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Sample records for tokamak reactor system

  1. Tokamak reactor systems studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A summary of work completed on the ARIES project during this report period is given. The main areas of effort were: neutronics, shield optimization and design, safety, systems, startup and shutdown, and ripple loss

  2. System assessment of helical reactors in comparison with tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Imagawa, S.; Muroga, T.; Sagara, A.; Okamura, S.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative assessment of tokamak and helical reactors has been performed using equivalent physics/engineering model and common costing model. Higher-temperature plasma operation is required in tokamak reactors to increase bootstrap current fraction and to reduce current-drive (CD) power. In helical systems, lower-temperature operation is feasible and desirable to reduce helical ripple transport. The capital cost of helical reactor is rather high, however, the cost of electricity (COE) is almost same as that of tokamak reactor because of smaller re-circulation power (no CD power) and less-frequent blanket replacement (lower neutron wall loading). The standard LHD-type helical reactor with 5% beta value is economically equivalent to the standard tokamak with 3% beta. The COE of lower-aspect ratio helical reactor is on the same level of high-β N tokamak reactors. (author)

  3. A systems analysis of the ARIES tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.

    1992-01-01

    The multi-institutional ARIES study has completed a series of cost-of-electricity optimized conceptual designs of commercial tokamak fusion reactors that vary the assumed advances in technology and physics. A comparison of these designs indicates the cost benefit of various design options. A parametric systems analysis suggests a possible means to obtain a marginally competitive fusion reactor

  4. DEALS: a maintainable superconducting magnet system for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hseih, S.Y.; Danby, G.; Powell, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of demountable superconducting magnet systems has been examined in a design study of a DEALS [Demountable Externally Anchored Low Stress] TF magnet for an HFITR [High Field Ignition Test Reactor] Tokamak device. All parts of the system appear feasible, including the demountable superconducting joints. Measurements on small scale prototype joints indicate that movable pressure contact joints exhibit acceptable electrical, mechanical, and cryogenic performance. Such joints permit a relatively simple support structure and are readily demountable. Assembly and disassembly sequences are described whereby any failed portion of the magnet, or any part of the reactor inside the TF coils can be removed and replaced if necessary

  5. Improvement of system code importing evaluation of Life Cycle Analysis of tokamak fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobori, Hikaru [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hiwatari, Ryoji [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We incorporated the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code. • We calculated CO{sub 2} emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. • We found that the objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. • The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. • The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant. - Abstract: This study incorporate the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code to calculate CO{sub 2} emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. Competitiveness of tokamak fusion power reactors is expected to be evaluated by the cost and environmental impact represented by the CO{sub 2} emissions, compared with present and future power generating systems such as fossil, nuclear and renewables. Result indicated that (1) The objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. (2) The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. (3) The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant.

  6. Improvement of system code importing evaluation of Life Cycle Analysis of tokamak fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobori, Hikaru; Kasada, Ryuta; Hiwatari, Ryoji; Konishi, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We incorporated the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code. • We calculated CO 2 emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. • We found that the objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. • The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO 2 emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. • The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant. - Abstract: This study incorporate the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code to calculate CO 2 emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. Competitiveness of tokamak fusion power reactors is expected to be evaluated by the cost and environmental impact represented by the CO 2 emissions, compared with present and future power generating systems such as fossil, nuclear and renewables. Result indicated that (1) The objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. (2) The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO 2 emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. (3) The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant.

  7. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injection system vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrotti, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the components of the Neutral Beam Lines of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will be enclosed in a 50 cubic meter box-shaped vacuum chamber. The chamber will have a number of unorthodox features to accomodate both neutral beam and TFTR requirements. The design constraints, and the resulting chamber design, are presented

  8. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.F.A.; Harbour, P.J.; Hotston, E.S.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  9. Systems study of tokamak fusion--fission reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenney, F.H.; Bathke, C.G.; Price, W.G. Jr.; Bohlke, W.H.; Mills, R.G.; Johnson, E.F.; Todd, A.M.M.; Buchanan, C.H.; Gralnick, S.L.

    1978-11-01

    This publication reports the results of a two to three year effort at a systematic analysis of a wide variety of tokamak-driven fissioning blanket reactors, i.e., fusion--fission hybrids. It addresses the quantitative problems of determining the economically most desirable mix of the two products: electric power and fissionable fuel and shows how the price of electric power can be minimized when subject to a variety of constraints. An attempt has been made to avoid restricting assumptions, and the result is an optimizing algorithm that operates in a six-dimensional parameter space. Comparisons are made on sets of as many as 100,000 distinct machine models, and the principal results of the study have been derived from the examination of several hundred thousand possible reactor configurations.

  10. Systems study of tokamak fusion--fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.; Bathke, C.G.; Price, W.G. Jr.; Bohlke, W.H.; Mills, R.G.; Johnson, E.F.; Todd, A.M.M.; Buchanan, C.H.; Gralnick, S.L.

    1978-11-01

    This publication reports the results of a two to three year effort at a systematic analysis of a wide variety of tokamak-driven fissioning blanket reactors, i.e., fusion--fission hybrids. It addresses the quantitative problems of determining the economically most desirable mix of the two products: electric power and fissionable fuel and shows how the price of electric power can be minimized when subject to a variety of constraints. An attempt has been made to avoid restricting assumptions, and the result is an optimizing algorithm that operates in a six-dimensional parameter space. Comparisons are made on sets of as many as 100,000 distinct machine models, and the principal results of the study have been derived from the examination of several hundred thousand possible reactor configurations

  11. ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Embrechts, M.

    1990-07-01

    This is a status report on technical progress relative to the tasks identified for the fifth year of Grant No. FG02-85-ER52118. The ARIES tokamak reactor study is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of the tokamak as an attractive fusion reactor with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The ARIES study is being coordinated by UCLA and involves a number of institutions, including RPI. The RPI group has been pursuing the following areas of research in the context of the ARIES-I design effort: MHD equilibrium and stability analyses; plasma-edge modeling and blanket materials issues. Progress in these areas is summarized herein

  12. The tokamak hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.L.; Rose, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    At a time when the potential benefits of various energy options are being seriously evaluated in many countries through-out the world, it is both timely and important to evaluate the practical application of fusion reactors for their economical production of nuclear fissile fuels from fertile fuels. The fusion hybrid reactor represents a concept that could assure the availability of adequate fuel supplies for a proven nuclear technology and have the potential of being an electrical energy source as opposed to an energy consumer as are the present fuel enrichment processes. Westinghouse Fusion Power Systems Department, under Contract No. EG-77-C-02-4544 with the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy, has developed a preliminary conceptual design for an early twenty-first century fusion hybrid reactor called the commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR). This design was developed as a first generation commercial plant producing fissile fuel to support a significant number of client Light Water Reactor (LWR) Plants. To the depth this study has been performed, no insurmountable technical problems have been identified. The study has provided a basis for reasonable cost estimates of the hybrid plants as well as the hybrid/LWR system busbar electricity costs. This energy system can be optimized to have a net cost of busbar electricity that is equivalent to the conventional LWR plant, yet is not dependent on uranium ore prices or standard enrichment costs, since the fusion hybrid can be fueled by numerous fertile fuel resources. A nearer-term concept is also defined using a beam driven fusion driver in lieu of the longer term ignited operating mode. (orig.)

  13. Compact Commercial Tokamak Reactor (CCTR): a concept for a 500-MWe commercial-tokamak fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, T.J.

    1980-11-01

    A detailed set of self-consistent parameters and costs for the conceptual design of a Compact Commercial Tokamak Reactor (CCTR) is given. Several of the basic design features are the following: an ignited plasma with a major radius of 4.9 m and minor radius of 1.4 m; a net electrical output of 500 MW; a borated-water-cooled, stainless steel shield; and a toroidal field of 12 T at the coil. The design, which utilizes the Westinghouse computer code for the COsting And Sizing of D-T burning Tokamaks (COAST), mainly provides the sizes and geometries associated with the definition of the main component features for which a detailed engineering design can be effectively undertaken. Design study alternatives, including a neutral beam driven design option, a design option with a toroidal field of 13 T at the coil, and a tungsten-shielded option are considered for the CCTR. Also included is the conceptual design of a Compact Fusion Engineering Device

  14. A cryogenic system for TIBER II [Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Kerns, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Phase II of the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER II) study describes one option for a small, economical, next-generation tokamak [1,2]. Because of its small size, minimum shielding is used between the plasma and the toroidal-field (TF) coils. Consequently, a large cryogenic system (approximately 70 kW at 4.5 K) capable of delivering forced-flow helium is required. This paper describes a cryogenic system that meets this requirement and includes TIBER-II requirements. 3 refs

  15. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant

  16. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains an overview of the Aries-I tokamak reactor study. The following topics are discussed on this tokamak: Systems studies; equilibrium, stability, and transport; summary and conclusions; current drive; impurity control system; tritium systems; magnet engineering; fusion-power-core engineering; power conversion; Aries-I safety design and analysis; design layout and maintenance; and start-up and operations

  17. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the Aries-I Tokamak: Design description; systems studies and economics; reactor plasma physics; magnet engineering; fusion-power-ore engineering; and environmental and safety features

  18. Four ignition TNS tokamak reactor systems: design summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1977-10-01

    Principal TNS objectives assumed included: (1) demonstration of ignition and burning dynamics; and (2) reactor technology forcing. The selection of an overall design approach for TNS required an early quantitative assessment of the most important design issues; namely, choice of ignition plasma design conditions (principally size and confining field of axis), and choice of toroidal field coil technology (resistive or superconducting windings). The design space investigated in this study ranged from ignited plasmas (elongated) with minor radii varying between 0.8 m (TFTR-like) and approximately 2.0 m (EPR-like). Four TF coil types were examined; these included copper, NbTi, Nb 3 Sn, and a hybrid design employing nested coils of copper and NbTi. A final step involved a further comparison of the four reference concepts using decision modeling techniques as a mechanism for selecting a preferred design approach for the TNS mission. Section 3.0 describes the TNS study process. Section 4.0 presents a summary of the parameters for the four reference point designs. Finally, Section 5.0 presents a brief description of the design features of many of the systems comprising the TNS design

  19. Conceptual integrated approach for the magnet system of a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.-L.; Hertout, P.; Saoutic, B.; Artaud, J.-F.; Zani, L.; Reux, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We give a conceptual approach of a fusion reactor magnet system based on analytical formula. • We give design criteria for the CS and TF cable in conduit conductors and for the magnet system structural description. • We apply this conceptual approach to ITER and we crosscheck with actual characteristics. • We apply this conceptual approach to a possible version of DEMO. - Abstract: In the framework of the reflexion about DEMO, a conceptual integrated approach for the magnet system of a tokamak reactor is presented. This objective is reached using analytical formulas which are presented in this paper, coupled to a Fortran code ESCORT (Electromagnetic Superconducting System for the Computation of Research Tokamaks), to be integrated into SYCOMORE, a code for reactor modelling presently in development at CEA/IRFM in Cadarache, using the tools of the EFDA Integrated Tokamak Modelling task force. The analytical formulas deal with all aspects of the magnet system, starting from the derivation of the TF system general geometry, from the plasma main characteristics. The design criteria for the cable current density and the structural design of the toroidal field and central solenoid systems are presented, enabling to deliver the radial thicknesses of the magnets and enabling also to estimate the plasma duration of the plateau. As a matter of fact, a pulsed version DEMO is presently actively considered in the European programmes. Considerations regarding the cryogenics and the protection are given, affecting the general design. An application of the conceptual approach is presented, allowing a comparison between ESCORT output data and actual ITER parameters and giving the main characteristics of a possible version for DEMO

  20. Channels in tokamak reactor shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchipakin, O.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of calculations of neutron transport through the channels in the tokamak reactor radiation shields, obtained by the Monte Carlo method and by the method of discrete ordinates, are considered. The given data show that the structural materials of the channel and that of the blanket and shields in the regions close to it are subjected to almost the same irradiation as the first wall and therefore they should satisfy the technical requirements. The radiation energy release in the injector channel wall, caused by neutron shooting, substantially depends on the channel dimensions. At the channel large diameter (0.7-10 m) this dependence noticeably decreases. The investigation of the effect of the injector channel cross section form on the neutron flux density through the channel, testifies to weak dependence of shooting radiation intensity on the form of the channel cross section. It is concluded that measures to decrease unfavourable effect of the channels on the safety of the power tokamak reactor operation and maintenance cause substantial changes in reactor design due to which the channel protection must be developed at first stages. The Monte Carlo method is recommended to be used for variant calculations and when calculating the neutron flux functionals in specific points of the system the discrete ordinate method is preferred [ru

  1. Design study of electrical power supply system for tokamak fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Design study of the electrical power supply system for a 2000MWt Tokamak-type fusion reactor has been carried out. The purposes are to reveal and study problems in the system, leading to a plan of the research and development. Performed were study of the electrical power supply system and design of superconducting inductive energy storages and power switches. In study of the system, specification and capability of various power supplies for the fusion power reactor and design of the total system with its components were investigated. For the superconducting inductive energy storages, material choice, design calculation, and structural design were conducted, giving the size, weight and performance. For thyristor switches, circuit design in the parallel / series connection of element valves and cooling design were studied, providing the size and weight. (auth.)

  2. Tokamak power systems studies, FY 1986: A second stability power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.; Baker, C.; Billone, M.

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the results of the work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during FY-1986 on the Tokamak Power Systems Study (TPSS). The purpose of the TPSS is to explore and develop ideas that would lead to improvements in the tokamak as a power reactor concept. The work at ANL concentrated on plasma engineering, impurity control, and the blanket/first wall/shield system. The work in FY-1986 extended these studies and focused them on a reference design point. The key features of the design point include: second stability regime with higher β and larger aspect ratio, steady-state operation with fast wave current drive, impurity control via a self-pumped slot limiter, a self-cooled liquid lithium, vanadium alloy blanket with simplified poloidal flow, and reduced reactor building volume with vertical lift maintenance. Sufficient work was carried out to report a preliminary cost estimate. In addition, reactor implications of steady-state operation in the first stability regime were also studied. 174 refs., 124 figs., 65 tabs

  3. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D 3 He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions

  4. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D{sup 3}He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions.

  5. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an interim status report on the STARFIRE project for the period of May to September 1979. The basic objective of the STARFIRE project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. Another key goal of the project is to give careful attention to the safety and environmental features of a commercial fusion reactor

  6. Operation of the tokamak fusion test reactor tritium systems during initial tritium experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Gentile, C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kozub, T.; LaMarche, P.; Murray, H.; Nagy, A.; Raftopoulos, S.; Rossmassler, R.; Sissingh, R.; Swanson, J.; Tulipano, F.; Viola, M.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R.T.

    1995-01-01

    The high power D-T experiments on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory commenced in November 1993. During initial operation of the tritium systems a number of start-up problems surfaced and had to be corrected. These were corrected through a series of system modifications and upgrades and by repair of failed or inadequate components. Even as these operational concerns were being addressed, the tritium systems continued to support D-T operations on the tokamak. During the first six months of D-T operations more than 107kCi of tritium were processed successfully by the tritium systems. D-T experiments conducted at TFTR during this period provided significant new data. Fusion power in excess of 9MW was achieved in May 1994. This paper describes some of the early start-up issues, and reports on the operation of the tritium system and the tritium tracking and accounting system during the early phase of TFTR D-T experiments. (orig.)

  7. Tokamak experimental power reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The principal results of a scoping and project definition study for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor are presented. Objectives are discussed; a preliminary conceptual design is described; detailed parametric, survey and sensitivity studies are presented; and research and development requirements are outlined. (U.S.)

  8. Conceptual design of superconducting magnet systems for the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Turner, L.R.; Mills, F.E.; DeMichele, D.W.; Smelser, P.; Kim, S.H.

    1976-01-01

    As an integral effort in the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor Conceptual Design, the conceptual design of a 10-tesla, pure-tension superconducting toroidal-field (TF) coil system has been developed in sufficient detail to define a realistic design for the TF coil system that could be built based upon the current state of technology with minimum technological extrapolations. A conceptual design study on the superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coils and the superconducting equilibrium-field (EF) coils were also completed. These conceptual designs are developed in sufficient detail with clear information on high current ac conductor design, cooling, venting provision, coil structural support and zero loss poloidal coil cryostat design. Also investigated is the EF penetration into the blanket and shield

  9. The ARIES tokamak fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlit, J.R.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Beecraft, W.R.; Hogan, J.T.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Reid, R.L.; Strickler, D.J.; Whitson, J.C.; Blanchard, J.P.; Emmert, G.A.; Santarius, J.F.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of the tokamak as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine their potential economics, safety, and environmental features and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak in 2nd stability regime and employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering; and ARIES-III is a conceptual D 3 He reactor. This paper focuses on the ARIES-I design. Parametric systems studies show that the optimum 1st stability tokamak has relatively low plasma current (∼ 12 MA), high plasma aspect ratio (∼ 4-6), and high magnetic field (∼ 24 T at the coil). ARIES-I is 1,000 MWe (net) reactor with a plasma major radius of 6.5 m, a minor radius of 1.4 m, a neutron wall loading of about 2.8 MW/m 2 , and a mass power density of about 90 kWe/ton. The ARIES-I reactor operates at steady state using ICRF fast waves to drive current in the plasma core and lower-hybrid waves for edge-plasma current drive. The current-drive system supplements a significant (∼ 57%) bootstrap current contribution. The impurity control system is based on high-recycling poloidal divertors. Because of the high field and large Lorentz forces in the toroidal-field magnets, innovative approaches with high-strength materials and support structures are used. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Cryogenic aspects of a demountable toroidal field magnet system for tokamak type fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, S.Y.; Powell, J.; Lehner, J.

    1977-01-01

    A new concept for superconducting Toroidal Field (TF) magnet construction is presented. It is termed the ''Demountable Externally Anchored Low Stress'' (DEALS) magnet system. In contrast to continuous wound conventional superconducting coils, each magnet coil is made from several straight coil segments to form a polygon which can be joined and disjoined to improve reactor maintenance accessibility or to replace failed coil segments if necessary. A design example is presented of a DEALS magnet system for a UWMAK II size reactor. The overall magnet system is described, followed by a detailed analysis of the major heat loads in order to assess the refrigeration requirements for the concept. Despite the increased heat loads caused by high current power leads (200,000 amps) and the coil warm reinforcement support system, the analysis shows that at most, only about one percent (approximately 20 Mw) of the plant electrical output (approximately 2,000 Mw) is needed to operate the magnet cryogenic system. The advantages and the drawbacks of the DEALS magnet system are also discussed. The advantages include: capability to replace failed coils, increased accessibility to the blanket shield assembly, reduced reliability requirements for the magnet, much lower stress in conductor, easier application of improved high field brittle superconductors like Nb 3 Sn, improved magnet safety features, etc. The drawbacks are the increased refrigeration requirements and the necessity of a movable coil support system. A comparison with a conventional magnet system is made. It is concluded that the benefits of the DEALS approach far outweigh its penalties, and that the DEALS concept is the most practical, economical way to construct TF magnet systems for Tokamak reactors

  11. Starfire: a commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Abdou, M.A.; DeFreece, D.A.; Trachsel, C.A.; Graumann, D.; Kokoszenski, J.

    1979-01-01

    The basic objective of the STARFIRE Project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. Another key goal of the project is to give careful attention to the safety and environmental features of a commercial fusion reactor. The STARFIRE Project was initiated in May 1979, with the goal of completing the design study by October 1980. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the major parameters and design features that have been tentatively selected for STARFIRE

  12. Design of deuterium and tritium pellet injector systems for Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysor, R.B.; Baylor, L.R.; Bryan, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    Three pellet injector designs developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are planned for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to reach the goal of a tritium pellet injector by 1988. These are the Repeating Pneumatic Injector (RPI), the Deuterium Pellet Injector (DPI) and the Tritium Pellet Injector (TPI). Each of the pellet injector designs have similar performance characteristics in that they deliver up to 4-mm-dia pellets at velocities up to 1500 m/s with a dsign goal to 2000 m/s. Similar techniques are utilized to freeze and extrude the pellet material. The injector systems incorporate three gun concepts which differ in the number of gun barrels and the method of forming and chambering the pellets. The RPI, a single barrel repeating design, has been operational on TFTR since April 1985. Fabrication and assembly are essentially complete for DPI, and TPI is presently on hold after completing about 80% of the design. The TFTR pellet injector program is described, and each of the injector systems is described briefly. Design details are discussed in other papers at this symposium

  13. Tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, Kiyohiko

    2009-01-01

    The structural material is one of key issues for the development of reliable superconducting magnets and peripheral equipments of fusion reactors. Standard stainless steels like SUS 304 and 316 steels available at present do not meet requirements. We are developing a new austenitic steel that has proposed target properties named 'JAERI BOX'. Additions of N and V at different amounts were tested to improve strength and fracture toughness of a base alloy SUS316LN at 4.2 K. Mechanical properties of the developed steel were examined. It is found that the charpy absorbed energy and the fracture toughness of the developed steel at 4.2 K are within JAERI BOX. (T.I.)

  14. Tokamak Systems Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged

  15. Burning plasma simulation and environmental assessment of tokamak, spherical tokamak and helical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Uemura, S.; Oishi, T.; Arimoto, H.; Shoji, T.; Garcia, J.

    2009-01-01

    Reference 1-GWe DT reactors (tokamak TR-1, spherical tokamak ST-1 and helical HR-1 reactors) are designed using physics, engineering and cost (PEC) code, and their plasma behaviours with internal transport barrier operations are analysed using toroidal transport analysis linkage (TOTAL) code, which clarifies the requirement of deep penetration of pellet fuelling to realize steady-state advanced burning operation. In addition, economical and environmental assessments were performed using extended PEC code, which shows the advantage of high beta tokamak reactors in the cost of electricity (COE) and the advantage of compact spherical tokamak in life-cycle CO 2 emission reduction. Comparing with other electric power generation systems, the COE of the fusion reactor is higher than that of the fission reactor, but on the same level as the oil thermal power system. CO 2 reduction can be achieved in fusion reactors the same as in the fission reactor. The energy payback ratio of the high-beta tokamak reactor TR-1 could be higher than that of other systems including the fission reactor.

  16. The effective cost of tritium for tokamak fusion power reactors with reduced tritium production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilligan, J.G.; Evans, K.

    1983-01-01

    If sufficient tritium cannot be produced and processed in tokamak blankets then at least two alternatives are possible. Tritium can be purchased; or reactors with reduced tritium (RT) content in the plasma can be designed. The latter choice may require development of magnet technology etc., but the authors show that the impact on the cost-of-electricity may be mild. Cost tradeoffs are compared to the market value of tritium. Adequate tritium production in fusion blankets is preferred, but the authors show there is some flexibility in the deployment of fusion if this is not possible

  17. Development of titanium alloy metallic balloon for locking system in tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.; Nishio, S.

    1995-01-01

    The development of a locking structure of in-vessel components such as blanket vessels is one of the key issues for a tokamak fusion reactor. A concept of a locking structure with a cotter (wedge) and cotter driver has been proposed. We considered the transformation of a metallic balloon (MB) with thin wall and flat shape cross-section very promising as a cotter driver. We tried to fabricate the MB made of different kinds of titanium alloy by superplastic forming (SPF). Several mockups of the MB were successfully fabricated and used for performance tests. A mockup of the locking structure with blanket vessels, cotter structures and MBs has also been fabricated. Using this mockup, the locking mechanism was verified through an experimental study. (orig.)

  18. Plasma-gun fueling for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1980-11-01

    In light of the uncertain extrapolation of gas puffing for reactor fueling and certain limitations to pellet injection, the snowplow plasma gun has been studied as a fueling device. Based on current understanding of gun and plasma behavior a design is proposed, and its performance is predicted in a tokamak reactor environment

  19. Conceptual design of a commercial tokamak reactor using resistive magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeClaire, R.J. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The future of the tokamak approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion depends in part on its potential as a commercial electricity-producing device. This potential is continually being evaluated in the fusion community using parametric, system, and conceptual studies of various approaches to improving tokamak reactor design. The potential of tokamaks using resistive magnets as commercial electricity-producing reactors is explored. Parametric studies have been performed to examine the major trade-offs of the system and to identify the most promising configurations for a tokamak using resistive magnets. In addition, a number of engineering issues have been examined including magnet design, blanket/first-wall design, and maintenance. The study indicates that attractive design space does exist and presents a conceptual design for the Resistive Magnet Commercial Tokamak Reactor (RCTR). No issue has been identified, including recirculating power, that would make the overall cost of electricity of RCTR significantly different from that of a comparably sized superconducting tokamak. However, RCTR may have reliability and maintenance advantages over commercial superconducting magnet devices

  20. Development of Tokamak reactor system code and conceptual studies of DEMO with He Cooled Molten Li blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, B.G.; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Yong Hi

    2007-01-01

    To develop the concepts of fusion power plants and identify the design parameters, we have been developing the tokamak reactor system code. The system code can take into account a wide range of plasma physics and technology effects simultaneously and it can be used to find design parameters which optimize the given figure of merits. The outcome of the system studies using the system code is to identify which areas of plasma physics and technologies and to what extent should be developed for realization of a given fusion power plant concepts. As an application of the tokamak reactor system code, we investigate the performance of DEMO for early realization with a limited extension from the plasma physics and technology used in the design of the ITER. Main requirements for DEMO are selected as: 1) to demonstrate tritium self-sufficiency, 2) to generate net electricity, and 3) for steady-state operation. The size of plasma is assumed to be same as that of ITER and the plasma parameters which characterize the performance, i.e. normalized β value, β N , confinement improvement factor for the H-mode, H and the ratio of the Greenwald density limit n/n G are assumed to be improved beyond those of ITER: β N >2.0, H>1.0 and n/n G >1.0. Tritium self-sufficiency is provided by the He Cooled Molten Lithium (HCML) blanket with the total thickness of 2.5 m including the shield. With n/n G >1.2, net electric power bigger than 500 MW is possible with β N >4.0 andH>1.2. To access operation space for higher electric power, main restrictions are given by the divertor heat load and the steady-state operation requirements. Developments in both plasma physics and technology are required to handle high heat load and to increase the current drive efficiency. (orig.)

  1. Demountable low stress high field toroidal field magnet system for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; Hsieh, D.; Lehner, J.; Suenaga, M.

    1977-01-01

    A new type of superconducting magnet system for large fusion reactors is described in this report. Instead of winding large planar or multi-axis coils, as has been proposed in previous fusion reactor designs, the superconducting coils are made by joining together several prefabricated conductor sections. The joints can be unmade and sections removed if they fail. Conductor sections can be made at a factory and shipped to the reactor site for assembly. The conductor stress level in the assembled coil can be kept small by external support of the coil at a number of points along its perimeter, so that the magnetic forces are transmitted to an external warm reinforcement structure. This warm reinforcement structure can also be the primary containment for the fusion reactor, constructed similar to a PCRV (Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel) used in fission reactors. Low thermal conductivity, high strength supports are used to transfer the magnetic forces to the external reinforcement through a hydraulic system. The hydraulic supports are movable and can be programmed to accommodate thermal contraction and to minimize stress in the superconducting coil

  2. Demountable low stress high field toroidal field magnet system for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; Hsieh, D.; Lehner, J.; Suenaga, M.

    1978-01-01

    A new type of superconducting magnet system for large fusion reactors is described. Instead of winding large planar or multi-axis coils, as has been proposed in previous fusion reactor designs, the superconducting coils are made by joining together several prefabricated conductor sections. The joints can be unmade and sections removed if they fail. Conductor sections can be made at a factory and shipped to the reactor site for assembly. The conductor stress level in the assembled coil can be kept small by external support of the coil at a number of points along its perimeter, so that the magnetic forces are transmitted to an external warm reinforcement structure. This warm reinforcement structure can also be the primary containment for the fusion reactor, constructed similar to a PCRV (Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel) used in fission reactors. Low thermal conductivity, high strength supports are used to transfer the magnetic forces to the external reinforcement through a hydraulic system. The hydraulic supports are movable and can be programmed to accommodate thermal contraction and to minimize stress in the superconducting coil. (author)

  3. Review of tokamak power reactor and blanket designs in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Gohar, Y.; Smith, D.; Sze, D.

    1986-01-01

    The last major conceptual design study of a tokamak power reactor in the United States was STARFIRE which was carried out in 1979-1980. Since that time US studies have concentrated on engineering test reactors, demonstration reactors, parametric systems studies, scoping studies, and studies of selected critical issues such as pulsed vs. steady-state operation and blanket requirements. During this period, there have been many advancements in tokamak physics and reactor technology, and there has also been a recognition that it is desirable to improve the tokamak concept as a commercial power reactor candidate. During 1984-1985 several organizations participated in the Tokamak Power Systems Study (TPSS) with the objective of developing ideas for improving the tokamak as a power reactor. Also, the US completed a comprehensive Blanket Comparison and Selection Study which formed the basis for further studies on improved blankets for fusion reactors

  4. RAMI Analysis for Designing and Optimizing Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) for the ITER's Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrada, Juan J.; Reiersen, Wayne T.

    2011-01-01

    U.S.-ITER is responsible for the design, engineering, and procurement of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS). TCWS is designed to provide cooling and baking for client systems that include the first wall/blanket, vacuum vessel, divertor, and neutral beam injector. Additional operations that support these primary functions include chemical control of water provided to client systems, draining and drying for maintenance, and leak detection/localization. TCWS interfaces with 27 systems including the secondary cooling system, which rejects this heat to the environment. TCWS transfers heat generated in the Tokamak during nominal pulsed operation - 850 MW at up to 150 C and 4.2 MPa water pressure. Impurities are diffused from in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel by water baking at 200-240 C at up to 4.4 MPa. TCWS is complex because it serves vital functions for four primary clients whose performance is critical to ITER's success and interfaces with more than 20 additional ITER systems. Conceptual design of this one-of-a-kind cooling system has been completed; however, several issues remain that must be resolved before moving to the next stage of the design process. The 2004 baseline design indicated cooling loops that have no fault tolerance for component failures. During plasma operation, each cooling loop relies on a single pump, a single pressurizer, and one heat exchanger. Consequently, failure of any of these would render TCWS inoperable, resulting in plasma shutdown. The application of reliability, availability, maintainability, and inspectability (RAMI) tools during the different stages of TCWS design is crucial for optimization purposes and for maintaining compliance with project requirements. RAMI analysis will indicate appropriate equipment redundancy that provides graceful degradation in the event of an equipment failure. This analysis helps demonstrate that using proven, commercially available equipment is better than using custom-designed equipment

  5. Optimization of steady-state beam-driven tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Singer, C.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent developments in neutral beam technology prompt us to reconsider the prospects for steady-state tokamak reactors. A mathematical reactor model is developed that includes the physics of beam-driven currents and reactor power balance, as well as reactor and beam system costs. This model is used to find the plasma temperatures that minimize the reactor cost per unit of net electrical output. The optimum plasma temperatures are nearly independent of β and are roughly twice as high as the optimum temperatures for ignited reactors. If beams of neutral deuterium atoms with near-optimum energies of 1 to 2 MeV are used to drive the current in a reactor the size of the International Tokamak Reactor, then the optimum temperatures are typically T /SUB e/ approx. = 12 to 15 keV and T /SUB i/ approx. = 17 to 21 keV for a wide range of model parameters. Net electrical output rises rapidly with increasing deuterium beam energy for E /SUB b/ less than or equal to 400 keV, but rises only slowly above E /SUB b/ about 1 MeV. We estimate that beam-driven steady-state reactors could be economically competitive with pulsed-ignition reactors if cyclic-loading problems limit the toroidal magnetic field strength of pulsed reactors to less than or equal to 85% of that allowed in steady-state reactors

  6. Cryogenic distillation: a fuel enrichment system for near-term tokamak-type D-T fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, B.; Davis, J.F.

    1980-02-01

    The successful operation and economic viability of deuterium-tritium- (D-T-) fueled tokamak-type commercial power fusion reactors will depend to a large extent on the development of reliable tritium-containment and fuel-recycle systems. Of the many operating steps in the fuel recycle scheme, separation or enrichment of the isotropic species of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation is one of the most important. A parametric investigation was carried out to study the effects of the various operating conditions and the composition of the spent fuel on the degree of separation. A computer program was developed for the design and analysis of a system of interconnected distillation columns for isotopic separation such that the requirements of near-term D-T-fueled reactors are met. The analytical results show that a distillation cascade consisting of four columns is capable of reprocessing spent fuel varying over a wide range of compositions to yield reinjection-grade fuel with essentially unlimited D/T ratio

  7. In-vessel maintenance concepts for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, V.P.; Berger, J.D.; Yount, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Concepts for rail-mounted and guided in-vessel handling machines (IVM) for remote maintenance inside tokamak fusion reactors are described. The IVM designs are based on concepts for tethered remotely operated vehicles and feature the use of multiple manipulator arms for remote handling and remote-controlled TV cameras for remote viewing. The concepts include IVMs for both single or dual rail systems located in the top or bottom of the reactor vessel

  8. Tokamak power systems studies, FY 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1985-12-01

    The Tokamak Power System Studies (TPSS) at ANL in FY-1985 were devoted to exploring innovative design concepts which have the potential for making substantial improvements in the tokamak as a commercial power reactor. Major objectives of this work included improved reactor economics, improved environmental and safety features, and the exploration of a wide range of reactor plant outputs with emphasis on reduced plant sizes compared to STARFIRE. The activities concentrated on three areas: plasma engineering, impurity control, and blanket/first wall/shield technology. 205 refs., 125 figs., 107 tabs.

  9. Comparative study of cost models for tokamak DEMO fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Tetsutarou; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Ban, Kanae; Kondo, Takuya; Tobita, Kenji; Goto, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Cost evaluation analysis of the tokamak-type demonstration reactor DEMO using the PEC (physics-engineering-cost) system code is underway to establish a cost evaluation model for the DEMO reactor design. As a reference case, a DEMO reactor with reference to the SSTR (steady state tokamak reactor) was designed using PEC code. The calculated total capital cost was in the same order of that proposed previously in cost evaluation studies for the SSTR. Design parameter scanning analysis and multi regression analysis illustrated the effect of parameters on the total capital cost. The capital cost was predicted to be inside the range of several thousands of M$s in this study. (author)

  10. Tritium system for a tokamak reactor with a self-pumped limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.M.; Sze, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    The self-pumping concept was proposed as a means of simplifying the impurity control system in a fusion reactor. The idea is to remove helium in-situ by trapping in freshly deposited metal surface layers of a limiter or divertor. Trapping material is added to the plasma scrape-off or edge region where it is transported to the wall. Some of the key issues for this concept are the tritium inventory in the trapping material and the permeation of protium and recycling of tritium. These quantities are shown to be acceptable for the reference design. The tritium issues for a helium-cooled solid breeder reactor design with vanadium alloy as a structural material are also examined. Models are presented for tritium permeation and inventory calculation for structure materials with the effect of a thin layer of coating material

  11. Life cycle assessment for energy payback of spherical tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Kanae; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Shoji, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    The energy payback ratio (EPR) is the index evaluating how a power plant produces the higher output energy effectively from the lower input energy. We used the system code and evaluated the EPRs of three reactor models; spherical tokamak (NC-ST), low aspect ratio tokamak reactor (LATR), and standard tokamak reactor (TR). The NC-ST and LATR systems have no center solenoid at the inboard side of plasma. In the case of NC-ST, normal conducting coils (NC) are used for toroidal field system. In LATR and TR superconducting coils (SC) are adopted. After we studied the relationship between the EPR of each fusion reactor and the aspect ratio in the range from 1.2 to 4.0, we evaluated the EPR of three typical models; ARIES-ST like, VECTOR like, and ARIES-RS like. The input parameters of aspect ratio, elongation, and normalized beta are as same as those of each original reactor. It was found that the EPR of LATR is the highest. Since LATR has no power loss due to ohmic-heating of normal conducting coils, the input energy of construction, operation and replacement is the lowest. (author)

  12. Technology issues for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The approach for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has evolved from a conservative plan based on cutting up and burying all of the systems, to one that considers the impact tritium contamination will have on waste disposal, how large size components may be used as their own shipping containers, and even the possibility of recycling the materials of components such as the toroidal field coils and the tokamak structure. In addition, the project is more carefully assessing the requirements for using remotely operated equipment. Finally, valuable cost database is being developed for future use by the fusion community

  13. HESTER: a hot-electron superconducting tokamak experimental reactor at M.I.T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.H.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1983-04-01

    HESTER is an experimental tokamak, designed to resolve many of the central questions in the tokamak development program in the 1980's. It combines several unique features with new perspectives on the other major tokamak experiments scheduled for the next decade. The overall objectives of HESTER, in rough order of their presently perceived importance, are the achievement of reactor-like wall-loadings and plasma parameters for long pulse periods, determination of a good, reactor-relevant method of steady-state or very long pulse tokamak current drive, duplication of the planned very high temperature neutral injection experiments using only radio frequency heating, a demonstration of true steady-state tokamak operation, integration of a high-performance superconducting magnet system into a tokamak experiment, determination of the best methods of long term impurity control, and studies of transport and pressure limits in high field, high aspect ratio tokamak plasmas. These objectives are described

  14. High power 1 MeV neutral beam system and its application plan for the international tokamak experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemsworth, R.S. [ITER Joint Central Team, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes the Neutral Beam Injection system which is presently being designed for the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER, in Europe Japan and Russia, with co-ordination by the Joint Central Team of ITER at Naka, Japan. The proposed system consists of three negative ion based neutral injectors, delivering a total of 50 MW of 1 MeV D{sup 0} to the ITER plasma for a pulse length of >1000 s. Each injectors uses a single caesiated volume arc discharge negative ion source, and a multi-grid, multi-aperture accelerator, to produce about 40 A of 1 MeV D{sup -}. This will be neutralized by collisions with D{sub 2} in a sub-divided gas neutralizer, which has a conversion efficiency of about 60%. The charged fraction of the beam emerging from the neutralizer is dumped in an electrostatic residual ion dump. A water cooled calorimeter can be moved into the beam path to intercept the neutral beam, allowing commissioning of the injector independent of ITER. ITER is scheduled to produce its first plasma at the beginning of 2008, and the planning of the R and D, construction and installation foresees the neutral injection system being available from the start of ITER operations. (author)

  15. The ICRH tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1976-01-01

    A Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor where the ion are maintained at Tsub(i) approximately 20keV>Tsub(e) approximately 7keV by ion-cyclotron resonance heating is shown to produce an energy amplification of Q>2 provided the principal ion energy loss channel is via collisional transfer to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power and requires a 50MHz radio-frequency generator capable of 50MW peak power; it is otherwise compatible with the conceptual design for the Princeton TFTR. The required n tausub(E) values for electrons and ions are respectively ntausub(Ee)>1.5.10 13 cm -3 -sec and ntausub(Ei)>4.10 13 cm -3 -sec. The principal areas where research is needed to establish this concept are: tokamak transport calculations, ICRH physics, trapped-particle instability energy losses, tokamak equilibria with high values of βsub(theta), and, of course, impurities

  16. Minerals resource implications of a tokamak fusion reactor economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, E.; Conn, R.W.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Sviatoslavsky, I.

    1979-09-01

    The mineral resource implications of an economy of tokamak-type fusion reactors are assessed based upon the recent conceptual reactor design study, NUWMAK, developed at the University of Wisconsin. For comparative purposes, various structural alloys of vanadium and steel are assumed to be usable in the NUWMAK design in place of the titanium alloy originally selected. In addition, the inner blanket core and magnet system of the conceptual reactor, HFCTR, developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, are assumed to be interchangeable with the comparable components in NUWMAK. These variations permit a range of likely requirements to be assessed

  17. Operation and control of high density tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attenberger, S.E.; McAlees, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    The incentive for high density operation of a tokamak reactor is discussed. The plasma size required to attain ignition is determined. Ignition is found to be possible in a relatively small system provided other design criteria are met. These criteria are described and the technology developments and operating procedures required by them are outlined. The parameters for such a system and its dynamic behavior during the operating cycle are also discussed

  18. International tokamak reactor conceptual design overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) Workshop is an unique collaborative effort among Euratom, Japan, the USA and USSR. The Zero-Phase of the INTOR Workshop, which was conducted during 1979, assessed the technical data base that would support the construction of the next major device in the tokamak program to operate in the early 1990s and defined the objectives and characteristics of this device. The INTOR workshop was extended into phase-1, the Definition Phase, in early 1980. The objective of the Phase-1 Workshop was to develop a conceptual design of the INTOR experiment. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the work of the Phase-1 INTOR Workshop (January 1980-June 1981, with emphasis upon the conceptual design

  19. UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on ''modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D- 3 He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs

  20. Tokamak experimental power reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Baker, C.C.; Roberts, M.

    1976-01-01

    Three designs of an EPR are briefly described. The plasma physics involved in the EPR design is discussed. Brief discussions on the following topics are included: (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) impurity control, (3) transport scaling, (4) burn cycle dynamics, (5) first wall system, (6) blanket/shield systems, (7) plasma heating, (8) toroidal field coils, (9) poloidal field coils, (10) energy storage and transfer, (11) tritium fuel cycle, (12) radiation damage, and (13) costs

  1. Preconceptual design and assessment of a Tokamak hybrid reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teofilo, V. L.; Leonard, B. R., Jr.; Aase, D. T.; Bickford, W. E.; McCormick, N. J.; McGrath, R. T.; Morrison, J. E.; Perry, R. T.; Schulte, S. C.; Willingham, C. E.

    1980-09-01

    The preconceptual design of a commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (THR) power plant was performed. The Tokamak fusion driver for this hybrid is operated in the ignition mode. The D-T fusion plasma, which produces 1140 MW of power, has a major radius of 5.4 m and a minor radius of 1.0 m with an elongation of 2.0. Double null poloidal divertors are assumed for impurity control. The confining toroidal field is maintained by D-shaped Nb3Sn superconducting magnets with a maximum field of 12T at the coil. Three blankets with four associated fuel cycle alternatives have been combined with the ignited Tokamak fusion driver. The engineering, material, and balance of plant design requirements for the THR are briefly described. Estimates of the capital, operating and maintenance, and fuel cycle costs were made for the various driver/blanket combinations and an assessment of the market penetrability of hybrid systems is presented. An analysis was made of the nonproliferation aspects of the hybrid and its associated fuel cycles relative to fission reactors. The current and required level of technology for both the fusion and fission components of the hybrid system has been reviewed. Licensing hybrid systems is also considered.

  2. Preconceptual design and assessment of a Tokamak Hybrid Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Leonard, B.R. Jr.; Aase, D.T.

    1980-09-01

    The preconceptual design of a commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (THR) power plant has been performed. The tokamak fusion driver for this hybrid is operated in the ignition mode. The D-T fusion plasma, which produces 1140 MW of power, has a major radius of 5.4 m and a minor radius of 1.0 m with an elongation of 2.0. Double null poloidal divertors are assumed for impurity control. The confining toroidal field is maintained by D-shaped Nb 3 Sn superconducting magnets with a maximum field of 12T at the coil. Three blankets with four associated fuel cycle alternatives have been combined with the ignited tokamak fusion driver. The engineering, material, and balance of plant design requirements for the THR are briefly described. Estimates of the capital, operating and maintenance, and fuel cycle costs have been made for the various driver/blanket combinations and an assessment of the market penetrability of hybrid systems is presented. An analysis has been made of the nonproliferation aspects of the hybrid and its associated fuel cycles relative to fission reactors. The current and required level of technology for both the fusion and fission components of the hybrid system has been reviewed. Licensing hybrid systems is also considered

  3. Wildcat: A commercial deuterium-deuterium tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K.; Baker, C.C.; Barry, K.M.

    1983-01-01

    WILDCAT is a conceptual design of a catalyzed deuterium-deuterium tokamak commercial fusion reactor. WILDCAT utilizes the beneficial features of no tritium breeding, while not extrapolating unnecessarily from existing deuterium-tritium (D-T) designs. The reactor is larger and has higher magnetic fields and plasma pressures than typical D-T devices. It is more costly, but eliminates problems associated with tritium breeding and has tritium inventories and throughputs approximately two orders of magnitude less than typical D-T reactors. There are both a steady-state version with Alfven-wave current drive and a pulsed version. Extensive comparison with D-T devices has been made, and cost and safety analyses have been included. All of the major reactor systems have been worked out to a level of detail appropriate to a complete conceptual design

  4. Steady-state tokamak reactor with non-divertor impurity control: STARFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1980-01-01

    STARFIRE is a conceptual design study of a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant. Particular emphasis has been placed on simplifying the reactor concept by developing design concepts to produce a steady-state tokamak with non-divertor impurity control and helium ash removal. The concepts of plasma current drive using lower hybrid rf waves and a limiter/vacuum system for reactor applications are described

  5. Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, E.; Chrzanowski, J.; Rule, K.; Viola, M.; Williams, M.; Strykowsky, R.

    1999-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the TFTR is scheduled to occur over a period of three years beginning in October 1999. This is not a typical Department of Energy D and D Project where a facility is isolated and cleaned up by ''bulldozing'' all facility and hardware systems to a greenfield condition. The mission of TFTR D and D is to: (a) surgically remove items which can be re-used within the DOE complex, (b) remove tritium contaminated and activated systems for disposal, (c) clear the test cell of hardware for future reuse, (d) reclassify the D-site complex as a non-nuclear facility as defined in DOE Order 420.1 (Facility Safety) and (e) provide data on the D and D of a large magnetic fusion facility. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The record-breaking deuterium-tritium experiments performed on TFTR resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 75 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size and shape of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling

  6. Stack and area tritium monitoring systems for the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, G.G.; Meixler, L.D.; Sirsingh, R.A.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the TFTR Tritium Stack and Area Monitoring Systems which have been developed to provide the required level of reliability in a cost effective manner consistent with the mission of the Tritium Handling System on TFTR. Personnel protection, environmental responsibility, and tritium containing system integrity have been the considerations in system design. During the Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) experiments on TFTR, tritium will be used for the first time as one of the fuels. Area monitors provide surveillance of the air in various rooms at TFTR. Stack monitors monitor the air at the TFTR test site that is exhausted through the HVAC systems, from the room exhaust stacks and the tritium systems process vents. The philosophies for the implementation of the Stack and Area Tritium Monitoring Systems at TFTR are to use hardwired controls wherever personnel protection is involved, and to take advantage of modern intelligent controllers to provide a distributed system to support the functions of tracking, displaying, and archiving concentration levels of tritium for all of the monitored areas and stacks

  7. A comparison of burn cycle options for Tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K.; Hassanein, A.M.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration of burn cycle options for commercial tokamaks shows that there is substantial motivation to achieve steady state operation. This is partly due to longer replacement periods for first wall and impurity control components, but, in addition, large cost savings are found when magnets, power supplies, and the energy transfer system are not frequently pulsed. The hybrid burn cycle, with a combination of ohmic and noninductive current drive, does not significantly improve the economics of ohmically-driven commercial reactors with large major radius. However, an INTOR-class device has a critically small hole in the doughnut, and we find for this size tokamak that the hybrid cycle is preferred over ohmically-driven operation

  8. Compact tokamak reactors part 2 (numerical results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.C.; Wootton, A.J.; Ross, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The authors describe a numerical optimization scheme for fusion reactors. The particular application described is to find the smallest copper coil spherical tokamak, although the numerical scheme is sufficiently general to allow many other problems to be solved. The solution to the steady state energy balance is found by first selecting the fixed variables. The range of all remaining variables is then selected, except for the temperature. Within the specified ranges, the temperature which satisfies the power balance is then found. Tests are applied to determine that remaining constraints are satisfied, and the acceptable results then stored. Results are presented for a range of auxiliary current drive efficiencies and different scaling relationships; for the range of variables chosen the machine encompassing volume increases or remains approximately unchanged as the aspect ratio is reduced

  9. Compact tokamak reactors part 2 (numerical results)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, J.C.; Wootton, A.J.; Ross, D.W.

    1996-10-21

    The authors describe a numerical optimization scheme for fusion reactors. The particular application described is to find the smallest copper coil spherical tokamak, although the numerical scheme is sufficiently general to allow many other problems to be solved. The solution to the steady state energy balance is found by first selecting the fixed variables. The range of all remaining variables is then selected, except for the temperature. Within the specified ranges, the temperature which satisfies the power balance is then found. Tests are applied to determine that remaining constraints are satisfied, and the acceptable results then stored. Results are presented for a range of auxiliary current drive efficiencies and different scaling relationships; for the range of variables chosen the machine encompassing volume increases or remains approximately unchanged as the aspect ratio is reduced.

  10. How much does a tokamak reactor cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidberg, J.; Cerfon, A.; Ballinger, S.; Barber, J.; Dogra, A.; McCarthy, W.; Milanese, L.; Mouratidis, T.; Redman, W.; Sandberg, A.; Segal, D.; Simpson, R.; Sorensen, C.; Zhou, M.

    2017-10-01

    The cost of a fusion reactor is of critical importance to its ultimate acceptability as a commercial source of electricity. While there are general rules of thumb for scaling both overnight cost and levelized cost of electricity the corresponding relations are not very accurate or universally agreed upon. We have carried out a series of scaling studies of tokamak reactor costs based on reasonably sophisticated plasma and engineering models. The analysis is largely analytic, requiring only a simple numerical code, thus allowing a very large number of designs. Importantly, the studies are aimed at plasma physicists rather than fusion engineers. The goals are to assess the pros and cons of steady state burning plasma experiments and reactors. One specific set of results discusses the benefits of higher magnetic fields, now possible because of the recent development of high T rare earth superconductors (REBCO); with this goal in mind, we calculate quantitative expressions, including both scaling and multiplicative constants, for cost and major radius as a function of central magnetic field.

  11. A ''SuperCode'' for performing systems analysis of tokamak experiments and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, S.W.; Barr, W.L.; Crotinger, J.A.; Perkins, L.J.; Solomon, C.J.; Chaniotakis, E.A.; Freidberg, J.P.; Wei, J.; Galambos, J.D.; Mandrekas, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new code, named the ''SUPERCODE,'' has been developed to fill the gap between currently available zero dimensional systems codes and highly sophisticated, multidimensional plasma performance codes. The former are comprehensive in content, fast to execute, but rather simple in terms of the accuracy of the physics and engineering models. The latter contain state-of-the-art plasma physics modelling but are limited in engineering content and time consuming to run. The SUPERCODE upgrades the reliability and accuracy of systems codes by calculating the self consistent 1 1/2 dimensional MHD-transport plasma evolution in a realistic engineering environment. By a combination of variational techniques and careful formation, there is only a modest increase in CPU time over O-D runs, thereby making the SUPERCODE suitable for use as a systems studies tool. In addition, considerable effort has been expended to make the code user- and programming-friendly, as well as operationally flexible, with the hope of encouraging wide usage throughout the fusion community

  12. The ARIES-III D-3He tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Werley, K.A.; Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Santarius, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The multi-institutional ARIES study has generated a conceptual design of another tokamak fusion reactor in a series that varies the assumed advances in technology and physics. The ARIES-III design uses a D- 3 He fuel cycle and requires advances in technology and physics for economical attractiveness. The optimal design was characterized through systems analyses for eventual conceptual engineering design. In this paper, results from the systems analysis are summarized, and a comparison with the high-field, D-T fueled ARIES-I is included

  13. The tokamak fusion test reactor tritium systems test contractor operational readiness review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Levine, J.; Norris, M.; Rehill, F.; Such, C.

    1993-01-01

    In preparation for D-T operations at TFTR, the TFTR project has successfully completed the C-ORR process which has led to the introduction of 200 curies of tritium to the site. Preparations for the C-ORR began approximately 2 years ago. During July 1992 a one-week Site Assistance Review was conducted by the C-ORR , and C-ORR Team consisting of 12 persons, all of whom were outside experts, many of whom were from other facilities within the DOE complex. During the July 1992 Site Assistance Review 201 findings were documented which fell into one of three categories. All of the 109 category one findings which were generated were required to be resolved prior to the introduction of tritium to the TFTR site. On April 5, 1993, the TFTR Tritium System Test C-ORR commenced. The results of the C-ORR as documented in the final report by the C-ORR was that category 1 findings were resolved, and it was the recommendation of the C-ORR Team to the PPPL ES ampersand H Board that TFTR initiate the Tritium Systems Test. DOE (Chicago Operations, Princeton Area Office) concurred with the C-ORR final report and on April 29, 1993, at 12:15 pm tritium was introduced to the TFTR site

  14. Tokamak reactor cost model based on STARFIRE/WILDCAT costing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    A cost model is presented which is useful for survey and comparative studies of tokamak reactors. The model is heavily based on STARFIRE and WILDCAT costing guidelines, philosophies, and procedures and reproduces the costing for these devices quite accurately

  15. Power supply requirements for a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Kustom, R.L.

    1979-02-01

    The power supply requirements for a 7-M major radius commercial tokamak reactor have been examined, using a system approach combining models of the reactor and poloidal coil set, plasma burn cycle and MHD calculations, and power supply characteristics and cost data. A conventional system using an MGF set and solid-state rectifier/inverter power supplies was studied in addition to systems using a homopolar generator, superconducting energy storage inductor, and dump resistors. The requirements and cost of the power supplies depend on several factors but most critically on the ohmic heating ramp time used for startup. Long ramp times (approx. > 8 s) seems to be feasible, from the standpoint of resistive volt-second losses, and would appear to make conventional systems quite competitive with nonconventional ones, which require further research and development

  16. Summary discussion: An integrated advanced tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    The tokamak concept improvement workshop addressed a wide range of issues involved in the development of a more attractive tokamak. The agenda for the workshop progressed from a general discussion of the long-range energy context (with the objective being the identification of a set of criteria and ''figures of merit'' for measuring the attractiveness of a tokamak concept) to particular opportunities for the improvement of the tokamak concept. The discussions concluded with a compilation of research program elements leading to an improved tokamak concept

  17. The 'FINTOR 1' design. A minimum size Tokamak Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolini, E.

    1978-01-01

    The work carried on by the FINTOR (Frascati, Ispra, Napoli, Tokamak Reactor) group has now reached a stage where the effects of the main physics and engineering constraints, for a minimum size Tokamak Experimental Reactor have been clearly identified. This phase, now completed, has allowed to produce a self-consistent design of each basic component of the reactor, FINTOR 1, and to identify the more relevant interface problems toward a further optimisation of the reactor dimensions and characteristics to be performed in the future (FINTOR 2)

  18. Concept study of the Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR) concept has been proposed as a realistic fusion power reactor to be built in the near future. An overall concept of SSTR is introduced which is based on a small extension of the present day physics and technologies. The major feature of SSTR is the maximum utilization of a bootstrap current in order to reduce the power required for the steady state operation. This requirement leads to the choice of moderate current (12 MA), and high βp (2.0) for the device, which are achieved by selecting high aspect ratio (A=4) and high toroidal magnetic field (16.5 T). A negative-ion-based neutral beam injection system is used both for heating and central current drive. Notable engineering features of SSTR are: the use of a uniform vacuum vessel and periodical replacements of the first wall and blanket layers and significant reduction of the electromagnetic force with the use of functionally gradient material. It is shown that a tokamak machine comparable to ITER in size can become a power reactor capable of generating about 1 GW of electricity with a plant efficiency of ∼30%. (author)

  19. COAST-4, Design and Cost of Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sink, D.A.; Iwinski, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: COAST produces a generalized description of a D-T burning tokamak reactor and facility. In each complete calculation, the geometry, dimensions, and ratings of approximately 50 subsystems are determined. In addition, performance data associated with the tokamak and facility operation and a detailed cost estimate, subsystem-by-subsystem, are provided. The cost estimates include the evaluation of direct and indirect capital costs, time-related, and operating costs. Devices which can be sized and costed include: TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor), The Next Step (TNS) type of devices, fusion-fission hybrids, engineering demonstration reactors, power producing reactors, and commercial (power and fissile fuel breeding) reactors. Both the ignition mode and the neutral-beam-driven mode of plasma operation are modeled. The plasma engineering calculations involve 0-D models which account for energy balance, particle balance, alpha-particle effects, slowing-down theory, plasma-plasma and beam-plasma fusion reaction rates, impurity effects, profile effects, and n(e)-tau(E) scaling. The tokamak engineering calculations account for poloidal and toroidal magnetic field coil assemblies (both superconducting and copper conductors are possible), neutral beam injectors, blanket/shield assemblies, plasma fueling, divertors, heat dissipation systems, and related power supplies. The modeling for the shaping field coils includes the positioning of each coil relative to the other device components, as well as scaling the coil currents from a reference set of current magnitudes and positions (which are supplied as input and should be consistent with a coil set providing equilibrium and stability conditions for the plasma). The reactor cell containing the tokamak device, the turbine-generator plant and facility, and balance-of-plant systems are taken into account. 2 - Method of solution: The COAST code 'builds' the tokamak around the plasma and

  20. Plasma startup patterns in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Koichi; Tone, Tatsuzo.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma startup patterns are studied from the viewpoint of net power loss represented by the total power loss less the α-particle heating power. The existence is shown of a critical temperature of plasma at which the net power loss becomes independent of plasma density. Observations are made which indicate that the net power loss decreases with lowering plasma density in the range below the critical temperature and vice versa, whether governed by empirical or trapped-ion scaling laws. A startup pattern is presented which minimizes the net power loss during startup, and which prescribes that: (1) The plasma density should be kept as low as possible until the plasma is heated up to the critical temperature; (2) thereafter, the plasma density should be increased to its steady state value while retaining the critical temperature; and (3) finally, with the density kept constant, the temperature should be further raised to its steady state value. The net power loss at critical temperature represents the lower limit of heating power required to bring the plasma to steady state in tokamak reactors. (author)

  1. Burn cycle requirements comparison of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.

    1983-12-01

    Burn cycle parameters and energy transfer system requirements were analyzed for an 8-m commercial tokamak reactor using four types of cycles: conventional, hybrid, internal transformer, and steady state. Not surprisingly, steady state is the best burn mode if it can be achieved. The hybrid cycle is a promising alternative to the conventional. In contrast, the internal transformer cycle does not appear attractive for the size tokamak in question

  2. Impurity control in near-term tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Smith, D.L.; Brooks, J.N.

    1976-10-01

    Several methods for reducing impurity contamination in near-term tokamak reactors by modifying the first-wall surface with a low-Z or low-sputter material are examined. A review of the sputtering data and an assessment of the technological feasibility of various wall modification schemes are presented. The power performance of a near-term tokamak reactor is simulated for various first-wall surface materials, with and without a divertor, in order to evaluate the likely effect of plasma contamination associated with these surface materials

  3. Conceptual analysis of a tokamak reactor with lithium dust jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, B.V.; Krylov, S.V.; Sergeev, V.Yu.; Skokov, V.G.; Timokhin, V.M.

    2010-01-01

    The steady-state operation of tokamak reactors requires radiating a substantial part of the fusion energy dissipated in plasma to make more uniform the heat loads onto the first wall and to reduce the erosion of the divertor plates. One of the approaches to realize this goal uses injection of lithium dust jet into the scrape-off layer (SOL). A quantitative conceptual analysis of the reactor parameters with lithium dust jet injection is presented here. The effects of the lithium on the core and SOL plasma are considered. The first results of developing the lithium jet injection technology and its application to the T-10 tokamak are also presented.

  4. UWMAK-II: a conceptual tokamak reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of a Tokamak fusion power reactor, UWMAK-II. The aim of this study is to perform a self consistent and thorough analysis of a probable future fusion power reactor in order to assess the technological problems posed by such a system and to examine feasible solutions. UWMAK-II is a conceptual Tokamak fusion reactor designed to deliver 1716 MWe continuously and to generate 5000 MW(th) during the plasma burn. The structural material is 316 stainless steel and the primary coolant is helium. UWMAK-II is a low aspect ratio, low field design and includes a double null, axisymmetric poloidal field divertor for impurity control. In addition, a carbon curtain, made of two dimensional woven carbon fiber, is mounted on the first vacuum chamber wall to protect the plasma from high Z impurities and to protect the first wall from erosion by charged particle bombardment. The blanket is designed to minimize the inventory of both tritium and lithium while achieving a breeding ratio greater than one. This has led to a blanket design based on the use of a solid breeding material (LiAlO 2 ) with beryllium as a neutron multiplier. The lithium is enriched to 90 percent 6 Li and the blanket coolant is helium at a maximum pressure of 750 psia (5.2 x 10 6 N/m 2 ). A cell of the UWMAK-II blanket design is shown. The breeding ratio is between 1.11 and 1.19 based on one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport calculations, depending on the method of homogenization. Detailed Monte Carlo calculations, which take into account the more complicated geometry, give a breeding ratio of 1.06. The total energy per fusion is 21.56 MeV, which is fairly high

  5. Near-wall plasma in a tokamak thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistunovich, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    The development of thermonuclear reactor projects such as the national ones GTRT and OTR (USSR), UWMAK-NUMAK and TIBER (USA), NET (Euratom), FER (Japan), as well as the international ones INTOR and JET allows one to determine in detail the problems arising in the creation of a reactor. One of these problems is extracting heat and particles from the reactor and removing thermonuclear reaction ash, which in the case of a DT reactor is helium. The solution of this problem is connected with the investigation of interaction processes of the plasma with the materials from which the reactor is constructed. Progress in studying the interaction of plasma with a material surface has given rise to a new division of plasma physics, which includes not only reactor problems, but also plasma-physical processes occurring in the region between the hot plasma and the first wall. Experiments on tokamaks have shown that the phenomena occurring in the wall plasma and in the hot zone of the tokamak once strongly correlated. In and number of regimes the confinement of the hot plasma is determined by the conditions in the peripheral region. A survey of the near-well plasma problem in a tokamak thermonuclear reactor is given. The results of recent investigations are presented, and the status of the problem as applied to the ITER reactor project is described

  6. Gas blanket fueling of a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gralnick, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is a speculative investigation of the potential of fueling a Tokamak by introducing a sufficiently large quantity of gaseous deuterium and tritium at the vacuum wall boundary. It is motivated by two factors: current generation tokamaks are, in a manner of speaking, fueled from the edge quite successfully as is evidenced by pulse lengths that are long compared to particle recycling times, and by rapid plasma density increase produced by gas puffing, alternative, deep penetration fueling techniques that have been proposed possess severe technological problems and large costs

  7. Revised design for the Tokamak experimental power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Brooks, J.N.

    1977-03-01

    A new, preliminary design has been identified for the tokamak experimental power reactor (EPR). The revised EPR design is simpler, more compact, less expensive and has somewhat better performance characteristics than the previous design, yet retains many of the previously developed design concepts. This report summarizes the principle features of the new EPR design, including performance and cost.

  8. Commercial tokamak reactors with resistive toroidal field magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombery, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Jassby, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Scaling relations and design concepts are developed for commercial tokamak reactors that use watercooled copper toroidal field (TF) magnets. Illustrative parameters are developed for reactors that are scaled up in size from LITE test reactor designs, which use quasi-continuous copper plate magnets. Acceptably low magnet power requirements may be attainable in a moderate beta (β = 0.065) commercial reactor with a major radius of 6.2 m. The shielding thickness and magnet size are substantially reduced relative to values in commercial reactors with superconducting magnets. Operation at high beta (β = 0.14) leads to a reduction in reactor size, magnet-stored energy, and recirculating power. Reactors using resistive TF magnets could provide advantages of physically smaller devices, improved maintenance features, and increased ruggedness and reliability

  9. Oak Ridge Tokamak experimental power reactor study scoping report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.

    1977-03-01

    This report presents the scoping studies performed as the initial part of the program to produce a conceptual design for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (EPR). The EPR as considered in this study is to employ all systems necessary for significant electric power production at continuous high duty cycle operation; it is presently scheduled to be the final technological step before a Demonstration Reactor Plant (Demo). The scoping study tasks begin with an exploration and identification of principal problem areas and then concentrate on consideration and evaluation of alternate design choices for each of the following major systems: Plasma Engineering and Physics, Nuclear, Electromagnetics, Neutral Beam Injection, and Tritium Handling. In addition, consideration has been given to the integration of these systems and requirements arising out of their incorporation into an EPR. One intent of this study is to document the paths explored in search of the appropriate EPR characteristics. To satisfy this intent, the explorations are presented in chart form outlining possible options in key areas with extensive supporting footnotes. An important result of the scoping study has been the development and definition of an EPR reference design to serve as (1) a common focus for the continuing design study and (2) a guide for associated development programs. In addition, the study has identified research and development requirements essential to facilitate the successful conceptual design, construction, and operation of an EPR.

  10. Conceptual design of a Tokamak hybrid power reactor (THPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, F.; Imamura, Y.; Inoue, M.; Asami, N.; Kasai, M.; Yanagisawa, I.; Ida, T.; Takuma, T.; Yamaji, K.; Akita, S.

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual design of a fusion-fission hybrid tokamak reactor has been carried out to investigate the engineering feasibility and promising scale of a commercial hybrid reactor power plant. A tokamak fusion driver based on the recent plasma scaling law is introduced in this design study. The major parameters and features of the reactor are R=6.06 m, a=1.66 m, Ip=11.8 MA, Pf=668 MW, double null divertor plasma and steady state burning with RF current drive. The fusion power has been determined with medium energy multiplication in the blanket so as to relieve thermal design problems and produce electric power around 1000 MW. Uranium silicide is used for the fast fission blanket material to promise good nuclear performance. The coolant of the blanket is FLIBE and the tritium breeding blanket material is Li 2 O ceramics providing breeding ratio above unity

  11. A conceptual design of superconducting spherical tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagayama, Yoshio; Shinya, Kichiro; Tanaka, Yasutoshi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fusion reactor concept named 'JUST (Japanese Universities' Super Tokamak reactor)'. From the plasma confinement system to the power generation system is evaluated in this work. JUST design has features as follows: the superconducting magnet, the steady state operation with high bootstrap current fraction, the easy replacement of neutron damaged first wall, the high heat flux in the divertor, and the low cost (or high β). By winding the OH solenoid over the center stack of toroidal field coil, we have the low aspect ratio and the 80cm thick neutron shield to protect the superconducting center stack. JUST is designed by using the 0-D transport code under the assumption that the energy confinement time is 1.8 times of the IPB98(y,2) scaling. Main parameters are as follows: the major radius of 4.5m, the aspect ratio of 1.8, the elongation ratio of 2.5, the toroidal field of 2.36T, the plasma current of 18MA, the toroidal beta of 22%, the central electron and ion temperature of 15keV and the fusion thermal power of 2.4GW. By using the mercury heat exchanger and the steam turbine, the heat efficiency is 33% and the electric power is 0.74GW. (author)

  12. Factors affecting the minimum capital cost of a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.

    1981-01-01

    The Mk IIA Culham conceptual tokamak reactor design is a 2500 MWe steady-state reactor developed on the basis of a cost optimisation. A revised 1200 MWe conceptual design, the Mk IIB, used a lower wall loading and lower thermodynamic efficiency. A detailed costing of the Mk IIB design, however, showed it to have an unacceptably high capital cost. Since this high cost is a common characteristic of many fusion reactor designs, the cost optimisation of the Mk II design has been reconsidered. (author)

  13. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Brooks, J.N. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hogan, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors.

  14. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Hogan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors

  15. Tokamak power systems studies at ANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Evans, K. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A number of advances in plasma physics and engineering promise to greatly improve the reactor prospects of tokamaks. The following features, in particular, are examined: (a) large aspect ratio (A ≅ 6), which may ease maintenance; (b) high beta (β ≥ 0.20) without indentation, which brings the maximum toroidal field down to about 7 T; (c) low toroidal current (I ≅ 5MA), which reduces the cost of the current drive and equilibrium field system; and (d) steady state operation with current density control via fast and slow wave current drive. The key to high beta operation with low toroidal current lies in utilizing second stability regime equilibria with the required current distributions produced by an appropriate selection of wave driver frequencies and power spectra. The ray tracing and current drive calculation is self-consistent with the actual magnetic fields produced in the plasma. In addition to matching desirable high-beta equilibria, this method is capable of producing a large variety of new equilibria, many of which look attractive. The impurity control activities in TPSS have emphasized the self-pumping concept as applied to using the entire first wall or ''slot'' limiters. The blanket design effort has emphasized liquid metal and Flibe concepts. The reference concept is a liquid lithium/vanadium, self-cooled configuration. Overall, there exists a number of major design improvements which will substantially improve the attractiveness of tokamak reactors

  16. Afterheat assessment for conceptual tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddard, A.J.H.; Jayatissa, S.

    1987-01-01

    Afterheat represents an important consideration in design of conceptual fusion power reactors, particularly during normal or unplanned shutdown. Afterheat calculations have been undertaken for various generic designs, but with special reference to the Culham DEMO reactor. These calculations have included the redistribution of heating by gamma ray transport. Selected temperature response calculations have been undertaken. (author)

  17. Tokamak fusion reactors with less than full tritium breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Gilligan, J.G.; Jung, J.

    1983-05-01

    A study of commercial, tokamak fusion reactors with tritium concentrations and tritium breeding ratios ranging from full deuterium-tritium operation to operation with no tritium breeding is presented. The design basis for these reactors is similar to those of STARFIRE and WILDCAT. Optimum operating temperatures, sizes, toroidal field strengths, and blanket/shield configurations are determined for a sequence of reactor designs spanning the range of tritium breeding, each having the same values of beta, thermal power, and first-wall heat load. Additional reactor parameters, tritium inventories and throughputs, and detailed costs are calculated for each reactor design. The disadvantages, advantages, implications, and ramifications of tritium-depleted operation are presented and discussed

  18. A conceptual design of a negative-ion-grounded advanced tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shin; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Tani, Keiji

    1988-05-01

    The NAVIGATOR concept is based on the negative-ion-grounded 500 keV 20 MW neutral beam injection system (NBI system), which has been proposed and studied at JAERI. The NAVIGATOR concept contains two categories; one is the NAVIGATOR machine as a tokamak reactor, and the other is the NAVIGATOR philosophy as a guiding principle in fusion research. The NAVIGATOR machine implies an NBI heated and full inductive ramped-up reactor. The NAVIGATOR concept should be applied in a phased approach to and beyond the operating goal for the FER (Fusion Experimental Reactor, the next generation tokamak machine in Japan). The mission of the FER is to realize self-ignition and a long controlled burn of about 800 seconds and to develop and test fusion technologies, including the tritium fuel cycle, superconducting magnet, remote maintenance and breeding blanket test modules. The NAVIGATOR concept is composed of three major elements, that is, reliable operation scenarios, reliable maintenability and sufficient flexibility of the reactor. The NAVIGATOR concept well supports the ideas of phased operation and phased construction of the FER, which will result in the reduction of technological risk. The NAVIGATOR concept is expected to bring forth the fruits growing up in the present large tokamak machines in the form of next generation machines. In addition, the NAVIGATOR concept will supply many required databases for the DEMO reactor. The details of the NAVIGATOR concept is described in this paper, and the concept may indicate a feasible strategy for developing fusion research. (author)

  19. MHD equilibrium properties of tokamak fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, A.M.M.; Gralnick, S.L.; Dalhed, H.E.

    1976-01-01

    The equilibrium properties of several Tokamak Reactor Designs are analyzed and compared for varying pressure and current profiles using the Princeton Equilibrium Code. It is found that the UWMAK configuration has a broader range of equilibria than the Princeton Reference Design configuration, but that the safety factor on axis is less than unity for peaked current distributions. The Argonne Experimental Power Reactor has a satisfactory range of equilibria, but a means of limiting or diverting the plasma has not yet been proposed, and this may substantially change the results obtained

  20. TIBER II: an upgraded tokamak igntion/burn experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.

    1986-01-01

    We are disIgning a minimum-size Tokamak ignition/Burn Reactor (TIBER II). This design incorporates physics requirements, neutron wall loading and fluence parameters that will make it compatible with a nuclear testing mission. Reactor relevant physics will be tested by using current drive and steady-state operation. Although the design accommodates several current drive options, including neutral beams, the base case uses a combination of lower hybrid and electron-cyclotron radio frequency power. Minimum neutron shielding, compact structures, high magnet-current densities, and remotely maintainable vacuum seals, all contribute to the compact size

  1. Resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnavarns, J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1980-11-01

    This paper analyzes the optimization of the geometry of resistive TF coils of rectangular bore for tokamak fusion test reactors and practical neutron generators. In examining the trade-offs between geometric parameters and magnetic field for reactors giving a specified neutron wall loading, either the resistive power loss or the lifetime coil cost can be minimized. Aspects of cooling, magnetic stress, and construction are addressed for several reference designs. Bending moment distributions in closed form have been derived for rectangular coils on the basis of the theory of rigid frames. Candidate methods of fabrication and of implementing demountable joints are summarized

  2. The ARIES-II and ARIES-IV second-stability tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, F.; Conn, R.W.; Hasan, M.Z.; Mau, T.-K.; Sharafat, S.; Baxi, C.B.; Leuer, J.A.; McQuillan, B.W.; Puhn, F.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Wong, C.P.C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.; Hua, T.; Hull, A.; Mattis, R.; Picologlou, B.; Sze, D.-K.; Dolan, T.J.; Herring, J.S.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Werley, K.A.; Bromberg, L.; Schultz, J.; Davis, F.; Holmes, J.A.; Lousteau, D.C.; Strickler, D.J.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.; Snead, L.; Steiner, D.; Valenti, M.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Emmert, G.A.; Khater, H.Y.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Cheng, E.T.

    1992-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-I design is a DT-burning reactor based on modest extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. The ARIES-III study focuses on the potential of tokamaks to operate with D- 3 He fuel system as an alternative to deuterium and tritium. The ARIES-II and ARIES-IV designs have the same fusion plasma but different fusion-power-core designs. The ARIES-II reactor uses liquid lithium as the coolant and tritium breeder and vanadium alloy as the structural material in order to study the potential of low-activation metallic blankets. The ARIES-IV reactor uses helium as the coolant, a solid tritium-breeding material, and silicon carbide composite as the structural material in order to achieve the safety and environmental characteristic of fusion. In this paper the authors describe the trade-off leading to the optimum regime of operation for the ARIES-II and ARIES-IV second-stability reactors and review the engineering design of the fusion power cores

  3. Contour analysis of steady state tokamak reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoto, R.S.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    A new method of analysis for presenting the possible operating space for steady state, non-ignited tokamak reactors is proposed. The method uses contours of reactor performance and plasma characteristics, fusion power gain, wall neutron flux, current drive power, etc., plotted on a two-dimensional grid, the axes of which are the plasma current I p and the normalized beta, β n = β/(I p /aB 0 ), to show possible operating points. These steady state operating contour plots are called SOPCONS. This technique is illustrated in an application to a design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) with neutral beam, lower hybrid and bootstrap current drive. The utility of the SOPCON plots for pointing out some of the non-intuitive considerations in steady state reactor design is shown. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 16 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  4. Tandem mirror and tokamak reactor maintainability comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis proceeds through estimates of downtime and resources required for selected maintenance actions and optimization of the replacement fraction, availability and cost of electricity. Scheduled downtime estimates and availability goals provide a basis for determining allowable forced outage downtimes. These analyses have been conducted with the assumption of redundancy wherever feasible but without the impact of maintenance equipment outages. Annual maintenance cost estimates and availabilities for both reactors are found to be approximately equal. However, the tandem mirror reactor capital costs are higher. Reduction of these costs appears feasible with the trend of current design studies toward smaller and more accessible machines

  5. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M. J.; De Esch, H. P. L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H- accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

  6. Safety analysis of superconducting toroidal field magnet for tokamak experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    Safety analysis of the superconducting toroidal field magnet for a Tokamak experimental fusion reactor has been carried out. Works were accident classification, FMEA and FTA analyses, coil stability and quench behavior calculations, failure detection and coil protection system designs, structure analysis, fracture and fatigue studies, and earthquake response analysis. Accident analysis of cryostat and refrigeration system was also performed. The objective of this work is to reveal technological problems of the toroidal field magnet by safety analysis. (author)

  7. Insulator applications in a Tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, D.

    1986-06-01

    Insulators, among which insulators ceramics, have great potential applications in fusion reactors. They will be used for all plasma-facing components as protection and, magnetic fusion devices being subject to large electrical currents flowing in any parts of the device, for their electrical insulating properties

  8. Design study of toroidal magnets for tokamak experimental power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekly, Z.J.J.; Lucas, E.J.

    1976-12-01

    This report contains the results of a six-month study of superconducting toroidal field coils for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to be built in the late 1980s. The designs are for 8 T and 12 T maximum magnetic field at the superconducting winding. At each field level two main concepts were generated; one in which each of the 16 coils comprising the system has an individual vacuum vessel and the other in which all the coils are contained in a single vacuum vessel. The coils have a D shape and have openings of 11.25 m x 7.5 m for the 8 T coils and 10.2 m x 6.8 m for the 12 T coils. All the designs utilize rectangular cabled conductor made from copper stabilized Niobium Titanium composite which operates at 4.2 K for the 8 T design and at 2.5 K for the 12 T design. Manufacturing procedures, processes and schedule estimates are also discussed

  9. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to operate at net electrical power conditions with a plant capacity factor of 50 percent for 10 years. The EPR operates in a pulsed mode at a frequency of approximately 1/min., with an approximate 75 percent duty cycle, is capable of producing approximately 72 MWe and requires 42 MWe. The annual tritium consumption is 16 kg. The EPR vacuum chamber is 6.25 m in major radius and 2.4 m in minor radius, is constructed of 2-cm thick stainless steel, and has 2-cm thick detachable, beryllium-coated coolant panels mounted on the interior. An 0.28 m stainless steel blanket and a shield ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 m surround the vacuum vessel. The coolant is H 2 O. Sixteen niobium-titanium superconducting toroidal-field coils provide a field of 10 T at the coil and 4.47 T at the plasma. Superconducting ohmic-heating and equilibrium-field coils provide 135 V-s to drive the plasma current. Plasma heating is accomplished by 12 neutral beam-injectors, which provide 60 MW. The energy transfer and storage system consists of a central superconducting storage ring, a homopolar energy storage unit, and a variety of inductor-converters

  10. Diamond Wire Cutting of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Robert Parsells

    2003-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 MeV neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies, while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the technology was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. Ten complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of DandD (Decontamination and Decommissioning) activity

  11. Plasma features and alpha particle transport in low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qiang; Wang Shaojie

    1997-06-01

    The results of the experiment and theory from low-aspect ratio tokamak devices have proved that the MHD stability will be improved. Based on present plasma physics and extrapolation to reduced aspect ratio, the feature of physics of low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor is discussed primarily. Alpha particle confinement and loss in the self-justified low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor parameters and the effect of alpha particle confinement and loss for different aspect ratio are calculated. The results provide a reference for the feasible research of compact tokamak reactor. (9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.)

  12. Oak Ridge Tokamak experimental power reactor study reference design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.; Bettis, E.S.

    1975-11-01

    A Tokamak EPR Reference Design is presented as a basis for further design study leading to a Conceptual Design. The set of basic plasma parameters selected--minor radius of 2.25 m, major radius of 6.75 m, magnetic field on axis of 4.8 T and plasma current of 7.2 MA--should produce a reactor-grade plasma with a significant neutron flux, even with the great uncertainty in plasma physics scaling from present experience to large sizes. Neutronics and heat transfer calculations coupled with mechanical design and materials considerations were used to develop a blanket and shield capable of operating at high temperature, protecting the surrounding coils, being maintained remotely and, in a few experimental modules, breeding tritium. Nb 3 Sn and NbTi superconductors are used in the toroidal field coil design. The coil system was developed for a maximum field of 11 T at the winding (to give a field on axis of 4.8 T), and combines multifilamentary superconducting cable with forced flow of supercritical helium enclosed in a steel conduit. The structural system uses a stainless steel center bucking ring and intercoil box beam bracing to provide rigid support for coils against the centering force, overturning moments from poloidal fields and faults, other external forces, and thermal stresses. The poloidal magnetics system is specially designed both to reduce the total volt-second energy requirements and to reduce the magnitude of the rate of field change at the toroidal field coils. The rate of field change imposed upon the toroidal field coils is reduced by at least a factor of 3.3 compared to that due to the plasma alone. Tritium processing, tritium containment and vacuum systems employ double containment and atmospheric cleanup to minimize releases. The document also contains discussions of systems integration and assembly, key research and development needs, and schedule considerations

  13. The ARIES-I high-field-tokamak reactor: Design-point determination and parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The multi-institutional ARIES study has examined the physics, technology, safety, and economic issues associated with the conceptual design of a tokamak magnetic-fusion reactor. The ARIES-I variant envisions a DT-fueled device based on advanced superconducting coil, blanket, and power-conversion technologies and a modest extrapolation of existing tokamak physics. A comprehensive systems and trade study has been conducted as an integral and ongoing part of the reactor assessment in order to identify an acceptable design point to be subjected to detailed analysis and integration as well as to characterize the ARIES-I operating space. Results of parametric studies leading to the identification of such a design point are presented. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  15. Neutronics and photonics calculations for the tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Baker, V.C.; Barnes, J.M.

    1977-03-01

    The results of one-dimensional neutronic and photonic calculations that compare the nuclear performance of blanket and shield designs proposed for use in the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor are presented. The nuclear analysis was carried out for both nonbreeding and tritium-breeding blanket modules to compare the spatial variations of the radiation flux and energy distributions, nuclear heating, radiation damage, and tritium breeding. Nonbreeding blanket modules that contain potassium plus SS-316 or potassium only as the energy-absorbing medium and breeding blankets that use natural lithium as the fertile material were evaluated as a function of the first-wall cooling scheme

  16. A concept of drastically easy maintenance (DREAM) tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Murakami, Y.; Adachi, J.; Miura, H.; Aoki, I.; Seki, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Here, a new concept of easy maintenance tokamak reactor is proposed. For the easy maintenance scheme, a plasma configuration with high aspect ratio (with slender doughnut shape) around 6 and a small number of torus sectoring of 12 are introduced. The adjacent torus sectors are mechanically jointed by a bolt/flange structure. A plasma vacuum region is comprised of a cryostat inner surface and 12 horizontal access doors. Overall machine size is determined from a fusion power of 3 GW and almost 100% bootstrap current within moderate Troyon coefficient of 3.5, MHD safety factor of 5 and plasma elongation of 1.6. (author)

  17. OTR-experimental fusion-fission tokamak-reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadomtsev, B.B.; Kolbasov, B.N.; Orlov, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    An original concept of OTR-experimental hybrid fusion-fission tokamak-reactor is given. Tendencies to probable changes in the reactor parameters and some engineering alternatives are discussed. The feasibility of ''non-chemical'' fuel cycle with direct neutron enrichment (in the fusion-fission reactor blanket) of the fuel elements made of depleted uranium for their use in fission reactors is considered. Advantages and shortcomings of the blanket cooling with water, liquid metal and with a gas are briefly discussed. The parameters of experimental and commercial fusion-fission reactors and a composition of the nuclear fuel unloaded from such reactors are given. An option for the detail design which should be done by us needs some corrections in plasma geometry and in other parameters with account taken of new experimental and theoretical results, as well as that of the estimates and comparison of different engineering solutions referred to the plasma engineering, electrophysical and nuclear engineering aspects of the design. An initial OTR-concept, the tendencies to the correction of parameters and some engineering alternatives studied in the present stage of design are discussed in the paper. 12 refs, 2 tabs

  18. Neutral-beam-injected tokamak fusion reactors: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1976-08-01

    The theories of energetic-ion velocity distributions, stability, injection, and orbits were summarized. The many-faceted role of the energetic ions in plasma heating, fueling, and current maintenance, as well as in the direct enhancement of fusion power multiplication and power density, is discussed in detail for three reactor types. The relevant implications of recent experimental results on several beam-injected tokamaks are examined. The behavior of energetic ions is found to be in accordance with classical theory, large total ion energy densities are readily achieved, and plasma equilibrium and stability are maintained. The status of neutral-beam injectors and of conceptual design studies of beam-driven reactors are briefly reviewed. The principal plasma-engineering problems are those associated directly with achieving quasi-stationary operation

  19. Electromagnetic effects involving a tokamak reactor first wall and blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Evans, K. Jr.; Gelbard, E.; Prater, R.

    1980-01-01

    Four electromagnetic effects experienced by the first wall and blanket of a tokamak reactor are considered. First, the first wall provides reduction of the growth rate of vertical axisymmetric instability and stabilization of low mode number interval kink modes. Second, if a rapid plasma disruption occurs, a current will be induced on the first wall, tending to maintain the field formerly produced by the plasma. Third, correction of plasma movement can begin on a time scale much faster than the L/R time of the first wall and blanket. Fourth, field changes, especially those from plasma disruption or from rapid discharge of a toroidal field coil, can cause substantial eddy current forces on elements of the first wall and blanket. These effects are considered specifically for the first wall and blanket of the STARFIRE commercial reactor design study

  20. Manufacturing aspects of toroidal field magnets for tokamak power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    The manufacturing aspects of two different toroidal field (TF) coils are discussed briefly. The first of these is the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) TF coil, which is presently in the design phase at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The second coil configuration reflects a reference design for a large experimental power reactor (EPR) which originated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This configuration was used by the Grumman Aerospace Corporation of Bethpage, N.Y. as the basis for an investigation of the manufacturing aspects of a large superconducting TF coil, the results of which are summarized. For each of these coils, the major characteristics of the design are first briefly described and the significant manufacturing aspects are then summarized

  1. Tritium pellet injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma phase. An existing deuterium pellet injector (DPI) was modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed for frozen pellets ranging in size from 3 to 4 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at tritium pellet speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller (PLC). The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were also made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellets. Results of the testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI has been installed and operated on TFTR in support of the CY-92 deuterium plasma run period. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and tritium gloveboxes and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability

  2. Application of advanced composites in tokamak magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, C.J.

    1977-11-01

    The use of advanced (high-modulus) composites in superconducting magnets for tokamak fusion reactors is discussed. The most prominent potential application is as the structure in the pulsed poloidal-field coil system, where a significant reduction in eddy currents could be achieved. Present low-temperature data on the advanced composites are reviewed briefly; they are too meager to do more than suggest a broad class of composites for a particular application

  3. Reactor costs and maintenance, with reference to the Culham Mark II conceptual tokamak reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.; Mitchell, J.T.D.

    1977-01-01

    Published designs of tokamak reactors have proposed conceptual solutions for most of the technological problems encountered. Two areas which remain uncertain, however, are the capital cost of the reactor and the practicability of reactor maintenance. A cost estimate for the Culham Conceptual Tokamak Reactor (Mk I) is presented. The capital cost of a power station incorporating this reactor would be significantly higher than that of an equivalent fast breeder fission power station, mainly because of the low power density of the fusion reactor which affects both the reactor and building costs. To reduce the fusion station capital costs a new conceptual design is proposed (Mk II) which incorporates a shaped plasma cross-section to give a higher plasma pressure ratio, βsub(t) approximately 0.1. Since the higher power density implies more severe radiation damage of the blanket structure, the question of reactor maintenance assumes greater importance. With the proposed scheme for regular replacement of the blanket, a fusion power station availability around 0.9 should be achievable. (author)

  4. PPPL tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1984-10-01

    The economic prospects of the tokamak are reviewed briefly and found to be favorable - if the size of ignited tokamak plasmas can be kept small and appropriate auxiliary systems can be developed. The main objectives of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory tokamak program are: (1) exploration of the physics of high-temperature toroidal confinement, in TFTR; (2) maximization of the tokamak beta value, in PBX; (3) development of reactor-relevant rf techniques, in PLT

  5. Maintenance oriented tokamak reactor with low activation material and high aspect ratio configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Ueda, S.; Aoki, I.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the difficulties of maintenance of a tokamak system are due to the radioactivity of its materials and the complexity of its configuration. To mitigate the difficulties, very low activation SiC/SiC composite material and a torus configuration with a high aspect ratio of eight are introduced. The torus system is divided radially into equal sectors, each of which forms an assembling unit. All piping and feeder systems are shifted to the spacious central torus region. The new concept is called DREAM tokamak reactor, which is an acronym for DRastically EAsy Maintenance. The maximum toroidal field strength of 20 T and the plasma major and minor radii of 16 m and 2 m lead to a high fusion power of 5.5 GW, under moderate physics constraints such as an MHD safety factor of three, a Troyon factor of three for the beta limit and an energy confinement time enhancement factor of two. (author)

  6. Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meglicki, Z.

    1995-01-01

    We describe in detail the implementation of a weighted differences code, which is used to simulate a tokamak using the Maschke-Perrin solution as an initial condition. The document covers the mainlines of the program and the most important problem-specific functions used in the initialization, static tests, and dynamic evolution of the system. The mathematics of the Maschke-Perrin solution is discussed in parallel with its realisation within the code. The results of static and dynamic tests are presented in sections discussing their implementation.The code can also be obtained by ftp -anonymous from cisr.anu.edu.au Directory /pub/papers/meglicki/src/tokamak. This code is copyrighted. (author). 13 refs

  7. Recent developments in engineering and technology concepts for prospective tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, G.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The tokamak has become the most developed magnetic fusion system and it appears likely that break-even and possibly ignition will first be demonstrated in existing machines of this type. Yet larger tokamaks could also demonstrate the essential technologies for the production of useful power. World-wide, well over a hundred tritium-breeder/heat-removal blanket concepts have been devised and preliminary engineering design studies undertaken, but the effort deployed on breeding and power recovery systems has been very small compared with that assigned to plasma research and development. The European Communities' NET (Next European Torus) project may offer an opportunity to redress this imbalance. The NET pre-design stage now in progress for some three years has selected many of the best features of plasma and nuclear design from the world's total efforts in these fields, and the NET concept is described in this paper as exemplifying where magnetic fusion power reactor technology stands today. It is concluded that although there are numerous more advanced types of magnetic confinement fusion reactor at early stages of their physics development, the tokamak offers the best opportunity for the early demonstration of fusion power

  8. An advanced conceptual Tokamak fusion power reactor utilizing closed cycle helium gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    UWMAK-III is a conceptual Tokamak reactor designed to study the potential and the problems associated with an advanced version of Tokamaks as power reactors. Design choices have been made which represent reasonable extrapolations of present technology. The major features are the noncircular plasma cross section, the use of TZM, a molybdenum based alloy, as the primary structural material, and the incorporation of a closed-cycle helium gas turbine power conversion system. A conceptual design of the turbomachinery is given together with a preliminary heat exchanger analysis that results in relatively compact designs for the generator, precooler, and intercooler. This paper contains a general description of the UWMAK-III system and a discussion of those aspects of the reactor, such as the burn cycle, the blanket design and the heat transfer analysis, which are required to form the basis for discussing the power conversion system. The authors concentrate on the power conversion system and include a parametric performance analysis, an interface and trade-off study and a description of the reference conceptual design of the closed-cycle helium gas turbine power conversion system. (Auth.)

  9. Status report on the conceptual design of a commercial tokamak hybrid reactor (CTHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    A preliminary conceptual design is presented for an early twenty-first century fusion hybrid reactor called the Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR). This design was developed as a first generation commercial plant producing fissile fuel to support a significant number of client Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants. The study has been made in sufficient depth to indicate no insurmountable technical problems exist and has provided a basis for valid cost estimates of the hybrid plants as well as the hybrid/LWR system busbar electricity costs. This energy system can be optimized to have a net cost of busbar electricity that is equivalent to the conventional LWR plant, yet is not dependent on uranium ore prices or standard enrichment costs, since the fusion hybrid can be fueled by numerous fertile fuel resources

  10. Status report on the conceptual design of a commercial tokamak hybrid reactor (CTHR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    A preliminary conceptual design is presented for an early twenty-first century fusion hybrid reactor called the Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR). This design was developed as a first generation commercial plant producing fissile fuel to support a significant number of client Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants. The study has been made in sufficient depth to indicate no insurmountable technical problems exist and has provided a basis for valid cost estimates of the hybrid plants as well as the hybrid/LWR system busbar electricity costs. This energy system can be optimized to have a net cost of busbar electricity that is equivalent to the conventional LWR plant, yet is not dependent on uranium ore prices or standard enrichment costs, since the fusion hybrid can be fueled by numerous fertile fuel resources.

  11. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, E.L.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transport power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve

  12. Locking mechanism for in-vessel components of tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Shimizu, K.; Koizumi, K.; Tada, E.

    1992-01-01

    The locking and unlocking mechanism for in-vessel replaceable components such as blanket modules, is one of the most critical issues of the tokamak fusion reactor, since the sufficient stiffness against the enormous electromagnetic loads and the easy replaceability are required. In this paper, the authors decide that a caulking cotter joint is worth initiating the R and D from veiwpoints of an effective use of space, a replaceability, a removability of nuclear heating, and a reliability. In this approach, the cotter driving (thrusting and plucking) mechanism is a critical technology. A flexible tube concept has been developed as the driving mechanism, where the stroke and driving force are obtained by a fat shape by the hydraulic pressure. The original normal tube is subjected to the working percentage of more than several hundreds percentage (from thickness of 1.2 mm to 0.2 mm) for plastically forming the flexible tube

  13. Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D ampersand D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D ampersand D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D ampersand D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates

  14. Generalized saddle point condition for ignition in a tokamak reactor with temperature and density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitari, O.; Hirose, A.; Skarsgard, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, the concept of a generalized ignition contour map, is extended to the realistic case of a plasma with temperature and density profiles in order to study access to ignition in a tokamak reactor. The generalized saddle point is found to lie between the Lawson and ignition conditions. If the height of the operation path with Goldston L-mode scaling is higher than the generalized saddle point, a reactor can reach ignition with this scaling for the case with no confinement degradation effect due to alpha-particle heating. In this sense, the saddle point given in a general form is a new criterion for reaching ignition. Peaking the profiles for the plasma temperature and density can lower the height of the generalized saddle point and help a reactor to reach ignition. With this in mind, the authors can judge whether next-generation tokamaks, such as Compact Ignition Tokamak, Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor, Next European Torus, Fusion Experimental Reactor, International Tokamak Reactor, and AC Tokamak Reactor, can reach ignition with realistic profile parameters and an L-mode scaling law

  15. The ARIES-III D-3He tokamak reactor: Design-point determination and parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Werley, K.A.; Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Santarius, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    The multi-institutional ARIES study has generated a conceptual design of another tokamak fusion reactor in a series that varies the assumed advances in technology and physics. The ARIES-3 design uses a D- 3 He fuel cycle and requires advances in technology and physics for economical attractiveness. The optimal design was characterized through systems analyses for eventual conceptual engineering design. Results from the systems analysis are summarized, and a comparison with the high-field, D-T fueled ARIES-1 is included. 11 refs., 5 figs

  16. Development of large insulator rings for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.; Tobin, A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses research and development leading to the manufacture of large ceramic insulator rings for the TFTR (TOKAMAK Fusion Test Reactor). Material applications, fabrication approach and testing activities are highlighted

  17. Safety analyses of the ARIES tokamak reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.S.; McCarthy, K.A.; Dolan, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    The ARIES design has sought to maximize environmental and safety advantages of fusion through careful selection of materials and design. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor design consists of an SiC composite structure for the first wall and blanket, cooled by 10MPa helium. The breeder is Li 2 ZrO 3 . The divertor consists of SiC composite tubes coated with 2mm tungsten. Loss-of-cooling accident (LOCA) calculations indicate maximum temperatures will not cause damage if the plasma is promptly extinguished. The ARIES-II design includes liquid lithium and vanadium, both of which have low activation, multiple barriers between the lithium and air and an inert cover gas to prevent lithium-air reactions. The ARIES-II reactor is passively safe with a total 1km early dose of about 88rem (0.88Sv). ARIES-III was an extensive examination of the viability of a D- 3 He fueled tokamak power reactor. Because neutrons are produced only through side reactions (D+D→ 3 He+n, and D+D→T+p followed by D+T→ 4 He+n), the reactor has a reduced activation of the first wall and shield, low afterheat and class A or C low level waste disposal. Since no tritium is required for operation, no lithium-containing breeding blanket is necessary. We modeled a LOCA in which the organic coolant was burning in order to estimate the amount of radionuclides released from the first wall. Because the maximum temperature is low, below 600 C, release fractions are small. We analyzed the disposition of the 20g per day of tritium that is produced by D-D reactions and removed by vacuum pumps. The ARIES-IV coolant is helium and the breeder is lithium oxide. The structure is silicon carbide. Since the neutron multiplier, beryllium metal, is combustible, releasing about 60MJkg -1 , beryllium is the chief source of chemical energy. Less than 10% of the 24 Na inventory is likely to diffuse out of the SiC during a fire in which the beryllium is consumed. Therefore, the offsite dose would be less than 200rem. ((orig.))

  18. Tokamak power system studies at ANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Evans, K. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    The following features, in particular, have been examined: (a) large aspect ratio (A ≅ 6), which may ease maintenance; (b) high beta (β ≥ 0.20) without indentation, which brings the maximum toroidal field down to about 6 to 7 T; (c) low toroidal current (I ≅ 4MA), which reduces the cost of the current drive and equilibrium field system; and (d) steady state operation with current density control via fast and slow wave current drive. The key to high beta operation with low toroidal current lies in utilizing second stability regime equilibria with the required current distributions produced by an appropriate selection of wave driver frequencies and power spectra. The ray tracing and current drive calculation is self-consistent with the actual magnetic fields they produce in the plasma. The impurity control activities in TPSS have emphasized the self-pumping concept as applied to using the entire first wall or ''slot'' limiters. The blanket design effort has emphasized liquid metal and Flibe concepts. The reference concept is a liquid lithium/vanadium, self-cooled configuration. Overall, there exists a number of major design improvements which will substantially improve the attractiveness of tokamak reactors

  19. First wall and blanket design for the STARFIRE commercial tokamak power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, G.D.; Trachsel, C.A.; Cramer, B.A.; Bowers, D.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The first wall and blanket design concepts being evaluated for the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor study are presented. The two concepts represent different approaches to the mechanical design of a tritium breeding blanket using the reference materials options. Each concept has a separate ferritic steel first wall cooled by heavy water (D 2 O), and a ferritic steel blanket with solid lithium oxide breeder cooled by helium. A separate helium purge system is used in both concepts to extract tritium. The two concepts are compared and relative advantages and disadvantages for each are discussed

  20. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncher, B.R.; Chi, J.W.H.; Fernandez, R.

    1976-01-01

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended

  1. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  2. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Adler, J.H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.

    1994-09-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to ∼9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the PFUS ∼6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at PFUS > 7 MW and its effect on performance in under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored

  3. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosea, J.; Adler, J.H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Anderson, J.L.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-11-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to {approximately}9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the P{sub FUS} {approximately}6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at P{sub FUS} > 7 MW and its effect on performance is under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored.

  4. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosea, J.; Adler, J.H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D. [and others

    1994-09-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to {approx}9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the PFUS {approx}6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at PFUS > 7 MW and its effect on performance in under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored.

  5. Proposed tokamak poloidal field system development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.; Vogel, H.F.; Warren, R.W.; Weldon, D.M.

    1977-05-01

    A program is proposed to develop poloidal field components for TNS and EPR size tokamak devices and to test these components in realistic circuits. Emphasis is placed upon the development of the most difficult component, the superconducting ohmic-heating coil. Switches must also be developed for testing the coils, and this switching technology is to be extended to meet the requirements for the large scale tokamaks. Test facilities are discussed; power supplies, including a homopolar to drive the coils, are considered; and poloidal field systems studies are proposed.

  6. Potential minimum cost of electricity of superconducting coil tokamak power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Peng, Y-K. M.

    1989-01-01

    The potential minimum cost of electricity (COE) for superconducting tokamak power reactors is estimated by increasing the physics (confinement, beta limit, bootstrap current fraction) and technology [neutral beam energy, toroidal field (TF) coil allowable stresses, divertor heat flux, superconducting coil critical field, critical temperature, and quench temperature rise] constraints far beyond those assumed for ITER until the point of diminishing returns is reached. A version of the TETRA systems code, calibrated with the ITER design and modified for power reactors, is used for this analysis, limiting this study to reactors with the same basic device configuration and costing algorithms as ITER. A minimum COE is reduced from >200 to about 80 mill/kWh when the allowable design constraints are raised to 2 times those of ITER. At 4 times the ITER allowables, a minimum COE of about 60 mill/kWh is obtained. The corresponding tokamak has a major radius of approximately 4 m, a plasma current close to 10 MA, an aspect ratio of 4, a confinement H- factor ≤3, a beta limit of approximately 2 times the first stability regime, a divertor heat flux of about 20 MW/m 2 , a Β max ≤ 18 T, and a TF coil average current density about 3 times that of ITER. The design constraints that bound the minimum COE are the allowable stresses in the TF coil, the neutral beam energy, and the 99% bootstrap current (essentially free current drive). 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Vulcan: A steady-state tokamak for reactor-relevant plasma–material interaction science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olynyk, G.M.; Hartwig, Z.S.; Whyte, D.G.; Barnard, H.S.; Bonoli, P.T.; Bromberg, L.; Garrett, M.L.; Haakonsen, C.B.; Mumgaard, R.T.; Podpaly, Y.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new scaling for obtaining reactor similarity in the divertor of scaled tokamaks. ► Conceptual design for a tokamak (“Vulcan”) to implement this new scaling. ► Demountable superconducting coils and compact neutron shielding. ► Helium-cooled high-temperature vacuum vessel and first wall. ► High-field-side lower hybrid current drive for non-inductive operation. - Abstract: An economically viable magnetic-confinement fusion reactor will require steady-state operation and high areal power density for sufficient energy output, and elevated wall/blanket temperatures for efficient energy conversion. These three requirements frame, and couple to, the challenge of plasma–material interaction (PMI) for fusion energy sciences. Present and planned tokamaks are not designed to simultaneously meet these criteria. A new and expanded set of dimensionless figures of merit for PMI have been developed. The key feature of the scaling is that the power flux across the last closed flux surface P/S ≃ 1 MW m −2 is to be held constant, while scaling the core volume-averaged density weakly with major radius, n ∼ R −2/7 . While complete similarity is not possible, this new “P/S” or “PMI” scaling provides similarity for the most critical reactor PMI issues, compatible with sufficient current drive efficiency for non-inductive steady-state core scenarios. A conceptual design is developed for Vulcan, a compact steady-state deuterium main-ion tokamak which implements the P/S scaling rules. A zero-dimensional core analysis is used to determine R = 1.2 m, with a conventional reactor aspect ratio R/a = 4.0, as the minimum feasible size for Vulcan. Scoping studies of innovative fusion technologies to support the Vulcan PMI mission were carried out for three critical areas: a high-temperature, helium-cooled vacuum vessel and divertor design; a demountable superconducting toroidal field magnet system; and a steady-state lower hybrid current drive system

  8. Broadband measurements of electron cyclotron emission in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] using a quasi-optical light collection system and a polarizing Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauffer, F.J.; Boyd, D.A.; Cutler, R.C.; Diesso, M.; McCarthy, M.P.; Montague, J.; Rocco, R.

    1988-04-01

    For the past three years, a Fourier transform spectrometer diagnostic system, employing a fast-scanning polarizing Michelson interferometer, has been operating on the TFTR tokamak at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It is used to measure the electron cyclotron emission spectrum over the range 2.5 to 18 cm/sup /minus/1/ (75-540 GHz) with a resolution of 0.123 cm/sup /minus/1/(3.7 GHz), at a rate of 72 spectra per second. The quasi-optical system for collecting the light and transporting it through the interferometer to the detector has been designed using the concepts of both Gaussian and geometrical optics in order to produce a system that is efficient over the entire spectral range. The commerical Michelson interferometer was custom-made for this project and is at the state of the art for this type of specialized instrument. Various pre-installation and post-installation tests of the optical system and the interferometer were performed and are reported here. An error propagation analysis of the absolute calibration process is given. Examples of electron cyclotron emission spectra measured in two polarization directions are given, and electron temperature profiles derived from each of them are compared. 34 refs., 17 figs

  9. Broadband measurements of electron cyclotron emission in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) using a quasi-optical light collection system and a polarizing Michelson interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, F.J.; Boyd, D.A.; Cutler, R.C.; Diesso, M.; McCarthy, M.P.; Montague, J.; Rocco, R.

    1988-04-01

    For the past three years, a Fourier transform spectrometer diagnostic system, employing a fast-scanning polarizing Michelson interferometer, has been operating on the TFTR tokamak at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It is used to measure the electron cyclotron emission spectrum over the range 2.5 to 18 cm/sup /minus/1/ (75-540 GHz) with a resolution of 0.123 cm/sup /minus/1/(3.7 GHz), at a rate of 72 spectra per second. The quasi-optical system for collecting the light and transporting it through the interferometer to the detector has been designed using the concepts of both Gaussian and geometrical optics in order to produce a system that is efficient over the entire spectral range. The commerical Michelson interferometer was custom-made for this project and is at the state of the art for this type of specialized instrument. Various pre-installation and post-installation tests of the optical system and the interferometer were performed and are reported here. An error propagation analysis of the absolute calibration process is given. Examples of electron cyclotron emission spectra measured in two polarization directions are given, and electron temperature profiles derived from each of them are compared. 34 refs., 17 figs.

  10. Study of an optimal configuration of a transmutation reactor based on a low-aspect-ratio tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Bong Guen; Kim, Hoseok

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Optimum configuration of a transmutation reactor based on a low aspect ratio tokamak was found. • Inboard and outboard radial build are determined by plasma physics, engineering and neutronics constraints. • Radial build and equilibrium fuel cycle play a major role in determining the transmutation characteristics. - Abstract: We determine the optimal configuration of a transmutation reactor based on a low-aspect-ratio tokamak. For self-consistent determination of the radial build of the reactor components, we couple a tokamak systems analysis with a radiation transport calculation. The inboard radial build of the reactor components is obtained from plasma physics and engineering constraints, while outboard radial builds are mainly determined by constraints on neutron multiplication, the tritium-breeding ratio, and the power density. We show that the breeding blanket model has an effect on the radial build of a transmutation blanket. A burn cycle has to be determined to keep the fast neutron fluence plasma-facing material below its radiation damage limit. We show that the radial build of the transmutation reactor components and the equilibrium fuel cycle play a major role in determining the transmutation characteristics.

  11. Tore Supra. Basic design Tokamak system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.; Bareyt, B.; Bon Mardion, G.

    1980-10-01

    This document describes the basic design for the main components of the Tokamak system of Tora Supra. As such, it focuses on the engineering problems, and refers to last year report on Tora Supra (EUR-CEA-1021) for objectives and experimental programme of the apparatus on one hand, and for qualifying tests of the main technical solutions on the other hand. Superconducting toroidal field coil system, vacuum vessels and radiation shields, poloidal field system and cryogenic system are described

  12. TIBER (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor) II as a precursor to an international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Gilleland, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER) was pursued in the US as one option for an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This concept evolved from earlier work on the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) to develop a small, ignited tokamak. While the copper-coil versions of TFCX became the short-pulsed, 1.23-m radius, Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), the superconducting TIBER with long pulse or steady state and a 2.6-m radius was considered for international collaboration. Recently the design was updated to TIBER II, to accommodate more conservative confinement scaling, double-poloidal divertors for impurity control, steady-state current drive, and nuclear testing. 18 refs., 1 fig

  13. Energy conversion options for ARIES-III - A conceptual D-3He tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarius, J.F.; Blanchard, J.P.; Emmert, G.A.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Ghoneim, N.M.; Hasan, M.Z.; Mau, T.K.; Greenspan, E.; Herring, J.S.; Kernbichler, W.; Klein, A.C.; Miley, G.H.; Miller, R.L.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1989-01-01

    The potential for highly efficient conversion of fusion power to electricity provides one motivation for investigating D- 3 He fusion reactors. This stems from: (1) the large fraction of D- 3 He power produced in the forms of charged particles and synchrotron radiation which are amenable to direct conversion, and (2) the low neutron fluence and lack of tritium breeding constraints, which increase design flexibility. The design team for a conceptual D- 3 He tokamak reactor, ARIES-III, has investigated numerous energy conversion options at a scoping level in attempting to realize high efficiency. The energy conversion systems have been studied in the context of their use on one or more of three versions of a D- 3 He tokamak: a first stability regime device, a second stability regime device, and a spherical torus. The set of energy conversion options investigated includes bootstrap current conversion, compression-expansion cycles, direct electrodynamic conversion, electrostatic direct conversion, internal electric generator, liquid metal heat engine blanket, liquid metal MHD, plasma MHD, radiation boiler, scrape-off layer thermoelectric, synchrotron radiation conversion by rectennas, synchrotron radiation conversion by thermal cycles, thermionic/AMTEC/thermal systems, and traveling wave conversion. The original set of options is briefly discussed, and those selected for further study are described in more detail. The four selected are liquid metal MHD, plasma MHD, rectenna conversion, and direct electrodynamic conversion. Thermionic energy conversion is being considered, and some options may require a thermal cycle in parallel or series. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  14. Enhancement of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor performance by lithium conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, D.K.; Hill, K.W.; Strachan, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Scott, S.D.; Budny, R.; Marmar, E.S.; Snipes, J.A.; Terry, J.L.; Batha, S.; Bell, R.E.; Bitter, M.; Bush, C.E.; Chang, Z.; Darrow, D.S.; Ernst, D.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.; Herrmann, H.W.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Levinton, F.M.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mueller, D.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.T.; Roquemore, A.L.; Skinner, C.H.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; von Halle, A.; von Goeler, S.; Wong, K.L.; Zweben, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Wall conditioning in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [K. M. McGuire et al., Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)] by injection of lithium pellets into the plasma has resulted in large improvements in deuterium endash tritium fusion power production (up to 10.7 MW), the Lawson triple product (up to 10 21 m -3 s keV), and energy confinement time (up to 330 ms). The maximum plasma current for access to high-performance supershots has been increased from 1.9 to 2.7 MA, leading to stable operation at plasma stored energy values greater than 5 MJ. The amount of lithium on the limiter and the effectiveness of its action are maximized through (1) distributing the Li over the limiter surface by injection of four Li pellets into Ohmic plasmas of increasing major and minor radius, and (2) injection of four Li pellets into the Ohmic phase of supershot discharges before neutral-beam heating is begun. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  15. Ion cyclotron transmission spectroscopy in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    The propagation of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies has been investigated experimentally in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. A small, broadband, radiofrequency (rf) magnetic probe located outside the plasma limiter, at a major radius near that of the plasma center, was excited with a low power, frequency swept source (1--200 MHz). Waves propagating to a distant location were detected with a second, identical probe. The rf transmission spectrum revealed a region of attenuation over a band of frequencies for which the minority fundamental resonance was located between the outer plasma edge and the major radius of the probe location. Distinct, non-overlapping attenuation bands were observed from hydrogen and helium-3 minority species; a distinct tritium band should be observed in future DT experiments. Rapid spectrum acquisition during a helium-3 gas puff experiment showed that the wave attenuation involved the plasma core and was not a surface effect. A model in which the received power varied exponentially with the minority density, averaged over the resonance region, fit the time evolution of the probe signal relatively well. Estimation of a 1-d tunneling parameter from the experimental observations is discussed. Minority concentrations of less than 0.5 % can be resolved with this measurement.

  16. Evaluating and planning the radioactive waste options for dismantling the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, K.; Scott, J.; Larson, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a kind tritium fusion research reactor, and is planned to be decommissioned within the next several years. This is the largest fusion reactor in the world and as a result of deuterium-tritum reactions is tritium contaminated and activated from 14 Mev neutrons. This presents many unusual challenges when dismantling, packaging and disposing its components and ancillary systems. Special containers are being designed to accommodate the vacuum vessel, neutral beams, and tritium delivery and processing systems. A team of experienced professionals performed a detailed field study to evaluate the requirements and appropriate methods for packaging the radioactive materials. This team focused on several current and innovative methods for waste minimization that provides the oppurtunmost cost effective manner to package and dispose of the waste. This study also produces a functional time-phased schedule which conjoins the waste volume, weight, costs and container requirements with the detailed project activity schedule for the entire project scope. This study and project will be the first demonstration of the decommissioning of a tritium fusion test reactor. The radioactive waste disposal aspects of this project are instrumental in demonstrating the viability of a fusion power reactor with regard to its environmental impact and ultimate success.

  17. MIRI: A multichannel far-infrared laser interferometer for electron density measurements on TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Johnson, L.C.; Anderson, H.M.; Chouinard, R.; Foote, V.S.; Ma, C.H.; Clifton, B.J.

    1987-07-01

    A ten-channel far-infrared laser interferometer which is routinely used to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the electron density profile on the TFTR tokamak is described and representative results are presented. This system has been designed for remote operation in the very hostile environment of a fusion reactor. The possible expansion of the system to include polarimetric measurements is briefly outlined. 13 refs., 8 figs

  18. Analysis of toroidal vacuum vessels for use in demonstration sized tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbert, M.E.

    1978-07-01

    The vacuum vessel component of the tokamak fusion reactor is the subject of this study. The main objective of this paper was to provide guidance for the structural design of a thin wall externally pressurized toroidal vacuum vessel. The analyses are based on the available state-of-the-art analytical methods. The shortcomings of these analytical methods necessitated approximations and assumptions to be made throughout the study. A principal result of the study has been the identification of a viable vacuum vessel design for the Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR) and The Next Step (TNS) Reactor

  19. Problems in modeling TF ripple loss of fast alphas from a tokamak reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hively, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    The present status of modeling TF ripple loss of fast alphas from tokamaks is summarized. The modeling issues are discussed, and several new aspects of this problem are described, including gyromotion, radial electric field, and sawtoothing. Existing models predict that TF ripple loss of fast alphas will have a low-to-moderate impact on the design of a tokamak engineering test reactor (ETR). 52 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. TRAIL: a Tokamak Rail Gun Limiter for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J R; Yu, W S; Fillo, J A; Usher, J L

    1980-01-01

    An attractive new limiter concept is investigated. The Tokamak Rail Gun Limiter (TRAIL) system impacts a stream of moderate velocity pellets (100 to 200 m/sec through the plasma edge region to absorb energy and define the plasma boundary. The pellets are recycled, after cooling, to the injector in an E-M mass accelerator. Heat fluxes of approx. 30,000 W/cm/sup 2/ can be readily accommodated by the pellets, with very low recirculating power requirements (approx. 0.1%) for the accelerator. The mass accelerator velocity requirements are well within the present state-of-the-art (several km/sec). Accelerators injecting pellets at approx. 1 km/sec can be used to control local plasma temperature and current profiles and to act as energy absorbers to shut down the plasma without damage to the first wall if a plasma disruption occurs.

  1. NE-213-scintillator-based neutron detection system for diagnostic measurements of energy spectra for neutrons having energies greater than or equal to 0.8 MeV created during plasma operations at the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; Hill, N.W.; Hou, F.S.; McConnell, J.W.; Spencer, R.R.; Tsang, F.Y.

    1985-08-01

    A system for making diagnostic measurements of the energy spectra of greater than or equal to 0.8-MeV neutrons produced during plasma operations of the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been fabricated and tested and is presently in operation in the TFTR Test Cell Basement. The system consists of two separate detectors, each made up of cells containing liquid NE-213 scintillator attached permanently to RCA-8850 photomultiplier tubes. Pulses obtained from each photomultiplier system are amplified and electronically analyzed to identify and separate those pulses due to neutron-induced events in the detector from those due to photon-induced events in the detector. Signals from each detector are routed to two separate Analog-to-Digital Converters, and the resulting digitized information, representing: (1) the raw neutron-spectrum data; and (2) the raw photon-spectrum data, are transmited to the CICADA data-acquisition computer system of the TFTR. Software programs have been installed on the CICADA system to analyze the raw data to provide moderate-resolution recreations of the energy spectrum of the neutron and photon fluences incident on the detector during the operation of the TFTR. A complete description of, as well as the operation of, the hardware and software is given in this report

  2. NE-213-scintillator-based neutron detection system for diagnostic measurements of energy spectra for neutrons having energies greater than or equal to 0. 8 MeV created during plasma operations at the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, J.K.; Hill, N.W.; Hou, F.S.; McConnell, J.W.; Spencer, R.R.; Tsang, F.Y.

    1985-08-01

    A system for making diagnostic measurements of the energy spectra of greater than or equal to 0.8-MeV neutrons produced during plasma operations of the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been fabricated and tested and is presently in operation in the TFTR Test Cell Basement. The system consists of two separate detectors, each made up of cells containing liquid NE-213 scintillator attached permanently to RCA-8850 photomultiplier tubes. Pulses obtained from each photomultiplier system are amplified and electronically analyzed to identify and separate those pulses due to neutron-induced events in the detector from those due to photon-induced events in the detector. Signals from each detector are routed to two separate Analog-to-Digital Converters, and the resulting digitized information, representing: (1) the raw neutron-spectrum data; and (2) the raw photon-spectrum data, are transmited to the CICADA data-acquisition computer system of the TFTR. Software programs have been installed on the CICADA system to analyze the raw data to provide moderate-resolution recreations of the energy spectrum of the neutron and photon fluences incident on the detector during the operation of the TFTR. A complete description of, as well as the operation of, the hardware and software is given in this report.

  3. High-energy tritium beams as current drivers in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Grisham, L.R.

    1983-04-01

    The effect on neutral-beam design and reactor performance of using high-energy (approx. 3-10 MeV) tritium neutral beams to drive steady-state tokamak reactors is considered. The lower current of such beams leads to several advantages over lower-energy neutral beams. The major disadvantage is the reduction of the reactor output caused by the lower current-drive efficiency of the high-energy beams

  4. Public acceptance of fusion energy and scientific feasibility of a fusion reactor. Steady-state tokamak reactors: SSTR and A-SSTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    1998-01-01

    The SSTR is a steady-state tokamak reactor based on a bootstrap current with near term technologies. The A-SSTR is an aggressive fusion reactor concept designed to address issues of economical competitiveness. (author)

  5. Fast wave current drive in reactor scale tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.; Saoutic, B.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility for driving current in large tokamak plasmas using the fast magnetosonic wave is analysed in terms of linear propagation-absorption, and also in terms of quasilinear absorption through an hamiltonian analysis of the wave-particle interaction. The tokamak geometry is shown to strongly influence the capability for the fast wave to sustain a significant part of the toroidal current. Synergetic effects with other scenarios are also discussed

  6. Packed-fluidized-bed blanket concept for a thorium-fueled commercial tokamak hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, J.W.H.; Miller, J.W.; Karbowski, J.S.; Chapin, D.L.; Kelly, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    A preliminary design of a thorium blanket was carried out as a part of the Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR) study. A fixed fuel blanket concept was developed as the reference CTHR blanket with uranium carbide fuel and helium coolant. A fixed fuel blanket was initially evaluated for the thorium blanket study. Subsequently, a new type of hybrid blanket, a packed-fluidized bed (PFB), was conceived. The PFB blanket concept has a number of unique features that may solve some of the problems encountered in the design of tokamak hybrid reactor blankets. This report documents the thorium blanket study and describes the feasibility assessment of the PFB blanket concept

  7. Development of integrated insulation joint for cooling pipe in tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Abe, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Masashi; Yamazaki, Seiichiro.

    1994-08-01

    In a tokamak fusion reactor, an electrically insulated part is needed for an in-vessel piping system in order to break an electric circuit loop. When a closed loop is formed in the piping system, large induced electromagnetic forces during a plasma disruption (rapid plasma current quench) could give damages on the piping system. Ceramic brazing joint is a conventional method for the electric circuit break, but an application to the fusion reactor is not feasible due to its brittleness. Here, a stainless steel/ceramics/stainless steel functionally gradient material (FGM) has been proposed and developed as an integrated insulation joint of the piping system. Both sides of the joint can be welded to the main pipes, and expected to be reliable even in the fusion reactor environment. When the FGM joint is manufactured by way of a sintering process, a residual thermal stress is the key issue. Through detailed computations of the residual thermal stress and several trial productions, tubular elements of FGM joints have been successfully manufactured. (author)

  8. Microcomputer Based System to control the Load of a Capacitor Array in the TJ-1 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Asenso, L.; Sanz, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    The power to create the magnetic fields in the TJ-1 Tokamak is provides by an array of 16 capacitor sets. The total capacity of this array is 8. 1F. This work describes a computer system based on the Motorola M-6800 micro- processor which controls the load of the capacitor set and stablished the conditions for the reactor trigger. (Author)

  9. Microcomputer based system to control the load of a capacitor array in the TJ-1 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi Primicia, J.; Asenjo, L.; Sanz, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The power to create the magnetic field in the TJ-1 TOKAMAK is provide by an array of 16 capacitor sets. The total capacity of this array is 8.1F. This work describes a computer system based on the Motorola M-6800 microprocessor which controls the load of the capacitor set-and establishes the conditions for the reactor trigger. (author)

  10. Materials and components for X-ray diagnostic use on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshey, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray diagnostic equipment will operate on Princeton's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during Hydrogen (HH and DH), Deuterium (DD) and Tritium (DT) discharges. The environmental requirements on diagnostic equipment with direct conductance to the Tokamak's vacuum are demanding. The materials and components will be subjected to: (a) ultra-high vacuum of 1 x 10 -8 torr, (b) temperature cycling from 15 0 C to 250 0 C, (c) radiation to 1 x 10 8 rads, (d) magnetic fields to 6 Tesla. In addition, selection of materials must also be based upon minimizing the formation of significant quantities of long lived radioactive elements created by the bombardment of 14 MeV neutrons. Shielding materials must also meet flammability requirements. This paper deals with the selection of materials and components as used on the TFTR X-ray Imaging Systems and the TFTR Pulse-Height Analysis Systems. The trade-offs that led to selection of materials are discussed. Test results and sources of test data are presented

  11. Lessons learned from the Tokamak Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study (ARIES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lessons from the four-year ARIES (Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study) investigation of a number of commercial magnetic-fusion-energy (MFE) power-plant embodiments of the tokamak are summarized. These lessons apply to physics, engineering and technology, and environmental, safety and health (ES ampersand H) characteristics of projected tokamak power plants. A general conclusion from this extensive investigation of the commercial potential of tokamak power plants is the need for combined, symbiotic advances relative to present understanding in physics, engineering, and materials before economic competitiveness with developing advanced energy sources can be realized. Advanced tokamak plasmas configured in the second-stability regime that achieve both high β and bootstrap fractions near unity through strong profile control offer high promise in this regard

  12. Lessons learned from the tokamak Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study (ARIES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lessons from the four-year ARIES (Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study) investigation of a number of commercial magnetic-fusion-energy (MFE) power-plant embodiments of the tokamak are summarized. These lessons apply to physics, engineering and technology, and environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) characteristics of projected tokamak power plants. Summarized herein are the composite conclusions and lessons developed in the course of four conceptual tokamak power-plant designs. A general conclusion from this extensive investigation of the commercial potential of tokamak power plants is the need for combined, symbiotic advances in both physics, engineering, and materials before economic competitiveness with developing advanced energy sources can be realized. Advances in materials are also needed for the exploitation of environmental advantages otherwise inherent in fusion power

  13. A comparison of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactor burn cycles. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Evans, K. Jr.; Kim, S.

    1985-01-01

    Pulsed operation of a tokamak reactor imposes cost penalties due to such problems as mechanical fatigue and the need to periodically transfer large amounts of energy to various reactor components. This study focuses on lifetime limitations and capital costs of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas include: fatigue in pulsed poloidal field coils; out-of-plane bending fatigue in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive current driver costs. A capital cost comparison is made for tokamak reactors operating under the four distinct operating cycles which have been proposed. Since high availability and a low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, we can characterize improvements in physics and technology which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles. A key conclusion is that steady-state operation is likely to result in the least expensive tokamak reactor (perhaps 20% cheaper than the best pulsed reactor), provided noninductive current drive efficiency can be increased roughly four-fold over present-day experimental results. (orig.)

  14. Wave-driver options for low-aspect-ratio steady-state tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1981-02-01

    Low aspect ratio designs are proposed for steady-state tokamak reactors. Benefits stem from reduced major radius and lessened stresses in the toroidal field coils, resulting in possible cost savings in the tokamak construction. In addition, a low aspect ratio (A = 2.6) permits the application of a bundle divertor capable of diverting 3-T fields to a power reactor using STARFIRE technology. Such a low aspect ratio is possible with the elimination of poloidal field coils in the central hole of the tokamak, which implies a need for noninductive current drive. Several plasma waves are considered for this application, and it appears likely that a candidate can be found which reduces the electric power for current maintenance to an acceptable value

  15. Cost of generating tritium internal and external to a tokamak hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crotzer, M.E.; Heck, F.M.; Steinke, K.C.

    1981-01-01

    The costs associated with producing tritium internal and external to a thorium-based tokamak hybrid are estimated for a number of scenarios and the resulting impact on the symbiotic system cost of electricity calculated. For tritium generation within the hybrid, both continuous and batch production is analyzed. For external production, the lithium-bearing blanket is replaced with thorium and the tritium is generated in the client fission reactors. Continuous tritium production within the hybrid is found to increase the cost of electricity from 1.4 to 4.0 mills/kW-h. Batch tritium production can increase the cost of electricity by 10 mills/kW-h. Producing tritium outside the hybrid, and thereby enhancing client support, increases the cost of electricity from 1.8 to 4.1 mills/kW-h

  16. Lifetime evaluation for thermal fatigue: application at the first wall of a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merola, M.; Biggio, M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal fatigue seems to be the most lifetime limiting phenomenon for the first wall of the next generation Tokamak fusion reactors. This work deals with the problem of the thermal fatigue in relation to the lifetime prediction of the fusion reactor first wall. The aim is to compare different lifetime methodologies among them and with experimental results. To fulfil this purpose, it has been necessary to develop a new numerical methodology, called reduced-3D, especially suitable for thermal fatigue problems

  17. Calculation of the gamma radiation levels in and around the NET-DN tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoejerup, C.F.

    1989-07-01

    Calculations of the gamma doses at a TOKAMAK fusion reactor, the NET-DN (1988) are presented. Neutron fluxes in the structures of the reactor are calculated by Monte Carlo methods (MCNP-2) and activations from the neutron induced reactions are determined by the ACTIVA computer programme. By Monte Carlo methods and the application of an approximative reciprocity principle, the gamma fluxes and doses are finally calculated. (author)

  18. Design of the shield door and transporter for the Culham Conceptual Tokamak Reactor Mark II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, J.A.S.

    1980-04-01

    In the Culham Conceptual Tokamak Reactor MK II access to the interior for blanket maintenance is through large openings in the fixed shield structure closed by removable shield doors when the reactor is operational. This report describes the design of the 200 tonne doors and the associated special-purpose remote operating transporter manipulator. The design, which has not been optimised, generally uses available commercial equipment and state-of-the-art techniques. (U.K.)

  19. Remote servicing considerations for near term tokamak power reactors (TNS). Final summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1977-01-01

    Next generation Tokamaks require special consideration for remote servicing. Three major problems are highlighted: (1) movement of heavy components, (2) remote connection/disconnection of joints, and (3) remote cutting, welding, and leak detection. The first problem is assumed to be handled with existing expertise and is not considered. The remaining problems are thought to be minimized by considering two engineering departures from conventional tokamak design; locating the field shaping coils outside of the toroidal coils and enclosing the total device within an evacuated reactor cell. Five topics under this vacuum building concept are discussed: incremental cost, vacuum pumping, tritium containment, activation topology, and first year operations

  20. A commercial tokamak reactor using super high field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.; Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Williams, J.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper explores the range of possibilities for producing super high fields with advanced superconducting magnets. Obtaining magnetic fields greater than about 18 T at the coil in a large superconducting magnet system will require advances in many areas of magnet technology. These needs are discussed and potential solutions (advanced superconductors, structural materials and design methods) evaluated. A point design for a commercial reactor with magnetic field at the coil of 24 T and fusion power of 1800 MW is presented. Critical issues and parameters for magnet design are identified. 20 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  1. What is past is prologue: future directions in tokamak power reactor design research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Conceptual tokamak power reactor designs over the last five years have provided us with many fundamental insights regarding tokamaks as fusion reactors. This first generation of studies has helped lay the groundwork upon which to build improvements in reactor design and begin a process of optimization. After reviewing the first generation of studies and the primary conclusions they produced, we discuss four current designs that are representative of present trends in this area of research. In particular, we discuss the trends towards reduced reactor size and higher neutron wall loadings. Moving in this direction requires new approaches to many subsystem designs. We describe new approaches and future directions in first wall and blanket designs that can achieve reliable operation and reasonable lifetime, the use of cryogenic but normal aluminum magnets for the pulsed coils in a tokamak, blanket designs that allow elimination of the intermediate loop, and low activity shields and toroidal field magnets. We close with a discussion of the future role of conceptual reactor design research and the need for close interaction with ongoing experiments in fusion technology

  2. Safety and Environment aspects of Tokamak- type Fusion Power Reactor- An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Bharat; Reddy, D. Chenna

    2017-04-01

    Naturally occurring thermonuclear fusion reaction (of light atoms to form a heavier nucleus) in the sun and every star in the universe, releases incredible amounts of energy. Demonstrating the controlled and sustained reaction of deuterium-tritium plasma should enable the development of fusion as an energy source here on Earth. The promising fusion power reactors could be operated on the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle with fuel self-sufficiency. The potential impact of fusion power on the environment and the possible risks associated with operating large-scale fusion power plants is being studied by different countries. The results show that fusion can be a very safe and sustainable energy source. A fusion power plant possesses not only intrinsic advantages with respect to safety compared to other sources of energy, but also a negligible long term impact on the environment provided certain precautions are taken in its design. One of the important considerations is in the selection of low activation structural materials for reactor vessel. Selection of the materials for first wall and breeding blanket components is also important from safety issues. It is possible to fully benefit from the advantages of fusion energy if safety and environmental concerns are taken into account when considering the conceptual studies of a reactor design. The significant safety hazards are due to the tritium inventory and energetic neutron fluence induced activity in the reactor vessel, first wall components, blanket system etc. The potential of release of radioactivity under operational and accident conditions needs attention while designing the fusion reactor. Appropriate safety analysis for the quantification of the risk shall be done following different methods such as FFMEA (Functional Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability). Level of safety and safety classification such as nuclear safety and non-nuclear safety is very important for the FPR (Fusion

  3. Study of intelligent system for control of the tokamak-ETE plasma positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Luis Filipe de Faria Pereira Wiltgen

    2003-01-01

    The development of an intelligent neural control system of the neural type, capable to perform real time control of the plasma displacement in the experiment tokamak spheric - ETE (spherical tokamak experiment ) is presented. The ETE machine is in operation since Nov 2000, in the LAP - Plasma Associated Laboratory of the Brazilian Institute on Spatial Research (INPE) in Sao Jose dos Campos, S P, Brazil. The experiment is dedicated to study the magnetic confinement of a fusion plasma in a configuration favorable for the construction of future reactors. Nuclear fusion constitutes a renewable energy source with low environmental impact, which uses atomic energy in pacific applications for the sustainable development of humanity. One of the important questions for the attainment of fusion relates to the stability of the plasma and control of its position during the reactor operation. Therefore, the development of systems to control the plasma in tokamaks constitutes a necessary technological advance for the feasibility of nuclear fusion. In particular, the research carried out in this thesis concerns the proposal of a system to control the vertical displacement of the plasma in the ETE tokamak, aiming to obtain steady pulses in this machine. A Magnetic Levitation system (Mag Lev) was developed as part of this work, allowing to study the nonlinear behavior of a device that, from the aspect of position control, is similar (analogous) to the plasma in the ETE tokamak, This magnetic levitation system was designed, mathematically modeled and built in order to test both classical and intelligent type controllers. The results of this comparison are very promising for the use of intelligent controllers in the ETE tokamak as well as other control applications. (author)

  4. Treating the neutronics of a (d,t)-fusion reactor operating on the tokamak principle (NET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.

    1990-10-01

    The primary aim of this work is to check the simplified one-dimensional neutronic approach being used frequently in design calculations. Therefore the neutronics of the NET (Next European Torus)-reactor is treated in a three-dimensional torus sector model by means of Monte Carlo calculations with the MCNP-code. Various blanket variants with different neutronic characteristics are taken into account. All of them had been developed for use in the NET-reactor: a ceramic solid breeder blanket using beryllium as neutron multiplier, a self-cooled liquid metal blanket using the eutectic alloy Pb-17Li or, alternatively, pure lithium as breeding material/coolant, and an aqueous lithium salt solution blanket. It is shown, that the one-dimensional approach can be applied in design calculations for evaluating power density distributions, if the plasma source is normalized in a consistent manner, if its spatial distribution is choosen appropriately, and, furthermore, if its angular dependence is taken into account. A three-dimensional treatment of the actual tokamak geometry, however, is necessary for determining the breeding performance of the blanket variants and for performing shielding calculations of the whole system blanket/shield. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Design study of superconducting toroidal magnet for tokamak experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Design study of the superconducting toroidal magnet for the Tokamak experimental fusion reactor has been carried out. Performed here were conductor design, magnetic field calculation, design of coil support, stress analysis, design of refrigeration system and safety analysis. The maximum toroidal field at the coil is 12.0 T, providing 6.0 T at the plasma center. The coil bore is 7.3 x 11.2 m, and the coil shape is deformed constant-tension D-shape. 16 coil design was chosen, considering the necessity for good access for the evacuation port or the support structure of blanket and shield. The maximum field ripple obtained in the plasma region is 0.47%. The operational current is 25,100 amperes, and the cryogenic stabilization is fulfilled. Nb 3 Sn superconductor was chosen in spite of its brittleness, to attain a toroidal field of 12 T which is higher than a practical limit for NbTi superconductor. The development of large Nb 3 Sn coil technology would be necessary to realize an economic fusion power reactor. (auth.)

  6. Reactor similarity for plasma–material interactions in scaled-down tokamaks as the basis for the Vulcan conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.G.; Olynyk, G.M.; Barnard, H.S.; Bonoli, P.T.; Bromberg, L.; Garrett, M.L.; Haakonsen, C.B.; Hartwig, Z.S.; Mumgaard, R.T.; Podpaly, Y.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Discussion of similarity scalings for reduced-size tokamaks. ► Proposal of a new set of scaling laws for divertor similarity. ► Discussion of how the new scaling provides fidelity to a reactor. ► The new scaling is used as the basis for the Vulcan conceptual design. - Abstract: Dimensionless parameter scaling techniques are a powerful tool in the study of complex physical systems, especially in tokamak fusion experiments where the cost of full-size devices is high. It is proposed that dimensionless similarity be used to study in a small-scale device the coupled issues of the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma, plasma–material interactions (PMI), and the plasma-facing material (PFM) response expected in a tokamak fusion reactor. Complete similarity is not possible in a reduced-size device. In addition, “hard” technological limits on the achievable magnetic field and peak heat flux, as well as the necessity to produce non-inductive scenarios, must be taken into account. A practical approach is advocated, in which the most important dimensionless parameters are matched to a reactor in the reduced-size device, while relaxing those parameters which are far from a threshold in behavior. “Hard” technological limits are avoided, so that the reduced-size device is technologically feasible. A criticism on these grounds is offered of the “P/R” model, in which the ratio of power crossing the last closed flux surface (LCFS), P, to the device major radius, R, is held constant. A new set of scaling rules, referred to as the “P/S” scaling (where S is the LCFS area) or the “PMI” scaling, is proposed: (i) non-inductive, steady-state operation; (ii) P is scaled with R 2 so that LCFS areal power flux P/S is constant; (iii) magnetic field B constant; (iv) geometry (elongation, safety factor q * , etc.) constant; (v) volume-averaged core density scaled as n≈n ¯ e ∼R −2/7 ; and (vi) ambient wall material temperature T W,0 constant. It is

  7. Plasma-material interactions in current tokamaks and their implications for next step fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.

    2001-01-01

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next step DT fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically in influence its operation, safety and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimetres from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma facing components. Controlling plasma-wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present day tokamaks, and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena stimulated an internationally co-ordinated effort in the part of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project (ITER), and significant progress has been made in better understanding these issues. The paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material inter actions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interaction are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation and (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modelling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D avenues for their resolution are presented. (author)

  8. Plasma-material interactions in current tokamaks and their implications for next-step fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.

    2001-01-01

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several cm from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally co-ordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the engineering design activities of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor project (ITER) and significant progress has been made in better understanding these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/re-deposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modelling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D avenues for their resolution are presented. (orig.)

  9. Preparations for deuterium tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, G. [and others

    1994-04-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinet{sup {trademark}} system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of {approximately} 10 megawatts (MW) of fusion power, evaluation of confinement and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of {alpha}-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined {alpha}-particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed.

  10. Preparations for deuterium--tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L.A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Biglow, T.S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N.L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M.J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Ja

    1994-05-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. [bold 21], 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinert[sup TM] system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium--deuterium (D--D) run to simulate expected deuterium--tritium (D--T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D--T experiments using D--D have been performed. The physics objectives of D--T operation are production of [approx]10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium--tritium plasmas, evaluation of [alpha]-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined [alpha] particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D--T experiments are reviewed.

  11. Elements of a method to scale ignition reactor Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotsaftis, M.

    1984-08-01

    Due to unavoidable uncertainties from present scaling laws when projected to thermonuclear regime, a method is proposed to minimize these uncertainties in order to figure out the main parameters of ignited tokamak. The method mainly consists in searching, if any, a domain in adapted parameters space which allows Ignition, but is the least sensitive to possible change in scaling laws. In other words, Ignition domain is researched which is the intersection of all possible Ignition domains corresponding to all possible scaling laws produced by all possible transports

  12. Conceptual designs of tokamak reactor and R D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukai, Yuzo; Yamato, Harumi; Sawada, Yoshio

    1983-01-01

    The conceptual design of both FER (Fusion Experimental Reactor) and R-project is now under way as the new step of JT-60. From the engineering viewpoint, these reactors, requiring D-T operation, have the challenge, such as the handling of tritium and components irradiated by neutron bombardment. Toshiba's design team is participating to these projects in order to realize the reactor and plant concept coping with the above objectives. This paper represents the conceptual design contributions of the FER and R-project as well as R D technology which are now under development, such as tritium handling app aratus, reactor materials, etc. (author)

  13. Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1980-06-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated the potential for producing a viable longburn tokamak reactor by enhancing the volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer through the use of high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were assessed in the context of extended burn operation. Using a one-dimensional transport code plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the startup and shutdown portions of the tokamak cycle. A representative large aspect ratio tokamak with an aspect ratio of 8 was found to achieve a burn time of 3.5 h at capital cost only approx. 25% greater than that of a moderate aspect ratio design tokamak

  14. Scoping and sensitivity analyses for the Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sink, D.A.; Gibson, G.

    1979-03-01

    The results of an extensive set of parametric studies are presented which provide analytical data of the effects of various tokamak parameters on the performance and cost of the DTHR (Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor). The studies were centered on a point design which is described in detail. Variations in the device size, neutron wall loading, and plasma aspect ratio are presented, and the effects on direct hardware costs, fissile fuel production (breeding), fusion power production, electrical power consumption, and thermal power production are shown graphically. The studies considered both ignition and beam-driven operations of DTHR and yielded results based on two empirical scaling laws presently used in reactor studies. Sensitivity studies were also made for variations in the following key parameters: the plasma elongation, the minor radius, the TF coil peak field, the neutral beam injection power, and the Z/sub eff/ of the plasma

  15. Application of high temperature ceramic superconductors (CSC) to commercial tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Kim, S.; Gohar, Y.; Turner, L.; Smith, D.L.; Mattas, R.

    1987-10-01

    Ceramic superconductors operating near liquid nitrogen temperature may experience higher heating rates without losing stability, compared to conventional superconductors. This will permit cable design with less stabilizer, reducing fabrication costs for large fusion magnets. Magnet performance is studied for different operating current densities in the superconductor, and cost benefits to commercial tokamak reactors are estimated. It appears that 10 kA . cm -2 (at 77 K and ∼10 T) is a target current density which must be achieved in order for the ceramic superconductors to compete with conventional materials. At current densities around 50 kA . cm -2 most potential benefits have already been gained, as magnet structural steel begins to dominate the cost at this point. For a steady state reactor reductions of ∼7% are forecast for the overall capital cost of the power plant in the best case. An additional ∼3% cost saving is possible for pulsed tokamaks. 9 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs

  16. Nuclear modules of ITER tokamak systems code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Baker, C.; Brooks, J.

    1987-10-01

    Nuclear modules were developed to model various reactor components in the ITER systems code. Several design options and cost algorithms are included for each component. The first wall, blanket and shield modules calculate the beryllium zone thickness, the disruptions results, the nuclear responses in different components including the toroidal field coils. Tungsten shield/water coolant/steel structure and steel shield/water coolant are the shield options for the inboard and outboard sections of the reactor. Lithium nitrate dissolved in the water coolant with a variable beryllium zone thickness in the outboard section of the reactor provides the tritium breeding capability. The reactor vault module defines the thickness of the reactor wall and the roof based on the dose equivalent during operation including skyshine contribution. The impurity control module provides the design parameters for the divertor including plate design, heat load, erosion rate, tritium permeation through the plate material to the coolant, plasma contamination by sputtered impurities, and plate lifetime. Several materials: Be, C, V, Mo, and W can be used for the divertor plate to cover a range of plasma edge temperatures. The tritium module calculates tritium and deuterium flow rates for the reactor plant. The tritium inventory in the fuelers, neutral beams, vacuum pumps, impurity control, first wall, and blanket is calculated. Tritium requirements are provided for different operating conditions. The nuclear models are summarized in this paper including the different design options and key analyses of each module. 39 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Preliminary conceptual design of a Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR). Status report, January 1978--March 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.L.

    1978-03-01

    The DTHR preliminary conceptual design consists of a magnetically confined fusion reactor fitted with a fertile thorium blanket. The fusion driver concept is based on a beam driven plasma, but at sufficiently high plasma densities that neutrons originating from the interactions of bulk plasma ions contribute significantly to the wall loading. The tokamak has a major radius of 5.2 m, a minor radius of 1.2 m, and the elongation is 1.6. All of the magnetic coil systems are superconducting Nb 3 Sn based on the Large Coil Project (LCP) technology. The toroidal field (TF) coils employ an innovative concept, the ''compact D'' configuration. An engineered bundle divertor concept has been developed based on the bundle divertor design techniques developed for TNS and ISX-B. A thermal power of 150MW of 200 keV deuterium is injected into the plasma through six ducts of a positive ion, neutral beam injection system (NBIS). A water cooled, 316 stainless steel vacuum vessel concept was developed and initial scoping analyses look encouraging. The fusile fuel handling system was evaluated and defined. Details of the tritium injection system remain to be developed. Tritium breeding will be assessed in subsequent phases of the DTHR operation. The fusion driver provides a neutron first wall loading of 2MW/m 2 for fissile production in the blanket

  18. Preliminary conceptual design of a Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR). Status report, January 1978--March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.L. (ed.)

    1978-03-01

    The DTHR preliminary conceptual design consists of a magnetically confined fusion reactor fitted with a fertile thorium blanket. The fusion driver concept is based on a beam driven plasma, but at sufficiently high plasma densities that neutrons originating from the interactions of bulk plasma ions contribute significantly to the wall loading. The tokamak has a major radius of 5.2 m, a minor radius of 1.2 m, and the elongation is 1.6. All of the magnetic coil systems are superconducting Nb/sub 3/Sn based on the Large Coil Project (LCP) technology. The toroidal field (TF) coils employ an innovative concept, the ''compact D'' configuration. An engineered bundle divertor concept has been developed based on the bundle divertor design techniques developed for TNS and ISX-B. A thermal power of 150MW of 200 keV deuterium is injected into the plasma through six ducts of a positive ion, neutral beam injection system (NBIS). A water cooled, 316 stainless steel vacuum vessel concept was developed and initial scoping analyses look encouraging. The fusile fuel handling system was evaluated and defined. Details of the tritium injection system remain to be developed. Tritium breeding will be assessed in subsequent phases of the DTHR operation. The fusion driver provides a neutron first wall loading of 2MW/m/sup 2/ for fissile production in the blanket.

  19. Comparative study of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactor burn cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K.; Hassanein, A.M.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1984-05-01

    Four distinct operating modes have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue in pulsed poloidal field coils; out-of-plant fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics and engineering which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles

  20. Comparative study of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactor burn cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K.; Hassanein, A.M.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1984-05-01

    Four distinct operating modes have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue in pulsed poloidal field coils; out-of-plant fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics and engineering which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles.

  1. Criteria of the efficiency for radiation protection of tokamak reactor superconducting magnet coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimin, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Factors determining serviceability of the main elements (superconductor, stabilizing conductor, insulation) of superconducting magnet coils for tokamak reactors are discussed. It is suggested that the limiting values of total and specific energy release in the material of superconducting coils, increase in electric resistance of the stabilizing conductor, decrease in the superconductor critical current and damage of the superconducting magnet insulation should be used as criteria of the reactor internal radiation protection efficiency. The conclusion is made that neutron fluence in the magnet coil components considered can be used as a generalized criterion of the first approximation for the evaluation of the protection efficiency

  2. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, J D

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered.

  3. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.D.

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered

  4. Filterscope diagnostic system on EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.; Wu, Z.W.; Gao, W.; Zhang, L.; Huang, J.; Chen, Y.J.; Wu, C.R.; Zhang, P.F.

    2015-01-01

    Filterscope diagnostic system, which is designed for monitoring the line emission in fusion plasma has been widely used on fusion devices such as DIII-D, NSTX, CDX-U, KSTAR etc. On EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), a filterscope diagnostic system has been mounted to observe the line emission and visible bremsstrahlung emission in plasma from discharge campaign of 2014. It plays a crucial role in studying Edge Localized Modes (ELM) and H-mode, thanks to its high temporal resolution (0.005ms) and good spatial resolution (∼2cm). Furthermore, multi-channel signals at up to 200kHz sampling rates can be digitized simultaneously. The wavelength covers He II (468.5nm), Li I (670.8nm), Li II (548.3nm), C III (465.0nm), O II (441.5nm), Mo I (386.4nm), W I (400.9nm) and visible bremsstrahlung radiation at 538nm besides Dα (656.1nm) and Dγ (433.9nm) with the corresponding wavelength filters. The new developed filterscope system was operating during the EAST 2014 fall experimental campaign and several types ELMs has been observed. (author)

  5. Design study of superconducting magnets for tokamak experimental fusion reactor, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Design study has been made of superconducting magnets for a Tokamak experimental fusion reactor: toroidal field magnet design, poloidal field magnet design, refrigeration system design, magnet safety analysis, and magnet assembling and disassembling system design. A maximum toroidal field in the coil is 11.0 T, providing 5.5 T at plasma center. Nb 3 Sn superconducting cable is used to attain the toroidal field of 11 T. The coil bore is 7.3 x 11.2 m, and the coil shape is deformed constant-tension D-shape. The magnetomotive force is 185.6 MAT, and the operational current is 25.9 kA. In poloidal field magnet design, the coil is pancake-wound Nb 3 Sn conductor. The conductor is enclosed in Ti-alloy sheath, which serves also as helium containment vessel. The conductor is cooled by forced flow supercritical helium of 7 atm and 4.6 K, and the operational current is 25 -- 27 kA. (author)

  6. Status of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutron activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H.W.; Ascione, G.; Elwood, S.; Gilbert, J.; Rule, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Measurements have been made following TFTR D-T campaigns to characterize the behavior of D-T fusion reactor neutron activation using Ionization Chamber, Geiger Mueller, and Ge detector gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. The results exhibit decay rates characteristic of the materials and geometries of the Test Cell hardware, and allow extrapolation to higher fusion power yields. The results can be used for benchmarking D-T fusion reactor activation simulations for accurate determinations of low activation long-lived cooling. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Reactor aspects of counterstreaming-ion tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1975-06-01

    Toroidal DT plasmas in which the D and T ions make up two distinct, quasi-thermal velocity distributions, oppositely displaced in velocity along the magnetic axis, are discussed. Such counterstreaming distributions can be set up by introducing all ions by tangential injection of neutral beams, and by removing ions from the plasma shortly after they have decelerated to an energy approximate to or less than 2T/sub e/ by Coulomb drag on the plasma electrons. A simple physical model for counterstreaming-ion operation is postulated, which allows one to deduce the ion velocity distributions and required energy and particle confinement times that are in good agreement with the results of previous Fokker-Planck calculations. The variations of fusion reactivity, power gain, and power density with injection energy and electron temperature are presented. The practical problems of implementing counter-streaming operation in a tokamak, such as charge-exchange losses, the prompt removal of cold ions, and the effect of impurities are discussed. (U.S.)

  8. Fusion materials studies and technological experiments in test thermonuclear reactor-tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altovskij, I.V.; Gornostaev, B.D.; Blinov, I.A.; Gur'ev, V.V.; Zujkov, G.A.; Osadchij, N.A.; Tochenyj, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive studies of materials (strength, radiation resistance, reliability and safety) should be made to substantiate designs during the initial stage of R and D and the choice of the final version for the design of the blanket and energy conversion system. It is evident that those experimental devices which are available or planned are not capable of simulating effects on the OTR blanket units (high neutron flux, strong electromagnetic fields, stresses due to coolant pressure at operating temperature and own weight, plasma effects, etc.). Therefore, in OTR design, constructive decisions should be taken on the use of the tokamak OTR as a unique experimental device for real full-scale tests of construction, uranium, lithium and protective materials (antidiffusion coatings for radiation safety, etc.) intended for long term reliable and safe operation in future commercial fusion reactors. In the paper, consideration is given to some experimental devices intended for the study of the physical and mechanical properties of materials under loads typical of blanket operation; research into the mutual compatibility of construction materials, with coolant and operating materials; the study of the efficiency and reliability of material coatings; and the determination of optimal operating temperature ranges for materials, etc. (author). 2 refs, 5 figs

  9. A Michelson interferometer/polarimeter on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.K.; Mansfield, D.K.; Johnson, L.C.; Ma, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    A multichannel interferometer/polarimeter for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been developed in order to study the time dependent plasma current density (J/sub p/) and electron density (n/sub e/) profile simultaneously. The goal of the TFTR is demonstration of breakeven via dueuterium and tritium (DT) plasma. In order to be operated and maintained during DT operation phase, the system is designed based on the Michelson geometry which possesses intrinsic standing wave problems. So far, there has been no observable signals due to these standing waves. However, a standing wave resulted from the beam path design to achieve a optimum use of the laser power was found. This standing wave has not prevented initial 10 channel interferometer operation. However, a single channel polarimeter test indicated this standing wave was fatal for Faraday notation measurements. Techniques employing 1/2 wave plates and polarizers have been applied to eliminate this standing wave problem. The completion of 10 channel Faraday rotation measurements may be feasible in the near future

  10. Reactor System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, S. K.; Kim, G. K.; Yeo, J. W.

    2006-08-01

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  11. Some stress-related issues in tokamak fusion reactor first walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Pai, B.; Ryder, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Recent design studies of a tokamak fusion power reactor and of various blankets have envisioned surface heat fluxes on the first wall ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/m 2 , and end-of-life irradiation fluences ranging from 100 dpa for the austenitic stainless steels to as high as 250 dpa for postulated vanadium alloys. Some tokamak blankets, particularly those using helium or liquid metal as coolant/breeder, may have to operate at relatively high coolant pressures so that the first wall may be subjected to high primary stress in addition to high secondary stresses such as thermal stresses or stresses due to constrained swelling. The present paper focusses on the various problems that may arise in the first wall because of stress and high neutron fluence, and discusses some of the design solutions that have been proposed to overcome these problems

  12. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [and others

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  13. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C.

    2001-01-01

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT (deuterium-tritium) fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D (Research and Development) avenues for their resolution are presented

  14. Tokamak reactor for treating fertile material or waste nuclear by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotschenreuther, Michael T.; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Valanju, Prashant M.

    2012-10-02

    Disclosed is a tokamak reactor. The reactor includes a first toroidal chamber, current carrying conductors, at least one divertor plate within the first toroidal chamber and a second chamber adjacent to the first toroidal chamber surrounded by a section that insulates the reactor from neutrons. The current carrying conductors are configured to confine a core plasma within enclosed walls of the first toroidal chamber such that the core plasma has an elongation of 1.5 to 4 and produce within the first toroidal chamber at least one stagnation point at a perpendicular distance from an equatorial plane through the core plasma that is greater than the plasma minor radius. The at least one divertor plate and current carrying conductors are configured relative to one another such that the current carrying conductors expand the open magnetic field lines at the divertor plate.

  15. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient

  16. Resistive requirements for the vacuum wall of a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Ehat, D.; Harkness, S.D.; Norem, J.; Stevens, H.; Turner, L.

    1978-01-01

    Most conceptual designs of tokamak power reactors have incorporated a ceramic insulator in the vacuum wall to make the wall electrically non-conducting. Such a material will have to be highly resistant to radiation damage at doses up to at least 10 MW-yr/m 2 while being compatible with a coolant and a first wall whose dimensions change due to thermal cycling and radiation damage. Thus there is considerable incentive to assess the consequences of eliminating the flux breaker from the design and having a conducting boundary instead. In this initial study the question of having a finite wall resistance has been examined in terms of its major implications on both the normal and abnormal operation of a tokamak reactor. This study has been conducted within the framework of the ANL-EPR-77 design although the results should provide some guidance for future reactors as well. The EPR design referred to is a 5 m major radius tokamak with an aspect ratio of 3.5, and with an equilibrium plasma current of 7.3 MA. The vacuum chamber is designed to accommodate a non-circular plasma with a height to width ratio of up to 1.65. The basic vacuum wall design is shown in Fig. 1. It is located about 0.4 M from the plasma boundary and has an irregular polygon shape made of sixteen sections, one per TF coil interval. Variations of this design having a range of resistance values have been used in the analysis

  17. Track-mounted remote handling system for the Tokamak Fusion Engineering Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, V.P.; Berger, J.D.; Daubert, R.L.; Yount, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Concepts for remote handling machines (IVM) designed to transverse the interior of toroidal vessels with guidance and support from track systems have been developed for the proposed Tokamak Fusion Engineering Test (TFET). TFET has been proposed as an upgrade for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), currently nearing completion. The track-mounted IVMs were conceived to perform in-vessel remote maintenance for TFET, including removal and replacement of pump limiter blades and protective tiles as well as other maintenance-related tasks such as vessel wall inspection leak testing and interior cleanup. The conceptual IVMs consist of three manipulator arms mounted on a common frame member: a single power manipulator arm with high load carrying capacity and two lower-capacity servomanipulator arms. Descriptions of the IVM concepts, in-vessel track systems, and ex-vessel handling systems are presented

  18. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, J.D.; Cooper, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shutdown system is described comprising a temperature sensitive device connected to control the electric power supply to a magnetic latch holding a body of a neutron absorbing material. The temperature sensitive device is exposed to the reactor coolant so that when the reactor coolant temperature rises above a specific level, the temperature sensitive device will cause deenergization of the magnetic latch to allow the body of neutron absorbing material to enter the reactor core. (author)

  19. The impact of servicing requirements on Tokamak fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.T.D.

    1978-01-01

    There is one design requirement which appears to be common to all D-T fusion reactors, irrespective of the plasma confinement principle embodied in the design. It must be practicable to repair the structure or 'first wall' nearest the plasma. A repair can include a range of operations between finding and sealing a pinhole leak in a weld to complete replacement of the whole structure of the breeding blanket. The two reasons why these repairs are necessary are: 1) The variability and defects in generally perfect products, such as those caused by errors of human performance or by flaws in raw materials. 2) The extreme severity of the environment of the first wall, which causes the deterioration of the properties of materials situated there. This deterioration is the result of neutron irradiation and transmutation in the materials under conditions of stress and high temperature and of surface corrosion and erosion

  20. First wall and limiter lifetime in pulsed tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.; Majumdar, S.; Cha, Y.; Hassanein, A.

    1983-12-01

    This study concentrates on the structural integrity of certain reactor subsystems under cyclic operation to answer the question: how long a burn pulse is needed to achieve the benefits of steady-state operation. Component lifetime in the steady-state is limited by three effects: radiation damage, disruptions, and sputtering erosion. Cyclic operation modifies one of these (the number of disruptions may increase with the number of burn cycles) and introduces a fourth life limit, thermal fatigue. Our design strategy is to determine the structure and coating thicknesses which maximize component lifetime against all life limitations. After calculating disruption damage (vaporization, melting) for candidate materials we present the lifetime analysis for different structures

  1. Superconducting coil design for a tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.; Smelser, P.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting toroidal field (TF) and polodial-field (PF) coils have been designed for the proposed Argonne National Laboratory experimental power reactor (EPR). Features of the design include: (1) Peak field of 8 T at 4.2 K or 10 T at 3.0 K. (2) Constant-tension shape for the TF coils, corrected for the finite number (16) of coils. (3) Analysis of errors in coil alignment. (4) Comparison of safety aspects of series-connected and parallel-connected coils. (5) A 60 kA sheet conductor of NbTi with copper stabilizer and stainless steel for support. (6) Superconducting PF coils outside the TF coils. (7) The TF coils shielded from pulsed fields by high-purity aluminum

  2. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lumia, M E

    2002-01-01

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed.

  3. Neutron Activation Cool-down of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascione, G.; Kugel, H.W.; Kumar, A.; Tilson, Jr, C.

    1998-06-10

    Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) final operations and post-shutdown neutron activation measurements were made. Ionization chambers were used to follow TFTR activation during operations and after shutdown. Gamma-ray energy spectroscopy measurements were performed to characterize TFTR activation at accessible vessel-bays and on sample hardware removed from structures at various distances from the vessel. The results demonstrate long-lived activations from common, commercially available materials used in the fabrication and field engineering of TFTR. The measurements allow characterization of residual TFTR neutron activation, the projection of residual activation decay, and benchmarking of low activation issues simulations.

  4. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.E. Lumia; C.A. Gentile

    2002-01-01

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed

  5. Design constraints for rf-driven steady-state tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1979-02-01

    Plasma current density profiles are computed due to electron Landau damping of lower hybrid waves launched into model tokamak density and temperature profiles. The total current and current profile shape are chosen consistent with magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium for a variety of temperature and density distributions and plasma beta values. Surface current equilibria appear attractive and are accessible to waves with n/sub z/ as low as 1.2. By suitably choosing the spectrum location and width it is possible to drive the 9.8 MA current of a 7.0-m reactor with as little as 2.8% of the fusion power recirculated as rf input from the waveguides

  6. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.E. Lumia; C.A. Gentile

    2002-01-18

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed.

  7. Data processing system for spectroscopy at Novillo Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega C, G.; Gaytan G, E.

    1998-01-01

    Taking as basis some proposed methodologies by software engineering it was designed and developed a data processing system coming from the diagnostic equipment by spectroscopy, for the study of plasma impurities, during the cleaning discharges. the data acquisition is realized through an electronic interface which communicates the computer with the spectroscopy system of Novillo Tokamak. The data were obtained starting from files type text and processed for their subsequently graphic presentation. For development of this system named PRODATN (Processing of Data for Spectroscopy in Novillo Tokamak) was used the LabVIEW graphic programming language. (Author)

  8. Power conversion and balance of plant considerations for the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, K.; Graumann, D.

    1981-01-01

    The power conversion and balance of plant facilities for this tenth-of-a-kind tokamak fusion power plant are a combination of both features common to any large power plant, and elements peculiar to the fusion technology. For example, the steam generators, turbine-generator and main condenser components of the power conversion system and the natural draft cooling towers that are used for heat rejection at sites not close to a large body of water are generic to power plants. The tritium reprocessing facilities that minimize the tritium inventory in the plant, the Electrical and RF Power Supply Building that contains the coil and rf power supplies, the cryogenic facilities that provide liquid helium coolant for the superconducting coils, and the Hot Cell in which fully remote repair and maintenance functions are performed are unique to a fusion power plant. One of the major features of the STARFIRE design is steady state operation that maximizes overall facility reliability and eliminates both thermal storage requirements and potential power fluctuations on the grid. The reference reactor power is 4000 MWt with a gross electric power generation of 1440 MW. For STARFIRE, water is the preferred coolant and is utilized in both the first wall/blanket and limiter cooling circuits. Dual parallel primary coolant loops cool the twenty-four first-wall/blanket sectors. The power deposited in the limiter, approximately 5% of the total thermal power, is removed by the separate limiter/feedwater loop and is used for feedwater heating in the steam power conversion system

  9. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient.

  10. Digital controlled pulsed electric system of the ETE tokamak. First report; Sistema eletrico pulsado com controle digital do Tokamak ETE (experimento Tokamak esferico). Primeiro relatorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Luis Felipe de F.P.W.; Del Bosco, Edson

    1997-12-31

    This reports presents a summary on the thermonuclear fusion and application for energy supply purposes. The tokamak device operation and the magnetic field production systems are described. The ETE tokamak is a small aspect ratio device designed for plasma physics and thermonuclear fusion studies, which presently is under construction at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) - S.J. dos Campos - S. Paulo. (author) 55 refs., 40 figs.

  11. What is past is prologue: future directions in Tokamak Power Reactor Design Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    After reviewing the first generation of studies and the primary conclusions they produced, four current designs are discussed that are representative of present trends in this area of research. In particular, the trends towards reduced reactor size and higher neutron wall loadings are discussed. Moving in this direction requires new approaches to many subsystem designs. New approaches and future directions in first wall and blanket designs that can achieve reliable operation and reasonable lifetime, the use of cryogenic but normal aluminum magnets for the pulsed coils in a tokamak, blanket designs that allow elimination of the intermediate loop, and low activity shields and toroidal field magnets are described. A discussion is given of the future role of conceptual reactor design research and the need for close interactions with ongoing experiments in fusion technology

  12. Influence of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha buildup on tokamak reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tolliver, J.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha accumulation on the confinement capability of a candidate Engineering Test Reactor plasma (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor) in achieving ignition and steady-state driven operation has been assessed using both global and 1-1/2-dimensional transport models. Estimates are made of the threshold for radial diffusion of fast alphas and thermal alpha buildup. It is shown that a relatively low level of radial transport, when combined with large gradients in the fast alpha density, leads to a significant radial flow with a deleterious effect on plasma performance. Similarly, modest levels of thermal alpha concentration significantly influence the ignition and steady-state burn capability

  13. D-3He tokamak reactor with inductive a.c. and unidirectional current operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitarai, O.

    1995-01-01

    We propose inductively operated D- 3 He tokamak reactors (R=9.5m, a=2.8 and 3.2m, B t =10 and 7.5T, and I p =53.6 and 52.5MA respectively) with an a.c. or unidirectional current (UDC) mode, operated in the first stability regime, with a small current drive power of about 500kW in the plasma side, and about 2MW in the transformer side. The high electron temperature T e (0)∼62.5keV together with a high bootstrap current fraction greater than 70% decreases the plasma resistance (to less than 1nΩ) and the loop voltage (less than 10mV range) and then prolongs the pulse length to more than 15h. The ignition characteristics of a D- 3 He tokamak reactor are analyzed by the operation path method on the P ht τ E 2 -T plane and POPCON for different confinement scalings. ((orig.))

  14. Application of high temperature ceramic superconductors (CSC) to commercial tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Kim, S.; Gohar, Y.; Turner, L.; Smith, D.L.; Mattas, R.

    1988-08-01

    Ceramic superconductors operating near liquid nitrogen temperature may experience higher heating rates without losing stability, compared conventional superconductors. This will permit cable design with less stabilizer, reducing fabrication costs for large fusion magnets. Magnet performance is studied for different operating current densities in the superconductor, and cost benefits to commercial tokamak reactors are estimated. It appears that 10 kA /center dot/ cm/sup /minus/2/ (at 77 K and /approximately/10 T) is a target current density which must be achieved in order for the ceramic superconductors to compete with conventional materials. At current densities around 50 kA /center dot/ cm/sup /minus/2/ most potential benefits have already been gained, as magnet structural steel begins to dominate the cost at this point. For a steady state reactor reductions of /approximately/7% are forecast for the overall capital cost of the power plant in the best case. An additional /approximately/3% cost saving is possible for pulsed tokamaks. 9 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs

  15. Deuterium-Tritium Simulations of the Enhanced Reversed Shear Mode in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Manickam, J.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff

    1997-04-01

    The potential performance, in deuterium-tritium plasmas, of a new enhanced con nement regime with reversed magnetic shear (ERS mode) is assessed. The equilibrium conditions for an ERS mode plasma are estimated by solving the plasma transport equations using the thermal and particle dif- fusivities measured in a short duration ERS mode discharge in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [F. M. Levinton, et al., Phys. Rev. Letters, 75, 4417, (1995)]. The plasma performance depends strongly on Zeff and neutral beam penetration to the core. The steady state projections typically have a central electron density of {approx}2:5x10 20 m{sup -3} and nearly equal central electron and ion temperatures of {approx}10 keV. In time dependent simulations the peak fusion power, {approx} 25 MW, is twice the steady state level. Peak performance occurs during the density rise when the central ion temperature is close to the optimal value of {approx} 15 keV. The simulated pressure profiles can be stable to ideal MHD instabilities with toroidal mode number n = 1, 2, 3, 4 and {infinity} for {beta}{sub norm} up to 2.5; the simulations have {beta}{sub norm} {le} 2.1. The enhanced reversed shear mode may thus provide an opportunity to conduct alpha physics experiments in conditions imilar to those proposed for advanced tokamak reactors.

  16. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    Volume II contains the following appendices: (1) summary of EPR design parameters, (2) impurity control, (3) plasma computational models, (4) structural support system, (5) materials considerations for the primary energy conversion system, (6) magnetics, (7) neutronics penetration analysis, (8) first wall stress analysis, (9) enrichment of isotopes of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation, and (10) noncircular plasma considerations

  17. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    Volume II contains the following appendices: (1) summary of EPR design parameters, (2) impurity control, (3) plasma computational models, (4) structural support system, (5) materials considerations for the primary energy conversion system, (6) magnetics, (7) neutronics penetration analysis, (8) first wall stress analysis, (9) enrichment of isotopes of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation, and (10) noncircular plasma considerations. (MOW)

  18. Public acceptance of fusion energy and scientific feasibility of a fusion reactor. DREAM (DRastically EAsy Maintenance) tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi

    1998-01-01

    If the major part of the electric power demand will be supplied by tokamak fusion power plants, a suitable tokamak reactor must be an ultimate goal, i.e., the reactor must be excellent both in terms of construction cost and safety aspects including operation availability (maintainability and reliability). In attaining this goal, an approach focusing on both safety and availability (including reliability and maintainability) issues is the most promising strategy. The tokamak reactor concept with a very high aspect ratio configuration and SiC/SiC composite structural materials is compatible with this approach, which is called the DREAM (DRastically EAsy Maintenance) approach. The SiC/SiC composite is a low activation material and an insulation material, and the high aspect ratio configuration leads to good accessibility for the maintenance of machines. As an intermediate steps between an experimental reactor such as ITER and the ultimate goal, the development of prototype reactor which demonstrates electric power generation and an initial-phase commercial reactor which demonstrates for COE (cost of electricity) competitiveness has been investigated. Especially for the prototype reactor, material and technological immaturity must be considered. (J.P.N.)

  19. The operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Tritium Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; LaMarche, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The TFTR tritium operations staff has successfully received, stored, handled, and processed over five hundred thousand curies of tritium for the purpose of supporting D-T (Deuterium-Tritium) operations at TFTR. Tritium operations personnel nominally provide continuous round the clock coverage (24 hours/day, 7 days/week) in shift complements consisting of I supervisor and 3 operators. Tritium Shift Supervisors and operators are required to have 5 years of operational experience in either the nuclear or chemical industry and to become certified for their positions. The certification program provides formal instruction, as well as on the job training. The certification process requires 4 to 6 months to complete, which includes an oral board lasting up to 4 hours at which time the candidate is tested on their knowledge of Tritium Technology and TFTR Tritium systems. Once an operator is certified, the training process continues with scheduled training weeks occurring once every 5 weeks. During D-T operations at TFTR the operators must evacuate the tritium area due to direct radiation from TFTR D-T pulses. During '' time operators maintain cognizance over tritium systems via a real time TV camera system. Operators are able to gain access to the Tritium area between TFTR D-T pulses, but have been excluded from die tritium area during D-T pulsing for periods up to 30 minutes. Tritium operators are responsible for delivering tritium gas to TFRR as well as processing plasma exhaust gases which lead to the deposition of tritium oxide on disposable molecular sieve beds (DMSB). Once a DMSB is loaded, the operations staff remove the expended DMSB, and replace it with a new DMSB container. The TFIR tritium system is operated via detailed procedures which require operator sign off for system manipulation. There are >300 procedures controlling the operation of the tritium systems

  20. The operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Tritium Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, C.A.; LaMarche, P.H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Anderson, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The TFTR tritium operations staff has successfully received, stored, handled, and processed over five hundred thousand curies of tritium for the purpose of supporting D-T (Deuterium-Tritium) operations at TFTR. Tritium operations personnel nominally provide continuous round the clock coverage (24 hours/day, 7 days/week) in shift complements consisting of I supervisor and 3 operators. Tritium Shift Supervisors and operators are required to have 5 years of operational experience in either the nuclear or chemical industry and to become certified for their positions. The certification program provides formal instruction, as well as on the job training. The certification process requires 4 to 6 months to complete, which includes an oral board lasting up to 4 hours at which time the candidate is tested on their knowledge of Tritium Technology and TFTR Tritium systems. Once an operator is certified, the training process continues with scheduled training weeks occurring once every 5 weeks. During D-T operations at TFTR the operators must evacuate the tritium area due to direct radiation from TFTR D-T pulses. During `` time operators maintain cognizance over tritium systems via a real time TV camera system. Operators are able to gain access to the Tritium area between TFTR D-T pulses, but have been excluded from die tritium area during D-T pulsing for periods up to 30 minutes. Tritium operators are responsible for delivering tritium gas to TFRR as well as processing plasma exhaust gases which lead to the deposition of tritium oxide on disposable molecular sieve beds (DMSB). Once a DMSB is loaded, the operations staff remove the expended DMSB, and replace it with a new DMSB container. The TFIR tritium system is operated via detailed procedures which require operator sign off for system manipulation. There are >300 procedures controlling the operation of the tritium systems.

  1. Pre-study of burn control in Tokamak reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elevant, T.; Anderson, D.; Hamnen, H.; Lisak, M.

    1991-04-01

    Findings from a general study of issues associated with control of burning fusion plasmas are reported, and applications to ITER are given. A number of control variables are discussed. A zerodimensional system has been developed and stability against coupled temperature and density variations are studied. Also space dependent energy balance and transition to thermonuclear burn are analysed as well as maximum obtainable Q-values under subignited operation conditions. Control designs with different input-output strategies are analysed and numerically simulated, and a numerical experiment of system identification is made. Requirements on diagnostics are discussed and areas for further studies are identified. (au) (64 refs.)

  2. Conceptual design of Remote Control System for EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, X.Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Li, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new design conception for remote control for EAST tokamak is proposed. • Rich Internet application (RIA) was selected to implement the user interface. • Some security mechanism was used to fulfill security requirement. - Abstract: The international collaboration becomes popular in tokamak research like in many other fields of science, because the experiment facilities become larger and more expensive. The traditional On-site collaboration Model that has to spend much money and time on international travel is not fit for the more frequent international collaboration. The Remote Control System (RCS), as an extension of the Central Control System for the EAST tokamak, is designed to provide an efficient and economical way to international collaboration. As a remote user interface, the RCS must integrate with the Central Control System for EAST tokamak to perform discharge control function. This paper presents a design concept delineating a few key technical issues and addressing all significant details in the system architecture design. With the aim of satisfying system requirements, the RCS will select rich Internet application (RIA) as a user interface, Java as a back-end service and Secure Socket Layer Virtual Private Network (SSL VPN) for securable Internet communication

  3. Nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is described. The system includes a series of parallel-connected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter and in each of which a precalculated functional value for that parameter is stored indicative of the percentage of maximum reactor load that the parameter contributes. The various functional values corresponding to the actual measured parameters are added together to provide a control signal used to shut down the reactor under overload conditions. (U.K.)

  4. Conceptual Design of Alborz Tokamak Poloidal Coils System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-04-01

    The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. One of the most important parts of tokamak design is the design of the poloidal field system. This part includes the numbers, individual position, currents and number of coil turns of the magnetic field coils. Circular cross section tokamaks have Vertical Field system but since the elongation and triangularity of plasma cross section shaping are important in improving the plasma performance and stability, the poloidal field coils are designed to have a shaped plasma configuration. In this paper the design of vertical field system and the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma, as given by the Grad-Shafranov equation will be discussed. The poloidal field coils system consists of 12 circular coils located symmetrically about the equator plane, six inner PF coils and six outer PF coils. Six outer poloidal field coils (PF) are located outside of the toroidal field coils (TF), and six inner poloidal field coils are wound on the inner legs and are located outside of a vacuum vessel.

  5. A flexible software architecture for tokamak discharge control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron, J.R.; Penaflor, B.; Walker, M.L.; Moller, J.; Butner, D.

    1995-01-01

    The software structure of the plasma control system in use on the DIII-D tokamak experiment is described. This system implements control functions through software executing in real time on one or more digital computers. The software is organized into a hierarchy that allows new control functions needed to support the DIII-D experimental program to be added easily without affecting previously implemented functions. This also allows the software to be portable in order to create control systems for other applications. The tokamak operator uses an X-windows based interface to specify the time evolution of a tokamak discharge. The interface provides a high level view for the operator that reduces the need for detailed knowledge of the control system operation. There is provision for an asynchronous change to an alternate discharge time evolution in response to an event that is detected in real time. Quality control is enhanced through off-line testing that can make use of software-based tokamak simulators

  6. A synchronization system to digitalize TJ-1 Tokamak data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Perez-Navarro, A.; Pacios, L.

    1983-01-01

    At TJ-1 Tokamak signals are stored on a 60-channel magnetic memory. In this report, a system to address those channels and synchronize readout is presented. Digitalized signals are stored in structured files on PDP-11/34 magnetic disks. (author)

  7. ORNL TNS Program: plasma engineering considerations and innovations for a medium field tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Rome, J.A.; Uckan, N.A.

    1977-12-01

    Recent plasma engineering studies have ascertained a viable concept for The Next Step (TNS) reactor based on medium toroidal fields between 4 T and 7 T at the plasma center, plasma anti β values up to 10%, and averaged densities between 0.6 x 10 14 cm -3 and 2.5 x 10 14 cm -3 . Plasma engineering innovations that can substantially reduce the size, cost, and complexity of the TNS reactor have been explored and are summarized. It is shown that the previously anticipated requirement of high pellet velocities can be substantially reduced; the toroidal field (TF) ripple requirements may be relaxed to reduce the number of TF coils and improve machine access; hybrid equilibrium field (EF) coils have been shown to require building only small interior coils and to reduce the power supply required by the exterior coils; proper approaches of microwave plasma preheating may reduce the peak loop voltage for start-up by an order of magnitude. The medium-field TNS reactor concepts and the plasma engineering innovations discussed should be applicable to other designs of tokamak reactors; some of the suggested innovations will be tested in upcoming experiments

  8. Safety in the ARIES-III D-3He tokamak reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.S.; Dolan, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the ARIES-III reactor study, an extensive examination of the viability of a D- 3 He-fueled commercial tokamak powder reactor. Because neutrons are produced only through side reactions (D+D- 3 HE+N; and D+D-T+p followed by D+T- 4 He+n), the reactor has the significant advantages of reduced activation of the first wall and shield, low afterheat and Class A or C low level waste disposal. Since no tritium is required for operation, no lithium-containing breeding blanket is necessary. A ferritic steel shield behind the first wall protects the magnets from gamma and neutron heating and from radiation damage. The authors explored the potential for isotopically tailoring the 4 mm tungsten layer on the divertor in order to reduce the offsite doses should a tungsten aerosol be released from the reactor after an accident. The authors also modeled a loss-of-cooling accident (LOCA) in which the organic coolant was burning in order to estimate the amount of radionuclides released from the first wall. Because the maximum temperature is low, degree C, release fractions are small. The authors analyzed the disposition of the 20 g/day of tritium that is produced by D-D reactions and removed by the vacuum pumps

  9. Pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Design and mode of operation of the main PWR components are described: reactor core, pressure vessel and internals, cooling systems with pumps and steam generators, ancillary systems, and waste processing. (TK) [de

  10. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  11. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-27

    If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  12. Technological and environmental prospects of low aspect ratio tokamak reactor VECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Tobita, K.; Isono, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sato, M.; Sakurai, S.; Yamauchi, M.; Nishitani, T.; Tani, K.; Sengoku, S.; Kudo, Y.; Song, Y.; Tokimatsu, K.; Shinya, K.; Senda, I.; Konishi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Optimization of VECTOR design parameters has led to a fusion output of 2.5 GW with a small reactor weight of 8,800 tons. Current ramp-up simulation with TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code) demonstrated a stable current ramp-up with externally non-inductive current drive and bootstrap current when a central current is induced externally enough to avoid an extreme reversed shear such as current hole. It was numerically confirmed that such a low-A reactor would have an advantage of α-particle confinement. The divertor is designed to use a flux expansion of scrape-off-layer in the divertor region to maintain the heat flux on the divertor plate to be lower than 10 MW/m 2 without remote radiative cooling. Because of its compactness, CO 2 emission in a life cycle of a VECTOR power plant is estimated to be as low as 3.2 g-CO 2 /kWh, being lower than that of an ITER-sized DEMO reactor (4.9 g-CO 2 /kWh). As to the waste management of VECTOR, on the basis of reactor design and radiological considerations, we suggest reusing a liquid metal breeding material (PbLi) and neutron shield material (TiH 2 ) in successive reactors. Due to this waste management, its disposal waste would be reduced to as low as 3,000-4,000 tons, which is comparable with the radioactive waste of a light water reactor (4,000 tons in metal). (author)

  13. Reactor safety assessment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Bray, M.A.; King, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). RSA is designed for use at the USNRC Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. RSAS is a situation assessment expert system which uses plant parametric data to generate conclusions for use by the NRC Reactor Safety Team. RSAS uses multiple rule bases and plant specific setpoint files to be applicable to all licensed nuclear power plants in the United States. RSAS currently covers several generic reactor categories and multiple plants within each category

  14. Software development of the KSTAR Tokamak Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.H.; Lee, T.G.; Baek, S.; Lee, S.I.; Chu, Y.; Kim, Y.O.; Kim, J.S.; Park, M.K.; Oh, Y.K.

    2008-01-01

    The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) project, which is constructing a superconducting Tokamak, was launched in 1996. Much progress in instrumentation and control has been made since then and the construction phase will be finished in August 2007. The Tokamak Monitoring System (TMS) measures the temperatures of the superconducting magnets, bus-lines, and structures and hence monitors the superconducting conditions during the operation of the KSTAR Tokamak. The TMS also measures the strains and displacements on the structures in order to monitor the mechanical safety. There are around 400 temperature sensors, more than 240 strain gauges, 10 displacement gauges and 10 Hall sensors. The TMS utilizes Cernox sensors for low temperature measurement and each sensor has its own characteristic curve. In addition, the TMS needs to perform complex arithmetic operations to convert the measurements into temperatures for each Cernox sensor for this large number of monitoring channels. A special software development effort was required to reduce the temperature conversion time and multi-threading to achieve the higher performance needed to handle the large number of channels. We have developed the TMS with PXI hardware and with EPICS software. We will describe the details of the implementations in this paper

  15. A Study of Performance in Low-Power Tokamak Reactor with Integrated Predictive Modeling Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianroj, Y.; Onjun, T.; Suwanna, S.; Picha, R.; Poolyarat, N.

    2009-07-01

    Full text: A fusion hybrid or a small fusion power output with low power tokamak reactor is presented as another useful application of nuclear fusion. Such tokamak can be used for fuel breeding, high-level waste transmutation, hydrogen production at high temperature, and testing of nuclear fusion technology components. In this work, an investigation of the plasma performance in a small fusion power output design is carried out using the BALDUR predictive integrated modeling code. The simulations of the plasma performance in this design are carried out using the empirical-based Mixed Bohm/gyro Bohm (B/gB) model, whereas the pedestal temperature model is based on magnetic and flow shear (δ α ρ ζ 2 ) stabilization pedestal width scaling. The preliminary results using this core transport model show that the central ion and electron temperatures are rather pessimistic. To improve the performance, the optimization approach are carried out by varying some parameters, such as plasma current and power auxiliary heating, which results in some improvement of plasma performance

  16. Design and construction of Alborz tokamak vacuum vessel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardani, M.; Amrollahi, R.; Koohestani, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. ► As one of the key components for the device, the vacuum vessel can provide ultra-high vacuum and clean environment for the plasma operation. ► A limiter is a solid surface which defines the edge of the plasma and designed to protect the wall from the plasma, localizes the plasma–surface interaction and localizes the particle recycling. ► Structural analyses were confirmed by FEM model for dead weight, vacuum pressure and plasma disruptions loads. - Abstract: The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. At the heart of the tokamak is the vacuum vessel and limiter which collectively are referred to as the vacuum vessel system. As one of the key components for the device, the vacuum vessel can provide ultra-high vacuum and clean environment for the plasma operation. The VV systems need upper and lower vertical ports, horizontal ports and oblique ports for diagnostics, vacuum pumping, gas puffing, and maintenance accesses. A limiter is a solid surface which defines the edge of the plasma and designed to protect the wall from the plasma, localizes the plasma–surface interaction and localizes the particle recycling. Basic structure analyses were confirmed by FEM model for dead weight, vacuum pressure and plasma disruptions loads. Stresses at general part of the VV body are lower than the structure material allowable stress (117 MPa) and this analysis show that the maximum stresses occur near the gravity support, and is about 98 MPa.

  17. Hydrogen isotope exchange and conditioning in graphite limiters used in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaMarche, P.H.; Dylla, H.F.; McCarthy, P.J.; Ulrickson, M.

    1986-01-01

    Isotopic exchange experiments performed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) are used to examine the outgassing and diffusive properties of graphite used as the plasma limiter. Changeover from hydrogen to deuterium for different periods ranges from approx.600 to 60 plasma discharges, which appears to be correlated in the limiter temperature. We present a simple analytical model that predicts a fast transient (approx.10 plasma discharges) changeover, where the deuterium fueling dilutes the adsorbed and near surface hydrogen, and a slowly changing term where bulk hydrogen diffuses to the surface. Using this model we can extract an activation energy for diffusion of 0.15 +- 0.02 eV. We hypothesize that interpore diffusion for this porous (approx.15%) material is consistent with our observations

  18. Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.

    1984-06-01

    Initial operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1 to 0.2 s for a line-average density range (anti n/sub e/) of 1 to 2.5 x 10 19 m -3 with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o) approx. 1.2 to 2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(o) approx. 0.9 to 1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/ approx. 3. A comparison of PLT, PDX, and TFTR plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law

  19. Measurements of tritium retention and removal on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Kamperschroer, J.; LaMarche, P.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Scott, S.; Ascione, G.; Amarescu, E.; Camp, R.; Casey, M.; Collins, J.; Cropper, M.; Gentile, C.; Gibson, M.; Hosea, J.; Kalish, M.; Langford, J.; Langish, S.; Mika, R.; Owens, D.K.; Pearson, G.; Raftopoulos, S.; Raucci, R.; Stevenson, T.; Von Halle, A.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, T.; Winston, J.

    1996-01-01

    Recent experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor have afforded an opportunity to measure the retention of tritium in a graphite limiter that is subject to erosion, codeposition, and high neutron flux. The tritium was injected by both gas puff and neutral beams. The isotopic mix of hydrogenic recycling was measured spectroscopically and the tritium fraction T/(H+D+T) transiently increased to as high as 75%. Some tritium was pumped out during the experimental run and some removed in a subsequent campaign using various clean-up techniques. While the short term retention of tritium was high, various conditioning techniques were successful in removing ≅8000 Ci and restoring the tritium inventory to a level well below the administrative limit. copyright 1996 American Vacuum Society

  20. Measurements of tritium retention and removal on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Kamperschroer, J.; LaMarche, P.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Scott, S.; Ascione, G.; Amarescu, E.; Camp, R.; Casey, M.; Collins, J.; Cropper, M.; Gentile, C.; Gibson, M.; Hosea, J.; Kalish, M.; Langford, J.; Langish, S.; Mika, R.; Owens, D.K.; Pearson, G.; Raftopoulos, S.; Raucci, R.; Stevenson, T.; Von Halle, A.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, T.; Winston, J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Recent experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor have afforded an opportunity to measure the retention of tritium in a graphite limiter that is subject to erosion, codeposition, and high neutron flux. The tritium was injected by both gas puff and neutral beams. The isotopic mix of hydrogenic recycling was measured spectroscopically and the tritium fraction T/(H+D+T) transiently increased to as high as 75{percent}. Some tritium was pumped out during the experimental run and some removed in a subsequent campaign using various clean-up techniques. While the short term retention of tritium was high, various conditioning techniques were successful in removing {approx_equal}8000 Ci and restoring the tritium inventory to a level well below the administrative limit. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  1. In-vessel tritium measurements using beta decay in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweben, S.J.; Gentile, C.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Pearson, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Walsh, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Tritium on the inside walls of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor was detected by configuring the vacuum vessel as an ionization chamber and measuring the secondary electron current from the tritium beta decay. The vessel was typically filled with {approx}5 Torr of dry nitrogen and the secondary electron current was collected by an internal electrode biased to about +15 V with respect to the vessel wall. The measured variations of the collected current with gas pressure, bias voltage, and applied magnetic fields are described, as well as an {ital in situ} calibration made by injecting a known amount of tritium gas. Improved versions of this diagnostic may be useful to track the in-vessel content of surface tritium in future fusion devices. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Numerical calculation of high frequency fast wave current drive in a reactor grade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushigusa, Kenkichi; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka

    1988-02-01

    A fast wave current drive with a high frequency is estimated for a reactor grade tokamak by the ray tracing and the quasi-linear Fokker-Planck calculations with an assumption of single path absorption. The fast wave can drive RF current with the drive efficiency of η CD = n-bar e (10 19 m -3 )I RC (A)R(m)/P RF (W) ∼ 3.0 when the wave frequency is selected to be f/f ci > 7. A sharp wave spectrum and a ph|| >/υ Te ∼ 3.0 are required to obtain a good efficiency. A center peaked RF current profile can be formed with an appropriate wave spectrum even in the high temperature plasma. (author)

  3. The magnet system of the Tokamak T-15 upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostenko, P.P.; Azizov, E.A.; Alfimov, D.E.; Belyakov, V.A.; Bondarchuk, E.N.; Chudnovsky, A.N.; Dokuka, V.N.; Kavin, A.A.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Khokhlov, M.V.; Kitaev, B.A.; Krasnov, S.V.; Maximova, I.I.; Labusov, A.N.; Lukash, V.E.; Mineev, A.B.; Muratov, V.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • T-15U project is the initial technical base for creating fusion neutron sources. • Magnet system of T-15U will confine the hot plasma in the divertor configuration. • Toroidal magnetic field at the plasma axis is 2 T. • T-15U should begin operations in 2016. - Abstract: Presently, the Tokamak T-15 is being upgraded. The magnet system of the Tokamak T-15 upgrade will obtain and confine the hot plasma in the divertor configuration. Plasma parameters are a major radius of 1.48 m, a minor radius of 0.67 m, an elongation of 1.7–1.9 and a triangularity of 0.3–0.4. The magnet system includes the toroidal winding and the poloidal magnet system. The poloidal magnet system generates the divertor with single null and double null magnetic configurations. The power supply system provides the necessary current scenarios in the windings of the magnet system. All elements of the magnet system will be manufactured by the end of 2015. The Tokamak T-15 upgrade should begin operations in 2016.

  4. The magnet system of the Tokamak T-15 upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostenko, P.P., E-mail: ppkhvost@rambler.ru [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Institute of Tokamak Physics, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Azizov, E.A.; Alfimov, D.E. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Institute of Tokamak Physics, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Belyakov, V.A.; Bondarchuk, E.N. [Joint Stock Company “D.V. Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus”, Metallostroy, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Chudnovsky, A.N.; Dokuka, V.N. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Institute of Tokamak Physics, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kavin, A.A. [Joint Stock Company “D.V. Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus”, Metallostroy, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Khayrutdinov, R.R. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Institute of Tokamak Physics, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Khokhlov, M.V.; Kitaev, B.A.; Krasnov, S.V.; Maximova, I.I.; Labusov, A.N. [Joint Stock Company “D.V. Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus”, Metallostroy, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lukash, V.E. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Institute of Tokamak Physics, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Mineev, A.B.; Muratov, V.P. [Joint Stock Company “D.V. Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus”, Metallostroy, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • T-15U project is the initial technical base for creating fusion neutron sources. • Magnet system of T-15U will confine the hot plasma in the divertor configuration. • Toroidal magnetic field at the plasma axis is 2 T. • T-15U should begin operations in 2016. - Abstract: Presently, the Tokamak T-15 is being upgraded. The magnet system of the Tokamak T-15 upgrade will obtain and confine the hot plasma in the divertor configuration. Plasma parameters are a major radius of 1.48 m, a minor radius of 0.67 m, an elongation of 1.7–1.9 and a triangularity of 0.3–0.4. The magnet system includes the toroidal winding and the poloidal magnet system. The poloidal magnet system generates the divertor with single null and double null magnetic configurations. The power supply system provides the necessary current scenarios in the windings of the magnet system. All elements of the magnet system will be manufactured by the end of 2015. The Tokamak T-15 upgrade should begin operations in 2016.

  5. Data acquisition system in JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Toshiaki; Matoba, Tohru; Mori, Masahiro; Kawakami, Tomohide; Kashiwa, Yoshitoshi; Yokoyama, Kenji; Matsuzaki, Yoshimi; Takada, Susumu

    1987-08-01

    Data acquisition system for JFT-2M tokamak has been developed. It handles systematically many types of data; monitoring data of JFT-2M machine, power supplies, plasma control system, several heating apparatus and a variety of data measured with diagnostic instruments. The system consists of a main super mini-computer, a front-end mini-computer and two CAMAC serial highways. Its main characteristics are good man-machine interface and the flexibility to the extended use. These are realized by table generators for a setup of control parameter of CAMAC module, serial highway, etc. and table handlers. In the tokamak experiment, the system can processes about 1.5 Mbyte data during the discharge interval of 3.5 minutes. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a safety system for a nuclear reactor which uses a parallel combination of computer type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular parameter (from transducers located in the reactor system) and each of which produces the functional counterpart of that particular parameter. The various functional counterparts are then added together to form a control signal for shutting down the reactor. The functional counterparts are developed by analysis of experimental thermal and hydraulic data, which are used to form expressions that define safe conditions

  7. Parameter study of high-β tokamak reactors with circular and strongly elongated cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herold, H.

    1977-05-01

    A simplified reactor model is used to study the influence of critical β-values on economy parameters and dimensions of possible long time pulsed tokamak reactors. Various betas deduced from stability and equilibrium MHD theory are introduced and put into the scaling in context with technological constraints, as maximum B-field, core constraint, maximum wall loading a.o. The plasma physical concepts treated comprise circular and strongly elongated cross section and approximated FCT equilibria. The computational results are presented as plots of possible economy parameter ranges (magnet energy, wall loading, volumina, investment costs per unit power) dependent on β for suitably chosen hierarchies of the constraints. - A burn time reduction by the build ups of α-pressure may be possible for the pressure profile sensitive high-β equilibria (FCT). Burn times in the 1O sec range, resulting from simple estimates, would about cancel the economic advantages of reactors with high-β equilibria compared to a β = 5% standardreactor (UWMAK I). (orig.) [de

  8. Design of self-cooled, liquid-metal blankets for tokamak and tandem mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Y.S.; Gohar, Y.; Hassanein, A.M.; Majumdar, S.; Picologlou, B.F.; Smith, D.L.; Szo, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    Results of the self-cooled, liquid-metal blanket design from the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) are summarized. The objectives of the BCSS project are to define a small number (about three) of blanket concepts that should be the focus of the blanket research and development (RandD) program, identify and prioritize the critical issues for the leading blanket concepts, and provide technical input necessary to develop a blanket RandD program plan. Two liquid metals (lithium and lithium-lead (17Li-83Pb)) and three structural materials (primary candidate alloy (PCA), ferritic steel (FS) (HT-9), and vanadium alloy (V-15 Cr-5 Ti)) are included in the evaluations for both tokamaks and tandem mirror reactors (TMRs). TMR is of the tube configuration similar to the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study design. Analyses were performed in the following generic areas for each blanket concept: MHD, thermal hydraulics, stress, neutronics, and tritium recovery. Integral analyses were performed to determine the design window for each blanket design. The Li/Li/V blanket for tokamak and the Li/Li/V, LiPb/LiPb/V, and Li/Li/HT-9 blankets for the TMR are judged to be top-rated concepts. Because of its better thermophysical properties and more uniform nuclear heating profile, liquid lithium is a better coolant than liquid 17Li83Pb. From an engineering point of view, vanadium alloy is a better structural material than either FS or PCA since the former has both a higher allowable structural temperature and a higher allowable coolant/structure interface temperature than the latter. Critical feasibility issues and design constraints for the self-cooled, liquid-metal blanket concepts are identified and discussed

  9. Overview of tritium systems for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlit, J.R.; Gruetzmacher, K.M.; Fleming, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is being designed at several laboratories to produce and study fully ignited plasma discharges. The tritium systems which will be needed for CIT include fueling systems and radiation monitoring and safety systems. Design of the tritium systems is the responsibility of the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major new tritium systems for CIT include a pellet injector, an air detritiation system and a glovebox atmosphere detritiation system. The pellet injector is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 7 refs., 2 figs

  10. Culham Conceptual Tokamak Mark II. Design study of the layout of a twin-reactor fusion power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, J.A.S.; Harding, N.H.

    1981-07-01

    This report describes the building layout and outline design for the nuclear complex of a fusion reactor power station incorporating two Culham Conceptual Tokamak Reactors Mk.II. The design incorporates equipment for steam generation, process services for the fusion reactors and all facilities for routine and non-routine servicing of the nuclear complex. The design includes provision of temporary facilities for on site construction of the major reactor components and shows that these facilities may be used for disassembly of the reactors either for major repair and/or decommissioning. Preliminary estimates are included, which indicate the cost benefits to be obtained from incorporating two reactors in one nuclear complex and from increased wall loading. (author)

  11. Interlock system for the COMPASS tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hron, Martin; Sova, J.; Šíba, J.; Kovář, J.; Adámek, Jiří; Pánek, Radomír; Havlíček, Josef; Písačka, Jan; Mlynář, Jan; Stöckel, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 85, 3-4 (2010), s. 505-508 ISSN 0920-3796. [IAEA Technical Meeting on Control, Data Acquisition and Remote Participation for Fusion Research/7th./. Aix – en – Provence, 15.06.2009-19.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7G09042; GA ČR GD202/08/H057 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak operation * Interlock * Personnel safety Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.143, year: 2010 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V3C-5003BXW-1&_user=6542793&_coverDate=07%2F31%2F2010&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000070123&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=6542793&md5=ef5794d05cc6530a905d1de43aa0ac6a&searchtype=a

  12. Comparison benchmark between tokamak simulation code and TokSys for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor vertical displacement control design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Qing-Lai; Xiao Bing-Jia; Guo Yong; Liu Lei; Wang Yue-Hang

    2017-01-01

    Vertical displacement event (VDE) is a big challenge to the existing tokamak equipment and that being designed. As a Chinese next-step tokamak, the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) has to pay attention to the VDE study with full-fledged numerical codes during its conceptual design. The tokamak simulation code (TSC) is a free boundary time-dependent axisymmetric tokamak simulation code developed in PPPL, which advances the MHD equations describing the evolution of the plasma in a rectangular domain. The electromagnetic interactions between the surrounding conductor circuits and the plasma are solved self-consistently. The TokSys code is a generic modeling and simulation environment developed in GA. Its RZIP model treats the plasma as a fixed spatial distribution of currents which couple with the surrounding conductors through circuit equations. Both codes have been individually used for the VDE study on many tokamak devices, such as JT-60U, EAST, NSTX, DIII-D, and ITER. Considering the model differences, benchmark work is needed to answer whether they reproduce each other’s results correctly. In this paper, the TSC and TokSys codes are used for analyzing the CFETR vertical instability passive and active controls design simultaneously. It is shown that with the same inputs, the results from these two codes conform with each other. (paper)

  13. Dynamic simulations of the cryogenic system of a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirillo, R.; Hoa, C.; Michel, F.; Rousset, B.; Poncet, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In a tokamak plasma confinement is achieved through high magnetic fields generated by superconductive coils that need to be cooled down to 4.4 K with a forced flow of supercritical Helium. Tokamak's coil system works cyclically and so it is subject to pulsed heat loads which have to be handled by the refrigerator. This latter has to be sized on the average power value and not according to the peak to limit investment and operation costs and hence the heat load needs to be smoothed. CEA Grenoble is in charge of providing the cryogenic system for the Japanese tokamak JT60-SA, currently under construction in Naka (Japan). Hence, in order to model and study the smoothing strategies, an experimental set up: HELIOS (Helium Loop for high load smoothing) has been built. This is a scaled down model (1:20) of the helium distribution system whose main components are a saturated helium bath and a supercritical helium loop. This large installation can reproduce conditions of pressure, temperature and transport times, similar to those expected in the cooling circuits of the central solenoid superconducting magnets of JT-60SA. The peak loads representative of the tokamak operation have been reproduced and smoothed before they arrive in the refrigerator, by means of a saturated helium bath (thermal reservoir). A dynamic modelling of the cryogenic system is presented, with results on the pulsed load scenarios. All the simulations have been performed with EcosimPro software developed and the cryogenic library: CRYOLIB. This document is made up of an abstract and the slides of the presentation

  14. Electric and electronic systems of the Tokamak Novillo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Callejas, R.; Valencia Alvarado, R.; Melendez Lugo, L.; Chavez Alarcon, E.

    1990-01-01

    The study, design and construction of electric and electronic equipment related to the Tokamak Novillo are described in this report. The equipment consists of: a) power supply and charge control circuits for six capacitor banks, b) control circuit for single and sequential shoots of the storaged energy on the magnetic coils, c) AF oscillator (17.5 kHz, 10kW, 2pps) for the cleaning discharge, d) data acquisition system. (Author)

  15. Data processing system for spectroscopy at Novillo Tokamak; Sistema de procesamiento de datos para espectroscopia en el Tokamak Novillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega C, G.; Gaytan G, E. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    Taking as basis some proposed methodologies by software engineering it was designed and developed a data processing system coming from the diagnostic equipment by spectroscopy, for the study of plasma impurities, during the cleaning discharges. the data acquisition is realized through an electronic interface which communicates the computer with the spectroscopy system of Novillo Tokamak. The data were obtained starting from files type text and processed for their subsequently graphic presentation. For development of this system named PRODATN (Processing of Data for Spectroscopy in Novillo Tokamak) was used the LabVIEW graphic programming language. (Author)

  16. Culham conceptual Tokamak reactor MkII. Conceptual layout of buildings for a twin reactor power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, J.A.S.; Harding, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the conceptual design of the nuclear complex of a 2400 MWe twin fusion reactor power station utilising common services and a single containment building. The design is based upon environmental and maintenance logistical requirements, the provision of adequate storage, workshop and construction facilities and the constraints imposed by the geometry of the main and auxiliary reactor coolant systems. (author)

  17. Reactor control system. PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    At present, 23 units of PWR type reactors have been operated in Japan since the start of Mihama Unit 1 operation in 1970 and various improvements have been made to upgrade operability of power stations as well as reliability and safety of power plants. As the share of nuclear power increases, further improvements of operating performance such as load following capability will be requested for power stations with more reliable and safer operation. This article outlined the reactor control system of PWR type reactors and described the control performance of power plants realized with those systems. The PWR control system is characterized that the turbine power is automatic or manually controlled with request of the electric power system and then the nuclear power is followingly controlled with the change of core reactivity. The system mainly consists of reactor automatic control system (control rod control system), pressurizer pressure control system, pressurizer water level control system, steam generator water level control system and turbine bypass control system. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Overview of the TIBER II [Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor] design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    The TIBER II Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor design is the result of efforts by numerous people and institutions, including many fusion laboratories, universities, and industries. While subsystems will be covered extensively in other reports, this overview will attempt to place the work in perspective. Major features of the design are compact size, low cost, and steady-state operation. These are achieved through plasma shaping and innovative features such as radiation tolerant magnets and optimized shielding. While TIBER II can operate in a pulsed mode, steady-state is preferred for nuclear testing. Current drive is achieved by a combination of lower hybrid and neutral beams. In addition, 10 MW of ECR is added for disruption control and current drive profiling. The TIBER II design has been the US option in preparation for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Other equivalent national designs are the NET in Europe, the FER in Japan and the OTR in the USSR. These designs will help set the basis for the new international design effort. 9 refs

  19. Calculations of alpha particle loss for reversed magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redi, M.H.; White, R.B.; Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; McCune, D.C.

    1997-03-01

    Hamiltonian coordinate, guiding center code calculations of the toroidal field ripple loss of alpha particles from a reversed shear plasma predict both total alpha losses and ripple diffusion losses to be greater than those from a comparable non-reversed magnetic shear plasma in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. High central q is found to increase alpha ripple losses as well as first orbit losses of alphas in the reversed shear simulations. A simple ripple loss model, benchmarked against the guiding center code, is found to work satisfactorily in transport analysis modelling of reversed and monotonic shear scenarios. Alpha ripple transport on TFTR affects ions within r/a=0.5, not at the plasma edge. The entire plasma is above threshold for stochastic ripple loss of alpha particles at birth energy in the reversed shear case simulated, so that all trapped 3.5 MeV alphas are lost stochastically or through prompt losses. The 40% alpha particle loss predictions for TFTR suggest that reduction of toroidal field ripple will be a critical issue in the design of a reversed shear fusion reactor.

  20. Long Pulse Technology Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernigan, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    The LPTT tokamak is a non-circular tokamak (R = 1.5 m, a = .45 m) proposed by ORNL for extended pulse operation at high β (5%) and reactor level wall power loading (40 w/cm 2 ). The toroidal field coils are superconducting and a super-conducting bundle divertor is proposed for active impurity control. All systems are designed for continuous operation which will provide pulse lengths > 20 seconds with a 6 to 10 weber flux swing. Experimental access and flexibility in operation are primary design goals

  1. Stationary Flowing Liquid Lithium (SFLiLi) systems for tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid; Gentile, Charles; Roquemore, Lane

    2013-10-01

    The present approach to magnetic fusion which relies on high recycling plasma-wall interaction has exhausted itself at the level of TFTR, JET, JT-60 devices with no realistic path to the burning plasma. Instead, magnetic fusion needs a return to its original idea of insulation of the plasma from the wall, which was the dominant approach in the 1970s and upon implementations has a clear path to the DEMO device with PDT ~= 100 MW and Qelectric > 1 . The SFLiLi systems of this talk is the technology tool for implementation of the guiding idea of magnetic fusion. It utilizes the unique properties of flowing LiLi to pump plasma particles and, thus, insulate plasma from the walls. The necessary flow rate, ~= 1 g3/s, is very small, thus, making the use of lithium practical and consistent with safety requirements. The talk describes how chemical activity of LiLi, which is the major technology challenge of using LiLi in tokamaks, is addressed by SFLiLi systems at the level of already performed (HT-7) experiment, and in ongoing implementations for a prototype of SFLiLi for tokamak divertors and the mid-plane limiter for EAST tokamak (to be tested in the next experimental campaign). This work is supported by US DoE contract No. DE-AC02-09-CH11466.

  2. Overview of the STARFIRE reference commercial tokamak fusion power reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Abdou, M.A.; DeFreece, D.A.; Trachsel, C.A.; Graumann, D.; Barry, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the STARFIRE study is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The major features for STARFIRE include a steady-state operating mode based on a continuous rf lower-hybrid current drive and auxiliary heating, solid tritium breeder material, pressurized water cooling, limiter/vacuum system for impurity control and exhaust, high tritium burnup, superconducting EF coils outside the TF superconducting coils, fully remote maintenance, and a low-activation shield

  3. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l i ). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q a ∼ 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l i plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q 0 > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions

  4. The nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the various nuclear reactor systems, starting with the Generation II, then the present development of the Generation III and the stakes and challenges of the future Generation IV. Some have found appropriate to oppose reactor systems or generations one to another, especially by minimizing the enhancements of generation III compared to generation II or by expecting the earth from generation IV (meaning that generation III is already obsolete). In the first part of the document (chapter 2), some keys are given to the reader to develop its proper opinion. Chapter 3 describes more precisely the various reactor systems and generations. Chapter 4 discusses the large industrial manoeuvres around the generation III, and the last chapter gives some economical references, taking into account, for the various means of power generation, the impediments linked to climate protection

  5. Microcomputer Based System to control the Load of a Capacitor Array in the TJ-1 Tokamak; Sistema de Control de Carga de Condensadores del TJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Asenso, L.; Sanz, J. A.

    1990-07-01

    The power to create the magnetic fields in the TJ-1 Tokamak is provides by an array of 16 capacitor sets. The total capacity of this array is 8. 1F. This work describes a computer system based on the Motorola M-6800 micro- processor which controls the load of the capacitor set and stablished the conditions for the reactor trigger. (Author)

  6. A Distributed Synchronization and Timing System on the EAST Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiarong; Wu, Yichun; Shu, Yantai

    2008-08-01

    A key requirement for the EAST distributed control system (EASTDCS) is time synchronization to an accuracy of RTOS). The DSTS provides the control and the data acquisition systems with reference clocks (0.01 Hz 10 MHz) and delayed trigger times ( 1 mus 4294 s). These are produced by a Core Module Unit (CMU) connected by optical fibres to many Local Synchronized Node Units (LSNU). The fibres provide immunity from electrical noise and are of equal length to match clock and trigger delays between systems. This paper describes the architecture of the DSTS on the EAST tokamak and provides an overview of the characteristics of the main and local units.

  7. System design of toroidal field power supply of CDD tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zheng Zhi

    1996-12-01

    This report deals with system design of Toroidal Field Power Supply of CDD tokamak (CDD-TFPS). The general design philosophy and design variations are introduced. After the outline of CDD-TFPS, the short-circuit calculation, the evaluation of converter parameters, the compatibility of converter and line are carried out. the specifications of major components, semi-conductor devices and accessories are given. High attention is paid to protection system. The design of sub-control and grounding system are described too. Some more general material for power supply design are attached in appendices for reference. (author). 30 tabs., 21 figs.

  8. Reaction-rate coefficients, high-energy ions slowing-down, and power balance in a tokamak fusion reactor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, Tatsuzo

    1978-07-01

    Described are the reactivity coefficient of D-T fusion reaction, slowing-down processes of deuterons injected with high energy and 3.52 MeV alpha particles generated in D-T reaction, and the power balance in a Tokamak reactor plasma. Most of the results were obtained in the first preliminary design of JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) driven with stationary neutral beam injection. A manual of numerical computation program ''BALTOK'' developed for the calculations is given in the appendix. (auth.)

  9. Tokamak burn cycle study: a data base for comparing long pulse and steady-state power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K. Jr.; Hassanein, A.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1983-11-01

    Several distinct operating modes (conventional ohmic, noninductive steady state, internal transformer, etc.) have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics (current drive efficiency) and engineering (superior materials) which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles.

  10. Tokamak burn cycle study: a data base for comparing long pulse and steady-state power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K. Jr.; Hassanein, A.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1983-11-01

    Several distinct operating modes (conventional ohmic, noninductive steady state, internal transformer, etc.) have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics (current drive efficiency) and engineering (superior materials) which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles

  11. Slow bank system of SINP-Tokamak: A short report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, R.; Ranjan, P.; Chowdhury, S.; Bose, S.

    1997-01-01

    SINP Tokamak was made operational in July, 1987. The power supply system of the tokamak at that time was designed for a plasma duration of around 2 ms for a peak plasma current of 75 kA. Efforts were directed to increase this duration to 20 ms with the help of a slow bank system designed to work in conjunction with the original fast bank system. The design aspects of the system were completed and the system has been partially executed. Subsequent to this partial implementation, efforts were directed to incorporate the necessary control system and interface facilities between the existing fast bank and the developed slow bank systems. The significant features of the control circuits are that they work according to a well thought out sequences of logic and are designed to guard against possible failures in the existing or the developed power supplies. Efforts have been put to make the operation of the system as much user-friendly as could be worked out within certain practical constraints. The control circuit and interface facilities have been put to extensive tests and are found to work satisfactorily. The entire power supply system is now in active use for different research programmes in the group. (author)

  12. Pulsed electrical system with digital control of the ETE tokamak (spherical tokamak experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Luis Filipe de Faria Pereira Wiltgen

    1999-01-01

    This work, presented as a M.Sc. dissertation in Electronic Engineering, comprehending basically the development of several dedicated electrical systems for the spherical tokamak ETE, in special, the capacitor bank circuit for plasma formation and heating (solenoid coils), the capacitor bank circuits for production of the toroidal and vertical magnetic fields for plasma confinement and equilibrium (toroidal and vertical coils), as well as, the control system which is based on personal computer with digital interface through CAMAC IEEE-583 modules and the safety system based on pneumatic components. The ETE is a machine to be used for experimental study of hot plasmas with fusion relevant parameters. The principal of the machine is the small aspect ratio parameter, A=R/α ∼ 1,5, where R and α are the major and minor radii, respectively, of the plasma toroidal column. This machine is under construction at Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP) of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) in Sao Jose dos Campos- SP. (author)

  13. Lithium beam diagnostic system on the COMPASS tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anda, G.; Bencze, A. [Wigner – RCP, HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Berta, M., E-mail: bertam@sze.hu [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Széchenyi István University, Győr (Hungary); Dunai, D. [Wigner – RCP, HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Hacek, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Krbec, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Réfy, D.; Krizsanóczi, T.; Bató, S.; Ilkei, T.; Kiss, I.G.; Veres, G.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner – RCP, HAS, Budapest (Hungary)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Li-beam diagnostic system on the COMPASS tokamak is an improved and compact system to allow testing of Atomic Beam Probe. • The possibility to measure background corrected density profiles on the few microseconds time scale. • First Li-beam diagnostic system with recirculating neutralizer. • The system includes the redesigned ion source with longer lifetime. - Abstract: An improved lithium beam based beam emission spectroscopy system – installed on COMPASS tokamak – is described. The beam energy enhanced up to 120 keV for Atomic Beam Probe measurement. The size of the ion source is doubled, using a newly developed thermionic heater instead of the conventionally used heating (tungsten or molybdenum) filament. The neutralizer is also improved. It produces the same sodium vapor in a cell but minimize the loss condensing the vapor on a cold surface which is led back (in fluid state) into the sodium oven. This way we call it recirculating neutralizer. The observation system consists of a CCD camera and an avalanche photodiode array.

  14. Measurements of energy and flux of neutrals at the wall in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampler, W.R.; Kilpatrick, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    The energy and flux of charge-exchange neutral deuterium incident on the wall in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) were measured using a carbon resistance probe. This device utilizes the increase in electrical resistance of a thin carbon film produced by the impinging particles. Particle energies and fluxes were determined from the stopping effect of thin layers of silicon over the carbon. Film thicknesses were chosen to give a useful energy range from about 50 to 5000 eV. Time-resolved data were obtained for the first time by using a transient digitizer to record the signals every millisecond during the discharge. The deduced flux and Maxwellian temperature were 0.7 x 10 14 /cm 2 s and kT = 350 eV, respectively, during Ohmic heating. Neutral beam heating (10 MW) increased the temperature by a factor of 4 and increased the flux by a factor of 2. The observed flux of neutrals to the wall is large enough for changes in the recycling of these particles to affect plasma fueling significantly

  15. Cryosorption of helium on argon frost in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Cropper, M.B.; Dylla, H.F.; Garzotto, V.; Dudek, L.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Martin, G.D.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.; Kim, J.

    1990-01-01

    Helium pumping on argon frost has been investigated on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam injectors and shown to be viable for limited helium beam operation. Maximum pumping speeds are ∼25% less than those measured for pumping of deuterium. Helium pumping efficiency is low, >20 argon atoms are required to pump each helium atom. Adsorption isotherms are exponential and exhibit a twofold increase in adsorption capacity as the cryopanel temperature is reduced from 4.3 K to 3.7 K. Pumping speed was found to be independent of cryopanel temperature over the temperature range studied. After pumping a total of 2000 Torr l of helium, the beamline base pressure rose to 2x10 -5 Torr from an initial value of 10 -8 Torr. Accompanying this three order of magnitude increase in pressure was a modest 40% decrease in pumping speed. The introduction of 168 Torr l of deuterium prior to helium injection reduced the pumping speed by a factor of two with no decrease in adsorption capacity

  16. Tritium production in He-3 gas cells immersed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutron field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jassby, D.L.; Gentile, C.A.; Ascione, G.; Kugel, H.W.; Roquemore, A.L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Kumar, A. [University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Tritium generated in an external cell by the reaction {sup 3}He(n,p)T can be used as a gauge of long-term fusion neutron production, because of the 12-year half-life of T and the relative ease of measuring the T content either by sampling or from the saturation current of the cell when operated as an ionization chamber. Two high-pressure {sup 3}He gas cells enclosed in polyethylene neutron moderators were exposed to Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutrons during high-power D{endash}T operation. The tritium produced in the cells was assayed by the Princeton Differential Atmospheric Tritium Sampler. The measured tritium generated per 10{sup 19} fusion neutrons was 510 pCi/cc at 2.3 m from the TFTR vessel and 1.3 m below the midplane, and 2020 pCi/cc at 1.0 m from the TFTR vessel in the midplane. Combining these results with previous measurements at a third location, we found 0.11 to 0.23 triton produced per neutron incident on the projected cell cross section, with an asymptotic local tritium breeding ratio of 0.32. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Measurements of tokamak fusion test reactor D-T radiation shielding efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H.W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Ascione, G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Elwood, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Gilbert, J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Ku, L.P. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Levine, J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Rule, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Azziz, N. [USDOE Environmental Measurements Lab., New York (United States); Goldhagen, P. [USDOE Environmental Measurements Lab., New York (United States); Hajnal, F. [USDOE Environmental Measurements Lab., New York (United States); Shebell, P. [USDOE Environmental Measurements Lab., New York (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Measurements of neutron and gamma dose-equivalents were performed in the test cell, at the outer test cell wall, in nearby work areas, and out to the nearest property lines at a distance of 180m. Argon ionization chambers, moderated {sup 3}He proportional counters, and fission chamber detectors were used to obtain measurements of neutron and gamma dose-equivalents per D-T neutron during individual tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) discharges. These measured neutron and gamma D-T dose-equivalents per TFTR neutron characterize the effects of local variations in material density resulting from the complex asymmetric site geometry. The measured dose-equivalents per TFTR D-T neutron and the cumulative neutron production were used to determine that the planned annual TFTR neutron production of 1 x 10{sup 21} D-T neutrons is consistent with the design objective of limiting the total dose-equivalent at the property line, from all radiation sources and pathways, to less than 10mrem per year. (orig.).

  18. Review of deuterium--tritium results from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K. M.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Anderson, J W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, C. W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N. L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Chang, C. S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dendy, R.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Evenson, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M. J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marmar, E. S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mazzucato, E.; Mauel, M.; McCarthy, M. P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; O`Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Sesnic, S.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Strachan, J. D.; Stodiek, W.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Tighe, W.; Timberlake, J. R.; Tobita, K.; Towner, H. H.; Tuszewski, M.; Halle, A. Von; Vannoy, C.; Viola, M.; Goeler, S. Von; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wester, R.; White, R.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Winston, J.; Wright, K.; Wong, K. L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zavereev, V.; Zweben, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    The first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas using nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium have been carried out on TFTR. At present the maximum fusion power of 10.7 MW, using 39.5 MW of neutral-beam heating, in a supershot discharge and 6.7 MW in a high-βp discharge following a current rampdown. The fusion power density in a core of the plasma is ≈ 2.8 MW m₋3, exceeding that expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) at 1500 MW total fusion power. The energy confinement time, τE, is observed to increase in D–T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the ni (0) Ti(0) τE product by 55%. The improvement in thermal confinement is caused primarily by a decrease in ion heat conductivity in both supershot and limiter-H-mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time to 0.27 s and enabled higher current operation in both supershot and high-βp discharges. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating of a D–T plasma, using the second harmonic of tritium, has been demonstrated. First measurements of the confined alpha particles have been performed and found to be in good agreement with TRANSP simulations. Initial measurements of the alpha ash profile have been compared with simulations using particle transport coefficients from He gas puffing experiments. The loss of alpha particles to a detector at the bottom of the vessel is well described by the first-orbit loss mechanism. No loss due to alpha-particle-driven instabilities has yet been observed. D–T experiments on TFTR will continue to explore the assumptions of the ITER design and to examine some of the physics issues associated with an advanced tokamak reactor.

  19. Advanced commercial Tokamak optimization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, R.H.; Berwald, D.H.; Gordon, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Our recent studies have concentrated on developing optimal high beta (bean-shaped plasma) commercial tokamak configurations using TRW's Tokamak Reactor Systems Code (TRSC) with special emphasis on lower net electric power reactors that are more easily deployable. A wide range of issues were investigated in the search for the most economic configuration: fusion power, reactor size, wall load, magnet type, inboard blanket and shield thickness, plasma aspect ratio, and operational β value. The costs and configurations of both steady-state and pulsed reactors were also investigated. Optimal small and large reactor concepts were developed and compared by studying the cost of electricity from single units and from multiplexed units. Multiplexed units appear to have advantages because they share some plant equipment and have lower initial capital investment as compared to larger single units

  20. Systematic design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennen, B.A.; Westerhof, E.; Nuij, Pwjm; M.R. de Baar,; Steinbuch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of tearing modes is essential for the operation of tokamaks. This paper describes the design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak. The two main control tasks of this feedback control system are the radial alignment of electron

  1. MTX [Microwave Tokamak Experiment] plasma diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, B.W.; Hooper, E.B.; Brooksby, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, a general overview of the MTX plasma diagnostics system is given. This includes a description of the MTX machine configuration and the overall facility layout. The data acquisition system and techniques for diagnostic signal transmission are also discussed. In addition, the diagnostic instruments planned for both an initial ohmic-heating set and a second FEL-heating set are described. The expected range of plasma parameters along with the planned plasma measurements will be reviewed. 7 refs., 5 figs

  2. A high energy neutral beam system for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, O.A.; Chan, C.F.; Cooper, W.S.

    1988-09-01

    High energy neutral beams provide a promising method of heating and driving current in steady-state tokamak fusion reactors. As an example, we have made a conceptual design of a neutral beam system for current drive on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The system, based on electrostatic acceleration of D/sup /minus// ions, can deliver up to 100 MW of 1.6 MeV D 0 neutrals through three ports. Radiation protection is provided by locating sensitive beamline components 35 to 50 m from the reactor. In an application to a 3300 MW power reactor, a system delivering 120 MW of 2-2.4 MeV deuterium beams assisted by 21 MW of lower hybrid wave power drives 25 MA and provides an adequate plasma power gain (Q = 24) for a commercial fusion power plant. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  3. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase II report. Volume I: executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, G.M.; Zahn, H.S.; Mantz, H.C.; Kaletta, G.R.; Waganer, L.M.; Carosella, L.A.; Conlee, J.L.

    1978-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify design features of fusion power reactors which contribute to the achievement of high levels of maintainability. Volume 1, the Executive Summary, presents the progress achieved toward this objective in this phase and includes a comparison with the results of the first phase study efforts. A series of maintainability design guidelines and an improved maintenance system are defined as initial steps in developing the requirements for a maintainable tokamak fusion power system. The principle comparative studies that are summarized include the determination of the benefits of various vacuum wall arrangements, the effect of unscheduled and scheduled maintenance of the first wall/blanket, some initial investigation of maintenance required for subsystems other than the first wall/blanket, and the impact of maintenance equipment failures

  4. Continuous, saturation, and discontinuous tokamak plasma vertical position control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrishkin, Yuri V., E-mail: y_mitrishkin@hotmail.com [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Pavlova, Evgeniia A., E-mail: janerigoler@mail.ru [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Evgenii A., E-mail: ea.kuznetsov@mail.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Gaydamaka, Kirill I., E-mail: k.gaydamaka@gmail.com [V. A. Trapeznikov Institute of Control Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Robust new linear state feedback control system for tokamak plasma vertical position. • Plasma vertical position relay control system with voltage inverter in sliding mode. • Design of full models of multiphase rectifier and voltage inverter. • First-order unit approximation of full multiphase rectifier model with high accuracy. • Wider range of unstable plant parameters of stable control system with multiphase rectifier. - Abstract: This paper is devoted to the design and comparison of unstable plasma vertical position control systems in the T-15 tokamak with the application of two types of actuators: a multiphase thyristor rectifier and a transistor voltage inverter. An unstable dynamic element obtained by the identification of plasma-physical DINA code was used as the plasma model. The simplest static feedback state space control law was synthesized as a linear combination of signals accessible to physical measurements, namely the plasma vertical displacement, the current, and the voltage in a horizontal field coil, to solve the pole placement problem for a closed-loop system. Only one system distinctive parameter was used to optimize the performance of the feedback system, viz., a multiple real pole. A first-order inertial unit was used as the rectifier model in the feedback. A system with a complete rectifier model was investigated as well. A system with the voltage inverter model and static linear controller was brought into a sliding mode. As this takes place, real time delays were taken into account in the discontinuous voltage inverter model. The comparison of the linear and sliding mode systems showed that the linear system enjoyed an essentially wider range of the plant model parameters where the feedback system was stable.

  5. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system is disclosed. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel

  6. Prototype tokamak fusion reactor based on SiC/SiC composite material focusing on easy maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Ueda, S.; Kurihara, R.; Kuroda, T.; Miura, H.; Sako, K.; Takase, H.; Seki, Y.; Adachi, J.; Yamazaki, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Mori, S.; Shinya, K.; Murakami, Y.; Senda, I.; Okano, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Yoshida, T.

    2000-01-01

    If the major part of the electric power demand is to be supplied by tokamak fusion power plants, the tokamak reactor must have an ultimate goal, i.e. must be excellent in construction cost, safety aspect and operational availability (maintainability and reliability), simultaneously. On way to the ultimate goal, the approach focusing on the safety and the availability (including reliability and maintainability) issues must be the more promising strategy. The tokamak reactor concept with the very high aspect ratio configuration and the structural material of SiC/SiC composite is compatible with this approach, which is called the DRastically Easy Maintenance (DREAM) approach. This is because SiC/SiC composite is a low activation material and an insulation material, and the high aspect ratio configuration leads to a good accessibility for the maintenance machines. As the intermediate steps along this strategy between the experimental reactor such as international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) and the ultimate goal, a prototype reactor and an initial phase commercial reactor have been investigated. Especially for the prototype reactor, the material and technological immaturities are considered. The major features of the prototype and commercial type reactors are as follows. The fusion powers of the prototype and the commercial type are 1.5 and 5.5 GW, respectively. The major/minor radii for the prototype and the commercial type are of 12/1.5 m and 16/2 m, respectively. The plasma currents for the prototype and the commercial type are 6 and 9.2 MA, respectively. The coolant is helium gas, and the inlet/outlet temperatures of 500/800 and 600/900 deg. C for the prototype and the commercial type, respectively. The thermal efficiencies of 42 and 50% are obtainable in the prototype and the commercial type, respectively. The maximum toroidal field strengths of 18 and 20 tesla are assumed in the prototype and the commercial type, respectively. The thermal

  7. Data bank system in JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, S.; Matsuda, T.; Miura, Y.; Mori, M.; Kawakami, T.; Matoba, T.

    1987-01-01

    It is very important to keep suitably and use effectively experimental data in the field of fusion research. The data bank system for fusion experiment can be classified into the following two forms, according to the type of their use: (1) Rapid Analysis Data Bank System; (2) High Quality Data Bank System. And their features are summarized. The data bank system of the former type was prepared for JFT-2M tokamak on the basis of the above classification. By introduction of this data bank system, the following results can be obtained: (1) Rationalization of data analyzing procedure; (2) Improvement of reliability by exclusion of bad data; (3) Easy expansions of analyzing function and tool development; (4) Space saving by extraction and compression of key information

  8. Vacuum system of the Tokamak Novillo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia Alvarado, R.; Lopez Callejas, R.; Melendez Lugo, L.; Chavez Alarcon, E.

    1990-01-01

    A toroidal vacuum chamber of 28 access ports was constructed from four stainless steel 316L elbows joined together with dielectric seals to provide voltage break in the toroidal direction. All vacuum seals were viton O-rings. A 500 1/s turbomolecular pump provide a base pressure of 4 x 10 -8 mbar with light backing (∼ 60 deg C). In the regime of cleaning discharge the toroidal chamber is filled with H 2 to a pressure of 0.2 + 0.4 mbar. The ohmic heating coils are pulsed with a AF oscillator (10 kW, 17.5 kHz) for 60-80 msec, at a repetition rate of about 2 Hz. A toroidal magnetic field of roughly 600 G is added to generate the cleaning discharge. According to a residual gas analyzer installed in the system, 80% of the base pressure was given by water; the other components were hydrogen and mon- and dioxides of carbon. (Author)

  9. New D3-D tokamak plasma control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, G. L.; Ferron, J. R.; McKee, E.; Nerem, A.; Smith, T.; Greenfield, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Lazarus, E. A.

    1992-09-01

    A state-of-the-art plasma control system has been constructed for use on the DIII-D tokamak to provide high speed real time data acquisition and feedback control of DIII-D plasma parameters. This new system has increased the precision to which discharge shape and position parameters can be maintained and has provided the means to rapidly change from one plasma configuration to another. The capability to control the plasma total energy and the ICRF antenna loading resistance has been demonstrated. The speed and accuracy of this digital system will allow control of the current drive and heating systems in order to regulate the current and pressure profiles and divertor power deposition in the DIII-D machine. Use of this system will allow the machine and power supplies to be better protected from undesirable operating regimes. The advanced control system is also suitable for control algorithm development for future machines in these areas and others such as disruption avoidance. The DIII-D tokamak facility is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by General Atomics Company (GA) in San Diego, California. The DIII-D experimental program will increase emphasis on rf heating and current drive in the near future and is installing a cryopumped divertor ring during the fall of 1992. To improve the flexibility of this machine for these experiments, the new shape control system was implemented. The new advanced plasma control system has enhanced the capabilities of the DIII-D machine and provides a data acquisition and control platform that promises to be useful far beyond its original charter.

  10. End points in discharge cleaning on TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, D.; Dylla, H.F.; Bell, M.G.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bush, C.E.; Gettelfinger, G.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Janos, A.C.; Jobes, F.C.

    1989-07-01

    It has been found necessary to perform a series of first-wall conditioning steps prior to successful high power plasma operation in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). This series begins with glow discharge cleaning (GDC) and is followed by pulse discharge cleaning (PDC). During machine conditioning, the production of impurities is monitored by a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). PDC is made in two distinct modes: Taylor discharge cleaning (TDC), where the plasma current is kept low (15--50 kA) and of short duration (50 ms) by means of a relatively high prefill pressure and aggressive PDC, where lower prefill pressure and higher toroidal field result in higher current (200--400 kA) limited by disruptions at q(a) /approx/ 3 at /approx/ 250 ms. At a constant repetition rate of 12 discharges/minute, the production rate of H/sub 2/O, CO, or other impurities has been found to be an unreliable measure of progress in cleaning. However, the ability to produce aggressive PDC with substantial limiter heating, but without the production of x-rays from runaway electrons, is an indication that TDC is no longer necessary after /approx/ 10/sup 5/ pulses. During aggressive PDC, the uncooled limiters are heated by the plasma from the bakeout temperature of 150/degree/C to about 250/degree/C over a period of three to eight hours. This limiter heating is important to enhance the rate at which H/sub 2/O is removed from the graphite limiter. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. End points in discharge cleaning on TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Dylla, H.F.; Bell, M.G.

    1989-07-01

    It has been found necessary to perform a series of first-wall conditioning steps prior to successful high power plasma operation in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). This series begins with glow discharge cleaning (GDC) and is followed by pulse discharge cleaning (PDC). During machine conditioning, the production of impurities is monitored by a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). PDC is made in two distinct modes: Taylor discharge cleaning (TDC), where the plasma current is kept low (15--50 kA) and of short duration (50 ms) by means of a relatively high prefill pressure and aggressive PDC, where lower prefill pressure and higher toroidal field result in higher current (200--400 kA) limited by disruptions at q(a) approx 3 at approx 250 ms. At a constant repetition rate of 12 discharges/minute, the production rate of H 2 O, CO, or other impurities has been found to be an unreliable measure of progress in cleaning. However, the ability to produce aggressive PDC with substantial limiter heating, but without the production of x-rays from runaway electrons, is an indication that TDC is no longer necessary after approx 10 5 pulses. During aggressive PDC, the uncooled limiters are heated by the plasma from the bakeout temperature of 150 degree C to about 250 degree C over a period of three to eight hours. This limiter heating is important to enhance the rate at which H 2 O is removed from the graphite limiter. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. Development of remote control integrator system on Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yichun; Wang Lingzhi; Shu Shuangbao

    2014-01-01

    In order to meet with the requirement of electromagnetic diagnosis to the J-TEXT Tokamak, a remote control integrator system was developed. With modular design method, the integrator system is composed of the integrator cards, a control card, a linear power card and the BNC interface cards, and it uses the PC control soft- ware to conduct network control. An integrator system provides 32 integrator channels, and all integral channels have four kinds of integral time constants for remote selection and provide three kinds of integrator running control methods. According to laboratory and J-TEXT field testing, it shows that the output voltage range is -10-10 V, output noise is not more than 5 mV, and for the four kinds of integral time constants, the integral output drifts are all less than 5 mV within 100 s for each integrator channel. (authors)

  13. Neutral beam injection system design for KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, B.H.; Lee, K.W.; Chung, K.S.; Oh, B.H.; Cho, Y.S.; Bae, Y.D.; Han, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-06-01

    The NBI system for KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) has been designed based on conventional positive ion beam technology. One beam line consists of three ion sources, three neutralizers, one bending magnet, and one drift tube. This system will deliver 8 MW deuterium beam to KSTAR plasma in normal operation to support the advanced experiments on heating, current drive and profile control. The key technical issues in this design were high power ion source(120 kV, 65 A), long pulse operation (300 seconds; world record is 30 sec), and beam rotation from vertical to horizontal direction. The suggested important R and D points on ion source and beam line components are also included. (author). 7 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Plasma density remote control system of experimental advanced superconductive tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mingxin; Luo Jiarong; Li Guiming; Wang Hua; Zhao Dazheng; Xu Congdong

    2007-01-01

    In Tokamak experiments, experimental data and information on the density control are stored in the local computer system. Therefore, the researchers have to be in the control room for getting the data. Plasma Density Remote Control System (DRCS), which is implemented by encapsulating the business logic on the client in the B/S module, conducts the complicated science computation and realizes the synchronization with the experimental process on the client. At the same time, Web Services and Data File Services are deployed for the data exchange. It is proved in the experiments that DRCS not only meets the requirements for the remote control, but also shows an enhanced capability on the data transmission. (authors)

  15. Filterscope diagnostic system on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z.; Wu, C. R.; Yao, X. J.; Zhang, P. F.; Jin, Z.; Hou, Y. M. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Z. W.; Gao, W., E-mail: gw118@ipp.ac.cn; Chen, Y. J.; Zhang, L.; Huang, J.; Chang, J. F.; Gao, W. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei 230031 (China); Guo, H. Y. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A filterscope diagnostic system has been mounted to observe the line emission and visible bremsstrahlung emission from plasma on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak during the 2014 campaign. By this diagnostic system, multiple wavelengths including D{sub α} (656.1 nm), D{sub γ} (433.9 nm), He II (468.5 nm), Li I (670.8 nm), Li II (548.3 nm), C III (465.0 nm), O II (441.5 nm), Mo I (386.4 nm), W I (400.9 nm), and visible bremsstrahlung radiation (538.0 nm) are monitored with corresponding wavelength filters. All these multi-channel signals are digitized at up to 200 kHz simultaneously. This diagnostic plays a crucial role in studying edge localized modes and H-mode plasmas, due to the high temporal resolution and spatial resolution that have been designed into it.

  16. Microwave polarimetry system in the CDX-U tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.S.; Fredriksen, A.; Qin, H.; Forest, C.B.; Ono, M.

    1995-01-01

    An existing microwave interferometer system is modified to add the capability of polarimetry in the CDX-U tokamak. Though this interferometer system can scan vertically and radially, only the vertical view channel is modified to accomodate Faraday rotation measurements, with its radial scanning capability preserved. For our relatively long microwave wavelength, the signal amplitude variation due to refraction is more important than effects due to vibration. An amplitude independent design of Faraday rotation diagnostics has been developed. By using a linearly polarized beam as input and putting a rotating polarizer in the beam after the plasma, birefringency effects are minimized. A digital phase detection technique has been developed for better resolution of the Faraday rotation angle

  17. Rail for inspection/maintenance device in TOKAMAK type container of a thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenji.

    1996-01-01

    A circular rail divided into four arcuate parts for an inspection/maintenance device which runs in a TOKAMAK type container is disposed. Each of the divided rails is supported at the center of the outer surface rotatably by extendable rail supporting shafts. Each of the divided rail is constituted such that it can be contained between limiters disposed at the outer side of the TOKAMAK container when each of the rail support shafts is contracted. With such a constitution, each of the rail support shafts and arcuate rail is contracted and rotated from the outside of the TOKAMAK type container by an actuator. In order to form a circular rail, each of the rail support shafts is extended toward the center of the TOKAMAK type container, and then each of the arcuate rails is rotated into a horizontal state. Then, the joint portions of each of the arcuate rails are connected by using remote controllable locking rods. (I.S.)

  18. Physics design of advanced steady-state tokamak reactor A-SSTR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Ushigusa, Kenkichi

    2000-10-01

    Based on design studies on the fusion power reactor such as the DEMO reactor SSTR, the compact power reactor A-SSTR and the DREAM reactor with a high environmental safety and high availability, a new concept of compact and economic fusion power reactor (A-SSTR2) with high safety and high availability is proposed. Employing high temperature superconductor, the toroidal filed coils supplies the maximum field of 23T on conductor which corresponds to 11T at the magnetic axis. A-SSTR2 (R p =6.2m, a p =1.5m, I p =12MA) has a fusion power of 4GW with β N =4. For an easy maintenance and for an enough support against a strong electromagnetic force on coils, a poloidal coils system has no center solenoid coils and consists of 6 coils located on top and bottom of the machine. Physics studies on the plasma equilibrium, controllability of the configuration, the plasma initiation and non-inductive current ramp-up, fusion power controllability and the diverter have shown the validity of the A-SSTR2 concept. (author)

  19. HL-1 tokamak data acquisition system and its initial application in the physical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Huichen; Fu Bo; Dong Jiafu

    1989-11-01

    A HL-1 tokamak data acquisition system has been developed and has been used in the physical experiment. The hardware and software configuration of the system, as well as the typical acquired data in the HL-1 experiment are introduced

  20. A study on the fusion reactor - Study of ICRF coupling in the KAIST tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Duk In; Chang, Hong Young; Lee, Sun Chil; Jun, Sang Jin; Kwon, Gi Chung; Seo, Sung Hun; Heo, Sung Hoi; You, Kwang Il; Song, Soo Bin; Lee, Sung Chul; Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Chan Hui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    Research objectives are to design and fabricate the antenna, measure t property of absorption transmitted to the plasma, and research the physical phenomena about the ICRF coupling, Main heating method is ohmic heating at the KAIST tokamak. The power of the plasma produced by ohmic heating is about 100 kW. Because the toroidal field is 5 {approx} 8 kG, the RF system`s output power is about 10 kW and frequency range is 7 {approx} 30 MHz. In the first year, a 1 kW RF preamplifier was bought. In this year, a CW 2 kW RF main amp. and RF power monitoring system was bought. In the research on antenna, we study the method how to measure electric field emitted from antenna using piezo elements. The matching network composed of two VVC (35 kV), 100 {approx} 1000 pF match firmly up to 50 kW power. We studied the measurement method of antenna impedance theoretically, and measured power efficiency and antenna impedance in the helicon plasma. 32 refs., 5 tabs., 29 figs. (author)

  1. Reactor cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Etsuji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate cleaning steps in the pipelines upon reactor shut-down by connecting a filtrating and desalting device to the cooling system to thereby always clean up the water in the pipelines. Constitution: A filtrating and desalting device is connected to the pipelines in the cooling system by way of drain valves and a check valve. Desalted water is taken out from the exit of the filtrating and desalting device and injected to one end of the cooling system pipelines by way of the drain valve and the check valve and then returned by way of another drain valve to the desalting device. Water in the pipelines is thus always desalted and the cleaning step in the pipelines is no more required in the shut-down. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. Equilibrium system analysis in a tokamak ignition experiment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera, R.; Weldon, W.F.; Woodson, H.H.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of the IGNITEX Project is to produce and control ignited plasmas for scientific study in the simplest and least expensive way possible. The original concept was proposed by both physics and engineering researchers along the following line of thought. Question: Is there any theoretically simple, compact and reliable way of achieving fusion ignition according to the results of the fusion research program for the last decades? Answer: Yes. An experiment to be carried out in an ohmically heated compact tokamak device with 20 T field on plasma axis. Question: Is there any practical way to carry out that experiment at low cost in the near term? Answer: Yes. Using a single-turn coil magnet system with homopolar power supplies.

  3. Equilibrium system analysis in a tokamak ignition experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera, R.; Weldon, W.F.; Woodson, H.H.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of the IGNITEX Project is to produce and control ignited plasmas for scientific study in the simplest and least expensive way possible. The original concept was proposed by both physics and engineering researchers along the following line of thought. Question: Is there any theoretically simple, compact and reliable way of achieving fusion ignition according to the results of the fusion research program for the last decades Answer: Yes. An experiment to be carried out in an ohmically heated compact tokamak device with 20 T field on plasma axis. Question: Is there any practical way to carry out that experiment at low cost in the near term Answer: Yes. Using a single-turn coil magnet system with homopolar power supplies.

  4. Reactor system on barge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kingo; Yamada, Nobuyuki

    1987-01-01

    Floating electrical power plants or power plant barges add new dimensions to utility planners and agencies in the world. Intrinsically safe and economical reactors (ISER) employ steel reactor pressure vessels, which significantly reduce the weight as compared with PIUS, and provide siting versatility including barge-mounted plants. In this paper, the outline of power plant barges and barge-mounted ISERs is described. Besides their mobility, power plant barges have the salient advantages such as short delivery time and better quality control due to the outfitting in shipyards. These power plant barges may be temporarily moored or permanently grounded in shallow water at the centers of industrial complexes or the suitable areas adjacent to them, and satisfy the increasing needs for electric power. A cost-effective and technically perfect barge positioning system should be designed to meet the specific requirement for the location and its condition. Offshore siting away from coast may be applicable only to large plants of 1,000 MWe or more, and inshore siting and coastal or river siting are considered for an ISER-200 barge-mounted plant. The system of a barge-mounted ISER plant is discussed in the case of a floating type and the type on a seismic base isolator. (Kako, I.)

  5. Reactor operating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Hiromi; Izumi, Masayuki; Uchikawa, Sadao; Takeda, Renzo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: In a bwr type reactor, to improve mainly the radial power distribution by control rods. Method: Control rods located successively at the outer parts are divided into N (N=1, 2 ...) groups, for example, control rods located at the center of the core forming a first group, those located at further outer side of said group forming a second group, and those located at further outer side of said second group forming a third group. Among control rods belonging to alternative groups, those mutually in positions of a knight in chess are selected, and inserted in the core. According to the present system, the operation having such thermal allowance as about 4% in the maximum linear output density and about 2% in the minimum critical output ratio becomes possible as compared with the prior art system. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Collaboration on Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Text Reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T.

    2000-06-01

    This proposal was peer reviewed and funded as a Collaboration on ''Low Phase Speed Radio Frequency Current Drive Experiments at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''. The original plans we had were to carry out the collaboration proposal by including a post doctoral scientist stationed at PPPL. In response to a 60+% funding cut, all expenses were radically pruned. The post doctoral position was eliminated, and the Principal Investigator (T. Intrator) carried out the brunt of the collaboration. Visits to TFTR enabled T. Intrator to set up access to the TFTR computing network, database, and get familiar with the new antennas that were being installed in TFTR during an up to air. One unfortunate result of the budget squeeze that TFTR felt for its last year of operation was that the experiments that we specifically got funded to perform were not granted run time on TFTR., On the other hand we carried out some modeling of the electric field structure around the four strap direct launch Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) antenna that was operated on TFTR. This turned out to be a useful exercise and shed some light on the operational characteristics of the IBW antenna and its coupling to the plasma. Because of this turn of events, the project was renamed ''Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''.

  7. Collaboration on Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Text Reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrator, T.

    2000-01-01

    This proposal was peer reviewed and funded as a Collaboration on ''Low Phase Speed Radio Frequency Current Drive Experiments at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''. The original plans we had were to carry out the collaboration proposal by including a post doctoral scientist stationed at PPPL. In response to a 60+% funding cut, all expenses were radically pruned. The post doctoral position was eliminated, and the Principal Investigator (T. Intrator) carried out the brunt of the collaboration. Visits to TFTR enabled T. Intrator to set up access to the TFTR computing network, database, and get familiar with the new antennas that were being installed in TFTR during an up to air. One unfortunate result of the budget squeeze that TFTR felt for its last year of operation was that the experiments that we specifically got funded to perform were not granted run time on TFTR., On the other hand we carried out some modeling of the electric field structure around the four strap direct launch Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) antenna that was operated on TFTR. This turned out to be a useful exercise and shed some light on the operational characteristics of the IBW antenna and its coupling to the plasma. Because of this turn of events, the project was renamed ''Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''

  8. Overview of Progress on the EU DEMO Reactor Magnet System Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zani, L.; Bayer, C.; biancolini, M.E.; Bonifetto, R.; Nijhuis, Arend; Yagotintsev, K.

    2016-01-01

    The DEMO reactor is expected to be the first application of fusion for electricity generation in the near future. To this aim, conceptual design activities are progressing in Europe (EU) under the lead of the EUROfusion Consortium in order to drive on the development of the major tokamak systems. In

  9. Radiation analysis of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) pellet injector system and its impact on personnel access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selcow, E.C.; Stevens, P.N.; Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is near completion. This short-pulse ignition experiment is planned to follow the operations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The high neutron wall loadings, /approximately/4-5 MW/m/sup 2/, associated with the operation of this device require that neutronics-related issues be considered in the overall system design. Radiation shielding is required for the protection of device components and personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure, and the entire experiment is housed in a circular test cell facility with a radius of /approximately/12 m. The most critical radiation concern in the CIT design process relates to the numerous penetrations in the device. This paper discusses the impact of a major penetration on the design and operations of the CIT pellet injection system. The pellet injector is a major component, which has a line-of-sight penetration through the igloo and test cell wall. All current options for maintenance of the injector require personnel access. A nuclear analysis has been performed to determine the feasibility of hands-on access. Results indicate that personnel access to the pellet injector glovebox is possible. 10 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Reactor applications of the compact fusion advanced Rankine (CFAR) cycle for a D-T tokamak fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, H.A.; Logan, B.G.; Campbell, R.B.

    1988-03-01

    We have made a preliminary design of a D-T fusion reactor blanket and MHD power conversion system based on the CFAR concept, and found that the performance and costs for the reference cycle are very attractive. While much remains to be done, the potential advantage of liquid metal Rankine cycles for fusion applications are much clearer now. These include low pressures and mass flow rates, a nearly isothermal module shell which minimizes problems of thermal distortion and stresses, and an insensitivity to pressure losses in the blanket so that the two-phase MHD pressure drops in the boilling part of the blanket and the ordinary vapor pressure drops in the pebble-bed superheating zones are acceptable (the direct result of pumping a liquid rather than having to compress a gas). There are no moving parts in the high-temperature MHD power generators, no steam bottoming plant is required, only small vapor precoolers and condensers are needed because of the high heat rejection trmperatures, and only a relatively small natural-draft heat exhanger is required to reject the heat to the atmosphere. The net result is a very compact fusion reactor and power conversion system which fit entirely inside an 18 meter radius reactor vault. Although we have not yet performed a detailed cost analysis, preliminary cost estimates indicate low capital costs and a very attractive cost of electricity. 11 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Intense relativistic electron beam injector system for tokamak current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, V.L.; Creedon, J.M.; Ecker, B.M.; Helava, H.I.

    1983-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) injection system designed for tokamak current drive experiments. The injection system uses a standard high-voltage pulsed REB generator and a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) to drive an REB-accelerating diode in plasma. A series of preliminary experiments has been carried out to test the system by injecting REBs into a test chamber with preformed plasma and applied magnetic field. REBs were accelerated from two types of diodes: a conventional vacuum diode with foil anode, and a plasma diode, i.e., an REB cathode immersed in the plasma. REB current was in the range of 50 to 100 kA and REB particle energy ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MeV. MITL power density exceeded 10 GW/cm 2 . Performance of the injection system and REB transport properties is documented for plasma densities from 5 x 10 12 to 2 x 10 14 cm -3 . Injection system data are compared with numerical calculations of the performance of the coupled system consisting of the generator, MITL, and diode

  12. 3He functions in tokamak-pumped laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-10-01

    3 He placed in an annular cell around a tokamak fusion generator can convert moderated fusion neutrons to energetic ions by the 3 He(n,p)T reaction, and thereby excite gaseous lasants mixed with the 3 He while simultaneously breeding tritium. The total 3 He inventory is about 4 kg for large tokamak devices. Special configurations of toroidal-field magnets, neutron moderators and beryllium reflectors are required to permit nearly uniform neutron current into the laser cell with minimal attenuation. The annular laser radiation can be combined into a single output beam at the top of the tokamak

  13. /sup 3/He functions in tokamak-pumped laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-10-01

    /sup 3/He placed in an annular cell around a tokamak fusion generator can convert moderated fusion neutrons to energetic ions by the /sup 3/He(n,p)T reaction, and thereby excite gaseous lasants mixed with the /sup 3/He while simultaneously breeding tritium. The total /sup 3/He inventory is about 4 kg for large tokamak devices. Special configurations of toroidal-field magnets, neutron moderators and beryllium reflectors are required to permit nearly uniform neutron current into the laser cell with minimal attenuation. The annular laser radiation can be combined into a single output beam at the top of the tokamak.

  14. Current generation by helicons and LH waves in modern tokamaks and reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, V.

    2014-02-01

    The Innovative concept and 3D full wave code modeling Off-axis current drive by RF waves in large scale tokamaks, reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO for steady state operation with high efficiency was proposed [1] to overcome problems well known for LH method [2]. The scheme uses the helicons radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) IC frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-1000 MHz, propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by Helicons will help to have regimes with negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure βN > 3 (the so-called Advanced scenarios) of interest for FNSF and the commercial reactor. Modeling with full wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC2 showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER, FNSF-AT and DEMO [2,3], using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal waves slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in tokamaks DIII-D, T-15MD and JT-60SA [3]. In DEMO and Power Plant antenna is strongly simplified, being some analoge of mirrors based ECRF launcher, as will be shown. For spherical tokamaks the Helicons excitation scheme does not provide efficient Off-axis CD profile flexibility due to strong coupling of helicons with O-mode, also through the boundary conditions in low aspect machines, and intrinsic large amount of trapped electrons, as is shown by STELION modeling for the NSTX tokamak. Brief history of Helicons experimental and modeling exploration in straight plasmas, tokamaks and tokamak based fusion Reactors projects is given, including planned joint DIII-D - Kurchatov Institute experiment on helicons CD [1].

  15. Development of the 'JFT-2' tokamak plasma position control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Noboru; Matsuzaki, Yoshimi; Suzuki, Norio; Murai, Katsuji; Suzuki, Satoshi.

    1980-01-01

    Digital control technique was applied to control the plasma position in the JFT-2 tokamak experiment device. The detail of the JFT-2 is described elsewhere. The plasma position control system consists of a Hitachi control computer, HIDIC 80, and a Hitachi micro-computer, HIDIC 08E. The plasma position is detected by the position control computer, and compared with a preset value. Then, a reference signal is supplied to the micro-computer controlling power source, and the phase control of the thyristor controlling power source is performed. Since the behavior of plasma is very fast, the fast control is required. The control of the thyristor controlling power source is made by direct digital control (DDC). The main component of the hardware of the present system is the micro-computer HIDIC 08E. The software is the direct task system without the operating system (OS). The results of experiments showed that the feedback control of the system worked well. (Kato, T.)

  16. The contribution to the energy balance and transport in an advanced-fuel tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzeni, S.; Vlad, G.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of synchrotron radiation emission on the energy balance of an advanced-fuel (such as D- 3 He, or catalyzed-D) tokamak plasma is considered. It is shown that a region in the β-T space exists, where the fusion energy delivered to the plasma overcomes synchrotron and bremsstrahlung energy losses, and which could then allow for ignited operation. 1-Dimensional codes results are also presented, which illustrate the main features of radial transport in a ignited, D- 3 He tokamak plasma

  17. The vertical field power supply system for HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shangbing; Xu Yonghong; Wang Minghong; Bu Mingnan; Yang Zhongchun; Liu Yuqin

    1999-05-01

    The vertical field power supply system has been developed for HL-1M Tokamak. It includes 3 d. c. voltage sources. One of them is connected to the output side of 80 MVA generator. Another one connected from the 6 kV system. Its current waveform is controlled with computer program set or plasma position feedback set. The experiment shows that it is possible to obtain 4 s plasma duration on HL-1M Tokamak

  18. Measuring channels for data transmission for on-line control systems of tokamak type thermonuclear devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsen'ev, V.A.; Bondarenko, I.M.; Gerasimov, V.P.; Repin, S.S.; Turkin, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental results are given of studying the measuring channel accuracy of automated control systems, automatic adjustment systems, interlocking and signalling control apparatus on tokamak-type devices. The diagram of the whole measuring channel is presented. It includes a measuring amplifier, a primary converter, a receiver-transmitter, secondary converters. Measurements of metrological characteristics of the measuring channels have shown that the design principles of the channels meet the measurement requarements of a tokamak device

  19. Development of lab scale fast gas injection system for SST-1 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathan, F.S.; Banaudha, Moni; Khristi, Yohan; Khan, M.S.; Khan, Ziauddin; Raval, D.C.; Khirwadkar, Samir

    2017-01-01

    The plasma density control plays an important role in Tokamak operation. The factors that influence plasma density in a Tokamak device are working gas injection, pumping, ionization rate and the recycle coefficient representing the wall conditions. Among these factors, gas injection is relatively convenient to be controlled. Hence, the most frequently adopted method to control the plasma density is to control the fast gas injection. This paper describes the design and experimental work carried out towards the development of Fast Gas Injection System for SST-1 Tokamak. Laboratory based test setup was successfully established for Fast Gas Injection System that can feed predefined quantity of gas in a controlled manner into vacuum chamber. Further, this FGIS system will be implemented in SST-1 Tokamak environment with online density feedback signal

  20. Upgraded data service system for HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Lianzheng; Luo Jiarong; Wei Peijie; Li Guiming; Cheng Ting; Qi Na

    2005-01-01

    A data service system plays an indispensable role in HT-7 Tokamak experiment. Since the former system doesn't provide the function of timely data procession and analysis, and all client software are based on Windows, it can't fulfill virtual fusion laboratory for remote researchers. Therefore, a new system which is simplified by three kinds of data servers and one data analysis and visualization software tool has been developed. The data servers include a data acquisition server based on file system, an MDSplus server used as the central repository for analysis data, and a web server. Users who prefer the convenience of application that can be run in a Web Browser can easily access the experiment data without knowing X-Windows. In order to adjust instruments to control experiment the operators need to plot data duly as soon as they are gathered. To satisfy their requirement, an upgraded data analysis and visualization software GT-7 is developed. It not only makes 2D data visualization more efficient, but also it can be capable of processing, analyzing and displaying interactive 2D and 3D graph of raw, analyzed data by the format of ASCII, LZO and MDSplus. (authors)

  1. Overview of the ITER Tokamak complex building and integration of plant systems toward construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, Jean-Jacques, E-mail: jean-jacques.cordier@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Bak, Joo-Shik [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Baudry, Alain [Engage Consortium, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Benchikhoune, Magali [Fusion For Energy (F4E), c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Carafa, Leontin; Chiocchio, Stefano [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Darbour, Romaric [Fusion For Energy (F4E), c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Elbez, Joelle; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Jeannoutot, Thomas; Kotamaki, Miikka; Kuehn, Ingo; Lee, Andreas; Levesy, Bruno; Orlandi, Sergio [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Packer, Rachel [Engage Consortium, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Patisson, Laurent; Reich, Jens; Rigoni, Giuliano [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    The ITER Tokamak complex consists of Tokamak, diagnostic and tritium buildings. The Tokamak machine is located in the bioshield pit of the Tokamak building. Plant systems are implemented in the three buildings and are strongly interfacing with the Tokamak. The reference baseline (3D) configuration is a set of over 1000 models that today defines in an exhaustive way the overall layout of Tokamak and plant systems, needed for fixing the interfaces and to complete the construction design of the buildings. During the last two years, one of the main ITER challenges was to improve the maturity of the plant systems layout in order to confirm their integration in the building final design and freeze the interface definitions in-between the systems and to the buildings. The propagation of safety requirements in the design of the nuclear building like confinement, fire zoning and radiation shielding is of first priority. A major effort was placed by ITER Organization together with the European Domestic Agency (F4E) and the Architect Engineer as a joint team to fix the interfaces and the loading conditions to buildings. The most demanding systems in terms of interface definition are water cooling, cryogenic, detritiation, vacuum, cable trays and building services. All penetrations through the walls for piping, cables and other equipment have been defined, as well as all temporary openings needed for the installation phase. Project change requests (PCR) impacting the Tokamak complex buildings have been implemented in a tight allocated time schedule. The most demanding change was to implement a new design of the Tokamak basic machine supporting system. The 18 supporting columns of the cryostat (2001 baseline) were replaced at the end of 2012 by a concrete crown and radial concrete ribs linked to the basemat and to the bioshield surrounding the Tokamak. The change was implemented successfully in the building construction design to allow basemat construction phase being performed

  2. Overview of the ITER Tokamak complex building and integration of plant systems toward construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, Jean-Jacques; Bak, Joo-Shik; Baudry, Alain; Benchikhoune, Magali; Carafa, Leontin; Chiocchio, Stefano; Darbour, Romaric; Elbez, Joelle; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Jeannoutot, Thomas; Kotamaki, Miikka; Kuehn, Ingo; Lee, Andreas; Levesy, Bruno; Orlandi, Sergio; Packer, Rachel; Patisson, Laurent; Reich, Jens; Rigoni, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    The ITER Tokamak complex consists of Tokamak, diagnostic and tritium buildings. The Tokamak machine is located in the bioshield pit of the Tokamak building. Plant systems are implemented in the three buildings and are strongly interfacing with the Tokamak. The reference baseline (3D) configuration is a set of over 1000 models that today defines in an exhaustive way the overall layout of Tokamak and plant systems, needed for fixing the interfaces and to complete the construction design of the buildings. During the last two years, one of the main ITER challenges was to improve the maturity of the plant systems layout in order to confirm their integration in the building final design and freeze the interface definitions in-between the systems and to the buildings. The propagation of safety requirements in the design of the nuclear building like confinement, fire zoning and radiation shielding is of first priority. A major effort was placed by ITER Organization together with the European Domestic Agency (F4E) and the Architect Engineer as a joint team to fix the interfaces and the loading conditions to buildings. The most demanding systems in terms of interface definition are water cooling, cryogenic, detritiation, vacuum, cable trays and building services. All penetrations through the walls for piping, cables and other equipment have been defined, as well as all temporary openings needed for the installation phase. Project change requests (PCR) impacting the Tokamak complex buildings have been implemented in a tight allocated time schedule. The most demanding change was to implement a new design of the Tokamak basic machine supporting system. The 18 supporting columns of the cryostat (2001 baseline) were replaced at the end of 2012 by a concrete crown and radial concrete ribs linked to the basemat and to the bioshield surrounding the Tokamak. The change was implemented successfully in the building construction design to allow basemat construction phase being performed

  3. A step towards controlled fusion reactors: Tore Supra tokamak with superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1988-01-01

    Tore Supra technology has to solve all the problems related to the development and the installaion of superconducting coils and associated cryogenic devices. Tore Supra will allow to get a significative experience to prepare next machines. Specifications and needs of tokamaks concerning the superconducting coils of future machines are recalled [fr

  4. Nitrogen Gas Heating and Supply System for SST-1 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Ziauddin; Pathan, Firozkhan; Paravastu, Yuvakiran; George, Siju; Ramesh, Gattu; Bindu, Hima; Raval, Dilip C.; Thankey, Prashant; Dhanani, Kalpesh; Pradhan, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    Steady State Tokamak (SST-1) vacuum vessel baking as well as baking of the first wall components of SST-1 are essential to plasma physics experiments. Under a refurbishment spectrum of SST-1, the nitrogen gas heating and supply system has been fully refurbished. The SST-1 vacuum vessel consists of ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible eight modules and eight sectors. Rectangular baking channels are embedded on each of them. Similarly, the SST-1 plasma facing components (PFC) are comprised of modular graphite diverters and movable graphite based limiters. The nitrogen gas heating and supply system would bake the plasma facing components at 350°C and the SST-1 vacuum vessel at 150°C over an extended duration so as to remove water vapour and other absorbed gases. An efficient PLC based baking facility has been developed and implemented for monitoring and control purposes. This paper presents functional and operational aspects of a SST-1 nitrogen gas heating and supply system. Some of the experimental results obtained during the baking of SST-1 vacuum modules and sectors are also presented here. (fusion engineering)

  5. The modeling of the RF system performance in TCA/BR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchko, L.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Nascimento, I.; Ozono, E.; Lerche, E.; Degasperi, F.T.; Tuszel, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    The results of numerical simulation of RF Alfven wave heating system that is intended to be used in TCA/BR tokamak are presented. The problem of monochromatic travelling RF field excitation in TCA/BR tokamak is analyzed by means of numerical simulation. The spectrum of the excited Alfven waves is determined using a one-dimensional MHD code. The transient time and AC analysis of the RF generator performance with antenna loading are discussed. (author). 9 refs., 6 figs

  6. Digital controlled pulsed electric system of the ETE tokamak. First report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Luis Felipe de F.P.W.; Del Bosco, Edson

    1997-01-01

    This reports presents a summary on the thermonuclear fusion and application for energy supply purposes. The tokamak device operation and the magnetic field production systems are described. The ETE tokamak is a small aspect ratio device designed for plasma physics and thermonuclear fusion studies, which presently is under construction at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) - S.J. dos Campos - S. Paulo. (author)

  7. Reactor safety protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Tsuguo.

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of neutron detectors are disposed around a reactor core and detection signals from optional two neutron detectors are inputted into a ratio calculation device. If the ratio between both of the neutron flux level signals exceeds a predetermined value, a reactor trip signal is generated from an alarm setting device. Further, detection signals from all of the neutron detection devices are inputted into an average calculation device and the reactor trip signal is generated also in a case where the average value exceeds a predetermined set value. That is, when the reactor core power is increased locally, the detection signal from the neutron detector nearer to the point of power increase is greater than the increase rate for the entire reactor core power, while the detection signal from the neutron detector remote from the point of power increase is smaller. Thus, the local power increase ratio in the FBR reactor core can be detected efficiently by calculating the ratio for the neutron flux level signals from two neutron detectors, thereby enabling to exactly recognize the local power increase rate in the reactor core. (N.H.)

  8. Comparative analysis of the possibility of applying low-melting metals with the capillary-porous system in tokamak conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyublinski, I. E., E-mail: lyublinski@yandex.ru; Vertkov, A. V., E-mail: avertkov@yandex.ru; Semenov, V. V., E-mail: darkfenix2006@mail.ru [OAO Krasnaya Zvezda (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The use of capillary-porous systems (CPSs) with liquid Li, Ga, and Sn is considered as an alternative for solving the problem of creating plasma-facing elements (PFEs) of the fusion neutron source (FNS) and the DEMO-type reactor. The main advantages of CPSs with liquid metal compared with hard materials are their stability with respect to the degradation of properties in tokamak conditions and capability of surface self-restoration. The evaluation of applicability of liquid metals is performed on the basis of the analysis of their physical and chemical properties, the interaction with the tokamak plasma, and constructive and process features of in-vessel elements with CPSs implementing the application of these metals in a tokamak. It is shown that the upper limit of the PFE working temperature for all low-melting metals under consideration lies in the range of 550–600°Ð¡. The decisive factor for PFEs with Li is the limitation on the admissible atomic flux into plasma, while for those with Ga and Sn it is the corrosion resistance of construction materials. The upper limit of thermal loads in the steady-state operating mode for the considered promising PFE design with the use of Li, Ga, and Sn is close to 18–20 MW/m{sup 2}. It is seen from the analysis that the use of metals with a low equilibrium vapor pressure of (Ga, Sn) gives no gain in extension of the region of admissible working temperatures of PFEs. However, with respect to the totality of properties, the possibility of implementing the self-restoration and stabilization effect of the liquid surface, the influence on the plasma discharge parameters, and the ability to protect the PFE surface in conditions of plasma perturbations and disruption, lithium is the most attractive liquid metal to create CPS-based PFEs for the tokamak.

  9. Reactor power control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomisawa, Teruaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To restore reactor-power condition in a minimum time after a termination of turbine bypass by reducing the throttling of the reactor power at the time of load-failure as low as possible. Constitution: The transient change of the internal pressure of condenser is continuously monitored. When a turbine is bypassed, a speed-control-command signal for a coolant recirculating pump is generated according as the internal pressure of the condenser. When the signal relating to the internal pressure of the condenser indicates insufficient power, a reactor-control-rod-drive signal is generated. (J.P.N.)

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

    1959-09-15

    Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

  11. Remote maintenance of Compact Ignition Tokamak ex-vessel systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePew, R.E.; Macdonald, D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel in the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) will require applying remote handling technology for ex-vessel maintenance and replacement of machine components. Highly activated and contaminated components of the fusion device's auxiliary systems, such as diagnostics and RF heating, must be replaced using remotely operated maintenance equipment in the test cell. Throughout the CIT remote maintenance (RM) studies conducted to date, computer modeling has been used extensively to investigate manipulator access in these complex, tightly packed, and cluttered surroundings. A recent refinement of computer modeling involves the use of an intelligent engineering work station for realtime interactive display of task simulations. This paper discusses the use of three-dimensional (3-D) kinematic computer models of the CIT machines that are proving to be powerful tools in our efforts to evaluate RM requirements. This presentation includes a video-taped simulation of remote replacement of a plasma viewing assembly. The simulation illustrates some of the constraints associated with typical RM activities and the ways in which computer modeling enhances the design process. 1 ref., 3 figs

  12. Combination of helical ferritic-steel inserts and flux-tube-expansion divertor for the heat control in tokamak DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, T.; Tokunaga, S.; Hoshino, K.; Shimizu, K.; Asakura, N.

    2015-01-01

    Edge localized modes (ELMs) in the H-mode operation of tokamak reactors may be suppressed/mitigated by the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP), but RMP coils are considered incompatible with DEMO reactors under the strong neutron flux. We propose an innovative concept of the RMP without installing coils but inserting ferritic steels of the helical configuration. Helically perturbed field is naturally formed in the axisymmetric toroidal field through the helical ferritic steel inserts (FSIs). When ELMs are avoided, large stationary heat load on divertor plates can be reduced by adopting a flux-tube-expansion (FTE) divertor like an X divertor. Separatrix shape and divertor-plate inclination are similar to those of a simple long-leg divertor configuration. Combination of the helical FSIs and the FTE divertor is a suitable method for the heat control to avoid transient ELM heat pulse and to reduce stationary divertor heat load in a tokamak DEMO reactor

  13. Automatic reactor protection system tester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deliant, J.D.; Jahnke, S.; Raimondo, E.

    1988-01-01

    The object of this paper is to present the automatic tester of reactor protection systems designed and developed by EDF and Framatome. In order, the following points are discussed: . The necessity for reactor protection system testing, . The drawbacks of manual testing, . The description and use of the Framatome automatic tester, . On-site installation of this system, . The positive results obtained using the Framatome automatic tester in France

  14. Transient temperature response of in-vessel components due to pulsed operation in tokamak fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Akio; Tone, Tatsuzo

    1985-12-01

    A transient temperature response of the in-vessel components (first wall, blanket, divertor/limiter and shielding) surrounding plasma in Tokamak Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) has been analysed. Transient heat load during start up/shut down and pulsed operation cycles causes the transient temperature response in those components. The fatigue lifetime of those components significantly depends upon the resulting cyclic thermal stress. The burn time affects the temperature control in the solid breeder (Li 2 O) and also affects the thermo-mechanical design of the blanket and shielding which are constructed with thick structure. In this report, results of the transient temperature response obtained by the heat transfer and conduction analyses for various pulsed operation scenarios (start up, shut down, burn and dwell times) have been investigated in view of thermo-mechanical design of the in-vessel components. (author)

  15. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.; Chan, A.A.; England, A.C.; Hendel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; Nieschmidt, E.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and /sup 3/He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling.

  16. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3 He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n) 3 He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3 He(d,p) 4 He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  17. Reactor applications of the compact fusion advanced Rankine (CFAR) cycle for a D-T tokamak fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Campbell, R.B. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-05-01

    The preliminary design of a high temperature blanket and compact power conversion system for a D-T reactor utilizing a mercury Rankine cycle and nonequilibrium MHD disk generators is described. The CFAR cycle is described in detail and a blanket geometry is proposed which is designed to give good heat transfer and low pressure drops for the two-phase boiling mercury flow in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The blanket utilizes beryllium and flibe in the low-temperature breeding zone and lithium aluminate in beryllium oxide pebbles in the high-temperature breeding zone to obtain a tritium breeding ratio of 1.07. With careful choice of materials and geometry, it has been possibly to have 46% of the neutron and gamma heat deposited in the high-temperature pebble beds at the back of the blanket. The design utilizes the many advantages of liquid-metal Rankine cycles, including low pressures, mass flow rates and pumping power, and superheating along with internal regeneration to achieve good thermal efficiencies of about 35% using the microwave superheater and about 32% without the microwave superheater. The capital costs are expected to be much lower than past design concepts because the MHD power generators and the mercury condensers and heat exchangers can all be placed inside the reactor vault; preliminary cost estimates indicate a very attractive cost of electricity for this advanced concept. (orig.).

  18. Dynamic analysis of the tokamak support system in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tado, S.; Kitamura, K.; Itou, Y.; Koizumi, K.; Tada, E.; Tsunematsu, T.

    1998-01-01

    The ITER tokamak machine has a relatively flexible support structure against horizontal loads as from an earthquake. Modal analyses and modal transient analyses have been carried out by using the finite element analysis code NASTRAN to assess the response of the tokamak driven by a horizontal seismic load with the ITER design response spectra. Two types of three-dimensional models and a simplified mass/spring model have been used as structural models. The three-dimensional models have been used for modal analyses and modal transient analyses. The simplified mass/spring model has been used for parameter surveying of the transient response. It has been shown in the analyses that the lowest natural frequency of the tokamak is about 2 cycles s -1 and that the maximum relative response displacement between the magnet and the vacuum vessel is about 14 mm. (orig.)

  19. BWR type reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Shin-ichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the internal structure in a reactor by rapidly and efficiently transferring heat generated in a reactor core out of the reactor and eliminating the danger of radiation exposure. Constitution: Steam generated in a pressure vessel is introduced into heat pipe group by inserting the heat pipe group into the steam dome of the pressure vessel. The introduced steam is condensed in the heat pipes to transfer the heat of the steam to the heat pipe group. The transferred heat is transmitted to a heat exchanger provided out of a containment vessel to generate steam to operate a turbine. Thus, it is not necessary to introduce the steam including radioactive substance externally and can remove only the heat so as to carry out the desired purpose. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Test results on systems developed for SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, D.

    2003-01-01

    Steady state Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is a large aspect ratio tokamak, configured to run double null diverted plasmas with significant elongation (κ) and triangularity Superconducting (SC) magnets are deployed for both the toroidal and poloidal field coils in SST-1. A NbTi based cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) has been fabricated by M/S Hitachi Cables Ltd., Japan under specification and supervision of IPR. The suitability of this CICC for the SST-1 magnets has been validated through test carried out on a model coil (MC) wound from this CICC. Toroidal and poloidal SC magnets have been fabricated and factory acceptance tests have been performed. SC magnets require liquid helium (LHe) cooled current leads, electrical isolators at LHe temperature, superconducting bus bars and LHe transfer lines. Full scale prototypes of these have been developed and tested successfully. SC magnets will be cooled to 4.5K by forced flow of supercritical Helium through the CICC. A 1 kW grade liquefier/refrigerator has been installed and is in final stages of commissioning at IPR. SST-1 deploys a fully welded ultra high vacuum vessel, made up of 16 vessel sectors having ports and 16 rings with D-shaped cross-section. To establish the fabrication methodology for this, a full scale proto-type of the vessel with two vessel sectors and three rings has been fabricated and tested successfully. Based on this the fabrication of the vessel sectors and rings is in final stage of fabrication. Liquid nitrogen cooled radiation shield are deployed between the vacuum vessel and SC magnets as well as SC magnets and cryostat, to minimize the radiation losses at the SC magnets. SST-1 will have three different high power radio frequency (RF) systems to additionally heat and non-inductively drive plasma current to sustain the plasma in steady state for a duration of up to 1000 sec. Ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) and electron cyclotron resonance frequency (ECRF) systems will primarily be

  1. Data acquisition system for electron cyclotron resonance heating on EAST tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weiye, E-mail: xuweiye@ipp.cas.cn; Xu, Handong, E-mail: xhd@ipp.cas.cn; Liu, Fukun; Hou, Fang; Wu, Zege

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A steady-state data acquisition system for ECRH on EAST tokamak is developed. • Both hardware architecture and software architecture are described. • The data acquisition system is very important for gyrotron operation. - Abstract: A steady-state data acquisition system for electron cyclotron resonance heating on EAST tokamak is presented. This system is established to acquire gyrotron related signals based on PXI platform. The acquired signals are used to analyze the state of gyrotrons, and to calculate the RF power generated by gyrotrons. The acquired data are saved to the data storage server and can be recalled by the data view client.

  2. Demonstration tokamak power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.; Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Mattas, R.; Smith, D.L.; DeFreece, D.; Morgan, G.D.; Trachsel, C.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design for a tokamak demonstration power plant (DEMO) was developed. A large part of the study focused on examining the key issues and identifying the R and D needs for: (1) current drive for steady-state operation, (2) impurity control and exhaust, (3) tritium breeding blanket, and (4) reactor configuration and maintenance. Impurity control and exhaust will not be covered in this paper but is discussed in another paper in these proceedings, entitled Key Issues of FED/INTOR Impurity Control System.

  3. Design and realization of the J-TEXT tokamak central control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhoujun; Zhuang Ge; Hu Xiwei; Zhang Ming; Qiu Shengshun; Wang Zhijiang; Ding Yonghua; Pan Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT), a medium-sized conventional tokamak, serves as a user experimental facility in the China-USA fusion research community. Development of a flexible and easy-to-use J-TEXT central control system (CCS) is of supreme importance for users to coordinate the experimental scenarios with full integration into the discharge operation. This paper describes in detail the structure and functions of the J-TEXT CCS system as well as the performance in practical implementation. Results obtained from both commissioning and routine operations show that the J-TEXT CCS system can offer a satisfactory and effective control that is reliable and stable. The J-TEXT tokamak achieved high-quality performance in its first-ever experimental campaign with this CCS system.

  4. Electron cyclotron heating of a tokamak reactor at down-shifted frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidone, I.; Giruzzi, G.; Mazzucato, E.

    1985-01-01

    The absorption of electron cyclotron waves in a hot and dense tokamak plasma is investigated for the case of the extraordinary mode for outside launching. It is shown that, for electron temperatures T/sub e/ greater than or equal to 5 keV, strong absorption occurs for oblique propagation at frequencies significantly below the electron gyrofrequency at the plasma center. A new density dependence of the wave absorption is found which is more favorable for plasma heating than the familiar n/sub e/ -1 scaling

  5. ITER tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, J.; Salpietro, E.; Shatalov, G.

    1991-01-01

    The results of the Conceptual Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are summarized. These activities, carried out between April 1988 and December 1990, produced a consistent set of technical characteristics and preliminary plans for co-ordinated research and development support of ITER; and a conceptual design, a description of design requirements and a preliminary construction schedule and cost estimate. After a description of the design basis, an overview is given of the tokamak device, its auxiliary systems, facility and maintenance. The interrelation and integration of the various subsystems that form the ITER tokamak concept are discussed. The 16 ITER equatorial port allocations, used for nuclear testing, diagnostics, fuelling, maintenance, and heating and current drive, are given, as well as a layout of the reactor building. Finally, brief descriptions are given of the major ITER sub-systems, i.e., (i) magnet systems (toroidal and poloidal field coils and cryogenic systems), (ii) containment structures (vacuum and cryostat vessels, machine gravity supports, attaching locks, passive loops and active coils), (iii) first wall, (iv) divertor plate (design and materials, performance and lifetime, a.o.), (v) blanket/shield system, (vi) maintenance equipment, (vii) current drive and heating, (viii) fuel cycle system, and (ix) diagnostics. 11 refs, figs and tabs

  6. Conceptual Design of Tokamak High Power Reactor (A-SSTR2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Tobita, Kenji; Ushigusa, Kenkichi; Konishi, Satoshi; Reactor Design Team

    Based on the last decade of JAERI reactor design studies, an advanced commercial reactor concept (A-SSTR2) that meets both economical and environmental requirements has been proposed. The A-SSTR2 is a compact power reactor (Rp = 6.2 m, ap = 1.5 m, Ip = 12 MA) with a high fusion power (Pf = 4 GW) and a net thermal efficiency of 51%. The machine configuration is simplified by eliminating the center solenoid (CS) coil system. An SiC/SiC composite for the blanket structure material, helium gas cooling with a pressure of 10 MPa and an outlet temperature of 900°C, and TiH2 for the bulk shield material are introduced. For the toroidal field (TF) coil, a high temperature (TC) superconducting wire made of bismuth with a maximum field of 23 T and a critical current density of 1,000 A/mm2 at a temperature of 20 K is applied. In spite of the CS-less configuration, a computer simulation gives satisfactory plasma equilibria, plasma initiation process, and current ramp-up scenario. The current rampup time is about 22 hours. The MHD stabilities for the ballooning mode and the ideal low n kink-modes are confirmed. The stabilization of n = 1 and n = 2 kink modes requires a shell position closer than 1.4 times and 1.2 times the plasma minor radius, respectively. With regard to the divertor thermal condition, it was found that a neon gas-seeded divertor plasma with a fraction of ˜ 2.5% gives a thermal load reduction at the divertor plate from 460 MW to 100 MW and a plasma temperature drop at the divertor plate from 200 eV to 20 ˜ 30 eV. By increasing the shield thickness by about 15 cm, the total radwaste is dramatically reduced. The radwaste percentage relative to the total waste is reduced from 92 wt.% to 17 wt.%.

  7. World's largest DC flywheel generator for the toroidal field power supply of JAERI's JFT-2M Tokamak nuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Takashi; Nakanishi, Yuji; Horita, Tsuyoshi; Kawase, Chiharu; Oyabu, Isao; Kishimoto, Takeshi.

    1996-01-01

    Mitsubishi Electric has delivered the world's largest DC generator for the toroidal field coil power supply of the JFT-2M Tokamak at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The unit rotates at 225 or 460 rpm, providing a maximum rated output of 2,700 V, 19,000 A and 51.3 MW. The toroidal field is a DC field, so use of a DC generator permits a simpler design consuming less floor space than an AC drive system. The generator was manufactured following extensive studies on commutation, mechanical strength and insulation. (author)

  8. A discussion on practicable scheme for machine control system of HL-2A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiang; Song Xianming; Jiang Chao

    2001-01-01

    This is the modified version of The Preliminary Design on the Hardware and Nets of HL-2A Tokamak. In this version, centralized control as well as the field bus communication on HL-2A Tokamak is used. The hardware components and the operational theory are introduced. The questions of practice program, extensibility, centralized control, cooperation with other subsystems and the continuous adaptation of present device are all discussed. The budget of the system is detailed. To keep the step with the overall engineering constructions of HL-2A, suggestions of the time program are presented for the system design, instrument purchases, installation, construction, user program development and the final operation processes for the machine control system of HL-2A Tokamak

  9. Magnetic field structure near the plasma boundary in helical systems and divertor tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Kazunobu; Itoh, Kimitaka

    1990-02-01

    Magnetic field structure of the scrape off layer (SOL) region in both helical systems and divertor tokamaks is studied numerically by using model fields. The connection length of the field line to the wall is calculated. In helical systems, the connection length, L, has a logarithmic dependence on the distance from the outermost magnetic surface or that from the residual magnetic islands. The effect of axisymmetric fields on the field structure is also determined. In divertor tokamaks, the connection length also has logarithmic properties near the separatrix. Even when the perturbations, which resonate to rational surfaces near the plasma boundary, are added, logarithmic properties still remain. We compare the connection length of torsatron/helical-heliotron systems with that of divertor tokamaks. It is found that the former is shorter than the latter by one order magnitude with similar aspect ratio. (author)

  10. A preliminary study of a D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket using compact fusion advanced Brayton (CFAB) cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Ohnishi, M.; Yamamoto, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Key issues on a D-T Tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket concept using CFAB (Compact Fusion Advanced Brayton) cycle are presented. Although the previously proposed and studied compact fusion advanced Rankine cycle using mercury liquid metal has shown, in general, excellent performance characteristics in extracting energy and electricity with high efficiency by the {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} nonequilibrium MHD disk generator, and in enhancing safety potential, there was a fear about uses of hazardous mercury as primary coolant as well as its limited natural resources. To overcome these disadvantages while retaining the advantage features of a ultra-high temperature coolant inherent in the synchrotron energy-enhanced D-T tokamak reactor, a compact fusion advanced Brayton cycle using helium was reexamined which was once considered relatively not superior in the CFAR study, at the expense of high, but acceptable circulation power, lower heat transfer characteristics, and probably of a little bit reduced safety.

  11. Radiation analysis of the CIT [Compact Ignition Tokamak] pellet injector system and its impact on personnel access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.; Stevens, P.N.; Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    The conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is nearing completion. The CIT is a short-pulse ignition experiment, which is planned to follow the operations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The high neutron wall loadings, 4--5 MW/m 2 , associated with the operation of this device require that neutronics-related issues be considered in the overall system design. Radiation shielding is required for the protection of device components as well as personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure, and the entire experiment is housed in a circular test cell facility that has a radius of 12 m. The most critical radiation concerns in the CIT design process relate to the numerous penetrations in the device. This report discusses the impact of a major penetration on the design and operation of the pellet injection system in the CIT. The pellet injector is a major component, and it has a line-of-sight penetration through the igloo and test cell wall. All current options for maintenance of the injector require hands-on-access. A nuclear analysis has been performed to establish the feasibility of hands-on-access. A coupled Monte Carlo/discrete-ordinates methodology was used to perform the analysis. This problem is characterized by deep penetration and streaming with very large length-to-diameter ratios. Results from this study indicate that personnel access to the pellet injector glovebox is possible. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Lithium beam diagnostic system on the COMPASS tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anda, G.; Bencze, A.; Berta, Miklós; Dunai, D.; Háček, Pavel; Krbec, Jaroslav; Réfy, D.; Krizsanóczi, T.; Bató, S.; Ilkei, T.; Kiss, I.G.; Veres, G.; Zoletnik, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 108, October (2016), s. 1-6 ISSN 0920-3796 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : BES * Plasma diagnostics * COMPASS tokamak Plasma density profile Plasma current fluctuations * Plasma density profile * Plasma current fluctuations Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379616303131

  13. Implementation of rapid imaging system on the COMPASS tokamak.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havránek, Aleš; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Fridrich, David; Cavalier, Jordan; Urban, Jakub; Komm, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 123, November (2017), s. 857-860 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Camera * Data acquisition * Video processing * Tokamak Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092037961730354X

  14. Preliminary project of s Thomson scattering system for the ETE tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berni, Luiz Angelo

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary project of the injection and laser light block system for the Thomson (ET) scattering diagnostic to be implanted at the ETE spheric tokamak of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE/LAP). Also, a scanning system for the optics of scattered light

  15. ICRF boronization. A new technique towards high efficiency wall coating for superconducting tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangang; Zhao Yan Ping; Gu Xue Mao

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for wall conditioning that will be especially useful for future larger superconducting tokamaks, such as ITER, has been successfully developed and encouraging results have been obtained. Solid carborane powder, which is non-toxic and non-explosive, was used. Pulsed RF plasma was produced by a non-Faraday shielding RF antenna with RF power of 10 kW. The ion temperature was about 2 keV with a toroidal magnetic field of 1.8 T and a pressure of 3x10 -1 Pa. Energetic ions broke up the carborane molecules, and the resulting boron ions struck and were deposited on the first wall. In comparison with glow discharge cleaning boronization, the B/C coating film shows higher adhesion, more uniformity and longer lifetime during plasma discharges. The plasma performance was improved after ICRF boronization. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  16. Reactor fueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Noriaki; Hirano, Haruyoshi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To optimally position a fuel catcher by mounting a television camera to a fuel catching portion and judging video images by the use of a computer or the like. Constitution: A television camera is mounted to the lower end of a fuel catching mechanism for handling nuclear fuels and a fuel assembly disposed within a reactor core or a fuel storage pool is observed directly from above to judge the position for the fuel assembly by means of video signals. Then, the relative deviation between the actual position of the fuel catcher and that set in a memory device is determined and the positional correction is carried out automatically so as to reduce the determined deviation to zero. This enables to catch the fuel assembly without failure and improves the efficiency for the fuel exchange operation. (Moriyama, K.)

  17. Power reactor information system (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    Since the very beginning of commercial operation of nuclear power plants, the nuclear power industry worldwide has accumulated more than 5000 reactor years of experience. The IAEA has been collecting Operating Experience data for Nuclear Power Plants since 1970 which were computerized in 1980. The Agency has undertaken to make Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) available on-line to its Member States. The aim of this publication is to provide the users of PRIS from their terminals with description of data base and communication systems and to show the methods of accessing the data

  18. Steady-state temperature profile of the tokamak reactor in the neoclassic mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, T.F.; Igitkhanov, Yu.L.; Tokar, M.Z.

    It has been shown that when transfer processes are neoclassic in nature, it is possible to have a thermonuclear reactor combustion mode during which there is formed in the near-wall area a protective zone of dense cold plasma which is capable of preventing the wall from being eroded. The fact that it is possible to establish this mode is due to the ''opacity'' of reactor plasma with regard to neutrals

  19. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.H.

    1974-01-01

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  20. Calculation of the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated 235U neutron detector on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, L. P.; Hendel, H. W.; Liew, S. L.

    1989-08-01

    Neutron transport simulations have been carried out to calculate the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated 235U neutron detector which is used on the TFTR as part of the primary fission detector diagnostic system for measuring fusion power yields. Transport simulations provide a means by which the effects of variations in various shielding and geometrical parameters can be explored. These effects are difficult to study in calibration experiments. The calculational model, benchmarked against measurements, can be used to complement future detector calibrations, when the high level of radioactivity resulting from machine operation may severely restrict access to the tokamak. We present a coupled forward-adjoint algorithm, employing both the deterministic and Monte Carlo sampling methods, to model the neutron transport in the complex tokamak and detector geometries. Sensitivities of the detector response to the major and minor radii, and angular anisotropy of the neutron emission are discussed. A semiempirical model based on matching the calculational results with a small set of experiments produces good agreement (± 15%) for a wide range of source energies and geometries.

  1. Power Reactor Information System (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg, R.

    1992-01-01

    The IAEA has been collecting Operating Experience data for Nuclear Power Plants of the IAEA Member States since 1970. In order to facilitate an analysis of nuclear power plant performance as well as to produce relevant publications, all previously collected data supplied from the questionnaires were computerized in 1980 and the Power Reactor Information System was implemented. PRIS currently contains production records for the years up to and including 1990 and about 98% of the reactors-years operating experience in the world is contained in PRIS. (orig.)

  2. Upgrade of the COMPASS tokamak real-time control system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janky, Filip; Havlíček, Josef; Batista, A.J.N.; Kudláček, Ondřej; Seidl, Jakub; Neto, A.C.; Pipek, Jan; Hron, Martin; Mikulín, Ondřej; Duarte, A.S.; Carvalho, B.B.; Stöckel, Jan; Pánek, Radomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 3 (2014), s. 186-194 ISSN 0920-3796 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2470; GA MŠk 7G10072; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Real-time * Feedback control * Real-time framework * MARTe * COMPASS tokamak Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.152, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379613007564

  3. New dual gas puff imaging system with up-down symmetry on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. C.; Shao, L. M.; Zweben, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    Gas puff imaging (GPI) offers a direct and effective diagnostic to measure the edge turbulence structure and velocity in the edge plasma, which closely relates to edge transport and instability in tokamaks. A dual GPI diagnostic system has been installed on the low field side on experimental adva...... American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4770122]...

  4. 39GHz ECRH system for breakdown studies on the TCA tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochelon, A.; Goodman, T.; Whaley, D.; Tran, M.Q.; Reinhard, D.; Perrenoud, A.; Joedicke, B.; Mathews, H.G.; Kasparek, W.; Thumm, M.

    1990-01-01

    The design construction and first operation of a 39GHz ECRH system (300 kW, 100 ms) for low loop-voltage breakdown and startup-assist experiments on the TCA tokamak is described. (author) 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  5. A D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket using compact fusion advanced Rankine (CFAR) cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Shimohiro, D.; Yamamoto, Y.; Toku, H. (Inst. of Atomic Energy, Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan)); Inui, Y.; Ishikawa, M.; Umoto, J.; Miki, N. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Fukuyama, A. (Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama Univ. (Japan)); Mitarai, O. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Kumamoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan)); Okamoto, M.; Sekimoto, H.; Fujii, Y.; Kim, Hu; Watanabe, K.; Ishii, T. (Research Lab. for Nuclear Engineering, Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Meguro (Japan)); Takagi, T. (Inst. of Fluid Science, Univ. Tohoku, Sendai (Japan)); Suzuki, T.; Mutoh, I. (National Research Inst. for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Miyazaki, K.; Saitoh, M. (Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan)); Logan, B.G.; Barr, W.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Hoffman, M.A. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)); Campbell, R.B. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-12-01

    Recent progress of a D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket concept using CFAR (Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine) cycle is presented. High enthalpy extraction in excess of 50% was found achievable by a nonequilibrium disk-type MHD generator for gas stagnation temperatures of 3000 K superheated by synchrotron radiation, leading to a 40% overall plant efficiency with recuperative heat cycle and advanced thermoelectric converters. The stored magnetic energy of a 10 T MHD three-pairs Helmholtz-type magnet was estimated to be about 600 MJ per MHD generator. A mixture of mercury and lithium liquid flow was examined and found applicable to reduce the mercury inventory. The tritium permeation loss inherent in the relatively high temperature CFAR cycle, neutronics relating to tritium breeding and streaming through the waveguide and the MHD generator duct are discussed. Results of a 2000 h high temperature (600-700deg C) mercury corrosion test of Type 304 stainless steel, a TZM alloy and four kinds of ceramic rods in refluxing mercury with 0.004 mol fraction of potassium admixture have shown no noticeable corrosion except for Type 304 stainless steel. (orig.).

  6. A conceptual composite blanket design for the Tokamak type of thermonuclear reactor incorporating thermoelectric pumping of liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta Gupta, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    The conceptual liquid lithium blanket design for the tokamak type of thermonuclear reactor put forward is a modification of the initial simple but novel design concept enunciated earlier that exploits the availability of suitably oriented magnetic fields and temperature gradients within the blanket to pump the liquid as has been shown feasible by laboratory model experiments. The modular construction of the blanket cells is retained but the earlier simple back to back double spiralling channel module is replaced by a composite unit of three radially nested layer-structures to optimise heat and tritium extraction from the blanket. The layer-structure at the first wall generates liquid lithium circulation by thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic forces and the segregated double spiralling channels serve as inlet-outlet driving devices. The outermost layer-structure is cooled by helium. Liquid lithium in the intermediate layer-structure is pumped at a very slow rate. The choice of the relative dimensional proportions of the three layer-structure and the channel cross-section, material property and the spiralling contour is of critical importance for the design. This paper presents the design data for a conceptual design of such a blanket with a 5000 MW (th) rating. (author)

  7. Hydrogen isotope trapping on graphite collectors during an isotope exchange experiment in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpatrick, S.J.; Ulrickson, M.; Dylla, H.F.; Manos, D.M.; Ramsey, A.T.; Nygren, R.; Hirooka, Y.; Wampler, W.R.

    1989-03-01

    A rotatable collector probe was used to expose several graphite samples to a deuterium-to-hydrogen-to-deuterium exchange experiment in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the start of the 1988 operations period. This experiment proved the utility of helium conditioning discharges in accelerating the changeover process. Samples included portions of a tile taken from the inner bumper limiter (POCO AXF-5Q graphite) of TFTR during the recent machine opening, and coupons which had been conditioned in the Plasma Interactive Surface Component Experimental Station (PISCES) by exposure to a helium plasma. The samples were exposed to different groups of the /approximately/100 1.4 MA discharges that comprised the experiment. They were removed and analyzed for retained deuterium and impurities by nuclear reaction analysis and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Codeposited carbon layers had been formed with thicknesses up to several tenths of a micron. The inferred percentages of trapped hydrogenic species were in general agreement with spectroscopic data. The computed carbon fluence per D + discharge, 1.2 /times/ 10 17 C/cm 2 , is compared to recent measurements on limiter tiles removed from TFTR. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  8. First wall/blanket/shield design and power conversion for the ARIES-IV tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.Z.; Conn, R.W.; Najmabadi, F.

    1994-01-01

    ARIES-IV is a conceptual, D-T burning, steady-state tokamak fusion reactor producing 1000 MWe net. It operates in the second plasma stability regime. The structural material is SiC composite and the primary coolant is helium at 10 MPa base pressure. The coolant flows poloidally in two loops, one inboard and one outboard. The coolant channels are circular tubes that form shells and are placed between two purge plates; the space between two adjacent tubes and the plate is purge gas flow area. The solid breeder is Li 2 O, and Be is used as neutron multiplier to ensure adequate TBR. Beryllium and Li 2 O are placed in between the adjacent tube shells. A computer code was developed to perform and optimize thermal-hydraulic design. Minimization of blanket thickness and the amount of Be, and the maximization of breeder zone thickness were done by iteration with neutronics. The gross thermal efficiency is 49%. The cost of electricity is 68 mills/kWh. The use of low activation SiC composite as the structural material, Li 2 O as the solid breeder, and avoidance of tungsten in the divertor has resulted in a good safety performance, and LSA rating of 1. Overall, SiC/He/Li 2 O ARIES-IV design is expected to have attractive economic and safety advantages

  9. PXIe based data acquisition and control system for ECRH systems on SST-1 and Aditya tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Jatinkumar J., E-mail: jatin@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Shukla, B.K.; Rajanbabu, N.; Patel, H.; Dhorajiya, P.; Purohit, D. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Mankadiya, K. [Optimized Solutions Pvt. Ltd (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Data Aquisition and control system (DAQ). • PXIe hardware–(PXI–PCI bus extension for Instrumention Express). • RHVPS–Regulated High Voltage Power supply. • SST1–Steady state superconducting tokamak. - Abstract: In Steady State Superconducting (SST-1) tokamak, various RF heating sub-systems are used for plasma heating experiments. In SST-1, Two Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) systems have been installed for pre-ionization, heating and current drive experiments. The 42 GHz gyrotron based ECRH system is installed and in operation with SST-1 plasma experiments. The 82.6 GHz gyrotron delivers 200 kW CW power (1000 s) while the 42 GHz gyrotron delivers 500 kW power for 500 ms duration. Each gyrotron system consists of various auxiliary power supplies, the crowbar unit and the water cooling system. The PXIe (PCI bus extension for Instrumentation Express)bus based DAC (Data Acquisition and Control) system has been designed, developed and under implementation for safe and reliable operation of the gyrotron. The Control and Monitoring Software applications have been developed using NI LabView 2014 software with real time support on windows platform.

  10. Evaluation of neutron streaming through injection ports in a tokamak-type fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Takahiro; Seki, Yasushi; Iida, Hiromasa

    1976-03-01

    The effects of neutron streaming through injection ports in the fusion reactor designed in JAERI have been studied, especially those on tritium breeding ratio and the shielding of the superconducting magnet. In placement of the injection ports in the blanket, the tritium breeding ratio decreases by up to 1.3%, and shielding problem of the superconducting magnet is very important. (auth.)

  11. Lithium adsorption by the first wall of fusion reactor-tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakunin, O.G.

    1989-01-01

    Lithium adsorption by the first wall of fusion reactor under stationary conditions and in the absence of chemical reactions is considered. Possibility of achieving 70% coating of the wall with lithium which can lead to sufficient decrease of sputtering is shown. 5 refs.; 5 figs

  12. On the survivability of diagnostic windows in the CIT [Compact Ignition Tokamak] reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.

    1988-11-01

    The problem of radiation induced stresses in CIT diagnostic windows is discussed. Existing data indicate windows of existing design will probably survive if placed on the periphery of the reactor. There is a lack of adequate engineering data upon which the design and survivability of windows can be based. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Final conceptual design report. [Overall cost and scheduling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-02-01

    The TFTR is the first U.S. magnetic confinement device planned to demonstrate the fusion of D-T at reactor power levels. This report addresses the physics objectives and the engineering goals of the TFTR project. Technical, cost, and schedule aspects of the project are included. (MOW)

  14. Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bolta, C.C.

    1976-03-01

    A scoping study for a Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility (TETF) is presented. The TETF is a tokamak with R = 3 m and I/sub p/ = 1.4 MA based on the counterstreaming-ion torus mode of operation. The primary purpose of TETF is to demonstrate fusion technologies for the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR), but it will also serve as an engineering and radiation test facility. TETF has several technological systems (e.g., superconducting toroidal-field coil, tritium fuel cycle, impurity control, first wall) that are prototypical of EPR.

  15. Tokamak ARC damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  16. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  17. Reactor protection and shut-down system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klar

    1980-01-01

    The reactor protection system being a part of the reactor safety system. The requirements on the reactor protection system are: high safety with regard to signal processing, high availability, self-reporting of faults etc. The functional sections of the reactor protection system are the analog section, the logic section and the generating of output signals. Description of the operation characteristics and of the extension of function. (orig.)

  18. Reactor protection systems for the Replacement Research Reactor, ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    The 20-MW Replacement Research Reactor Project which is currently under construction at ANSTO will have a combination of a state of the art triplicated computer based reactor protection system, and a fully independent, and diverse, triplicated analogue reactor protection system, that has been in use in the nuclear industry, for many decades. The First Reactor Protection System (FRPS) consists of a Triconex triplicated modular redundant system that has recently been approved by the USNRC for use in the USA?s power reactor program. The Second Reactor Protection System is a hardwired analogue system supplied by Foxboro, the Spec 200 system, which is also Class1E qualified. The FRPS is used to drop the control rods when its safety parameter setpoints have been reached. The SRPS is used to drain the reflector tank and since this operation would result in a reactor poison out due to the time it would take to refill the tank the FRPS trip setpoints are more limiting. The FRPS and SRPS have limited hardwired indications on the control panels in the main control room (MCR) and emergency control centre (ECC), however all FRPS and SRPS parameters are capable of being displayed on the reactor control and monitoring system (RCMS) video display units. The RCMS is a Foxboro Series I/A control system which is used for plant control and monitoring and as a protection system for the cold neutron source. This paper will provide technical information on both systems, their trip logics, their interconnections with each other, and their integration into the reactor control and monitoring system and control panels. (author)

  19. Anomalous loss of DT alpha particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Hans W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1997-09-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of α-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on α-particle loss has led to a better understanding of α-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing α-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e., compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90° lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an α-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized α-particles near the passing/trapped boundary was observed to occur between inward and outward shifts at an intermediate value of plasma current (1.4 MA). This anomalous loss feature is not yet understood.

  20. Optimization design study of an innovative divertor concept for future experimental tokamak-type fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willem Janssens, Ir.; Crutzen, Y.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Matera, R.

    1991-01-01

    The design optimization study of an innovative divertor concept for future experimental tokamak-type fusion devices is both an answer to the actual problems encountered in the multilayer divertor proposals and an illustration of a rational modelling philosophy and optimization strategy for the development of a new divertor structure. Instead of using mechanical attachment or metallurgical bonding of the protective material to the heat sink as in most actual divertor concepts, the so-called brush divertor in this study uses an array of unidirectional fibers penetrating in both the protective armor and the underling composite heat sink. Although the approach is fully concentrated on the divertor performance, including both a description of its function from the theoretical point of view and an overview of the problems related to the materials choice and evaluation, both the approach followed in the numerical modelling and the judgment of the results are thought to be valid also for other applications. Therefore the spin-off of the study must be situated in both the technological progress towards a feasible divertor solution, which introduces no additional physical uncertainties, and in the general area of the thermo-mechanical finite-element modelling on both macro-and microscale. The brush divertor itself embodies the use, and thus the modelling, of advanced materials such as tailor-made metal matrix composites and dispersion strengthened metals, and is shown to offer large potential advantages, demanding however and experimental validation under working conditions. It is clearly indicated where the need originates for an integrated experimental program which must allow to verify the basic modelling assumptions in order to arrive at the use of numerical computation as a powerful and realistic tool of structural testing and life-time prediction

  1. Design of a tokamak fusion reactor first wall armor against neutral beam impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, R.A.

    1977-12-01

    The maximum temperatures and thermal stresses are calculated for various first wall design proposals, using both analytical solutions and the TRUMP and SAP IV Computer Codes. Beam parameters, such as pulse time, cycle time, and beam power, are varied. It is found that uncooled plates should be adequate for near-term devices, while cooled protection will be necessary for fusion power reactors. Graphite and tungsten are selected for analysis because of their desirable characteristics. Graphite allows for higher heat fluxes compared to tungsten for similar pulse times. Anticipated erosion (due to surface effects) and plasma impurity fraction are estimated. Neutron irradiation damage is also discussed. Neutron irradiation damage (rather than erosion, fatigue, or creep) is estimated to be the lifetime-limiting factor on the lifetime of the component in fusion power reactors. It is found that the use of tungsten in fusion power reactors, when directly exposed to the plasma, will cause serious plasma impurity problems; graphite should not present such an impurity problem

  2. Activation analysis of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.

    1986-01-01

    The US fusion program has completed the conceptual design of a compact tokamak device that achieves ignition. The high neutron wall loadings associated with this compact deuterium-tritium-burning device indicate that radiation-related issues may be significant considerations in the overall system design. Sufficient shielding will be requied for the radiation protection of both reactor components and occupational personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure to permit personnel access into the test cell after shutdown and limit the total activation of the test cell components. This paper describes the conceptual design of the igloo shield system and discusses the major neutronic concerns related to the design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

  3. New design of cable-in-conduit conductor for application in future fusion reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, J.; Wu, Y.; Li, J.; Liu, Fang; Dai, Chao; Shi, Y.; Liu, H.; Mao, Z.; Nijhuis, Arend; Zhou, Chao; Yagotyntsev, Kostyantyn; Lubkemann, Ruben; Anvar, Valiyaparambil Abdulsalam; Devred, A.

    2017-01-01

    The China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a new tokamak device whose magnet system includes toroidal field, central solenoid (CS) and poloidal field coils. The main goal is to build a fusion engineering tokamak reactor with about 1 GW fusion power and self-sufficiency by blanket. In order

  4. A distributed high speed data acquisition system for KT5C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiang; Wang Zhijiang; Lu Ronghua; Wang Jun; Yu Yi; Zhu Zhenghua; Wen Yizhi; Wan Shude; Liu Wandong; Yu Changxuan

    2005-01-01

    The development of a distributed data acquisition system with low cost to implement high speed data collection through the campus networks for a small tokamak, KT5C, is presented. Data of 512 k bytes at 5 MHz from 5 channels for each can be collected during about 10s after three researchers at different positions demand this system for acquisitions. This system realizes long distance multiuser operations; virtually efficiency of the data acquisition is enhanced. (authors)

  5. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) special-purpose remote maintenance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, L.S.; Welland, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    A key element in the preconceptual design of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) was the development of design concepts for special-purpose remote maintenance systems. Included were systems for shield sector replacement, vacuum vessel sector and toroidal field coil replacement, limiter blade replacement, protective tile replacement, and general-purpose maintenance. This paper addresses these systems as they apply to the copper toroidal field (TF) coil version of the TFCX

  6. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase I report. Volume I. Study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, H.S.

    1977-10-01

    The overall purpose of the study is to identify design features of tokamak fusion power reactors which contribute to the achievement of high levels of maintainability. In this first phase, the principal emphasis is on scheduled maintenance whose frequency is determined by the life of the reactor first wall/blanket. Remote operations are baselined. Five conceptual reactor designs have been analyzed. Each concept is characterized by the size of the replaceable first wall/blanket module--large, intermediate, small--and whether access to the module was from the outside of the reactor, the inside of the reactor or a combination of both. The study results are expressed in terms of availability (scheduled maintenance downtime), the costs of maintenance (capital and recurring) and the percent effect of maintenance on the cost of electricity. During this first phase, the study benefitted significantly by the critical review of the feasibility of maintenance functions and the time-to-perform estimates by numerous persons involved in nuclear maintenance and remote operations

  7. Reactor technology: power conversion systems and reactor operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of advanced fuels permits the use of coolants (organic, high pressure helium) that result in power conversion systems with good thermal efficiency and relatively low cost. Water coolant would significantly reduce thermal efficiency, while lithium and salt coolants, which have been proposed for DT reactors, will have comparable power conversion efficiencies, but will probably be significantly more expensive. Helium cooled blankets with direct gas turbine power conversion cycles can also be used with DT reactors, but activation problems will be more severe, and the portion of blanket power in the metallic structure will probably not be available for the direct cycle, because of temperature limitations. A very important potential advantage of advanced fuel reactors over DT fusion reactors is the possibility of easier blanket maintenance and reduced down time for replacement. If unexpected leaks occur, in most cases the leaking circuit can be shut off and a redundant cooling curcuit will take over the thermal load. With the D-He 3 reactor, it appears practical to do this while the reactor is operating, as long as the leak is small enough not to shut down the reactor. Redundancy for Cat-D reactors has not been explored in detail, but appears feasible in principle. The idea of mobile units operating in the reactor chamber for service and maintenance of radioactive elements is explored

  8. KDAS: General-Purpose Data Acquisition System Developed for KAIST-Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Seong-Heon; Choe, Wonho; Chang, Hong-Young; Jeong, Seung-Ho

    2000-01-01

    The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)-Tokamak Data Acquisition System (KDAS) was originally developed for KAIST-Tokamak (R/a = 0.53 m/0.14 m). It operates on a distributed system based on personal computers and has a driver-based hierarchical structure. Since KDAS can be dynamically composed of any number of available computers, and the hardware-dependent codes can be thoroughly separated into external drivers, it exhibits excellent system performance flexibility and extensibility and can optimize various user needs. It collectively controls the VXI, CAMAC, GPIB, and RS232 instrument hybrids. With these useful and convenient features, it can be applied to any computerized experiment, especially to fusion-related research. The system design and features are discussed in detail

  9. Pneumatic transport systems for TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, John A.

    1970-01-01

    Main parameters and advantages of pneumatically operated systems, primarily those operated by gas pressure are discussed. The special irradiation ends for the TRIGA reactor are described. To give some idea of the complexity of some modern systems, the author presents the large system currently operating at the National Bureau of Standards in Washington. In this system, 13 stations are located throughout the radiochemistry laboratories and three irradiation ends are located in the reactor, which is a 14-megawatt unit. The system incorporates practically every fail-safe device possible, including ball valves located on all capsule lines entering the reactor area, designed to close automatically in the event of a reactor scram, and at that time capsules within the reactor would be diverted by means of switches located on the inside of the reactor wall. The whole system is under final control of a permission control panel located in the reactor control room. Many other safety accessories of the system are described

  10. Propose Reactor Control and Monitoring System for RTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sabri Minhat; Izhar Abu Hussin; Mohd Idris Taib; Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha

    2011-01-01

    Reactor control and monitoring system is a one of the important features used in reactor. The control and monitoring must come together to provide safety, excellent performance and reliable in nuclear reactor technology application. Objectives of this technical paper are to design and propose reactor control system and reactor monitoring system in Research Reactor (RTP) for Reactor Upgrading Project. (author)

  11. Data acquisition and processing system of the electron cyclotron emission imaging system of the KSTAR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. B.; Lee, W.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A new innovative electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic system for the Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) produces a large amount of data. The design of the data acquisition and processing system of the ECEI diagnostic system should consider covering the large data production and flow. The system design is based on the layered structure scalable to the future extension to accommodate increasing data demands. Software architecture that allows a web-based monitoring of the operation status, remote experiment, and data analysis is discussed. The operating software will help machine operators and users validate the acquired data promptly, prepare next discharge, and enhance the experiment performance and data analysis in a distributed environment.

  12. First experimental results with the Current Limit Avoidance System at the JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Tommasi, G. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Galeani, S. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Università di Roma, Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Jachmich, S. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Koninklijke Militaire School - Ecole Royale Militaire, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Joffrin, E. [IRFM-CEA, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-paul-lez-Durance (France); Lennholm, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium); Lomas, P.J. [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Neto, A.C. [Associazione EURATOM-IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, IST, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Maviglia, F. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); McCullen, P. [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Pironti, A. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Rimini, F.G. [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Sips, A.C.C. [European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium); Varano, G.; Vitelli, R. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Università di Roma, Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Zaccarian, L. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Universitè de Toulouse, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2013-06-15

    The Current Limit Avoidance System (CLA) has been recently deployed at the JET tokamak to avoid current saturations in the poloidal field (PF) coils when the eXtreme Shape Controller is used to control the plasma shape. In order to cope with the current saturation limits, the CLA exploits the redundancy of the PF coils system to automatically obtain almost the same plasma shape using a different combination of currents in the PF coils. In the presence of disturbances it tries to avoid the current saturations by relaxing the constraints on the plasma shape control. The CLA system has been successfully implemented on the JET tokamak and fully commissioned in 2011. This paper presents the first experimental results achieved in 2011–2012 during the restart and the ITER-like wall campaigns at JET.

  13. Data acquisition and control system for the ECE imaging diagnostic on the EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, C.; Lan, T.; Xie, J.; Gao, B.; Liu, W.; Yu, C.; Zhu, Y.; Domier, C.W.; Luhmann, N.C.; Milne, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    A 384-channel electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system is installed on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) and 7-gigabyte data is produced for each regular discharge of a 10-second pulse. The data acquisition and control (DAC) system for the EAST ECEI diagnostics covers the large data production and embeds the ability to report the data quality instantly after the discharge. The symmetric routing design of the timing signal distributions among the 384 channels provides a low-cost solution to the synchronization of a large number of channels. The application of the load-balance bond service largely reduces the configuration difficulty and the cost in the high-speed data transferring tasks. Benefiting from the various kinds of hardware units with dedicated functionalities, an automated and user interactive DAC work flow is achieved, including the pre-selections of the automation scheme and the observation region, 384-channel data acquisition and local caching, post-discharge imaging data quality evaluation, remote system status monitoring, and inter-discharge imaging system event handling. The system configuration in a specific physics experiment is further optimized through the associated operating software which is enhanced by the input of the tokamak operation status and the region of interest (ROI) from other diagnostics. The DAC system is based on a modularized design and scalable to the long-pulse discharges in the EAST tokamak.

  14. Data acquisition and control system for the ECE imaging diagnostic on the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, C.; Lan, T.; Zhu, Y.; Xie, J.; Gao, B.; Liu, W.; Yu, C.; Milne, P. G.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2017-06-01

    A 384-channel electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system is installed on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) and 7-gigabyte data is produced for each regular discharge of a 10-second pulse. The data acquisition and control (DAC) system for the EAST ECEI diagnostics covers the large data production and embeds the ability to report the data quality instantly after the discharge. The symmetric routing design of the timing signal distributions among the 384 channels provides a low-cost solution to the synchronization of a large number of channels. The application of the load-balance bond service largely reduces the configuration difficulty and the cost in the high-speed data transferring tasks. Benefiting from the various kinds of hardware units with dedicated functionalities, an automated and user interactive DAC work flow is achieved, including the pre-selections of the automation scheme and the observation region, 384-channel data acquisition and local caching, post-discharge imaging data quality evaluation, remote system status monitoring, and inter-discharge imaging system event handling. The system configuration in a specific physics experiment is further optimized through the associated operating software which is enhanced by the input of the tokamak operation status and the region of interest (ROI) from other diagnostics. The DAC system is based on a modularized design and scalable to the long-pulse discharges in the EAST tokamak.

  15. Materials problems and possible solutions for near term Tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to clarify the magnitude of the problems that might arise from neutron damage and to put into perspective the methods and facilities that might be used to solve these problems. First, a brief review of some of the fundamental aspects of radiation damage from neutrons will be given for the non-materials scientist followed by a current listing of the anticipated radiation environment of the various near term (TFTR, JET, T-20), EPR, and DPR designs. The reader should note that such designs are highly fluid and may change considerably in the future (in fact due to the very problem we will be discussing). Next, the present and future facilities that could be used to test CTR materials will be reviewed and their utility in providing pertinent fundamental and engineering data will be discussed. Finally, some conclusions and recommendations on the near term reactor materials problems will be presented

  16. Comparison of explicit calculations for n = 3 to 8 dielectronic satellites of the FeXXV Kα resonance line with experimental data from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decaux, V.; Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; Hill, K.W.; von Goeler, S.; Park, H.; Bhalla, C.P.

    1991-12-01

    Dielectronic satellite spectra of the FeXXV Kα resonance line observed from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasmas have been compared with recent explicit calculations for the n = 3 to 8 dielectronic satellites as well as the earlier theoretical predictions, which were based on the 1/n 3 scaling law for n > 4 satellites. The analysis has been performed by least-squares fits of synthetic spectra to the experimental data. The synthetic spectra constructed from both theories are in good agreement with the observed data. However, the electron temperature values obtained from the fit of the present explicit calculations are in better agreement with independent measurements. 20 refs., 4 figs

  17. Digital control system of advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Huaqing; Zhang Rui; Liu Lixin

    2001-01-01

    This article produced the Digital Control System For Advanced Reactor made by NPIC. This system uses Siemens SIMATIC PCS 7 process control system and includes five control system: reactor power control system, pressurizer level control system, pressurizer pressure control system, steam generator water level control system and dump control system. This system uses three automatic station to realize the function of five control system. Because the safety requisition of reactor is very strict, the system is redundant. The system configuration uses CFC and SCL. the human-machine interface is configured by Wincc. Finally the system passed the test of simulation by using RETRAN 02 to simulate the control object. The research solved the key technology of digital control system of reactor and will be very helpful for the nationalization of digital reactor control system

  18. Recirculation system for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H. E.; Dollard, W. J.; Tower, S. N.

    1980-01-01

    A recirculation system for use in pressurized water nuclear reactors to increase the output temperature of the reactor coolant, thereby achieving a significant improvement in plant efficiency without exceeding current core design limits. A portion of the hot outlet coolant is recirculated to the inlets of the peripheral fuel assemblies which operate at relatively low power levels. The outlet temperature from these peripheral fuel assemblies is increased to a temperature above that of the average core outlet. The recirculation system uses external pumps and introduces the hot recirculation coolant to the free space between the core barrel and the core baffle, where it flows downward and inward to the inlets of the peripheral fuel assemblies. In the unlikely event of a loss of coolant accident, the recirculation system flow path through the free space and to the inlets of the fuel assemblies is utilized for the injection of emergency coolant to the lower vessel and core. During emergency coolant injection, the emergency coolant is prevented from bypassing the core through the recirculation system by check valves inserted into the recirculation system piping

  19. Computerized reactor pressure vessel materials information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Monserrate, C.; Kenworthy, L.D.; Tether, C.D.

    1980-10-01

    A computerized information system for storage and retrieval of reactor pressure vessel materials data was established, as part of Task Action Plan A-11, Reactor Vessel Materials Toughness. Data stored in the system are necessary for evaluating the resistance of reactor pressure vessels to flaw-induced fracture. This report includes (1) a description of the information system; (2) guidance on accessing the system; and (3) a user's manual for the system

  20. Spectroscopic system for impurity measurements in the TJ-1 Tokamak of JEN; Un sistema espectroscopico para medidas de impurezas en el Tokamak TJ-1 de la JEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navas, G.; Zurro, B.

    1982-07-01

    we describe a spectroscopic system with spatial resolution capability that has been configured for plasma diagnostic in the TJ-1 Tokamak of JEN. The experimental system, based on a one meter monochromator, has been absolutely calibrated using a tungsten-halogen lamp. The calibration procedures and the absolute spectral sensitivity are presented as well as its dependence with the polarization. A simplified spectroscopic model of the radiation emitted by the intrinsic plasma impurities (C, 0, . . . ) has been developed. A one dimensional model of the temporal evolution of various ionization stages in coronal equilibrium is used to predict the electron temperature and impurity concentration. This model has been applied to experimental data from several Tokamaks. (Author) 23 refs.

  1. Spectroscopic system for impurity measurements in the TJ-1 Tokamak of JEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navas, G.; Zurro, B.

    1982-01-01

    we describe a spectroscopic system with spatial resolution capability that has been configured for plasma diagnostic in the TJ-1 Tokamak of JEN. The experimental system, based on a one meter monochromator, has been absolutely calibrated using a tungsten-halogen lamp. The calibration procedures and the absolute spectral sensitivity are presented as well as its dependence with the polarization. A simplified spectroscopic model of the radiation emitted by the intrinsic plasma impurities (C, 0, . . . ) has been developed. A one dimensional model of the temporal evolution of various ionization stages in coronal equilibrium is used to predict the electron temperature and impurity concentration. This model has been applied to experimental data from several Tokamaks. (Author) 23 refs

  2. Energy, Vacuum, Gas Fueling, and Security Systems for the Spherical Tokamak MEDUSA-CR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jeferson; Soto, Christian; Carvajal, Johan; Ribeiro, Celso

    2013-10-01

    The former spherical tokamak (ST) MEDUSA (Madison EDUcation Small Aspect.ratio tokamak, R training and to clarify several issues in relevant physics for conventional and mainly STs, including beta studies in bean-shaped ST plasmas, transport, heating and current drive via Alfvén wave, and natural divertor STs with ergodic magnetic limiter. We present here the energy, vacuum, gas fueling, and security systems for MEDUSA-CR device. The interface with the control and data acquisition systems based on National Instruments (NI) software (LabView) and hardware (on loan to our laboratory via NI-Costa Rica) are also presented. VIE-ITCR, IAEA-CRP contract 17592, National Instruments of Costa Rica.

  3. Systematic design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennen, B.A.; Westerhof, E.; De Baar, M.R.; Nuij, P.W.J.M.; Steinbuch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of tearing modes is essential for the operation of tokamaks. This paper describes the design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak. The two main control tasks of this feedback control system are the radial alignment of electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (ECRH/ECCD) with a tearing mode and the stabilization of a mode at a specific width. In order to simulate these control tasks, the time evolution of a tearing mode subject to suppression by ECRH/ECCD and destabilization by a magnetic perturbation field is modelled using the generalized Rutherford equation. The model includes an equilibrium model and an ECRH/ECCD launcher model. The dynamics and static equilibria of this model are analysed. The model is linearized and based on the linearized model, linear feedback controllers are designed and simulated, demonstrating both alignment and width control of tearing modes in TEXTOR. (paper)

  4. Current drive studies for the ARIES steady-state tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, T.K.; Ehst, D.A.; Mandrekas, J.

    1994-01-01

    Steady-state plasma operating scenarios are designed for three versions of the ARIES reactor, using non-inductive current drive techniques that have an established database. R.f. waves, including fast and lower hybrid waves, are the reference drivers for the D-T burning ARIES-I and ARIES-II/IV, while neutral beam injection is employed for ARIES-III which burns D- 3 He. Plasma equilibria with a high bootstrap-current component have been used, in order to minimize the recirculating power fraction and cost of electricity. To maintain plasma stability, the driven current profile has been aligned with that of equilibrium by proper choices of the plasma profiles and power launch parameters. Except for ARIES-III, the current-drive power requirements and the relevant technology developments are found to be quite reasonable. The wave-power spectrum and launch requirements are also considered achievable with a modest development effort. Issues such as an improved database for fast-wave current drive, lower-hybrid power coupling to the plasma edge, profile control in the plasma core, and access to the design point of operation remain to be addressed. ((orig.))

  5. Determination of settings in the protection system for Tokamak-15 superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudnovsky, A.N.; Khvostenko, P.P.; Posadsky, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    The calculations results of the maximal temperature heating of Tokamak-15 superconducting magnet (T-15 SM) under energy removal dependent on the current through the coil are given in paper. The calculations of SM thermomechanical strength have shown that the maximal coil heating temperature should not exceed 150--160 K. The range of the settings level in SM protection system for currents 1 ≤ 4 kA has been determined

  6. Functional systems of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1982-01-01

    The main topics, discussed in the present paper, are: - Principle design of the reactor coolant system - reactor pressure vessel with internals - containment design - residual heat removal and emergency cooling systems - nuclear component cooling systems - emergency feed water systems - plant electric power supply system. (orig./RW)

  7. Underwater robot system for reactor vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Sung Uk; Jeong, Kyung Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    It is dangerous to work inside reactor vessel because of high radioactivity. So robot system is necessary to work inside reactor vessel instead of workers. And robot also has advantage of mobility over conventional equipment which has limitation of the range of accessibility. In this paper, we describe design consideration and criteria of robot system for reactor vessel, and component of developed system. Reliability, usability and convenience of robot system were considered to design and fabrication.

  8. Underwater robot system for reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Sung Uk; Jeong, Kyung Min

    2012-01-01

    It is dangerous to work inside reactor vessel because of high radioactivity. So robot system is necessary to work inside reactor vessel instead of workers. And robot also has advantage of mobility over conventional equipment which has limitation of the range of accessibility. In this paper, we describe design consideration and criteria of robot system for reactor vessel, and component of developed system. Reliability, usability and convenience of robot system were considered to design and fabrication

  9. Structural design features for commercial fusion power reactor magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Young, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of structural design features for commercial fusion power reactor magnet systems is discussed. Changing concepts in plasma physics and impurity control, new data on radiation damage in materials and developments in the maintainability and repairability of the magnet systems are the driving influences in this evolution. Generic problems in the magnet designs are discussed for several proposed magnetic confinement system configurations, including tokamaks, tandem mirrors, the Elmo Bumpy Torus, and the reversed field theta pinch. These systems are compared on the basis of how efficiently the magnets make use of structural materials. A measure of the effectiveness of a magnet system is found by determining the ratio of net electric power output from the reactor to the stored energy in the magnetic fields produced by the magnet coils in a given system. The stored energy in the magnetic field can then be used to establish a minimum structural volume and mass by use of the virial theorem. Experience with coil types such as solenoids, toroids, Yin-Yang, etc. has established factors by which the minima must be multiplied to yield anticipated volumes and masses of realistic magnet systems. These initial, admittedly approximate, calculations allow designers to estimate early in the process the contribution of the magnet systems to the overall cost of a fusion reactor. As work progresses these estimates can be used to indicate the degree to which the designers is making effective use of the structural material. Basic rules for effective placement of structure, common to all magnet systems, are also discussed in detail. Factors are presented which make it possible to compare structural savings to the cost of researching the parameters involved in the stability of superconductors. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear reactor coolant and cover gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.A.; Redding, A.H.; Tower, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    A core cooling system is disclosed for a nuclear reactor of the type utilizing a liquid coolant with a cover gas above free surfaces of the coolant. The disclosed system provides for a large inventory of reactor coolant and a balanced low pressure cover gas arrangement. A flow restricting device disposed within a reactor vessel achieves a pressure of the cover gas in the reactor vessel lower than the pressure of the reactor coolant in the vessel. The low gas pressure is maintained over all free surfaces of the coolant in the cooling system including a coolant reservoir tank. Reactor coolant stored in the reservoir tank allows for the large reactor coolant inventory provided by the invention

  11. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates. Volume IX is divided into three sections: Chapter 1, Reactor Systems; Chapter 2, Fuel-Cycle Systems; and the Appendixes. Chapter 1 contains the characterizations of the following 12 reactor types: light-water reactor; heavy-water reactor; water-cooled breeder reactor; high-temperature gas-cooled reactor; gas-cooled fast reactor; liquid-metal fast breeder reactor; spectral-shift-controlled reactor; accelerator-driven reactor; molten-salt reactor; gaseous-core reactor; tokamak fusion-fisson hybrid reactor; and fast mixed-spectrum reactor. Chapter 2 contains similar information developed for fuel-cycle facilities in the following categories: mining and milling; conversion and enrichment; fuel fabrication; spent fuel reprocessing; waste handling and disposal; and transportation of nuclear materials.

  12. Conceptual design of a Langmuir probe system for the tokamak ASDEX-UPGRADE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastassiadis, A.; Tsingas, A.C.; Tsois, N.N.; Zoumbos, G.A.

    1985-05-01

    The conceptual design of a Langmuir probe system for the tokamak ASDEX-UPG is presented. This system is intended to carry out electrostatic measurements, in space and time, on the boundary layer plasma over the largest possible volume of the divertor plasma during discharges. Conducted by preset design requirements a fast probe system is proposed. During discharges signal measurements will be performed by means of a data-acquisition system and the motion will be controlled by a real-time computer. The desired information concerning plasma parameters and the motion of the probe system will be available to the diagnostician via a video display unit. (author)

  13. Inertial confinement fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, T.G.; Bohachevsky, I.O.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    A variety of reactor cavity concepts, drivers, and energy conversion mechanisms are being considered to realize commercial applications of ICF. Presented in this paper are: (1) a review of reactor concepts with estimates of practically achievable pulse repetition rates; (2) a survey of drivers with estimates of the requirements on reactor conditions imposed by beam propagation characteristics; and (3) an assessment of compatible driver-reactor combinations

  14. In-situ Tritium Measurements of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Bumper Limiter Tiles Post D-T Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.A. Gentile; C.H. Skinner; K.M. Young; M. Nishi; S. Langish; et al

    1999-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) Engineering and Research Staff in collaboration with members of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Tritium Engineering Laboratory have commenced in-situ tritium measurements of the TFTR bumper limiter. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) operated with tritium from 1993 to 1997. During this time ∼ 53,000 Ci of tritium was injected into the TFTR vacuum vessel. After the cessation of TFTR plasma operations in April 1997 an aggressive tritium cleanup campaign lasting ∼ 3 months was initiated. The TFTR vacuum vessel was subjected to a regimen of glow discharge cleaning (GDC) and dry nitrogen and ''moist air'' purges. Currently ∼ 7,500 Ci of tritium remains in the vacuum vessel largely contained in the limiter tiles. The TFTR limiter is composed of 1,920 carbon tiles with an average weight of ∼ 600 grams each. The location and distribution of tritium on the TFTR carbon tiles are of considerable interest. Future magnetically confined fusion devices employing carbon as a limiter material may be considerably constrained due to potentially large tritium inventories being tenaciously held on the surface of the tiles. In-situ tritium measurements were conducted in TFTR bay L during August and November 1998. During the bay L measurement campaign open wall ion chambers and ultra thin thermoluminscent dosimeters (TLD) affixed to a boom and end effector were deployed into the vacuum vessel. The detectors were designed to make contact with the surface of the bumper limiter tile and to provide either real time (ion chamber) or passive (TLD) indication of the surface tritium concentration. The open wall ion chambers were positioned onto the surface of the tile in a manner which employed the surface of the tile as one of the walls of the chamber. The ion chambers, which are (electrically) gamma insensitive, were landed at four positions per tile. The geometry for landing the TLD's provided measurement at 24

  15. Tokamak TCABR: Acquisition system, data analysis, and remote participation using MDSplus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sá, W.P. de

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The implementation of MDSplus in TCABR tokamak. ► Interfaces between the system already installed and the MDSplus. - Abstract: Each plasma physics laboratory has a proprietary scheme to control and data acquisition system. Usually, it is different from one laboratory to another. It means that each laboratory has its own way to control the experiment and retrieving data from the database. Fusion research relies to a great extent on international collaboration and this private system makes it difficult to follow the work remotely. The TCABR data analysis and acquisition system has been upgraded to support a joint research programme using remote participation technologies. The choice of MDSplus (Model Driven System plus) is proved by the fact that it is widely utilized, and the scientists from different institutions may use the same system in different experiments in different tokamaks without the need to know how each system treats its acquisition system and data analysis. Another important point is the fact that the MDSplus has a library system that allows communication between different types of language (JAVA, Fortran, C, C++, Python) and programs such as MATLAB, IDL, OCTAVE. In the case of tokamak TCABR interfaces (object of this paper) between the system already in use and MDSplus were developed, instead of using the MDSplus at all stages, from the control, and data acquisition to the data analysis. This was done in the way to preserve a complex system already in operation and otherwise it would take a long time to migrate. This implementation also allows add new components using the MDSplus fully at all stages.

  16. Functional model and general principles of structural materials selection for fusion tokamak reactor first wall and blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinokurov, V.F.; Glukhikh, V.A.; Gorynin, I.V.; Kazantsev, A.N.; Parshin, A.M.; Saksaganskij, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    The functional mathematical model of the most energy-stressed components of the reactor (the first wall and blanket) is developed. This model is the basis for the quantitative estimate of various concepts and design options from promise view points, physical and technological requirements may be formulated in general and limiting properties may be found. In this way the first wall and blanket may be directly introduced within the framework of multi-parametric system analysis and fusion reactor optimization. The concept of base structure is suggested as a generalized representation of ''the first-wall-blanket structure'' and its functions. A set of structural, thermophysical and hydraulic parameters is introduced to describe the base structure. The calculated model is presented, permitting by variation of structural and physical parameters to determine technical and economic reactor parameters as the functions of plasma parameters and structural material properties. The mechanisms of fusion reactor destructive effects on structural materials characteristics are analyzed. Comparative estimates of promising steels and alloys of various classes and modifications are given. The effect of neutron irradiation dose and temperature on strength, plasticity and swelling of materials and their compatibility with gas and liquid metal coolants are shown. Structural, physical and technological methods to improve operating characteristics and to raise radiation material resistance are discussed. (author). 7 refs, 11 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Control system of neoclassical tearing modes in real time on HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Longwen; Ji, Xiaoquan; Song, Shaodong; Xia, Fan; Xu, Yuan; Ye, Jiruo; Jiang, Min; Chen, Wenjin; Sun, Tengfei; Liang, Shaoyong; Ling, Fei; Ma, Rui; Huang, Mei; Qu, Hongpeng; Song, Xianming; Yu, Deliang; Shi, Zhongbin; Liu, Yi; Yang, Qingwei; Xu, Min; Duan, Xuru; Liu, Yong

    2017-11-01

    The stability and performance of tokamak plasmas are routinely limited by various magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities, such as neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). This paper presents a rather simple method to control the NTMs in real time (RT) on a tokamak, including the control principle of a feedback approach for RT suppression and stabilization for the NTMs. The control system combines Mirnov, electron cyclotron emission, and soft X-ray diagnostics used for determining the NTM positions. A methodology for fast detection of 2/1 or 3/2 NTM positions with 129 × 129 grid reconstruction is elucidated. The forty poloidal angles for steering the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH)/electron cyclotron current drive launcher are used to establish the alignment of antenna mirrors with the center of the NTM and to ensure launcher emission intersecting with the rational surface of a magnetic island. Pilot experiments demonstrate the RT control capability to trace the conventional tearing modes (CTMs) in the HL-2A tokamak. The 2/1 CTMs have been suppressed or stabilized by the ECRH power deposition on site or with the steerable launcher.

  18. Safety analysis of reactor's cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Results of the analysis of reactor's RBMK-1500 coolant system during normal operation mode, hydrodynamic testing and in the case of earthquake are presented. Analysis was performed using RELAP5 code. Calculations showed the most vulnerable place in the reactor's coolant system. It was found that in the case of earthquake the horizontal support system of drum separator could be damaged

  19. On estimation of reliability of a nuclear power plant with tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemin, A.I.; Smetannikov, V.P.; Shiverskij, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    The results of the analysis of INTOR plant reliability are presented. The first stage of the analysis consists in the calculation of the INTOR plant structural reliability factors (15 ibs main systems have been considered). For each system the failure flow parameter (W(1/h)) and operational readiness Ksub(r) have been determined which for the plant as a whole besides these factors-technological utilization coefficient Ksub(TU) and mean-cycles-between failures Tsub(o). The second stage of the reliability analysis consists in investigating methods of improving its reliability factors reratively to the one calculated at the first level stage. It is shown that the reliability of the whole plant to the most essential extent is determined by the power supply system reliability. The following as to the influence extent on the INTOR plant reliability is the cryogenic system. Calculations of the INTOR plant reliability factors have given the following values: W=4,5x10 -3 1/h. Tsub(o)=152 h, Ksub(r)=0,71, Ksub(TU)=o,4 g

  20. Tokamaks - Third Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A L

    2004-01-01

    John Wesson's well known book, now re-edited for the third time, provides an excellent introduction to fusion oriented plasma physics in tokamaks. The author's task was a very challenging one, for a confined plasma is a complex system characterised by a variety of dimensionless parameters and its properties change qualitatively when certain threshold values are reached in this multi-parameter space. As a consequence, theoretical description is required at different levels, which are complementary: particle orbits, kinetic and fluid descriptions, but also intuitive and empirical approaches. Theory must be carried out on many fronts: equilibrium, instabilities, heating, transport etc. Since the properties of the confined plasma depend on the boundary conditions, the physics of plasmas along open magnetic field lines and plasma surface interaction processes must also be accounted for. Those subjects (and others) are discussed in depth in chapters 2-9. Chapter 1 mostly deals with ignition requirements and the tokamak concept, while chapter 14 provides a list of useful relations: differential operators, collision times, characteristic lengths and frequencies, expressions for the neoclassical resistivity and heat conduction, the bootstrap current etc. The presentation is sufficiently broad and thorough that specialists within tokamak research can either pick useful and up-to-date information or find an authoritative introduction into other areas of the subject. It is also clear and concise so that it should provide an attractive and accurate initiation for those wishing to enter the field and for outsiders who would like to understand the concepts and be informed about the goals and challenges on the horizon. Validation of theoretical models requires adequately resolved experimental data for the various equilibrium profiles (clearly a challenge in the vicinity of transport barriers) and the fluctuations to which instabilities give rise. Chapter 10 is therefore devoted to

  1. Magnet system for catalyzed D-D and D-He3 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.L.; Powell, J.R.; Hsieh, S.Y.

    1977-01-01

    A new concept for toroidal field magnets, called the DEALS (Demountable Externally Anchored Low Stress) magnet systems, has been conceived and developed for advanced fuel reactors. This concept should result in substantial cost reductions for toroidal magnets. In addition, the conductor stress is relatively low and compressive in nature, which is very important if brittle Nb 3 Sn conductors are to be successfully used, since advanced fuel Tokamak reactors require Nb 3 Sn conductor if reasonable power densities are to be achieved. A final very important benefit of the DEALS magnet system is demountability. Failed magnet segments can probably be replaced fairly rapidly (i.e., in approximately a month) without requiring movement and/or dissassembly of the blanket/shield regions and poloidal coils. Due to the high degree of non-circularity present in the plasmas of the low-β Tokamak reactor designs which are detailed in this report, a system of poloidal field coils is necessitated to provide both shape and positional stability. In addition, the uncertainty regarding the accessibility of the high-β regimes discussed may also necessitate extensive poloidal field systems. Volt second requirements are such that they must be alleviated also by this poloidal field system

  2. Influence of the magnetic toroidal field on the design of magnet systems for future fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    It is often stated that an increase of the toroidal magnetic field on the plasma axis of tokamaks could be beneficial for future fusion reactors and will help in the economic viability of this new source of energy. After the development associated with ITER magnets regarding prototype conductors, joints and model coils, it is now possible to have a realistic approach of the design of magnet systems for fusion application and in particular of the toroidal field (TF) conductor design. This approach is meaningful since the ITER size is relevant to that of future fusion reactors. A demonstration reactor, the construction of which is supposed to start in 20 years would likely not be very different of ITER as for the magnet system

  3. Conceptual design of an electrical power module for the tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Bullis, R.; Sedgeley, D.; Caldwell, C.S.; Pettus, W.G.; Schluderberg, D.C.

    1979-01-01

    The TFTR Engineering Test Station (ETS) can support blanket modules with a fusion-neutron view area of 0.5 m/sup 2/. If the TFTR magnetic systems and beam injectors can operate with pulse lengths of 5 s, once every 300 s, the time-averaged neutron power incident on a module will be 1.5 kW, which can be enhanced by a suitable blanket energy multiplier. A preliminary conceptual design of a dual-loop steam-generating power system that can be housed in the ETS has been carried out. The optimal heat transfer fluid in the primary loop is an organic liquid, which allows an operating temperature of 700/degree/F at low pressure. The primary coolant must be preheated electrically to operating temperature. A ballast tank levels the temperature at the steam generator, so that the secondary loop is in steady-state operation. With a natural-uranium blanket multiplier, the time-averaged net electrical power is 1.2 kW(e). 8 refs

  4. The control system position to the electric probe in the Tokamak Novillo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Garcia, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The electric probe are used to determine the parameters of electronic temperatures, the electron density and the plasma potential in Tokamak machines. On this machines the electric probes are used only in the plasma edge due to the intensive flow of high energy particles. This is the region in which the plasma density and temperature are relatively low. It is showed, in this work, the design and construction of an electro mechanic system which is used to control the position of the probe into the discharge chamber. This system is called T he control system position to the electric probe in the tokamak Novillo . This controller is a minimum system that is in charge , by a programming, to rule a step motor by a logic sequence commutation. This is done with the purpose of slide the probe in a radial way with a milli metric precision into the discharge chamber. To this purpose it is used a step motor, due it is principal characteristic is the control of the end element position without a feedback needing of the wrong signal. The system function consist on reading, through a board, the corresponding data to the position where it is wanted to place the probe, it also displays by a numeric indicator the position in which the probe is located (in an interval from 0 to 100 mm), and provide the logic sequence commutation for the step motor. The minimum system is constituted by the micro controller 8748-8 that gives with all precision the control of the electric probe position in the Tokamak Novillo, by programming, associated circuits, amplification unit bi phase unipolar and switching power (they supply the power to the control circuit and to the step motor too), avoiding the destruction of the electric probe. (Author). 17 refs, 29 figs

  5. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; O' Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E {parallel} B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E parallel B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  7. A self-description data framework for Tokamak control system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Feiran; Zhuang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The SDD framework can be applied to different Tokamak devices. • We explain how configuration settings of control systems are described in SDD models, namely components and connections. • Evolving SDD models are stored in a dynamic schema database. • The SDD editor supports plug-and-play SDD models. - Abstract: A Tokamak device consists of numerous control systems, which need to be integrated. CODAC (Control, Data Access and Communication) system requires the configuration settings of these control systems to carry out the integration smoothly. SDD (Self-description data) is designed to describe the static configuration of control systems. ITER CODAC group has released an SDD software package for control system designers to manage the static configuration, but it is specific for ITER plant control systems. Following the idea of ITER SDD, we developed a flexible and scalable SDD framework to develop SDD software for J-TEXT and other sophisticated devices. The SDD framework describes the configuration settings of various control systems, including physical and logical elements and their relation information, in SDD models which are classified into Components and Connections. The framework is composed of three layers: the MongoDB database, an open-source, dynamic schema, NoSQL (Not Only SQL) database; the SDD service, which maps SDD models to MongoDB and handles the transaction and business logic; the SDD applications, which can be used to create and maintain SDD information, and generate various kinds of output using the stored SDD information.

  8. A self-description data framework for Tokamak control system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zheng, Wei, E-mail: zhengwei@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hu, Feiran; Zhuang, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The SDD framework can be applied to different Tokamak devices. • We explain how configuration settings of control systems are described in SDD models, namely components and connections. • Evolving SDD models are stored in a dynamic schema database. • The SDD editor supports plug-and-play SDD models. - Abstract: A Tokamak device consists of numerous control systems, which need to be integrated. CODAC (Control, Data Access and Communication) system requires the configuration settings of these control systems to carry out the integration smoothly. SDD (Self-description data) is designed to describe the static configuration of control systems. ITER CODAC group has released an SDD software package for control system designers to manage the static configuration, but it is specific for ITER plant control systems. Following the idea of ITER SDD, we developed a flexible and scalable SDD framework to develop SDD software for J-TEXT and other sophisticated devices. The SDD framework describes the configuration settings of various control systems, including physical and logical elements and their relation information, in SDD models which are classified into Components and Connections. The framework is composed of three layers: the MongoDB database, an open-source, dynamic schema, NoSQL (Not Only SQL) database; the SDD service, which maps SDD models to MongoDB and handles the transaction and business logic; the SDD applications, which can be used to create and maintain SDD information, and generate various kinds of output using the stored SDD information.

  9. Tokamak poloidal field systems. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1980-05-01

    Work is reported on the development of superconducting tokamak poloidal field systems (TPFS). Progress is discussed on the design of a 20 MJ, 50 kA, 7.5 T superconducting pulsed energy storage coil operated in a 1 to 2 s bipolar mode from +7.5 T to -7.5 T in 1982. Conductor development for the coil is presented. A facility that uses a traction motor energy transfer system to test coils in the 20 to 100 MJ energy range is discussed. Current interrupter development and testing for protection and energy transfer circuits are also presented. The 400 kJ METS coil test preparation is under way

  10. A system to deposit boron films (boronization) in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodapp, T.R.; Jackson, G.L.; Phillips, J.; Holtrop, K.L.; Petersen, P.I.; Winter, J.

    1991-09-01

    A system has been added to the D3-D tokamak to coat its plasma facing surfaces with a film of boron using diborane gas. The system includes special health and safety equipment for handling the diborane gas which is toxic and inflammable. The purpose of the boron film is to reduce the levels of impurity atoms in the D3-D plasmas. Experiments following the application of the boron film in D3-D have led to significant reductions in plasma impurity levels and the observation of a new, very high confinement regime. 9 refs., 1 fig

  11. Testing and commissioning the multinode ECRH realtime control system on the FTU tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galperti, C., E-mail: galperti@ifp.cnr.it [EURATOM – ENEA – CNR Fusion Association, CNR-IFP, via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milan (Italy); Boncagni, L., E-mail: luca.boncagni@enea.it [EURATOM – ENEA – CNR Fusion Association, Frascati Research Center, Division of Fusion Physics, Rome, Frascati (Italy); Alessi, E.; Sozzi, C.; Nowak, S.; Granucci, G.; Minelli, D.; Marchetto, C. [EURATOM – ENEA – CNR Fusion Association, CNR-IFP, via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milan (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • We conceived, developed and commissioned a distributed multinode control hardware with proven real-time performances. • The adopted hardware solution is modular and reconfigurable. • The adopted software solution is able to host many experimental scenarios and is totally remotely programmable, configurable and testable. • Effective results in on-line MHD instability detection are presented. - Abstract: In tokamak machines, the ECRH heating system is crucial for plasma heating and for stability control. To be reliable, an ECRH control system should be deeply integrated into the supervision and control systems of the machine, and must be interconnected to the diagnostic instruments and the power actuators of the plant. Moreover, several ECRH experiments are under investigation by the community. So, for the sake of efficiency, it should be possible to reprogram a control system on the fly and possibly from remote locations, even during experiment campaigns. This paper presents the new ECRH control system under development at the FTU tokamak. This system consists of multiple units that acquire and process data and are linked through Ethernet and dedicated fiber-optic data links, under a Linux/MARTe framework. This paper also presents open-loop operative results, both about performances of the control system and about signal processing of the diagnostics relevant to MHD control.

  12. Testing and commissioning the multinode ECRH realtime control system on the FTU tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperti, C.; Boncagni, L.; Alessi, E.; Sozzi, C.; Nowak, S.; Granucci, G.; Minelli, D.; Marchetto, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We conceived, developed and commissioned a distributed multinode control hardware with proven real-time performances. • The adopted hardware solution is modular and reconfigurable. • The adopted software solution is able to host many experimental scenarios and is totally remotely programmable, configurable and testable. • Effective results in on-line MHD instability detection are presented. - Abstract: In tokamak machines, the ECRH heating system is crucial for plasma heating and for stability control. To be reliable, an ECRH control system should be deeply integrated into the supervision and control systems of the machine, and must be interconnected to the diagnostic instruments and the power actuators of the plant. Moreover, several ECRH experiments are under investigation by the community. So, for the sake of efficiency, it should be possible to reprogram a control system on the fly and possibly from remote locations, even during experiment campaigns. This paper presents the new ECRH control system under development at the FTU tokamak. This system consists of multiple units that acquire and process data and are linked through Ethernet and dedicated fiber-optic data links, under a Linux/MARTe framework. This paper also presents open-loop operative results, both about performances of the control system and about signal processing of the diagnostics relevant to MHD control

  13. Reactor inventory monitoring system for Angra-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S Neto, Joaquim A.; Silva, Marcos C.; Pinheiro, Ronaldo F.M.; Soares, Milton; Martinez, Aquilino; Comerlato, Cesar A.; Oliveira, Eugenio A.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the project of Reactor Inventory Monitoring System, which will be installed in Angra I Nuclear Power Plant. The inventory information is important to the operators take corrective actions in case of an incident that may cause a failure in the core cooling. (author)

  14. Fission control system for nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, G.H.; Estes, G.P.

    Control system for nuclear reactor comprises a first set of reactivity modifying rods fixed in a reactor core with their upper ends stepped in height across the core, and a second set of reactivity modifying rods movable vertically within the reactor core and having their lower ends stepped to correspond with the stepped arrangement of the first set of rods, pairs of the rods of the first and second sets being in coaxial alignment.

  15. Conceptual design of advanced steady-state tokamak reactor (A-SSTR2) - Compact and safety oriented commercial power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Ushigusa, K.; Ueda, S.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the last decade JAERI reactor design studies, the advanced commercial reactor concept (A-SSTR2) which meets both economical and environmental requirements has been proposed. The A-SSTR2 is a compact power reactor (R p =6.2m, a p =1.5m, I p =12MA) with a high fusion power (P f =4GW) and a net thermal efficiency of 51%. The machine configuration is simplified by eliminating a center solenoid (CS) coil system. SiC/SiC composite for blanket structure material, helium gas cooling with pressure of 10MPa and outlet temperature of 900 deg. C, and TiH 2 for bulk shield material are introduced. For the toroidal field (TF) coil, a high temperature (T C ) superconducting wire made of bismuth with the maximum field of 23T and the critical current density of 1000A/mm 2 at a temperature of 20K is applied. In spite of the CS-less configuration, a computer simulation gives a satisfactory plasma equilibria, plasma initiation process and current ramp up scenario. (author)

  16. Expert system for fast reactor diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parcy, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    A general description of expert systems is given. The operation of a fast reactor is reviewed. The expert system to the diagnosis of breakdowns limited to the reactor core. The structure of the system is described: specification of the diagnostics; structure of the data bank and evaluation of the rules; specification of the prediagnostics and evaluation; explanation of the diagnostics; time evolution of the system; comparison with other expert systems. Applications to some cases of faults are finally presented [fr

  17. Definition of the basic DEMO tokamak geometry based on systems code studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meszaros, Botond; Bachmann, Christian; Kemp, Richard; Federici, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The definition of the DEMO 2D geometry has been introduced. • A methodology to derive the DEMO radial and vertical builds from the PROCESS systems code results has been defined. • Other 2D and 3D geometrical assumptions required to create a sensible 3D configuration model of DEMO have been defined. - Abstract: This paper describes the methodology that has been developed and applied to derive the principal geometry of the main DEMO tokamak systems, in particular the radial and vertical cross section based on the systems code output parameters, while exact parameters are described elsewhere [1]. This procedure reviews the analysis of the radial and vertical build provided by the system code to verify critical integration interfaces, e.g. missing or too large gaps and/or insufficient thickness of components, and updates these dimensions based on results of more detailed analyses (e.g. neutronics, plasma scenario modelling, etc.) that were carried out outside of the system code in the past years. As well as providing a 3D configuration model of the DEMO tokamak for integrated engineering analysis, the results can also be used to refine the systems code model. This method, subject to continuous refinement, controls the derivation of the main machine parameters and ensures their coherence vis-à-vis a number of agreed controlled physics and engineering assumptions.

  18. StructUre and test results of the Tokamak-7 device cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaev, I.V.; VolobUev, A.N.; Zhul'kin, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    A cryogenic system (CS) of the Tokamak-7 (T-7) installation with the longitudinal field superconducting magnetic system (SMS) is described. The CS is designed for cool-down, cryostatic cooling and heating of the T-7 cryogenic objects and consists of a helium system (HS) and a nitrogen cryogenic system (NCS). The HS consists of:a a heliUm delivery system intended for distributing and controlling the helium flows in the SMS; cryogenic helium units; a 1.25 m 3 volume for storing liquid helium; a compressor compartment using piston compressors at the 3 MPa operating pressure and 140 g/s total capacity; gaseous helium storages (3600 m 3 under normal conditions); helium cleaning and drying systems; a gas holder of 20 m 3 operating volume; cryogenic pipelines and pipe fittings. The NCS operates on delivered nitrogen and includes a 120 m 3 liquid nitrogen storage, evaporators and electric heaters producing up to 230 g/s of gaseous nitrogen at 300 K, a separator, cryogenic pipelines and fittings. It is found that the CS has the necessary cold production reserve, ensures reliable operation of the Tokamak-7 device and permits to carry out practically continuous plasma experiments

  19. Definition of the basic DEMO tokamak geometry based on systems code studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meszaros, Botond, E-mail: botond.meszaros@efda.org [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Garching (Germany); Bachmann, Christian [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Garching (Germany); Kemp, Richard [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Federici, Gianfranco [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The definition of the DEMO 2D geometry has been introduced. • A methodology to derive the DEMO radial and vertical builds from the PROCESS systems code results has been defined. • Other 2D and 3D geometrical assumptions required to create a sensible 3D configuration model of DEMO have been defined. - Abstract: This paper describes the methodology that has been developed and applied to derive the principal geometry of the main DEMO tokamak systems, in particular the radial and vertical cross section based on the systems code output parameters, while exact parameters are described elsewhere [1]. This procedure reviews the analysis of the radial and vertical build provided by the system code to verify critical integration interfaces, e.g. missing or too large gaps and/or insufficient thickness of components, and updates these dimensions based on results of more detailed analyses (e.g. neutronics, plasma scenario modelling, etc.) that were carried out outside of the system code in the past years. As well as providing a 3D configuration model of the DEMO tokamak for integrated engineering analysis, the results can also be used to refine the systems code model. This method, subject to continuous refinement, controls the derivation of the main machine parameters and ensures their coherence vis-à-vis a number of agreed controlled physics and engineering assumptions.

  20. ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] reactor building design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, S.L.; Blevins, J.D.; Delisle, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is at the midpoint of a two-year conceptual design. The ITER reactor building is a reinforced concrete structure that houses the tokamak and associated equipment and systems and forms a barrier between the tokamak and the external environment. It provides radiation shielding and controls the release of radioactive materials to the environment during both routine operations and accidents. The building protects the tokamak from external events, such as earthquakes or aircraft strikes. The reactor building requirements have been developed from the component designs and the preliminary safety analysis. The equipment requirements, tritium confinement, and biological shielding have been studied. The building design in progress requires continuous iteraction with the component and system designs and with the safety analysis. 8 figs

  1. Korea Superconducting tokamak advanced research project - Development of heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    The heating and current drive systems for KSTAR based on multiple technologies (neutral beam, ion cyclotron, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron) have been designed to provide heating and current drive capabilities as well as flexibility in the control of current density and pressure profiles needed to meet the mission and research objectives of the machine. They are designed to operate for long-pulse lengths of up to 300 s. The NBI system initially delivers 8 MW of neutral beam power to the plasma from one co-directed beam line and shall be upgraded to provide 20 MW of neutral beam power with two co-directed beam lines plus one counter-directed beam line. It will be capable of being reconfigured such that the source arrangement is changed from horizontal to vertical stacking, with 6 MW beam power to the plasmas per beam line, in order to facilitate profile control. The RF system initially delivers 6 MW of rf power to the plasma, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. The system will be upgraded to proved 12 MW of rf power through 2 adjacent ports. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of RF system and the system have the capabilities to be operationable for pulse length up to 300 sec and in the 25-60 MHz frequency range. Lower hybrid system initially provides 1.5 MW LH rf power to the plasma at 3.7 GHz through a horizontal port, which has a capability to be operated for pulse length up to 300 sec, and shall be upgraded to provide 4.5 MW of LH rf power to the plasma. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of LHCD system which incorporate the TPX-type launcher and independently phase-changeable transmission system for the fully phased coupler. The ECH system will deliver up to 0.5 MW of power to the plasma for up to 0.5 sec. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of ECH system which includes an 84 GHz gyrotron system, a transmission system, and a launcher. The basic design of the low loss transmission system

  2. Parametric robustness of the reactor control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon Joon; Kim, Sin

    1998-01-01

    The parametric analysis method is applied to the reactor control system. The mathematical reactor model is discussed in terms of the parametric uncertainties. The Tsyplin-Polyak locus, based on the boundary crossing theorem, shows the reactor plant has an intrinsic stability. A simple controller is incorporated to the plant to configure the overall closed loop system. Then parametric stability margins are obtained for the controller constants. The results show that a new design constraint of the controller robustness with respect to overall system should be considered for the controller design of an uncertain system

  3. Self-actuating reactor shutdown system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrus, Donald M.; Brummond, Willian A; Peterson, Leslie F.

    1988-01-01

    A control system for the automatic or self-actuated shutdown or "scram" of a nuclear reactor. The system is capable of initiating scram insertion by a signal from the plant protection system or by independent action directly sensing reactor conditions of low-flow or over-power. Self-actuation due to a loss of reactor coolant flow results from a decrease of pressure differential between the upper and lower ends of an absorber element. When the force due to this differential falls below the weight of the element, the element will fall by gravitational force to scram the reactor. Self-actuation due to high neutron flux is accomplished via a valve controlled by an electromagnet and a thermionic diode. In a reactor over-power, the diode will be heated to a change of state causing the electromagnet to be shorted thereby actuating the valve which provides the changed flow and pressure conditions required for scramming the absorber element.

  4. TREAT Reactor Control and Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, W.C.; Brookshier, W.K.; Burrows, D.R.; Lenkszus, F.R.; McDowell, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    The main control algorithm of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Automatic Reactor Control System (ARCS) resides in Read Only Memory (ROM) and only experiment specific parameters are input via keyboard entry. Prior to executing an experiment, the software and hardware of the control computer is tested by a closed loop real-time simulation. Two computers with parallel processing are used for the reactor simulation and another computer is used for simulation of the control rod system. A monitor computer, used as a redundant diverse reactor protection channel, uses more conservative setpoints and reduces challenges to the Reactor Trip System (RTS). The RTS consists of triplicated hardwired channels with one out of three logic. The RTS is automatically tested by a digital Dedicated Microprocessor Tester (DMT) prior to the execution of an experiment. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Reactor power reduction system and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    An improved control method for maintaining the operation of a nuclear reactor system in response to an event which requires an immediate but less than complete power reduction called an accelerated power reduction, by rapidly inserting into said reactor core a portion of said regulating rods selected from said predetermined regulation sequence. (author)

  6. Additional reactor protection system of RBMK-1500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of anticipated transients without scram of RBMK-1500 reactor showed that additional reactor protection system is required. Data of accident analysis in the case of loose of external electric power and loose of vacuum in condensers of turbines are provided

  7. Magnet power system for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.C.; Musslewhite, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The system configuration, layout, and general philosophy for the MTX magnet power system is described. The vast majority of the magnet power equipment was quite successfully used on the ALCATOR-C experiment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The AC power for the magnet system at MIT was obtained from a 225MVA alternator. The power for the system at LLNL is obtained directly from the local utility's 230 kV line. This installation, therefore, necessitates the addition of a great deal of equipment in ranges from new switchgear in the substation to using existing switchgear obtained from MIT as contractors for intershop electrical isolation as well as safety isolation for personnel entry into the experimental area. Additionally, some discussion is made of the unique layout of this facility and the tradeoffs made to accommodate them. 2 refs., 6 figs

  8. New technology for reactor protection system of CAREM reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezzutti, J.C.; Verrastro, C.; Estryk, D.

    2009-01-01

    The use of FPGA in safety functions in a nuclear power plant, increase the reliability of software based systems, without loose any of the function required by the supervision and control systems. In this work the architecture of a Reactor Protection System is described, it use four independent measurement channels in 2 oo 4 configuration, each channel is based on diverse approach in 1 oo 2 configuration, the reliability of this system is near the same than the hardwired logic, with full performance like software based system. (author)

  9. Reactor core design aiding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Nobuhiro; Hamaguchi, Yukio; Nakao, Takashi; Kondo, Yasuhide

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional radial power distribution and an axial one-dimensional power distribution are determined based on a distribution of a three-dimensional infinite multiplication factor, to obtain estimated power distribution estimation values. The estimation values are synthesized to obtain estimated three-dimensional power distribution values. In addition, the distribution of a two-dimensional radial multiplication factor and the distribution of an one-dimensional axial multiplication factor are determined based on the three-dimensional power distribution, to obtain estimated values for the multiplication factor distribution. The estimated values are synthesized to form estimated values for the three-dimensional multiplication factor distribution. Further, estimated fuel loading pattern value is determined based on the three-dimensional power distribution or the two-dimensional radial power distribution. Since the processes for determining the estimated values comprise only additive and multiplying operations, processing time can be remarkably saved compared with calculation based on a detailed physical models. Since the estimation is performed on every fuel assemblies, a nervous circuit network not depending on the reactor core system can be constituted. (N.H.)

  10. Upgrade of the COMPASS tokamak real-time control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janky, F., E-mail: filip.janky.work@gmail.com [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Prague (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Havlicek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Prague (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Batista, A.J.N. [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Kudlacek, O.; Seidl, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Prague (Czech Republic); Neto, A.C. [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Pipek, J.; Hron, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Prague (Czech Republic); Mikulin, O. [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, V Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • An upgrade of the COMPASS real-time system has been made to generally improve the plasma performance. • Stability of discharges in SNT configuration has been increased. • Plasma flat-top phase length has been extended. • Central solenoid protection has been developed. • Plasma position estimation has been improved. - Abstract: The COMPASS plasma control system is based on the MARTe real-time framework. Thanks to MARTe modularity and flexibility new algorithms have been developed for plasma diagnostic (plasma position calculation), control (shaping field control), and protection systems (central solenoid protection). Moreover, the MARTe framework itself was modified to broaden the communication capabilities via Aurora. This paper presents the recent upgrades and improvements made to the COMPASS real-time plasma control system, focusing on the issues related to precision of the real-time calculations, and discussing the improvements in terms of discharge parameters and stability. In particular, the new real-time system has given the possibility to analyze and to minimize the transport delays of each control loop.

  11. The MTX [Microwave Tokamak Experiment] data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butner, D.N.; Drlik, M.; Brown, M.D.; Casper, T.A.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The diagnostic data from the MTX experiment is acquired and processed by an expandable, distributed, multivendor computer network. The system blends a variety of software into a coordinated, unified, and highly flexible design. Using modular software design techniques, we created a system stressing distributed processing, portability, and transparent data access. In our approach to modularity, we standardized communication interfaces between modules and separated generic tasks from machine and application-specific implementations. For flexible distributed processing, we used modular, portable software and LLNL facility that provides an interprocess communication system (IPCS) in the multivendor network. With transparent data access, any program can access data stored anywhere in the network without knowing the specific location. The computer hardware includes a DEC VAX cluster, HP workstations and HP desktop computers. We are using commercial software in addition to packages from MIT, ORNL, and LLNL. 4 refs., 4 figs

  12. Liquid Metals as Plasma-facing Materials for Fusion Energy Systems: From Atoms to Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Howard A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Koel, Bruce E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Bernasek, Steven L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Carter, Emily A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Debenedetti, Pablo G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2017-06-23

    The objective of our studies was to advance our fundamental understanding of liquid metals as plasma-facing materials for fusion energy systems, with a broad scope: from atoms to tokamaks. The flow of liquid metals offers solutions to significant problems of the plasma-facing materials for fusion energy systems. Candidate metals include lithium, tin, gallium, and their eutectic combinations. However, such liquid metal solutions can only be designed efficiently if a range of scientific and engineering issues are resolved that require advances in fundamental fluid dynamics, materials science and surface science. In our research we investigated a range of significant and timely problems relevant to current and proposed engineering designs for fusion reactors, including high-heat flux configurations that are being considered by leading fusion energy groups world-wide. Using experimental and theoretical tools spanning atomistic to continuum descriptions of liquid metals, and bridging surface chemistry, wetting/dewetting and flow, our research has advanced the science and engineering of fusion energy materials and systems. Specifically, we developed a combined experimental and theoretical program to investigate flows of liquid metals in fusion-relevant geometries, including equilibrium and stability of thin-film flows, e.g. wetting and dewetting, effects of electromagnetic and thermocapillary fields on liquid metal thin-film flows, and how chemical interactions and the properties of the surface are influenced by impurities and in turn affect the surface wetting characteristics, the surface tension, and its gradients. Because high-heat flux configurations produce evaporation and sputtering, which forces rearrangement of the liquid, and any dewetting exposes the substrate to damage from the plasma, our studies addressed such evaporatively driven liquid flows and measured and simulated properties of the different bulk phases and material interfaces. The range of our studies

  13. Microwave Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. The experiment, soon to be operational, provides an opportunity to study dense plasmas heated by powers unprecedented in the electron-cyclotron frequency range required by the especially high magnetic fields used with the MTX and needed for reactors. 1 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  14. Design of the RF system for Alfven wave heating and current drive in a TCA/BR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchko, L.; Andrade, M.L.; Ozono, E.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Degaspari, F.T.; Nascimento, I.C.

    1995-01-01

    The advanced RF system for Alfven wave plasma heating and current drive in TCA/BR tokamak is presented. The antenna system is capable of exciting the standing and travelling wave M = -1,N = 1,N =-4,-6 with single helicity and thus provides the possibility to improve Alfven wave plasma heating efficiency in TCA/BR tokamak and to increase input power level up to P ≅ 1 MW, without the uncontrolled density rise which was encountered in previous TCA (Switzerland) experiments. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  15. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  16. Distributed expert systems for nuclear reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    A network of distributed expert systems is the heart of a prototype supervisory control architecture developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for an advanced multimodular reactor. Eight expert systems encode knowledge on signal acquisition, diagnostics, safeguards, and control strategies in a hybrid rule-based, multiprocessing and object-oriented distributed computing environment. An interactive simulation of a power block consisting of three reactors and one turbine provides a realistic, testbed for performance analysis of the integrated control system in real-time. Implementation details and representative reactor transients are discussed

  17. Seismic attenuation system for a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liszkai, Tamas; Cadell, Seth

    2018-01-30

    A system for attenuating seismic forces includes a reactor pressure vessel containing nuclear fuel and a containment vessel that houses the reactor pressure vessel. Both the reactor pressure vessel and the containment vessel include a bottom head. Additionally, the system includes a base support to contact a support surface on which the containment vessel is positioned in a substantially vertical orientation. An attenuation device is located between the bottom head of the reactor pressure vessel and the bottom head of the containment vessel. Seismic forces that travel from the base support to the reactor pressure vessel via the containment vessel are attenuated by the attenuation device in a direction that is substantially lateral to the vertical orientation of the containment vessel.

  18. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high {beta}-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect.

  19. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high β-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect

  20. An equipment protection and safety system for the ASDEX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gernhardt, J.; Groening, D.; Hohenoecker, H.; Ruhs, N.

    1981-02-01

    Our compromise between safety requirements and costs is a hybrid of relay, solid-state and computer-controlled protection systems used for ASDEX. The toroidal field coils, ohmic heating coils, vertical field coils, divertor coils, radial field coils, stainless-steel vacuum vessel and structure are protected by measuring the water flow (131 channels), temperature (142 channels), mechanical displacements (141 channels), voltage symmetry (28 channels), current symmetry (6 channels), weight of the vessel (8 channels) and the overvoltage. To detect flow, temperature, displacement, voltage, current and weight, we use the following devices: Venturi tubes (self-made), RTD thermoresistors (Pt-100), linear potentiometers (1 kΩ), voltage dividers (self-made), Rogowski coils (self-made) and straing gauges. (orig.) [de

  1. Sampling system for a boiling reactor NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabelin, A.I.; Yakovleva, E.D.; Solov'ev, Yu.A.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations and pilot running of the nuclear power plant with a VK-50 boiling reactor reveal the necessity of normalizing the design system of water sampling and of mandatory replacement of the needle-type throttle device by a helical one. A method for designing a helical throttle device has been worked out. The quantitative characteristics of depositions of corrosion products along the line of reactor water sampling are presented. Recommendations are given on the organizaton of the sampling system of a nuclear power plant with BWR type reactors

  2. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  3. ANALYTICAL SYNTHESIS OF CHEMICAL REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Labutin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the analytical synthesis of the synergetic control system of chemical reactor for the realization of a complex series-parallel exothermal reaction has been solved. The synthesis of control principles is performed using the analytical design method of aggregated regulators. Synthesized nonlinear control system solves the problem of stabilization of the concentration of target component at the exit of reactor and also enables one to automatically transfer to new production using the equipment.

  4. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  5. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-01-01

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores treated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcome the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better thermal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor

  6. Tokamak poloidal-field systems. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1982-03-01

    Work on the superconducting tokamak poloidal field system (TPFS) program is being redirected. The development of the 20 MJ, 50 kA, 7.5 T superconducting programmed energy storage coil is being terminated. The superconductor for the 20 MJ coil is being processed only to an intermediate state, and manufacture of the epoxy fiberglass dewar is being stopped. Further, development of the TPFS test facility is in abeyance. Change in program emphasis arises from prospective rf plasma current driven or beam heated tokamaks with programmed coil characteristics for the poloidal field being different from those to have been simulated by the 20 MJ coil and from budgetary constraints. Work is reported on the development of the coil, conductor, nonconducting dewar, and test facility to the recent time when the program change was instigated. Work in support of the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) and the Fusion Engineering Design (FED) Center is given. Analysis of the experiments on the 400 kJ METS coil test was completed

  7. Electron cyclotron heating/current-drive system using high power tubes for QUEST spherical tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onchi, Takumi; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Nagata, T.; Kuroda, K.; Hanada, K.; Kariya, T.; Kubo, S.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Kobayashi, S.; Quest Team

    2017-10-01

    Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is the primary method to ramp up plasma current non-inductively in QUEST spherical tokamak. A 28 GHz gyrotron is employed for short pulses, where the radio frequency (RF) power is about 300 kW. Current ramp-up efficiency of 0.5 A/W has been obtained with focused beam of the second harmonic X-mode. A quasi-optical polarizer unit has been newly installed to avoid arcing events. For steady-state tokamak operation, 8.56 GHz klystron with power of 200 kW is used as the CW-RF source. The high voltage power supply (54 kV/13 A) for the klystron has been built recently, and initial bench test of the CW-ECH system is starting. The array of insulated-gate bipolar transistor works to quickly cut off the input power for protecting the klystron. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI (15H04231), NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS13KUTR085, NIFS17KUTR128), and through MEXT funding for young scientists associated with active promotion of national university reforms.

  8. Soft x-ray imaging system for measurement of noncircular tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonck, R.J.; Reusch, M.; Jaehnig, K.P.; Hulse, R.; Roney, P.

    1986-08-01

    A soft x-ray camera and image processing system has been constructed to provide measurements of the internal shape of high temperature tokamak plasmas. The camera consists of a metallic-foil-filtered pinhole aperture and a microchannel plate image intensifier/convertor which produces a visible image for detection by a CCD TV camera. A wide-angle tangential view of the toroidal plasma allows a single compact camera to view the entire plasma cross section. With Be filters 12 to 50 μm thick, the signal from the microchannel plate is produced mostly by nickel L-line emissions which orignate in the hot plasma core. The measured toroidal image is numerically inverted to produce a cross-sectional soft x-ray image of the plasma. Since the internal magnetic flux surfaces are usually isothermal and the nickel emissivity depends strongly on the local electron temperature, the x-ray emission contours reflect the shape of the magnetic surfaces in the plasma interior. Initial results from the PBX tokamak experiment show clear differences in internal plasma shapes for circular and bean-shaped discharges

  9. Tokamak simulation code manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Moon Kyoo; Oh, Byung Hoon; Hong, Bong Keun; Lee, Kwang Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    The method to use TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code) developed by Princeton plasma physics laboratory is illustrated. In KT-2 tokamak, time dependent simulation of axisymmetric toroidal plasma and vertical stability have to be taken into account in design phase using TSC. In this report physical modelling of TSC are described and examples of application in JAERI and SERI are illustrated, which will be useful when TSC is installed KAERI computer system. (Author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Tokamak simulation code manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Kyoo; Oh, Byung Hoon; Hong, Bong Keun; Lee, Kwang Won

    1995-01-01

    The method to use TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code) developed by Princeton plasma physics laboratory is illustrated. In KT-2 tokamak, time dependent simulation of axisymmetric toroidal plasma and vertical stability have to be taken into account in design phase using TSC. In this report physical modelling of TSC are described and examples of application in JAERI and SERI are illustrated, which will be useful when TSC is installed KAERI computer system. (Author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Development of an automatic reactor inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hee; Eom, Heung Seop; Lee, Jae Cheol; Choi, Yoo Raek; Moon, Soon Seung

    2002-02-01

    Using recent technologies on a mobile robot computer science, we developed an automatic inspection system for weld lines of the reactor vessel. The ultrasonic inspection of the reactor pressure vessel is currently performed by commercialized robot manipulators. Since, however, the conventional fixed type robot manipulator is very huge, heavy and expensive, it needs long inspection time and is hard to handle and maintain. In order to resolve these problems, we developed a new automatic inspection system using a small mobile robot crawling on the vertical wall of the reactor vessel. According to our conceptual design, we developed the reactor inspection system including an underwater inspection robot, a laser position control subsystem, an ultrasonic data acquisition/analysis subsystem and a main control subsystem. We successfully carried out underwater experiments on the reactor vessel mockup, and real reactor ready for Ulchine nuclear power plant unit 6 at Dusan Heavy Industry in Korea. After this project, we have a plan to commercialize our inspection system. Using this system, we can expect much reduction of the inspection time, performance enhancement, automatic management of inspection history, etc. In the economic point of view, we can also expect import substitution more than 4 million dollars. The established essential technologies for intelligent control and automation are expected to be synthetically applied to the automation of similar systems in nuclear power plants

  12. Design of an O-mode frequency modulated reflectometry system for the measurement of Alborz Tokamak plasma density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koohestani, Saeideh [Department of Energy Engineering and physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrollahi, Reza, E-mail: amrollahi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi, Gholamreza [Department of Electrical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Reflectometry is a common method for plasma diagnostic, in which microwaves are launched into the plasma and reflected at the critical surfaces. Comparing the reflected microwave signals with the launched waves would give rise to the plasma density profiles. In the present study, an ordinary mode (O-mode) frequency modulation (FM) reflectometry system has been designed for the electron density profile measurement of the Alborz Tokamak plasma. This system has been considered to operate at K-band (18–26.5 GHz) frequency range and scan the frequency band between 18 to 26 GHz in 40 μS. The density profile from major radius r = 47.9–51.55 cm can be measured in Alborz Tokamak plasma. Based on the Alborz Tokamak operational conditions, the characteristic frequencies, and some dimensional limitations, all parts of reflectometer have been designed so that an appropriate efficiency with minimum attenuation, especially in transmitting/receiving system would be achieved. A dual antenna and an oversized waveguide of X-band (8–12 GHz) for transmitting and receiving purposes and a balanced detector for absolute phase determination have been utilized. The details of the Alborz Tokamak FM reflectometry components focusing on the antenna and waveguide design and mounting are described in this paper. Additionally, the procedure of plasma profile reconstruction using the system output signal is discussed. This system uses signal phase shift to determine the position of the cutoff layer.

  13. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  14. Design and construction of high-frequency magnetic probe system on the HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, S. Y.; Ji, X. Q.; Sun, T. F.; Xu, Yuan; Lu, J.; Yuan, B. S.; Ren, L. L.; Yang, Q. W.

    2017-12-01

    A high-frequency magnetic probe system is designed, calibrated and constructed on the HL-2A tokamak. To investigate the factors which affect the probe frequency response, the inductance and capacitance in the probe system are analyzed using an equivalent circuit. Suitable sizes and turn number of the coil, and the length of transmission cable are optimized based on the theory and detailed test in the calibration. To deal with the frequency response limitation and bake-out, the ceramic grooved technique is used and the probe is wound with a bare copper wire. A cascade filter is manufactured with a suitable bandwidth as well as a good phase consistency between channels. The system has been used in the experiment to measure high frequency (≤300 kHz) magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations, which can meet the requirement of physical analysis on HL-2A.

  15. Survey of fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.K.; Kang, H.D.; Oh, Y.K.; Lee, K.W.; In, S.Y.; Kim, Y.C.

    1983-01-01

    The present object of the fusion research is to accomplish the scientific break even by the year of 1986. In view of current progress in the field of Fusion reactor development, we decided to carry out the conceptual design of Tokamak-type fusion reactor during the year of 82-86 in order to acquire the principles of the fusion devices, find the engineering problems and establish the basic capabilities to develop the key techniques with originality. In this year the methods for calculating the locations of the poloidal coils and distribution of the magnetic field, which is one of the most essential and complicated task in the fusion reactor design works, were established. Study on the optimization of the design method of toroidal field coil was also done. Through this work, we established the logic for the design of the toroidal field coil in tokamak and utilize this technique to the design of small compact tokamak. Apart from the development work as to the design technology of tokamak, accelerating column and high voltage power supply (200 KVDC, 100 mA) for intense D-T neutron generator were constructed and now beam transport systems are under construction. This device will be used to develop the materials and the components for the tokamak fusion reactor. (Author)

  16. Transmutation of nuclear waste with a low-aspect-ratio Tokamak neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Bong Guen; Moon, Se Youn

    2014-01-01

    The transmutation characteristics of transuranics (TRUs) in a transmutation reactor based on a LAR (Low-aspect-ratio) tokamak as a neutron source are investigated. The optimum radial build of a transmutation reactor is found by using a coupled analysis of the tokamak systems and the neutron transport. The dependences of the transmutation characteristics on the aspect ratio A in the range of 1.5 to 2.5 and on the fusion power in the range of 150 to 500 MW are investigated. An equilibrium fuel cycle is developed for effective transmutation, and show that with one unit of the transmutation reactor based on the LAR tokamak producing fusion power in the range of a few hundred MWs, up to 3 PWRs (1.0 GWe capacity) can be supported with a burn-up fraction larger than 50%.

  17. Intermediate frequency band digitized high dynamic range radiometer system for plasma diagnostics and real-time Tokamak control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, W. A.; van Beveren, V.; Thoen, D. J.; Nuij, Pjwm; M.R. de Baar,; Donne, A. J. H.; Westerhof, E.; Goede, A. P. H.; Krijger, B.; van den Berg, M. A.; Kantor, M.; M. F. Graswinckel,; Hennen, B.A.; Schüller, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    An intermediate frequency (IF) band digitizing radiometer system in the 100-200 GHz frequency range has been developed for Tokamak diagnostics and control, and other fields of research which require a high flexibility in frequency resolution combined with a large bandwidth and the retrieval of the

  18. Intermediate frequency band digitized high dynamic range radiometer system for plasma diagnostics and real-time Tokamak control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, WA.; Van Beveren, V.; Thoen, D.J.; Nuij, P.J.W.M.; De Baar, M.R.; Donné, A.J.H.; Westerhof, E.; Goede, A.P.H.; Krijger, B.; Van den Berg, M.A.; Kantor, M.; Graswinckel, M.F.; Hennen, B.A.; Schüller, F.C.

    2011-01-01

    An intermediate frequency (IF) band digitizing radiometer system in the 100–200 GHz frequency range has been developed for Tokamak diagnostics and control, and other fields of research which require a high flexibility in frequency resolution combined with a large bandwidth and the retrieval of the

  19. Designs of the measurement system of the plamsa current and loop voltage on the HL-2A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qingwei; Feng Beibin; Lu Jie; Zhou Hangyu

    2004-11-01

    The diagnostic systems for plasma current and loop voltage measurement on the HL-2A tokamak have been described in detail. The measurement principles and diagnostic arrangements have been mentioned as well. The more carefully compensation techniques have been used to deal with the interferential magnetic field. (authors)

  20. Power supplies and quench protection for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeyer, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First plasma is scheduled for the year 2000. TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This is a new feature which requires not only a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes but also that ultra-reliable quench protection devices be used to rapidly discharge the stored energy from the magnets in the event of a quench. This paper describes the plan and basis for the adaptation and augmentation of the PPPL/TFTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Following a description of the basic operational requirements, four major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF power supply, the PF power supply, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems