens and BPA than the respective acceptable and tolerable daily intakes (ADIs and TDIs) established by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Observed intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) indicated moderate to high reliability of spot urine measurements for all the environmental phenols (ICCs: 0.70-0.97). Use of hair products, deodorants, face and hand creams were significantly associated with higher urinary levels of parabens. Occurrence of environmental phenols in healthy Norwegian women and children is abundant. Among emerging bisphenols, there is widespread exposure to BPS. A single spot urine sample can be used for estimating short-term exposures

  3. Degradation of a chiral nonylphenol isomer in two agricultural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haifeng; Spiteller, Michael; Guenther, Klaus; Boehmler, Gabriele; Zuehlke, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    The degradation of a chiral nonylphenol isomer, 4-(1-ethyl-1,4-dimethylpentyl)phenol (NP 112 ), in two agricultural soils from Monheim and Dortmund, Germany has been studied. The degradation of NP 112 and the formation of a nitro-nonylphenol metabolite were determined by means of GC-MS analysis. The degradation followed bi-exponential order kinetics, with half-life of less than 5 days in both soils. The nitro-metabolite was found at different concentration levels in the two soils. The nitro-metabolite of NP 112 was more persistent than its parent compound. After 150 days about 13% of the initially applied NP 112 remained in the Monheim soil as its nitro-metabolite. Results of the E-screen assay revealed that the nitro-NP 112 has oestrogenic potency of 85% of that of NP 112 . Furthermore, the results of chiral GC-MS analysis revealed that no chiral degradation of NP 112 occurred in this study. - The degradation of a chiral nonylphenol isomer in agricultural soils followed bi-exponential order kinetics resulting in a more persistent nitro-metabolite.

  4. Enhancement of photocatalytic properties of TiO2 nanoparticles doped with CeO2 and supported on SiO2 for phenol degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Chunjing; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zailei; Ji, Yongjun; Zhan, Hanhui; Xiao, Fangxing; Wang, Dan; Liu, Bin; Su, Fabing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CeO 2 -TiO 2 /SiO 2 composites were prepared via a facile co-precipitation method. • Introduction of SiO 2 support increases the dispersion of CeO 2 -TiO 2 . • CeO 2 -TiO 2 /SiO 2 exhibits an enhanced photocatalytic efficiency for phenol degradation. • Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ pair coexisting in CeO 2 improves electron–hole pairs separation efficiency. - Abstract: A series of CeO 2 -TiO 2 and CeO 2 -TiO 2 /SiO 2 composites were prepared with TiCl 4 and Ce (NO 3 ) 3 ·6H 2 O as precursors via a facile co-precipitation method. The obtained samples were characterized by various techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption (N 2 -BET), Fourier transformation infrared spectrum (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV–Vis spectroscopy measurements. The results indicated that TiO 2 doped with CeO 2 and supported on SiO 2 could reduce the crystallite size, inhibit the phase transformation, enhance the thermal stability, and effectively extend the spectral response from UV to visible range. When applied to the phenol photodegradation on a homemade batch reactor with an external cooling jacket, the CeO 2 -TiO 2 /SiO 2 catalysts exhibited significantly enhanced photodegradation efficiency in comparison with commercial Degussa P25 and CeO 2 -TiO 2 . The unique catalytic properties of CeO 2 -TiO 2 /SiO 2 were ascribed to improved electron–hole pairs separation efficiency and formation of more reactive oxygen species owing to the presence of Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ , as well as high dispersion of active component of CeO 2 -TiO 2 as a result of the introduction of SiO 2 support. Furthermore, the catalysts can be easily recovered from the reaction solution by centrifugation and reused for four cycles without significant loss of activity

  5. Phytochemical phenolics in organically grown vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Janice E; Zhao, Xin; Carey, Edward E; Welti, Ruth; Yang, Shie-Shien; Wang, Weiqun

    2005-12-01

    Fruit and vegetable intake is inversely correlated with risks for several chronic diseases in humans. Phytochemicals, and in particular, phenolic compounds, present in plant foods may be partly responsible for these health benefits through a variety of mechanisms. Since environmental factors play a role in a plant's production of secondary metabolites, it was hypothesized that an organic agricultural production system would increase phenolic levels. Cultivars of leaf lettuce, collards, and pac choi were grown either on organically certified plots or on adjacent conventional plots. Nine prominent phenolic agents were quantified by HPLC, including phenolic acids (e. g. caffeic acid and gallic acid) and aglycone or glycoside flavonoids (e. g. apigenin, kaempferol, luteolin, and quercetin). Statistically, we did not find significant higher levels of phenolic agents in lettuce and collard samples grown organically. The total phenolic content of organic pac choi samples as measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay, however, was significantly higher than conventional samples (p lettuce and collards, the organic system provided an increased opportunity for insect attack, resulting in a higher level of total phenolic agents in pac choi.

  6. Oral tolerance induction with altered forms of ovalbumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stransky B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available As a T cell-dependent phenomenon, oral tolerance is not expected to depend necessarily on native configuration of antigens. We investigated the induction of oral tolerance with modified ovalbumin (Ova. Oral administration of heat-denatured (HD-Ova and cyanogen bromide-degraded ovalbumin was less effective than native Ova in inducing oral tolerance in B6D2F1 mice. HD-Ova was effective in suppressing delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH reactions but did not suppress specific antibody formation. Injection of Ova directly into the stomach, but not into the ileum or cecum, suppressed subsequent immunization to DTH reactions. Gavage with protease inhibitors (aprotinin or ovomucoid before gavage with Ova was ineffective in blocking tolerance induction. Treatment with hydroxyurea to destroy cycling cells 24 h before gavage with Ova blocked oral tolerance induction and also the possibility to passively transfer tolerance to naive recipients with the serum of mice gavaged with Ova 1 h before. The implications of these findings about oral tolerance induction are discussed

  7. Dynamic Changes in Phenolics and Antioxidant Capacity during Pecan (Carya illinoinensis Kernel Ripening and Its Phenolics Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Jia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pecan (Carya illinoinensis kernels have a high phenolics content and a high antioxidant capacity compared to other nuts—traits that have attracted great interest of late. Changes in the total phenolic content (TPC, condensed tannins (CT, total flavonoid content (TFC, five individual phenolics, and antioxidant capacity of five pecan cultivars were investigated during the process of kernel ripening. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadruple time-of-flight mass (UPLC-Q/TOF-MS was also used to analyze the phenolics profiles in mixed pecan kernels. TPC, CT, TFC, individual phenolics, and antioxidant capacity were changed in similar patterns, with values highest at the water or milk stages, lowest at milk or dough stages, and slightly varied at kernel stages. Forty phenolics were tentatively identified in pecan kernels, of which two were first reported in the genus Carya, six were first reported in Carya illinoinensis, and one was first reported in its kernel. The findings on these new phenolic compounds provide proof of the high antioxidant capacity of pecan kernels.

  8. Dynamic Changes in Phenolics and Antioxidant Capacity during Pecan (Carya illinoinensis) Kernel Ripening and Its Phenolics Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaodong; Luo, Huiting; Xu, Mengyang; Zhai, Min; Guo, Zhongren; Qiao, Yushan; Wang, Liangju

    2018-02-16

    Pecan ( Carya illinoinensis ) kernels have a high phenolics content and a high antioxidant capacity compared to other nuts-traits that have attracted great interest of late. Changes in the total phenolic content (TPC), condensed tannins (CT), total flavonoid content (TFC), five individual phenolics, and antioxidant capacity of five pecan cultivars were investigated during the process of kernel ripening. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadruple time-of-flight mass (UPLC-Q/TOF-MS) was also used to analyze the phenolics profiles in mixed pecan kernels. TPC, CT, TFC, individual phenolics, and antioxidant capacity were changed in similar patterns, with values highest at the water or milk stages, lowest at milk or dough stages, and slightly varied at kernel stages. Forty phenolics were tentatively identified in pecan kernels, of which two were first reported in the genus Carya , six were first reported in Carya illinoinensis , and one was first reported in its kernel. The findings on these new phenolic compounds provide proof of the high antioxidant capacity of pecan kernels.

  9. Phenol Biodegradation by Free and Immobilized Candida tropicalis RETL-Crl on Coconut Husk and Loofah Packed in Biofilter Column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shazryenna, D; Ruzanna, R; Jessica, M S; Piakong, M T

    2015-01-01

    Phenols and its derivatives are environmental pollutant commonly found in many industrial effluents. It is toxic in nature and causes various health hazards. However, they are poorly removed in conventional biological processes due to their toxicity. Immobilization of microbial cells has received increasing interest in the field of waste treatment and creates opportunities in a wide range of sectors including environmental pollution control. Live cells of phenol-degrading yeast, Candida tropicalis RETL-Crl, were immobilized on coconut husk and loofah by adsorption. The immobolized particle was packed into biofilter column which used for continuous treatment of a phenol with initial phenol concentration of 3mM. Both loofah and coconut husk have similar phenol biodegradation rate of 0.0188 gL −1 h −1 within 15 hours to achieve a phenol removal efficiency of 100%. However loofah have lower biomass concentration of 4.22 gL −1 compared to biomass concentration on coconut husk, 4.39 gL −1 . Coconut husk contain higher biomass concentration which makes it better support material than loofah. Fibrous matrices such as loofah and coconut husk provide adequate supporting surfaces for cell adsorption, due to their high specific surface area. Therefore, coconut husk and loofah being an agricultural waste product have the potential to be used as low-cost adsorbent and support matrix for microbial culture immobilization for the removal of organic pollutant from wastewater. (paper)

  10. From rice bag to table: Fate of phenolic chemical compositions and antioxidant activities in waxy and non-waxy black rice during home cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yayuan; Cai, Weixi; Xu, Baojun

    2016-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to systematically analyze degradation rate of functional substances, such as total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), condensed tannin content (CTC), monomeric anthocyanin content (MAC), cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy3glc), and peonidin-3-glucoside (Pn3glc), as well as antioxidant activities in cooked waxy and non-waxy black rice through different home cooking manners. Results showed that greater phenolics and antioxidant capacities were detected in non-waxy rice rather than waxy one. All processed black rice exhibited significantly (price. Different processing methods significantly degraded the content and activities of antioxidants of both waxy and non-waxy black rice. Under the same cooking time, black rice porridge retained more active substances than that of cooked rice by rice cooker. Therefore, to maintain bioavailability of active components, black rice porridge may gain more health promoting effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Degradation of organic contaminants found in organic waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has arisen in recycling of the waste created by modern society. A common way of recycling the organic fraction is amendment on farmland. However, these wastes may contain possible hazardous components in small amounts, which may prevent their use in farming. The ob...... phenol ethoxylates. The results are promising as they indicate that a great potential for biological degradation is present, though the inoculum containing the microorganisms capable of transforming the recalcitrant xenobiotics has to be chosen carefully....

  12. Electronic Energy Levels and Band Alignment for Aqueous Phenol and Phenolate from First Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalka, Daniel; Pham, Tuan Anh; Sprik, Michiel; Galli, Giulia

    2015-07-30

    Electronic energy levels in phenol and phenolate solutions have been computed using density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory. The valence and conduction bands of the solvent and the ionization energies of the solutes have been aligned with respect to the vacuum level based on the concept of a computational standard hydrogen electrode. We have found significant quantitative differences between the generalized-gradient approximation, calculations with the HSE hybrid functional, and many-body perturbation theory in the G0W0 approximation. For phenol, two ionization energies below the photoionization threshold of bulk water have been assigned in the spectrum of Kohn-Sham eigenvalues of the solution. Deprotonation to phenolate was found to lift a third occupied energy level above the valence band maximum of the solvent which is characterized by an electronic lone pair at the hydroxyl group. The second and third ionization energies of phenolate were found to be very similar and explain the intensity pattern observed in recent experiments using liquid-microjet photoemission spectroscopy.

  13. Mechanism of microsomal metabolism of benzene to phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinson, J.A.; Freeman, J.P.; Potter, D.W.; Mitchum, R.K.; Evans, F.E.

    1985-05-01

    The mechanism of microsomal hydroxylation of benzene to phenol has been studied by examining the microsomal metabolism of the specifically deuterated derivative 1,3,5-(/sub 2/H/sup 3/)benzene. Evidence for the formation of the following four products was obtained: 2,3,5-(/sub 2/H/sup 3/)phenol, 3,5-(/sub 2/H/sup 2/)phenol, 2,4,6-(/sub 2/H/sup 3/)phenol, and 2,4-(/sub 2/H/sup 2/)phenol. The presence of 2,3,5-(2H3)phenol and 2,4-(/sub 2/H/sup 2/)phenol shows that, in the microsomal metabolism of benzene to phenol, a NIH shift had occurred. A deuterium isotope effect (kH/kD) of approximately 4 was detected in both the meta- and para-deuterated phenols. This finding indicates that cyclohexadienone, formed either by isomerization of the epoxide or directly from the enzyme-substrate complex, is a major intermediate in the metabolism of benzene to phenol.

  14. Changes of turbidity during the phenol oxidation by photo-Fenton treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Natalia; Camarero, Luis M; Lomas, Jose M; Perez, Jonatan

    2014-11-01

    Turbidity presented by phenol solutions oxidized with Fenton reagent shows the tendency of a first order intermediate kinetics. Thus, turbidity can be considered a representative parameter of the presence of intermediate oxidation species, which are generated along the decomposition of toxic and reluctant contaminants, such as phenol. Moreover, that parameter presents a linear dependence with the catalyst dosage, but is also determined by the initial contaminant load. When analyzing the oxidation mechanism of phenol, it is found that the maximum turbidity occurs when the treatment is carried out at oxidant to phenol molar ratios R = 4.0. These oxidation conditions correspond to the presence of a reaction mixture mainly composed of dihydroxylated rings, precursors of the muconic acid formation. The oxidation via "para" comprises the formation reactions of charge transfer complexes (quinhydrone), between the para-dihydroxylated intermediates (hydroquinone) and the para-substituted quinones (p-benzoquinone), which are quite unstable and reactive species, quickly decomposed into hydroxyhydroquinones. Working with oxidant ratios up to R = 6.0, the maximum observed value of turbidity in the oxidized solutions is kept almost constant. It is found that, in these conditions, the pyrogallol formation is maximal, what is generated through the degradation of ortho-species (catechol and ortho-benzoquinone) and meta-substituted (resorcinol). Operating with ratios over R = 6.0, these intermediates are decomposed into biodegradable acids, generating lower turbidity in the solution. Then, the residual turbidity is a function of the molar ratio of the ferrous ions vs. moles of oxidant utilized in the essays, that lets to estimate the stoichiometric dosage of catalyst as 20 mg/L at pH = 3.0, whereas operating in stoichiometric conditions, R = 14.0, the residual turbidity of water results almost null.

  15. Sol-Gel-Assisted Microwave-Derived Synthesis of Anatase Ag/TiO2/GO Nanohybrids toward Efficient Visible Light Phenol Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. Alsharaeh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A simple microwave-assisted (MWI wet chemical route to synthesize pure anatase phase titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs is reported here using titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4 as starting material. The as-prepared TiO2 NPs were characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV/visible absorption spectroscopy, and infrared and Raman spectroscopic techniques. Further modification of the anatase TiO2 NPs was carried out by incorporating plasmonic silver (Ag NPs and graphene oxide (GO in order to enhance the visible light absorption. The photocatalytic activities of the anatase TiO2, Ag/TiO2, and Ag/TiO2/GO nanocomposites were evaluated under both ultraviolet (UV and visible light irradiation using phenol as a model contaminant. The presence of Ag NPs was found to play a significant role to define the photocatalytic activity of the Ag/TiO2/GO nanocomposite. It was found that the Ag performed like a sink under UV excitation and stored photo-generated electrons from TiO2, whereas, under visible light excitation, the Ag acted as a photosensitizer enhancing the photocatalytic activity of the nanocomposite. The detailed mechanism was studied based on photocatalytic activities of Ag/TiO2/GO nanocomposites. Therefore, the as-prepared Ag/TiO2/GO nanocomposite was used as photocatalytic materials under both UV and visible light irradiation toward degradation of organic molecules.

  16. Chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger - formation of halogenated phenols and subsequent environmental risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melbye, Alf G.; Faksness, Liv-Guri; Knudsen, Boerre Leif

    2006-03-15

    Formation of halogenated phenols as side products from treatment of produced water with aqueous chlorine dioxide has been investigated. The literature describes formation of halogenated hydrocarbons in effluent treatment using chlorine, hypochlorite and chlorine dioxide. A new chlorine dioxide product, originally intended as a H2S scavenger in the oil and gas industry, has been tested both as a phenol scavenger and H2S-scavenger for produced water applications. The concern about the possible formation of halogenated by-products initiated laboratory testing of chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger for produced water applications. The tests also included synthetic matrixes containing phenols, and the tests show that halogenated phenols, mainly brominated species, are found in produced water after treatment with chlorine dioxide. Due to potential environmental risk from halogenated organic contaminants, the use of chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger is not recommended. (Author)

  17. Phytoremediation potential of the novel atrazine tolerant Lolium multiflorum and studies on the mechanisms involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merini, Luciano J.; Bobillo, Cecilia; Cuadrado, Virginia; Corach, Daniel; Giulietti, Ana M.

    2009-01-01

    Atrazine impact on human health and the environment have been extensively studied. Phytoremediation emerged as a low cost, environmental friendly biotechnological solution for atrazine pollution in soil and water. In vitro atrazine tolerance assays were performed and Lolium multiflorum was found as a novel tolerant species, able to germinate and grow in the presence of 1 mg kg -1 of the herbicide. L. multiflorum presented 20% higher atrazine removal capacity than the natural attenuation, with high initial degradation rate in microcosms. The mechanisms involved in atrazine tolerance such as mutation in psbA gene, enzymatic detoxification via P 450 or chemical hydrolysis through benzoxazinones were evaluated. It was demonstrated that atrazine tolerance is conferred by enhanced enzymatic detoxification via P 450 . Due to its atrazine degradation capacity in soil and its agronomical properties, L. multiflorum is a candidate for designing phytoremediation strategies for atrazine contaminated agricultural soils, especially those involving run-off avoiding. - Finding of a novel atrazine-tolerant species, as a potential candidate for phytoremediating herbicide-contaminated agriculture soils and elucidation of the mechanisms involved in tolerance.

  18. Phytoremediation potential of the novel atrazine tolerant Lolium multiflorum and studies on the mechanisms involved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merini, Luciano J. [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bobillo, Cecilia [Servicio de Huellas Digitales Geneticas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, BS As (Argentina); Cuadrado, Virginia [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Corach, Daniel [Servicio de Huellas Digitales Geneticas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, BS As (Argentina); Giulietti, Ana M., E-mail: agiule@ffyb.uba.a [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-11-15

    Atrazine impact on human health and the environment have been extensively studied. Phytoremediation emerged as a low cost, environmental friendly biotechnological solution for atrazine pollution in soil and water. In vitro atrazine tolerance assays were performed and Lolium multiflorum was found as a novel tolerant species, able to germinate and grow in the presence of 1 mg kg{sup -1} of the herbicide. L. multiflorum presented 20% higher atrazine removal capacity than the natural attenuation, with high initial degradation rate in microcosms. The mechanisms involved in atrazine tolerance such as mutation in psbA gene, enzymatic detoxification via P{sub 450} or chemical hydrolysis through benzoxazinones were evaluated. It was demonstrated that atrazine tolerance is conferred by enhanced enzymatic detoxification via P{sub 450}. Due to its atrazine degradation capacity in soil and its agronomical properties, L. multiflorum is a candidate for designing phytoremediation strategies for atrazine contaminated agricultural soils, especially those involving run-off avoiding. - Finding of a novel atrazine-tolerant species, as a potential candidate for phytoremediating herbicide-contaminated agriculture soils and elucidation of the mechanisms involved in tolerance.

  19. A review of phenolic compounds in oil-bearing plants: Distribution, identification and occurrence of phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alu'datt, Muhammad H; Rababah, Taha; Alhamad, Mohammad N; Al-Mahasneh, Majdi A; Almajwal, Ali; Gammoh, Sana; Ereifej, Khalil; Johargy, Ayman; Alli, Inteaz

    2017-03-01

    Over the last two decades, separation, identification and measurement of the total and individual content of phenolic compounds has been widely investigated. Recently, the presence of a wide range of phenolic compounds in oil-bearing plants has been shown to contribute to their therapeutic properties, including anti-cancer, anti-viral, anti-oxidant, hypoglycemic, hypo-lipidemic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Phenolics in oil-bearing plants are now recognized as important minor food components due to several organoleptic and health properties, and they are used as food or sources of food ingredients. Variations in the content of phenolics in oil-bearing plants have largely been attributed to several factors, including the cultivation, time of harvest and soil types. A number of authors have suggested that the presence phenolics in extracted proteins, carbohydrates and oils may contribute to objectionable off flavors The objective of this study was to review the distribution, identification and occurrence of free and bound phenolic compounds in oil-bearing plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. QSARs for phenols and phenolates: oxidation potential as a predictor of reaction rate constants with photochemically produced oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William A; Oueis, Yan; O'Connor, Meghan; Rinaman, Johanna E; Taggart, Miranda G; McCarthy, Rachel E; Foster, Kimberley A; Latch, Douglas E

    2017-03-22

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for prediction of the reaction rate constants of phenols and phenolates with three photochemically produced oxidants, singlet oxygen, carbonate radical, and triplet excited state sensitizers/organic matter, are developed. The predictive variable is the one-electron oxidation potential (E 1 ), which is calculated for each species using density functional theory. The reaction rate constants are obtained from the literature, and for singlet oxygen, are augmented with new experimental data. Calculated E 1 values have a mean unsigned error compared to literature values of 0.04-0.06 V. For singlet oxygen, a single linear QSAR that includes both phenols and phenolates is developed that predicts experimental rate constants, on average, to within a factor of three. Predictions for only 6 out of 87 compounds are off by more than a factor of 10. A more limited data set for carbonate radical reactions with phenols and phenolates also gives a single linear QSAR with prediction of rate constant being accurate to within a factor of three. The data for the reactions of phenols with triplet state sensitizers demonstrate that two sensitizers, 2-acetonaphthone and methylene blue, most closely predict the reactivity trend of triplet excited state organic matter with phenols. Using sensitizers with stronger reduction potentials could lead to overestimation of rate constants and thus underestimation of phenolic pollutant persistence.

  1. Consequences of plant phenolic compounds for productivity and health of ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorn, Garry C; McNabb, Warren C

    2003-05-01

    Plant phenolic compounds are diverse in structure but are characterised by hydroxylated aromatic rings (e.g. flavan-3-ols). They are categorised as secondary metabolites, and their function in plants is often poorly understood. Many plant phenolic compounds are polymerised into larger molecules such as the proanthocyanidins (PA; condensed tannins) and lignins. Only the lignins, PA, oestrogenic compounds and hydrolysable tannins will be considered here. Lignins slow the physical and microbial degradation of ingested feed, because of resilient covalent bonding with hemicellulose and cellulose, rather than any direct effects on the rumen per se. The PA are prevalent in browse and are expressed in the foliage of some legumes (e.g. Lotus spp.), but rarely in grasses. They reduce the nutritive value of poor-quality diets, but can also have substantial benefits for ruminant productivity and health when improved temperate forages are fed. Beneficial effects are dependent on the chemical and physical structure, and concentration of the PA in the diet, but they have been shown to improve live-weight gain, milk yield and protein concentration, and ovulation rate. They prevent bloat in cattle, reduce gastrointestinal nematode numbers, flystrike and CH4 production. Some phenolic compounds (e.g. coumestans) cause temporary infertility, whilst those produced by Fusarium fungi found in pasture, silage or stored grains can cause permanent infertility. The HT may be toxic because products of their metabolism can cause liver damage and other metabolic disorders.

  2. The use of a tannin crude extract from Cistus ladanifer L. to protect soya-bean protein from degradation in the rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinho, M T P; Moreira, O C; Pereira, M S; Bessa, R J B

    2007-06-01

    Cistus ladanifer L. (CL) is a perennial shrub abundant in dry woods and dry land of Mediterranean zone, with high level of tannins. Tannins bind to protein, preventing its degradation in the digestive compartments. This tannin/protein complex may be advantageous when partially protecting good-quality feed protein from excessive rumen protein degradation. The objective of this trial was to use a CL phenol crude extract to prevent excessive rumen degradation of soya-bean meal protein. The phenolic compounds were extracted using an acetone/water solution (70:30, v/v). Soya-bean meal was then treated with this crude CL extract, containing 640 g of total phenols (TP) per kg of dry matter (DM), in order to obtain mixtures with 0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100 and 150 g of TP per kg DM. Three rumen-cannulated rams were used to assess in sacco rumen degradability of DM and nitrogen (N). The three-step in vitro procedure was used to determine intestinal digestibility. Increasing extract concentrations quadratically decreased the N-soluble fraction a (R2 = 0.96, P = 0.0001) and increased the non-soluble degradable fraction b (R2 = 0.92, P = 0.005). The rate of degradation c linearly decreased with CL extract doses (R2 = 0.44, P = 0.0065). For the effective rumen degradability of N, a linear reduction (R2 = 0.94, P < 0.0001) was observed. The in vitro intestinal digestibility of protein (ivID) quadratically decreased (R2 = 0.99, P < 0.0001) with TP inclusion and the rumen undegradable protein (RUP) showed a quadratic increase (R2 = 0.94, P = 0.0417). Total intestinal protein availability, computed from the RUP and ivID, linearly decreased with TP inclusion level (R2 = 0.45, P = 0.0033).

  3. Directional liquefaction of biomass for phenolic compounds and in situ hydrodeoxygenation upgrading of phenolics using bifunctional catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng Feng; Chung-yun Hse; Kui Wang; Zhongzhi Yang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    Phenolic compounds derived from biomass are important feedstocks for the sustainable production of hydrocarbon biofuels. Hydrodeoxygenation is an effective process to remove oxygen-containing functionalities in phenolic compounds. This paper reported a simple method for producing hydrocarbons by liquefying biomass and upgrading liquefied products. Three phenolic...

  4. Production, Optimization, and Characterization of Organic Solvent Tolerant Cellulases from a Lignocellulosic Waste-Degrading Actinobacterium, Promicromonospora sp. VP111.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lebin; Ram, Hari; Kumar, Alok; Singh, Ved Pal

    2016-07-01

    High costs of natural cellulose utilization and cellulase production are an industrial challenge. In view of this, an isolated soil actinobacterium identified as Promicromonospora sp. VP111 showed potential for production of major cellulases (CMCase, FPase, and β-glucosidase) utilizing untreated agricultural lignocellulosic wastes. Extensive disintegration of microcrystalline cellulose and adherence on it during fermentation divulged true cellulolytic efficiency of the strain. Conventional optimization resulted in increased cellulase yield in a cost-effective medium, and the central composite design (CCD) analysis revealed cellulase production to be limited by cellulose and ammonium sulfate. Cellulase activities were enhanced by Co(+2) (1 mM) and retained up to 60 °C and pH 9.0, indicating thermo-alkaline tolerance. Cellulases showed stability in organic solvents (25 % v/v) with log P ow  ≥ 1.24. Untreated wheat straw during submerged fermentation was particularly degraded and yielded about twofold higher levels of cellulases than with commercial cellulose (Na-CMC and avicel) which is especially economical. Thus, this is the first detailed report on cellulases from an efficient strain of Promicromonospora that was non-hemolytic, alkali-halotolerant, antibiotic (erythromycin, kanamycin, rifampicin, cefaclor, ceftazidime) resistant, multiple heavy metal (Mo(+6) = W(+6) > Pb(+2) > Mn(+2) > Cr(+3) > Sn(+2)), and organic solvent (n-hexane, isooctane) tolerant, which is industrially and environmentally valuable.

  5. Degradation of environment pollutant dyes using phytosynthesized metal nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    MeenaKumari, M.; Philip, Daizy

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time biogenic reduction and stabilization of gold and silver ions at room temperature using fruit juice of Punica granatum. The formation, morphology and crystalline structure of the synthesized nanoparticles are determined using UV-Visible, XRD and TEM. An attempt to reveal the partial role of phenolic hydroxyls in the reduction of Au3+ and Ag+ is done through FTIR analysis. The synthesized nanoparticles are used as potential catalysts in the degradation of a cationic phenothiazine dye, an anionic mono azo dye and a cationic fluorescent dye. The calculated values of percentage removal of dyes and the rate constants from pseudo first order kinetic data fit give a comparative study on degradation of organic dyes in presence of prepared gold and silver nanoparticles.

  6. Effects of extrusion, infrared and microwave processing on Maillard reaction products and phenolic compounds in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilić, Slađana; Mogol, Burçe Ataç; Akıllıoğlu, Gül; Serpen, Arda; Delić, Nenad; Gökmen, Vural

    2014-01-15

    The Maillard reaction indicators furosine, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), acrylamide and color were determined to evaluate heat effects induced during extrusion, infrared and microwave heating of soybean. In addition, the present paper aimed to study changes in the phenolic compounds, as well as in the overall antioxidant properties of different soybean products in relation to heating at 45-140 °C during the processes. Soybean proteins were highly sensible to Maillard reaction and furosine was rapidly formed under slight heating conditions during extrusion and infrared heating. Microwave heating at lower temperatures for a longer time yielded lower acrylamide levels in the final soybean products, as a result of its partial degradation. However, during infrared heating, acrylamide formation greatly increased with decreasing moisture content. After a short time of extrusion and infrared heating at 140 °C and microwave heating at 135 °C for 5 min, concentrations of HMF increased to 11.34, 26.21 and 34.97 µg g(-1), respectively. The heating conditions caused formation of acrylamide, HMF and furosine in high concentration. The results indicate that the complex structure of soybeans provides protection of phenolic compounds from thermal degradation, and that Maillard reaction products improved the antioxidant properties of heat-treated soybean. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. The impact of drying techniques on phenolic compound, total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of oat flour tarhana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Değirmencioğlu, Nurcan; Gürbüz, Ozan; Herken, Emine Nur; Yıldız, Aysun Yurdunuseven

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the changes in phenolic composition, total phenolic content, and antioxidant capacity of tarhanas supplemented with oat flour (OF) at the levels of 20-100% (w/w) after three drying treatments (sun-, oven-, and microwave drying) were investigated. A total of seventeen phenolic standards have been screened in tarhanas, and the most abundant flavonol and phenolic acid compounds were kaempferol (23.62mg/g) and 3-hydroxy-4-metoxy cinnamic acid (9.60mg/g). The total phenolic content amount gradually increased with the addition of OF to tarhana, but decidedly higher total phenolic content was found in samples oven dried at 55°C as compared with other methods. The microwave- and oven dried tarhana samples showed higher TEACDPPH and TEACABTS values than those dried with the other methods, respectively, in higher OF amounts. Consequently, oven- and microwave-drying can be recommended to retain the highest for phenolic compounds as well as maximal antioxidant capacity in OF supplemented tarhana samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrochemical removal of phenol from oil refinery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahab, O; Amin, N K; El-Ashtoukhy, E-S Z

    2009-04-30

    This study explores the possibility of using electrocoagulation to remove phenol from oil refinery waste effluent using a cell with horizontally oriented aluminum cathode and a horizontal aluminum screen anode. The removal of phenol was investigated in terms of various parameters namely: pH, operating time, current density, initial phenol concentration and addition of NaCl. Removal of phenol during electrocoagulation was due to combined effect of sweep coagulation and adsorption. The results showed that, at high current density and solution pH 7, remarkable removal of 97% of phenol after 2h can be achieved. The rate of electrocoagulation was observed to increase as the phenol concentration decreases; the maximum removal rate was attained at 30 mg L(-1) phenol concentration. For a given current density using an array of closely packed Al screens as anode was found to be more effective than single screen anode, the percentage phenol removal was found to increase with increasing the number of screens per array. After 2h of electrocoagulation, 94.5% of initial phenol concentration was removed from the petroleum refinery wastewater. Energy consumption and aluminum Electrode consumption were calculated per gram of phenol removed. The present study shows that, electrocoagulation of phenol using aluminum electrodes is a promising process.

  9. Comparative Study of Commercial Oxide Electrodes Performance in Electrochemical Degradation of Organics in Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelegrino Rosângela L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the potentiality of two types of DSAâ commercial electrodes, for electrochemical treatment of effluents, is investigated. Oxide anodes, with nominal composition of 70TiO2/30RuO2 and 45IrO2/55Ta2O5, were used in a flow-cell reactor for the electrooxidation of phenol. Comparative results were presented as phenol concentration decay as a function of electrolysis time, as well as COD and TOC concentration reduction. The cell reactor was operated at current densities, ranging from 15 to 150 mA cm-2 and solution linear velocity was 0.24 m s-1. Results reported in this paper showed that phenol and quinones were degraded to a very low concentration, besides only a small portion of the organic carbon is reduced. Starting from 100 mg L-1, after five hours of electrolysis at 100 mA cm-2, concentrations reached 0.4 mg L-1 of phenol, 1 mg L-1 of hydroquinone, 7 mg L-1 of benzoquinone and TOC was reduced by 35%.

  10. Aerobic Microbial Degradation of Chlorochromate Compounds Polluting the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, O.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Eight soil and sludge samples which have been polluted with petroleum wastes for more than 41 years were used for isolation of adapted indigenous microbial communities able to mineralize the chloro aromatic compounds [3-chlorobenzoic acid (3-CBA), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2,6-dichlorophenol indole phenol (2,6-DCPP) and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB)] and use them as a sole carbon and energy sources. From these communities, the most promising bacterial strain MAM-24 which has the ability to degrade the four chosen aromatic compounds was isolated and identified by comparative sequence analysis for its 16S-rRNA coding genes and it was identified as Bacillus mucilaginosus HQ 013329. Degradation percentage was quantified by HPLC. Degradation products were identified by GC-MS analysis which revealed that the isolated strain and its mutant dechlorinated the four chloro aromatic compounds in the first step forming acetophenone which is considered as the corner stone of the intermediate compounds

  11. Degradation of transgene DNA in genetically modified herbicide-tolerant rice during food processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shangxin; Zhou, Guanghong; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Liangyan; Dai, Sifa; Xu, Xinglian; Xiao, Hongmei

    2011-12-01

    In order to assess the effect of food processing on the degradation of exogenous DNA components in sweet rice wine and rice crackers made from genetically modified (GM) rice (Oryza sativa L.), we developed genomic DNA extraction methods and compared the effect of different food processing procedures on DNA degradation. It was found that the purity, quantity and quality of DNA by alkaline lysis method were higher than by CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) method. For sweet rice wine, CAMV35S (cauliflower mosaic virus 35S) promoter and NOS (nopaline synthase) terminator were degraded by the third day, whereas the exogenous gene Bar (bialaphos resistance) remained unaffected. For rice crackers, boiling, drying and microwaving contributed to the initial degradations of DNA. Baking resulted in further degradations, and frying led to the most severe changes. These results indicated that the stability of DNA in GM rice was different under different processing conditions. For sweet rice wine, Bar was most stable, followed by NOS, CAMV35S, and SPS. For rice crackers, CAMV35S was most stable, followed by SPS, NOS, and Bar. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of ethylenediamine on chemical degradation of insulin aspart in pharmaceutical solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Christian; Jacobsen, Dorte; Palm, Lisbeth

    2008-11-01

    To examine the effect of different amine compounds on the chemical degradation of insulin aspart at pharmaceutical formulation conditions. Insulin aspart preparations containing amine compounds or phosphate (reference) were prepared and the chemical degradation was assessed following storage at 37 degrees C using chromatographic techniques. Ethylenediamine was examined at multiple concentrations and the resulting insulin-ethylenediamine derivates were structurally characterized using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. The effects on ethylenediamine when omitting glycerol or phenolic compounds from the formulations were investigated. Ethylenediamine was superior in terms of reducing formation of high molecular weight protein and insulin aspart related impurities compared to the other amine compounds and phosphate. Monotransamidation of insulin aspart in the presence of ethylenediamine was observed at all of the six possible Asn/Gln residues with Asn(A21) having the highest propensity to react with ethylenediamine. Data from formulations studies suggests a dual mechanism of ethylenediamine and a mandatory presence of phenolic compounds to obtain the effect. The formation of high molecular weight protein and insulin aspart related impurities was reduced by ethylenediamine in a concentration dependant manner.

  13. Accident tolerant fuels for LWRs: A perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J., E-mail: zinklesj@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Terrani, K.A.; Gehin, J.C.; Ott, L.J.; Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The motivation for exploring the potential development of accident tolerant fuels in light water reactors to replace existing Zr alloy clad monolithic (U, Pu) oxide fuel is outlined. The evaluation includes a brief review of core degradation processes under design-basis and beyond-design-basis transient conditions. Three general strategies for accident tolerant fuels are being explored: modification of current state-of-the-art zirconium alloy cladding to further improve oxidation resistance (including use of coatings), replacement of Zr alloy cladding with an alternative oxidation-resistant high-performance cladding, and replacement of the monolithic ceramic oxide fuel with alternative fuel forms.

  14. Accident tolerant fuels for LWRs: A perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Terrani, K.A.; Gehin, J.C.; Ott, L.J.; Snead, L.L.

    2014-01-01

    The motivation for exploring the potential development of accident tolerant fuels in light water reactors to replace existing Zr alloy clad monolithic (U, Pu) oxide fuel is outlined. The evaluation includes a brief review of core degradation processes under design-basis and beyond-design-basis transient conditions. Three general strategies for accident tolerant fuels are being explored: modification of current state-of-the-art zirconium alloy cladding to further improve oxidation resistance (including use of coatings), replacement of Zr alloy cladding with an alternative oxidation-resistant high-performance cladding, and replacement of the monolithic ceramic oxide fuel with alternative fuel forms

  15. Genome-wide screening of the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, which is a potential inhibitor of bioethanol fermentation, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Ayako; Nakamura, Toshihide; Ando, Akira; Tokuyasu, Ken; Shima, Jun

    2008-04-15

    Lignocellulosic materials are abundant and among the most important potential sources for bioethanol production. Although the pretreatment of lignocellulose is necessary for efficient saccharification and fermentation, numerous by-products, including furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds, are generated in the pretreatment step. Many of these components inhibit the growth and fermentation of yeast. In particular, vanillin is one of the most effective inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates because it inhibits fermentation at very low concentrations. To identify the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, we screened a set of diploid yeast deletion mutants, which are powerful tools for clarifying the function of particular genes. Seventy-six deletion mutants were identified as vanillin-sensitive mutants. The numerous deleted genes in the vanillin-sensitive mutants were classified under the functional categories for 'chromatin remodeling' and 'vesicle transport', suggesting that these functions are important for vanillin tolerance. The cross-sensitivity of the vanillin-sensitive mutants to furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds was also examined. Genes for ergosterol biosynthesis were required for tolerance to all inhibitory compounds tested, suggesting that ergosterol is a key component of tolerance to various inhibitors. Our analysis predicts that vanillin tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is affected by various complicated processes that take place on both the molecular and the cellular level. In addition, the ergosterol biosynthetic process is important for achieving a tolerance to various inhibitors. Our findings provide a biotechnological basis for the molecular engineering as well as for screening of more robust yeast strains that may potentially be useful in bioethanol fermentation.

  16. Formation of brominated phenolic contaminants from natural manganese oxides-catalyzed oxidation of phenol in the presence of Br(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kunde; Song, Lianghui; Zhou, Shiyang; Chen, Da; Gan, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Brominated phenolic compounds (BPCs) are a class of persistent and potentially toxic compounds ubiquitously present in the aquatic environment. However, the origin of BPCs is not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the formation of BPCs from natural manganese oxides (MnOx)-catalyzed oxidation of phenol in the presence of Br(-). Experiments at ambient temperature clearly demonstrated that BPCs were readily produced via the oxidation of phenol by MnOx in the presence of Br(-). In the reaction of MnOx sand with 0.213 μmol/L phenol and 0.34 mmol/L Br(-) for 10 min, more than 60% of phenol and 56% of Br(-) were consumed to form BPCs. The yield of BPCs increased with increasing concentrations of phenol and Br(-). Overall, a total of 14 BPCs including simple bromophenols (4-bromophenol, 2,4-dibromophenol, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol), hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs), and hydroxylated polybrominated biphenyls (OH-PBBs) were identified. The production of BPCs increased with increasing concentrations of Br(-) or phenol. It was deduced that Br(-) was first oxidized to form active bromine, leading to the subsequent bromination of phenol to form bromophenols. The further oxidation of bromophenols by MnOx resulted in the formation of OH-PBDEs and OH-PBBs. In view of the ubiquity of phenol, Br(-), and MnOx in the environment, MnOx-mediated oxidation may play a role on the natural production of BPCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 78 FR 53047 - Halosulfuron-methyl; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ...: This regulation establishes tolerances for residues of halosulfuron-methyl in or on artichoke and... metabolites and degradates, in or on artichoke and caneberry subgroup 13-07A at 0.05 parts per million (ppm... Proposed New Uses on Artichoke and Caneberry (Crop subgroup 13-07A),'' dated March 25, 2013, pp. 30-34...

  18. Determination of Phenolic Compounds in Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Proestos

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Wine contains natural antioxidants such as phenolic compounds also known as bioactive compounds. Samples of commercially available Greek wines were analyzed in order to determine this phenolic content. For the analysis, Reversed Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC coupled with a multiwavelength Ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis detector was used. The most abundant phenolic substances detected were (+-catechin (13.5-72.4 mg L-1 , gallic acid (0.40-99.47 mg L-1 and caffeic acid (0.87-33.48 mg L-1. The principal component analysis (PCA technique was used to study differentiation among wines according to their production area. Red wines contained more phenolic substances than white ones. Differences of the phenolic composition in wines of the same cultivar were investigated too.

  19. Co-expression of G2-EPSPS and glyphosate acetyltransferase GAT genes conferring high tolerance to glyphosate in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfu eGuo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is a widely used non-selective herbicide with broad spectrum of weed control around the world. At present, most of the commercial glyphosate tolerant soybeans utilize glyphosate tolerant gene CP4-EPSPS or glyphosate acetyltransferase gene GAT separately. In this study, both glyphosate tolerant gene G2-EPSPS and glyphosate degraded gene GAT were co-transferred into soybean and transgenic plants showed high tolerance to glyphosate. Molecular analysis including PCR, Sothern blot, qRT-PCR and Western blot revealed that target genes have been integrated into genome and expressed effectively at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the glyphosate tolerance analysis showed that no typical symptom was observed when compared with a glyphosate tolerant line HJ06-698 derived from GR1 transgenic soybean even at four-fold labeled rate of Roundup. Chlorophyll and shikimic acid content analysis of transgenic plant also revealed that these two indexes were not significantly altered after glyphosate application. These results indicated that co-expression of G2-EPSPS and GAT conferred high tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate in soybean. Therefore, combination of tolerant and degraded genes provides a new strategy for developing glyphosate tolerant transgenic crops.

  20. Evaluation of auxin and thiamine interaction effect on PAL activity and phenolic compounds content in vegetative growth stage of soybean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nazi nadernejad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycin max L. is one of the most important oily seeds in the world. This plant is rich in protein and unsaturated fats, and plays a significant role in human health with phenolic compounds and flavonoids. Indole Butyric Acid (IBA is a plant growth regulator that plays a key role in producing phenolic compounds and increasing the antioxidant capacity of the plant. Thiamine is one of the important vitamins in strengthening the immune system and increasing the resistance to environmental stresses in the plant's growth stages. Regarding the effect of hormone auxin and thiamine on the production of phenolic compounds as one of the antioxidant compounds in growth stages, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the two compounds in two stages of soybean growth and compare their effect on phenolic compounds changes in order to Detecting higher antioxidant capacity in environmental stress tolerance. For this purpose, the DPX cultivar of soybean seeds were prepared from Dezful Agriculture Research Center and planted in perlite containing flowers. The plants were planted under factorial design under IBA treatments with three concentrations of 0, 10 and 50 and thiamine with three concentrations of 0, 50 and 200. Extraction and evaluation of phenolic compounds, anthocyanins and pigments in leaves were performed. Data were analyzed using Duncan's test at a significant level of 5%. The results showed that the combined use of auxin and thiamine increased the carotenoid content in both phases and caused a significant increase in phenolic content. Application of auxin alone reduced auxin and thiamine the anthocyanin content significantly in both phases, but did not have a significant effect on phenolic content. The results showed that the PAL activity of the phenolic and anthocyanin content increased significantly in the 9-leaf stage compared to 3-leaf. Generally, the results showed that interaction effect between auxin and thiamine on

  1. Fractional-order active fault-tolerant force-position controller design for the legged robots using saturated actuator with unknown bias and gain degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Yousef; Majd, Vahid Johari; Ehsani-Seresht, Abbas

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a novel fault accommodation strategy is proposed for the legged robots subject to the actuator faults including actuation bias and effective gain degradation as well as the actuator saturation. First, the combined dynamics of two coupled subsystems consisting of the dynamics of the legs subsystem and the body subsystem are developed. Then, the interaction of the robot with the environment is formulated as the contact force optimization problem with equality and inequality constraints. The desired force is obtained by a dynamic model. A robust super twisting fault estimator is proposed to precisely estimate the defective torque amplitude of the faulty actuator in finite time. Defining a novel fractional sliding surface, a fractional nonsingular terminal sliding mode control law is developed. Moreover, by introducing a suitable auxiliary system and using its state vector in the designed controller, the proposed fault-tolerant control (FTC) scheme guarantees the finite-time stability of the closed-loop control system. The robustness and finite-time convergence of the proposed control law is established using the Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, numerical simulations are performed on a quadruped robot to demonstrate the stable walking of the robot with and without actuator faults, and actuator saturation constraints, and the results are compared to results with an integer order fault-tolerant controller.

  2. Phenol wastewater remediation: advanced oxidation processes coupled to a biological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubalcaba, A; Suárez-Ojeda, M E; Stüber, F; Fortuny, A; Bengoa, C; Metcalfe, I; Font, J; Carrera, J; Fabregat, A

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, there are increasingly stringent regulations requiring more and more treatment of industrial effluents to generate product waters which could be easily reused or disposed of to the environment without any harmful effects. Therefore, different advanced oxidation processes were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial effluents containing phenol. Wet air oxidation and Fenton process were tested batch wise, while catalytic wet air oxidation and H2O2-promoted catalytic wet air oxidation processes were studied in a trickle bed reactor, the last two using over activated carbon as catalyst. Effluent characterisation was made by means of substrate conversion (using high liquid performance chromatography), chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon. Biodegradation parameters (i.e. maximum oxygen uptake rate and oxygen consumption) were obtained from respirometric tests using activated sludge from an urban biological wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The main goal was to find the proper conditions in terms of biodegradability enhancement, so that these phenolic effluents could be successfully treated in an urban biological WWTP. Results show promising research ways for the development of efficient coupled processes for the treatment of wastewater containing toxic or biologically non-degradable compounds.

  3. [Production, absorption and excretion of phenols in intestinal obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, M

    1986-11-01

    In intestinal obstruction, phenols were produced in the distended loop proximal to obstruction by enteric bacteria. Clinically, in 17 cases of non-strangulated intestinal obstruction, phenols were detected in 15 cases and mean concentration of phenols was 4.2 +/- 9.7 micro g/ml(mean +/- 1 SD). In the fraction of phenols, p-cresol was detected in 15 cases and mean concentration was 3.8 +/- 7.7 and phenol was detected in 4 cases and mean concentration was 0.5 +/- 2.6. Phenols were decreased as clinical improvement of intestinal obstruction. Enteric bacteria in enteric juice ranged from 10(4) to 10(10)/ml and its change paralleled to phenols concentration. Mean urinary concentration of phenols in intestinal obstruction was increased to 297 +/- 415 mg/day compared to control (less than 50 mg/day). Its change also paralleled to phenols concentration in enteric juice. Closed ileal loop was made in dogs and phenols were infused in the loop. Phenols were increased in the portal vein 5 min after the infusion and in the femoral vein 60 min after the infusion. Phenols, which was thought to be toxic to the host, were proved to be produced in the distended intestine and excreted from the kidney.

  4. Rapid phenolic O-glycosylation of small molecules and complex unprotected peptides in aqueous solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadzinski, Tyler J.; Steinauer, Angela; Hie, Liana; Pelletier, Guillaume; Schepartz, Alanna; Miller, Scott J.

    2018-06-01

    Glycosylated natural products and synthetic glycopeptides represent a significant and growing source of biochemical probes and therapeutic agents. However, methods that enable the aqueous glycosylation of endogenous amino acid functionality in peptides without the use of protecting groups are scarce. Here, we report a transformation that facilitates the efficient aqueous O-glycosylation of phenolic functionality in a wide range of small molecules, unprotected tyrosine, and tyrosine residues embedded within a range of complex, fully unprotected peptides. The transformation, which uses glycosyl fluoride donors and is promoted by Ca(OH)2, proceeds rapidly at room temperature in water, with good yields and selective formation of unique anomeric products depending on the stereochemistry of the glycosyl donor. High functional group tolerance is observed, and the phenol glycosylation occurs selectively in the presence of virtually all side chains of the proteinogenic amino acids with the singular exception of Cys. This method offers a highly selective, efficient, and operationally simple approach for the protecting-group-free synthesis of O-aryl glycosides and Tyr-O-glycosylated peptides in water.

  5. Identification of the free phenolic profile of Adlay bran by UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS and inhibitory mechanisms of phenolic acids against xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lianzhu; Yang, Qingyun; Zhao, Kun; Zhao, Mouming

    2018-07-01

    Adlay bran free phenolic extract has been previously demonstrated to possess potent xanthine oxidase (XOD) inhibitory activity. The aims of this study were to characterize the free phenolic profile of adlay bran and investigate the structure-activity relationship, underlying mechanism and interaction of phenolic acids as XOD inhibitors. A total of twenty phenolics including ten phenolic acids, two coumarins, two phenolic aldedhyes and six flavonoids were identified in a phenolic compound-guided separation by UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS. Adlay bran free phenolic extract possessed strong XOD inhibitory activity related to hydroxycinnamic acids with methoxyl groups. The hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions were the main forces in the binding of adlay phenolics to XOD. Sinapic acid, identified in adlay bran for the first time, possessed strong XOD inhibitory activity in a mixed non-competitive manner, and synergistic effects with other adlay phenolic acids at low concentrations, and would be a promising agent for preventing and treating hyperuricemia. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Deciphering the role of the phenylpropanoid metabolism in the tolerance of Capsicum annuum L. to Verticillium dahliae Kleb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Marta; Silvar, Cristina; Merino, Fuencisla; Martínez-Cortés, Teresa; Lu, Fachuang; Ralph, John; Pomar, Federico

    2017-05-01

    Verticillium dahliae is an economically relevant soilborne pathogen that causes vascular wilt in several crops, including pepper (Capsicum annuum). Fungal infection is usually visualized as a vascular browning, likely due to the onset of phenylpropanoid metabolism, which also seems to play a crucial role in the tolerance of some pepper varieties. In the current work, the potential function of distinct phenylpropanoid derivatives (suberin, lignin and phenolic compounds) in the pepper tolerance response against V. dahliae, was investigated. Histochemical and biochemical analyses ruled out suberin as a key player in the pepper-fungus interaction. However, changes observed in lignin composition and higher deposition of bound phenolics in infected stems seemed to contribute to the reinforcement of cell walls and the impairment of V. dahliae colonization. Most importantly, this is the first time that the accumulation of the hydroxycinnamic acid amide N-feruloyltyramine was reported in pepper stems in response to a vascular fungus. Fungitoxic activity for that hydroxycinnamate-tyramine conjugate was demonstrated as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Study of the interactions between Eu(III) and Al2O3 particles in the presence of phenolic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, P.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of environmental pollution by radionuclides, this work was focused on the interactions occurring in systems containing europium(III) - as a chemical analogue for the actinides Am(III) and Cm(III) -, phenolic acids - lignin degradation products and anti-fungi, naturally occurring in soils, and alumina - representative of sorption sites found in the environment. This study was conducted at different scales of description: the macroscopic scale - to quantify Eu(III) and/or phenolic acids adsorption onto the mineral surface -, and the microscopic scale - to study the chemical environment of Eu(III) using Time-Resolved Luminescence Spectroscopy (TRLS). First, the binary systems, i.e. systems containing only two entities among the three previously cited, were characterized. Complexation constants of Eu(III) by three phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic, and 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acids) were determined and quantum calculations (DFT) were carried out on La(III)-acid complex analogues. Sorption of the acids onto aluminol sites was modelled using surface complexation concepts. Analyses of two ternary systems (containing 4-hydroxybenzoic and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acids) revealed synergistic processes for Eu(III) and phenolic acids sorption onto Al 2 O 3 . A spectral fingerprint of ternary complex involving Eu(III)/4-hydroxybenzoic acid/Al 2 O 3 surface sites was evidenced. (author) [fr

  8. Mutagenicity testing in the Salmonella typhimurium assay of phenolic compounds and phenolic fractions obtained from smokehouse smoke condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, B L; Lin, P Z

    1982-08-01

    Smokehouse smoke, which is used for flavouring meat products, was investigated for its mutagenic activity in the Salmonella typhimurium assay. We were chiefly concerned with the fractions free of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons but containing phenol compounds, which are responsible for the preservative and aromatizing properties of the smoke. The most abundantly occurring phenol compounds (phenol, cresols, 2,4-dimethylphenol, brenzcatechine, syringol, eugenol, vanilline and guaiacol) gave negative results when they were tested for mutagenicity at five concentrations up to 5000 micrograms/plate, with and without S-9 mix, using five strains of S. typhimurium. Even when phenol was further investigated in a variety of test conditions, no induction of his+ revertants was observed. When smokehouse smoke was condensed and fractionated the majority of the various phenolic fractions also gave negative results when tested at five concentrations using five strains of S. typhimurium. However there was a slight increase in the number of revertants in a few cases. The presence in the phenolic fractions of very small amounts of mutagenic impurities, the nature of which needs further investigation, cannot be excluded. These results support the further development of non-hazardous smoke-aroma preparations, based on the phenolic components of smokehouse smoke.

  9. Mutagenicity testing in the Salmonella typhimurium assay of phenolic compounds and phenolic fractions obtained from smokehouse smoke condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, B.L.; Lin, P.Z.

    1982-08-01

    Smokehouse smoke, which is used for flavouring meat products, was investigated for its mutagenic activity in the Salmonella typhimurium assay. We were chiefly concerned with the fractions free of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons but containing phenol compounds, which are responsible for the preservative and aromatizing properties of the smoke. The most abundantly occurring phenol compounds (phenol, cresols, 2,4-dimethylphenol, brenzcatechine, syringol, eugenol, vanilline and guaiacol) gave negative results when they were tested for mutagenicity at five concentrations up to 5000 micrograms/plate, with and without S-9 mix, using five strains of S. typhimurium. Even when phenol was further investigated in a variety of test conditions, no induction of his+ revertants was observed. When smokehouse smoke was condensed and fractionated the majority of the various phenolic fractions also gave negative results when tested at five concentrations using five strains of S. typhimurium. However there was a slight increase in the number of revertants in a few cases. The presence in the phenolic fractions of very small amounts of mutagenic impurities, the nature of which needs further investigation, cannot be excluded. These results support the further development of non-hazardous smoke-aroma preparations, based on the phenolic components of smokehouse smoke.

  10. Synergetic effect of alkaline earth metal oxides and iron oxides on the degradation of hexachlorobenzene and its degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guijin; Liu, Yexuan; Huang, Linyan; Shi, Yali; Zhang, Aiqian; Zhang, Lixia; Liu, Wenbin; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was carried out over physical mixtures of a series of alkaline earth metal oxides (MO: M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and iron oxides with different crystal types (Fe(x)O(y):Fe(2)O(3) or Fe(3)O(4)) at 300°C. These physical mixtures all showed a synergetic effect toward the degradation of HCB. A range of degradation products were identified by various methods, including tri- to penta-chlorobenzenes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), tri- to penta-chlorophenols, tetrachlorocatechol (TCC) and tetrachlorohydroquinone (TCHQ) by GC-MS after derivatization, and formic and acetic acids by ion chromatography. Two degradation pathways, hydrodechlorination and oxidative degradation, appear to occur competitively. However, more sequential chlorinated benzene and phenol congeners were formed over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4) than over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) under the same conditions. The oxidative reaction dominated over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) and was promoted as the major reaction by the synergetic effect, while both the oxidative and hydrodechlorination reactions were important over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4), and both pathways are remarkably promoted by the synergetic effect. The enhanced hydrodechlorination may be attributed to free electrons generated by the transformation of Fe(3)O(4) into Fe(2)O(3), and hydrogen provided by water adsorbed on the MO. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative Effects of Gibberellin and Paclobutrazol on Na and K Content, Phenolic Compounds and the Activity of Some Enzymesin its Biosynthesis Pathway in Sweet Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor under Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hosein Fhrghani

    2017-08-01

    salt–stricken plants. PBZ treatment decreased negative effects of salinity and increased potassium (K+ content in roots and its transfer from root to shoot. Whereas, translocation factor of sodium was increased about 39% by GA treatment at the presence of 150mM salt. PBZ enhanced phenol content in shoots by increasing PAL activity. Therefore, GA and PBZ improved salt tolerance by transferring some ions toward shoot and root respectively. It seemed that, PBZ has an effective role in salt resistance by increasing of root growth, phenol content and maintaining the ionic balance

  12. Formation of degradation compounds from lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery: sugar reaction mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helena; Sørensen, Hanne R.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    , several aldehydes and ketones and many different organic acids and aromatic compounds may be generated during hydrothermal treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. The reaction mechanisms are of interest because the very same compounds that are possible inhibitors for biomass processing enzymes......The degradation compounds formed during pretreatment when lignocellulosic biomass is processed to ethanol or other biorefinery products include furans, phenolics, organic acids, as well as mono- and oligomeric pentoses and hexoses. Depending on the reaction conditions glucose can be converted to 5......-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF) and/or levulinic acid, formic acid and different phenolics at elevated temperatures. Correspondingly, xylose can follow different reaction mechanisms resulting in the formation of furan-2-carbaldehyde (furfural) and/or various C-1 and C-4 compounds. At least four routes...

  13. Total catalytic wet oxidation of phenol and its chlorinated derivates with MnO2/CeO2 catalyst in a slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Luna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a synthetic effluent of phenol was treated by means of a total oxidation process-Catalyzed Wet Oxidation (CWO. A mixed oxide of Mn-Ce (7:3, the catalyst, was synthesized by co-precipitation from an aqueous solution of MnCl2 and CeCl3 in a basic medium. The mixed oxide, MnO2/CeO2, was characterized and used in the oxidation of phenol in a slurry reactor in the temperature range of 80-130ºC and pressure of 2.04-4.76 MPa. A phenol solution containing 2.4-dichlorophenol and 2.4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was also degraded with good results. A lumped kinetic model, with two parallel reaction steps, fits precisely with the integrated equation and the experimental data. The kinetic parameters obtained are in agreement with the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were determined to be 38.4 for the total oxidation and 53.4 kJ/mol for the organic acids formed.

  14. Compositional differences in the phenolics compounds of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates phenolic composition of commercial and experimental wines derived from bunch (Vitis vinifera) and muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia) grapes to determine compositional differences in phenolics. HPLC analysis of wines showed that majority of phenolic compounds eluted during the first 30 min. Of the red ...

  15. Chemistry and health of olive oil phenolics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicerale, Sara; Conlan, Xavier A; Sinclair, Andrew J; Keast, Russell S J

    2009-03-01

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially attributed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Most recent interest has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils. Studies (human, animal, in vivo and in vitro) have shown that olive oil phenolics have positive effects on certain physiological parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet and cellular function, and antimicrobial activity. Presumably, regular dietary consumption of virgin olive oil containing phenolic compounds manifests in health benefits associated with a Mediterranean diet. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the physiological effects of olive oil phenolics. Moreover, a number of factors have the ability to affect phenolic concentrations in virgin olive oil, so it is of great importance to understand these factors in order to preserve the essential health promoting benefits of olive oil phenolic compounds.

  16. Molecular level biodegradation of phenol and its derivatives through dmp operon of Pseudomonas putida: A bio-molecular modeling and docking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sujay; Banerjee, Arundhati

    2015-10-01

    Participation of Pseudomonas putida-derived methyl phenol (dmp) operon and DmpR protein in the biodegradation of phenol or other harmful, organic, toxic pollutants was investigated at a molecular level. Documentation documents that P. putida has DmpR protein which positively regulates dmp operon in the presence of inducers; like phenols. From the operon, phenol hydroxylase encoded by dmpN gene, participates in degrading phenols after dmp operon is expressed. For the purpose, the 3-D models of the four domains from DmpR protein and of the DNA sequences from the two Upstream Activation Sequences (UAS) present at the promoter region of the operon were demonstrated using discrete molecular modeling techniques. The best modeled structures satisfying their stereo-chemical properties were selected in each of the cases. To stabilize the individual structures, energy optimization was performed. In the presence of inducers, probable interactions among domains and then the two independent DNA structures with the fourth domain were perused by manifold molecular docking simulations. The complex structures were made to be stable by minimizing their overall energy. Responsible amino acid residues, nucleotide bases and binding patterns for the biodegradation, were examined. In the presence of the inducers, the biodegradation process is initiated by the interaction of phe50 from the first protein domain with the inducers. Only after the interaction of the last domain with the DNA sequences individually, the operon is expressed. This novel residue level study is paramount for initiating transcription in the operon; thereby leading to expression of phenol hydroxylase followed by phenol biodegradation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Phenol Removal from Industrial Wastewater by HRP Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iran Alemzadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, horseradish peroxidase for phenol removal was utilized. First, the process was studied at the laboratory scale using a synthetic phenol solution (1-10 mM. Results showed that horseradish peroxidase (HRP could effectively remove phenolic compounds from wastewater and that the catalytic capability of the enzyme was maintained for a wide range of pH, temperature, and aromatic concentration levels. The performance conditions were optimized for at lease 95% and 100% removal of phenolic compounds for both actual and synthetic wastewaters under high and low phenol concentrations (1 and 10 mM. The phenolic wastewater used was an olive mill effluent with a phenol concentration of 1221 mg/L (13 mM and a pH value of 3.5. At the end of the reaction, the phenolic compounds changed to insoluble polymers and precipitated. Each enzyme/wastewater system was optimized for the following chemical dosages: hydrogen peroxide, enzyme, polyethylene glycol (PEG, and buffer. Furthermore, the reaction time to achieve at least 95% phenol removal was determined. According to the results, COD and BOD reduced to 58% and 78%, respectively. Experimental results showed an increase in H2O2 concentration beyond the optimum dose resulting from enzyme inactivation, thus reducing the phenol removal efficiency. On the other hand, increasing the enzyme, PEG, and/or reaction time beyond the optimum values resulted in only a marginal increase in removal efficiency.

  18. Treatment of coal gasification wastewater by a two-continuous UASB system with step-feed for COD and phenols removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Han, H.J.; Yuan, M.; Li, H.Q.; Fang, F.; Wang, K. [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2011-05-15

    A two-continuous mesophilic (37 {+-} 2{sup o}C) UASB system with step-feed was investigated as an attractive optimization strategy for enhancing COD and total phenols removal of the system and improving aerobic biodegradability of real coal gasification wastewater. Through the step-feed period, the maximum removal efficiencies of COD and total phenols reached 55-60% and 58-63% respectively in the system, at an influent flow distribution ratio of 0.2 and influent COD concentration of 2500 mg/L; the corresponding efficiencies were at low levels of 45-50% and 43-50% respectively at total HRT of 48 h during the single-feed period. The maximum specific methanogenic activity and substrate utilization rate were 592 {+-} 16 mg COD-CH{sub 4}/(gVSS d) and 89 {+-} 12 mg phenol/(gVSS d) during the step-feed operation. After the anaerobic digestion with step-feed, the aerobic effluent COD concentration decreased from 270 {+-} 9 to 215 {+-} 10 mg/L. The results suggested that step-feed enhanced the degradation of refractory organics in the second reactor.

  19. Electrochemical remediation of the phenol contaminated clay soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korolev, V.A.; Babakina, O.A.; Lazareva, E.V. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The study phenol migration induced by electric current is multiple analyze, because determine the governing factor of electrokinetic remediation is one more problem. The governing factor of phenol removal can be electroosmotic water transport, ionic migration or phenol destruction caused by electrolysis or oxidizing agents. Therefore research objective was study mechanism of removal phenol from soils with different mineral composition. To answer on set issue should be studied the effectiveness of electrochemcial remediation for contaminated soil and determination electrokinetic characteristics of interaction clay's particles with phenol solution. (orig.)

  20. Genome-wide screening of the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, which is a potential inhibitor of bioethanol fermentation, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokuyasu Ken

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignocellulosic materials are abundant and among the most important potential sources for bioethanol production. Although the pretreatment of lignocellulose is necessary for efficient saccharification and fermentation, numerous by-products, including furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds, are generated in the pretreatment step. Many of these components inhibit the growth and fermentation of yeast. In particular, vanillin is one of the most effective inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates because it inhibits fermentation at very low concentrations. To identify the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, we screened a set of diploid yeast deletion mutants, which are powerful tools for clarifying the function of particular genes. Results Seventy-six deletion mutants were identified as vanillin-sensitive mutants. The numerous deleted genes in the vanillin-sensitive mutants were classified under the functional categories for 'chromatin remodeling' and 'vesicle transport', suggesting that these functions are important for vanillin tolerance. The cross-sensitivity of the vanillin-sensitive mutants to furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds was also examined. Genes for ergosterol biosynthesis were required for tolerance to all inhibitory compounds tested, suggesting that ergosterol is a key component of tolerance to various inhibitors. Conclusion Our analysis predicts that vanillin tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is affected by various complicated processes that take place on both the molecular and the cellular level. In addition, the ergosterol biosynthetic process is important for achieving a tolerance to various inhibitors. Our findings provide a biotechnological basis for the molecular engineering as well as for screening of more robust yeast strains that may potentially be useful in bioethanol fermentation.

  1. Error Mitigation of Point-to-Point Communication for Fault-Tolerant Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamine, Robert L.; Hodson, Robert F.; LaMeres, Brock J.; Ray, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Fault tolerant systems require the ability to detect and recover from physical damage caused by the hardware s environment, faulty connectors, and system degradation over time. This ability applies to military, space, and industrial computing applications. The integrity of Point-to-Point (P2P) communication, between two microcontrollers for example, is an essential part of fault tolerant computing systems. In this paper, different methods of fault detection and recovery are presented and analyzed.

  2. Inhibition of lignin-derived phenolic compounds to cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Li, Wen-Chao; Liu, Li; Zhu, Jia-Qing; Li, Xia; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Lignin-derived phenolic compounds are universal in the hydrolysate of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. The phenolics reduce the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis and increase the cost of ethanol production. We investigated inhibition of phenolics on cellulase during enzymatic hydrolysis using vanillin as one of the typical lignin-derived phenolics and Avicel as cellulose substrate. As vanillin concentration increased from 0 to 10 mg/mL, cellulose conversion after 72-h enzymatic hydrolysis decreased from 53 to 26 %. Enzyme deactivation and precipitation were detected with the vanillin addition. The enzyme concentration and activity consecutively decreased during hydrolysis, but the inhibition degree, expressed as the ratio of the cellulose conversion without vanillin to the conversion with vanillin (A 0 /A), was almost independent on hydrolysis time. Inhibition can be mitigated by increasing cellulose loading or cellulase concentration. The inhibition degree showed linear relationship with the vanillin concentration and exponential relationship with the cellulose loading and the cellulase concentration. The addition of calcium chloride, BSA, and Tween 80 did not release the inhibition of vanillin significantly. pH and temperature for hydrolysis also showed no significant impact on inhibition degree. The presence of hydroxyl group, carbonyl group, and methoxy group in phenolics affected the inhibition degree. Besides phenolics concentration, other factors such as cellulose loading, enzyme concentration, and phenolic structure also affect the inhibition of cellulose conversion. Lignin-blocking agents have little effect on the inhibition effect of soluble phenolics, indicating that the inhibition mechanism of phenolics to enzyme is likely different from insoluble lignin. The inhibition of soluble phenolics can hardly be entirely removed by increasing enzyme concentration or adding blocking proteins due to the dispersity and multiple binding sites of phenolics

  3. Preparation of weak-light-driven TiO2-based catalysts via adsorbed-layer nanoreactor synthesis and enhancement of their photo-degradation performance in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Xu, Zhi-yong; Zhu, Yi-chen; Wu, Li-guang; Yuan, Hao-xuan; Li, Chang-chun; Liu, Ya-yu; Cai, Jing

    2017-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was first employed as a support in preparing TiO2 nanoparticles by adsorbed-layer nanoreactor synthesis (ALNS). Both TiO2 crystallization and GO reduction simultaneously occurred during solvothermal treatment with alcohol as a solvent. By transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, the results showed that TiO2 nanoparticles with less than 10 nm of size distributed very homogeneously on the GO surface. Tight interaction between TiO2 particles and GO surface could effectively inhibit the aggregation of TiO2 particles, during solvothermal treatment for anatase TiO2 formation. Alcohol could also reduce oxygenated functional groups on GO surface after solvothermal treatment. TiO2 particles with small size and the decrease in oxygenated functional groups on the GO surface both caused high separation efficiency of photo-generated charge carriers, thus resulting in high photo-degradation performance of catalysts. Strong phenol adsorption on photocatalyst was key to enhancing photo-degradation efficiency for phenol in seawater. Moreover, the change in catalyst structure was minimal at different temperatures of solvothermal treatment. But, the degradation rate and efficiency for phenol in seawater were obviously enhanced because of the sensitive structure-activity relationship of catalysts under weak-light irradiation.

  4. Study of Tannin- degrading bacteria isolated from Pistachio soft hulls and feces of goat feeding on it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Tahmourespour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tannins (tannic acid are toxic, high molecular weight and water- soluble polyphenols that are present in many plants such as pistachio and its by- products. Wide ranges of microorganisms including bacteria tolerate tannin and degrade it. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize tannin- tolerant bacteria from pistachio soft hulls (P- SH and feces of goat before and after feeding on this by- product as tannin rich diet. Materials and methods: Tannin tolerant bacteria were isolated from enrichment cultures of samples in medium containing tannic acid as a sole source of carbon and energy. Tannin hydrolyzing ability of isolates was confirmed by observation of clear zones around the colonies. The increasing concentrations of tannin on minimal salt medium (MSM agar plates were used to test the maximum tolerable concentrations (MTCs. Furthermore, in the supplemented media tannin concentrations were measured by bovine serum albumin (BSA precipitation assay during time intervals. Results: Tannin- degrading bacterial population of P- SH was about only 10.3% of total population. More than 50 percent of tannin degrading strains were isolated from goat feces after grazing on tannin rich diet. Isolated bacteria were Gram- negative and positive rod species belonging to Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Escherichia and Enterobacter genera. Among the isolated bacteria 71.4% could tolerate the concentration of 64 g/l of tannin in their media while only 7.2% were able to tolerate the maximum tannin concentration of 16 g/l. Bacterial isolates of goat feces could degrade tannin more than 72% after 72 h of incubation. In the case of soft P- SH isolates, the biodegradation percentage was between 17- 75%. Discussion and conclusion: Feeding of tannin rich diet induced a shift in digestive system microbial profile with increased population of tannin tolerant bacteria. The ability of isolated strains provides novel insights for the role they can

  5. Accumulation of Phenolic Compounds and Expression Profiles of Phenolic Acid Biosynthesis-Related Genes in Developing Grains of White, Purple, and Red Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongyun; Li, Yaoguang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Chenyang; Qin, Haixia; Ding, Huina; Xie, Yingxin; Guo, Tiancai

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols in whole grain wheat have potential health benefits, but little is known about the expression patterns of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes and the accumulation of phenolic acid compounds in different-colored wheat grains. We found that purple wheat varieties had the highest total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity. Among phenolic acid compounds, bound ferulic acid, vanillic, and caffeic acid levels were significantly higher in purple wheat than in white and red wheat, while total soluble phenolic acid, soluble ferulic acid, and vanillic acid levels were significantly higher in purple and red wheat than in white wheat. Ferulic acid and syringic acid levels peaked at 14 days after anthesis (DAA), whereas p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid levels peaked at 7 DAA, and vanillic acid levels gradually increased during grain filling and peaked near ripeness (35 DAA). Nine phenolic acid biosynthesis pathway genes (TaPAL1, TaPAL2, TaC3H1, TaC3H2, TaC4H, Ta4CL1, Ta4CL2, TaCOMT1, and TaCOMT2) exhibited three distinct expression patterns during grain filling, which may be related to the different phenolic acids levels. White wheat had higher phenolic acid contents and relatively high gene expression at the early stage, while purple wheat had the highest phenolic acid contents and gene expression levels at later stages. These results suggest that the expression of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes may be closely related to phenolic acids accumulation.

  6. Phenolics, Antiradical Assay and Cytotoxicity of Processed Mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenolics, Antiradical Assay and Cytotoxicity of Processed Mango ( Mangifera indica ) and Bush Mango ( Irvingia gabonensis ) Kernels. ... Nigerian Food Journal ... Phenolic constituents (total phenols, flavonoids, tannins, and anthocyanins), comparative antiradical potency and cytotoxicity of processed mango (Mangifera ...

  7. Selection of the Mutants with High Hydroquinone Degradation Ability of Serratia Marcesscen by Plasma Mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Risheng; You Qidong; He Weijing; Zhu Huixia

    2009-01-01

    In this study, an efficient way by plasma induced mutation was applied to improve the hydroquinone degradation capacity of Serratia marcescens AB 90027 (SM27). The results showed that combined with the selection of hydroquinone tolerance, the mutant with high hydroquinone degradation ability induced by plasma could be achieved. The best dose for plasma mutation was 15 s, which showed a 47.0% higher positive mutation ratio. Besides, the aimed mutant was markedly different from the parent strain (SM27) in colonial traits while cultivated on Kings media. Finally, the hydroquinone degradation ratio reached 70.5% using the induced mutant strain with 1500 mg/L hydroquinone (HQ) after 15 days of cultivation as the selective conditions; however, it was only 46.7% for SM27. The improvement of the degradation capacity by the induced mutant with a high concentration of HQ selection was attributed to its faster growth and higher hydroquinone tolerance compared with that of the parent strain.

  8. EPICOR-II resin degradation results from first resin samples of PF-8 and PF-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1985-12-01

    The 28 March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 released approximately 560,000 gallons of contaminated water to the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings. The water was decontaminated using a demineralization system called EPICOR-II developed by Epicor, Inc. The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Project is studying the chemical and physical conditions of the synthetic ion exchange resins found in several EPICOR-II prefilters. This report summarizes results and analyses of the first sampling of ion exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PE-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated Epicor, Inc. resins to determine if degradation has occurred due to the high internal radiation dose received by the EPICOR-II resins. Results also are compared with recent findings on resin degradation by Battelle Columbus Laboratories and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Analyses comparing test results of resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 with unirradiated resins obtained from Epicor, Inc. show resin degradation has occurred in some of the EPICOR-II resins examined. The mechanism of degradation is compared with work of other researchers and is consistent with their findings. The strong acid cation resins (divinylbenzene, styrene base structure) are losing effective cross-linking along with scission of functional groups and are experiencing first an increase and eventually a decrease in total exchange capacity as the absorbed radiation dose increases. The phenolic cation resins (phenol-formaldehyde base structure) show a loss of effective cross-linking and oxidation of the polymer chain. Analyses of resins removed from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 over the next several years should show a further increase in degradation

  9. Screening for drought tolerance in cultivars of the ornamental genus Tagetes (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Cicevan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Drought tolerance was evaluated in twelve cultivars of three ornamental Tagetes species (T. patula, T. tenuifolia and T. erecta. A stress treatment was performed by completely stopping watering of plants maintained in controlled greenhouse conditions. After three weeks, several plant growth parameters (stem length (SL, fresh weight (FW and water content (WC, photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids (Car, osmolytes (proline (Pro, glycine betaine (GB and total soluble sugars (TSS, an oxidative stress maker (malondialdehyde (MDA and antioxidants (total phenolic compounds (TPC and total flavonoids (TF were measured. Considerable differences in the evaluated traits were found among the control and drought-stressed plants. Drought stress generally caused a marked reduction in plant growth and carotenoid pigments, and an increase in soluble solutes and oxidative stress. For most cultivars, proline levels in stressed plants increased between 30 and 70-fold compared to the corresponding controls. According to the different measured parameters, on average T. erecta proved to be more tolerant to drought than T. patula and T. tenuifolia. However, a considerable variation in the tolerance to drought was found within each species. The traits with greater association to drought tolerance as well as the most tolerant cultivars could be clearly identified in a principal components analysis (PCA. Overall, our results indicate that drought tolerant cultivars of Tagetes can be identified at early stages using a combination of plant growth and biochemical markers.

  10. Biochemical degradation and physical migration of polyphenolic compounds in osmotic dehydrated blueberries with pulsed electric field and thermal pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuanshan; Jin, Tony Z; Fan, Xuetong; Wu, Jijun

    2018-01-15

    Fresh blueberries were pretreated by pulsed electric fields (PEF) or thermal pretreatment and then were subject to osmotic dehydration. The changes in contents of anthocyanins, predominantly phenolic acids and flavonols, total phenolics, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity and antioxidant activity in the blueberry samples during pretreatment and osmotic dehydration were investigated. Biochemical degradation and physical migration of these nutritive compounds from fruits to osmotic solutions were observed during the pretreatments and osmotic dehydration. PEF pretreated samples had the least degradation loss but the most migration loss of these compounds compared to thermally pretreated and control samples. Higher rates of water loss and solid gain during osmotic dehydration were also obtained by PEF pretreatment, reducing the dehydration time from 130 to 48h. PEF pretreated and dehydrated fruits showed superior appearance to thermally pretreated and control samples. Therefore, PEF pretreatment is a preferred technology that balances nutritive quality, appearance, and dehydration rate. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Comparison of total phenolic content and composition of individual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A successful peanut breeding to obtain genotypes with greater phenolic content requires information on type and content of phenolic compounds in parental peanut genotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the total phenolic contents and phenolic acid profiles of 15 Valencia-type peanut genotypes both in peanut ...

  12. Berry Phenolics of Grapevine under Challenging Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernâni Gerós

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant phenolics have been for many years a theme of major scientific and applied interest. Grape berry phenolics contribute to organoleptic properties, color and protection against environmental challenges. Climate change has already caused significant warming in most grape-growing areas of the world, and the climatic conditions determine, to a large degree, the grape varieties that can be cultivated as well as wine quality. In particular, heat, drought and light/UV intensity severely affect phenolic metabolism and, thus, grape composition and development. In the variety Chardonnay, water stress increases the content of flavonols and decreases the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis of stilbene precursors. Also, polyphenolic profile is greatly dependent on genotype and environmental interactions. This review deals with the diversity and biosynthesis of phenolic compounds in the grape berry, from a general overview to a more detailed level, where the influence of environmental challenges on key phenolic metabolism pathways is approached. The full understanding of how and when specific phenolic compounds accumulate in the berry, and how the varietal grape berry metabolism responds to the environment is of utmost importance to adjust agricultural practices and thus, modify wine profile.

  13. Dechlorination of chlorinated phenols by subnanoscale Pd{sup 0}/Fe{sup 0} intercalated in smectite: pathway, reactivity, and selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Hanzhong; Wang, Chuanyi, E-mail: jiahz0143@aliyun.com

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: Dechlorination process of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by smectite-templated Pd{sup 0}/Fe{sup 0}. - Highlights: • Smectite was employed as templated matrix to prepare subnanoscale Pd{sup 0}/Fe{sup 0} particles. • Dechlorination rate depends linearly on the Pd content as its loadings <0.065 wt.%. • Dechlorination rates correlate with the total charge of C on chlorinated phenols. • The dechlorination selectivity relies on charges of individual C in aromatic ring. - Abstract: Smectite clay was employed as templated matrix to prepare subnanoscale Pd{sup 0}/Fe{sup 0} particles, and their components as well as intercalated architectures were well characterized by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (X-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, as-prepared Pd{sup 0}/Fe{sup 0} subnanoscale nanoparticles were evaluated for their dechlorination effect using chlorinated phenols as model molecules. As a result, pentachlorophenol (PCP) is selectively transformed to phenol in a stepwise dechlorination pathway within 6 h, and the dechlorination rate constants show linearly relationship with contents of Pd as its loadings <0.065%. Comparing with PCP, other chlorinated phenols display similar degradation pattern but within much shorter time frame. The dechlorination rate of chlorinated phenols increases with decreasing in number of -Cl attached to aromatic ring, which can be predicted by the total charge of the aromatic ring, exhibiting an inversely linear relationship with the dechlorination rates. While the selectivity of dechlorination depends on the charges associated with the individual aromatic carbon. Chloro-functional groups at the ortho-position are easier to be dechlorinated than that at meta- and para- positions yielding primarily 3,4,5-TCP as intermediate from PCP, further to phenol. The effective dechlorination warrants their potential utilizations in development of in-situ remediation technologies for organic pollutants in contaminated

  14. Estimate of consumption of phenolic compounds by Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Gesser Corrêa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Estimate the intake of phenolic compounds by the Brazilian population. METHODS: To estimate the average per capita food consumption, micro data from the National Dietary Survey and from the Household Budget Survey from 2008 to 2009 was analyzed. The phenolic content in food was estimated from the base of Phenol-Explorer. It was chosen according to compatibility and variety of food items and usual method of preparation. RESULTS: The Brazilian population consumed, on average, 460.15 mg/day of total phenolic compounds, derived mainly from beverages (48.9%, especially coffee and legumes (19.5%. Since this analysis of classes of phenolics it was possible to observe an intake of 314 mg/day of phenolic acids, 138.92 mg/day of flavonoids and 7.16 mg/ day of other kinds of phenolics. Regarding the variables studied this present study shows that those men who live in the countryside and in the northeastern region of the country had a higher consumption of phenolic compounds. Besides, consumption was higher by adults and the elderly, the medium income classes, the population with incomplete and complete primary education and those with adequate nutrition and also overweight status. CONCLUSION: The intake of phenolic compounds can be considered low, especially where consumption of fruit and vegetables is insufficient. We can conclude that coffee and black beans were the best contributors to phenolic intake.

  15. Co-expression of G2-EPSPS and glyphosate acetyltransferase GAT genes conferring high tolerance to glyphosate in soybean

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Bingfu; Guo, Yong; Hong, Huilong; Jin, Longguo; Zhang, Lijuan; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Lu, Wei; Lin, Min; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used non-selective herbicide with broad spectrum of weed control around the world. At present, most of the commercial glyphosate tolerant soybeans utilize glyphosate tolerant gene CP4-EPSPS or glyphosate acetyltransferase gene GAT separately. In this study, both glyphosate tolerant gene G2-EPSPS and glyphosate degraded gene GAT were co-transferred into soybean and transgenic plants showed high tolerance to glyphosate. Molecular analysis including PCR, Sothern blot, qRT-...

  16. Phenolic Acids, Phenolic Aldehydes and Furanic Derivatives in Oak Chips: American vs. French Oaks

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrita, M.J.; Barrocas Dias, C.; Costa Freitas, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Phenolic acids (gallic, vanillic, syringic and ellagic acids), phenolic aldehydes (vanillin, syringaldehyde, coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde) and furanic derivatives (furfural, 5-methylfurfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural) were quantified in commercial American and French oak chips. Chips with different sizes and toast degrees were used. Compounds were extracted directly from the wood samples in order to determine possible differences among woods as well as toast degree. Likewise, the compo...

  17. CORRELATION AMONG PHENOLIC, TOXIC METALS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    in food and related products is essential for understanding their nutritive importance. .... (prepared solution), with 0.1 M nitric acid in order to check the linearity. ..... Shahidi, F.; Naczk, M. Food Phenolics: An overview in Food Phenolics: Sources ...

  18. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation potential of a new acid tolerant, diazotrophic P-solubilizing and heavy metal resistant bacterium Cupriavidus sp. MTS-7 isolated from long-term mixed contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppusamy, Saranya; Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Lee, Yong Bok; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    An isolate of Cupriavidus (strain MTS-7) was identified from a long-term PAHs and heavy metals mixed contaminated soil with the potential to biodegrade both LMW and HMW PAHs with added unique traits of acid and alkali tolerance, heavy metal tolerance, self-nutrient assimilation by N fixation and P solubilization. This strain completely degraded the model 3 (150 mg L(-1) Phe), 4 (150 mg L(-1) Pyr) and 5 (50 mg L(-1) BaP) ring PAHs in 4, 20 and 30 days, respectively. It could mineralize 90-100% of PAHs (200 mg L(-1) of Phe and Pyr) within 15 days across pH ranging from 5 to 8 and even in the presence of toxic metal contaminations. During biodegradation, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were 5 (Cu(2+)) and 3 (Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+)) mg L(-1) of the potentially bioavailable metal ions and over 17 mg L(-1) metal levels was lethal for the microbe. Further, it could fix 217-274 μg mL(-1) of N and solubilize 79-135 μg mL(-1) of P while PAHs degradation. MTS-7 as a superior candidate could be thus used in the enhanced bioaugmentation and/or phytoremediation of long-term mixed contaminated sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sulfomethylated phenolic material useful in post primary oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, P.R.; Pardue, J.E.

    1986-12-30

    This patent describes a sulfomethylated alkyl phenol compound chosen from among the group consisting of sulfomethylated alkyl phenol, sulfomethylated alkylated bis-phenol, and sulfomethylated alkylated naphthol.

  20. Role of iron species in the photo-transformation of phenol in artificial and natural seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calza, Paola; Massolino, Cristina; Pelizzetti, Ezio; Minero, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    The role played by iron oxides (goethite and akaganeite) and iron(II)/(III) species as photo-sensitizers toward the transformation of organic matter was examined in saline water using phenol as a model molecule. The study was carried out in NaCl 0.7 M solution at pH 8, artificial (ASW) and natural (NSW) seawater, in a device simulating solar light spectrum and intensity. Under illumination phenol decomposition occurs in all the investigated cases. Conversely, dark experiments show that no reaction takes place, implying that phenol transformation is a light- activated process. Following the addition of Fe(II) ions to aerated solutions, Fe(II) is easily oxidized to Fe(III) and hydrogen peroxide is formed. Regardless of the addition of Fe(II) or Fe(III) ions, photo-activated degradation is mediated by Fe(III) species. Several (and different) hydroxylated and halogenated intermediates were identified. In ASW, akaganeite promotes the formation of ortho and para chloro derivatives (2- and 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol), while goethite induces the formation of 3-chlorophenol and bromophenols. Conversely, Fe(II) or Fe(III) addition causes the formation of 3- and 4-chlorophenol and 2,3- or 3,4-dichlorophenol. 4-Bromophenol was only identified when irradiating Fe(II) spiked solutions. Natural seawater sampled in the Gulf of Trieste, Italy, has been spiked with phenol and irradiated. Phenol photo-induced transformation in NSW mediated by natural photosensitizers occurs and leads to the formation of numerous halophenols, condensed products and nitrophenols. When NSW is spiked with phenol and iron oxides, Fe(II) or Fe(III), halophenols production is enhanced. A close analogy exists between Fe(III), Fe(II)/goethite in ASW and NSW products. Different halophenols production in the natural seawater samples depends on Fe(II)/goethite (above all for 3-chlorophenol, 2,3-dichlorophenol and 4-bromophenol formation) and on Fe(III) colloidal species (3

  1. Cytotoxicity of Phenol Red in Toxicity Assays for Carbon Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To explore the novel properties of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs in nanotoxicity assays, the adsorption of phenol red (a pH indicator for culture medium by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs and three kinds of carbon blacks (CBs with nanosize, and its effects on cytotoxicity were studied. Results indicated that the phenol red adsorbed and delivered into cells by CBs was responsible for the toxicity to Hela cells in the medium without serum. The cellular uptake of phenol red was verified using 125I-labeling techniques. The size-dependent cytotoxicity of CBs was found to closely correlate to adsorption of phenol red, cellular uptake of phenol red-CB complexes and the amount of phenol red delivered into the cells by CBs. Although the CBs were either nontoxic or slightly toxic, as vehicles of phenol red, they played an essential role in the cytotoxicity induced by phenol red. However, MWNTs showed an intrinsic cytotoxicity independent of phenol red. The implications associated with these findings are discussed.

  2. Phenolic content variability and its chromosome location in tritordeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Lopez, José F.; Ostos-Garrido, Francisco J.; Castillo, Almudena; Martín, Antonio; Gimenez, Maria J.; Pistón, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    For humans, wheat is the most important source of calories, but it is also a source of antioxidant compounds that are involved in the prevention of chronic disease. Among the antioxidant compounds, phenolic acids have great potential to improve human health. In this paper we evaluate the effect of environmental and genetic factors on the phenolics content in the grain of a collection of tritordeums with different cytoplasm and chromosome substitutions. To this purpose, tritordeum flour was used for extraction of the free, conjugates and bound phenolic compounds. These phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by RP-HPLC and the results were analyzed by univariate and multivariate methods. This is the first study that describes the composition of phenolic acids of the amphiploid tritordeum. As in wheat, the predominant phenolic compound is ferulic acid. In tritordeum there is great variability for the content of phenolic compounds and the main factor which determines its content is the genotype followed by the environment, in this case included in the year factor. Phenolic acid content is associated with the substitution of chromosome DS1D(1Hch) and DS2D(2Hch), and the translocation 1RS/1BL in tritordeum. The results show that there is high potential for further improving the quality and quantity of phenolics in tritordeum because this amphiploid shows high variability for the content of phenolic compounds. PMID:24523725

  3. Phenolic Composition and Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Free and Bound Phenolic Fractions from a Peruvian Purple Corn (Zea mays L.) Accession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez Ranilla, Lena; Christopher, Ashish; Sarkar, Dipayan; Shetty, Kalidas; Chirinos, Rosana; Campos, David

    2017-12-01

    Beneficial effects on overall gut health by phenolic bioactives-rich foods are potentially due to their modulation of probiotic gut bacteria and antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria. Based on this rationale, the effect of the free and bound phenolic fractions from a Peruvian purple corn accession AREQ-084 on probiotic lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum and the gastric cancer-related pathogen Helicobacter pylori was evaluated. The free and bound phenolic composition was also determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Anthocyanins were the major phenolic compounds (310.04 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents/100 g dry weight, DW) in the free phenolic fraction along with hydroxycinnamic acids such as p-coumaric acid derivatives, followed by caffeic and ferulic acid derivatives. The bound phenolic form had only hydroxycinnamic acids such as ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, and a ferulic acid derivative with ferulic acid being the major phenolic compound (156.30 mg/100 g DW). These phenolic compounds were compatible with beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria such as L. helveticus and B. longum as these bacteria were not inhibited by the free and bound phenolic fractions at 10 to 50 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL of sample doses, respectively. However, the pathogenic H. pylori was also not inhibited by both purple corn phenolic forms at same above sample doses. This study provides the preliminary base for the characterization of phenolic compounds of Peruvian purple corn biodiversity and its potential health benefits relevant to improving human gut health. This study provides insights that Peruvian purple corn accession AREQ-084 can be targeted as a potential source of health-relevant phenolic compounds such as anthocyanins along with hydroxycinnamic acids linked to its dietary fiber fraction. Additionally, these phenolic fractions did not affect the gut health associated beneficial bacteria nor the pathogenic

  4. Enhancement of naphthalene tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the ferredoxin-like protein (ADI1) from rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Bo; Han, Hong-Juan; Zhao, Wei; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The ADI1 Arabidopsis plants enhanced tolerance and degradation efficiency to naphthalene and had great potential for phytoremediation of naphthalene in the plant material before composting or harvesting and removal. Naphthalene is a global environmental concern, because this substance is assumed to contribute considerably to human cancer risk. Cleaning up naphthalene contamination in the environment is crucial. Phytoremediation is an efficient technology to clean up contaminants. However, no gene that can efficiently degrade exogenous recalcitrant naphthalene in plants has yet been discovered. Ferredoxin (Fd) is a key player of biological electron transfer reaction in the PAH degradation process. The biochemical pathway for bacterial degradation of naphthalene has been well investigated. In this study, a rice gene, ADI1, which codes for a putative photosynthetic-type Fd, has been transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants enhanced tolerance and degradation efficiency of naphthalene. Compared with wild-type plants, transgenic plants assimilated naphthalene from the culture media faster and removed more of this substance. When taken together, our findings suggest that breeding plants with overexpressed ADI1 gene is an effective strategy to degrade naphthalene in the environment.

  5. Sorption of a phenols mixture in aqueous solution with activated carbon; Sorcion de una mezcla de fenoles en solucion acuosa con carbon activado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia M, D

    2004-07-01

    The constant population growth and the quick industrialization have caused severe damages to our natural aquifer resources for a great variety of organic and inorganic pollutants. Among these they are those phenol compounds that are highly toxic, resistant (to the degradation chemistry) and poorly biodegradable. The phenolic compounds is used in a great variety of industries, like it is the production of resins, nylon, plastifiers, anti-oxidants, oil additives, drugs, pesticides, colorants, explosives, disinfectants and others. The disseminated discharges or effluents coming from the industrial processes toward lakes and rivers are causing a growing adverse effect in the environment, as well as a risk for the health. Numerous studies exist on the phenols removal and phenols substituted for very varied techniques, among them they are the adsorption in activated carbon. This finishes it has been used successfully for the treatment of residual waters municipal and industrial and of drinking waters and it is considered as the best technique available to eliminate organic compounds not biodegradable and toxic present in aqueous solution (US EPA, 1991). However a little information exists on studies carried out in aqueous systems with more of a phenolic compound. The activated carbon is broadly used as adsorbent due to its superficial properties in the so much treatment of water as of aqueous wastes, adsorbent for the removal of organic pollutants. The main objective of this work is the adsorption of a aqueous mixture of phenol-4 chloro phenol of different concentrations in activated carbon of mineral origin of different meshes and to diminish with it their presence in water. The experiments were carried out for lots, in normal conditions of temperature and pressure. The experimental results show that the removal capacity depends so much of the superficial properties of the sorbent like of the physical properties and chemical of the sorbate. The isotherms were carried

  6. Dynamics of Phenol Degrading—Iron Reducing Bacteria in Intensive Rice Croopping System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUWENJING; W.REICHARDT; 等

    2001-01-01

    Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of cropping season,nitrogen fertilizer input and aerated fallow o the dynamics of phenol degrading-iron reducing bacteria(PD-IRB)in tropical irrigated rice(Oryza sativa L.)systems,The PD-IRB population density was monitored at different stages of rice growth in two cropping seasons (dry and early wet) in a continuous annual triple rice cropping system under irrigated condition,In this system,the high nitrogen input (195 and 135 kg N ha-1 in dry and ewt seasons ,respectivel