WorldWideScience

Sample records for tokamak program issues

  1. PPPL tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1984-10-01

    The economic prospects of the tokamak are reviewed briefly and found to be favorable - if the size of ignited tokamak plasmas can be kept small and appropriate auxiliary systems can be developed. The main objectives of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory tokamak program are: (1) exploration of the physics of high-temperature toroidal confinement, in TFTR; (2) maximization of the tokamak beta value, in PBX; (3) development of reactor-relevant rf techniques, in PLT

  2. Status of the tokamak program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, J.

    1981-08-01

    For a specific configuration of magnetic field and plasma to be economically attractive as a commercial source of energy, it must contain a high-pressure plasma in a stable fashion while thermally isolating the plasma from the walls of the containment vessel. The tokamak magnetic configuration is presently the most successful in terms of reaching the considered goals. Tokamaks were developed in the USSR in a program initiated in the mid-1950s. By the early 1970s tokamaks were operating not only in the USSR but also in the U.S., Australia, Europe, and Japan. The advanced state of the tokamak program is indicated by the fact that it is used as a testbed for generic fusion development - for auxiliary heating, diagnostics, materials - as well as for specific tokamak advancement. This has occurred because it is the most economic source of a large, reproducible, hot, dense plasma. The basic tokamak is considered along with tokamak improvements, impurity control, additional heating, particle and power balance in a tokamak, aspects of microscopic transport, and macroscopic stability.

  3. Physics issues of high bootstrap current tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozeki, T.; Azumi, M.; Ishii, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Physics issues of a tokamak plasma with a hollow current profile produced by a large bootstrap current are discussed based on experiments in JT-60U. An internal transport barrier for both ions and electrons was obtained just inside the radius of zero magnetic shear in JT-60U. Analysis of the toroidal ITG microinstability by toroidal particle simulation shows that weak and negative shear reduces the toroidal coupling and suppresses the ITG mode. A hard beta limit was observed in JT-60U negative shear experiments. Ideal MHD mode analysis shows that the n = 1 pressure-driven kink mode is a plausible candidate. One of the methods to improve the beta limit against the kink mode is to widen the negative shear region, which can induce a broader pressure profile resulting in a higher beta limit. The TAE mode for the hollow current profile is less unstable than that for the monotonic current profile. The reason is that the continuum gaps near the zero shear region are not aligned when the radius of q min is close to the region of high ∇n e . Finally, a method for stable start-up for a plasma with a hollow current profile is describe, and stable sustainment of a steady-state plasma with high bootstrap current is discussed. (Author)

  4. Spherical tokamak power plant design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hender, T.C.; Bond, A.; Edwards, J.; Karditsas, P.J.; McClements, K.G.; Mustoe, J.; Sherwood, D.V.; Voss, G.M.; Wilson, H.R.

    2000-01-01

    The very high β potential of the spherical tokamak has been demonstrated in the START experiment. Systems code studies show the cost of electricity from spherical tokamak power plants, operating at high β in second ballooning mode stable regime, is comparable with fossil fuels and fission. Outline engineering designs are presented based on two concepts for the central rod of the toroidal field (TF) circuit - a room temperature water cooled copper rod or a helium cooled cryogenic aluminium rod. For the copper rod case the TF return limbs are supported by the vacuum vessel, while for the aluminium rod the TF coils form an independent structure. In both cases thermohydraulic and stress calculations indicate the viability of the design. Two-dimensional neutronics calculations show the feasibility of tritium self-sufficiency without an inboard blanket. The spherical tokamak has unique maintenance possibilities based on lowering major component structures into a hot cell beneath the device and these are discussed

  5. Proposed tokamak poloidal field system development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.; Vogel, H.F.; Warren, R.W.; Weldon, D.M.

    1977-05-01

    A program is proposed to develop poloidal field components for TNS and EPR size tokamak devices and to test these components in realistic circuits. Emphasis is placed upon the development of the most difficult component, the superconducting ohmic-heating coil. Switches must also be developed for testing the coils, and this switching technology is to be extended to meet the requirements for the large scale tokamaks. Test facilities are discussed; power supplies, including a homopolar to drive the coils, are considered; and poloidal field systems studies are proposed.

  6. Tokamak first-wall coating program development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.J.; Langley, R.A.; Prevender, T.S.

    1977-08-01

    The development of a research program to study coatings for control of impurities originating from the first wall of a Tokamak reactor is extensively discussed. The first wall environment and sputtering, temperature, surface chemical, and bulk radiation damage effects are reviewed. Candidate materials and application techniques are discussed. The philosophy and flow chart of a recommended coating development plan are presented and discussed. Projected impacts of the proposed plan include benefits to other aspects of confinement experiments. A list of 45 references is appended

  7. Status of tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, J.M.

    1979-10-01

    An overall review of the tokamak program is given with particular emphasis upon developments over the past five years in the theoretical and experimental elements of the program. A summary of the key operating parameters for the principal tokamaks throughout the world is given. Also discussed are key issues in plasma confinement, plasma heating, and tokamak design

  8. Technology and physics in the Tokamak Program: The need for an integrated, steady-state RandD tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The Steady-state Tokamak (STE) Experiment is a proposed superconducting-coil, hydrogen-plasma tokamak device intended to address the integrated non-nuclear issues of steady state, high-power tokamak physics and technology. Such a facility has been called for in the US program plan for the mid 1990's, and will play a unique role in the world-wide fusion effort. Information from STE on steady-state current drive, plasma control, and high power technology will contribute significantly to the operating capabilities of future steady-state devices. This paper reviews preliminary designs and expected technological contributions to the US and world fusion reactor research from each of the above mentioned reactor systems. This document is intended as a proposal and feasibility discussion and does not include exhaustive technical reviews. 12 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Overview of the Tokamak de Varennes program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacher, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Tokamak de Varennes will be the major Canadian experiment in the magnetic fusion domain. It has a toroidal field of 1.5 tesla, major radius of 0.85 m, a minor radius of 0.25 m, and will study long pulses, up to 30 seconds duration. Initially, a series of successive plasma pulses, each of the order of seconds, will yield a duty factor of over 50 percent. During this phase, the major emphasis will be on the study of impurity generation, transport, and control, plasma-wall interactions and material properties. The program will include studies of fast current rampdown and the resultant current profile modifications. The development of advanced diagnostics will also be undertaken. To attain a higher duty factor with continuous plasma operation, noninductive current drive by radio=frequency will be added as an early upgrade. This will introduce current drive investigations such as transformer recharge and profile relaxation, and enhance the wall and materials study program. In this context, the Tokamak de Varennes will concentrate on the study of impurity exhaust and retention as well as net erosion of the limiter and neutralization plate materials

  10. General Tokamak Circuit Simulation Program-GTCSP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukawa, Makoto; Miura, Yushi; Aoyagi, Tetsuo.

    1997-05-01

    General Tokamak Circuit Simulation Program (GTCSP) was originally developed for the design work of JT-60 Power Supply System in JAERI. Therefore the prepared models (components) to be analyzed are generator, thyristor converter and coils. This is one of the unique points of GTCSP in comparison with other conventional electric circuit analysis program, because they make a circuit from the small devices such as resister, coil, condenser, transistor and so on. However, GTCSP is also clearly conventional because it is possible to construct an electric circuit freely with the prepared components. Moreover, a similar function could be realized by addition a new component to GTCSP. This report is assumed to be used as an User Manual of the GTCSP, not only to present the development and the analytical functions. Then some useful examples are described, and how to get graphic outputs are also mentioned. (author)

  11. The scientific program of the Tokamak de Varennes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daughney, C.C.

    1989-01-01

    The Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) is the principal research tool of the Centre canadien de fusion magnetique (CCFM). This article places the Tokamak de Varennes within the framework of the Canadian National Fusion Program (NFP) and describes the scientific program of the TdeV as it was presented at the April 1989 meeting of the CCFM Advisory Committee. The CCFM scientific plant contains three main elements: tokamak development, research on transport and equilibrium in plasmas, and research on the plasma-wall problem. Phase I of the experimental program, commissioning the tokamak and the diagnostic systems, has been completed. Phase II of the experimental program will begin in December 1989 with the plasma boundary defined by a magnetic divertor and the power supplies and vacuum system capable of creating a sequence of one-second plasma pulses. (3 figs., 3 refs.) (L.L.)

  12. Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, John.

    1996-01-01

    This book is the first compiled collection about tokamak. At first chapter tokamak is represented from fusion point of view and also the necessary conditions for producing power. The following chapters are represent plasma physics, the specifications of tokamak, plasma heating procedures and problems related to it, equilibrium, confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability, instabilities, plasma material interaction, plasma measurement and experiments regarding to tokamak; an addendum is also given at the end of the book

  13. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  14. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Voitsekhovitch, I.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  15. The steady-state tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politzer, D.A.; Nevins, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a steady-state tokamak experiment (STE) needed to develop the technology and physics data base required for construction of a steady-state fusion power demonstration reactor in the early 21st century. The STE will provide an integrated facility for the development and demonstration of steady-state and particle handling, low-activation high-heat-flux components and materials, efficient current drive, and continuous plasma performance in steady-state, with reactor-like plasma conditions under severe conditions of heat and particle bombardment of the wall. The STE facility will also be used to develop operation and control scenarios for ITER

  16. Issues for the electric utilities posed by DT tokamak fusion powerplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The DT tokamak is the mainline approach to magnetic fusion energy in all industrialized countries with a major commitment to fusion research. It achieved this status largely through historical accident and not as the result of considered choice among alternatives. After twenty-five years of intensive tokamak research, it is appropriate to ask whether the path down which the tokamak concept is leading the fusion community is the way to an acceptable powerplant for the electric utilities, or an aberration which should be replaced with an approach more promising in the long term. Issues surrounding the DT tokamak can be grouped in three broad areas: physics; safety/environmental; and engineering/economic. In addition to these problems, detailed engineering design studies of DT tokamak fusion powerplants over a twenty year period have revealed a number of additional problems. Most of thee are related to the presence of tritium and energetic neutron fluxes, which tend to make the cost of electricity of DT tokamaks higher than that of fossil or fission powerplants. These safety and economic issues of the DT tokamak powerplant also appear to be intractable, and have not been made to go away by twenty years of progressively more detailed and extensive engineering design studies

  17. Technology issues for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The approach for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has evolved from a conservative plan based on cutting up and burying all of the systems, to one that considers the impact tritium contamination will have on waste disposal, how large size components may be used as their own shipping containers, and even the possibility of recycling the materials of components such as the toroidal field coils and the tokamak structure. In addition, the project is more carefully assessing the requirements for using remotely operated equipment. Finally, valuable cost database is being developed for future use by the fusion community

  18. UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on ''modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D- 3 He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs

  19. Employee Assistance Program Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettleman, Alan G.; McGuire, William

    1999-01-01

    Employee Assistance Program (EAP) officers, as well as personnel in other disciplines from eight NASA Centers, attended this breakout session. Ms. Brenda Blair, MA, CEAP, a guest speaker at the conference, also attended as a consultant. Representatives from the NASA Centers introduced themselves and spoke briefly about their programs. In a discussion related to the conference theme on benchmarking, quality control issues within the EAP community and adequate documentation of cases were addressed. Disposition and provision for quality assurance checks for EAP providers in single person offices were also discussed. Ms. Blair presented methods for consulting with other NASA personnel in single person EAP offices as a quality control measure. EAP intervention in critical incidents was discussed. The question of whether EAP assistance is an asset or a potential liability in those situations was addressed. Suggestions were made of topics for future EAP video-teleconference topics. A program on EAP ethics was planned for a September video teleconference. Each person was asked to provide intake forms they use to Mr. Gettleman or Ms. Blair. Ms. Blair said she would review the forms to ensure that adequate notification is provided to the client for confidentiality. She would also review them to ensure they have adequate limits of confidentiality--a topic for future video teleconferencing. Mr. Gettleman described the NASA initiative to reduce stresses in the workplace, and the activities of an ad-hoc EAP group that will make recommendations to NASA senior management. Alternative training methods were discussed for reaching target audiences such as employees at risk, supervisors, and others. Pfc. David A. Pendleton, Victim Assistance Coordinator, U.S. Capitol Police. U.S. House of Representatives made a special presentation. Pfc. Pendleton was on duty during the tragic shooting of two Federal guards at the U.S. Capitol. He related the events immediately after the incident. He

  20. Issues in tokamak/stellarator transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1990-08-01

    At present, the mechanism for anomalous energy transport in low-β toroidal plasmas -- tokamaks and stellarators -- remains unclear, although transport by turbulent E x B velocities associated with nonlinear, fine-scale microinstabilities is a leading candidate. This article discusses basic theoretical concepts of various transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms as well as experimental ramifications which would enable one to distinguish among them and hence identify a dominant transport mechanism. While many of the predictions of fine-scale turbulence are born out by experiment, notable contradictions exist. Projections of ignition margin rest both on the scaling properties of the confinement mechanism and on the criteria for entering enhanced confinement regimes. At present, the greatest uncertainties lie with the basis for scaling confinement enhancement criteria. A series of questions, to be answered by new experimental/theoretical work, is posed to resolve these outstanding contradictions (or refute the fine-scale turbulence model) and to establish confinement enhancement criteria. 73 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Compact Ignition Tokamak Program: R and D needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    This report on the Compact Ignition Tokamak Program supplies information concerning: segmented vacuum vessel joint development; first wall tile attachments; first wall/tile development - composite materials; vacuum leak detection; high frequency rf sources; Faraday shield development; design and testing of rf launchers for high power, ling pulse operation; radiation hardened, low loss, dielectric windows for rf, IR, visible, UV and X-rays, mirrors for changing direction and focusing IR, visible and UV radiation; radiation resistant optical dielectric wave guides; radiation resistant HV insulation for diagnostic magnetic pickup coils; compact radiation and/or magnetic shielding for in-vault diagnostics that need some attenuation to reduce S/N ratio; radiation hardened line-of-sight sensors such as bolometers, UV and soft X-ray detectors, neutral particle analyzers, torus pressure gauges; special maintenance fixtures and tools; material properties - design data base - all materials; and insulation - electrical/thermal and mechanical properties

  2. Summary discussion: An integrated advanced tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    The tokamak concept improvement workshop addressed a wide range of issues involved in the development of a more attractive tokamak. The agenda for the workshop progressed from a general discussion of the long-range energy context (with the objective being the identification of a set of criteria and ''figures of merit'' for measuring the attractiveness of a tokamak concept) to particular opportunities for the improvement of the tokamak concept. The discussions concluded with a compilation of research program elements leading to an improved tokamak concept

  3. Theoretical issues in tokamak confinement: (i) Internal/edge transport barriers and (ii) runaway avalanche confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Helander, P.; Thyagaraja, A.; Andersson, F.; Fueloep, T.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Romanelli, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarises a number of distinct, but related, pieces of work on key confinement issues for tokamaks, in particular the formation of internal and edge transport barriers, both within turbulent and neoclassical models, and radial diffusion of avalanching runaway electrons. First-principle simulations of tokamak turbulence and transport using the two-fluid, electromagnetic, global code CUTIE are described. The code has demonstrated the spontaneous formation of internal transport barriers near mode rational surfaces, in qualitative agreement with observations on JET and RTP. The theory of neoclassical transport in an impure, toroidal plasma has been extended to allow for steeper pressure and temperature gradients than are usually considered, and is then found to become nonlinear under conditions typical of the tokamak edge. For instance, the particle flux is found to be a nonmonotonic function of the gradients, thus allowing for a bifurcation in the ion particle flux. Finally, it is shown that radial diffusion caused by magnetic fluctuations can effectively suppress avalanches of runaway electrons if the fluctuation amplitude exceeds δB/B∼10 -3 . (author)

  4. Overview of the TCV tokamak program: scientific progress and facility upgrades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coda, S.; Ahn, J.; Albanese, R.

    2017-01-01

    The TCV tokamak is augmenting its unique historical capabilities (strong shaping, strong electron heating) with ion heating, additional electron heating compatible with high densities, and variable divertor geometry, in a multifaceted upgrade program designed to broaden its operational range with...

  5. Overview of the TCV tokamak program : scientific progress and facility upgrades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coda, S.; Ahn, J.; Albanese, R.; Alberti, S.; Alessi, E.; Allan, S.; Anand, H.; Anastassiou, G.; Andrèbe, Y.; Angioni, C.; Ariola, M.; Bernert, M.; Beurskens, M.N.A.; Bin, W.; Blanchard, P.; Blanken, T.C.; Boedo, J.A.; Bolzonella, T.; Bouquey, F.; Braunmüller, F.H.; Bufferand, H.; Buratti, P.; Calabró, G.; Camenen, Y.; Carnevale, D.; Carpanese, F.; Causa, F.; Cesario, R.; Chapman, I.T.; Chellai, O.; Choi, D.; Cianfarani, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Citrin, J.; Costea, S.; Crisanti, F.; Cruz, N.; Czarnecka, A.; Decker, J.; De Masi, G.; De Tommasi, G.; Douai, D.; Dunne, M.; Duval, B.P.; Eich, T.; Elmore, S.; Esposito, B.; Faitsch, M.; Fasoli, A.; Fedorczak, N.; Felici, F.; Février, O.; Ficker, O.; Fietz, S.; Fontana, M.; Frassinetti, L.; Furno, I.; Galeani, S.; Gallo, A.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Garrido, I.; Geiger, B.; Giovannozzi, E.; Gobbin, M.; Goodman, T.P.; Gorini, G.; Gospodarczyk, M.; Granucci, G.; Graves, J.P.; Guirlet, R.; Hakola, A.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Hawke, J.; Hennequin, P.; Hnat, B.; Hogeweij, D.; Hogge, J.- P.; Honoré, C.; Hopf, C.; Horáček, J.; Huang, Z.; Igochine, V.; Innocente, P.; Ionita-Schrittwieser, C.; Isliker, H.; Jacquier, R.; Jardin, A.; Kamleitner, J.; Karpushov, A.; Keeling, D.L.; Kirneva, N.; Kong, M.; Koubiti, M.; Kovacic, J.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Krawczyk, N.; Kudlacek, O.; Labit, B.; Lazzaro, E.; Le, H.B.; Lipschultz, B.; Llobet, X.; Lomanowski, B.; Loschiavo, V.P.; Lunt, T.; Maget, P.; Maljaars, E.; Malygin, A.; Maraschek, M.; Marini, C.; Martin, P.; Martin, Y.; Mastrostefano, S.; Maurizio, R.; Mavridis, M.; Mazon, D.; McAdams, R.; McDermott, R.; Merle, A.; Meyer, H.; Militello, F.; Miron, I.G.; Molina Cabrera, P.A.; Moret, J.M.; Moro, A.; Moulton, D.; Naulin, V.; Nespoli, F.; Nielsen, A.H.; Nocente, M.; Nouailletas, R.; Nowak, S.; Odstrčil, T.; Papp, G.; Papřok, R.; Pau, A.; Pautasso, G.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Pisokas, T.; Porte, L.; Preynas, M.; Ramogida, G.; Rapson, C.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Reich, M.; Reimerdes, H.; Reux, C.; Ricci, P.; Rittich, D.; Riva, F.; Robinson, T.; Saarelma, S.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Sauter, O.; Scannell, R.; Schlatter, Ch.; Schneider, B.; Schneider, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Sciortino, F.; Sertoli, M.; Sheikh, U.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, M.; Sinha, J.; Sozzi, C.; Spolaore, M.; Stange, T.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Tamain, P.; Teplukhina, A.; Testa, D.; Theiler, C.; Thornton, A.; Tophøj, L.; Tran, M.Q.; Tsironis, C.; Tsui, C.; Uccello, A.; Vartanian, S.; Verdoolaege, G.; Verhaegh, K.H.A.; Vermare, L.; Vianello, N.; Vijvers, W.A.J.; Vlahos, L.; Vu, N.M.T.; Walkden, N.; Wauters, T.; Weisen, H.; Wischmeier, M.; Zestanakis, P.; Zuin, M.

    2017-01-01

    The TCV tokamak is augmenting its unique historical capabilities (strong shaping, strong electron heating) with ion heating, additional electron heating compatible with high densities, and variable divertor geometry, in a multifaceted upgrade program designed to broaden its operational range without

  6. Critical Design Issues of Tokamak Cooling Water System of ITER's Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seokho H.; Berry, Jan

    2011-01-01

    U.S. ITER is responsible for the design, engineering, and procurement of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS). The TCWS transfers heat generated in the Tokamak to cooling water during nominal pulsed operation 850 MW at up to 150 C and 4.2 MPa water pressure. This water contains radionuclides because impurities (e.g., tritium) diffuse from in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel by water baking at 200 240 C at up to 4.4MPa, and corrosion products become activated by neutron bombardment. The system is designated as safety important class (SIC) and will be fabricated to comply with the French Order concerning nuclear pressure equipment (December 2005) and the EU Pressure Equipment Directive using ASME Section VIII, Div 2 design codes. The complexity of the TCWS design and fabrication presents unique challenges. Conceptual design of this one-of-a-kind cooling system has been completed with several issues that need to be resolved to move to next stage of the design. Those issues include flow balancing between over hundreds of branch pipelines in parallel to supply cooling water to blankets, determination of optimum flow velocity while minimizing the potential for cavitation damage, design for freezing protection for cooling water flowing through cryostat (freezing) environment, requirements for high-energy piping design, and electromagnetic impact to piping and components. Although the TCWS consists of standard commercial components such as piping with valves and fittings, heat exchangers, and pumps, complex requirements present interesting design challenges. This paper presents a brief description of TCWS conceptual design and critical design issues that need to be resolved.

  7. The insulation irradiation test program for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McManamy, T.J.; Kanemoto, G.; Snook, P.

    1990-01-01

    The electrical insulation for the toroidal field coils of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is expected to be exposed to radiation doses on the order of 10 10 rad with ∼90% of the dose from neutrons. The coils are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature and then heated during the pulse to a peak temperature >300 K. In a program to evaluate the effects of radiation exposure on the insulators, three types of boron-free insulation were irradiated at room temperature in the Advanced Technology Reactor (ATR) and tested at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The materials were Spaulrad-S, Shikishima PG5-1, and Shikishima PG3-1. The first two use a bismaleimide resin and the third an aromatic amine hardened epoxy. Spaulrad-S is a two-dimensional (2-D) weave of S-glass, while the others are 3-D weaves of T-glass. Flexure and shear/compression samples were irradiated to approximately 5 x 10 9 rad and 3 x 10 10 rad with 35 to 40% of the total dose from neutrons. The shear/compression samples were tested in pairs by applying an average compression of 345 MPa and then a shear load. After static tests were completed, fatigue testing was done by cycling the shear load for up to 30,000 cycles with a constant compression. The static shear strength of the samples that did not fail was then determined. Generally, shear strengths on the order of 120 MPa were measured. The behavior of the flexure and shear/compression samples was significantly different; large reductions in the flexure strength were observed, while the shear strength stayed the same or increased slightly. The 3-D weave material demonstrated higher strength and significantly less radiation damage than the 2-D material in flexure but performed nearly identically when tested with combined shear and compression. The epoxy system was much more sensitive to fatigue damage than the bismaleimide materials. 9 refs., 5 figs

  8. Fusion Canada issue 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue TdeV tokamak updates, fusion research in Korea, CCFM program review, TdeV divertor plasma, and CFFTP program review. 4 figs.

  9. Fusion Canada issue 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue TdeV tokamak updates, fusion research in Korea, CCFM program review, TdeV divertor plasma, and CFFTP program review. 4 figs

  10. Draft program plant for TNS: The Next Step after the tokamak fusion test reactor. Part III. Project specific RD and D needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    Research and development needs for the TNS systems are described according to the following chapters: (1) tokamak system, (2) electrical power systems, (3) plasma heating systems, (4) tokamak support systems, (5) instrumentation, control, and data systems, and (6) program recommendations

  11. Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of the new large tokamaks JET, JT-60 and TFTR important advances in magnetic confinement have been made. These include the exploitation of radio frequency and neutral beam heating on a much larger scale than previously, the demonstration of regimes of improved confinement and the demonstration of current drive at the Megamp level. A number of small and medium sized tokamaks have also come into operation recently such as WT-3 in Japan with an emphasis on radio frequency current drive and HL-1 a medium sized tokamak in China. Each of these new tokamaks is addressing specific problems which remain for the future development of the system. Of these particular problems: β, density and q limits remain important issues for the future development of the tokamak. β limits are being addressed on the DIII-D device in the USA. The anomalous confinement that the tokamak displays is being explored in detail on the TEXT device in the USA. Two other problems are impurity control and current drive. There is significant emphasis on divertor configurations at the present time with their enhanced confinement in the so called H mode. Due to improved discharge cleaning techniques and the ability to repetitively refuel using pellets, purer plasmas can be obtained even without divertors. Current drive remains a crucial issue for quasi of near steady state operation of the tokamak in the future and many current drive schemes are being investigated. (author) [pt

  12. Fusion Canada issue 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on increased funding for the Canadian Fusion Program, news of the compact Toroid fuelling gun, an update on Tokamak de Varennes, the Canada - U.S. fusion meeting, measurements of plasma flow velocity, and replaceable Tokamak divertors. 4 figs

  13. Fusion Canada issue 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on increased funding for the Canadian Fusion Program, news of the compact Toroid fuelling gun, an update on Tokamak de Varennes, the Canada - U.S. fusion meeting, measurements of plasma flow velocity, and replaceable Tokamak divertors. 4 figs.

  14. Fusion Canada issue 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a funding report for CFFTP, a technical update for Tokamak de Varennes and a network for university research by the National Fusion Program. 4 figs

  15. Physics objectives of PI3 spherical tokamak program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen; Laberge, Michel; Reynolds, Meritt; O'Shea, Peter; Ivanov, Russ; Young, William; Carle, Patrick; Froese, Aaron; Epp, Kelly

    2017-10-01

    Achieving net energy gain with a Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) system requires the initial plasma state to satisfy a set of performance goals, such as particle inventory (1021 ions), sufficient magnetic flux (0.3 Wb) to confine the plasma without MHD instability, and initial energy confinement time several times longer than the compression time. General Fusion (GF) is now constructing Plasma Injector 3 (PI3) to explore the physics of reactor-scale plasmas. Energy considerations lead us to design around an initial state of Rvessel = 1 m. PI3 will use fast coaxial helicity injection via a Marshall gun to create a spherical tokamak plasma, with no additional heating. MTF requires solenoid-free startup with no vertical field coils, and will rely on flux conservation by a metal wall. PI3 is 5x larger than SPECTOR so is expected to yield magnetic lifetime increase of 25x, while peak temperature of PI3 is expected to be similar (400-500 eV) Physics investigations will study MHD activity and the resistive and convective evolution of current, temperature and density profiles. We seek to understand the confinement physics, radiative loss, thermal and particle transport, recycling and edge physics of PI3.

  16. Intelligence Community Programs, Management, and Enduring Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-08

    books, journal papers, conference presentations, working papers, and other electronic and print publications. Intelligence Community Programs... Intelligence Community Programs, Management, and Enduring Issues Anne Daugherty Miles Analyst in Intelligence and National Security Policy...

  17. Overview of recent experimental results from the DIII-D advanced tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    The D III-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, we have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: 1) We have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; 2) Using this rotational stabilization, we have achieved β N H 89 ≥ 10 for 4 τ E limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; 3) Using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, we have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased β T by 60%; 4) We have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; 5) We have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; 6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and 7) We have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 τ E ) at the same fusion gain parameter of β N H 89 /q 95 2 ≅ 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q 95 = 4.2. We have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: 1) We have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 τ E ) with constant density and constant radiated power; 2) We have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet injection of noble gases; 3) We have found that the heat and particle fluxes to the inner strike points of balanced, double-null divertors are much smaller than to the outer strike points. (author)

  18. Area Safety Program for the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappe, G.M.

    1984-10-01

    Overall the Area Safety Program has proved to be a very successful operation. There is no doubt that a safety program organized through line management is the best way to involve all personnel. Naturally, when the program was first started, there was some criticism and a certain resistance on the part of a few individuals to fully participate. However, once the program was underway and it could be seen that it was working to everyone's advantage, this reluctance disappeared and a spirit of full cooperation is now enjoyed. It is very important that for this success to continue there must be a two way flow of information, both from the Area Safety Coordinators up through line management, and from senior management, with decisions and answers, back down through the management chain with the utmost dispatch. As with all programs, there is still room for improvement. This program has started a review cycle with a view to streamlining certain areas and possibly increasing its scope in others

  19. Fusion Canada issue 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-06-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on operation at Tokamak de Varennes, CRITIC irradiations at AECL, Tritium systems at TFTR, physics contribution at ITER. 4 figs.

  20. Fusion Canada issue 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue ITER reactor siting, a major upgrade for TdeV tokamak, Ceramic Breeders: new tritium mapping technique and Joint Fusion Symposium. 2 figs

  1. Some stress-related issues in tokamak fusion reactor first walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Pai, B.; Ryder, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Recent design studies of a tokamak fusion power reactor and of various blankets have envisioned surface heat fluxes on the first wall ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/m 2 , and end-of-life irradiation fluences ranging from 100 dpa for the austenitic stainless steels to as high as 250 dpa for postulated vanadium alloys. Some tokamak blankets, particularly those using helium or liquid metal as coolant/breeder, may have to operate at relatively high coolant pressures so that the first wall may be subjected to high primary stress in addition to high secondary stresses such as thermal stresses or stresses due to constrained swelling. The present paper focusses on the various problems that may arise in the first wall because of stress and high neutron fluence, and discusses some of the design solutions that have been proposed to overcome these problems

  2. U.S. NRC's generic issues program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, J.V.; Foster, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has a Generic Issues Program (GIP) to address Generic Issues (GI). A GI is defined as 'a regulatory matter involving the design, construction, operation, or decommissioning of several, or a class of, NRC licensees or certificate holders that is not sufficiently addressed by existing rules, guidance, or programs'. This rather legalistic definition has several practical corollaries: First, a GI must involve safety. Second, the issue must involve at least two plants, or it would be a plant-specific issue rather than a GI. Third, the potential safety question must not be covered by existing regulations and guidance (compliance). Thus, the effect of a GI is to potentially change the body of regulations and associated guidance (e.g., regulatory guides). The GIP was started in 1976, thus it is a relatively mature program. Approximately 850 issues have been processed by the program to date. More importantly, even after 30 years, new GIs continue to be proposed. The entire set of Generic Issues (GIs) is updated annually in NUREG-0933, 'A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues'. GIs normally involve complex questions of safety and regulation. Efficient and effective means of addressing these issues are very important for regulatory effectiveness. If an issue proves to pose a genuine, significant safety question, then swift, effective, enforceable, and cost-effective action needs to be taken. Conversely, if an issue is of little safety significance, the issue should be dismissed in an expeditious manner, avoiding unnecessary expenditure of resources and regulatory burden or uncertainty. This paper provides a summary of the 5-stage program, from identification through the regulatory assessment stage. The paper also includes a discussion of the program's seven criteria, sources of proposed GIs, recent improvements, publicly available information, historical performance, and status of current GIs. (authors)

  3. Physics issues of a proposed program, SPIRIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki

    2000-01-01

    Physics issues of the proposed program, SPIRIT (Self-organized Plasma with Induction, Reconnection, and Induction Techniques) are discussed. The main purpose of this program is to explore the physics of global stability and sustainment of compact toroids, including FRC (field reversed configuration) as well as low-aspect-ratio RFP (reversed field pinch), spheromak and spherical torus. (author)

  4. Open Issues in Object-Oriented Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1995-01-01

    We discuss a number of open issues within object-oriented programming. The central mechanisms of object-oriented programming appeared with Simula, developed more than 30 years ago; these include class, subclass, virtual function, active object and the first application framework, Class Simulation....... The core parts of object-oriented programming should be well understood, but there are still a large number of issues where there is no consensus. The term object-orientation has been applied to many subjects, such as analysis, design implementation, data modeling in databases, and distribution...

  5. Handbook of critical issues in goal programming

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, C

    1991-01-01

    Goal Programming (GP) is perhaps the oldest and most widely used approach within the Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) paradigm. GP combines the logic of optimisation in mathematical programming with the decision maker's desire to satisfy several goals. The primary purpose of this book is to identify the critical issues in GP and to demonstrate different procedures capable of avoiding or mitigating the inherent pitfalls associated with these issues. The outcome of a search of the literature shows many instances where GP models produced misleading or even erroneous results simply because

  6. Development of nuclear safety issues program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J. C.; Yoo, S. O.; Yoon, Y. K.; Kim, H. J.; Jeong, M. J.; Noh, K. W.; Kang, D. K

    2006-12-15

    The nuclear safety issues are defined as the cases which affect the design and operation safety of nuclear power plants and also require the resolution action. The nuclear safety issues program (NSIP) which deals with the overall procedural requirements for the nuclear safety issues management process is developed, in accordance with the request of the scientific resolution researches and the establishment/application of the nuclear safety issues management system for the nuclear power plants under design, construction or operation. The NSIP consists of the following 4 steps; - Step 1 : Collection of candidates for nuclear safety issues - Step 2 : Identification of nuclear safety issues - Step 3 : Categorization and resolution of nuclear safety issues - Step 4 : Implementation, verification and closure The NSIP will be applied to the management directives of KINS related to the nuclear safety issues. Through the identification of the nuclear safety issues which may be related to the potential for accident/incidents at operating nuclear power plants either directly or indirectly, followed by performance of regulatory researches to resolve the safety issues, it will be possible to prevent occurrence of accidents/incidents as well as to cope with unexpected accidents/incidents by analyzing the root causes timely and scientifically and by establishing the proper flow-up or remedied regulatory actions. Moreover, the identification and resolution of the safety issues related to the new nuclear power plants completed at the design stage are also expected to make the new reactor licensing reviews effective and efficient as well as to make the possibility of accidents/incidents occurrence minimize. Therefore, the NSIP developed in this study is expected to contribute for the enhancement of the safety of nuclear power plants.

  7. Development of nuclear safety issues program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J. C.; Yoo, S. O.; Yoon, Y. K.; Kim, H. J.; Jeong, M. J.; Noh, K. W.; Kang, D. K.

    2006-12-01

    The nuclear safety issues are defined as the cases which affect the design and operation safety of nuclear power plants and also require the resolution action. The nuclear safety issues program (NSIP) which deals with the overall procedural requirements for the nuclear safety issues management process is developed, in accordance with the request of the scientific resolution researches and the establishment/application of the nuclear safety issues management system for the nuclear power plants under design, construction or operation. The NSIP consists of the following 4 steps; - Step 1 : Collection of candidates for nuclear safety issues - Step 2 : Identification of nuclear safety issues - Step 3 : Categorization and resolution of nuclear safety issues - Step 4 : Implementation, verification and closure The NSIP will be applied to the management directives of KINS related to the nuclear safety issues. Through the identification of the nuclear safety issues which may be related to the potential for accident/incidents at operating nuclear power plants either directly or indirectly, followed by performance of regulatory researches to resolve the safety issues, it will be possible to prevent occurrence of accidents/incidents as well as to cope with unexpected accidents/incidents by analyzing the root causes timely and scientifically and by establishing the proper flow-up or remedied regulatory actions. Moreover, the identification and resolution of the safety issues related to the new nuclear power plants completed at the design stage are also expected to make the new reactor licensing reviews effective and efficient as well as to make the possibility of accidents/incidents occurrence minimize. Therefore, the NSIP developed in this study is expected to contribute for the enhancement of the safety of nuclear power plants

  8. Ethical Issues in Parent Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapon-Shevin, Mara

    1982-01-01

    Four areas of ethical concern are voiced in the training of parents of handicapped children: (1) selection of program goals, (2) problems involved with both positive reinforcement and punishment, (3) conflicts between experimentation and therapeutic intervention, and (4) level of parent training. Consideration of ethical issues at each step of…

  9. Program of thermonuclear reactor structure materials study at Kazakhstan tokamak KTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkolnik, V.S.; Velikhov, E.P.; Cherepnin, Yu. S.; Tikhomirov, L. N.; Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Shestacov, V.P.; Azizov, E.A.; Gostev, A.A.; Buzhinskij, O.A.

    2000-01-01

    Physical and technical capacities of KTM tokamak are basis of the project. These properties will help to perform a wide spectrum of research on the first wall materials, limiter materials, as well as on materials of divertor plates and mockups of divertor receivers including porous ones with liquid metal cooling within the range of flux loads from 0.1 to 20 MW/m 2 . In research program for the first wall materials the basic attention will be drawn to erosion resistance, recycling, permeability, heat resistance, spraying, possibility of conditioning and recovering their first wall protective properties, material influence on physical processes in hot plasma thread. In the course of limiter material studying basic efforts will be focused on these materials influence on plasma effective charge Z e ff and operation capacity of limiters in a wide spectrum of flux loads

  10. Issues facing the U. S. mirror program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, T.V.

    1978-07-01

    Some of the current issues associated with the U.S. Magnetic Mirror Program are analyzed. They are presented as five separate papers entitled: (1) Relevant Issues Broughtup by the Mirror Reactor Design Studies. (2) An Assessment of the Design Study of the 1 MeV Neutral Beam Injector Required for a Tandem Mirror Reactor. (3) The Significance of the Radial Plasma Size Measured in Units of Ion Gyroradii in Tandem Mirrors and Field Reversed Mirrors. (4) Producing Field Reversed Mirror Plasmas by Methods used in Field Reversed Theta Pinch. (5) RF Stoppering of Mirror Confined Plasma.

  11. Overview of the TCV tokamak program: scientific progress and facility upgrades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, S.; Ahn, J.; Albanese, R.; Alberti, S.; Alessi, E.; Allan, S.; Anand, H.; Anastassiou, G.; Andrèbe, Y.; Angioni, C.; Ariola, M.; Bernert, M.; Beurskens, M.; Bin, W.; Blanchard, P.; Blanken, T. C.; Boedo, J. A.; Bolzonella, T.; Bouquey, F.; Braunmüller, F. H.; Bufferand, H.; Buratti, P.; Calabró, G.; Camenen, Y.; Carnevale, D.; Carpanese, F.; Causa, F.; Cesario, R.; Chapman, I. T.; Chellai, O.; Choi, D.; Cianfarani, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Citrin, J.; Costea, S.; Crisanti, F.; Cruz, N.; Czarnecka, A.; Decker, J.; De Masi, G.; De Tommasi, G.; Douai, D.; Dunne, M.; Duval, B. P.; Eich, T.; Elmore, S.; Esposito, B.; Faitsch, M.; Fasoli, A.; Fedorczak, N.; Felici, F.; Février, O.; Ficker, O.; Fietz, S.; Fontana, M.; Frassinetti, L.; Furno, I.; Galeani, S.; Gallo, A.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Garrido, I.; Geiger, B.; Giovannozzi, E.; Gobbin, M.; Goodman, T. P.; Gorini, G.; Gospodarczyk, M.; Granucci, G.; Graves, J. P.; Guirlet, R.; Hakola, A.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Hawke, J.; Hennequin, P.; Hnat, B.; Hogeweij, D.; Hogge, J.-Ph.; Honoré, C.; Hopf, C.; Horáček, J.; Huang, Z.; Igochine, V.; Innocente, P.; Ionita Schrittwieser, C.; Isliker, H.; Jacquier, R.; Jardin, A.; Kamleitner, J.; Karpushov, A.; Keeling, D. L.; Kirneva, N.; Kong, M.; Koubiti, M.; Kovacic, J.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Krawczyk, N.; Kudlacek, O.; Labit, B.; Lazzaro, E.; Le, H. B.; Lipschultz, B.; Llobet, X.; Lomanowski, B.; Loschiavo, V. P.; Lunt, T.; Maget, P.; Maljaars, E.; Malygin, A.; Maraschek, M.; Marini, C.; Martin, P.; Martin, Y.; Mastrostefano, S.; Maurizio, R.; Mavridis, M.; Mazon, D.; McAdams, R.; McDermott, R.; Merle, A.; Meyer, H.; Militello, F.; Miron, I. G.; Molina Cabrera, P. A.; Moret, J.-M.; Moro, A.; Moulton, D.; Naulin, V.; Nespoli, F.; Nielsen, A. H.; Nocente, M.; Nouailletas, R.; Nowak, S.; Odstrčil, T.; Papp, G.; Papřok, R.; Pau, A.; Pautasso, G.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Pisokas, T.; Porte, L.; Preynas, M.; Ramogida, G.; Rapson, C.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Reich, M.; Reimerdes, H.; Reux, C.; Ricci, P.; Rittich, D.; Riva, F.; Robinson, T.; Saarelma, S.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Sauter, O.; Scannell, R.; Schlatter, Ch.; Schneider, B.; Schneider, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Sciortino, F.; Sertoli, M.; Sheikh, U.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, M.; Sinha, J.; Sozzi, C.; Spolaore, M.; Stange, T.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Tamain, P.; Teplukhina, A.; Testa, D.; Theiler, C.; Thornton, A.; Tophøj, L.; Tran, M. Q.; Tsironis, C.; Tsui, C.; Uccello, A.; Vartanian, S.; Verdoolaege, G.; Verhaegh, K.; Vermare, L.; Vianello, N.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Vlahos, L.; Vu, N. M. T.; Walkden, N.; Wauters, T.; Weisen, H.; Wischmeier, M.; Zestanakis, P.; Zuin, M.; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-10-01

    The TCV tokamak is augmenting its unique historical capabilities (strong shaping, strong electron heating) with ion heating, additional electron heating compatible with high densities, and variable divertor geometry, in a multifaceted upgrade program designed to broaden its operational range without sacrificing its fundamental flexibility. The TCV program is rooted in a three-pronged approach aimed at ITER support, explorations towards DEMO, and fundamental research. A 1 MW, tangential neutral beam injector (NBI) was recently installed and promptly extended the TCV parameter range, with record ion temperatures and toroidal rotation velocities and measurable neutral-beam current drive. ITER-relevant scenario development has received particular attention, with strategies aimed at maximizing performance through optimized discharge trajectories to avoid MHD instabilities, such as peeling-ballooning and neoclassical tearing modes. Experiments on exhaust physics have focused particularly on detachment, a necessary step to a DEMO reactor, in a comprehensive set of conventional and advanced divertor concepts. The specific theoretical prediction of an enhanced radiation region between the two X-points in the low-field-side snowflake-minus configuration was experimentally confirmed. Fundamental investigations of the power decay length in the scrape-off layer (SOL) are progressing rapidly, again in widely varying configurations and in both D and He plasmas; in particular, the double decay length in L-mode limited plasmas was found to be replaced by a single length at high SOL resistivity. Experiments on disruption mitigation by massive gas injection and electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) have begun in earnest, in parallel with studies of runaway electron generation and control, in both stable and disruptive conditions; a quiescent runaway beam carrying the entire electrical current appears to develop in some cases. Developments in plasma control have benefited from

  12. ACHP | News | ACHP Issues Program Comment to Streamline Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Program Comment to Streamline Communication Facilities Construction and Modification ACHP Issues Program Comment to Streamline Communication Facilities Construction and Modification The Advisory Council on

  13. Overall program status and policy issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, T.H.

    1989-01-01

    Under the terms of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) will permanently dispose of high-level radioactive waste from defense activities and spent fuel from commercial nuclear power plants. The waste management system authorized by the NWPA, as amended in 1987, is to include three major components: a geologic repository for permanent disposal, a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility for packaging and temporarily storing waste, and a system for transporting the waste to the MRS and to the repository. This paper discusses DOE's objectives for the waste management system, including the priority DOE places on maintaining and enhancing schedules for accepting waste; current policy and programmatic issues; and the strategies being employed for dealing with these issues. These strategies include efforts to ensure that site characterization activities support licensing requirements, the use of contingency planning, the application of systems integration, and systems studies of the role of an MRS. This paper reports briefly on the status of the site characterization program, including DOE's efforts to (a) strengthen quality assurance, (b) prepare for construction of the exploratory shaft facility that will be used to conduct underground tests, (c) clarify US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing requirements and expedite the licensing process, (d) comply with applicable environmental regulations, and (e) monitor and mitigate the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of site characterization activities

  14. The high beta tokamak-extended pulse magnetohydrodynamic mode control research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, D A; Bialek, J; Byrne, P J; De Bono, B; Levesque, J P; Li, B Q; Mauel, M E; Navratil, G A; Pedersen, T S; Rath, N; Shiraki, D

    2011-01-01

    The high beta tokamak-extended pulse (HBT-EP) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mode control research program is studying ITER relevant internal modular feedback control coil configurations and their impact on kink mode rigidity, advanced digital control algorithms and the effects of plasma rotation and three-dimensional magnetic fields on MHD mode stability. A new segmented adjustable conducting wall has been installed on the HBT-EP and is made up of 20 independent, movable, wall shell segments instrumented with three distinct sets of 40 saddle coils, totaling 120 in-vessel modular feedback control coils. Each internal coil set has been designed with varying toroidal angular coil coverage of 5, 10 and 15 0 , spanning the toroidal angle range of an ITER port plug based internal coil to test resistive wall mode (RWM) interaction and multimode MHD plasma response to such highly localized control fields. In addition, we have implemented 336 new poloidal and radial magnetic sensors to quantify the applied three-dimensional fields of our control coils along with the observed plasma response. This paper describes the design and implementation of the new control shell incorporating these control and sensor coils on the HBT-EP, and the research program plan on the upgraded HBT-EP to understand how best to optimize the use of modular feedback coils to control instability growth near the ideal wall stabilization limit, answer critical questions about the role of plasma rotation in active control of the RWM and the ferritic resistive wall mode, and to improve the performance of MHD control systems used in fusion experiments and future burning plasma systems.

  15. Activation analysis of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.

    1986-01-01

    The US fusion program has completed the conceptual design of a compact tokamak device that achieves ignition. The high neutron wall loadings associated with this compact deuterium-tritium-burning device indicate that radiation-related issues may be significant considerations in the overall system design. Sufficient shielding will be requied for the radiation protection of both reactor components and occupational personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure to permit personnel access into the test cell after shutdown and limit the total activation of the test cell components. This paper describes the conceptual design of the igloo shield system and discusses the major neutronic concerns related to the design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

  16. Fusion Canada issue 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue the Canada - US fusion meeting in Montreal, fusion breeder work in Chile, new management at CFFTP, fast electrons in tokamaks: new data from TdeV, a program review of CCFM and Velikhov to address Montreal fusion meeting. 1 fig

  17. Fusion Canada issue 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a technical update on Tokamak de Varennes, a report on the Beatrix II Breeding Materials Test Program, the Tritium glovebox system for UPM, Saudi Arabia, a broad update of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project is also included. 1 fig

  18. Fusion Canada issue 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a technical update on Tokamak de Varennes, a report on the Beatrix II Breeding Materials Test Program, the Tritium glovebox system for UPM, Saudi Arabia, a broad update of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project is also included. 1 fig.

  19. Overview of the TCV tokamak program: scientific progress and facility upgrades.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coda, S.; Ficker, Ondřej; Horáček, Jan; Papřok, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, October (2017), č. článku 102011. ISSN 0029-5515 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : TCV * tokamak * overview Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016

  20. Varennes Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumyn, P.B.

    A consortium of five organizations under the leadership of IREQ, the Institute de Recherche d'Hydro-Quebec has completed a conceptual design study for a tokamak device, and in January 1981 its construction was authorized with funding being provided principally by Hydro-Quebec and the National Research Council, as well as by the Ministre d'Education du Quebec and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). The device will form the focus of Canada's magnetic-fusion program and will be located in IREQ's laboratories in Varennes. Presently the machine layout is being finalized from the physics point of view and work has started on equipment design and specification. The Tokamak de Varennes will be an experimental device, the purpose of which is to study plasma and other fusion related phenomena. In particular it will study: 1. Plasma impurities and plasma/liner interaction; 2. Long pulse or quasi-continuous operation using plasma rampdown and eventually plasma current reversal in order to maintain the plasma; and 3. Advanced diagnostics

  1. Present status of Tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Jayanta

    1991-01-01

    The scenario of thermonuclear fusion research is presented, and the tokamak which is the most promising candidate as a fusion reactor is introduced. A brief survey is given of the most noteworthy tokamaks in the global context, and fusion programmes relating to Next Step devices are outlined. Supplementary heating of tokamak plasma by different methods is briefly reviewed; the latest achievements in heating to fusion temperatures are also reported. The progress towards the high value of the fusion product necessary for ignition is described. The improvement in plasma confinement brought about especially by the H-mode, is discussed. The latest situation in pushing up Β for increasing the efficiency of a tokamak is elucidated. Mention is made of the different types of wall treatment of the tokamak vessel for impurity control, which has led to a significant improvement in tokamak performance. Different methods of current drive for steady state tokamak operation are reviewed, and the issue of current drive efficiency is addressed. A short resume is given of the various diagnostic methods which are employed on a routine basis in the major tokamak centres. A few diagnostics recently developed or proposed in the context of the advanced tokamaks as well as the Next Step devices are indicated. The important role of the interplay between theory, experiment and simulation is noted, and the areas of investigation requiring concerted effort for further progress in tokamak research are identified. (author). 17 refs

  2. Finite element and node point generation computer programs used for the design of toroidal field coils in tokamak fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-06-01

    The structural analysis of toroidal field coils in Tokamak fusion machines can be performed with the finite element method. This technique has been employed for design evaluations of toroidal field coils on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Diverter Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The application of the finite element method can be simplified with computer programs that are used to generate the input data for the finite element code. There are three areas of data input where significant automation can be provided by supplementary computer codes. These concern the definition of geometry by a node point mesh, the definition of the finite elements from the geometric node points, and the definition of the node point force/displacement boundary conditions. The node point forces in a model of a toroidal field coil are computed from the vector cross product of the coil current and the magnetic field. The computer programs named PDXNODE and ELEMENT are described. The program PDXNODE generates the geometric node points of a finite element model for a toroidal field coil. The program ELEMENT defines the finite elements of the model from the node points and from material property considerations. The program descriptions include input requirements, the output, the program logic, the methods of generating complex geometries with multiple runs, computational time and computer compatibility. The output format of PDXNODE and ELEMENT make them compatible with PDXFORC and two general purpose finite element computer codes: (ANSYS) the Engineering Analysis System written by the Swanson Analysis Systems, Inc., and (WECAN) the Westinghouse Electric Computer Analysis general purpose finite element program. The Fortran listings of PDXNODE and ELEMENT are provided

  3. 76 FR 20534 - Program Integrity Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys... educational programs or those that provide marketing, advertising, recruiting, or admissions services. We have... the institution to provide services, such as food service, other than educational programs, marketing...

  4. 78 FR 17598 - Program Integrity Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant Program, the Federal Pell Grant Program, and the Academic Competitiveness Grant (AGC) and National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant (National Smart... is most likely to be obtained. As the primary function of admissions representatives is to serve as...

  5. Code quality issues in student programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuning, H.W.; Heeren, B.J.; Jeuring, J.T.

    2017-01-01

    Because low quality code can cause serious problems in software systems, students learning to program should pay attention to code quality early. Although many studies have investigated mistakes that students make during programming, we do not know much about the quality of their code. This study

  6. Summer Food Service Program. Nourishing News. Volume 3, Issue 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) is to provide nutritious meals to children in low-income areas when school is not in session. This issue of "Nourishing News" focuses on SFSPs. The articles contained in this issue are: (1) Is Your Summer Food Program Financially Fit? (Jean Zaske); (2) Keeping the…

  7. Effectiveness of Mentoring Program Practices. Research in Action. Issue 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, David L.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on mentoring program practices in relation to issues of effectiveness, while recognizing that implications for program quality conceptualized more broadly is a key concern in need of greater investigation. The author provides an overview of selected conceptual and methodological issues involved with identification of…

  8. Fusion Canada issue 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are Canada-ITER contributions, NET Fuel Processing Loop, Bilateral Meeting for Canada-Europe, report from Tokamak de Varennes and a report from the University of Toronto on materials research for Fusion Reactors. 3 figs

  9. Fusion Canada issue 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are CFFTP highlights on the Karlsruhe Isotope Separation System, a report on ITER tritium process systems, an experimental update on Tokamak de Varennes and Canada-U.S. bilateral technical collaboration topics. 2 figs

  10. Fusion Canada issue 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the 1996 IAEA Fusion Conference site, operations at the Tokamak de Varennes including divertor pumping of impurities and pumping of carbon monoxide and methane, a discussion of the CFFTP and it's role. 1 fig

  11. Fusion Canada issue 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Europe proposes Canada`s participation in ITER, tritium for JET, CCFM/TdeV-Tokamak helium pumping and TdeV update, ITER-related R and D at CFFTP, ITER Deputy Director visits Canada, NFP Director to Chair IFRC, Award for Akira Hirose. 3 figs.

  12. Fusion Canada issue 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-11-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on availability of Canadian Tritium, an ITER update, a CCFM update on Tokamak and the new team organization, an international report on Fusion in Canada and a Laser Fusion Project at the University of Toronto. 3 figs.

  13. Fusion Canada issue 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue a bi-lateral meeting between Canada and Japan, water and hydrogen detritiation, in-situ tokamak surface analysis, an update of CCFM/TdeV and tritium accounting Industry guidance in Fusion, fast probe for plasma-surface interaction. 4 figs

  14. Fusion Canada issue 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the 1996 IAEA Fusion Conference site, operations at the Tokamak de Varennes including divertor pumping of impurities and pumping of carbon monoxide and methane, a discussion of the CFFTP and it`s role. 1 fig.

  15. Fusion Canada issue 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-01-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Ontario Hydro`s contract for tritium supply from Germany, a CCFM update on plasma biasing, divertor operation, radiofrequency plasma current drive and the plasma heating system for the Tokamak de Varennes, and an agreement for ITER engineering design activities. 5 figs.

  16. Fusion Canada issue 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are Canada-ITER contributions, NET Fuel Processing Loop, Bilateral Meeting for Canada-Europe, report from Tokamak de Varennes and a report from the University of Toronto on materials research for Fusion Reactors. 3 figs.

  17. Fusion Canada issue 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Europe proposes Canada's participation in ITER, tritium for JET, CCFM/TdeV-Tokamak helium pumping and TdeV update, ITER-related R and D at CFFTP, ITER Deputy Director visits Canada, NFP Director to Chair IFRC, Award for Akira Hirose. 3 figs

  18. Fusion Canada issue 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are CFFTP highlights on the Karlsruhe Isotope Separation System, a report on ITER tritium process systems, an experimental update on Tokamak de Varennes and Canada-U.S. bilateral technical collaboration topics. 2 figs.

  19. Fusion Canada issue 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue tritium supply for Japanese research, Canada to host the 1995 IAEA Conference on Tritium, studies on the tokamak divertor and edge plasma studies, a tritium field release study, erosion studies on plasma facing materials, G. Pacher returns to CCFM and an update on CCFM/TdeV

  20. Fusion Canada issue 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Darlington`s Tritium Removal Facility, work at universities on Deuterium Diffusivity in Beryllium, Fusion Studies, confinement research and the operation of divertors at Tokamak de Varennes. 5 figs.

  1. Fusion Canada issue 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue a bi-lateral meeting between Canada and Japan, water and hydrogen detritiation, in-situ tokamak surface analysis, an update of CCFM/TdeV and tritium accounting Industry guidance in Fusion, fast probe for plasma-surface interaction. 4 figs.

  2. Fusion Canada issue 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on availability of Canadian Tritium, an ITER update, a CCFM update on Tokamak and the new team organization, an international report on Fusion in Canada and a Laser Fusion Project at the University of Toronto. 3 figs

  3. Fusion Canada issue 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on a fusion cooperation agreement between Japan and Canada, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on plasma biasing experiments and boronization tests and a collaboration between Canada and the U.S. on a compact toroid fuelling gun. 4 figs

  4. Fusion Canada issue 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Darlington's Tritium Removal Facility, work at universities on Deuterium Diffusivity in Beryllium, Fusion Studies, confinement research and the operation of divertors at Tokamak de Varennes. 5 figs

  5. Fusion Canada issue 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Ontario Hydro's contract for tritium supply from Germany, a CCFM update on plasma biasing, divertor operation, radiofrequency plasma current drive and the plasma heating system for the Tokamak de Varennes, and an agreement for ITER engineering design activities. 5 figs

  6. Potential off-normal events and associated radiological source terms for the compact ignition tokamak: Fusion Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Lyon, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), the latest step in the United States program to develop the commercial application of fusion power, is designed as the first fusion device to achieve ignition conditions. It is to be constructed near Princeton, New Jersey on the site of the existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). To address the environmental impact and public safety concerns, a preliminary analysis was performed of potential off-normal radiological releases. Operational occurrences, natural phenomena, accidents with external origins, and accidents external to the PPPL site were considered as potential sources for off-normal events. Based on an initial screening, events were selected for preliminary analysis. Included in these events were tritium releases from the tritium delivery and recovery system, tritium releases from the torus, releases of activated nitrogen from the test cell or cryostat, seismic events, and shipping accidents. In each case, the design considerations related to the event were reviewed and the release scenarios discussed. Because of the complexity of some of the proposed safety systems, in some cases event trees were used to describe the accident scenarios. For each scenario, the probability was estimated as well as the release magnitude, isotope, chemical form, and release mode. 10 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Accelerator technology in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustom, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    This article presents the similarities in the technology required for high energy accelerators and tokamak fusion devices. The tokamak devices and R and D programs described in the text represent only a fraction of the total fusion program. The technological barriers to producing successful, economical tokamak fusion power plants are as many as the plasma physics problems to be overcome. With the present emphasis on energy problems in this country and elsewhere, it is very likely that fusion technology related R and D programs will vigorously continue; and since high energy accelerator technology has so much in common with fusion technology, more scientists from the accelerator community are likely to be attracted to fusion problems

  8. Teaching Global Issues in an Undergraduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapalska, Alina M.; Wingrove-Haugland, Erik; LaMonica, Christopher; Rivero, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    In preparing cadets to be officers, the U.S. Coast Guard Academy (CGA) is committed to developing "the whole person." CGA has increasingly developed program-specific ways to achieve educational goals and learning outcomes. While character development and ethical education have long been important learning outcomes, today's CGA curriculum…

  9. 75 FR 34805 - Program Integrity Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant (National Smart Grant) Programs. DATES: We must receive your... Association of College and University Business Officers, representing business officers. Val Meyers, Michigan... identifying and handling test score abnormalities, ensuring the integrity of the testing environment, and...

  10. Language Issues in Mobile Program Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    primitives for instance synchronous operations Nondeterminism and Privacy Now suppose we introduce nondeterminism via a simple concurrent language...code setting is that the only observable events are those that can be observed from within a mobile program using language primitives and any host...Possibilistic NI is given in It uses a main thread and two triggered threads each with a busy wait loop implementing a semaphore to copy every bit of

  11. High-heat tank safety issue resolution program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, O.S.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program plan is to provide a guide for selecting corrective actions that will mitigate and/or remediate the high-heat waste tank safety issue for single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106. This program plan also outlines the logic for selecting approaches and tasks to mitigate and resolve the high-heat safety issue. The identified safety issue for high-heat tank 241-C-106 involves the potential release of nuclear waste to the environment as the result of heat-induced structural damage to the tank's concrete, if forced cooling is interrupted for extended periods. Currently, forced ventilation with added water to promote thermal conductivity and evaporation cooling is used to cool the waste. At this time, the only viable solution identified to resolve this safety issue is the removal of heat generating waste in the tank. This solution is being aggressively pursued as the permanent solution to this safety issue and also to support the present waste retrieval plan. Tank 241-C-106 has been selected as the first SST for retrieval. The program plan has three parts. The first part establishes program objectives and defines safety issues, drivers, and resolution criteria and strategy. The second part evaluates the high-heat safety issue and its mitigation and remediation methods and alternatives according to resolution logic. The third part identifies major tasks and alternatives for mitigation and resolution of the safety issue. Selected tasks and best-estimate schedules are also summarized in the program plan

  12. Plea for stellarator funding raps tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, M.

    1992-01-01

    The funding crunch in magnetic confinement fusion development has moved the editor of a largely technical publication to speak out on a policy issue. James A. Rome, who edits Stellarator News from the Fusion Energy Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, wrote an editorial that appeared on the front page of the May 1992 issue. It was titled open-quotes The US Stellarator Program: A Time for Renewal,close quotes and while it focused chiefly on that subject (and lamented the lack of funding for the operation of the existing ATF stellarator at Oak Ridge), it also cited some of the problems inherent in the mainline MCF approach--the tokamak--and stated that if the money can be found for further tokamak design upgrades, it should also be found for stellarators. Rome wrote, open-quotes There is growing recognition in the US, and elsewhere, that the conventional tokamak does not extrapolate to a commercially competitive energy source except with very high field coils ( 1000 MWe).close quotes He pointed up open-quotes the difficulty of simultaneously satisfying conflicting tokamak requirements for efficient current drive, high bootstrap-current fraction, complete avoidance of disruptions, adequate beta limits, and edge-plasma properties compatible with improved (H-mode) confinement and acceptable erosion of divertor plates.close quotes He then called for support for the stellarator as open-quotes the only concept that has performance comparable to that achieved in tokamaks without the plasma-current-related limitations listed above.close quotes

  13. ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Embrechts, M.

    1990-07-01

    This is a status report on technical progress relative to the tasks identified for the fifth year of Grant No. FG02-85-ER52118. The ARIES tokamak reactor study is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of the tokamak as an attractive fusion reactor with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The ARIES study is being coordinated by UCLA and involves a number of institutions, including RPI. The RPI group has been pursuing the following areas of research in the context of the ARIES-I design effort: MHD equilibrium and stability analyses; plasma-edge modeling and blanket materials issues. Progress in these areas is summarized herein

  14. Federal Tax Issues Raised by International Study Abroad Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Bertrand M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Identifies and describes tax issues raised by study abroad programs and suggests steps that a college or university can take to minimize or eliminate adverse U.S. and foreign tax exposure to both itself and its employees. (EV)

  15. Continuous tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-04-01

    A tokamak configuration is proposed that permits the rapid replacement of a plasma discharge in a ''burn'' chamber by another one in a time scale much shorter than the elementary thermal time constant of the chamber first wall. With respect to the chamber, the effective duty cycle factor can thus be made arbitrarily close to unity minimizing the cyclic thermal stress in the first wall. At least one plasma discharge always exists in the new tokamak configuration, hence, a continuous tokamak. By incorporating adiabatic toroidal compression, configurations of continuous tokamak compressors are introduced. To operate continuous tokamaks, it is necessary to introduce the concept of mixed poloidal field coils, which spatially groups all the poloidal field coils into three sets, all contributing simultaneously to inducing the plasma current and maintaining the proper plasma shape and position. Preliminary numerical calculations of axisymmetric MHD equilibria in continuous tokamaks indicate the feasibility of their continued plasma operation. Advanced concepts of continuous tokamaks to reduce the topological complexity and to allow the burn plasma aspect ratio to decrease for increased beta are then suggested

  16. Advanced commercial tokamak study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, S.L.; Dabiri, A.E.; Keeton, D.C.; Brown, T.G.; Bussell, G.T.

    1985-12-01

    Advanced commercial tokamak studies were performed by the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) as a participant in the Tokamak Power Systems Studies (TPSS) project coordinated by the Office of Fusion Energy. The FEDC studies addressed the issues of tokamak reactor cost, size, and complexity. A scoping study model was developed to determine the effect of beta on tokamak economics, and it was found that a competitive cost of electricity could be achieved at a beta of 10 to 15%. The implications of operating at a beta of up to 25% were also addressed. It was found that the economics of fusion, like those of fission, improve as unit size increases. However, small units were found to be competitive as elements of a multiplex plant, provided that unit cost and maintenance time reductions are realized for the small units. The modular tokamak configuration combined several new approaches to develop a less complex and lower cost reactor. The modular design combines the toroidal field coil with the reactor structure, locates the primary vacuum boundary at the reactor cell wall, and uses a vertical assembly and maintenance approach. 12 refs., 19 figs

  17. Neutron issues in the JANUS mouse program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnes, B.A.; Grahn, D.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, the JANUS program in the Biological and Medical Research Division at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has compiled a database on the response of both sexes of an F 1 hybrid mouse, the B6CF 1 (C57BL/6 x BALB/c), to external whole- body irradiation by 60 Co γ-rays and fission neutrons. Three basic patterns of exposure for both neutrons and γ-rays have been investigated: single exposures, 24 equal once-weekly exposures, and 60 equal once-weekly exposures. All irradiations were terminated at predetermined total doses, with dose calculated in centigrays at the midline of the mouse. Three endpoints will be discussed in this paper: (1) life shortening, (2) a point estimate for cumulative mortality, and (3) the hazard function. Life shortening is used as an analysis endpoint because it summarizes, in a single index, the integrated effect of all injuries accumulated by an organism. Histopathological analyses of the mice used in the ANL studies have indicated that 85% of the deaths were caused by neoplasms. Connective tissue tumors were the dominant tumor in the B6CF 1 mouse, with tumors of lymphoreticular origin accounting for approximately 80% of this class. The latter two endpoints will therefore be used to describe the life table experience of mice dying from the lymphoreticular class of tumors. Dose-response models will be applied to the three endpoints in order to describe the response function for neutron exposures, evaluate the effect of dose range and pattern of exposure on the response function for neutrons, and provide a set of neutron relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of the ANL database. 25 refs

  18. Overview of recent experimental results from the DIII-D advanced tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of DIII-D Advanced Tokamak (AT) experiments are to investigate and optimize the upper limits of energy confinement and MHD stability in a tokamak plasma, and to simultaneously maximize the fraction of non-inductive current drive. Significant overall progress has been made in the past 2 years, as the performance figure of merit β N H 89P of 9 has been achieved in ELMing H-mode for over 16 τ E without sawteeth. We also operated at β N ∼7 for over 35 τ E or 3 τ R , with the duration limited by hardware. Real-time feedback control of β (at 95% of the stability boundary), optimizing the plasma shape (e.g., δ, divertor strike- and X-point, double/single null balance), and particle control (n e /n GW ∼0.3, Z eff N H 89P of 7. The QDB regime has been obtained to date only with counter neutral beam injection. Further modification and control of internal transport barriers (ITBs) has also been demonstrated with impurity injection (broader barrier), pellets, and ECH (strong electron barrier). The new Divertor-2000, a key ingredient in all these discharges, provides effective density, impurity and heat flux control in the high-triangularity plasma shapes. Discharges at n e /n GW ∼1.4 have been obtained with gas puffing by maintaining the edge pedestal pressure; this operation is easier with Divertor-2000. We are developing several other tools required for AT operation, including real-time feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) with external coils, and control of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) with electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). (author)

  19. Study of the aeraulic re-suspension applied to the dust issue in the future ITER tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rondeau, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    In ITER, a loss of vacuum accident is likely to re-suspend particles produced and deposited on the torus walls. The thesis purpose is to provide reliable experimental data to develop and validate a re-suspension model, taking into account the low pressure and predicting the amount of particles mobilized during such event. Experiments were carried out as a function of key parameters - particle diameter, friction velocity and density of the atmosphere - entering in the re-suspension mechanism. The size distribution of tungsten particles produced in tokamaks shows diameters from 0.1 to 10 μm. The experimental data of tungsten particle monolayer deposits re-suspension are in good agreement with the Rock'n Roll model when the particles are only mobilised by the fluid. However, a mobilisation of fine particles by clustering, no taken into account in re-suspension models, was highlighted. My experiments have also revealed the importance of the multilayers deposit structure (porosity and thickness) in the re-suspension mechanism with, here again, a mobilisation by particle clustering. The effect of low pressure in the re-suspension mechanism was studied between 10 and 1,000 mbar and shows a friction reduction in the airflow forces at low pressure. Finally, measurements of the MES phenomenon kinetics highlighted three distinct regions with a short-term effect, a long-term effect and a transition region which must be taken into account in a MES calculation. (author)

  20. The Tokamak IST-TOK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.; Manso, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    A small tokamak is under construction at the Portuguese Technical Superior Institute. The main objective is to create a home based laboratory in which an independent scientific program might be developed. (L.C.J.A.). 14 refs, 6 figs

  1. International service learning programs: ethical issues and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisch, Rebecca A

    2011-08-01

    Inequities in global health are increasingly of interest to health care providers in developed countries. In response, many academic healthcare programs have begun to offer international service learning programs. Participants in these programs are motivated by ethical principles, but this type of work presents significant ethical challenges, and no formalized ethical guidelines for these activities exist. In this paper the ethical issues presented by international service learning programs are described and recommendations are made for how academic healthcare programs can carry out international service learning programs in a way that minimizes ethical conflicts and maximizes benefits for all stakeholders. Issues related to project sustainability and community involvement are emphasized. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported

  3. International tokamak reactor conceptual design overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) Workshop is an unique collaborative effort among Euratom, Japan, the USA and the USSR, under the auspices of the IAEA, to assess, define, design, construct and operate the next major experiment in the World Tokamak Program beyond the TFTR, JET, JT-60, T-15 generation. During the Zero-Phase (1979), a technical data base assessment was performed, leading to a positive assessment of feasibility. During Phase-I (1/80-6/81), a conceptual design was developed to define the concept. The programmatic objectives are that INTOR should: (1) be the maximum reasonable step beyond the TFTR, JET, JT-60, T-15 generation of tokamaks, (2) demonstrate the plasma performance required for tokamak DEMOs, (3) test the development and integration into a reactor system of those technologies required for a DEMO, (4) serve as a test facility for blanket, tritium production, materials, and plasma engineering technology, (5) test fusion reactor component reliability, (6) test the maintainability of a fusion reactor, and (7) test the factors affecting the reliability, safety and environmental acceptability of a fusion reactor. A conceptual design has been developed to define a device which is consistent with these objectives. The design concept could, with a reasonable degree of confidence, be developed into a workable engineering design of a tokamak that met the performance objectives of INTOR. There is some margin in the design to allow for uncertainty. While design solutions have been found for all of the critical issues, the overall design may not yet be optimal. (author)

  4. ORNL TNS Program: plasma engineering considerations and innovations for a medium field tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Rome, J.A.; Uckan, N.A.

    1977-12-01

    Recent plasma engineering studies have ascertained a viable concept for The Next Step (TNS) reactor based on medium toroidal fields between 4 T and 7 T at the plasma center, plasma anti β values up to 10%, and averaged densities between 0.6 x 10 14 cm -3 and 2.5 x 10 14 cm -3 . Plasma engineering innovations that can substantially reduce the size, cost, and complexity of the TNS reactor have been explored and are summarized. It is shown that the previously anticipated requirement of high pellet velocities can be substantially reduced; the toroidal field (TF) ripple requirements may be relaxed to reduce the number of TF coils and improve machine access; hybrid equilibrium field (EF) coils have been shown to require building only small interior coils and to reduce the power supply required by the exterior coils; proper approaches of microwave plasma preheating may reduce the peak loop voltage for start-up by an order of magnitude. The medium-field TNS reactor concepts and the plasma engineering innovations discussed should be applicable to other designs of tokamak reactors; some of the suggested innovations will be tested in upcoming experiments

  5. Effect of generic issues program on improving safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fard, M. R.; Kauffman, J. V.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) identifies (by its assessment of plant operation) certain issues involving public health and safety, the common defense and security, or the environment that could affect multiple entities under NRC jurisdiction. The Generic Issues Program (GIP) addresses the resolution of these Generic Issues (GIs). The resolution of these issues may involve new or revised rules, new or revised guidance, or revised interpretation of rules or guidance that affect nuclear power plant licensees, nuclear material certificate holders, or holders of other regulatory approvals. U.S. NRC provides information related to the past and ongoing GIP activities to the general public by the use of three main resources, namely NUREG-0933, 'Resolution of Generic Safety Issues, ' Generic Issues Management Control System (GIMCS), and GIP public web page. GIP information resources provide information such as historical information on resolved GIs, current status of the open GIs, policy documents, program procedures, GIP annual and quarterly reports and the process to contact GIP and propose a GI This paper provides an overview of the GIP and several examples of safety improvements resulting from the resolution of GIs. In addition, the paper provides a brief discussion of a few recent GIs to illustrate how the program functions to improve safety. (authors)

  6. Nuclear weapons modernization: Plans, programs, and issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Amy F.

    2017-11-01

    The United States is currently recapitalizing each delivery system in its "nuclear triad" and refurbishing many of the warheads carried by those systems. The plans for these modernization programs have raised a number of questions, both within Congress and among analysts in the nuclear weapons and arms control communities, about the costs associated with the programs and the need to recapitalize each leg of the triad at the same time. This paper covers four distinct issues. It begins with a brief review of the planned modernization programs, then addresses questions about why the United States is pursuing all of these modernization programs at this time. It then reviews the debate about how much these modernization programs are likely to cost in the next decade and considers possible changes that might reduce the cost. It concludes with some comments about congressional views on the modernization programs and prospects for continuing congressional support in the coming years.

  7. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J.G.; Berni, L.A.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Ueda, M.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J.; Barbosa, L.F.W.; Patire Junior, H.; The high-power microwave sources group

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  8. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] (and others)

    2003-07-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  9. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J.G.; Berni, L.A.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Ueda, M.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma; Barbosa, L.F.W. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Mecanica Espacial e Controle; The high-power microwave sources group

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  10. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes

    2003-01-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  11. LIDAR Thomson scattering for advanced tokamaks. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Nilson, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    The LIDAR Thomson Scattering for Advanced Tokamaks project made a valuable contribution by combining LLNL expertise from the MFE Program: tokamak design and diagnostics, and the ICF Program and Physics Dept.: short-pulse lasers and fast streak cameras. This multidisciplinary group evaluated issues involved in achieving a factor of 20 higher high spatial resolution (to as small as 2-3 mm) from the present state of the art in LIDAR Thomson scattering, and developed conceptual designs to apply LIDAR Thomson scattering to three tokamaks: Upgraded divertor measurements in the existing DIII-D tokamak; Both core and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering in the proposed (now cancelled) TPX; and core, edge, and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering on the presently planned International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER. Other issues were evaluated in addition to the time response required for a few millimeter spatial resolution. These include the optimum wavelength, 100 Hz operation of the laser and detectors, minimizing stray light - always the Achilles heel of Thomson scattering, and time dispersion in optics that could prevent good spatial resolution. Innovative features of our work included: custom short pulsed laser concepts to meet specific requirements, use of a prism spectrometer to maintain a constant optical path length for high temporal and spatial resolution, the concept of a laser focus outside the plasma to ionize gas and form an external fiducial to use in locating the plasma edge as well as to spread the laser energy over a large enough area of the inner wall to avoid laser ablation of wall material, an improved concept for cleaning windows between shots by means of laser ablation, and the identification of a new physics issue - nonlinear effects near a laser focus which could perturb the plasma density and temperature that are to be measured

  12. Heavy-section steel technology program: Fracture issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    Large-scale fracture mechanics tests have resulted in the identification of a number of fracture technology issues. Identification of additional issues has come from the reactor vessel materials irradiation test program and from reactor operating experience. This paper provides a review of fracture issues with an emphasis on their potential impact on a reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock (PTS) analysis. Mixed mode crack propagation emerges as a major issue, due in large measure to the poor performance of existing models for the prediction of ductile tearing. Rectification of ductile tearing technology deficiencies may require extending the technology to include a more complete treatment of stress state and loading history effects. The effect of cladding on vessel fracture remains uncertain to the point that it is not possible to determine at this time if the net effect will be positive or negative. Enhanced fracture toughness for shallow flaws has been demonstrated for low-strength structural steels. Demonstration of a similar effect in reactor pressure vessel steels could have a significant beneficial effect on the probabilistic analysis of reactor vessel fracture. Further development of existing fracture mechanics models and concepts is required to meet the special requirements for fracture evaluation of circumferential flaws in the welds of ring-forged vessels. Fracture technology advances required to address the issues discussed in this paper are the major objective for the ongoing Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at ORNL

  13. Heavy-Section Steel Technology program fracture issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    Large scale fracture mechanics tests have resulted in the identification of a number of fracture technology issues. Identification of additional issues has come from the reactor vessel materials irradiation test program and from reactor operating experience. This paper provides a review of fracture issues with an emphasis on their potential impact on a reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock (PTS) analysis. Mixed mode crack propagation emerges as a major issue, due in large measure to the poor performance of existing models for the prediction of ductile tearing. Rectification of ductile tearing technology deficiencies may require extending the technology to include a more complete treatment of stress state and loading history effects. The effect of cladding on vessel fracture remains uncertain to the point that it is not possible to determine at this time if the net effect will be positive or negative. Enhanced fracture toughness for shallow flaws has been demonstrated for low strength structural steels. Demonstration of a similar effect in reactor pressure vessel steels could have a significant beneficial effect on the probabilistic analysis of reactor vessel fracture. Further development of existing fracture mechanics models and concepts is required to meet the special requirements for fracture evaluation of circumferential flaws in the welds of ring forged vessels. Fracture technology advances required to address the issues discussed in this paper are the major objective for the ongoing Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at ORNL. 24 refs., 18 figs

  14. Tokamak COMPASS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řípa, Milan; Křenek, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2011), s. 32-34 ISSN 1210-4612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : fusion * tokamak * Compass * Golem * Institute of Plasma Physics AVCR v.v * NBI * diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  15. Program plan for the resolution of tank vapor issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of the priorities, logic, work breakdown structure (WBS), task descriptions, and program milestones required for the resolution of tank vapor issues associated with the single-shell tanks (SST) and double-shell tanks (DST). The primary objective of this plan is to determine whether a health (personnel exposure) and/or safety (flammability) hazard exists. This plan is focused upon one waste tank, 241-C-103, but contains all elements required to bring the vapor issues to resolution

  16. Initial DEMO tokamak design configuration studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Christian, E-mail: christian.bachmann@efda.org [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aiello, G. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R. [ENEA/CREATE, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Arbeiter, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Aubert, J. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Boccaccini, L.; Carloni, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Federici, G. [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Kovari, M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Li Puma, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Loving, A. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maione, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Mattei, M. [ENEA/CREATE, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Mazzone, G. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Meszaros, B. [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Riccardo, V. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A definition of main DEMO requirements. • A description of the DEMO tokamak design configuration. • A description of issues yet to be solved. - Abstract: To prepare the DEMO conceptual design phase a number of physics and engineering assessments were carried out in recent years in the frame of EFDA concluding in an initial design configuration of a DEMO tokamak. This paper gives an insight into the identified engineering requirements and constraints and describes their impact on the selection of the technologies and design principles of the main tokamak components. The EU DEMO program aims at making best use of the technologies developed for ITER (e.g., magnets, vessel, cryostat, and to some degree also the divertor). However, other systems in particular the breeding blanket require design solutions and advanced technologies that will only partially be tested in ITER. The main differences from ITER include the requirement to breed, to extract, to process and to recycle the tritium needed for plasma operation, the two orders of magnitude larger lifetime neutron fluence, the consequent radiation dose levels, which limit remote maintenance options, and the requirement to use low-activation steel for in-vessel components that also must operate at high temperature for efficient energy conversion.

  17. Workplace wellness programs in Canada: an exploration of key issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Erin; MacKinnon, Neil J

    2008-01-01

    Faced with the reality of rising health costs, Canadian employers are thinking beyond traditional notions of responsibility for employee health and have begun to embrace Workplace Wellness Programs (WWPs). This article investigates the critical issues of WWPs in the Canadian context from the perspective of key stakeholders. Using a combination of literature and key informant interviews, seven key themes are presented along with recommendations for wider implementation of WWPs in Canada.

  18. Interfaith Program for Public Awareness of Nuclear Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    Planning for the Interfaith Progam for Public Awareness of Nuclear Issues (IPPANI) began at the time of the Falkland Islands crisis. At that time representatives of certain of the faith groups in Toronto became concerned about the moral and ethical implications of Canada's export of fuel for a CANDU nuclear generating plant in Argentina. In order to accomplish its goals, the Planning Committee devised a program to provide unbiased input to the faith groups' deliberations on the ethical and moral issues involved in the nuclear debate. The development of a fair set of questions was aided by obtaining advice from the Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA), and from Energy Probe and others. The work of preparing a suitable agenda was completed early in 1984. Its result was embodied in appendices to the public document promoting the program, which is appended to this report. Invitations were sent to over six hundred individuals and organizations to appear before the panelists as 'presenters'. The resulting invitation list included spokespeople for both 'pro' and 'anti' nuclear positions on each of the three topics, as well as some who were found to be 'in the middle'. The three major topics were domestic nuclear issues, international trade and military uses of nuclear materials and technology. The next task of the Planning Committee is that of embodying the process and its results in an educational program for the supplementary and parochial school systems. The production of this book is the first step in that task

  19. Enhanced Confinement Scenarios Without Large Edge Localized Modes in Tokamaks: Control, Performance, and Extrapolability Issues for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingi, R [PPPL

    2014-07-01

    Large edge localized modes (ELMs) typically accompany good H-mode confinement in fusion devices, but can present problems for plasma facing components because of high transient heat loads. Here the range of techniques for ELM control deployed in fusion devices is reviewed. The two baseline strategies in the ITER baseline design are emphasized: rapid ELM triggering and peak heat flux control via pellet injection, and the use of magnetic perturbations to suppress or mitigate ELMs. While both of these techniques are moderately well developed, with reasonable physical bases for projecting to ITER, differing observations between multiple devices are also discussed to highlight the needed community R & D. In addition, recent progress in ELM-free regimes, namely Quiescent H-mode, I-mode, and Enhanced Pedestal H-mode is reviewed, and open questions for extrapolability are discussed. Finally progress and outstanding issues in alternate ELM control techniques are reviewed: supersonic molecular beam injection, edge electron cyclotron heating, lower hybrid heating and/or current drive, controlled periodic jogs of the vertical centroid position, ELM pace-making via periodic magnetic perturbations, ELM elimination with lithium wall conditioning, and naturally occurring small ELM regimes.

  20. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D 3 He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions

  1. Demonstration tokamak power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.; Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Mattas, R.; Smith, D.L.; DeFreece, D.; Morgan, G.D.; Trachsel, C.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design for a tokamak demonstration power plant (DEMO) was developed. A large part of the study focused on examining the key issues and identifying the R and D needs for: (1) current drive for steady-state operation, (2) impurity control and exhaust, (3) tritium breeding blanket, and (4) reactor configuration and maintenance. Impurity control and exhaust will not be covered in this paper but is discussed in another paper in these proceedings, entitled Key Issues of FED/INTOR Impurity Control System

  2. Fusion Canada issue 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Canada's plans to participate in the Engineering Design Activities (EDA), bilateral meetings with Canada and the U.S., committee meeting with Canada-Europe, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on Plasma Biasing experiments and boronized graphite tests, fusion materials research at the University of Toronto using a dual beam accelerator and a review of the CFFTP and the CCFM. 2 figs

  3. Critical Issues Forum: A multidisciplinary educational program integrating computer technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, R.J.; Robertson, B.; Jacobs, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The Critical Issues Forum (CIF) funded by the US Department of Energy is a collaborative effort between the Science Education Team of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and New Mexico high schools to improve science education throughout the state of New Mexico as well as nationally. By creating an education relationship between the LANL with its unique scientific resources and New Mexico high schools, students and teachers participate in programs that increase not only their science content knowledge but also their critical thinking and problem-solving skills. The CIF program focuses on current, globally oriented topics crucial to the security of not only the US but to that of all nations. The CIF is an academic-year program that involves both teachers and students in the process of seeking solutions for real world concerns. Built around issues tied to LANL`s mission, participating students and teachers are asked to critically investigate and examine the interactions among the political, social, economic, and scientific domains while considering diversity issues that include geopolitical entities and cultural and ethnic groupings. Participants are expected to collaborate through telecommunications during the research phase and participate in a culminating multimedia activity, where they produce and deliver recommendations for the current issues being studied. The CIF was evaluated and found to be an effective approach for teacher professional training, especially in the development of skills for critical thinking and questioning. The CIF contributed to students` ability to integrate diverse disciplinary content about science-related topics and supported teachers in facilitating the understanding of their students using the CIF approach. Networking technology in CIF has been used as an information repository, resource delivery mechanism, and communication medium.

  4. Diagnostics for the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The research program of the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project is concentrated on the study of plasma transport processes. The RTP tokamak is therefore equipped with an extensive set of multichannel diagnostics, including a 19-channel FIR interferometer, a 20-channel heterodyne ECE system, an 80-channel

  5. Update of ZTH physics and design issues and physics goals of ZTH and role in the Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMarco, J.N.

    1990-01-01

    The ZTH construction program is scheduled for completion in December of 1992. Some design features are still amenable to changes directed by new physics or computational information. Numerical results for the ZTH tapered poloidal field gap show that a relatively simple linear taper results in substantial reduction in field error. This design is simpler to manufacture compared with the compound curve predicted by analytical calculations. Also, ongoing analysis of ZT-40M data indicates that the fluctuation levels of magnetic fields and x-rays at high θ (1.7), can be reduced to the fluctuation levels at ''standard'' operational θ (1.4) by changing the winding configuration of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The effect is thought to depend on the shell-like action of the TF coils when they consist of many turns in parallel. Magnetic-field effects, such as field errors, at the unshielded toroidal-field butt-joint gap in the shell can be reduced by this effective external shell. Design implications for installing a second low-current TF coil on ZTH are presented. ZTH has the capability of operating at 4 MA with the addition of power supplies. The projected parameters of ZTH are discussed in the context of various conceptual design. The sensitivity of the conceptual design to the physics results from machines like RFX and ZTH is reviewed. It is shown that the 4 MA ZTH physics results will make a significant advance for the RFP program toward the programmatic RFP fusion goals. Finally, the influence of RFP and tokamak physics on the conceptual design of high mass-power-density (MPD) fusion reactors is investigated through the TITAN and ARIES studies. The confinement characteristics required of these conceptual designs are compared; physics issues are identified that are required to bring the MPD and fusion-power-core of the tokamak designs into coincidence with the RFP designs

  6. Impact of occupational issues on DOE's environmental restoration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.R.; Lesperance, A.M.; Smith, D.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a 30-yr, multi-billion-dollar environmental restoration program for most of the facilities included in its nuclear weapons complex. Long-term planning efforts are under way to identify strategies and approaches for carrying out this extraordinarily complicated task. The DOE has already entered into interagency agreements with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and states for many of its environmental restoration sites. These agreements set legally enforceable deadlines for cleanup activities at these sites. In addition, DOE has made other commitments to Congress and the public regarding its environmental restoration schedule. Thousands of workers will be directly involved in environmental restoration activities at DOE sites. Cleanup activity will be carried out in environments involving potential exposure to highly toxic chemical substances and radionuclides. It is inevitable that occupational safety and health (OSH) issues will become both critical and highly visible to DOE. The OSH issues associated with cleanup activities will likely attract the attention of workers, unions, the media, regulators, and the public. This paper reviews three case studies describing OSH activities in DOE's environmental restoration program. These case studies will help alert DOE officials to ways that various OSH issues should be considered when planning environmental restoration activities. This activity is being coordinated with other DOE work to identify occupational requirements that are applicable to DOE cleanup work

  7. High-speed civil transport issues and technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Marle D.

    1992-01-01

    A strawman program plan is presented, consisting of technology developments and demonstrations required to support the construction of a high-speed civil transport. The plan includes a compilation of technology issues related to the development of a transport. The issues represent technical areas in which research and development are required to allow airframe manufacturers to pursue an HSCT development. The vast majority of technical issues presented require flight demonstrated and validated solutions before a transport development will be undertaken by the industry. The author believes that NASA is the agency best suited to address flight demonstration issues in a concentrated effort. The new Integrated Test Facility at NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility is considered ideally suited to the task of supporting ground validations of proof-of-concept and prototype system demonstrations before night demonstrations. An elaborate ground hardware-in-the-loop (iron bird) simulation supported in this facility provides a viable alternative to developing an expensive fill-scale prototype transport technology demonstrator. Drygen's SR-71 assets, modified appropriately, are a suitable test-bed for supporting flight demonstrations and validations of certain transport technology solutions. A subscale, manned or unmanned flight demonstrator is suitable for flight validation of transport technology solutions, if appropriate structural similarity relationships can be established. The author contends that developing a full-scale prototype transport technology demonstrator is the best alternative to ensuring that a positive decision to develop a transport is reached by the United States aerospace industry.

  8. Employee assistance programs: an employer's guide to emerging liability issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliman, G C; Edwards, E L

    1992-01-01

    Increasing numbers of employers are implementing employee assistance programs (EAPs) designed to assist employees with personal issues that affect their work performance. Studies show that EAPs can dramatically increase employee productivity, but the benefits from EAPs have been accompanied by a less welcome development: lawsuits filed against employers by employees who allege that they suffered harm in the course of obtaining services through their employers' EAPs. Although the potential for liability will always exist, the employer that adheres to certain guidelines will be able to minimize its risk and make its EAP well worth the investment.

  9. The role of the spherical tokamak in clarifying tokamak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, A.W.; Akers, R.J.; Connor, J.W.; Counsell, G.F.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Hender, T.C.; Maddison, G.P.; Martin, T.J.; McClements, K.G.; Roach, C.M.; Robinson, D.C.; Sykes, A.; Valovic, M.; Wilson, H.R.; Fonck, R.J.; Gusev, V.; Kaye, S.M.; Majeski, R.; Peng, Y.-K.M.; Medvedev, S.; Sharapov, S.; Walsh, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The spherical tokamak (ST) provides a unique environment in which to perform complementary and exacting tests of the tokamak physics required for a burning plasma experiment of any aspect ratio, while also having the potential for long-term fusion applications in its own right. New experiments are coming on-line in the UK (MAST), USA (NSTX, Pegasus), Russia (Globus-M), Brazil (ETE) and elsewhere, and the status of these devices will be reported, along with newly-analysed data from START. Those physics issues where the ST provides an opportunity to remove degeneracy in the databases or clarify one's understanding will be emphasized. (author)

  10. TPX tokamak construction management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, D.; Kungl, D.; Seidel, P.; Halfast, C.

    1995-01-01

    A construction management contract normally involves the acquisition of a construction management firm to assist in the design, planning, budget conformance, and coordination of the construction effort. In addition the construction management firm acts as an agent in the awarding of lower tier contracts. The TPX Tokamak Construction Management (TCM) approach differs in that the construction management firm is also directly responsible for the assembly and installation of the tokamak including the design and fabrication of all tooling required for assembly. The Systems Integration Support (SIS) contractor is responsible for the architect-engineering design of ancillary systems, such as heating and cooling, buildings, modifications and site improvements, and a variety of electrical requirements, including switchyards and >4kV power distribution. The TCM will be responsible for the procurement of materials and the installation of the ancillary systems, which can either be performed directly by the TCM or subcontracted to a lower tier subcontractor. Assurance that the TPX tokamak is properly assembled and ready for operation when turned over to the operations team is the primary focus of the construction management effort. To accomplish this a disciplined constructability program will be instituted. The constructability effort will involve the effective and timely integration of construction expertise into the planning, component design, and field operations. Although individual component design groups will provide liaison during the machine assembly operations, the construction management team is responsible for assembly

  11. Draft program plan for TNS: The Next Step after the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Part IV. Program planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, W.B.

    1977-02-01

    In this fourth part of the four-part TNS Draft Program Plan, project engineering concerns are considered. The TNS Project is first broken down into the major time and functional periods of feasibility study, preconceptual design, conceptual design, and line item construction, while the elements of the project are organized into an administrative work breakdown structure. With the aid of these two classifying schemes, the project tasks are described in terms of schedule, estimated cost, type of funding, and proposed type of participant. The initial constraints of completion data, anticipated scientific inputs, and budget procedures are used to develop a two-phase project in which the facilities are authorized first and the device 2 years later. This specific mechanism is fundamental to the construction of the schedule and should be reconsidered when the completion and initiation dates are reformulated

  12. Methanol supply issues for alternative fuels demonstration programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teague, J.M.; Koyama, K.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper surveys issues affecting the supply of fuel-grade methanol for the California Energy Commission's alternative fuels demonstration programs and operations by other public agencies such as transit and school districts. Establishing stable and reasonably priced sources of methanol (in particular) and of alternative fuels generally is essential to their demonstration and commercialization. Development both of vehicle technologies and of fuel supply and distribution are complementary and must proceed in parallel. However, the sequence of scaling up supply and distribution is not necessarily smooth; achievement of volume thresholds in demand and through-put of alternative fuels are marked by different kinds of challenges. Four basic conditions should be met in establishing a fuel supply: (1) it must be price competitive with petroleum-based fuels, at least when accounting for environmental and performance benefits; (2) bulk supply must meet volumes required at each phase; necessitating resilience among suppliers and a means of designating priority for high value users; (3) distribution systems must be reliable, comporting with end users' operational schedules; (4) volatility in prices to the end user for the fuel must be minimal. Current and projected fuel volumes appear to be insufficient to induce necessary economies of scale in production and distribution for fuel use. Despite their benefits, existing programs will suffer absent measures to secure economical fuel supplies. One solution is to develop sources that are dedicated to fuel markets and located within the end-use region

  13. Tokamak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical conditions required for breakeven in thermonuclear fusion are derived, and the early conceptual ideas of magnetic confinement and subsequent development are followed, leading to present-day large scale tokamak experiments. Confinement and diffusion are developed in terms of particle orbits, whilst magnetohydrodynamic stability is discussed from energy considerations. From these ideas are derived the scaling laws that determine the physical size and parameters of this fusion configuration. It becomes clear that additional heating is required. However there are currently several major gaps in our understanding of experiments; the causes of anomalous electron energy loss and the major current disruption, the absence of the 'bootstrap' current and what physics determines the maximum plasma pressure consistent with stability. The understanding of these phenomena is a major challenge to plasma physicists. (author)

  14. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program: Embrittlement issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corwin, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents and the potential for major contamination releases. It is imperative to understand and predict the capabilities and limitations of its integrity. It is particularly vital to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV's fracture resistance which occurs during service, since without that radiation damage it is virtually impossible to postulate a realistic scenario which would result in RPV failure. The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior, and in particular the fracture toughness properties, of typical pressure vessel steels as they relate to light-water reactor pressure-vessel integrity. Results from HSSI studies provide information needed to aid in resolving major regulatory issues facing the USNRC which involve RPV irradiation embrittlement such as pressurized-thermal shock, operating pressure-temperature limits, low-temperature overpressurization, and the specialized problems associated with low upper-shelf (LUS) welds. Taken together the results of these studies also provide guidance and bases for evaluating both the aging behavior and the potential for plant life extension of light-water RPVs. The principal materials examined within the HSSI program are high-copper welds since their postirradiation properties are most frequently limiting in the continued safe operation of commercial RPVs. Embrittlement modeling studies have shown that the time or dose required for the point defect concentrations, which ultimately contribute to irradiation embrittlement, to reach their steady state values can be comparable to the component lifetime or to the duration of an irradiation experiment

  15. Gender: Issues of Power and Equity in Counselor Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Rose Marie

    1996-01-01

    Argues that counselor educators have a responsibility to address gender issues and to find ways that encourage the exploration of these issues. Discusses professional standards and their bearing on gender, proposes models and strategies for incorporating gender issues, outlines a feminist training model, and explores Gender Aware Therapy as a…

  16. Tokamak Systems Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged

  17. The ETE spherical Tokamak project. IAEA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Del Bosco, E.; Berni, L.A.; Ferreira, J.G.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J.; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma]. E-mail: ludwig@plasma.inpe.br

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the historical development of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of October, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  18. Nuclear fusion research at Tokamak Energy Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windridge, Melanie J.; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Kingham, David

    2017-01-01

    Tokamak Energy's approach is close to the mainstream of nuclear fusion, and chooses a spherical tokamak, which is an economically developed form of Tokamak reactor design, as research subjects together with a high-temperature superconducting magnet. In the theoretical prediction, it is said that spherical tokamak can make tokamak reactor's scale compact compared with ITER or DEMO. The dependence of fusion energy multiplication factor on reactor size is small. According to model studies, it has been found that the center coil can be protected from heat and radiation damage even if the neutron shielding is optimized to 35 cm instead of 1 m. As a small tokamak with a high-temperature superconducting magnet, ST25 HTS, it demonstrated in 2015 continuous operation for more than 24 hours as a world record. Currently, this company is constructing a slightly larger ST40 type, and it is scheduled to start operation in 2017. ST40 is designed to demonstrate that it can realize a high magnetic field with a compact size and aims at attaining 8-10 keV (reaching the nuclear fusion reaction temperature at about 100 million degrees). This company will verify the startup and heating technology by the coalescence of spherical tokamak expected to have plasma current of 2 MA, and will also use 2 MW of neutral particle beam heating. In parallel with ST40, it is promoting a development program for high-temperature superconducting magnet. (A.O.)

  19. Internet-Mediated Learning in Public Affairs Programs: Issues and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, Dianne; Reed, B. J.; Rydl, Teri L.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of Internet-mediated learning in public affairs programs identifies issues for faculty, students, and administrators, including intellectual property rights, instructional issues, learning approaches, student expectations, logistics and support, complexity of coordination, and organizational control. (DB)

  20. Robust Sliding Mode Control for Tokamaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Garrido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion has arisen as an alternative energy to avoid carbon dioxide emissions, being the tokamak a promising nuclear fusion reactor that uses a magnetic field to confine plasma in the shape of a torus. However, different kinds of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities may affect tokamak plasma equilibrium, causing severe reduction of particle confinement and leading to plasma disruptions. In this sense, numerous efforts and resources have been devoted to seeking solutions for the different plasma control problems so as to avoid energy confinement time decrements in these devices. In particular, since the growth rate of the vertical instability increases with the internal inductance, lowering the internal inductance is a fundamental issue to address for the elongated plasmas employed within the advanced tokamaks currently under development. In this sense, this paper introduces a lumped parameter numerical model of the tokamak in order to design a novel robust sliding mode controller for the internal inductance using the transformer primary coil as actuator.

  1. EPa`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Exposure issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Three major issues to be dealt with over the next ten years in the exposure assessment field are: consistency in terminology, the impact of computer technology on the choice of data and modeling, and conceptual issues such as the use of time-weighted averages.

  2. Liquid nitrogen cooling considerations of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabiri, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical procedure was developed to estimate the cooldown time between pulses of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) utilizing liquid nitrogen. Fairly good agreement was obtained between the analysis results and those measured in the early fusion experimental devices. The cooldown time between pulses in the CIT is controlled by the energy disposition in the inner leg of the TF coil. A cooldown time of less than one hour is feasible for the CIT if fins are used in the cooling channels. An R and D experimental program is proposed to determine the actual cooldown time between pulses since this would be considered an issue in the conceptual design of the CIT

  3. Usability Issues in the Design of Novice Programming Systems,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-01

    lists this as a design principle for novice programming environments. In traditional compiled languages, beginners are also confused by the need to...programming task external knowledge that might interfere with correct under- standing of the language. Most beginner programming errors can be...language for text editing, but [Curtis 1988] found that a textual pseudocode and graphical flowcharts were both bet- ter than natural language in program

  4. Financing Early Childhood Education Programs: State, Federal, and Local Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustedt, Jason T.; Barnett, W. Steven

    2011-01-01

    The landscape of financing early childhood education in the U.S. is complex. Programs run the gamut from tuition-supported private centers to public programs supported by federal, state, or local funds. Different funding streams are poorly coordinated. The federal government funds several major targeted programs that are available only to specific…

  5. Tokamak devices: towards controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocheris, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Tokamak family is from Soviet Union. These devices were exclusively studied at the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow for more than ten years. The first occidental Tokamak started in 1970 at Princeton. The TFR (Tokamak Fontenay-aux-Roses) was built to be superior to the Russian T4. Tokamak future is now represented by the JET (Joint European Tokamak) [fr

  6. Analysis of Confinement Strategies for a Tokamak Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Christian; Gaillard, Jean-Philippe; Marbach, Gabriel; Cambi, Gilio; Cook, Ian; Johansson, Lise-Lotte; Meyder, Rainer; Mustoe, Julian; Pinna, Tonio

    2001-01-15

    The Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion Power (SEAFP) was performed in the framework of the European fusion program, whose results have already been published. The European Commission decided to continue this program for some identified issues that required development. One of these issues was the analysis and specification of the containment concepts that minimize accidental releases to the environment.To perform such an assessment, a methodology was followed to identify the most challenging accidental sequences in terms of containment integrity.The results of the accident selection and analysis that were performed during the extension of the SEAFP-2 program are given. Preliminary recommendations for the definition of a confinement strategy for tokamak fusion reactors are established.

  7. Analysis of Confinement Strategies for a Tokamak Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Christian; Gaillard, Jean-Philippe; Marbach, Gabriel; Cambi, Gilio; Cook, Ian; Johansson, Lise-Lotte; Meyder, Rainer; Mustoe, Julian; Pinna, Tonio

    2001-01-01

    The Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion Power (SEAFP) was performed in the framework of the European fusion program, whose results have already been published. The European Commission decided to continue this program for some identified issues that required development. One of these issues was the analysis and specification of the containment concepts that minimize accidental releases to the environment.To perform such an assessment, a methodology was followed to identify the most challenging accidental sequences in terms of containment integrity.The results of the accident selection and analysis that were performed during the extension of the SEAFP-2 program are given. Preliminary recommendations for the definition of a confinement strategy for tokamak fusion reactors are established

  8. Field load and displacement boundary condition computer program used for the finite element analysis and design of toroidal field coils in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-06-01

    The design evaluation of toroidal field coils on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Diverter Experiment (PDX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been performed by structural analysis with the finite element method. The technique employed has been simplified with supplementary computer programs that are used to generate the input data for the finite element computer program. Significant automation has been provided by computer codes in three areas of data input. These are the definition of coil geometry by a mesh of node points, the definition of finite elements via the node points and the definition of the node point force/displacement boundary conditions. The computer programs by name that have been used to perform the above functions are PDXNODE, ELEMENT and PDXFORC. The geometric finite element modeling options for toroidal field coils provided by PDXNODE include one-fourth or one-half symmetric sections of circular coils, oval shaped coils or dee-shaped coils with or without a beveled wedging surface. The program ELEMENT which defines the finite elements for input to the finite element computer code can provide considerable time and labor savings when defining the model of coils of non-uniform cross-section or when defining the model of coils whose material properties are different in the R and THETA directions due to the laminations of alternate epoxy and copper windings. The modeling features provided by the program ELEMENT have been used to analyze the PLT and the TFTR toroidal field coils with integral support structures. The computer program named PDXFORC is described. It computes the node point forces in a model of a toroidal field coil from the vector crossproduct of the coil current and the magnetic field. The model can be of one-half or one-fourth symmetry to be consistent with the node model defined by PDXNODE, and the magnetic field is computed from toroidal or poloidal coils

  9. International Trade and Education: Issues and Programs. AACJC Issues Series, No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, James R., Ed.; Sakamoto, Clyde, Ed.

    This technical assistance monograph on international trade education was designed to give college officials insights into programs and services offered by a number of postsecondary institutions; to identify problems experienced by program administrators; and to share the perspectives of leaders in international trade education. First, introductory…

  10. ORNL TNS program: microwave start-up of tokamak plasmas near electron cyclotron and upper hybrid resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Borowski, S.K.

    1977-12-01

    The scenario of toroidal plasma start-up with microwave initiation and heating near the electron cyclotron frequency is suggested and examined here. We assume microwave irradiation from the high field side and an anomalously large absorption of the extraordinary waves near the upper hybrid resonance. The dominant electron energy losses are assumed to be due to magnetic field curvature and parallel drifts, ionization of neutrals, cooling by ions, and radiation by low Z impurities. It is shown by particle and energy balance considerations that electron temperatures around 250 eV and densities of 10 12 to 10 13 cm -3 can be maintained, at least in a narrow region near the upper hybrid resonance, with modest microwave powers in the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX) (120 kW at 28 GHz) and The Next Step (TNS) (0.57 MW at 120 GHz). The loop voltages required for start-up from these initial plasmas are also estimated. It is shown that the loop voltage can be reduced by a factor of five to ten from that for unassisted start-up without an increase in the resistive loss in volt-seconds. If this reduction in loop voltage is verified in the ISX experiments, substantial savings in the cost of power supplies for the ohmic heating (OH) and equilibrium field (EF) coils can be realized in future large tokamaks

  11. Fusion Canada issue 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Canada-Europe Accords: 5 year R and D collaboration for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) AECL is designated to arrange and implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) while EUROTAM is responsible for operating Europe's Fusion R and D programs plus MOU and EDA. The MOU includes tokamaks, plasma physics, fusion technology, fusion fuels and other approaches to fusion energy (as alternatives to tokamaks). STOR-M Tokamak was restarted at the University of Saskatchewan following upgrades to the plasma chamber to accommodate the Compact Toroid (CT) injector. The CT injector has a flexible attachment thus allowing for injection angle adjustments. Real-time video images of a single plasma discharge on TdeV showing that as the plasma density increases, in a linear ramp divertor, the plasma contact with the horizontal plate decreases while contact increases with the oblique plate. Damage-resistant diffractive optical elements (DOE) have been developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research by Gentac Inc. and the National Optics Institute, laser beam homogeniser and laser harmonic separator DOE can also be made using the same technology. Studies using TdeV indicate that a divertor will be able to pump helium from the tokamak with a detached-plasma divertor but helium extraction performance must first be improved, presently the deuterium:helium retention radio-indicates that in order to pump enough helium through a fusion reactor, too much deuterium-tritium fuel would be pumped out. 2 fig

  12. Kentucky Career and Technical Teacher Education Programs/Ongoing Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Ed; Stubbs, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    What is Career and Technical Education (CTE)? How does one identify and recognized strong CTE educational programs? And after one has answers to the first two questions, how does one successfully align CTE teacher education (CTTE) programs across large institutions such as colleges within universities, or in Kentucky's endeavor within universities…

  13. "STOP the Violence": FCCLA Program Tackles School Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "STOP the Violence--Students Taking on Prevention" is a program designed to involve students and address school violence at its core from the peer-to- peer perspective. Developed by members of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), the program empowers young persons to recognize, report, and reduce the potential for youth…

  14. Improvement of the tokamak concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, L

    1994-12-31

    Improvement of the tokamak concept is highly desirable to reduce the size and capital cost of a device able to ignite to increase the plasma pressure, i.e. the power density to reduce the cost of electricity, and to increase the fraction of bootstrap current to render the tokamak compatible with continuous operation. The most important results obtained in this field are summarized, and the options are shown which are still open and explored by the various experiments. Various effects of the plasma shaping are discussed, plasma configurations with both high {beta}{sub N} and H{sub G} are explored, and the issues of stable steady state and of the plasma edge are briefly discussed. (R.P.). 65 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Advanced commercial Tokamak optimization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, R.H.; Berwald, D.H.; Gordon, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Our recent studies have concentrated on developing optimal high beta (bean-shaped plasma) commercial tokamak configurations using TRW's Tokamak Reactor Systems Code (TRSC) with special emphasis on lower net electric power reactors that are more easily deployable. A wide range of issues were investigated in the search for the most economic configuration: fusion power, reactor size, wall load, magnet type, inboard blanket and shield thickness, plasma aspect ratio, and operational β value. The costs and configurations of both steady-state and pulsed reactors were also investigated. Optimal small and large reactor concepts were developed and compared by studying the cost of electricity from single units and from multiplexed units. Multiplexed units appear to have advantages because they share some plant equipment and have lower initial capital investment as compared to larger single units

  16. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yuntao; Wu, Weiyue; Du, Shijun

    2014-01-01

    Provides a systematic introduction to tokamaks in engineering mechanics. Includes design guides based on full mechanical analysis, which makes it possible to accurately predict load capacity and temperature increases. Presents comprehensive information on important design factors involving materials. Covers the latest advances in and up-to-date references on tokamak devices. Numerous examples reinforce the understanding of concepts and provide procedures for design. Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study of mechanical/fusion engineering with a general understanding of tokamak engineering mechanics.

  17. Electrostatic Discharge Issues in International Space Station Program EVAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    EVA activity in the ISS program encounters several dangerous ESD conditions. The ISS program has been aggressive for many years to find ways to mitigate or to eliminate the associated risks. Investments have included: (1) Major mods to EVA tools, suit connectors & analytical tools (2) Floating Potential Measurement Unit (3) Plasma Contactor Units (4) Certification of new ISS flight attitudes (5) Teraflops of computation (6) Thousands of hours of work by scores of specialists (7) Monthly management attention at the highest program levels. The risks are now mitigated to a level that is orders of magnitude safer than prior operations

  18. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yuntao; Du, Shijun

    2013-01-01

    Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study

  19. Advanced Tokamak Stability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linjin

    2015-03-01

    The intention of this book is to introduce advanced tokamak stability theory. We start with the derivation of the Grad-Shafranov equation and the construction of various toroidal flux coordinates. An analytical tokamak equilibrium theory is presented to demonstrate the Shafranov shift and how the toroidal hoop force can be balanced by the application of a vertical magnetic field in tokamaks. In addition to advanced theories, this book also discusses the intuitive physics pictures for various experimentally observed phenomena.

  20. International Population Assistance and Family Planning Programs: Issues for Congress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nowels, Larry; Veillette, Connie

    2006-01-01

    .... international family planning programs. In 1984, controversy arose over U.S. population aid policy when the Reagan Administration introduced restrictions, which became known as the "Mexico City policy...

  1. International Population Assistance and Family Planning Programs: Issues for Congress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blanchfield, Luisa

    2008-01-01

    .... international family planning programs. In 1984, controversy arose over U.S. population aid policy when the Reagan Administration introduced restrictions, which became known as the "Mexico City policy...

  2. Airport Improvement Program (AIP) : reauthorization issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This report discusses the Airport Improvement Program and its complement, the PFC, within the broader context of airport capital development finance.5 After a brief history of federal support for airport construction and improvement, the report descr...

  3. Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms: Economic, Program, and Policy Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hornbeck, J. F

    2007-01-01

    .... This report focuses on the trade adjustment assistance (TAA) program for firms, which provides technical assistance to help them develop strategies to remain competitive in the changing international economy...

  4. Issues Surrounding the Evaluation of Teacher Internship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, D.

    2006-12-01

    Georgia Intern-Fellowships for Teachers (GIFT) is a collaborative effort designed to enhance mathematics and science experiences of Georgia teachers and their students through summer research internships for teachers. By offering business, industry, public science institute and research summer fellowships to teachers, GIFT provides educators with first-hand exposure to the skills and knowledge necessary for the preparation of our future workforce. Since 1991, GIFT has placed middle and high school math, science and technology teachers in over 1100 positions throughout the state. In these fellowships, teachers are involved in cutting edge scientific and engineering research, data analysis, curriculum development and real-world inquiry and problem solving, and create Action Plans to assist them in translating the experience into changed classroom practice. Since 2004, an increasing number of high school students have worked with their teachers in research laboratories. The GIFT program has an advisory board composed of university researchers, business and education leaders. The board members work in various subcommittees assisting the program with areas such as sponsor recruitment, evaluation and long term planning. The evaluation subcommittee has been actively involved in providing direction regarding the evaluation of the GIFT program's impact on teachers and their students. The program recently conducted a survey of its former participants. This presentation will discuss the results of the survey and the challenges associated with program evaluation of teacher internship programs.

  5. Tokamak confinement scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.

    1998-01-01

    The scaling of energy confinement with engineering parameters, such as plasma current and major radius, is important for establishing the size of an ignited fusion device. Tokamaks exhibit a variety of modes of operation with different confinement properties. At present there is no adequate first principles theory to predict tokamak energy confinement and the empirical scaling method is the preferred approach to designing next step tokamaks. This paper reviews a number of robust theoretical concepts, such as dimensional analysis and stability boundaries, which provide a framework for characterising and understanding tokamak confinement and, therefore, generate more confidence in using empirical laws for extrapolation to future devices. (author)

  6. Tokamak concept innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    This document contains the results of the IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Tokamak Concept Innovations held 13-17 January 1986 in Vienna. Although it is the most advanced fusion reactor concept the tokamak is not without its problems. Most of these problems should be solved within the ongoing R and D studies for the next generation of tokamaks. Emphasis for this meeting was placed on innovations that would lead to substantial improvements in a tokamak reactor, even if they involved a radical departure from present thinking

  7. Steady State Advanced Tokamak (SSAT): The mission and the machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.; Goldston, R.; Nevins, B.; Neilson, H.; Shannon, T.; Montgomery, B.

    1992-03-01

    Extending the tokamak concept to the steady state regime and pursuing advances in tokamak physics are important and complementary steps for the magnetic fusion energy program. The required transition away from inductive current drive will provide exciting opportunities for advances in tokamak physics, as well as important impetus to drive advances in fusion technology. Recognizing this, the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee and the US National Energy Strategy identified the development of steady state tokamak physics and technology, and improvements in the tokamak concept, as vital elements in the magnetic fusion energy development plan. Both called for the construction of a steady state tokamak facility to address these plan elements. Advances in physics that produce better confinement and higher pressure limits are required for a similar unit size reactor. Regimes with largely self-driven plasma current are required to permit a steady-state tokamak reactor with acceptable recirculating power. Reliable techniques of disruption control will be needed to achieve the availability goals of an economic reactor. Thus the central role of this new tokamak facility is to point the way to a more attractive demonstration reactor (DEMO) than the present data base would support. To meet the challenges, we propose a new ''Steady State Advanced Tokamak'' (SSAT) facility that would develop and demonstrate optimized steady state tokamak operating mode. While other tokamaks in the world program employ superconducting toroidal field coils, SSAT would be the first major tokamak to operate with a fully superconducting coil set in the elongated, divertor geometry planned for ITER and DEMO

  8. Fusion Research Center, theory program. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The Texas FRC theory program is directed primarily toward understanding the initiation, heating, and confinement of tokamak plasmas. It supports and complements the experimental programs on the TEXT and PRETEXT devices, as well as providing information generally applicable to the national tokamak program. A significant fraction of the Center's work has been carried out in collaboration with, or as a part of, the program of the Institute for Fusion Studies (IFS). During the past twelve months, 14 FRC theory reports and 12 IFS reports with partial FRC support have been issued

  9. BENTO buffer development program in Finland - Key issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autio, J.; Korkiala-Tanttu, L.; Vaehaenen, M.; Koskinen, K.; Korkeakoski, P.; Haapala, K.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Posiva launched a programme, BENTO, to develop technology of using bentonite in spent nuclear fuel repositories. The main purpose of the BENTO programme is to produce buffer designs and verify that they fulfil the requirements, especially safety requirements. To achieve this objective, resources and the level of expertise and know-how has to be increased. There are several uncertainties related to the functioning of the buffer components at present. An issue is defined as being significant if there is sufficient uncertainty that the buffer system might not fulfil the requirements because of the issue. These significant issues need to be resolved in order to develop a proper design and to verify the fulfilment of the requirements. The list of significant issues may change with time. Therefore it is crucial to develop adequate expertise, know-how and laboratory facilities to manage the changes. Moreover, there is confidence that by solving the open issues a defendable construction license application can be submitted in 2012. The basic nature of the programme is a combination of material and process research with the design and manufacturing of buffer components to produce feasible buffer design with proven long-term functional properties. The development work carried out under BENTO-programme has been initially divided into four different projects. During the course of work the number of projects and their content can be adjusted. The four BENTO projects are: 1. Manufacturing (MANU); 2. Design (DESI); 3. Modelling (MODE); 4. Material and Process Research (MARE). BENTO programme aims at producing feasible buffer designs which fulfil the requirements specified in Posiva's requirement management system. The designs are produced in DESI-project by following the design development scheme which starts from specification of design basis and ends in documented detailed designs and therefore DESIgn is specified as one

  10. Options for an ignited tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.

    1984-02-01

    It is expected that the next phase of the fusion program will involve a tokamak with the goals of providing an ignited plasma for pulses of hundreds of seconds. A simple model is described in this memorandum which establishes the physics conditions for such a self-sustaining plasma, for given ion and electron thermal diffusivities, in terms of R/a, b/a, I, B/q, epsilon β/sub p/, anti T/sub i/, and anti T/sub e//anti T/sub i/. The model is used to produce plots showing the wide range of tokamaks that may ignite or have a given ignition margin. The constraints that limit this range are discussed

  11. Workshop on High Power ICH Antenna Designs for High Density Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, R. E.

    1990-02-01

    A workshop in high power ICH antenna designs for high density tokamaks was held to: (1) review the data base relevant to the high power heating of high density tokamaks; (2) identify the important issues which need to be addressed in order to ensure the success of the ICRF programs on CIT and Alcator C-MOD; and (3) recommend approaches for resolving the issues in a timely realistic manner. Some specific performance goals for the antenna system define a successful design effort. Simply stated these goals are: couple the specified power per antenna into the desired ion species; produce no more than an acceptable level of RF auxiliary power induced impurities; and have a mechanical structure which safely survives the thermal, mechanical and radiation stresses in the relevant environment. These goals are intimately coupled and difficult tradeoffs between scientific and engineering constraints have to be made.

  12. Workshop on high power ICH antenna designs for high density tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamodt, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    A workshop in high power ICH antenna designs for high density tokamaks was held in Boulder, Colorado on January 31 through February 2, 1990. The purposes of the workshop were to: (1) review the data base relevant to the high power heating of high density tokamaks; (2) identify the important issues which need to be addressed in order to ensure the success of the ICRF programs on CIT and Alcator C-MOD; and (3) recommend approaches for resolving the issues in a timely realistic manner. Some specific performance goals for the antenna system define a successful design effort. Simply stated these goals are: couple the specified power per antenna into the desired ion species; produce no more than an acceptable level of rf auxiliary power induced impurities; and have a mechanical structure which safely survives the thermal, mechanical and radiation stresses in the relevant environment. These goals are intimately coupled and difficult tradeoffs between scientific and engineering constraints have to be made

  13. International Population Assistance and Family Planning Programs: Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-24

    activities and USAID began to purchase contraceptives for distribution through its programs in the developing world. The first International Population...agenda of initiatives that include the promotion of gender equality, increasing adolescent education on sexuality and reproductive health, and...maintains family planning projects in more than 60 countries that include counseling and services, training of health workers, contraceptive supplies and

  14. The issue resolution process in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Transportation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, J.A.; Denny, S.

    1987-01-01

    The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program consists of various technical and institutional program activities which engender concern from the general public and from policymakers at federal, state, and local levels. Most familiar are the concerns centered around selection of a site for a repository; however, the transportation portion of the OCRWM program also engenders similar concerns for safety, efficiency and effectiveness. The major Transportation institutional issues were detailed in the Institutional Plan, issued in 1986, and include topics such as liability, defense waste, routing, emergency response, risk identification and mitigation, cash integrity, inspection and enforcement of high-level waste shipments and use of overweight trucks as part of the modal mix. This paper will define the process being used to identify and resolve institutional issues, show how the technical and institutional issues interface and are addressed, and briefly describe four specific activities which illustrate the process of resolving institutional issues in the Transportation program

  15. The Learning Community: A Program to Address Issues of Academic Achievement and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Mary; Steele, Claude

    1996-01-01

    Describes the 21st Century Program at the University of Michigan, a program to address issues of academic achievement and student retention in higher education. The conceptual basis for this program comes from C. Steele's work that finds that there are disruptive pressures tied to racial stereotypes that in turn diminish academic performance. (SLD)

  16. Virtual K-12 Public School Programs and Students with Disabilities: Issues and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Eve

    2010-01-01

    This policy forum proceedings document contains a short introduction section that describes the current status of virtual public school programs in general and special education programs in particular. Next, this document provides a state-of-the-nation report that describes the exponential growth these programs and the evolving policy issues for…

  17. Special issue about the ENERGIE interdisciplinary program of the CNRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lallemand, M.; Stitou, D.; Lallemand, A.; Destruel, P.; Seguy, I.; Bock, H.; Nierengarten, J.F.; Alonso, C.; Estibals, B.; Menanteau, Ph.; David, S.; Clement, A.H.

    2006-01-01

    The French national center of scientific research (CNRS) has started in 2001 a huge interdisciplinary program about the development of new energy sources (solar, biomass, wind energy, geothermal energy, future nuclear systems), the mastery of energy vectors (electricity, heat, hydrogen), and the development of clean and ecological processes (combustion, fuel cells, dwellings, industrial processes etc..). The program has involved about a thousand of researchers and has led to the realization of 65 projects. This newsletter presents the results of a selection of these integrated research projects: development of thermochemical processes for solar cooling and refrigeration, two-phase refrigerants for a lower environmental impact, organic semiconductors for photovoltaic conversion, TECHPOL - an observatory for new energy technologies, scenarios for future nuclear reactors (enriched uranium cycle, regeneration, uranium cycle, thorium cycle), waves energy conversion systems. (J.S.)

  18. Mainstreaming gender in HIV programs: issues, challenges and way forward

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Aprajita; Das, Madhumita

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. It is increasingly being recognized that gender inequality is a critical factor fuelling the HIV epidemic in India and elsewhere in the world. To undertake a research and programmatic review to understand how gender has been integrated in existing HIV interventions in India and to highlight the challenges associated with gender mainstreaming to propose recommendations to fill the gaps. Review of literature both published and grey along with exploration of selected HIV program both H...

  19. Program plan for the resolution of tank vapor issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, J.W.; Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    Since 1987, workers at the Hanford Site waste tank farms in Richland, Washington, have reported strong odors emanating from the large, underground high-level radioactive waste storage tanks. Some of these workers have complained of symptoms (e.g., headaches, nausea) related to the odors. In 1992, the U.S. Department of Energy, which manages the Hanford Site, and Westinghouse Hanford Company determined that the vapor emissions coming from the tanks had not been adequately characterized and represented a potential health risk to workers in the immediate vicinity of the tanks. At that time, workers in certain areas of the tank farms were required to use full-face, supplied-breathing-air masks to reduce their exposure to the fugitive emissions. While use of supplied breathing air reduced the health risks associated with the fugitive emissions, it introduced other health and safety risks (e.g., reduced field of vision, air-line tripping hazards, and heat stress). In 1992, an aggressive program was established to assure proper worker protection while reducing the use of supplied breathing air. This program focuses on characterization of vapors inside the tanks and industrial hygiene monitoring in the tank farms. If chemical filtration systems for mitigation of fugitive emissions are deemed necessary, the program will also oversee their design and installation. This document presents the plans for and approach to resolving the Hanford Site high-level waste tank vapor concerns. It is sponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

  20. Tokamak control simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelbaum, T.N.; Serben, S.; Var, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A computer model of a tokamak experimental power reactor and its control system is being constructed. This simulator will allow the exploration of various open loop and closed loop strategies for reactor control. This paper provides a brief description of the simulator and some of the potential control problems associated with this class of tokamaks

  1. Draft program plan for TNS: the next step after the tokamak fusion test reactor. Part I. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.

    1977-10-01

    A draft program plan for TNS has been prepared which consists of two basic parts--an R and D Needs Assessment and a Project Plan with schedules and necessary implementation steps. In this brief but intensive effort, questions concerning (1) the present basis for the TNS program, (2) the principal gaps in the supporting program, and (3) the necessary actions to be taken to implement the TNS program were examined. The study supported the thesis that the physics and technology bases do exist from which to start the TNS design as a central fusion program goal. Specific recommendations are made to emphasize those physics, technology, and engineering areas in which there are program gaps. In the project engineering study, a basic schedule with close support from the R and D program is developed from which recommendations on administrative actions and areas for further elucidation are made. This document presents in summary form the findings of the study, the development of the principal theses, and the recommendation to ERDA-DMFE

  2. Predictions of of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve this objective requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems - ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various role of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The paper addresses these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX. (author). 6 refs, 3 figs

  3. Predictions of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve these objectives requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems--ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various roles of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The authors have addressed these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX

  4. Ethical issues in using data from quality management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerenz, David R

    2009-08-01

    Since the advent of formal, data-driven quality improvement programs in health care in the late 1980s and early 1990s, there are have been questions raised about requirements for ethical committee review of quality improvement activities. A form of consensus emerged through a series of articles published between 1996 and 2007, but there is still significant variation among ethics review committees and individual project leaders in applying broad policies on requirements for committee review and/or written informed consent by participants. Recent developments in quality management, particularly the creation and use of multi-site disease registries, have raised new questions about requirements for review and consent, since the activities often have simultaneous research and quality improvement goals. This article discusses ways in which policies designed for local quality improvement projects and data bases may be adapted to apply to multi-site registries and research projects related to them.

  5. Heavy-section steel irradiation program: Embrittlement issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corwin, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents and the potential for major contamination releases. The RPV is one of only two major safety- related components of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. In particular, it is vital to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV's fracture resistance which occurs during service, since without that radiation damage it is virtually impossible to postulate a realistic scenario which would result in RPV failure. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior, and in particular the fracture toughness properties, of typical pressure vessel steels as they relate to light-water reactor pressure-vessel integrity. Effects of specimen size, material chemistry, product form and microstructure, irradiation fluence, flux, temperature and spectrum, and postirradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties including fracture toughness crack arrest toughness ductile tearing resistance Charpy V-notch impact energy, dropweight nil-ductility temperature and tensile properties. Models based on observations of radiation-induced microstructural changes using the field on microprobe and the high resolution transmission electron microscopy provide improved bases for extrapolating the measured changes in fracture properties to wider ranges of irradiation conditions. The principal materials examined within the HSSI program are high-copper welds since their postirradiation properties are most frequently limiting in the continued safe operation of commercial RPVs

  6. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). However, the results of this investigation are believed to be generally applicable to the broad class of the next generation of experimental tokamak facilities such as ETF. The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties are compared to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations are developed on resolving the issue

  7. Multiple system responses program: Identification of concerns related to a number of specific regulatory issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.A.; Casada, M.L.; Palko, L.E.; Roberts, M.W.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the activities and results of the Multiple System Responses (MSR) program conducted by the Nuclear Operations Analysis Center (NOAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of the MSR program was to gather and review documentation for several unresolved safety issues and related programs of interest, and from that documentation, describe any additional potential safety concerns. The MSR program provides information that will aid the NRC staff in making an assessment of the relative safety significance of the concerns through the established prioritization process. Judgments were not made regarding the validity of the concerns expressed by others. Rather, the concerns were documented and potential safety issues were developed and defined as specifically as possible. Twenty-one potential safety issues were developed from the documented concerns. Additional information was gathered to support the NRC efforts in reviewing these issues for prioritization. 73 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Physics design of an ultra-long pulsed tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Inoue, N.; Wang, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Okano, K.

    1993-01-01

    A pulsed tokamak reactor driven only by inductive current drive has recently revived, because the non-inductive current drive efficiency seems to be too low to realize a steady-state tokamak reactor with sufficiently high energy gain Q. Essential problems in pulsed operation mode is considered to be material fatigue due to cyclic operation and expensive energy storage system to keep continuous electric output during a dwell time. To overcome these problems, we have proposed an ultra-long pulsed tokamak reactor called IDLT (abbr. Inductively operated Day-Long Tokamak), which has the major and minor radii of 10 m and 1.87 m, respectively, sufficiently to ensure the burning period of about ten hours. Here we discuss physical features of inductively operated tokamak plasmas, employing the similar constraints with ITER CDA design for engineering issues. (author) 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Substance abuse issues among women in domestic violence programs: findings from North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sandra L; Moracco, Kathryn E; Chang, Judy C; Council, Carol L; Dulli, Lisa S

    2008-09-01

    This article discusses the results of a survey of North Carolina domestic violence programs that found that substance abuse problems are common among program clients, yet only half of the programs had policies concerning substance-abusing clients, and one fourth had memoranda of agreement with substance abuse treatment providers. Most programs with shelters asked clients about substance use; however, one third of the shelters would not admit women if they were noticeably under the influence of substances while seeking shelter residence, instead referring them to substance abuse programs. Approximately one tenth of the domestic violence programs did not have any staff or volunteers with training in substance abuse issues. Implications are discussed.

  10. High-heat tank safety issue resolution program plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, O.S.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this program plan is to provide a guide for selecting corrective actions that will mitigate and/or remediate the high-heat waste tank safety issue for single-shell tank 241-C-106. The heat source of approximately 110,000 Btu/hr is the radioactive decay of the stored waste material (primarily 90 Sr) inadvertently transferred into the tank in the later 1960s. Currently, forced ventilation, with added water to promote thermal conductivity and evaporation cooling, is used for heat removal. The method is very effective and economical. At this time, the only viable solution identified to permanently resolve this safety issue is the removal of heat-generating waste in the tank. This solution is being aggressively pursued as the only remediation method to this safety issue, and tank 241-C-106 has been selected as the first single-shell tank for retrieval. The current cooling method and other alternatives are addressed in this program as means to mitigate this safety issue before retrieval. This program plan has three parts. The first part establishes program objectives and defines safety issue, drivers, and resolution criteria and strategy. The second part evaluates the high-heat safety issue and its mitigation and remediation methods and other alternatives according to resolution logic. The third part identifies major tasks and alternatives for mitigation and resolution of the safety issue. A table of best-estimate schedules for the key tasks is also included in this program plan

  11. Tokamaks. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, John; Campbell, D.J.; Connor, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    It is interesting to recall the state of tokamak research when the first edition of this book was written. My judgement of the level of real understanding at that time is indicated by the virtual absence of comparisons of experiment with theory in that edition. The need then was for a 'handbook' which collected in a single volume the concepts and models which form the basis of everyday tokamak research. The experimental and theoretical endeavours of the subsequent decade have left almost all of this intact, but have brought a massive development of the subject. Firstly, there are now several areas where the experimental behaviour is described in terms of accepted theory. This is particularly true of currents parallel to the magnetic field, and of the stability limitations on the plasma pressure. Next there has been the research on large tokamaks, hardly started at the writing of the first edition. Now our thinking is largely based on the results from these tokamaks and this work has led to the long awaited achievement of significant amounts of fusion power. Finally, the success of tokamak research has brought us face to face with the problems involved in designing and building a tokamak reactor. The present edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes an account of the advances outlined above. (Author)

  12. Tokamak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of tokamak reactor studies with particular attention to commercial reactor concepts developed within the last three years. Emphasis is placed on DT fueled reactors for electricity production. A brief history of tokamak reactor studies is presented. The STARFIRE, NUWMAK, and HFCTR studies are highlighted. Recent developments that have increased the commercial attractiveness of tokamak reactor designs are discussed. These developments include smaller plant sizes, higher first wall loadings, improved maintenance concepts, steady-state operation, non-divertor particle control, and improved reactor safety features

  13. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  14. Survey of Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The survey covers the following topics:- Introduction and history of tokamak research; review of tokamak apparatus, existing and planned; remarks on measurement techniques and their limitations; main results in terms of electron and ion temperatures, plasma density, containment times, etc. Empirical scaling; range of operating densities; impurities, origin, behaviour and control (including divertors); data on fluctuations and instabilities in tokamak plasmas; data on disruptive instabilities; experiments on shaped cross-sections; present experimental evidence on β limits; auxiliary heating; experimental and theoretical problems for the future. (author)

  15. Tokamak ARC damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  16. Do Supplemental Remedial Reading Programs Address the Motivational Issues of Struggling Readers? An Analysis of Five Popular Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Matthew P; Schwanenflugel, Paula J

    2004-04-01

    Five popular, but distinctly different, remedial reading programs were reviewed regarding the potential to motivate children to read. It is argued that current remedial reading program designs and research on program effectiveness ignore the impact that motivation has on struggling readers. In addition, we develop a theory of reading motivation specific to struggling readers that highlights motivational constructs we feel are important to the improvement of reading skill for this population of students. The three aspects of reading motivation most relevant to the instruction of remedial readers include: (a) improving reading self-efficacy; (b) making internal and controllable outcome attributions for successes and failures associated with reading; and (c) establishing personally relevant value in becoming a better reader. We conclude that, while most programs address some motivational issues and other issues not at all, most programs could make minor modifications that would greatly enhance their motivational impact.

  17. Intervening: Managerial Issues and Challenges in an Educational Management Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrilleaux, Louis E.; Schermerhorn, John R., Jr.

    The literature on intervention theory tends to overlook the pragmatic managerial issues and challenges of intervening. This paper analyzes the formative period of a school management development program to establish crucial differences between the program director's espoused theory and the actual experience of the intervention. These differences…

  18. Media, Tourism, Environment, and Cultural Issues in Australia: A Case Study of a Study Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A multidisciplinary study abroad program developed by a U.S. journalism school and cosponsored by a college of agriculture and natural resources interweaves the themes of mass media, tourism, environment, and cultural issues in Australia. This article traces the development and evolution of the faculty-led program and discusses its curriculum,…

  19. Program plan for evaluation of the Ferrocyanide Waste Tank safety issue at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsheim, G.L.; Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    This document describes the background, priorities, strategy and logic, and task descriptions for the Ferrocyanide Waste Tank Safety Program. The Ferrocyanide Safety Program was established in 1990 to provide resolution of a major safety issue identified for 24 high-level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site

  20. A programmatic framework for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.; Goldston, R.J.; Neilson, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the confinement of reactor-grade plasmas, so that the authors are now preparing for experiments at the open-quotes power breakevenclose quotes level in the JET and TFTR experiments. In ITER the authors will extend the performance of tokamaks into the burning plasma regime, develop the technology of fusion reactors, and produce over a gigawatt of fusion power. Besides taking these crucial steps toward the technical feasibility of fusion, the authors must also take steps to ensure its economic acceptability. The broad requirements for economically attractive tokamak reactors based on physics advancements have been set forth in a number of studies. An advanced physics data base is emerging from a physics program of concept improvement using existing tokamaks around the world. This concept improvements program is emerging as the primary focus of the US domestic tokamak program, and a key element of that program is the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). With TPX the authors can develop the scientific data base for compact, continuously-operating fusion reactors, using advanced steady-state control techniques to improve plasma performance. The authors can develop operating techniques needed to ensure the success of ITER and provide first-time experience with several key fusion reactor technologies. This paper explains the relationships of TPX to the current US fusion physics program, to the ITER program, and to the development of an attractive tokamak demonstration plant for this next stage in the fusion program

  1. Navy Ohio Replacement (SSBN[X]) Ballistic Missile Submarine Program: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-05

    Navy Ohio Replacement (SSBN[X]) Ballistic Missile Submarine Program: Background and Issues for Congress Ronald O’Rourke Specialist in Naval...Affairs April 5, 2016 Congressional Research Service 7-5700 www.crs.gov R41129 Navy Ohio Replacement (SSBN[X]) Ballistic Missile Submarine...1,091.1 million in research and development funding for the Ohio replacement program (ORP), a program to design and build a new class of 12 ballistic

  2. EDF ageing management program of nuclear components: a safety and economical issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faidy, C.

    2005-01-01

    Ageing management of Nuclear Power Plants is an essential issue for utilities, in term of safety and availability and corresponding economical consequences. Practically all nuclear countries have developed a systematic program to deal with ageing of components on their plants. This paper presents the ageing management program developed by EDF and that are compared with different other approaches in other countries (IAEA guidelines and GALL report). The paper presents a general overview of the programs, the major results, recommendations and conclusions. (author)

  3. Heat load material studies: Simulated tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahl, J.M.; McDonald, J.M.; Zakharov, A.; Tserevitinov, S.; Barabash, V.; Guseva, M.

    1991-01-01

    It is clear that an improved understanding of the effects of tokamak disruptions on plasma facing component materials is needed for the ITER program. very large energy fluxes are predicted to be deposited in ITER and could be very damaging to the machine. During 1991, Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico conducted cooperative tokamak disruption simulation experiments at several Soviet facilities. These facilities were located at the Efremov Institute in Leningrad, the Kurchatov Atomic Energy Institute (Troisk and Moscow) and the Institute for Physical Chemistry of the Soviet Adademy of Sciences in Moscow. Erosion of graphite from plasma stream impact is seen to be much less than that observed with laser or electron beams with similar energy fluxes. This, along with other data obtained, seem to suggest that the ''vapor shielding'' effect is a very important phenomenon in the study of graphite erosion during tokamak disruption

  4. Tokamak simulation code manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Kyoo; Oh, Byung Hoon; Hong, Bong Keun; Lee, Kwang Won

    1995-01-01

    The method to use TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code) developed by Princeton plasma physics laboratory is illustrated. In KT-2 tokamak, time dependent simulation of axisymmetric toroidal plasma and vertical stability have to be taken into account in design phase using TSC. In this report physical modelling of TSC are described and examples of application in JAERI and SERI are illustrated, which will be useful when TSC is installed KAERI computer system. (Author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Energetic particle destabilization of shear Alfven waves in stellarators and tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spong, D.A.; Carreras, B.A.; Hedrick, C.L.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Weller, A.

    1994-01-01

    An important issue for ignited devices is the resonant destabilization of shear Alfven waves by energetic populations. These instabilities have been observed in a variety of toroidal plasma experiments in recent years, including: beam-destabilized toroidal Alfven instabilities (TAE) in low magnetic field tokamaks, ICRF destabilized TAE's in higher field tokamaks, and global Alfven instabilities (GAE) in low shear stellarators. In addition, excitation and study of these modes is a significant goal of the TFIR-DT program and a component of the ITER physics tasks. The authors have developed a gyrofluid model which includes the wave-particle resonances necessary to excite such instabilities. The TAE linear mode structure is calculated nonperturbatively, including many of the relevant damping mechanisms, such as: continuum damping, non-ideal effects (ion FLR and electron collisionality), and ion/electron Landau damping. This model has been applied to both linear and nonlinear regimes for a range of experimental cases using measured profiles

  6. Digital control of plasma position in Damavand tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emami, M.; Babazadeh, A.R.; Roshan, M.V.; Memarzadeh, M.; Habibi, H. [Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Nuclear Fusion Research Center. Plasma Physics Lab.

    2002-03-01

    Plasma position control is one of the important issues in the design and operation of tokamak fusion research device. Since a tokamak is basically an electrical system consisting of power supplies, coils, plasma and eddy currents, a model in which these components are treated as an electrical circuits is used in designing Damavand plasma position control system. This model is used for the simulation of the digital control system and its parameters have been verified experimentally. In this paper, the performance of a high-speed digital controller as well as a simulation study and its application to the Damavand tokamak is discussed. (author)

  7. Ethical and Logistical Issues Raised by the Advanced Donation Program "Pay It Forward" Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lainie Friedman; Rodrigue, James R; Veatch, Robert M

    2017-10-01

    The advanced donation program was proposed in 2014 to allow an individual to donate a kidney in order to provide a voucher for a kidney in the future for a particular loved one. In this article, we explore the logistical and ethical issues that such a program raises. We argue that such a program is ethical in principle but there are many logistical issues that need to be addressed to ensure that the actual program is fair to both those who do and do not participate in this program. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Diagnostics systems for the TBR-E tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.; Ferreira, J.L.; Aso, Y.; Ferreira, J.G.

    1992-08-01

    A general view of the several diagnostics systems proposed for the TBR-E tokamak is given. This project is a joint undertaking of INPE, USP and UNICAMP plasma laboratories. The requirements for the measurements of the plasma produced parameters are described. Special attention is given for diagnostics used to investigate new physical issues on a low aspect ratio tokamak such as TBR-E. (author)

  9. HESTER: a hot-electron superconducting tokamak experimental reactor at M.I.T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.H.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1983-04-01

    HESTER is an experimental tokamak, designed to resolve many of the central questions in the tokamak development program in the 1980's. It combines several unique features with new perspectives on the other major tokamak experiments scheduled for the next decade. The overall objectives of HESTER, in rough order of their presently perceived importance, are the achievement of reactor-like wall-loadings and plasma parameters for long pulse periods, determination of a good, reactor-relevant method of steady-state or very long pulse tokamak current drive, duplication of the planned very high temperature neutral injection experiments using only radio frequency heating, a demonstration of true steady-state tokamak operation, integration of a high-performance superconducting magnet system into a tokamak experiment, determination of the best methods of long term impurity control, and studies of transport and pressure limits in high field, high aspect ratio tokamak plasmas. These objectives are described

  10. Facility approach to tokamak operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, P.H.; Gabbard, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    In anticipation of the appearance of more advanced tokamaks and other fusion relevant experiments, program has been established at ORNL to systemically identify the requirements of an effective machine operations group. This program is presently applied to the ISX-B experiment. With its continuing development, it is expected to provide major support in the identification of potential problem areas and to assist in the generation of the necessary procedures for forthcoming devices. The present and future generations of large plasma devices will function as facilities, operated by an operations group as service to the plasma physicists and diagnosticians. The purpose of the program discussed here is to develop and to encourage an orderly transition to the facility-like style of operation

  11. Joint research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Del Bosco, E.; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Oost, G. van

    2005-01-01

    Small tokamaks have an important role in fusion research. More than 40 small tokamaks are operational. Research on small tokamaks has created a scientific basis for the scaling-up to larger tokamaks. Well-known scientific and engineering schools, which are now determining the main directions of fusion science and technology, have been established through research on small tokamaks. Combined efforts within a network of small and medium size tokamaks will further enhance the contribution of small tokamaks. A new concept of interactive co-ordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project is presented. (author)

  12. Joint research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Bosco, E. Del; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Oost, G. van; He, Yexi; Hegazy, H.; Hirose, A.; Hron, M.; Kuteev, B.; Ludwig, G.O.; Nascimento, I.C.; Silva, C.; Vorobyev, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Small tokamaks have an important role in fusion research. More than 40 small tokamaks are operational. Research on small tokamaks has created a scientific basis for the scaling-up to larger tokamaks. Well-known scientific and engineering schools, which are now determining the main directions of fusion science and technology, have been established through research on small tokamaks. Combined efforts within a network of small and medium size tokamaks will further enhance the contribution of small tokamaks. A new concept of interactive coordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project, is presented

  13. NCRP Program Area Committee 5: Environmental Radiation and Radioactive Waste Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S Y; Napier, Bruce

    2016-02-01

    Program Area Committee 5 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) focuses its activities on environmental radiation and radioactive waste issues. The Committee completed a number of reports in these subject areas, most recently NCRP Report No. 175, Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Major Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. Historically this Committee addressed emerging issues of the nation pertaining to radioactivity or radiation in the environment or radioactive waste issues due either to natural origins or to manmade activities.

  14. Concept definition of KT-2, a large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with FWCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Kyoo; Chang, In Soon; Chung, Moon Kyoo; Hwang, Chul Kyoo; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang Ryul; Choi, Byung Ho; Hong, Bong Keun; Oh, Byung Hoon; Chung, Seung Ho; Yoon, Byung Joo; Yoon, Jae Sung; Song, Woo Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Choong Suk; Chang, Hong Yung; Choi, Duk In; Nam, Chang Heui [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kyoo Sun [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sang Heui [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Heui Dong [Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Koo [Pohang Inst. of Science and Technology, Kyungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-01

    A concept definition of the KT-2 tokamak is made. The research goal of the machine is to study the `advanced tokamak` physics and engineering issues on the mid size large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with intense RF heating (>5 MW). Survey of the status of the research fields, the physics basis for the concept, operation scenarios, as well as machine design concept are presented. (Author) 86 refs., 17 figs., 22 tabs.

  15. Concept definition of KT-2, a large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with FWCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Kyoo; Chang, In Soon; Chung, Moon Kyoo; Hwang, Chul Kyoo; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang Ryul; Choi, Byung Ho; Hong, Bong Keun; Oh, Byung Hoon; Chung, Seung Ho; Yoon, Byung Joo; Yoon, Jae Sung; Song, Woo Sub; Chang, Choong Suk; Chang, Hong Yung; Choi, Duk In; Nam, Chang Heui; Chung, Kyoo Sun; Hong, Sang Heui; Kang, Heui Dong; Lee, Jae Koo

    1994-11-01

    A concept definition of the KT-2 tokamak is made. The research goal of the machine is to study the 'advanced tokamak' physics and engineering issues on the mid size large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with intense RF heating (>5 MW). Survey of the status of the research fields, the physics basis for the concept, operation scenarios, as well as machine design concept are presented. (Author) 86 refs., 17 figs., 22 tabs

  16. Advanced statistics for tokamak transport colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, K.S.

    1989-03-01

    This is a compendium of three separate articles on the statistical analysis of tokamak transport. The first article is an expository introduction to advanced statistics and scaling laws. The second analyzes two important problems of tokamak data---colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation in detail. The third article generalizes the Swamy random coefficient model to the case of degenerate matrices. Three papers have been processed separately

  17. Microwave Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. The experiment, soon to be operational, provides an opportunity to study dense plasmas heated by powers unprecedented in the electron-cyclotron frequency range required by the especially high magnetic fields used with the MTX and needed for reactors. 1 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  18. Magnetic ''islandography'' in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Waddell, B.V.; Hicks, H.R.

    1978-09-01

    Tearing modes are shown to be responsible for most of the experimentally observed macroscopic behavior of tokamak discharges. The effects of these collective magnetic perturbations on magnetic topology and plasma transport in tokamaks are shown to provide plausible explanations for: internal disruptions (m/n = 1); Mirnov oscillations (m/n = 2,3...); and major disruptions (coupling of 2/1-3/2 modes). The nonlinear evolution of the tearing modes is followed with fully three-dimensional computer codes. The effects on plasma confinement of the magnetic islands or stochastic field lines induced by the macroscopic tearing modes are discussed and compared with experiment. Finally, microscopic magnetic perturbations are shown to provide a natural model for the microscopic anomalous transport processes in tokamaks

  19. Infusing Gender and Diversity Issues into Educational Leadership Programs: Transformational Learning and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michelle; Mountford, Meredith; Skrla, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to consider the impact of incorporating a set of readings focused on issues of gender, diversity, leadership, and feminist thought into the curriculum of a statewide educational leadership doctoral program. Design/methodology/approach: Based data from open-ended surveys, semi-structured interviews, and…

  20. Internal disruption in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Savrukhin, P.V.

    1990-01-01

    A review of results of experimental and theoretical investigations of internal disruption in tokamaks is given. Specific features of various types of saw-tooth oscillations are described and their classification is performed. Theoretical models of the process of development of internal disruption instability are discussed. Effect of internal disruption on parameters of plasma, confined in tokamak, is considered. Scalings of period and amplitude of saw-tooth oscillations, as well as version radius are presented. Different methods for stabilizing instability of internal disruption are described

  1. Overview of Tokamak Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unterberg, Bernhard; Samm, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    An overview is given of recent results obtained in tokamak devices. We introduce basic confinement scenarios as L-mode, H-mode and plasmas with an internal transport barrier and discuss methods for profile control. Important findings in DT-experiments at JET as α-particle heating are described. Methods for power exhaust like plasma regimes with a radiating mantle and radiative divertor scenarios are discussed. The overall impact of plasma edge conditions on the general plasma performance in tokamaks is illustrated by describing the impact of wall conditions on confinement and the edge operational diagram of H-mode plasmas

  2. Internal disruptions in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Savrukhin, P.V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of the phenomenon of internal disruptions in tokamaks are reviewed. A classification scheme is introduced and the features of different types of sawtooth oscillations are described. A theoretical model for the development of the internal disruption instability is discussed. The effect of internal disruptions on the parameters of plasma confined in tokamaks is discussed. Scaling laws for the period and amplitude of sawtooth oscillations, as well as for the inversion radius, are presented. Different methods of stabilizing the internal disruption instability are described

  3. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations on resolving the issue are discussed

  4. Fusion technology applications of the spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.C.; Akers, R.; Allfrey, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Fusion technology applications of the spherical tokamak are presented, exploiting its high β capability, normal conducting TF coils, compact core, high natural elongation, disruption resilience and low capital cost. We concentrate here on two particular applications: a volume neutron source (VNS) for component testing and a power plant, addressing engineering and physics issues for steady state operation. The prospect of nearer term burning plasma ST devices are discussed in the conclusions. (author)

  5. Fusion technology applications of the spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.C.; Akers, R.; Allfrey, S.J.

    2001-01-01

    Fusion technology applications of the spherical tokamak are presented, exploiting its high β capability, normal conducting TF coils, compact core, high natural elongation, disruption resilience and low capital cost. We concentrate here on two particular applications: a volume neutron source (VNS) for component testing and a power plant, addressing engineering and physics issues for steady state operation. The prospect of nearer term burning plasma ST devices are discussed in the conclusions. (author)

  6. Joint Czechoslovak-Soviet workshop on current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    At the Joint Czechoslovak-Soviet Workshop on Current Drive in Tokamaks, five papers dealing with issues of general interest were presented. In a theoretical paper by Klima and Pavlo a one-dimensional model of the lower-hybrid current drive is described and the results of its analysis are used in a numerical simulation using T-7 tokamak parameters. In the second theoretical paper by Vojtsekhovich, Parail and Pereverzev the influence of the LH wave spectrum on the efficiency of the current drive is studied. Two papers deal with a new microwave system designed for experiments on LHCD in the T-7 tokamak. In particular, the power spectra of new four-waveguide grills are computed. In the last paper the non-inductive start-up of the discharge in the T-7 tokamak by means of electron cyclotron waves is investigated. (J.U.)

  7. Conceptual design of a commercial tokamak reactor using resistive magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeClaire, R.J. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The future of the tokamak approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion depends in part on its potential as a commercial electricity-producing device. This potential is continually being evaluated in the fusion community using parametric, system, and conceptual studies of various approaches to improving tokamak reactor design. The potential of tokamaks using resistive magnets as commercial electricity-producing reactors is explored. Parametric studies have been performed to examine the major trade-offs of the system and to identify the most promising configurations for a tokamak using resistive magnets. In addition, a number of engineering issues have been examined including magnet design, blanket/first-wall design, and maintenance. The study indicates that attractive design space does exist and presents a conceptual design for the Resistive Magnet Commercial Tokamak Reactor (RCTR). No issue has been identified, including recirculating power, that would make the overall cost of electricity of RCTR significantly different from that of a comparably sized superconducting tokamak. However, RCTR may have reliability and maintenance advantages over commercial superconducting magnet devices

  8. Post discharge issues identified by a call-back program: identifying improvement opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Patricia I; Kara, Areeba

    2017-12-01

    The period following discharge from the hospital is one of heightened vulnerability. Discharge instructions serve as a guide during this transition. Yet, clinicians receive little feedback on the quality of this document that ties into the patients' experience. We reviewed the issues voiced by discharged patients via a call-back program and compared them to the discharge instructions they had received. At our institution, patients receive an automated call forty-eight hours following discharge inquiring about progress. If indicated by the response to the call, they are directed to a nurse who assists with problem solving. We reviewed the nursing documentation of these encounters for a period of nine months. The issues voiced were grouped into five categories: communication, medications, durable medical equipment/therapies, follow up and new or ongoing symptoms. The discharge instructions given to each patient were reviewed. We retrieved data on the number of discharges from each specialty from the hospital over the same period. A total of 592 patients voiced 685 issues. The numbers of patients discharged from medical or surgical services identified as having issues via the call-back line paralleled the proportions discharged from medical and surgical services from the hospital during the same period. Nearly a quarter of the issues discussed had been addressed in the discharge instructions. The most common category of issues was related to communication deficits including missing or incomplete information which made it difficult for the patient to enact or understand the plan of care. Medication prescription related issues were the next most common. Resource barriers and questions surrounding medications were often unaddressed. Post discharge issues affect patients discharged from all services equally. Data from call back programs may provide actionable targets for improvement, identify the inpatient team's 'blind spots' and be used to provide feedback to clinicians.

  9. Risk Management for Study Abroad Programs: Issues and Resources to Inform Program Development, Administration, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a practical background to the health and safety risks and challenges for U.S. colleges and universities and other program providers. Potential risks, field-based guidelines, good practices, and resources to support the management of risks by study abroad offices will be covered.

  10. High beta tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, R.A.; Berger, D.P.; Charlton, L.A.; Hogan, J.T.; Munro, J.K.; Nelson, D.B.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Sigmar, D.J.; Strickler, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    MHD equilibrium, stability, and transport calculations are made to study the accessibility and behavior of ''high beta'' tokamak plasmas in the range β approximately 5 to 15 percent. For next generation devices, beta values of at least 8 percent appear to be accessible and stable if there is a conducting surface nearby

  11. Sawtooth phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Savrukhin, P.V.

    1989-01-01

    A review of experimental and theoretical investigaions of sawtooth phenomena in tokamaks is presented. Different types of sawtooth oscillations, scaling laws and methods of interanl disruption stabilization are described. Theoretical models of the sawtooth instability are discussed. 122 refs.; 4 tabs

  12. Reconnection in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pare, V.K.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations with several different computer codes based on the resistive MHD equations have shown that (m = 1, n = 1) tearing modes in tokamak plasmas grow by magnetic reconnection. The observable behavior predicted by the codes has been confirmed in detail from the waveforms of signals from x-ray detectors and recently by x-ray tomographic imaging

  13. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This document consists of a collection of papers presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Research Using Small Tokamaks. It contains 22 papers on a wide variety of research aspects, including diagnostics, design, transport, equilibrium, stability, and confinement. Some of these papers are devoted to other concepts (stellarators, compact tori). Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The technical reports contained in this collection of papers on research using small tokamaks fall into four main categories, i.e., (i) experimental work (heating, stability, plasma radial profiles, fluctuations and transport, confinement, ultra-low-q tokamaks, wall physics, a.o.), (ii) diagnostics (beam probes, laser scattering, X-ray tomography, laser interferometry, electron-cyclotron absorption and emission systems), (iii) theory (strong turbulence, effects of heating on stability, plasma beta limits, wave absorption, macrostability, low-q tokamak configurations and bootstrap currents, turbulent heating, stability of vortex flows, nonlinear islands growth, plasma-drift-induced anomalous transport, ergodic divertor design, a.o.), and (iv) new technical facilities (varistors applied to establish constant current and loop voltage in HT-6M), lower-hybrid-current-drive systems for HT-6B and HT-6M, radio-frequency systems for HT-6M ICR heating experimentation, and applications of fiber optics for visible and vacuum ultraviolet radiation detection as applied to tokamaks and reversed-field pinches. A total number of 51 papers are included in the collection. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Compact tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.; Wiley, J.C.; Edmonds, P.H.; Ross, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The possible use of tokamaks for thermonuclear power plants is discussed, in particular tokamaks with low aspect ratio and copper toroidal field coils. Three approaches are presented. First, the existing literature is reviewed and summarized. Second, using simple analytic estimates, the size of the smallest tokamak to produce an ignited plasma is derived. This steady state energy balance analysis is then extended to determine the smallest tokamaks power plant, by including the power required to drive the toroidal field and by considering two extremes of plasma current drive efficiency. Third, the analytic results are augmented by a numerical calculation that permits arbitrary plasma current drive efficiency and different confinement scaling relationships. Throughout, the importance of various restrictions is emphasized, in particular plasma current drive efficiency, plasma confinement, plasma safety factor, plasma elongation, plasma beta, neutron wall loading, blanket availability and recirculation of electric power. The latest published reactor studies show little advantage in using low aspect ratios to obtain a more compact device (and a low cost of electricity) unless either remarkably high efficiency plasma current drive and low safety factor are combined, or unless confinement (the H factor), the permissible elongation and the permissible neutron wall loading increase as the aspect ratio is reduced. These results are reproduced with the analytic model. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs

  16. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1990-04-01

    This paper discusses the following work on the text tokamak: data systems; particle confinement; impurity transport; plasma rotation; runaway electrons; electron cyclotron heating; FIR system; transient transport; internal turbulence; edge turbulence; ion temperature; EML experiments; impurity pellet experiments; MHD experiments and analysis; TEXT Upgrade; and Upgrade diagnostics

  17. Preface paper to the Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere (SALSA) Program special issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, D.C.; Chehbouni, A.; Goff, B.; MacNish, B.; Maddock, T.; Moran, S.; Shuttleworth, W.J.; Williams, D.G.; Watts, C.; Hipps, L.H.; Cooper, D.I.; Schieldge, J.; Kerr, Y.H.; Arias, H.; Kirkland, M.; Carlos, R.; Cayrol, P.; Kepner, W.; Jones, B.; Avissar, R.; Begue, A.; Bonnefond, J.-M.; Boulet, G.; Branan, B.; Brunel, J.P.; Chen, L.C.; Clarke, T.; Davis, M.R.; DeBruin, H.; Dedieu, G.; Elguero, E.; Eichinger, W.E.; Everitt, J.; Garatuza-Payan, J.; Gempko, V.L.; Gupta, H.; Harlow, C.; Hartogensis, O.; Helfert, M.; Holifield, C.; Hymer, D.; Kahle, A.; Keefer, T.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Lhomme, J.-P.; Lagouarde, J.-P.; Lo, Seen D.; Luquet, D.; Marsett, R.; Monteny, B.; Ni, W.; Nouvellon, Y.; Pinker, R.; Peters, C.; Pool, D.; Qi, J.; Rambal, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Santiago, F.; Sano, E.; Schaeffer, S.M.; Schulte, M.; Scott, R.; Shao, X.; Snyder, K.A.; Sorooshian, S.; Unkrich, C.L.; Whitaker, M.; Yucel, I.

    2000-01-01

    The Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere Program (SALSA) is a multi-agency, multi-national research effort that seeks to evaluate the consequences of natural and human-induced environmental change in semi-arid regions. The ultimate goal of SALSA is to advance scientific understanding of the semi-arid portion of the hydrosphere-biosphere interface in order to provide reliable information for environmental decision making. SALSA approaches this goal through a program of long-term, integrated observations, process research, modeling, assessment, and information management that is sustained by cooperation among scientists and information users. In this preface to the SALSA special issue, general program background information and the critical nature of semi-arid regions is presented. A brief description of the Upper San Pedro River Basin, the initial location for focused SALSA research follows. Several overarching research objectives under which much of the interdisciplinary research contained in the special issue was undertaken are discussed. Principal methods, primary research sites and data collection used by numerous investigators during 1997-1999 are then presented. Scientists from about 20 US, five European (four French and one Dutch), and three Mexican agencies and institutions have collaborated closely to make the research leading to this special issue a reality. The SALSA Program has served as a model of interagency cooperation by breaking new ground in the approach to large scale interdisciplinary science with relatively limited resources.

  18. Tokamaks (Second Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stott, Peter [JET, UK (United Kingdom)

    1998-10-01

    The first edition of John Wesson's book on tokamaks, published in 1987, established itself as essential reading for researchers in the field of magnetic confinement fusion: it was an excellent introduction for students to tokamak physics and also a valuable reference work for the more experienced. The second edition, published in 1997, has been completely rewritten and substantially enlarged (680 pages compared with 300). The new edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes discussion of the substantial advances in fusion research during the past decade. The new book, like its predecessor, is well written and commendable for its clarity and accuracy. In fact many of the chapters are written by a series of co-authors bringing the benefits of a wide range of expertise but, by careful editing, Wesson has maintained a uniformity of style and presentation. The chapter headings and coverage for the most part remain the same - but are expanded considerably and brought up to date. The most substantial change is that the single concluding chapter in the first edition on 'Experiments' has been replaced by three chapters: 'Tokamak experiments' which deals with some of the earlier key experiments plus a selection of recent small and medium-sized devices, 'Large experiments' which gives an excellent summary of the main results from the four large tokamaks - TFTR, JET, JT60/JT60U and DIII-D, and 'The future' which gives a very short (possibly too short in my opinion) account of reactors and ITER. This is an excellent book, which I strongly recommend should have a place - on the desk rather than in the bookshelf - of researchers in magnetic confinement fusion. (book review)

  19. Tokamaks (Second Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stott, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The first edition of John Wesson's book on tokamaks, published in 1987, established itself as essential reading for researchers in the field of magnetic confinement fusion: it was an excellent introduction for students to tokamak physics and also a valuable reference work for the more experienced. The second edition, published in 1997, has been completely rewritten and substantially enlarged (680 pages compared with 300). The new edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes discussion of the substantial advances in fusion research during the past decade. The new book, like its predecessor, is well written and commendable for its clarity and accuracy. In fact many of the chapters are written by a series of co-authors bringing the benefits of a wide range of expertise but, by careful editing, Wesson has maintained a uniformity of style and presentation. The chapter headings and coverage for the most part remain the same - but are expanded considerably and brought up to date. The most substantial change is that the single concluding chapter in the first edition on 'Experiments' has been replaced by three chapters: 'Tokamak experiments' which deals with some of the earlier key experiments plus a selection of recent small and medium-sized devices, 'Large experiments' which gives an excellent summary of the main results from the four large tokamaks - TFTR, JET, JT60/JT60U and DIII-D, and 'The future' which gives a very short (possibly too short in my opinion) account of reactors and ITER. This is an excellent book, which I strongly recommend should have a place - on the desk rather than in the bookshelf - of researchers in magnetic confinement fusion. (book review)

  20. Interlock System for the COMPASS Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hron, M.; Adamek, J.; Pisacka, J.; Panek, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Sova, J.; Siba, J.; Kovarj, J. [Department of Control Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The COMPASS tokamak (R=0.56 m, a=0.18 - 0.23 m) is starting operation presently at Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR in Prague. An important issue of the operation is the safety of the personnel and machine protection against faults, presented in this contribution. The personnel protection is based on a restricted access into the experimental hall during the operation of potentially dangerous systems. A tokamak hall access system, based on Honeywell WIN-PAK (tm) 2005, allows to set the status of the experimental area (open/closed) and to control the in and out movement of persons using access cards. On top of this, a check of the whole experimental area by the operator is enforced before the hall enclosure. A hardware interlock then interprets the experimental hall status and controls the operation of key systems accordingly. The permit for operation is granted and the real status of the systems is reported by hard wired potential less contacts. The control procedure is based on a PLC MicroPEL M66. This PLC provides HW interface between Actuators (Relays and switches) and it is connected on PESNET bus. Its programming is done using language Simple v.2 in Winstudio IDE. Second site of personnel protection system is created on PC where runs a .NET application on MSWindows XP or 2000. This PC is connected with PLC via PESNET bus (on RS485 layer) and it generates all control signals to PLC from the operator. Simultaneously, the PC receives all warning and alarm signals from the PLC. This signals are displayed on a screen of the PC in real-time, this way the GUI provides visualization of the controlled process. Except for this fact the operator is informed about the status of the system and individual subsystems on a PC via an operator's panel. Further we will describe the machine protection which uses similar system for checking conditions for the start of a shot. Fast key processes which have to be checked during the shot are

  1. NRC research program on plant aging: Listing and summaries of reports issued through July 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondic, N.N.

    1992-09-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This is a comprehensive hardware-oriented engineering research program focused on understanding the aging mechanisms of components and systems in nuclear power plants. The NPAR program also focuses on methods for simulating and monitoring the aging-related degradation of these components and systems. In addition, it provides recommendations for effective maintenance to manage aging and for implementation of the research results in the regulatory process. This document contains a listing and index of reports generated in the NPAR Program that were issued through July 1992 and summaries of those reports. Each summary describes the elements of the research covered in the report and outlines the significant results. For the convenience of the user, the reports are indexed by personal author, corporate author, and subject

  2. NRC Research Program on Plant Aging: Listing and summaries of reports issued through June 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondic, N.N.; Hill, E.L.

    1991-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This is a comprehensive hardware-oriented engineering research program focused on understanding the aging mechanisms of components and systems in nuclear power plants. The NPAR program also focuses on methods for simulating and monitoring the aging-related degradation of these components and systems. In addition, it provides recommendations for effective maintenance to manage aging and for the implementation of the research results in the regulatory process. This document contains a listing and index of reports generated in the NPAR Program that were issued through June 1991 and summaries of those reports. Each summary describes the elements of the research covered in the report and outlines the significant results. For the convenience of the user, the reports are indexed by personal author, corporate author, and subject. 102 refs

  3. NRC research program on plant aging: Listing and abstracts of reports issued through February 1, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondic, N.N.

    1989-08-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This is a comprehensive hardware-oriented program focused on understanding the aging mechanisms of components and systems in nuclear plants. The NPAR Program also focuses on methods for simulating and monitoring the aging-related degradation of these components and systems. This document contains a listing and index of reports generated in the NPAR Program that were issued through February 1, 1989, and abstracts of those reports. Each abstract describes the elements of the research covered in the report and outlines the significant results. For the convenience of the user, the reports are indexed by personal author, corporate author, and subject

  4. NRC research program on plant aging: Listing and summaries of reports issued through May 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondic, N.N.; Hill, E.L.

    1990-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This is a comprehensive hardware-oriented engineering research program focused on understanding the aging mechanisms of components and systems in nuclear plants. The NPAR program also focuses on methods for simulating and monitoring the aging-related degradation of these components and systems. In addition, it provides recommendations for effective maintenance to manage aging and for the implementation of the research results in the regulatory process. This document contains a listing and index of reports generated in the NPAR Program that were issued through May 1990 and summaries of those reports. Each summary describes the elements of the research covered in the report and outlines the significant results. For the convenience of the user, the reports are indexed by personal author, corporate author, and subject

  5. The ARIES-ST study: Assessment of the spherical tokamak concept as fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, F.; Tillack, M.; Miller, R.; Mau, T.K.; Jardin, S.; Stambaugh, R.; Steiner, D.; Waganer, L.

    2001-01-01

    Recent experimental achievements and theoretical studies have generated substantial interest in the spherical tokamak concept. The ARIES-ST study was undertaken as a national U.S. effort to investigate the potential of the spherical tokamak concept as a fusion power plant and as a vehicle for fusion development. The 1000-MWe ARIES-ST power plant has an aspect ratio of 1.6, a major radius of 3.2 m, a plasma elongation (at 95% flux surface) of 3.4 and triangularity of 0.64. This configuration attains a β of 54% (which is 90% of the maximum theoretical β). While the plasma current is 31 MA, the almost perfect alignment of bootstrap and equilibrium current density profiles results in a current-drive power of only 31 MW. The on-axis toroidal field is 2.1 T and the peak field at the TF coil is 7.6 T, which leads to 288 MW of Joule losses in the normal-conducting TF system. The ARIES-ST study has highlighted many areas where tradeoffs among physics and engineering systems are critical in determining the optimum regime of operation for spherical tokamaks. Many critical issues also have been identified which must be resolved in R and D programs. (author)

  6. Development of DEMO-FNS tokamak for fusion and hybrid technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Azizov, E. A.; Alexeev, P. N.; Ignatiev, V. V.; Subbotin, S. A.; Tsibulskiy, V. F.

    2015-07-01

    The history of fusion-fission hybrid systems based on a tokamak device as an extremely efficient DT-fusion neutron source has passed through several periods of ample research activity in the world since the very beginning of fusion research in the 1950s. Recently, a new roadmap of the hybrid program has been proposed with the goal to build a pilot hybrid plant (PHP) in Russia by 2030. Development of the DEMO-FNS tokamak for fusion and hybrid technologies, which is planned to be built by 2023, is the key milestone on the path to the PHP. This facility is in the phase of conceptual design aimed at providing feasibility studies for a full set of steady state tokamak technologies at a fusion energy gain factor Q ˜ 1, fusion power of ˜40 MW and opportunities for testing a wide range of hybrid technologies with the emphasis on continuous nuclide processing in molten salts. This paper describes the project motivations, its current status and the key issues of the design.

  7. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-12

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development.

  8. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development

  9. Experimental programs and facilities for ASTRID development related to the Severe Accident Issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journeau, C.; Suteau, C.; Trotignon, L.; Willermoz, G.; Ducros, G.; Courouau, J.L.; Ruggieri, J.M.; Serre, F.

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental program has been launched in order to gain new data in support of the severe accident studies related to the ASTRID demonstrator. The main new issues with respect to the historic experimental database are mainly related to new design options: heterogeneous core with thick pins; new materials; new severe accident mitigation systems such as - corium discharge channels; - core-catcher with sacrificial materials; - some issues remaining open as Fuel Coolant Interaction. Experiments are needed both in-pile and out of pile: - Depending on the objectives, the out of pile experiments can be conducted - with simulant; - with prototypic corium; - or with irradiated fuel. A new large scale corium facility, FOURNAISE, must be built to fulfill this program. Already, experimental R&D started in existing facilities, such as VITI or CORRONA

  10. Adolescent developmental issues in Hong Kong: Relevance to positive youth development programs in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L

    2006-01-01

    Several adolescent developmental issues and problems in Hong Kong are examined in this paper. First, the changing adolescent substance abuse patterns are described. Second, although the overall youth crime trend was relatively stable in the past decade, shoplifting and stealing crimes deserve our concern. Third, adolescent mental health problem is a growing problem. Fourth, statistics show that unhealthy life styles, such as smoking, early sex and moral confusion are issues of concern. Fifth, the proportion of adolescents experiencing economic disadvantage has increased. Sixth, youth unemployment and non-engaged youth are growing problems when the economy of Hong Kong is undergoing re-structuring. Seventh, family and parenting problems in families with adolescents deserve our attention. Finally, the Social Development Index showed that the development of young people has gradually deteriorated in the past decade. These adolescent issues and problems provide useful pointers for designing the positive youth development program financially sponsored by the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust.

  11. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor: Physics issues, capabilities and physics program plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Present status and understanding of the principal plasma-performance determining physics issues that affect the physics design and operational capabilities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [ITER EDA Agreement and Protocol 2 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1994)] are presented. Emphasis is placed on the five major physics-basis issues emdash energy confinement, beta limit, density limit, impurity dilution and radiation loss, and the feasibility of obtaining partial-detached divertor operation emdash that directly affect projections of ITER fusion power and burn duration performance. A summary of these projections is presented and the effect of uncertainties in the physics-basis issues is examined. ITER capabilities for experimental flexibility and plasma-performance optimization are also described, and how these capabilities may enter into the ITER physics program plan is discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. Potential CERCLA reauthorization issues relevant to US DOE's Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.D.; Jaksch, J.A.; Dailey, R.L.

    1993-02-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is currently scheduled to be reauthorized in 1994. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a significant stake in CERCLA reauthorization. CERCLA, along with its implementing regulation, the National Contingency Plan (NCP), is the principal legal authority governing DOE's environmental restoration program. The manner in which CERCLA-related issues are identified, evaluated, and dispatched may have a substantial impact on DOE's ability to conduct its environmental restoration program. A number of issues that impact DOE's environmental restoration program could be addressed through CERCLA reauthorization. These issues include the need to (1) address how the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) should be integrated into DOE CERCLA actions, (2) facilitate the streamlining of the Superfund process at DOE sites, (3) address the conflicts between the requirements of CERCLA and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) that are especially relevant to DOE, (4) examine the criteria for waiving applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) at DOE sites, and (5) delineate the appropriate use of institutional controls at DOE sites

  13. Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1980-06-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated the potential for producing a viable longburn tokamak reactor by enhancing the volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer through the use of high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were assessed in the context of extended burn operation. Using a one-dimensional transport code plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the startup and shutdown portions of the tokamak cycle. A representative large aspect ratio tokamak with an aspect ratio of 8 was found to achieve a burn time of 3.5 h at capital cost only approx. 25% greater than that of a moderate aspect ratio design tokamak

  14. Coherent structures in tokamak plasmas workshop: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koniges, A.E.; Craddock, G.G.

    1992-08-01

    Coherent structures have the potential to impact a variety of theoretical and experimental aspects of tokamak plasma confinement. This includes the basic processes controlling plasma transport, propagation and efficiency of external mechanisms such as wave heating and the accuracy of plasma diagnostics. While the role of coherent structures in fluid dynamics is better understood, this is a new topic for consideration by plasma physicists. This informal workshop arose out of the need to identify the magnitude of structures in tokamaks and in doing so, to bring together for the first time the surprisingly large number of plasma researchers currently involved in work relating to coherent structures. The primary purpose of the workshop, in addition to the dissemination of information, was to develop formal and informal collaborations, set the stage for future formation of a coherent structures working group or focus area under the heading of the Tokamak Transport Task Force, and to evaluate the need for future workshops on coherent structures. The workshop was concentrated in four basic areas with a keynote talk in each area as well as 10 additional presentations. The issues of discussion in each of these areas was as follows: Theory - Develop a definition of structures and coherent as it applies to plasmas. Experiment - Review current experiments looking for structures in tokamaks, discuss experimental procedures for finding structures, discuss new experiments and techniques. Fluids - Determine how best to utilize the resource of information available from the fluids community both on the theoretical and experimental issues pertaining to coherent structures in plasmas. Computation - Discuss computational aspects of studying coherent structures in plasmas as they relate to both experimental detection and theoretical modeling

  15. Medical school accreditation in Australia: Issues involved in assessing major changes and new programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Field

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Medical Council (AMC is an independent company for quality assurance and quality improvement in medical education in Australia and New Zealand. Accreditation procedures for the 20 medical schools in these two countries are somewhat different for three different circumstances or stages of school development: existing medical schools, established courses undergoing major changes, and new schools. This paper will outline some issues involved in major changes to existing courses, and new medical school programs. Major changes have included change from a 6 year undergraduate course to a 5 year undergraduate course or 4 year graduate-entry course, introduction of a lateral graduate-entry stream, new domestic site of course delivery, offshore course delivery, joint program between two universities, and major change to curriculum. In the case of a major change assessment, accreditation of the new or revised course may be granted for a period up to two years after the full course has been implemented. In the assessment of proposals for introduction of new medical courses, six issues needing careful consideration have arisen: forward planning, academic staffing, adequate clinical experience, acceptable research program, adequacy of resources, postgraduate training program and employment.

  16. Tokamak reactor startup power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weldon, D.M.; Murray, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Tokamak startup with ohmic heating (OH)-induced voltages requires rather large voltages and power supplies. On present machines, with no radiofrequency (rf)-assist provisions, hundreds of volts have been specified for their designs. With the addition of electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) assist, the design requirements have been lowered. To obtain information on the cost and complexity associated with this ECRH-assisted, OH-pulsed startup voltage for ignition-type machines, a trade-off study was completed. The Fusion Engineering Device (FED) configuration was selected as a model because information was available on the structure. The data obtained are applicable to all tokamaks of this general size and complexity, such as the Engineering Test Reactor

  17. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.F.A.; Harbour, P.J.; Hotston, E.S.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  18. Theory of tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R B [Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1989-01-01

    The book covers the consequences of ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamics, these theories being responsible for most of what is well understood regarding the physics of tokamak discharges. The focus is on the description of equilibria, the linear and nonlinear theory of large scale modes, and single particle guiding center motion, including simple neoclassical effects. modern methods of general magnetic coordinates are used, and the student is introduced to the onset of chaos in Hamiltonian systems in the discussion of destruction of magnetic surfaces. Much of the book is devoted to the description of the limitations placed on tokamak operating parameters given by ideal and resistive modes, and current ideas about how to extend and optimize these parameters. (author). refs.; figs.

  19. Axisymmetric tokamak scapeoff transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.; Langer, W.D.

    1982-08-01

    We present the first self-consistent estimate of the magnitude of each term in a fluid treatment of plasma transport for a plasma lying in regions of open field lines in an axisymmetric tokamak. The fluid consists of a pure hydrogen plasma with sources which arise from its interaction with neutral hydrogen atoms. The analysis and results are limited to the high collisionality regime, which is optimal for a gaseous neutralizer divertor, or to a cold plasma mantle in a tokamak reactor. In this regime, both classical and neoclassical transport processes are important, and loss of particles and energy by diamagnetic flow are also significant. The prospect of extending the analysis to the lower collisionality regimes encountered in many existing experiments is discussed

  20. Density limits in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, M.

    1984-06-01

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to neutral hydrogen radiation and recycling is of great importance for the energy balance at the periphery. It is shown that the requirement for thermal equilibrium implies a constraint on the maximum attainable edge density. The relation to other density limits is discussed. The average plasma density is shown to be a strong function of the refuelling deposition profile. (author)

  1. Tokamak pump limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been done with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a region may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased edge electron temperature are observed in discharges with improved confinement. The injection of small amounts of neon into ISX-B has more clearly shown an improved electron core energy confinement during neutral beam injection. While carried out with a regular limiter, this Z-mode of operation is ideal for use with pump limiters and should be a way to achieve energy confinement times similar to values for H-mode tokamak plasmas. The implication of all these results for the design of a reactor pump limiter is described

  2. Modular tokamak magnetic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a tokamak reactor including a vacuum vessel, toroidal confining magnetic field coils disposed concentrically around the minor radius of the vacuum vessel, and poloidal confining magnetic field coils, an ohmic heating coil system comprising at least one magnetic coil disposed concentrically around a toroidal field coil, wherein the magnetic coil is wound around the toroidal field coil such that the ohmic heating coil enclosed the toroidal field coil

  3. Tokamak pump limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; California Univ., Los Angeles

    1984-01-01

    Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6 MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been performed with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scrape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a regime may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased edge electron temperature are observed in discharges with improved confinement. The injection of small amounts of neon into ISX-B has more clearly shown an improved electron core energy confinement during neutral beam injection. While carried out with a regular limiter, this 'Z-mode' of operation is ideal for use with pump limiters and should be a way to achieve energy confinement times similar to values for H-mode tokamak plasmas. The implication of all these results for the design of a reactor pump limiter is described. (orig.)

  4. Controlled thermonuclear fusion in TOKAMAK type reactors, the European example: Joint European Torus (JET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, P.J.; Yassen, F.; Assis, A.S. de; Raposo, C.

    1988-07-01

    The development of controlled thermonuclear reaction in TOKAMAK type reactors, and the main projects in the world are presented. The main characteristics of the JET (Joint European Torus) program, the perspectives for energy production, and the international cooperation for viable use of the TOKAMAK are analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. International tokamak reactor conceptual design overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) Workshop is an unique collaborative effort among Euratom, Japan, the USA and USSR. The Zero-Phase of the INTOR Workshop, which was conducted during 1979, assessed the technical data base that would support the construction of the next major device in the tokamak program to operate in the early 1990s and defined the objectives and characteristics of this device. The INTOR workshop was extended into phase-1, the Definition Phase, in early 1980. The objective of the Phase-1 Workshop was to develop a conceptual design of the INTOR experiment. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the work of the Phase-1 INTOR Workshop (January 1980-June 1981, with emphasis upon the conceptual design

  6. Management issues related to effectively implementing a nutrition education program using peer educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, T; Serrano, E; Anderson, J

    2001-01-01

    To explore the influence of administrative aspects of a nutrition education program with peer educators delivering the program. Telephone interviews with peer educators trained to deliver La Cocina Saludable, a nutrition education program for Hispanics. Open- and closed-ended questions. Abuelas (grandmothers) recruited and trained as peer educators for the program. The sample included peer educators no longer teaching (22%), currently teaching (30%), and who never taught after training. Motives and incentives for becoming peer educators, challenges for peer educators, and reasons peer educators withdrew from the program. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze quantitative data from the closed-ended questions. Qualitative analysis was applied to data from open-ended questions. Working with community and learning about nutrition were prime motivators. Recruiting participants and coordination of classes appeared to be major challenges. Personal issues and traveling in a large geographic area were cited as the main reasons for quitting. The effectiveness of using peer educators for La Cocina Saludable may be improved through empowerment, additional training, a structured and equitable reimbursement system, and assistance to carry out administrative tasks.

  7. A study on the impact of the GLOBE program on students' attitudes regarding environmental issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfready, Gary Martin

    A key objective in environmental curricula should be to instill responsible and concerned attitudes toward environmental issues. This can be accomplished through the application of innovative programs which emphasize the development of the affective domain of learning. The development of personal attitudes is one form of evidence that the affective domain is being addressed. This study was undertaken to determine the impact of the GLOBE program (Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment) on the attitudes of students toward environmental issues. Three hundred and five middle and high school level students from four states were surveyed to determine their attitudes toward selected environmental statements. Results demonstrated that attitudes toward environmental issues of GLOBE students were significantly greater than non-GLOBE students. Additional analysis demonstrated that regardless of grade levels, gender, racial and ethnicity backgrounds, depth of GLOBE involvement, and degree of teachers' GLOBE experiences, GLOBE students display similar levels of attitudes toward environmental issues. Establishment of a reliable Likert scale measurement instrument was accomplished. Permission to use an existing survey was obtained. Additional items were added to increase validity. Establishment of reliability was accomplished through a Guttman split half analysis of the piloted instrument. Through the use of factor analysis, four categories or sub-groupings of attitudes were determined to exist. Reliability was established for the factors. These sub-groupings were identified as personal commitment to environmental protection, awareness of avenues for action, loci of control, and students' perception of teachers' abilities to present environmental topics. These categories were a part of the analysis of four hypotheses.

  8. Dust limit management strategy in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosanvallon, S.; Grisolia, C.; Andrew, P.; Ciattaglia, S.; Delaporte, P.; Douai, D.; Garnier, D.; Gauthier, E.; Gulden, W.; Hong, S.H.; Pitcher, S.; Rodriguez, L.; Taylor, N.; Tesini, A.; Vartanian, S.; Vatry, A.; Wykes, M.

    2009-01-01

    Dust is produced in tokamaks by the interaction between the plasma and the plasma facing components. Dust has not yet been of a major concern in existing tokamaks mainly because the quantity is small and these devices are not nuclear facilities. However, in ITER and in future reactors, it will represent operational and potential safety issues. From a safety point of view, in order to control the potential dust hazard, the current ITER strategy is based on a defense in depth approach designed to provide reliable confinement systems, to avoid failures, and to measure and minimise the dust inventory. In addition, R and D is put in place for optimisation of the proposed methods, such as improvement of measurement, dust cleaning and the reduction of dust production. The aim of this paper is to present the approach for the control of the dust inventory, relying on the monitoring of envelope values and the development of removal techniques already developed in the existing tokamaks or plasma dedicated devices or which will need further research and development in order to be integrated in ITER.

  9. Dust limit management strategy in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosanvallon, S.; Grisolia, C.; Andrew, P.; Ciattaglia, S.; Delaporte, P.; Douai, D.; Garnier, D.; Gauthier, E.; Gulden, W.; Hong, S. H.; Pitcher, S.; Rodriguez, L.; Taylor, N.; Tesini, A.; Vartanian, S.; Vatry, A.; Wykes, M.

    2009-06-01

    Dust is produced in tokamaks by the interaction between the plasma and the plasma facing components. Dust has not yet been of a major concern in existing tokamaks mainly because the quantity is small and these devices are not nuclear facilities. However, in ITER and in future reactors, it will represent operational and potential safety issues. From a safety point of view, in order to control the potential dust hazard, the current ITER strategy is based on a defense in depth approach designed to provide reliable confinement systems, to avoid failures, and to measure and minimise the dust inventory. In addition, R&D is put in place for optimisation of the proposed methods, such as improvement of measurement, dust cleaning and the reduction of dust production. The aim of this paper is to present the approach for the control of the dust inventory, relying on the monitoring of envelope values and the development of removal techniques already developed in the existing tokamaks or plasma dedicated devices or which will need further research and development in order to be integrated in ITER.

  10. Experimental results from the TUMAN 3 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golant, V.E.; Andrejko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Korneev, V.A.; Krikunov, S.V.; Lipin, B.M.; Lebedev, S.V.; Levin, L.S.; Podushnikova, K.A.; Razdobarin, G.T.; Rozhansky, V.A.; Rozhdestvensky, V.V.; Tendler, M.; Tukachinsky, A.S.; Jaroshevich, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    The open-quote open-quote TUMAN-3 close-quote close-quote Tokamak programme concentrates on issues of improved confinement. In 1989 the transition from an ordinary Ohmic regime into an improved confinement mode was achieved. The signatures of the H-mode in auxiliary heated tokamaks have been observed in this regime. The crucial role of the boundary radial electric field was found in the experiments with internal bias probe. Other techniques were demonstrated to disturb the boundary plasma which led to H-mode triggering: short increase of working gas puffing, minor radius magnetic compression and pellet injection. The role scaling of the energy confinement time in the Ohmic H-mode was obtained, which differs dramatically from the scaling for the ordinary Ohmic regime. There were found a strong dependence of τ E on plasma current and a weak dependence on density. The maximum value of τ E was 10 times longer than in the ordinary Ohmic region. The τ E scaling for the Ohmic H-mode is consistent with the scaling proposed for devices with powerful auxiliary heating. The results shows that H-mode physics is universal in tokamaks with different geometries and heating methods. (AIP) copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  11. Experimental and theoretical basis for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.S.

    1994-09-01

    In this paper, arguments will be presented to support the attractiveness of advanced tokamaks as fusion reactors. The premise that all improved confinement regimes obtained to date were limited by magnetohydrodynamic stability will be established from experimental results. Accessing the advanced tokamak regime, therefore, requires means to overcome and enhance the beta limit. We will describe a number of ideas involving control of the plasma internal profiles, e.g. to achieve this. These approaches will have to be compatible with the underlying mechanisms for confinement improvement, such as shear rotation suppression of turbulence. For steady-state, there is a trade-off between full bootstrap current operation and the ability to control current profiles. The coupling between current drive and stability dictates the choice of sources and suggests an optimum for the bootstrap fraction. We summarize by presenting the future plans of the US confinement devices, DIII-D, PBX-M, C-Mod, to address the advanced tokamak physics issues and provide a database for the design of next-generation experiments

  12. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization

  13. The density limit in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alladio, F.

    1985-01-01

    A short summary of the present status of experimental observations, theoretical ideas and understanding of the density limit in tokamaks is presented. It is the result of the discussion that was held on this topic at the 4th European Tokamak Workshop in Copenhagen (December 4th to 6th, 1985). 610 refs

  14. DIII-D tokamak long range plan. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The DIII-D Tokamak Long Range Plan for controlled thermonuclear magnetic fusion research will be carried out with broad national and international participation. The plan covers: (1) operation of the DIII-D tokamak to conduct research experiments to address needs of the US Magnetic Fusion Program; (2) facility modifications to allow these new experiments to be conducted; and (3) collaborations with other laboratories to integrate DIII-D research into the national and international fusion programs. The period covered by this plan is 1 November 19983 through 31 October 1998

  15. Safeguard and security issues for the U.S. Fissile Materials Disposition Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, C.D.; Moya, R.W.; Duggan, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Materials Disposition (MD) is analyzing long-term storage and disposition options for fissile materials, preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), preparing for a Record of Decision (ROD) regarding this material, and conducting other related activities. A primary objective of this program is to support U.S. nonproliferation policy by reducing major security risks. Particular areas of concern are the acquisition of this material by unauthorized persons and preventing the reintroduction of the material for use in weapons. This paper presents some of the issues, definitions, and assumptions addressed by the Safeguards and Security Project Team in support of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). The discussion also includes some preliminary ideas regarding safeguards and security criteria that are applicable to the screening of disposition options

  16. Safeguards and security issues for the U.S. Fissile Materials Disposition Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, C.D.; Moya, R.W.; Duggan, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Materials Disposition (MD) is analyzing long-term storage and disposition options for fissile materials, preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), preparing for a Record of Decision (ROD) regarding this material, and conducting other related activities. A primary objective of this program is to support US nonproliferation policy by reducing major security risks. Particular areas of concern are the acquisition of this material by unauthorized persons and preventing the reintroduction of the material for use in weapons. This paper presents some of the issues, definitions, and assumptions addressed by the Safeguards and Security Project Team in support of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). The discussion also includes some preliminary ideas regarding safeguards and security criteria that are applicable to the screening of disposition options

  17. Faculty Development for Simulation Programs: Five Issues for the Future of Debriefing Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Adan; Grant, Vincent; Dieckmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    STATEMENT: Debriefing is widely recognized as a critically important element of simulation-based education. Simulation educators obtain and/or seek debriefing training from various sources, including workshops at conferences, simulation educator courses, formal fellowships in debriefings, or thro...... be used to improve debriefing quality within programs? (5) How can we individualize debriefing training opportunities to the learning needs of our educators?......STATEMENT: Debriefing is widely recognized as a critically important element of simulation-based education. Simulation educators obtain and/or seek debriefing training from various sources, including workshops at conferences, simulation educator courses, formal fellowships in debriefings......, or through advanced degrees. Although there are many options available for debriefing training, little is known about how faculty development opportunities should be structured to maintain and enhance the quality of debriefing within simulation programs. In this article, we discuss 5 key issues to help shape...

  18. Tokamaks - Third Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A L

    2004-01-01

    John Wesson's well known book, now re-edited for the third time, provides an excellent introduction to fusion oriented plasma physics in tokamaks. The author's task was a very challenging one, for a confined plasma is a complex system characterised by a variety of dimensionless parameters and its properties change qualitatively when certain threshold values are reached in this multi-parameter space. As a consequence, theoretical description is required at different levels, which are complementary: particle orbits, kinetic and fluid descriptions, but also intuitive and empirical approaches. Theory must be carried out on many fronts: equilibrium, instabilities, heating, transport etc. Since the properties of the confined plasma depend on the boundary conditions, the physics of plasmas along open magnetic field lines and plasma surface interaction processes must also be accounted for. Those subjects (and others) are discussed in depth in chapters 2-9. Chapter 1 mostly deals with ignition requirements and the tokamak concept, while chapter 14 provides a list of useful relations: differential operators, collision times, characteristic lengths and frequencies, expressions for the neoclassical resistivity and heat conduction, the bootstrap current etc. The presentation is sufficiently broad and thorough that specialists within tokamak research can either pick useful and up-to-date information or find an authoritative introduction into other areas of the subject. It is also clear and concise so that it should provide an attractive and accurate initiation for those wishing to enter the field and for outsiders who would like to understand the concepts and be informed about the goals and challenges on the horizon. Validation of theoretical models requires adequately resolved experimental data for the various equilibrium profiles (clearly a challenge in the vicinity of transport barriers) and the fluctuations to which instabilities give rise. Chapter 10 is therefore devoted to

  19. The tokamak as a neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendel, H.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1989-11-01

    This paper describes the tokamak in its role as a neutron source, with emphasis on experimental results for D-D neutron production. The sections summarize tokamak operation, sources of fusion and non-fusion neutrons, principal neutron detection methods and their calibration, neutron energy spectra and fluxes outside the tokamak plasma chamber, history of neutron production in tokamaks, neutron emission and fusion power gain from JET and TFTR (the largest present-day tokamaks), and D-T neutron production from burnup of D-D tritons. This paper also discusses the prospects for future tokamak neutron production and potential applications of tokamak neutron sources. 100 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Tokamak instrumentation and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becraft, W.R.; Bettis, E.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Onega, R.J.; Stone, R.S.

    1979-02-01

    The three areas of study emphasis to date are: (1) Physics implications for controls, (2) Computer simulation, and (3) Shutdown/aborts. This document reports on the FY 78 efforts (the first year of these studies) to address these problems. Transient scenario options for the startup of a tokamak are developed, and the implications for the control system are discussed. This document also presents a hybrid computer simulation (analog and digital) of the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) which is now being used for corroborative controls investigations. The simulation will be expanded to represent a TNS/ETF machine

  1. Maximum entropy tokamak configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minardi, E.

    1989-01-01

    The new entropy concept for the collective magnetic equilibria is applied to the description of the states of a tokamak subject to ohmic and auxiliary heating. The condition for the existence of steady state plasma states with vanishing entropy production implies, on one hand, the resilience of specific current density profiles and, on the other, severe restrictions on the scaling of the confinement time with power and current. These restrictions are consistent with Goldston scaling and with the existence of a heat pinch. (author)

  2. The design of the KSTAR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.S.; Kim, J.; Hwang, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) project is the major effort of the Korean national fusion program (KNFP) to develop a steady-state-capable advanced superconducting tokamak to establish a scientific and technological basis for an attractive fusion reactor. Major parameters of the tokamak are: major radius 1.8 m, minor radius 0.5 m, toroidal field 3.5 Tesla, and plasma current 2 MA with a strongly shaped plasma cross-section and double-null divertor. The initial pulse length provided by the poloidal magnet system is 20 s, but the pulse length can be increased to 300 s through non-inductive current drive. The plasma heating and current drive system consists of neutral beam, ion cyclotron waves, lower hybrid waves, and electron-cyclotron waves for flexible profile control. A comprehensive set of diagnostics is planned for plasma control and performance evaluation and physics understanding. The project has completed its conceptual design phase and moved to the engineering design phase. The target date of the first plasma is set for year 2002. (orig.)

  3. Variational formalism for kinetic-MHD instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edery, D.; Garbet, X.; Roubin, J.P.; Samain, A.

    1991-07-01

    A variational formalism that includes in a consistent way the tokamak plasma fluid response to an electromagnetic field as well as the particle-field resonant interaction effects is presented. The integrability of the unperturbed motion of the particles is used to establish a general functional similar to the classical Lagrangian for the electromagnetic field, which is extremum with respect to the field potentials. This functional is the sum of fluid terms closely related to the classical MHD energy and of resonant terms describing the kinetic effects. The formalism is used to study a critical issue in tokamak confinement, namely the sawteeth stabilization by energetic particles

  4. DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Research Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V.S. Chan; C.M. Greenfield; L.L. Lao; T.C. Luce; C.C. Petty; G.M. Staebler

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the development of long-pulse, high performance discharges on the DIII-D tokamak. It is highlighted by a discharge achieving simultaneously β N H of 9, bootstrap current fraction of 0.5, noninductive current fraction of 0.75, and sustained for 16 energy confinement times. The physics challenge has changed in the long-pulse regime. Non-ideal MHD modes are limiting the stability, fast ion driven modes may play a role in fast ion transport which limits the stored energy and plasma edge behavior can affect the global performance. New control tools are being developed to address these issues

  5. Review of tokamak power reactor and blanket designs in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Gohar, Y.; Smith, D.; Sze, D.

    1986-01-01

    The last major conceptual design study of a tokamak power reactor in the United States was STARFIRE which was carried out in 1979-1980. Since that time US studies have concentrated on engineering test reactors, demonstration reactors, parametric systems studies, scoping studies, and studies of selected critical issues such as pulsed vs. steady-state operation and blanket requirements. During this period, there have been many advancements in tokamak physics and reactor technology, and there has also been a recognition that it is desirable to improve the tokamak concept as a commercial power reactor candidate. During 1984-1985 several organizations participated in the Tokamak Power Systems Study (TPSS) with the objective of developing ideas for improving the tokamak as a power reactor. Also, the US completed a comprehensive Blanket Comparison and Selection Study which formed the basis for further studies on improved blankets for fusion reactors

  6. Queer Youth as Teachers: Dismantling Silence of Queer Issues in a Teacher Preparation Program Committed to Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiegler, Sam

    2008-01-01

    This interview-based essay explores how a teacher-training program, while ostensibly dedicated to the idea of teaching for social justice, completely neglected issues of homophobia and heterosexism. How did silence around queer issues leave a dedicated group of young, queer teachers-in-training without the academic, intellectual, or psychological…

  7. Reactor safety issues resolved by the 2D/3D program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The 2D/3D Program studied multidimensional thermal-hydraulics in a PWR core and primary system during the end-of-blowdown and post-blowdown phases of a large-break LOCA (LBLOCA), and during selected small-break LOCA (SBLOCA) transients. The program included tests at the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF), and the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF), and computer analyses using TRAC. Tests at CCTF investigated core thermal-hydraulics and overall system behavior while tests at SCTF concentrated on multidimensional core thermal-hydraulics. The UPTF tests investigated two-phase flow behavior in the downcomer, upper plenum, tie plate region, and primary loops. TRAC analyses evaluated thermal-hydraulic behavior throughout the primary system in tests as well as in PWRs. This report summarizes the test and analysis results in each of the main areas where improved information was obtained in the 2D/3D Program. The discussion is organized in terms of the reactor safety issues investigated. This report was prepared in a coordination among US, Germany and Japan. US and Germany have published the report as NUREG/IA-0127 and GRS-101 respectively. (author)

  8. Reactor safety issues resolved by the 2D/3D Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damerell, P.S.; Simons, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    The 2D/3D Program studied multidimensional thermal-hydraulics in a PWR core and primary system during the end-of-blowdown and post-blowdown phases of a large-break LOCA (LBLOCA), and during selected small-break LOCA (SBLOCA) transients. The program included tests at the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF), and the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF), and computer analyses using TRAC. Tests at CCTF investigated core thermal-hydraulics and overall system behavior while tests at SCTF concentrated on multidimensional core thermal-hydraulics. The UPTF tests investigated two-phase flow behavior in the downcomer, upper plenum, tie plate region, and primary loops. TRAC analyses evaluated thermal-hydraulic behavior throughout the primary system in tests as well as in PWRs. This report summarizes the test and analysis results in each of the main areas where improved information was obtained in the 2D/3D Program. The discussion is organized in terms of the reactor safety issues investigated

  9. Reactor safety issues resolved by the 2D/3D program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The 2D/3D Program studied multidimensional thermal-hydraulics in a PWR core and primary system during the end-of-blowdown and post-blowdown phases of a large-break LOCA (LBLOCA), and during selected small-break LOCA (SBLOCA) transients. The program included tests at the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF), and the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF), and computer analyses using TRAC. Tests at CCTF investigated core thermal-hydraulics and overall system behavior while tests at SCTF concentrated on multidimensional core thermal-hydraulics. The UPTF tests investigated two-phase flow behavior in the downcomer, upper plenum, tie plate region, and primary loops. TRAC analyses evaluated thermal-hydraulic behavior throughout the primary system in tests as well as in PWRs. This report summarizes the test and analysis results in each of the main areas where improved information was obtained in the 2D/3D Program. The discussion is organized in terms of the reactor safety issues investigated. This report was prepared in a coordination among US, Germany and Japan. US and Germany have published the report as NUREG/IA-0127 and GRS-101 respectively. (author).

  10. Topology of tokamak orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, J.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-09-01

    Guiding center orbits in noncircular axisymmetric tokamak plasmas are studied in the constants of motion (COM) space of (v, zeta, psi/sub m/). Here, v is the particle speed, zeta is the pitch angle with respect to the parallel equilibrium current, J/sub parallels/, and psi/sub m/ is the maximum value of the poloidal flux function (increasing from the magnetic axis) along the guiding center orbit. Two D-shaped equilibria in a flux-conserving tokamak having β's of 1.3% and 7.7% are used as examples. In this space, each confined orbit corresponds to one and only one point and different types of orbits (e.g., circulating, trapped, stagnation and pinch orbits) are represented by separate regions or surfaces in the space. It is also shown that the existence of an absolute minimum B in the higher β (7.7%) equilibrium results in a dramatically different orbit topology from that of the lower β case. The differences indicate the confinement of additional high energy (v → c, within the guiding center approximation) trapped, co- and countercirculating particles whose orbit psi/sub m/ falls within the absolute B well

  11. ITER tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, J.; Salpietro, E.; Shatalov, G.

    1991-01-01

    The results of the Conceptual Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are summarized. These activities, carried out between April 1988 and December 1990, produced a consistent set of technical characteristics and preliminary plans for co-ordinated research and development support of ITER; and a conceptual design, a description of design requirements and a preliminary construction schedule and cost estimate. After a description of the design basis, an overview is given of the tokamak device, its auxiliary systems, facility and maintenance. The interrelation and integration of the various subsystems that form the ITER tokamak concept are discussed. The 16 ITER equatorial port allocations, used for nuclear testing, diagnostics, fuelling, maintenance, and heating and current drive, are given, as well as a layout of the reactor building. Finally, brief descriptions are given of the major ITER sub-systems, i.e., (i) magnet systems (toroidal and poloidal field coils and cryogenic systems), (ii) containment structures (vacuum and cryostat vessels, machine gravity supports, attaching locks, passive loops and active coils), (iii) first wall, (iv) divertor plate (design and materials, performance and lifetime, a.o.), (v) blanket/shield system, (vi) maintenance equipment, (vii) current drive and heating, (viii) fuel cycle system, and (ix) diagnostics. 11 refs, figs and tabs

  12. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-01-01

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 (micro)m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics

  13. Axisymmetric control in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, D.A.

    1991-02-01

    Vertically elongated tokamak plasmas are intrinsically susceptible to vertical axisymmetric instabilities as a result of the quadrupole field which must be applied to produce the elongation. The present work analyzes the axisymmetric control necessary to stabilize elongated equilibria, with special application to the Alcator C-MOD tokamak. A rigid current-conserving filamentary plasma model is applied to Alcator C-MOD stability analysis, and limitations of the model are addressed. A more physically accurate nonrigid plasma model is developed using a perturbed equilibrium approach to estimate linearized plasma response to conductor current variations. This model includes novel flux conservation and vacuum vessel stabilization effects. It is found that the nonrigid model predicts significantly higher growth rates than predicted by the rigid model applied to the same equilibria. The nonrigid model is then applied to active control system design. Multivariable pole placement techniques are used to determine performance optimized control laws. Formalisms are developed for implementing and improving nominal feedback laws using the C-MOD digital-analog hybrid control system architecture. A proportional-derivative output observer which does not require solution of the nonlinear Ricatti equation is developed to help accomplish this implementation. The nonrigid flux conserving perturbed equilibrium plasma model indicates that equilibria with separatrix elongation of at least κ sep = 1.85 can be stabilized robustly with the present control architecture and conductor/sensor configuration

  14. Modelling dust transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.D.; Martin, J.D.; Bacharis, M.; Coppins, M.; Counsell, G.F.; Allen, J.E.; Counsell, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    The DTOKS code, which models dust transport through tokamak plasmas, is described. The floating potential and charge of a dust grain in a plasma and the fluxes of energy to and from it are calculated. From this model, the temperature of the dust grain can be estimated. A plasma background is supplied by a standard tokamak edge modelling code (B2SOLPS5.0), and dust transport through MAST (the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak) and ITER plasmas is presented. We conclude that micron-radius tungsten dust can reach the separatrix in ITER. (authors)

  15. A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the Environmental Restoration Program: Selected case histories and associated issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.C.

    1994-08-01

    Since the 1940s, US Department of Energy (DOE) sites have been used for nuclear materials processing and production, warhead testing, and weapons research and development. These activities have resulted in extensive environmental contamination. DOE has established a goal to cleanup and restore the groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water at its facilities across the nation. To achieve this goal, many workers will be needed to conduct the cleanup. These workers will need training and will be required to follow occupational safety and health (OSH) regulations and guidelines. Compliance with the OSH regulations and guidelines will have an anomous influence on the schedule, money, and technology needed for environmental restoration. Therefore, one area that must be considered in the early stages of long-term planning is the impact of OSH issues on the environmental restoration process. The DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigate the impact of these issues on the environmental restoration process

  16. Tokamak building-design considerations for a large tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.; Thomson, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    Design and construction of a satisfactory tokamak building to support FED appears feasible. Further, a pressure vessel building does not appear necessary to meet the plant safety requirements. Some of the building functions will require safety class systems to assure reliable and safe operation. A rectangular tokamak building has been selected for FED preconceptual design which will be part of the confinement system relying on ventilation and other design features to reduce the consequences and probability of radioactivity release

  17. Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines, Quartelry Report: 2nd Quarter, Issue No.1, October 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, P.; Forsyth, T.

    2000-11-02

    The Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines quarterly report provides industry members with a description of the program, its mission, and purpose. It also provides a vehicle for participants to report performance data, activities, and issues during quarterly test periods.

  18. Procurement activities required by the nuclear program developed by nuclearelectrica national company- technical issues versus public acquisitions legal issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatamanu, Mariana

    2007-01-01

    Public procurement is one of the areas of the single market where the results of the liberalization drive have not yet measured up to expectations. This communication presents some technical issues versus public acquisition legal issues and suggests ways and means of improving contract award procedures. Procurement area includes the acquisition of goods, services and works, thus assumption not only for purchasing equipment, components, spare-parts or materials, but also hiring of the contractors or consultants to carry out services and works. Procurement is related to the function of management of supply, which encompasses aside range of planning function, coding and classification, stockholding policies, store-keeping, stores accounting, etc. but it is also related to the hiring of contractors or consultants for work or services. As an answer to the challenge of the increasing market globalization it has been developed the ISO quality system, within 9000 family of standards. The very intensive competition for all market clients, either locally or globally, encouraged development of a new concept of quality management systems. Due to its specificity of activity and with respect to the rules and legislation requirements imposed either by the internal Romanian Laws and Regulations or/and by international market rules and constrains, the development, construction and operation of a Nuclear Power Plant shall be performed in a controlled condition and based on specific authorizations obtained by the Owner of the NPP from the Romanian Regulatory Authorities. The experience, accumulated by over 10 years of operation of Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 by our company, demonstrates the high importance of the Quality Management System that imposes the quality of the components installed on the plant, the services and the works developed to assure a safety operation of the nuclear unit, with a strongly dependence by the procurement system established for purchasing of goods, services and

  19. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The technical reports in this document were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting ''Research on Small Tokamaks'', September 1990, in three sessions, viz., (1) Plasma Modes, Control, and Internal Phenomena, (2) Edge Phenomena, and (3) Advanced Configurations and New Facilities. In Section (1) experiments at controlling low mode number modes, feedback control using external coils, lower-hybrid current drive for the stabilization of sawtooth activity and continuous (1,1) mode, and unmodulated and fast modulated ECRH mode stabilization experiments were reported, as well as the relation to disruptions and transport of low m,n modes and magnetic island growth; static magnetic perturbations by helical windings causing mode locking and sawtooth suppression; island widths and frequency of the m=2 tearing mode; ultra-fast cooling due to pellet injection; and, finally, some papers on advanced diagnostics, i.e., lithium-beam activated charge-exchange spectroscopy, and detection through laser scattering of discrete Alfven waves. In Section (2), experimental edge physics results from a number of machines were presented (positive biasing on HYBTOK II enhancing the radial electric field and improving confinement; lower hybrid current drive on CASTOR improving global particle confinement, good current drive efficiency in HT-6B showing stabilization of sawteeth and Mirnov oscillations), as well as diagnostic developments (multi-chord time resolved soft and ultra-soft X-ray plasma radiation detection on MT-1; measurements on electron capture cross sections in multi-charged ion-atom collisions; development of a diagnostic neutral beam on Phaedrus-T). Theoretical papers discussed the influence of sheared flow and/or active feedback on edge microstability, large edge electric fields, and two-fluid modelling of non-ambipolar scrape-off layers. Section (3) contained (i) a proposal to construct a spherical tokamak ''Proto-Eta'', (ii) an analysis of ultra-low-q and runaway

  20. Data processing system for spectroscopy at Novillo Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega C, G.; Gaytan G, E.

    1998-01-01

    Taking as basis some proposed methodologies by software engineering it was designed and developed a data processing system coming from the diagnostic equipment by spectroscopy, for the study of plasma impurities, during the cleaning discharges. the data acquisition is realized through an electronic interface which communicates the computer with the spectroscopy system of Novillo Tokamak. The data were obtained starting from files type text and processed for their subsequently graphic presentation. For development of this system named PRODATN (Processing of Data for Spectroscopy in Novillo Tokamak) was used the LabVIEW graphic programming language. (Author)

  1. Development of a visualized software for tokamak experiment data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jianyong; Ding Xuantong; Luo Cuiwen

    2004-01-01

    With the VBA programming in Microsoft Excel, the authors have developed a post-processing software of experimental data in tokamak. The standard formal data in the HL-1M and HL-2A tokamaks can be read, displayed in Excel, and transmitted directly into the MATLAB workspace, for displaying pictures in MATLAB with the software. The authors have also developed data post-processing software in MATLAB environment, which can read standard format data, display picture, supply visual graphical user interface and provide part of advanced signal processing ability

  2. Evolution of the DINA-CH tokamak full discharge simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, J.B.; Dokouka, V.N.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Lukash, V.E.; Duval, B.P.; Moret, J.-M.; Artaud, J.-F.; Baziuk, V.; Cavinato, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarises the approach taken to develop an open architecture full tokamak discharge simulator - DINA-CH - based on the DINA code and implemented under graphical programming control using Matlab-SIMULINK. The evolution path and present status are presented, with applications to ITER and TCV. The future evolution combining DINA-CH with Cronos, is discussed

  3. Natural current profiles in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biskamp, D.

    1986-01-01

    It is proposed that a certain class of equilibrium, which follow from an elementary variational principle, are the natural current profiles in tokamaks, to which actual discharge profiles tend to relax. (orig.)

  4. Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Alcator C-Mod at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is operated as a DOE national user facility. Alcator C-Mod is a unique, compact tokamak facility that uses...

  5. JUST: Joint Upgraded Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizov, E.A.; Dvorkin, N.Ya.; Filatov, O.G.

    1997-01-01

    The main goals, ideas and the programme of JUST, spherical tokamak (ST) for the plasma burn investigation, are presented. The place and prospects of JUST in thermonuclear investigations are discussed. (author)

  6. Preliminary Design of Alborz Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, M.; Amrollahi, R.; Saramad, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. The most important part of the tokamak design is the design of TF coils. In this paper a refined design of the TF coil system for the Alborz tokamak is presented. This design is based on cooper cable conductor with 5 cm width and 6 mm thickness. The TF coil system is consist of 16 rectangular shape coils, that makes the magnetic field of 0.7 T at the plasma center. The stored energy in total is 160 kJ, and the power supply used in this system is a capacitor bank with capacity of C = 1.32 mF and V max = 14 kV.

  7. New directions in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    New directions for tokamak research are briefly mentioned. Some of the areas for new considerations are the following: reactor size, beta ratio, current drivers, blankets, impurity control, and modular designs

  8. Structural features of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citrolo, J.; Brown, G.; Rogoff, P.

    1987-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is undergoing preliminary structural design and definitions. It will be relatively inexpensive with ignition capabilities. During the definition phase it was concluded that the TF coil should be assembled from the laminate copper-Inconel plates since copper alone cannot sustain the expected magnetic and thermal loads. An extensive test program is being initiated to investigate the various materials, and their elastic and inelastic response and to develop the constitutive equations required for the selection of design criteria and for the stress analysis of this device. Finite element analysis nonlinear material capabilities are being used to study, predict and correlate the machine behavior

  9. Revisiting Employee Assistance Programs and Substance Use Problems in the Workplace: Key Issues and a Research Agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Levy Merrick, Elizabeth S.; Volpe-Vartanian, Joanna; Horgan, Constance M.; McCann, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    This column describes employee assistance program (EAPs) and identifies key issues for contemporary EAPs. These programs began as occupational alcohol programs and have evolved into more comprehensive resources. To better understand contemporary EAPs, the authors suggest a research agenda at includes descriptive studies to provide an up-to-date picture of services; investigations of how contemporary EAPs address substance use problems, including management consultation for early identificatio...

  10. A model for plasma discharges simulation in Tokamak devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Antonio M.M.; Silva, Ruy P. da; Galvao, Ricardo M.O.; Kusnetzov, Yuri; Nascimento, I.C.; Cuevas, Nelson

    2001-01-01

    In this work, a 'zero-dimensional' model for simulation of discharges in Tokamak machine is presented. The model allows the calculation of the time profiles of important parameters of the discharge. The model was applied to the TCABR Tokamak to study the influence of parameters and physical processes during the discharges. Basically it is constituted of five differential equations: two related to the primary and secondary circuits of the ohmic heating transformer and the other three conservation equations of energy, charge and neutral particles. From the physical model, a computer program has been built with the objective of obtaining the time profiles of plasma current, the current in the primary of the ohmic heating transformer, the electronic temperature, the electronic density and the neutral particle density. It was also possible, with the model, to simulate the effects of gas puffing during the shot. The results of the simulation were compared with the experimental results obtained in the TCABR Tokamak, using hydrogen gas

  11. Cryogenic system design for a compact tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Kerns, J.A.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The International Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) is a program presently underway to design a next-generation tokamak reactor. The cryogenic system for this reactor must meet unusual and new requirements. Unusually high heat loads (100 kW at 4.5 K) must be handled because neutron shielding has been limited to save space in the reactor core. Also, large variations in the cryogenics loads occur over short periods of time because of the pulsed nature of some of the operating scenarios. This paper describes a workable cryogenic system design for a compact tokamak reactor such as ITER. A design analysis is presented dealing with a system that handles transient loads, coil quenches, reactor cool-down and the effect of variations in helium-supply temperatures on the cryogenic stability of the coils. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Bataan Coastal Resource Management Programs: Environmental, Socio-Economic, and Implementation Issues from Stakeholders’ Views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvin B. Cervania

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A study on the status of Bataan’s coastal zones, and the issues on the province’s coastal resource management (CRM programs under an integrated framework was commissioned by the Department of Science and Technology-Region III in the Philippines. Twenty-eight representative coastal villages and 11 water testing sites served as study areas. The research participants totalled to 1,300. Focused group discussions, survey and interviews, laboratory testing, documentary analysis, and literature review were used in the data gathering. It was concluded that the province’s coastal zones are in a disturbed state, which has negative implications to its already subsistent coastal population and important coastal economic activities. The province’s CRM projects have been arbitrary and intermittent. There are too few conservation initiatives due to scarcity of baseline data necessary for more methodical CRM programs. There is poor grassroots level involvement in CRM decision-making processes as well which clearly defeats the essence of integrated coastal management. A coordinated effort to strengthen stakeholder participation in critical CRM stages, and to conduct more comprehensive profilings and assessments of the province’s coastal environment involving the government, academics, and scientists are recommended to substantiate stakeholder involvement and increase the quality of data for CRM projects.

  13. Review of Issues Associated with Safe Operation and Management of the Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Paul M.; Blomberg, Richard D.; Gleghorn, George J.; Krone, Norris J.; Voltz, Richard A.; Dunn, Robert F.; Donlan, Charles J.; Kauderer, Bernard M.; Brill, Yvonne C.; Englar, Kenneth G.; hide

    1996-01-01

    At the request of the President of the United States through the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the NASA Administrator tasked the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel with the responsibility to identify and review issues associated with the safe operation and management of the Space Shuttle program arising from ongoing efforts to improve and streamline operations. These efforts include the consolidation of operations under a single Space Flight Operations Contract (SFOC), downsizing the Space Shuttle workforce and reducing costs of operations and management. The Panel formed five teams to address the potentially significant safety impacts of the seven specific topic areas listed in the study Terms of Reference. These areas were (in the order in which they are presented in this report): Maintenance of independent safety oversight; implementation plan for the transition of Shuttle program management to the Lead Center; communications among NASA Centers and Headquarters; transition plan for downsizing to anticipated workforce levels; implementation of a phased transition to a prime contractor for operations; Shuttle flight rate for Space Station assembly; and planned safety and performance upgrades for Space Station assembly. The study teams collected information through briefings, interviews, telephone conversations and from reviewing applicable documentation. These inputs were distilled by each team into observations and recommendations which were then reviewed by the entire Panel.

  14. The collaborative tokamak control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic fusion experiments keep growing in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaborations between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. In the US, the National Fusion Collaboratory Project is developing a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for all aspects of magnetic fusion energy research by creating a robust, user-friendly collaborative environment and deploying this to the more than 1000 US fusion scientists in 40 institutions who perform magnetic fusion research. This paper reports on one aspect of the project which is the development of the collaborative tokamak control room to enhance both collocated and remote scientific participation in experimental operations. This work includes secured computational services that can be scheduled as required, the ability to rapidly compare experimental data with simulation results, a means to easily share individual results with the group by moving application windows to a shared display, and the ability for remote scientists to be fully engaged in experimental operations through shared audio, video, and applications. The project is funded by the USDOE Office of Science, Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program and unites fusion and computer science researchers to directly address these challenges

  15. Numerical Tokamak Project code comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, R.E.; Cohen, B.I.; Beer, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Numerical Tokamak Project undertook a code comparison using a set of TFTR tokamak parameters. Local radial annulus codes of both gyrokinetic and gyrofluid types were compared for both slab and toroidal case limits assuming ion temperature gradient mode turbulence in a pure plasma with adiabatic electrons. The heat diffusivities were found to be in good internal agreement within ± 50% of the group average over five codes

  16. Confinement and diffusion in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliams, R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of electric field fluctuations on confinement and diffusion in tokamak is discussed. Based on the experimentally determined cross-field turbolent diffusion coefficient, D∼3.7*cT e /eB(δn i /n i ) rms which is also derived by a simple theory, the cross-field diffusion time, tp=a 2 /D, is calculated and compared to experimental results from 51 tokamak for standard Ohmic operation

  17. Enhancement of confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis begins by identifying a hypothetical model of tokamak confinement that is designed to take into account the conflict between Tsub(e)(r)-profile shapes arising from microscopic transport and J(r)-profile shapes required for gross stability. On the basis of this model, a number of hypothetical lines of advance are developed. Some TFTR experiments that may point the way to a particularly attractive type of tokamak reactor regime are discussed. (author)

  18. High Beta Tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, G.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Ivers, T.H.; Sankar, M.K.V.; Eisner, E.; Gates, D.; Garofalo, A.; Kombargi, R.; Maurer, D.; Nadle, D.; Xiao, Q.

    1993-01-01

    During the past 6 months, experiments have been conducted with the HBT-EP tokamak in order to (1) test and evaluate diagnostic systems, (2) establish basic machine operation, (3) document MHD behavior as a function of global discharge parameters, (4) investigate conditions leading to passive stabilization of MHD instabilities, and (5) quantify the external saddle coil current required for DC mode locking. In addition, the development and installation of new hardware systems has occurred. A prototype saddle coil was installed and tested. A five-position (n,m) = (1,2) external helical saddle coil was attached for mode-locking experiments. And, fabrication of the 32-channel UV tomography and the multipass Thomson scattering diagnostics have begun in preparation for installation later this year

  19. Anomalous transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented of what is known about anomalous transport in tokamaks. It is generally thought that this anomalous transport is the result of fluctuations in various plasma parameters. In the plasma edge detailed measurements of the quantities required to directly determine the fluctuation driven fluxes are available. The total flux of particles is well explained by the measured electrostatic fluctuation driven flux. However, a satisfactory model to explain the origin of the fluctuations has not been identified. The processes responsible for determining the edge energy flux are less clear, but electrostatic convection plays an important part. In the confinement region experimental observations are presently restricted to measurements of density and potential fluctuations and their correlations. The characteristics of the measured fluctuations are discussed and compared with the predictions of various models. Comparisons between measured particle, electron heat and ion heat fluxes, and those fluxes predicted to result from the measured fluctuations, are made. Magnetic fluctuations is discussed

  20. Tokamak hybrid study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.

    1976-09-01

    A report on one year of study of a tokamak hybrid reactor is presented. The plasma is maintained by both D and T beams. To obtain long burn times a poloidal field divertor is required. Both the single null and the double null style of divertor are considered. The blanket consists of a neutron multiplier region containing natural uranium followed by burner regions of molten salt (flibe) loaded with PuF 3 to enhance the energy multiplication. Economic analysis has been applied only recently to a variety of reactor sizes and plasma conditions. Early indications suggest that the most attractive hybrids will have large plasmas of major radius in excess of 8 meters

  1. Tokamak hybrid study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.

    1976-01-01

    A report on one year of study of a tokamak hybrid reactor is given. The plasma is maintained by both D and T beams. To obtain long burn times a poloidal field divertor is required. Both the single null and the double null style of divertor are considered. The blanket consists of a neutron multiplier region containing natural uranium followed by burner regions of molten salt (flibe) loaded with PuF 3 to enhance the energy multiplication. Economic analysis has been applied only recently to a variety of reactor sizes and plasma conditions. Early indications suggest that the most attractive hybrids will have large plasmas of major radius in excess of 8 meters

  2. The Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses his lab's plan for completing the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) conceptual design during calendar year 1987. Around July 1 they froze the subsystem envelopes on the device to continue with the conceptual design. They did this by formalizing a general requirements document. They have been developing the management plan and submitted a version to the DOE July 10. He describes a group of management activities. They released the vacuum vessel Request For Proposals (RFP) on August 5. An RFP to do a major part of the system engineering on the device is being developed. They intend to assemble the device outside of the test cell, then move it into the the test cell, install it there, and bring to the test cell many of the auxiliary facilities from TFTR, for example, power supplies

  3. Plasma turbulence in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldas, Ibere L.; Heller, M.V.A.P.; Brasilio, Z.A. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-12-31

    Full text. In this work we summarize the results from experiments on electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations in tokamak plasmas. Spectral analyses show that these fluctuations are turbulent, having a broad spectrum of wavectors and a broad spectrum of frequencies at each wavector. The electrostatic turbulence induces unexpected anomalous particle transport that deteriorates the plasma confinement. The relationship of these fluctuations to the current state of plasma theory is still unclear. Furthermore, we describe also attempts to control this plasma turbulence with external magnetic perturbations that create chaotic magnetic configurations. Accordingly, the magnetic field lines may become chaotic and then induce a Lagrangian diffusion. Moreover, to discuss nonlinear coupling and intermittency, we present results obtained by using numerical techniques as bi spectral and wavelet analyses. (author)

  4. Disruptions in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondeson, A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses major and minor disruptions in Tokamaks. A number of models and numerical simulations of disruptions based on resistive MHD are reviewed. A discussion is given of how disruptive current profiles are correlated with the experimentally known operational limits in density and current. It is argued that the q a =2 limit is connected with stabilization of the m=2/n=1 tearing mode for a approx.< 2.7 by resistive walls and mode rotation. Experimental and theoretical observations indicate that major disruptions usually occur in at least two phases, first a 'predisruption', or loss of confinement in the region 1 < q < 2, leaving the q approx.= 1 region almost unaffected, followed by a final disruption of the central part, interpreted here as a toroidal n = 1 external kink mode. (author)

  5. Simulation of tokamak runaway-electron events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.; Miyahara, A.; Miyake, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    1987-08-01

    High energy runaway-electron events which can occur in tokamaks when the plasma hits the first wall are a critical issue for the materials selection of future devices. Runaway-electron events are simulated with an electron linear accelerator to better understand the observed runaway-electron damage to tokamak first wall materials and to consider the runaway-electron issue in further materials development and selection. The electron linear accelerator produces beam energies of 20 to 30 MeV at an integrated power input of up to 1.3 kW. Graphite, SiC + 2 % AlN, stainless steel, molybdenum and tungsten have been tested as bulk materials. To test the reliability of actively cooled systems under runaway-electron impact layer systems of graphite fixed to metal substrates have been tested. The irradiation resulted in damage to the metal compounds but left graphite and SiC + 2 % AlN without damage. Metal substrates of graphite - metal systems for actively cooled structures suffer severe damage unless thick graphite shielding is provided. (author)

  6. Data processing system for spectroscopy at Novillo Tokamak; Sistema de procesamiento de datos para espectroscopia en el Tokamak Novillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega C, G.; Gaytan G, E. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    Taking as basis some proposed methodologies by software engineering it was designed and developed a data processing system coming from the diagnostic equipment by spectroscopy, for the study of plasma impurities, during the cleaning discharges. the data acquisition is realized through an electronic interface which communicates the computer with the spectroscopy system of Novillo Tokamak. The data were obtained starting from files type text and processed for their subsequently graphic presentation. For development of this system named PRODATN (Processing of Data for Spectroscopy in Novillo Tokamak) was used the LabVIEW graphic programming language. (Author)

  7. The Precision Medicine Initiative's All of Us Research Program: an agenda for research on its ethical, legal, and social issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Pamela L; Parker, Lisa S

    2017-07-01

    The Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) is an innovative approach to developing a new model of health care that takes into account individual differences in people's genes, environments, and lifestyles. A cornerstone of the initiative is the PMI All of Us Research Program (formerly known as PMI-Cohort Program) which will create a cohort of 1 million volunteers who will contribute their health data and biospecimens to a centralized national database to support precision medicine research. The PMI All of US Research Program is the largest longitudinal study in the history of the United States. The designers of the Program anticipated and addressed some of the ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) associated with the initiative. To date, however, there is no plan to call for research regarding ELSI associated with the Program-PMI All of Us program. Based on analysis of National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding announcements for the PMI All of Us program, we have identified three ELSI themes: cohort diversity and health disparities, participant engagement, and privacy and security. We review All of Us Research Program plans to address these issues and then identify additional ELSI within each domain that warrant ongoing investigation as the All of Us Research Program develops. We conclude that PMI's All of Us Research Program represents a significant opportunity and obligation to identify, analyze, and respond to ELSI, and we call on the PMI to initiate a research program capable of taking on these challenges.Genet Med advance online publication 01 December 2016.

  8. Transport and turbulence in a magnetized plasma (application to tokamak plasmas); Transport et turbulence dans un plasma magnetise (application aux plasmas de tokamaks)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y

    2004-03-01

    This document gathers the lectures made in the framework of a Ph.D level physics class dedicated to plasma physics. This course is made up of 3 parts : 1) collisions and transport, 2) transport and turbulence, and 3) study of a few exchange instabilities. More precisely the first part deals with the following issues: thermonuclear fusion, Coulomb collisions, particles trajectories in a tokamak, neo-classical transport in tokamaks, the bootstrap current, and ware pinch. The second part involves: particle transport in tokamaks, quasi-linear transport, resonance islands, resonance in tokamaks, from quasi to non-linear transport, and non-linear saturation of turbulence. The third part deals with: shift velocities in fluid theory, a model for inter-change instabilities, Rayleigh-Benard instability, Hasegawa-Wakatani model, and Hasegawa-Mima model. This document ends with a series of appendices dealing with: particle-wave interaction, determination of the curvature parameter G, Rossby waves.

  9. A National Survey of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) Participants on Environmental Effects, Wildlife Issues, and Vegetation Management on Program Lands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allen, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    A national survey of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contractees was completed to obtain information about environmental and social effects of the program on participants, farms, and communities...

  10. Bibliography of fusion product physics in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1989-09-01

    Almost 700 citations have been compiled as the first step in reviewing the recent research on tokamak fusion product effects in tokamaks. The publications are listed alphabetically by the last name of the first author and by subject category

  11. Equilibrium reconstruction in the TCA/Br tokamak; Reconstrucao do equilibrio no tokamak TCA/BR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Wanderley Pires de

    1996-12-31

    The accurate and rapid determination of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium configuration in tokamaks is a subject for the magnetic confinement of the plasma. With the knowledge of characteristic plasma MHD equilibrium parameters it is possible to control the plasma position during its formation using feed-back techniques. It is also necessary an on-line analysis between successive discharges to program external parameters for the subsequent discharges. In this work it is investigated the MHD equilibrium configuration reconstruction of the TCA/BR tokamak from external magnetic measurements, using a method that is able to fast determine the main parameters of discharge. The thesis has two parts. Firstly it is presented the development of an equilibrium code that solves de Grad-Shafranov equation for the TCA/BR tokamak geometry. Secondly it is presented the MHD equilibrium reconstruction process from external magnetic field and flux measurements using the Function Parametrization FP method. this method. This method is based on the statistical analysis of a database of simulated equilibrium configurations, with the goal of obtaining a simple relationship between the parameters that characterize the equilibrium and the measurements. The results from FP are compared with conventional methods. (author) 68 refs., 31 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. Tokamak engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1975-07-01

    The design criteria for a tokamak engineering test reactor can be met by operating in the two-component mode with reacting ion beams, together with a new blanket-shield design based on internal neutron spectrum shaping. A conceptual reactor design achieving a neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m 2 is presented. The tokamak has a major radius of 3.05 m, the plasma cross-section is noncircular with a 2:1 elongation, and the plasma radius in the midplane is 55 cm. The total wall area is 149 m 2 . The plasma conditions are T/sub e/ approximately T/sub i/ approximately 5 keV, and ntau approximately 8 x 10 12 cm -3 s. The plasma temperature is maintained by injection of 177 MW of 200-keV neutral deuterium beams; the resulting deuterons undergo fusion reactions with the triton-target ions. The D-shaped toroidal field coils are extended out to large major radius (7.0 m), so that the blanket-shield test modules on the outer portion of the torus can be easily removed. The TF coils are superconducting, using a cryogenically stable TiNb design that permits a field at the coil of 80 kG and an axial field of 38 kG. The blanket-shield design for the inner portion of the torus nearest the machine center line utilizes a neutron spectral shifter so that the first structural wall behind the spectral shifter zone can withstand radiation damage for the reactor lifetime. The energy attenuation in this inner blanket is 8 x 10 -6 . If necessary, a tritium breeding ratio of 0.8 can be achieved using liquid lithium cooling in the []outer blanket only. The overall power consumption of the reactor is about 340 MW(e). A neutron wall loading greater than 1 MW/m 2 can be achieved by increasing the maximum magnetic field or the plasma elongation. (auth)

  13. NOTES: issues and technical details with introduction of NOTES into a small general surgery residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavic, Michael S; Mirza, Brian; Horne, Walter; Moskowitz, Jesse B

    2008-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a development of recent origin. In 2004, Kalloo et al first described NOTES investigation in an animal model. Since then, several investigators have pursued NOTES study in animal survival and nonsurvival models. Our objectives for this project included studying NOTES intervention in a laboratory environment using large animal (swine) models and learning to do so in a safe, controlled manner. Ultimately, we intend to introduce NOTES methodology into our surgical residency training program. The expertise of an experienced laparoscopic surgeon, fellowship-trained laparoendoscopic surgeon, and veterinarian along with a senior surgical resident was utilized to bring the input of several disciplines to this study. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM/COP) approved this study. A series of 5 laboratory sessions using mixed breed farm swine varying in weight from 37 kg to 43.1 kg was planned for the initial phase of NOTES introduction into our residency program. Animals were not kept alive in this investigation. All animals were anesthetized using a standard swine protocol and euthanized following guidelines issued by the American Veterinary Medical Association Panel on Euthanasia. Equipment included a Fujinon EVE endoscope 0.8 cm in diameter with a suction/irrigation channel and one working channel. Initially, a US Endoscopy gastric overtube, 19.5 mm OD and 50 cm in length, was used to facilitate passage of the endoscope. However, this device was found to have insufficient length. Subsequently, commercially available 5/8" diameter clear plastic tubing, 70 cm to 80 cm in length, was adapted for use as an overtube. Standard endoscopic instruments included Boston Scientific biopsy forceps, needle-knife, papillotome, endoscopic clip applier, and Valley Lab electrosurgical unit. A Karl Storz laparoscope and tower were used for

  14. START: the creation of a spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Alan

    1992-01-01

    The START (Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak) plasma fusion experiment is now operational at AEA Fusion's Culham Laboratory. It is the world's first experiment to explore an extreme limit of the tokamak - the Spherical Tokamak - which theoretical studies predict may have substantial advantages in the search for economic fusion power. The Head of the START project, describes the concept, some of the initial experimental results and the possibility of developing a spherical tokamak power reactor. (author)

  15. An Empirical Evaluation of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Greg; D'Andrea, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship program, one of the nation's largest school choice programs. It is the first ever completed empirical evaluation of a tax-credit scholarship program, a type of program that creates school choice through the tax code. Earlier reports, including a recent one on the Florida program, have not…

  16. Draft program plan for TNS: The Next Step after the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Part II. R and D needs assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.

    1977-12-01

    The information contained in this document represents the brief but intensive efforts of the Oak Ridge TNS Program Team to answer the following questions: (1) Is there an adequate basis of R and D support for the TNS program as a central, ambitious goal for the fusion program. (2) What are the principal gaps in the current and projected R and D program. (3) What must be done to permit operation of TNS in the mid 1980s. The findings of our preliminary study provide these answers to the questions: (1) The physics and technology base does exist from which to start the TNS design as a central fusion program goal. (2) We have specific recommendations for new emphasis in certain physics and technology areas to minimize R and D program gaps. (3) TNS conceptual design must be started now, and a close look at organizing the fusion program around a TNS project is an essential need to support operation in the mid 1980s

  17. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Cancer classification issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltse, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Issues presented are related to classification of weight of evidence in cancer risk assessments. The focus in this paper is on lines of evidence used in constructing a conclusion about potential human carcinogenicity. The paper also discusses issues that are mistakenly addressed as classification issues but are really part of the risk assessment process. 2 figs.

  18. MAIA, Eigenvalues for MHD Equation of Tokamak Plasma Stability Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Azumi, M.; Kurita, G.; Tsunematsu, T.; Takeda, T.

    1986-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: This program solves an eigenvalue problem zBx=Ax where A and B are real block tri-diagonal matrices. This eigenvalue problem is derived from a reduced set of linear resistive MHD equations which is often employed to study tokamak plasma stability problem. 2 - Method of solution: Both the determinant and inverse iteration methods are employed. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The eigenvalue z must be real

  19. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Zhang, H.

    2009-01-01

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions

  20. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high β-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect

  1. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high {beta}-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect.

  2. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.J. Zweben, H. Zhang

    2009-02-12

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions.

  3. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    TPX is a national project involving a large number of US fusion laboratories, universities, and industries. The element of the TPX requirements that is a primary driver for the hardware design is the fact that TPX tokamak hardware is being designed to accommodate steady state operation if the external systems are upgraded from the 1,000 second initial operation. TPX not only incorporates new physics, but also pioneers new technologies to be used in ITER and other future reactors. TPX will be the first tokamak with fully superconducting magnetic field coils using advanced conductors, will have internal nuclear shielding, will use robotics for machine maintenance, and will remove the continuous, concentrated heat flow from the plasma with new dispersal techniques and with special materials that are actively cooled. The Conceptual Design for TPX was completed during Fiscal Year 1993. The Preliminary Design formally began at the beginning of Fiscal Year 1994. Industrial contracts have been awarded for the design, with options for fabrication, of the primary tokamak hardware. A large fraction of the design and R and D effort during FY94 was focused on the tokamak and in turn on the tokamak magnets. The reason for this emphasis is because the magnets require a large design and R and D effort, and are critical to the project schedule. The magnet development is focused on conductor development, quench protection, and manufacturing R and D. The Preliminary Design Review for the Magnets is planned for fall, 1995

  4. Ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs in a restructuredelectri city industry: Issues and options for regulators andlegislators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph; Goldman, Charles; Nadel, Stephen

    1998-05-01

    Electric industry restructuring requires state regulators and legislators to re-examine the purposes served by and the continuing need for ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs, as well as the mechanisms to collect funds for these programs and the institutions appropriate to administer them. This paper offers background to these issues and a series of recommendations based on analysis of recent state experiences. Our recommendations are summarized.

  5. Resistive instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, P.H.

    1985-10-01

    Low-m tearing modes constitute the dominant instability problem in present-day tokamaks. In this lecture, the stability criteria for representative current profiles with q(0)-values slightly less than unit are reviewed; ''sawtooth'' reconnection to q(0)-values just at, or slightly exceeding, unity is generally destabilizing to the m = 2, n = 1 and m = 3, n = 2 modes, and severely limits the range of stable profile shapes. Feedback stabilization of m greater than or equal to 2 modes by rf heating or current drive, applied locally at the magnetic islands, appears feasible; feedback by island current drive is much more efficient, in terms of the radio-frequency power required, then feedback by island heating. Feedback stabilization of the m = 1 mode - although yielding particularly beneficial effects for resistive-tearing and high-beta stability by allowing q(0)-values substantially below unity - is more problematical, unless the m = 1 ideal-MHD mode can be made positively stable by strong triangular shaping of the central flux surfaces. Feedback techniques require a detectable, rotating MHD-like signal; the slowing of mode rotation - or the excitation of non-rotating modes - by an imperfectly conducting wall is also discussed

  6. Tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Brooks, J.N.

    1978-01-01

    A tokamak experimental power reactor has been designed that is capable of producing net electric power over a wide range of possible operating conditions. A net production of 81 MW of electricity is expected from the design reference conditions that assume a value of 0.07 for beta-toroidal, a maximum toroidal magnetic field of 9 T and a thermal conversion efficiency of 30%. Impurity control is achieved through the use of a low-Z first wall coating. This approach allows a burn time of 60 seconds without the incorporation of a divertor. The system is cooled by a dual pressurized water/steam system that could potentially provide thermal efficiencies as high as 39%. The first surface facing the plasma is a low-Z coated water cooled panel that is attached to a 20 cm thick blanket module. The vacuum boundary is removed a total of 22 cm from the plasma, thereby minimizing the amount of radiation damage in this vital component. Consideration is given in the design to the possible use of the EPR as a materials test reactor. It is estimated that the total system could be built for less than 550 million dollars

  7. Classical tokamak transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocentini, Aldo

    1982-01-01

    A qualitative treatment of the classical transport theory of a magnetically confined, toroidal, axisymmetric, two-species plasma is presented. The 'weakly collisional' ('banana' and 'plateau') and 'collision dominated' ('Pfirsch-Schlueter' and 'highly collisional') regimes, as well as the Ware effect are discussed. The method used to evaluate the diffusion coffieicnts of particles and heat in the weakly collisional regime is based on stochastic argument, that requires an analysis of the characteristic collision frequencies and lengths for particles moving in a tokamak-like magnetic field. The same method is used to evaluate the Ware effect. In the collision dominated regime on the other hand, the particle and heat fluxes across the magnetic field lines are dominated by macroscopic effects so that, although it is possible to present them as diffusion (in fact, the fluxes turn out to be proportional to the density and temperature gradients), a macroscopic treatment is more appropriate. Hence, fluid equations are used to inveatigate the collision dominated regime, to which particular attention is devoted, having been shown relatively recently that it is more complicated than the usual Pfirsch-Schlueter regime. The whole analysis presented here is qualitative, aiming to point out the relevant physical mechanisms involved in the various regimes more than to develop a rigorous mathematical derivation of the diffusion coefficients, for which appropriate references are given. (author)

  8. Tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bertoncini, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to operate at net electrical power conditions with a plant capacity factor of 50 percent for 10 yr. The EPR operates in a pulsed mode at a frequency of approximately 1/min, with approximately 75 percent duty cycle, is capable of producing approximately 72 MWe and requires 42 MWe. The annual tritium consumption is 16 kg. The EPR vacuum chamber is 6.25 m in major radius and 2.4 m in minor radius, is constructed of 2 cm thick stainless steel, and has 2 cm thick detachable, beryllium-coated coolant panels mounted on the interior. A 0.28 m stainless steel blanket and a shield ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 m surround the vacuum vessel. The coolant is H 2 O. Sixteen niobium-titanium superconducting toroidal field coils provide a field of 10 T at the coil and 4.47 T at the plasma. Superconducting ohmic heating and equilibrium field coils provide 135 V-s to drive the plasma current. Plasma heating is accomplished by 12 neutral beam injectors which provide 60 MW. The energy transfer and storage system consists of a central superconducting storage ring, a homopolar energy storage unit, and a variety of inductor-convertors

  9. Fractional power operation of tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, T.K.; Vold, E.L.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Methods to operate a tokamak fusion reactor at fractions of its rated power, identify the more effective control knobs and assess the impact of the requirements of fractional power operation on full power reactor design are explored. In particular, the role of burn control in maintaining the plasma at thermal equilibrium throughout these operations is studied. As a prerequisite to this task, the critical physics issues relevant to reactor performance predictions are examined and some insight into their impact on fractional power operation is offered. The basic tool of analysis consists of a zero-dimensional (0-D) time-dependent plasma power balance code which incorporates the most advanced data base and models in transport and burn plasma physics relevant to tokamaks. Because the plasma power balance is dominated by the transport loss and given the large uncertainty in the confinement model, the authors have studied the problem for a wide range of energy confinement scalings. The results of this analysis form the basis for studying the temporal behavior of the plasma under various thermal control mechanisms. Scenarios of thermally stable full and fractional power operations have been determined for a variety of transport models, with either passive or active feedback burn control. Important power control parameters, such as gas fueling rate, auxiliary power and other plasma quantities that affect transport losses, have also been identified. The results of these studies vary with the individual transport scaling used and, in particular, with respect to the effect of alpha heating power on confinement

  10. Sawtooth driven particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, T.

    2013-01-01

    The radial transport of particles in tokamaks is one of the most stringent issues faced by the magnetic confinement fusion community, because the fusion power is proportional to the square of the pressure, and also because accumulation of heavy impurities in the core leads to important power losses which can lead to a 'radiative collapse'. Sawteeth and the associated periodic redistribution of the core quantities can significantly impact the radial transport of electrons and impurities. In this thesis, we perform numerical simulations of sawteeth using a nonlinear tridimensional magnetohydrodynamic code called XTOR-2F to study the particle transport induced by sawtooth crashes. We show that the code recovers, after the crash, the fine structures of electron density that are observed with fast-sweeping reflectometry on the JET and TS tokamaks. The presence of these structure may indicate a low efficiency of the sawtooth in expelling the impurities from the core. However, applying the same code to impurity profiles, we show that the redistribution is quantitatively similar to that predicted by Kadomtsev's model, which could not be predicted a priori. Hence finally the sawtooth flushing is efficient in expelling impurities from the core. (author) [fr

  11. HT-7U superconducting tokamak: Physics design, engineering progress and schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Yuanxi

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting tokamak research program begun in China in ASIPP since 1994. The program is included in existent superconducting tokamak HT-7 and the next new superconducting tokamak HT-7U which is one of national key research projects in China. With the elongation cross-section, divertor and higher plasma parameter the main objectives of HT-7U are widely investigation both of the physics and technology for steady state advanced tokamak as well as the investigation of power and particle handle under steady-state operation condition. The physics and engineering design have been completed and significant progresses on R and D and fabrication have been achieved. HT-7U will begin assembly at 2003 and possible to get first plasma around 2004. (author)

  12. Understanding L-H transition in tokamak fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guosheng; Wu, Xingquan

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews the current state of understanding of the L-H transition phenomenon in tokamak plasmas with a focus on two central issues: (a) the mechanism for turbulence quick suppression at the L-H transition; (b) the mechanism for subsequent generation of sheared flow. We briefly review recent advances in the understanding of the fast suppression of edge turbulence across the L-H transition. We uncover a comprehensive physical picture of the L-H transition by piecing together a number of recent experimental observations and insights obtained from 1D and 2D simulation models. Different roles played by diamagnetic mean flow, neoclassical-driven mean flow, turbulence-driven mean flow, and turbulence-driven zonal flows are discussed and clarified. It is found that the L-H transition occurs spontaneously mediated by a shift in the radial wavenumber spectrum of edge turbulence, which provides a critical evidence for the theory of turbulence quench by the flow shear. Remaining questions and some key directions for future investigations are proposed. This work was supported by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China under Contracts No. 2015GB101000, No. 2013GB106000, and No. 2013GB107000 and National Natural Science Foundation of China under Contracts No. 11575235 and No. 11422546.

  13. Advanced tokamak burning plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Ramos, J.; Schultz, J.; Nevins, W.N.

    2001-01-01

    A new reduced size ITER-RC superconducting tokamak concept is proposed with the goals of studying burn physics either in an inductively driven standard tokamak (ST) mode of operation, or in a quasi-steady state advanced tokamak (AT) mode sustained by non-inductive means. This is achieved by reducing the radiation shield thickness protecting the superconducting magnet by 0.34 m relative to ITER and limiting the burn mode of operation to pulse lengths as allowed by the TF coil warming up to the current sharing temperature. High gain (Q≅10) burn physics studies in a reversed shear equilibrium, sustained by RF and NB current drive techniques, may be obtained. (author)

  14. Large aspect ratio tokamak study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Sardella, C.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) investigated the potential for producing a viable long burn tokamak reactor through enhanced volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer by employing high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were accessed in the context of extended burn operation. Plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed using a one-dimensional transport code. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the field in the ohmic heating coil and the wave shape of the ohmic heating discharge. A high aspect ratio reference reactor was chosen and configured

  15. Plasma boundary phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangeby, P.C.

    1989-06-01

    The focus of this review is on processes occurring at the edge, and on the connection between boundary plasma - the scrape-off layer (SOL) and the radiating layer - and central plasma processes. Techniques used for edge diagnosis are reviewed and basic experimental information (n e and T e ) is summarized. Simple models of the SOL are summarized, and the most important effects of the boundary plasma - the influence on the fuel particles, impurities, and energy - on tokamak operation dealt with. Methods of manipulating and controlling edge conditions in tokamaks and the experimental data base for the edge during auxiliary heating of tokamaks are reviewed. Fluctuations and asymmetries at the edge are also covered. (9 tabs., 134 figs., 879 refs.)

  16. Computational studies of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Tomonori; Tsunematsu, Toshihide; Tokuda, Shinji

    1981-02-01

    Computational studies of tokamak plasmas are extensively advanced. Many computational codes have been developed by using several kinds of models, i.e., the finite element formulation of MHD equations, the time dependent multidimensional fluid model, and the particle model with the Monte-Carlo method. These codes are applied to the analyses of the equilibrium of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma (SELENE), the time evolution of the high-beta tokamak plasma (APOLLO), the low-n MHD stability (ERATO-J) and high-n ballooning mode stability (BOREAS) in the INTOR tokamak, the nonlinear MHD stability, such as the positional instability (AEOLUS-P), resistive internal mode (AEOLUS-I) etc., and the divertor functions. (author)

  17. 77 FR 68790 - Program Comment Issued for Streamlining Section 106 Review for Actions Affecting Post-1945...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... Program Comment including: Removing reinforced concrete rigid frames, metal rigid frames, and curved metal... culverts and reinforced concrete boxes among the common bridge types covered by the Program Comment. Two... Program Comment: Program Comment for Common Post-1945 Concrete and Steel Bridges I. Introduction Every...

  18. Conceptual design of Remote Control System for EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, X.Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Li, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new design conception for remote control for EAST tokamak is proposed. • Rich Internet application (RIA) was selected to implement the user interface. • Some security mechanism was used to fulfill security requirement. - Abstract: The international collaboration becomes popular in tokamak research like in many other fields of science, because the experiment facilities become larger and more expensive. The traditional On-site collaboration Model that has to spend much money and time on international travel is not fit for the more frequent international collaboration. The Remote Control System (RCS), as an extension of the Central Control System for the EAST tokamak, is designed to provide an efficient and economical way to international collaboration. As a remote user interface, the RCS must integrate with the Central Control System for EAST tokamak to perform discharge control function. This paper presents a design concept delineating a few key technical issues and addressing all significant details in the system architecture design. With the aim of satisfying system requirements, the RCS will select rich Internet application (RIA) as a user interface, Java as a back-end service and Secure Socket Layer Virtual Private Network (SSL VPN) for securable Internet communication

  19. Surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiel, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    During this PhD, the challenges on the non-intrusive surface temperature measurements of metallic plasma facing components in tokamaks are reported. Indeed, a precise material emissivity value is needed for classical infrared methods and the environment contribution has to be known particularly for low emissivities materials. Although methods have been developed to overcome these issues, they have been implemented solely for dedicated experiments. In any case, none of these methods are suitable for surface temperature measurement in tokamaks.The active pyrometry introduced in this study allows surface temperature measurements independently of reflected flux and emissivities using pulsed and modulated photothermal effect. This method has been validated in laboratory on metallic materials with reflected fluxes for pulsed and modulated modes. This experimental validation is coupled with a surface temperature variation induced by photothermal effect and temporal signal evolvement modelling in order to optimize both the heating source characteristics and the data acquisition and treatment. The experimental results have been used to determine the application range in temperature and detection wavelengths. In this context, the design of an active pyrometry system on tokamak has been completed, based on a bicolor camera for a thermography application in metallic (or low emissivity) environment.The active pyrometry method introduced in this study is a complementary technique of classical infrared methods used for thermography in tokamak environment which allows performing local and 2D surface temperature measurements independently of reflected fluxes and emissivities. (author) [fr

  20. Development in Diagnostics Application to Control Advanced Tokamak Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Y.

    2008-01-01

    For continuous operation expected in DEMO, all the plasma current must be non-inductively driven, with self-generated neoclassical bootstrap current being maximized. The control of such steady state high performance tokamak plasma (so-called 'Advanced Tokamak Plasma') is a challenge because of the strong coupling between the current density, the pressure profile and MHD stability. In considering diagnostic needs for the advanced tokamak research, diagnostics for MHD are the most fundamental, since discharges which violate the MHD stability criteria either disrupt or have significantly reduced confinement. This report deals with the development in diagnostic application to control advanced tokamak plasma, with emphasized on recent progress in active feedback control of the current profile and the pressure profile under DEMO-relevant high bootstrap-current fraction. In addition, issues in application of the present-day actuators and diagnostics for the advanced control to DEMO will be briefly addressed, where port space for the advanced control may be limited so as to keep sufficient tritium breeding ratio (TBR)

  1. Conceptual design of Remote Control System for EAST tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, X.Y., E-mail: xysun@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Li, S.

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • A new design conception for remote control for EAST tokamak is proposed. • Rich Internet application (RIA) was selected to implement the user interface. • Some security mechanism was used to fulfill security requirement. - Abstract: The international collaboration becomes popular in tokamak research like in many other fields of science, because the experiment facilities become larger and more expensive. The traditional On-site collaboration Model that has to spend much money and time on international travel is not fit for the more frequent international collaboration. The Remote Control System (RCS), as an extension of the Central Control System for the EAST tokamak, is designed to provide an efficient and economical way to international collaboration. As a remote user interface, the RCS must integrate with the Central Control System for EAST tokamak to perform discharge control function. This paper presents a design concept delineating a few key technical issues and addressing all significant details in the system architecture design. With the aim of satisfying system requirements, the RCS will select rich Internet application (RIA) as a user interface, Java as a back-end service and Secure Socket Layer Virtual Private Network (SSL VPN) for securable Internet communication.

  2. Issues in NASA Program and Project Management. Special Report: 1997 Conference. Project Management Now and in the New Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Topics Considered Include: NASA's Shared Experiences Program; Core Issues for the Future of the Agency; National Space Policy Strategic Management; ISO 9000 and NASA; New Acquisition Initiatives; Full Cost Initiative; PM Career Development; PM Project Database; NASA Fast Track Studies; Fast Track Projects; Earned Value Concept; Value-Added Metrics; Saturn Corporation Lessons Learned; Project Manager Credibility.

  3. SPECIAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL OF THE AIR & WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION ON THE PARTICULATE MATTER SUPERSITES PROGRAM AND RELATED STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article is the preface or editors note to the dedicated issue of the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association for a selection of scientific papers from the specialty conference entitled, "Particulate Matter Supersites Program and Related Studies," that was...

  4. Education by the Numbers: The Fiscal Effect of School Choice Programs, 1990-2006. School Choice Issues in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aud, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    School choice programs, which allow students to attend the public or private school of their choice using public funds, have taken root in the U.S. and are growing rapidly both in number and size. Their fiscal impact has become an important political issue. Proponents say school choice saves money because private schooling is more efficient,…

  5. NRC program for the resolution of generic issues related to nuclear power plants. (Includes plans for the resolution of ''unresolved safety issues'' pursuant to Section 210 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    This report provides a description of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Program for the Resolution of Generic Issues Related to Nuclear Power Plants. The NRC program is of considerably broader scope than the ''Unresolved Safety Issues Plan'' required by Section 210. The NRC program does include plans for the resolution of ''Unresolved Safety Issues''; however, in addition, it includes generic tasks for the resolution of environmental issues, for the development of improvements in the reactor licensing process and for consideration of less conservative design criteria or operating limitations in areas where over conservatisms may be unnecessarily restrictive or costly

  6. Alcohol & drug abuse: Revisiting employee assistance programs and substance use problems in the workplace: key issues and a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Elizabeth S Levy; Volpe-Vartanian, Joanna; Horgan, Constance M; McCann, Bernard

    2007-10-01

    This column describes employee assistance program (EAPs) and identifies key issues for contemporary EAPs. These programs began as occupational alcohol programs and have evolved into more comprehensive resources. To better understand contemporary EAPs, the authors suggest a research agenda that includes descriptive studies to provide an up-to-date picture of services; investigations of how contemporary EAPs address substance use problems, including management consultation for early identification; further study of EAPs' effects on outcomes, such as productivity and work group outcomes; examination of the relationship between EAPs and other workplace resources; further examination of influences on EAP utilization; and development and testing of EAP performance measures.

  7. Revisiting Employee Assistance Programs and Substance Use Problems in the Workplace: Key Issues and a Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy Merrick, Elizabeth S.; Volpe-Vartanian, Joanna; Horgan, Constance M.; McCann, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    This column describes employee assistance program (EAPs) and identifies key issues for contemporary EAPs. These programs began as occupational alcohol programs and have evolved into more comprehensive resources. To better understand contemporary EAPs, the authors suggest a research agenda at includes descriptive studies to provide an up-to-date picture of services; investigations of how contemporary EAPs address substance use problems, including management consultation for early identification; further study of EAPs’ effects on outcomes, such as productivity and work group outcomes; examination of the relationship between EAPs and other workplace resources; further examination of influences on EAP utilization; and development and testing of EAP performance measures. PMID:17914000

  8. FRESCO: fusion reactor simulation code for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsinen, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    The study of the dynamics of tokamak fusion reactors, a zero-dimensional particle and power balance code FRESCO (Fusion Reactor Simulation Code) has been developed at the Department of Technical Physics of Helsinki University of Technology. The FRESCO code is based on zero-dimensional particle and power balance equations averaged over prescribed plasma profiles. In the report the data structure of the FRESCO code is described, including the description of the COMMON statements, program input, and program output. The general structure of the code is described, including the description of subprograms and functions. The physical model used and examples of the code performance are also included in the report. (121 tabs.) (author)

  9. [Fusion research/tokamak]. Final report, 1 May 1988 - 30 April 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Fusion Research Center Program are: (1) to advance /the transport studies of tokamaks, including the development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for the text-upgrade tokamak. Work is described on five basic categories: (1) magnetic fusion energy database; (2) computational support and numerical modeling; (3) support for TEXT-upgrade and diagnostics; (4) transport studies; and (5) Alfven waves

  10. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an interim status report on the STARFIRE project for the period of May to September 1979. The basic objective of the STARFIRE project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. Another key goal of the project is to give careful attention to the safety and environmental features of a commercial fusion reactor

  11. LHCD experiments on tokamak CASTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, F.; Badalec, J.; Jakubka, J.; Kryska, L.; Preinhaelter, J.; Stoeckel, J.; Valovic, M.; Nanobashvili, S.; Weixelbaum, L.; Wenzel, U.; Spineanu, F.; Vlad, M.

    1990-10-01

    A short survey is given of the experimental activities at the small Prague tokamak CASTOR. They concern primarily the LH current drive using multijunction waveguide grills as launching antennae. During two last years the, efforts were focused on a study of the electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations under conditions of combined inductive/LHCD regimes and of the relation of the level of these fluctuations to the anomalous particles transport in tokamak CASTOR. Results of the study are discussed in some detail. (author). 24 figs., 51 refs

  12. Tritium Experience in Large Tokamaks: Application to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Gentile, C.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D; Gentile, C.; Federici, G.; Haanges, R.

    1998-05-01

    Recent experience with the use of tritium fuel in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, together with progress in developing the technical design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor has expanded the technical knowledge base for tritium issues in fusion. This paper reports on an IEA workshop that brought together scientists and engineers to share experience and expertise on all fusion-related tritium issues. Extensive discussion periods were devoted to exploring outstanding issues and identifying potential R ampersand D avenues to address them. This paper summarizes the presentations, discussions, and recommendations

  13. Recent developments in the role of atomic processes in future tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, D.

    1996-01-01

    Since the beginning of magnetic fusion research, reducing the impurity level in experiments has been strongly correlated with successful achievement of high performance plasmas. One of the most important examples of this was the recognition that the use of tungsten as a plasma facing material and the associated high radiative losses were responsible for the poor performance of the ORMAK and PLT tokamaks. Tungsten was replaced with graphite and the central plasma temperature in PLT increased a factor of ten. The magnetic fusion program is now planning on constructing an ignited fusion experiment. One of the major design issues is the reduction of the peak heat loads on the plasma facing components. It appears that the carefully controlled introduction of impurities can lead to a solution of the problem. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. The tokamak hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.L.; Rose, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    At a time when the potential benefits of various energy options are being seriously evaluated in many countries through-out the world, it is both timely and important to evaluate the practical application of fusion reactors for their economical production of nuclear fissile fuels from fertile fuels. The fusion hybrid reactor represents a concept that could assure the availability of adequate fuel supplies for a proven nuclear technology and have the potential of being an electrical energy source as opposed to an energy consumer as are the present fuel enrichment processes. Westinghouse Fusion Power Systems Department, under Contract No. EG-77-C-02-4544 with the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy, has developed a preliminary conceptual design for an early twenty-first century fusion hybrid reactor called the commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR). This design was developed as a first generation commercial plant producing fissile fuel to support a significant number of client Light Water Reactor (LWR) Plants. To the depth this study has been performed, no insurmountable technical problems have been identified. The study has provided a basis for reasonable cost estimates of the hybrid plants as well as the hybrid/LWR system busbar electricity costs. This energy system can be optimized to have a net cost of busbar electricity that is equivalent to the conventional LWR plant, yet is not dependent on uranium ore prices or standard enrichment costs, since the fusion hybrid can be fueled by numerous fertile fuel resources. A nearer-term concept is also defined using a beam driven fusion driver in lieu of the longer term ignited operating mode. (orig.)

  15. Tokamak Plasmas : Mirnov coil data analysis for tokamak ADITYA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spatial and temporal structures of magnetic signal in the tokamak ADITYA is analysed using recently developed singular value decomposition (SVD) technique. The analysis technique is first tested with simulated data and then applied to the ADITYA Mirnov coil data to determine the structure of current peturbation as ...

  16. Compact Ignition Tokamak conventional facilities optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commander, J.C.; Spang, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    A high-field ignition machine with liquid-nitrogen-cooled copper coils, designated the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), is proposed for the next phase of the United States magnetically confined fusion program. A team of national laboratory, university, and industrial participants completed the conceptual design for the CIT machine, support systems and conventional facilities. Following conceptual design, optimization studies were conducted with the goal of improving machine performance, support systems design, and conventional facilities configuration. This paper deals primarily with the conceptual design configuration of the CIT conventional facilities, the changes that evolved during optimization studies, and the revised changes resulting from functional and operational requirements (F and ORs). The CIT conventional facilities conceptual design is based on two premises: (1) satisfaction of the F and ORs developed in the CIT building and utilities requirements document, and (2) the assumption that the CIT project will be sited at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in order that maximum utilization can be made of existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) buildings and utilities. The optimization studies required reevaluation of the F and ORs and a second look at TFTR buildings and utilities. Some of the high-cost-impact optimization studies are discussed, including the evaluation criteria for a change from the conceptual design baseline configuration. The revised conventional facilities configuration are described and the estimated cost impact is summarized

  17. Design of self-cooled, liquid-metal blankets for tokamak and tandem mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Y.S.; Gohar, Y.; Hassanein, A.M.; Majumdar, S.; Picologlou, B.F.; Smith, D.L.; Szo, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    Results of the self-cooled, liquid-metal blanket design from the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) are summarized. The objectives of the BCSS project are to define a small number (about three) of blanket concepts that should be the focus of the blanket research and development (RandD) program, identify and prioritize the critical issues for the leading blanket concepts, and provide technical input necessary to develop a blanket RandD program plan. Two liquid metals (lithium and lithium-lead (17Li-83Pb)) and three structural materials (primary candidate alloy (PCA), ferritic steel (FS) (HT-9), and vanadium alloy (V-15 Cr-5 Ti)) are included in the evaluations for both tokamaks and tandem mirror reactors (TMRs). TMR is of the tube configuration similar to the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study design. Analyses were performed in the following generic areas for each blanket concept: MHD, thermal hydraulics, stress, neutronics, and tritium recovery. Integral analyses were performed to determine the design window for each blanket design. The Li/Li/V blanket for tokamak and the Li/Li/V, LiPb/LiPb/V, and Li/Li/HT-9 blankets for the TMR are judged to be top-rated concepts. Because of its better thermophysical properties and more uniform nuclear heating profile, liquid lithium is a better coolant than liquid 17Li83Pb. From an engineering point of view, vanadium alloy is a better structural material than either FS or PCA since the former has both a higher allowable structural temperature and a higher allowable coolant/structure interface temperature than the latter. Critical feasibility issues and design constraints for the self-cooled, liquid-metal blanket concepts are identified and discussed

  18. A flexible software architecture for tokamak discharge control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron, J.R.; Penaflor, B.; Walker, M.L.; Moller, J.; Butner, D.

    1995-01-01

    The software structure of the plasma control system in use on the DIII-D tokamak experiment is described. This system implements control functions through software executing in real time on one or more digital computers. The software is organized into a hierarchy that allows new control functions needed to support the DIII-D experimental program to be added easily without affecting previously implemented functions. This also allows the software to be portable in order to create control systems for other applications. The tokamak operator uses an X-windows based interface to specify the time evolution of a tokamak discharge. The interface provides a high level view for the operator that reduces the need for detailed knowledge of the control system operation. There is provision for an asynchronous change to an alternate discharge time evolution in response to an event that is detected in real time. Quality control is enhanced through off-line testing that can make use of software-based tokamak simulators

  19. Evaluating programs that address ideological issues: ethical and practical considerations for practitioners and evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lisa D; Fagen, Michael C; Neiger, Brad L

    2014-03-01

    There are important practical and ethical considerations for organizations in conducting their own, or commissioning external, evaluations and for both practitioners and evaluators, when assessing programs built on strongly held ideological or philosophical approaches. Assessing whether programs "work" has strong political, financial, and/or moral implications, particularly when expending public dollars, and may challenge objectivity about a particular program or approach. Using a case study of the evaluation of a school-based abstinence-until-marriage program, this article discusses the challenges, lessons learned, and ethical responsibilities regarding decisions about evaluation, specifically associated with ideologically driven programs. Organizations should consider various stakeholders and views associated with their program to help identify potential pitfalls in evaluation. Once identified, the program or agency needs to carefully consider its answers to two key questions: Do they want the answer and are they willing to modify the program? Having decided to evaluate, the choice of evaluator is critical to assuring that ethical principles are maintained and potential skepticism or criticism of findings can be addressed appropriately. The relationship between program and evaluator, including agreements about ownership and eventual publication and/or promotion of data, should be addressed at the outset. Programs and organizations should consider, at the outset, their ethical responsibility when findings are not expected or desired. Ultimately, agencies, organizations, and programs have an ethical responsibility to use their data to provide health promotion programs, whether ideologically founded or not, that appropriately and effectively address the problems they seek to solve.

  20. Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks, Task 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharer, J.E.

    1991-07-01

    The research performed under this grant during the past three years has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling and heating issues: efficient coupling during the L- to H-mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas edge plasma profiles; analysis of both dielectric-filled waveguide and coil ICRF antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results; ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation and heating analyses; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report. 15 refs

  1. Library system for a one dimensional tokamak transport code: (LIBJT60), 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Toshio

    1982-12-01

    A library system is developed to control and manage huge programs in terms of FORTRAN source. It is applied to widely used one dimensional tokamak transport codes (LIBJT60), which have been developed in the Division of Large Tokamak Development. The structure of data and program in the transport code turn out to be flexible enough to respond to various demands and this gigantic code frame work can be decomposed into groups of a compact code with a specific function. Some editing support tools for programming and debugging are also developed to save programming work. By applying this library system, users can obtain a code whose functions can be efficiently developed. (author)

  2. Tabulations of Responses from the 1999 Survey of Spouses of Active Duty Personnel. Volume 2. Programs and Services, Employment, Family, Economic Issues, and Background

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deak, Mary

    2001-01-01

    The 1999 Active Duty Surveys (ADS) gather information on current location, spouse's military assignment, military life, programs and services, spouse employment, family information, economic issues, and background...

  3. Energy losses on tokamak startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1983-01-01

    During the startup of a tokamak reactor using poloidal field (PF) coils to induce plasma currents, the conducting structures carry induced currents. The associated energy losses in the circuits must be provided by the startup coils and the PF system. This paper provides quantitative and comparitive values for the energies required as a function of the thickness or resistivity of the torus shells

  4. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant

  5. Integral torque balance in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, V.D.

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at clarifying the balance between the sinks and sources in the problem of intrinsic plasma rotation in tokamaks reviewed recently by deGrassie (2009 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51 124047). The integral torque on the toroidal plasma is calculated analytically using the most general magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma model taking account of plasma anisotropy and viscosity. The contributions due to several mechanisms are separated and compared. It is shown that some of them, though, possibly, important in establishing the rotation velocity profile in the plasma, may give small input into the integral torque, but an important contribution can come from the magnetic field breaking the axial symmetry of the configuration. In tokamaks, this can be the error field, the toroidal field ripple or the magnetic perturbation created by the correction coils in the dedicated experiments. The estimates for the error-field-induced electromagnetic torque show that the amplitude of this torque is comparable to the typical values of torques introduced into the plasma by neutral beam injection. The obtained relations allow us to quantify the effect that can be produced by the existing correction coils in tokamaks on the plasma rotation, which can be used in experiments to study the origin and physics of intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Several problems are proposed for theoretical studies and experimental tests.

  6. ECRH Studies on Tokamak Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-10

    r.I*cru.Dtrtibution uUnliited 300 Unicorn Pork Drive Woburn, Massachusetts 04801 ECRH STUDIES ON TOKAMAK PLASMAS JAYCOR Project No. 6183 Final Report...up techniques now in use or being suggested, include growing the plasma from a small minor radius or applying a negative voltage spike immediately

  7. Tokamak and RFP ignition requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma model is applied to calculate numerically transport- confinement (nτ E ) requirements and steady-state operation tokamak. The CIT tokamak and RFP ignition conditions are examined. Physics differences between RFP and tokamaks, and their consequences for a DT ignition machine, are discussed. The ignition RFP, compared to a tokamak, has many physics advantages, including ohmic heating to ignition (no need for auxiliary heating systems), higher beta, low ignition current, less sensitivity of ignition requirements to impurity effects, no hard disruptions (associated with beta or density limits), and successful operation with high radiation fractions (f RAD ∼ 0.95). These physics advantages, coupled with important engineering advantages associated with lower external magnetic fields, larger aspect ratios, and smaller plasma cross sections translate into significant cost reductions for both ignition and power reactor. The primary drawback of the RFP is the uncertainty that the present confinement scaling will extrapolate to reactor regimes. The 4-MA ZTH was expected to extend the nτ E transport scaling data three order of magnitude above ZT-40M results, and if the present scaling held, to achieve a DT-equivalent scientific energy breakeven, Q=1. A basecase RFP ignition point is identified with a plasma current of 8.1 MA and no auxiliary heating. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Tokamak impurity-control techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is given of the impurity-control functions in tokamaks, their relative merits and disadvantages and some prominent edge-interaction-control techniques, and there is a discussion of a new proposal, the particle scraper, and its potential advantages. (author)

  9. An enhanced tokamak startup model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Rajiv; Artaud, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    The startup of tokamaks has been examined in the past in varying degree of detail. This phase typically involves the burnthrough of impurities and the subsequent rampup of plasma current. A zero-dimensional (0D) model is most widely used where the time evolution of volume averaged quantities determines the detailed balance between the input and loss of particle and power. But, being a 0D setup, these studies do not take into consideration the co-evolution of plasma size and shape, and instead assume an unchanging minor and major radius. However, it is known that the plasma position and its minor radius can change appreciably as the plasma evolves in time to fill in the entire available volume. In this paper, an enhanced model for the tokamak startup is introduced, which for the first time takes into account the evolution of plasma geometry during this brief but highly dynamic period by including realistic one-dimensional (1D) effects within the broad 0D framework. In addition the effect of runaway electrons (REs) has also been incorporated. The paper demonstrates that the inclusion of plasma cross section evolution in conjunction with REs plays an important role in the formation and development of tokamak startup. The model is benchmarked against experimental results from ADITYA tokamak.

  10. Multimegawatt neutral beams for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1979-03-01

    Most of the large magnetic confinement experiments today and in the near future use high-power neutral-beam injectors to heat the plasma. This review briefly describes this remarkable technique and summarizes recent results as well as near term expectations. Progress has been so encouraging that it seems probable that tokamaks will achieve scientific breakeven before 1990

  11. Joint research using small tokamaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Del Bosco, E.; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Van Oost, G.; He, Yexi; Hegazy, H.; Hirose, A.; Hron, Martin; Kuteev, B.; Ludwig, G.O.; Nascimento, I.C.; Silva, C.; Vorobyev, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 10 (2005), S245-S254 ISSN 0029-5515. [Fusion Energy Conference contributions. Vilamoura, 1.11.2004-6.11.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : small tokamaks * thermonuclear fusion Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.418, year: 2005

  12. Utility Green-Pricing Programs: What Defines Success? (Topical Issues Brief); TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swezey, B.; Bird, L.

    2001-01-01

    ''Green pricing'' is an optional service through which customers can support a greater level of investment by their electric utility in renewable energy technologies. Electric utilities in 29 states are now implementing green-pricing programs. This report examines important elements of green-pricing programs, including the different types of programs offered, the premiums charged, customer response, and additional factors that experience indicates are key to the development of successful programs. The best-performing programs tend to share a number of common attributes related to product design, value creation, product pricing, and program implementation. The report ends with a list of ''best practices'' for utilities to follow when developing and implementing programs

  13. Utility Green-Pricing Programs: What Defines Success? (Topical Issues Brief)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swezey, B.; Bird, L.

    2001-09-13

    ''Green pricing'' is an optional service through which customers can support a greater level of investment by their electric utility in renewable energy technologies. Electric utilities in 29 states are now implementing green-pricing programs. This report examines important elements of green-pricing programs, including the different types of programs offered, the premiums charged, customer response, and additional factors that experience indicates are key to the development of successful programs. The best-performing programs tend to share a number of common attributes related to product design, value creation, product pricing, and program implementation. The report ends with a list of ''best practices'' for utilities to follow when developing and implementing programs.

  14. TNS Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The fusion program plan is briefly reviewed and the role of the prototype experimental power reactor, thought of as The Next Step (TNS), is discussed. The required device capabilities and basic reactor concepts for a TNS fusion electric plant are given. A detailed discussion of the physics considerations for the Power Generating Fusion Reactor (PGFR), including plasma heating, MHD equilibrium and stability, burn control resulting from toroidal field ripple, fueling, and boundary effects, is presented. Engineering considerations of the major PGFR systems, as well as diagnostics, instrumentation, control, and programmatic issues are also considered in detail. It is concluded that TNS design studies have established the existence of a technical basis for constructing a long pulse, D-T burning tokamak to be operational prior to 1990

  15. What's New in USDA's Food Distribution Program for Schools? School Programs USDA Foods Update. Volume 14, Issue 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Agriculture, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an update on all the new products and projects that U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) has been working on, in its effort to help schools meet the nutritional needs of the students and to help in the President's challenge to End Childhood Hunger by 2015. This issue includes: (1) Back to…

  16. Access to special education for exceptional students in French immersion programs: An equity issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Wise

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exceptional pupils enrolled in Canadian French immersion programs rarely have access to the same range of special education programs and services that are available to students in the regular English program. More often than not, students with special needs are encouraged to transfer to English programs to access necessary support services. This counselling-out process perpetuates the elitist status commonly attributed to French immersion programs. From a critical pedagogy perspective, this inquiry examines the lack of incentive on the part of multiple French immersion stakeholders to accommodate students with special needs. It further attempts to unveil the myths created by these stakeholders to better understand this discriminatory educational practice. The impact of federal and provincial funding models on access to special education programs and services is discussed, and the application of funding allocations by English-language district school boards is explored. The inquiry concludes with recommendations to promote more inclusionary practices.

  17. Issues in assessing the cost-effectiveness of coordinated DSM programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, L.J.; Brown, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Coordinated demand-side management (DSM) programs, co-administered by government agencies and electric and gas utilities, are likely to grow in importance in the coming years. Because of the unique features of these types of DSM programs, special care must be taken in assessing their cost-effectiveness. In this paper, we discuss these features, suggest how standard cost-effectiveness measures must be adapted to accommodate them, and show how important these adaptations are in assessing the cost-effectiveness of coordinated programs. At first, we use a least-cost, financial approach. The discussion indicates that failure to account properly for the special features of coordinated programs materially affects estimates of cost-effectiveness and, in extreme cases, may lead to rejection of otherwise cost-effective programs. Then extending the analysis to include economic factors, we speculate that most types of coordinated programs are more attractive than when evaluated on a financial basis. (author)

  18. Analysis of the Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance (SGLI) program: history, current issues and future implications

    OpenAIRE

    Callan, Patrick M.; Voogd, Michael; Schmid, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    MBA Professional Report The SGLI program is the military life insurance program overseen by the Veterans' Affairs (VA) but managed and administered by The Prudential Insurance Company of America. Recently, a series of news stories by Bloomberg News reported that the program might not be following the law, and that Prudential was profiting from the deaths of servicemen and women. The primary purpose of this paper was to analyze the news articles for factual content and determine whethe...

  19. Advanced statistics for tokamak transport colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is an expository introduction to advanced statistics and scaling laws and their application to tokamak devices. Topics of discussion are as follows: implicit assumptions in the standard analysis; advanced regression techniques; specialized tools in statistics and their applications in fusion physics; and improved datasets for transport studies

  20. SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE ISSUED IN BRAZIL AT POST GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN TOURISM AND CORRELATED AREAS FROM 2000 TO 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Fabíola Momm

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A research on scientific knowledge issued in Brazil at post graduate programs in Tourism and correlated areas was conducted taking in account bibliographical references contained in Master Thesis presented in four Post Graduate Programs from 2000 to 2006. It was an exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study using bibliometric a scientometric tools and techniques. 334 bibliographical references were organized and classified following the Spanish Documental Center of Spain Tourism Thesaurus patterns. As a result 15 research lines were identified. As for scientific knowledge itself, a great diversity of research lines and issues were identified. The study demonstrates the hierarchical relation between generic terms and specific terms and points which knowledge areas have a dialogue with the field. Final considerations suggest reflection on scientific development in Tourism in Brazil is needed.

  1. SPSS and SAS programs for addressing interdependence and basic levels-of-analysis issues in psychological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Brian P

    2004-02-01

    Levels-of-analysis issues arise whenever individual-level data are collected from more than one person from the same dyad, family, classroom, work group, or other interaction unit. Interdependence in data from individuals in the same interaction units also violates the independence-of-observations assumption that underlies commonly used statistical tests. This article describes the data analysis challenges that are presented by these issues and presents SPSS and SAS programs for conducting appropriate analyses. The programs conduct the within-and-between-analyses described by Dansereau, Alutto, and Yammarino (1984) and the dyad-level analyses described by Gonzalez and Griffin (1999) and Griffin and Gonzalez (1995). Contrasts with general multilevel modeling procedures are then discussed.

  2. Computational study of axisymmetric modes in noncircular cross section tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.; Chance, M.S.; Greene, J.M.; Grimm, R.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Kerner, W.; Manickam, J.; Weimer, K.E.

    1976-09-01

    A major computational program to investigate the MHD equilibrium, stability, and nonlinear evolution properties of realistic tokamak configurations is proceeding. Preliminary application is made to the Princeton PDX device. Both axisymmetric (n = 0) modes and kink (n = 1) modes are found; the growth rates depend sensitively on the configuration. A study of the nonlinear evolution of axisymmetric modes in such a device shows that flux conservation in the vacuum region can limit their growth

  3. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for Edge Plasma Analysis in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castracane, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe (HNBP) developed initially with DOE funding under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was installed on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) at the CCFM. This diagnostic was designed to perform fundamental measurements of edge plasma properties. The hardware was capable of measuring electron density and potential profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fluctuation spectra for these parameters were obtained with HNBP for transport studies

  4. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for Edge Plasma Analysis in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castracane, J.

    2001-01-04

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe (HNBP) developed initially with DOE funding under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was installed on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) at the CCFM. This diagnostic was designed to perform fundamental measurements of edge plasma properties. The hardware was capable of measuring electron density and potential profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fluctuation spectra for these parameters were obtained with HNBP for transport studies.

  5. Challenges in Serving Rural American Children through the Summer Food Service Program. Issue Brief No. 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauchope, Barbara; Stracuzzi, Nena

    2010-01-01

    Many families rely on U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-funded school lunch and breakfast programs to make the family's food budget stretch, improving their food security throughout the school year. These programs feed about 31 million students annually. During the summer where schools are not in session, food security decreases. The USDA…

  6. Non-Axisymmetric Shaping of Tokamaks Preserving Quasi-Axisymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long-Poe Ku and Allen H. Boozer

    2009-06-05

    If quasi-axisymmetry is preserved, non-axisymmetric shaping can be used to design tokamaks that do not require current drive, are resilient to disruptions, and have robust plasma stability without feedback. Suggestions for addressing the critical issues of tokamaks can only be validated when presented with sufficient specificity that validating experiments can be designed. The purpose of this paper is provide that specificity for non-axisymmetric shaping. To our knowledge, no other suggestions for the solution of a number of tokamak issues, such as disruptions, have reached this level of specificity. Sequences of three-field-period quasi-axisymmetric plasmas are studied. These sequences address the questions: (1) What can be achieved at various levels of non-axisymmetric shaping? (2) What simplifications to the coils can be achieved by going to a larger aspect ratio? (3) What range of shaping can be achieved in a single experimental facility? The sequences of plasmas found in this study provide a set of interesting and potentially important configurations.

  7. High-β steady-state advanced tokamak regimes for ITER and FIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.M.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Kessel, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Gorelenkov, N.; Jardin, S.C.; Schmidt, J.A.; Navratil, G.A.; Bialek, J.; Ulrickson, M.A.; Rognlein, T.; Mandrekas, J.

    2005-01-01

    An attractive tokamak-based fusion power plant will require the development of high-β steady-state advanced tokamak regimes to produce a high-gain burning plasma with a large fraction of self-driven current and high fusion-power density. Both ITER and FIRE are being designed with the objective to address these issues by exploring and understanding burning plasma physics both in the conventional H-mode regime, and in advanced tokamak regimes with β N ∼ 3 - 4, and f bs ∼50-80%. ITER has employed conservative scenarios, as appropriate for its nuclear technology mission, while FIRE has employed more aggressive assumptions aimed at exploring the scenarios envisioned in the ARIES power-plant studies. The main characteristics of the advanced scenarios presently under study for ITER and FIRE are compared with advanced tokamak regimes envisioned for the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS-C), the US ARIES-RS Power Plant Study and the Japanese Advanced Steady-State Tokamak Reactor (ASSTR). The goal of the present work is to develop advanced tokamak scenarios that would fully exploit the capability of ITER and FIRE. This paper will summarize the status of the work and indicate critical areas where further R and D is needed. (author)

  8. Microwave Tokamak Experiment: Overview and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. 3 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Combined confinement system applied to tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1986-01-01

    From particle orbit point of view, a tokamak is a combined confinement configuration where a closed toroidal volume is surrounded by an open confinement system like a magnetic mirror. By eliminating a cold halo plasma, the energy loss from the plasma becomes convective. The H-mode in diverted tokamaks is an example. Because of the favorable scaling of the energy confinement time with temperature, the performance of the tokamak may be significantly improved by taking advantage of this effect. (author)

  10. Presheath profiles in simulated tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBombard, B.; Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Lehmer, R.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Ra, Y.; Tynan, G.

    1988-04-01

    The PISCES plasma surface interaction facility at UCLA generates plasmas with characteristics similar to those found in the edge plasmas of tokamaks. Steady state magnetized plasmas produced by this device are used to study plasma-wall interaction phenomena which are relevant to tokamak devices. We report here progress on some detailed investigations of the presheath region that extends from a wall surface into these /open quotes/simulated tokamak/close quotes/ edge plasma discharges along magnetic field lines

  11. Research Issues in the Study of Public Attitudes toward Ethical Problems in Television Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rarick, David L.; Lind, Rebecca Ann

    Three empirical studies focused on viewer reactions to ethical issues in television news, and on actions audience members felt were appropriate to control possibly unethical behaviors in television broadcasting. The first study was a 12-minute telephone survey of 293 randomly selected adults in Minneapolis-St. Paul (Minnesota) in 1989 to determine…

  12. The role of the states in a federal climate program : issues and options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of some of the key isuses regarding statefederal roles in a federal climate program and identifies four possible mechanisms that have been suggested for allowing states to set more stringent reduction targets. *Cont...

  13. "Perfect Storm": Analyzing Strategic Issues Confronting Program Executive Office, Missiles and Space

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Joseph S; Warnick, David A

    2007-01-01

    ...: the implementation of Program Budget Decision 753, the deterioration of the matrix support structure, the aging of the civilian workforce, and the influx of new organizations resulting from the Base...

  14. F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    bulkheads on the F-22.”28 Third, the driveshaft, lift-fan clutch, and actuator for the F-35B’s roll-post nozzles will be redesigned following...levels of participation in the program. International partners are also assisting with Initial Operational Test and Evaluation ( IOT &E), a subset of...Week/Ares blog, March 15, 2010. 59 Currently, the UK, Italy, and the Netherlands have agreed to participate in the IOT &E program. UK, the senior F

  15. Prospects for pilot plants based on the tokamak, spherical tokamak and stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.E.; Bromberg, L.; Brown, T.; Burgess, Thomas W.; Dix, D.; Gerrity, T.; Goldston, R.J.; Hawryluk, R.; Kastner, R.; Kessel, C.; Malang, S.; Minervini, J.; Neilson, G.H.; Neumeyer, C.L.; Prager, S.; Sawan, M.; Sheffield, J.; Sternlieb, A.; Waganer, L.; Whyte, D.G.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    A potentially attractive next-step towards fusion commercialization is a pilot plant, i.e. a device ultimately capable of small net electricity production in as compact a facility as possible and in a configuration scalable to a full-size power plant. A key capability for a pilot-plant programme is the production of high neutron fluence enabling fusion nuclear science and technology (FNST) research. It is found that for physics and technology assumptions between those assumed for ITER and nth-of-a-kind fusion power plant, it is possible to provide FNST-relevant neutron wall loading in pilot devices. Thus, it may be possible to utilize a single facility to perform FNST research utilizing reactor-relevant plasma, blanket, coil and auxiliary systems and maintenance schemes while also targeting net electricity production. In this paper three configurations for a pilot plant are considered: the advanced tokamak, spherical tokamak and compact stellarator. A range of configuration issues is considered including: radial build and blanket design, magnet systems, maintenance schemes, tritium consumption and self-sufficiency, physics scenarios and a brief assessment of research needs for the configurations.

  16. EDITORIAL: Special issue: overview reports from the Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) (Daejeon, South Korea, 2010) Special issue: overview reports from the Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) (Daejeon, South Korea, 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-09-01

    -U tokamak in China. Other MCF Overview of results from the Large Helical Device; Overview of TJ-II experiments; Overview of the RFX fusion science program. ICF Progress toward ignition on the National Ignition Facility; Studying ignition schemes on European laser facilities; Cross device or cross programme topical overviews Effects of 3D magnetic perturbations on toroidal plasmas; Toroidal momentum transport. We trust that, as usual, this issue will be a useful resource for the community and we thank all of the authors and referees for their hard work in preparing the papers for publication. Whilst the number of overview reports is the same as for the Geneva FEC special issue (2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 100201), we are pleased to note that we have a complete set of summaries in this issue.

  17. Transport in the tokamak plasma edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental observations characterize the edge plasma or boundary layer in magnetically confined plasmas as a region of great complexity. Evidence suggests the edge physics plays a key role in plasma confinement although the mechanism remains unresolved. This study focuses on issues in two areas: observed poloidal asymmetries in the Scrape Off Layer (SOL) edge plasma and the physical nature of the plasma-neutral recycling. A computational model solves the coupled two dimensional partial differential equations governing the plasma fluid density, parallel and radial velocities, electron and ion temperatures and neutral density under assumptions of toroidal symmetry, ambipolarity, anomalous diffusive radial flux, and neutral-ion thermal equilibrium. Drift flow and plasma potential are calculated as dependent quantities. Computational results are compared to experimental data for the CCT and TEXTOR:ALT-II tokamak limiter cases. Comparisons show drift flux is a major component of the poloidal flow in the SOL along the tangency/separatrix. Plasma-neutral recycling is characterized in several tokamak divertors, including the C-MOD device using magnetic flux surface coordinates. Recycling is characterized by time constant, τ rc , on the order of tens of milliseconds. Heat flux transients from the core into the edge on shorter time scales significantly increase the plasma temperatures at the target and may increase sputtering. Recycling conditions in divertors vary considerably depending on recycled flux to the core. The high density, low temperature solution requires that the neutral mean free path be small compared to the divertor target to x-point distance. The simulations and analysis support H-mode confinement and transition models based on the recycling divertor solution bifurcation

  18. Plasma diagnostics for the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M.

    1988-06-01

    The primary mission of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is to study the physics of alpha-particle heating in an ignited D-T plasma. A burn time of about 10 /tau//sub E/ is projected in a divertor configuration with baseline machine design parameters of R=2.10 m, 1=0.65 m, b=1.30 m, I/sub p/=11 MA, B/sub T/=10 T and 10-20 MW of auxiliary rf heating. Plasma temperatures and density are expected to reach T/sub e/(O) /approximately/20 keV, T/sub i/(O) /approximately/30 keV, and n/sub e/(O) /approximately/ 1 /times/ 10 21 m/sup /minus/3/. The combined effects of restricted port access to the plasma, the presence of severe neutron and gamma radiation backgrounds, and the necessity for remote of in-cell components create challenging design problems for all of the conventional diagnostic associated with tokamak operations. In addition, new techniques must be developed to diagnose the evolution in space, time, and energy of the confined alpha distribution as well as potential plasma instabilities driven by collective alpha-particle effects. The design effort for CIT diagnostics is presently in the conceptual phase with activity being focused on the selection of a viable diagnostic set and the identification of essential research and development projects to support this process. A review of these design issues and other aspects impacting the selection of diagnostic techniques for the CIT experiment will be presented. 28 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Flux driven turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, P.; Ottaviani, M.; Sarazin, Y.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.; Waltz, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with tokamak plasma turbulence in the case where fluxes are fixed and profiles are allowed to fluctuate. These systems are intermittent. In particular, radially propagating fronts, are usually observed over a broad range of time and spatial scales. The existence of these fronts provide a way to understand the fast transport events sometimes observed in tokamaks. It is also shown that the confinement scaling law can still be of the gyroBohm type in spite of these large scale transport events. Some departure from the gyroBohm prediction is observed at low flux, i.e. when the gradients are close to the instability threshold. Finally, it is found that the diffusivity is not the same for a turbulence calculated at fixed flux than at fixed temperature gradient, with the same time averaged profile. (author)

  20. Plasma diagnostics on large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlinskij, D.V.; Magyar, G.

    1988-01-01

    The main tasks of the large tokamaks which are under construction (T-15 and Tore Supra) and of those which have already been built (TFTR, JET, JT-60 and DIII-D) together with their design features which are relevant to plasma diagnostics are briefly discussed. The structural features and principal characteristics of the diagnostic systems being developed or already being used on these devices are also examined. The different diagnostic methods are described according to the physical quantities to be measured: electric and magnetic diagnostics, measurements of electron density, electron temperature, the ion components of the plasma, radiation loss measurements, spectroscopy of impurities, edge diagnostics and study of plasma stability. The main parameters of the various diagnostic systems used on the six large tokamaks are summarized in tables. (author). 351 refs, 44 figs, 22 tabs

  1. Starfire: a commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Abdou, M.A.; DeFreece, D.A.; Trachsel, C.A.; Graumann, D.; Kokoszenski, J.

    1979-01-01

    The basic objective of the STARFIRE Project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. Another key goal of the project is to give careful attention to the safety and environmental features of a commercial fusion reactor. The STARFIRE Project was initiated in May 1979, with the goal of completing the design study by October 1980. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the major parameters and design features that have been tentatively selected for STARFIRE

  2. Comprehensive numerical modelling of tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.; Dubois, P.F.

    1991-01-01

    We outline a plan for the development of a comprehensive numerical model of tokamaks. The model would consist of a suite of independent, communicating packages describing the various aspects of tokamak performance (core and edge transport coefficients and profiles, heating, fueling, magnetic configuration, etc.) as well as extensive diagnostics. These codes, which may run on different computers, would be flexibly linked by a user-friendly shell which would allow run-time specification of packages and generation of pre- and post-processing functions, including workstation-based visualization of output. One package in particular, the calculation of core transport coefficients via gyrokinetic particle simulation, will become practical on the scale required for comprehensive modelling only with the advent of teraFLOP computers. Incremental effort at LLNL would be focused on gyrokinetic simulation and development of the shell

  3. Magnetic island formation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1989-04-01

    The size of a magnetic island created by a perturbing helical field in a tokamak is estimated. A helical equilibrium of a current- carrying plasma is found in a helical coordinate and the helically flowing current in the cylinder that borders the plasma is calculated. From that solution, it is concluded that the helical perturbation of /approximately/10/sup /minus/4/ of the total plasma current is sufficient to cause an island width of approximately 5% of the plasma radius. 6 refs

  4. Equilibrium Reconstruction in EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jinping; Wan Baonian; Shen Biao; Sun Youwen; Liu Dongmei; Xiao Bingjia; Ren Qilong; Gong Xianzu; Li Jiangang; Lao, L. L.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction of experimental axisymmetric equilibria is an important part of tokamak data analysis. Fourier expansion is applied to reconstruct the vessel current distribution in EFIT code. Benchmarking and testing calculations are performed to evaluate and validate this algorithm. Two cases for circular and non-circular plasma discharges are presented. Fourier expansion used to fit the eddy current is a robust method and the real time EFIT can be introduced to the plasma control system in the coming campaign. (magnetically confined plasma)

  5. Relaxed states of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucinski, M.Y.; Okano, V.

    1993-01-01

    The relaxed states of tokamak plasmas are studied. It is assumed that the plasma relaxes to a quasi-steady state which is characterized by a minimum entropy production rate, compatible with a number of prescribed conditions and pressure balance. A poloidal current arises naturally due to the anisotropic resistivity. The minimum entropy production theory is applied, assuming the pressure equilibrium as fundamental constraint on the final state. (L.C.J.A.)

  6. Runaway electrons during tokamak startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.S.; Jayakumar, R.

    1988-01-01

    Runaway electrons significantly affect the plasma and impurity evolution during tokamak startup. During its rise, a runaway pulse stores magnetic flux inductively; this is then released during the decay phase of the runaway pulse. This process affects plasma formation, current initiation and current buildup. Because of their relativistic velocities the runaway electrons have higher ionization and excitation rates than the plasma electrons. This leads to a significant modification of the impurity behaviour and consequently the plasma evolution. (author). 20 refs, 8 figs

  7. Minimum scaling laws in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1986-10-01

    Scaling laws governing anomalous electron transport in tokamaks with ohmic and/or auxiliary heating are derived using renormalized Vlasov-Ampere equations for low frequency electromagnetic microturbulence. It is also shown that for pure auxiliary heating (or when auxiliary heating power far exceeds the ohmic power), the energy confinement time scales as tau/sub E/ ∼ P/sub inj//sup -1/3/, where P/sub inj/ is the injected power

  8. Gyrosheath near the tokamak edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Xiao, H.; Valanju, P.M.

    1993-03-01

    A new model for the structure of the radial electric field profile in the edge during the H-mode is proposed. Charge separation caused by the difference between electron and ion gyromotion, or more importantly in a tokamak, the banana motion (halo effect) can self-consistently produce an electric dipole moment that causes the sheared radial electric field. The calculated results based on the model are consistent with D-III D and TEXTOR experimental results

  9. Tokamak plasma boundary layer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, T.F.; Kirillov, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    A model has been developed for the limiter layer and for the boundary region of the plasma column in a tokamak to facilitate analytic calculations of the thickness of the limiter layers, the profiles and boundary values of the temperature and the density under various conditions, and the difference between the electron and ion temperatures. This model can also be used to analyze the recycling of neutrals, the energy and particle losses to the wall and the limiter, and other characteristics

  10. Shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieras, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Shear Alfven waves in an axisymmetric tokamak are examined within the framework of the linearized ideal MHD equations. Properties of the shear Alfven continuous spectrum are studied both analytically and numerically. Implications of these results in regards to low frequency rf heating of toroidally confined plasmas are discussed. The structure of the spatial singularities associated with these waves is determined. A reduced set of ideal MHD equations is derived to describe these waves in a very low beta plasma

  11. New issues and direction in the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sluyter, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    In pursuit of its goal of developing a laboratory microfusion capability for both defense and other applications, the US Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program has developed a set of laser and light ion research facilities which, with their supporting components, represent the most advanced set of high energy density physics research capabilities in the world. The US ICF Program is considering both direct and indirect drive as a path to ignition. In the former, a deuterium-tritium (DT) filled spherical capsule is directly imploded using laser light, while in the latter driver (laser or light ion) energy is converted to x-rays which are then used to implode a capsule. The latter results in greater drive symmetry and reduced hydrodynamic instability at a cost in efficiency. The Program's major direct drive laser facilities are the NIKE KrF laser at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the Nd-glass OMEGA Upgrade laser at the University of Rochester. The 40-kJ Nova laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), completed in 1984, is the Program's major indirect drive facility. In addition to their Program related work, a number of these facilities are now available to outside users through a proposal submission process. The next few years are expected to be very exciting for ICF as experiments commence on OMEGA Upgrade and NIKE and efforts continue to construct the National Ignition Facility (NIF) a large glass laser which is designed to demonstrate ignition in the laboratory

  12. International greenhouse gas trading programs: a discussion of measurement and accounting issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vine, Edward; Kats, Gregory; Sathaye, Jayant; Joshi, Hemant

    2003-01-01

    There is general scientific consensus that global warming is occurring and that this results from human activities, primarily burning fossil fuels. There is also a growing international consensus that the most cost-effective way to slow global warming is to establish international climate change trading programs that let institutions sell greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions in an international trading program. A well designed international GHG trading program could save billions or tens of billions of dollars and could result in a more rapid transfer of cleaner, more modern energy generating, transmitting and using technologies to developing nations. Establishing an international GHG trading program will require the development of international consensus rules on how to value and credit investments, for example in energy efficiency, that result in reduced emissions of greenhouse gases. Such a program would require the development of an international technical agreement on how to value emissions reductions attributed to energy-efficiency investments that reflect realistic estimates of future energy savings--and emissions reductions--that come from those investments. This paper examines five possible approaches for valuing energy savings which might serve as the basis for an international agreement, discusses the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and discusses lessons learned from conducting this evaluation process

  13. How would we deal with radiation related issues in high school educational programs?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Kuniko

    1999-01-01

    Current educational curriculum will be more improved and the materials in schools will be somewhat different by the year of 2002 when students have two days off in a week. It is a well known fact that recent Japanese people's level of understanding about Science and Technology is the second from the bottom among OECD nations and, as a matter of fact, few schools are dealing with scientific issues such as atomic energy or radiation. High school teachers need to survey what students know about atomic power and radiation, how deep they studied in previous schools and what kind of interest they have in conservation of world energy sources or environmental issues discussed today. Through questionnaires to 328 students, it became clear that they were most interesting to the effect of radiation or radioactivity on any kind of things in the environment, and that they want to know solutions for those problems such as greenhouse effect, ozone layers and Garbage disposal. (M. Suetake)

  14. Fourth SIAM conference on mathematical and computational issues in the geosciences: Final program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The conference focused on computational and modeling issues in the geosciences. Of the geosciences, problems associated with phenomena occurring in the earth`s subsurface were best represented. Topics in this area included petroleum recovery, ground water contamination and remediation, seismic imaging, parameter estimation, upscaling, geostatistical heterogeneity, reservoir and aquifer characterization, optimal well placement and pumping strategies, and geochemistry. Additional sessions were devoted to the atmosphere, surface water and oceans. The central mathematical themes included computational algorithms and numerical analysis, parallel computing, mathematical analysis of partial differential equations, statistical and stochastic methods, optimization, inversion, homogenization and renormalization. The problem areas discussed at this conference are of considerable national importance, with the increasing importance of environmental issues, global change, remediation of waste sites, declining domestic energy sources and an increasing reliance on producing the most out of established oil reservoirs.

  15. Discharge cleaning for a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Shigeyuki

    1983-01-01

    Various methods of discharge cleaning for tokamaks are described. The material of the first walls of tokamaks is usually stainless steel, inconel, titanium and so on. Hydrogen is exclusively used as the discharge gas. Glow discharge cleaning (GDC), Taylor discharge cleaning (TDC), and electron cyclotron resonance discharge cleaning (ECR-DC) are discussed in this paper. The cleaning by GDC is made by moving a movable anode to the center of a tokamak vassel. Taylor found the good cleaning effect of induced discharge by high pressure and low power discharge. This is called TDC. When the frequency of high frequency discharge in a magnetic field is equal to that of the electron cyclotron resonance, the break down potential is lowered if the pressure is sufficiently low. The ECR-CD is made by using this effect. In TDC and ECR-DC, the electron temperature, which has a close relation to the production rate of H 0 , can be controlled by the pressure. In GDC, the operating pressure was improved by the radio frequency glow (RG) method. However, there is still the danger of arcing. In case of GDC and ECR-DC, the position of plasma can be controlled, but not in case of TDC. The TDC is accepted by most of takamak devices in the world. (Kato, T.)

  16. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM'y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nTτ's ∼ 2.5x greater than ELM'ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices

  17. Recent results and near-term expectations in Tokamak fusion research in the U.S., Europe, and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of fusion is often thought about in terms of three different activities: scientific feasibility, engineering feasibility, and economic feasibility. This paper discusses the scientific feasibility of fusion. Reactor temperatures, reactor densities and confinement, particle control, plasma power handling, and self-heating are some of the issues examined. Collaboration and results from research at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton, the JT-60U in Japan, and JET, the Joint European Torus Tokamak in Oxford are presented

  18. Extending the foreign spent fuel acceptance program: Policy and implementation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, Edwin S.

    2005-01-01

    The May 2006 expiration date of the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance Program is fast approaching. In April 2004, Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham instructed the Energy Department to 'initiate actions necessary to extend .... the fuel acceptance deadline'. However, extending the deadline may not be a simple task. The limits on the original program resulted from a delicate negotiation among many stakeholders. Any proposal to increase the duration and scope of the program will have to be considered in the context of DOE's failure since 1996 to develop viable treatment, packaging and long-term disposal options for FRR SNF. It is also unclear whether accepting additional low-enriched uranium FRR SNF can be justified on security grounds. This paper will propose criteria for acceptance of spent fuel under an extension that are intended to minimize controversy and ensure consistency with a threat-based prioritization of homeland security expenditures. (author)

  19. The E-rate Program and Libraries and Library Consortia, 2000-2004: Trends and Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Jaeger

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The E-rate program has provided tremendous benefits to libraries, allowing many libraries and library systems to acquire technological equipment and services that would otherwise be too expensive, increasing the availability of public Internet access through libraries. This article analyzes the data related to the E-rate program and the discounts that it has provided to libraries and library systems between 2000 and 2004. By examining the E-rate data in a longitudinal manner, this article explores the trends in the application for and the provision of E-rate discounts to libraries and library consortia at national and state levels. The data suggest that, despite a number of controversies over the years, the program has provided a significant level of support for libraries and library consortia.

  20. A discussion on practicable scheme for machine control system of HL-2A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiang; Song Xianming; Jiang Chao

    2001-01-01

    This is the modified version of The Preliminary Design on the Hardware and Nets of HL-2A Tokamak. In this version, centralized control as well as the field bus communication on HL-2A Tokamak is used. The hardware components and the operational theory are introduced. The questions of practice program, extensibility, centralized control, cooperation with other subsystems and the continuous adaptation of present device are all discussed. The budget of the system is detailed. To keep the step with the overall engineering constructions of HL-2A, suggestions of the time program are presented for the system design, instrument purchases, installation, construction, user program development and the final operation processes for the machine control system of HL-2A Tokamak

  1. Maintenance concept development for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), located at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, will be the next major experimental machine in the US Fusion Program. Its use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel requires the use of remote handling technology to carry out maintenance operations on the machine. These operations consist of removing and repairing such components as diagnostic equipment modules by using remotely operated maintenance equipment. The major equipment being developed for maintenance external to the vacuum vessel includes both bridge-mounted and floor-mounted manipulator systems. Additionally, decontamination (decon) equipment, hot cell repair facilities, and equipment for handling and packaging solid radioactive waste (rad-waste) are being developed. Recent design activities have focused on establishing maintenance system interfaces with the facility design, developing manipulator system requirements, and using mock-ups to support the tokamak configuration design. 3 refs., 8 figs

  2. On the simulation of the tokamak longitUdinal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simakov, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of imitation of tokamak longitudinal field with a limited number of coils of a toroidal solenoid is considered in connection with construction of the bench-mark facility for the tokamak superconductive magnetic system. These coils should satisfactorily imitate the fields of the absent twenty three coils in the region of the twenty fourth. Fields and forces are calculated by the Tokat program. The analysis of the variants considered showed that with refuse from limitations on the cryostat sizes with acceptable accuracy the longitudinal field by means of 7-8 coils is possible. With the given sizes of the cryostat (d=4.1 m) it is hardly possible to obtain acceptable field imitation because of great current densities in the neighbouring coils. But on the bench of four coils one can obtain data, which, probably, will be useful during the evaluation of attaining the project parameters of the toroidal solenoid

  3. Tore-Supra: a Tokamak with superconducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1987-07-01

    Tore Supra is a tokamak under construction on the site of Cen Cadarache by the Euratom-CEA Association. The machine technology integrates all problems related to the fabrication and the operation of large superconducting coils and of the associated cryogenic system. Tore Supra will provide a significant experience to prepare the next generation of machines for plasma physics and controlled fusion. Tore Supra is specially designed to implement a large physics program. The superconducting coils make possible the study of plasma confinement in long pulses (more than 60s), the impurities and the stability, and the efficiency of additional heating sources (neutral particle beams and radio frequency heating). The opportunity is taken to recall the particular features and requirements of the superconducting coils of the large future tokamaks in order to point out the problems that have to be faced by any new material (superconducting or not)

  4. Is internship program an answer to some of your business issues?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kridlova, Katarina Kridlova; Turcan, Romeo V.; Christensen, Keld Arenholt

    2018-01-01

    , which have strong influence on the quality and effectiveness of the internship program. It also summarizes part of the findings of a research project, which was conducted at a specific, multinational corporation. The main goal of the research project was to investigate the role of the internship...

  5. F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program: Background, Status, and Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bolkcom, Christopher; Murch, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The Defense Department's F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) is one of three aircraft modernization programs in tactical aviation, the others being the Air Force F-22A fighter and the Navy F/A-18E/F fighter/attack plane...

  6. F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter "JSF" Program: Background, Status, and Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murch, Anthony; Bolkcom, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The Defense Department's F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) is one of three aircraft modernization programs in tactical aviation, the others being the Air Force F-22A fighter and the Navy F/A-18E/F fighter/attack plane...

  7. F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program: Background, Status, and Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bolkcom, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The Defense Department's F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) is one of three aircraft modernization programs in tactical aviation, the others being the Air Force F-22A fighter and the Navy F/A-18E/F fighter/attack plane...

  8. The U.S. Navy’s Consultant Development and Qualification Program: Origin and Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    Navy-wide program, probably as part of an NMPC OE manual (Ref. 9]. a. Pcific Fleet The HRMSYSPACINST 1500.1 is an admirably brief instruction, thirty...profesional OD organizacion external. to USN. 5. The above guidance is not intended to preclude special activities or applications by individual Centers

  9. Early Childhood Development Policy and Programming in India: Critical Issues and Directions for Paradigm Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Adarsh; Sen, Rekha Sharma; Gulati, Renu

    2008-01-01

    The critical importance of the early childhood years and the rights perspective to human development has made policy and programming for early childhood development an imperative for every nation. In India, poverty, changing economic and social structures resulting in the breakdown of traditional coping mechanisms and family care systems, and the…

  10. Big-City Imperative: Agenda for Action. Issues for Urban Programming into the Next Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krofta, Janet; Panshin, Dan

    1989-01-01

    Extension needs to find its future niche in the urban area where people now are with the same success that it currently enjoys in rural areas. Opportunities for extension programing include at-risk youth and families, environmental quality, and community revitalization. (JOW)

  11. Collective dose as a performance measure for occupational radiation protection programs: Issues and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, D.J.; Harty, R.; Hickey, E.E.; Martin, J.B.; Peffers, M.S.; Kathren, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    Collective dose is one of the performance measures used at many US Department of Energy (DOE) contractor facilities to quantitatively assess the objectives of the radiation protection program. It can also be used as a management tool to improve the program for keeping worker doses as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Collective dose is used here to mean the sum of all total effective dose equivalent values for all workers in a specified group over a specified time. It is often used as a surrogate estimate of radiological risk. In principle, improvements in radiation protection programs and procedures will result in reduction of collective dose, all other things being equal. Within the DOE, most frequently, a single collective dose number, which may or may not be adjusted for workload and other factors, is used as a performance measure for a contractor. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the use of collective dose as a performance measure for ALARA programs at DOE sites

  12. The Abbott School Construction Program: NJ Department of Education Proposed Facilities Regulations. Analysis of Preschool Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponessa, Joan; Boylan, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    This report on preschool facilities analyzes regulations proposed by the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) to implement the Educational Facilities Construction and Financing Act. (EFCFA). EFCFA, which authorizes and governs New Jersey's public school construction program, was enacted in July 2000 to implement the State Supreme Court's…

  13. The WIC Program: Background, Trends, and Economic Issues, 2009 Edition. Economic Research Report Number 73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Victor; Frazao, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The mission of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is to safeguard the health of low-income women, infants, and children through age 4 who are at nutritional risk. WIC provides nutritious foods to supplement diets, nutrition education, and referrals to health care and other social services.…

  14. An Early Look at the Career Ready Internship Program. Issue Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutschow, Elizabeth Zachry; Taketa, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    While a college degree offers the opportunity for increased income, a degree alone does not guarantee a student's successful entry into the workforce. Work-based learning, such as internships and apprenticeship programs, has become an increasingly popular way to help students build workforce skills and experience and gain real-world exposure to a…

  15. Maternal substance use and integrated treatment programs for women with substance abuse issues and their children: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milligan Karen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of women with substance abuse issues is increasing. Women present with a unique constellation of risk factors and presenting needs, which may include specific needs in their role as mothers. Numerous integrated programs (those with substance use treatment and pregnancy, parenting, or child services have been developed to specifically meet the needs of pregnant and parenting women with substance abuse issues. This synthesis and meta-analysis reviews research in this important and growing area of treatment. Methods We searched PsycINFO, MedLine, PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, Proquest Dissertations, Sociological Abstracts, and CINAHL and compiled a database of 21 studies (2 randomized trials, 9 quasi-experimental studies, 10 cohort studies of integrated programs published between 1990 and 2007 with outcome data on maternal substance use. Data were summarized and where possible, meta-analyses were performed, using standardized mean differences (d effect size estimates. Results In the two studies comparing integrated programs to no treatment, effect sizes for urine toxicology and percent using substances significantly favored integrated programs and ranged from 0.18 to 1.41. Studies examining changes in maternal substance use from beginning to end of treatment were statistically significant and medium sized. More specifically, in the five studies measuring severity of drug and alcohol use, the average effect sizes were 0.64 and 0.40, respectively. In the four cohort studies of days of use, the average effect size was 0.52. Of studies comparing integrated to non-integrated programs, four studies assessed urine toxicology and two assessed self-reported abstinence. Overall effect sizes for each measure were not statistically significant (d = -0.09 and 0.22, respectively. Conclusions Findings suggest that integrated programs are effective in reducing maternal substance use. However, integrated programs were not

  16. How would we deal with radiation related issues in high school educational programs?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Kuniko [Attached High School of Akita Keizai Houka Univ., Akita (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Current educational curriculum will be more improved and the materials in schools will be somewhat different by the year of 2002 when students have two days off in a week. It is a well known fact that recent Japanese people's level of understanding about Science and Technology is the second from the bottom among OECD nations and, as a matter of fact, few schools are dealing with scientific issues such as atomic energy or radiation. High school teachers need to survey what students know about atomic power and radiation, how deep they studied in previous schools and what kind of interest they have in conservation of world energy sources or environmental issues discussed today. Through questionnaires to 328 students, it became clear that they were most interesting to the effect of radiation or radioactivity on any kind of things in the environment, and that they want to know solutions for those problems such as greenhouse effect, ozone layers and Garbage disposal. (M. Suetake)

  17. Navy DDG-51 and DDG-1000 Destroyer Programs: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-17

    Capability Build 16 Combat System upgrade as well as testing of the AMDR minimum track range requirement against supersonic, sea- skimming ASCM threat...the Navy awarded a fixed price contract to Bath Iron Works for a steel deckhouse, hangar, and aft peripheral vertical launching system for the third...and that originally planned for the CG(X). The ships reflected in this program have been priced based on continuation of the existing DDG 51 re

  18. A quasi-linear gyrokinetic transport model for tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casati, A.

    2009-10-01

    After a presentation of some basics around nuclear fusion, this research thesis introduces the framework of the tokamak strategy to deal with confinement, hence the main plasma instabilities which are responsible for turbulent transport of energy and matter in such a system. The author also briefly introduces the two principal plasma representations, the fluid and the kinetic ones. He explains why the gyro-kinetic approach has been preferred. A tokamak relevant case is presented in order to highlight the relevance of a correct accounting of the kinetic wave-particle resonance. He discusses the issue of the quasi-linear response. Firstly, the derivation of the model, called QuaLiKiz, and its underlying hypotheses to get the energy and the particle turbulent flux are presented. Secondly, the validity of the quasi-linear response is verified against the nonlinear gyro-kinetic simulations. The saturation model that is assumed in QuaLiKiz, is presented and discussed. Then, the author qualifies the global outcomes of QuaLiKiz. Both the quasi-linear energy and the particle flux are compared to the expectations from the nonlinear simulations, across a wide scan of tokamak relevant parameters. Therefore, the coupling of QuaLiKiz within the integrated transport solver CRONOS is presented: this procedure allows the time-dependent transport problem to be solved, hence the direct application of the model to the experiment. The first preliminary results regarding the experimental analysis are finally discussed

  19. Design considerations of modular pump limiters for large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.; Klepper, C.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-11-01

    Long-pulse (>10-s) and high-power (>10-MW) operation of large tokamaks requires multiple limiter modules for particle and heat removal, and the power load must be distributed among a number of modules. Because each added module changes the performance of all the others, a set of design criteria must be defined for the overall limiter system. The relationship between individual modules must also be considered from the standpoint of flux coverage and shadowing effects. This paper addresses these issues and provides design guidelines. Parameters of the individual modules are then determined from the system requirements for particle and power removal. Long-pulse operation of large tokamaks requires that the limiter modules be equipped with active cooling. At the leading edge of a module, the cooling channel determines the thickness of the limiter blade (or head). A model has been developed for estimating the system exhaust efficiency in terms of the parameters of the leading edge (i.e., its thickness and the design heat flux) in terms of given device parameters and the power load that must be removed. The impact on module design of state-of-the-art engineering technology for high heat removal is discussed. The choice of locations for the modules is also investigated, and the effects of shadowing between modules on particle and power removal are examined. The results are applied to the Tore Supra tokamak. Conceptual design parameters of the modular pump limiter system are given. 10 refs., 5 figs

  20. Magnetic confinement by Tokamak: physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachon, J.

    1980-01-01

    After describing the Tokamak configuration concept, the author provides an analysis of the principal physical aspects of this type of installation and concludes by estimating that the Tokamak concept is a 'plausible candidate' as a means of producing controlled thermonuclear fusion [fr

  1. Economic evaluation of tokamak power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Steiner, D.

    1977-01-01

    This study reports the impact of plasma operating characteristics, engineering options, and technology on the capital cost trends of tokamak power plants. Tokamak power systems are compared to other advanced energy systems and found to be economically competitive. A three-phase strategy for demonstrating commercial feasibility of fusion power, based on a common-site multiple-unit concept, is presented

  2. Simulation of a major tokamak disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.; Monticello, D.A.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1977-08-01

    It is known that the internal tokamak disruption leads to a current profile which is flattened inside the surface where the safety factor equals unity. It is shown that such a profile can lead to m = 2 magnetic islands which grow to fill a substantial part of the tokamak cross section in a time consistent with the observations of the major disruption

  3. MAST: a Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darke, A.C.; Harbar, J.R.; Hay, J.H.; Hicks, J.B.; Hill, J.W.; McKenzie, J.S.; Morris, A.W.; Nightingale, M.P.S.; Todd, T.N.; Voss, G.M.; Watkins, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The highly successful tight aspect ratio tokamak research pioneered on the START machine at Culham, together with the attractive possibilities of the concept, suggest a larger device should be considered. The design of a Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak is described, operating at much higher currents and over longer pulses than START and compatible with strong additional heating. (orig.)

  4. Mercier criterion for high-β tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, R.M.O.

    1984-01-01

    An expression, for the application of the Mercier criterion to numerical studies of diffuse high-β tokamaks (β approximatelly Σ,q approximatelly 1), which contains only leading order contributions in the high-β tokamak approximation is derived. (L.C.) [pt

  5. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains an overview of the Aries-I tokamak reactor study. The following topics are discussed on this tokamak: Systems studies; equilibrium, stability, and transport; summary and conclusions; current drive; impurity control system; tritium systems; magnet engineering; fusion-power-core engineering; power conversion; Aries-I safety design and analysis; design layout and maintenance; and start-up and operations

  6. Engineering Design of KSTAR tokamak main structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, K.H.; Cho, S.; Her, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    The main components of the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak including vacuum vessel, plasma facing components, cryostat, thermal shield and magnet supporting structure are in the final stage of engineering design. Hundai Heavy Industries (HHI) has been involved in the engineering design of these components. The current configuration and the final engineering design results for the KSTAR main structure are presented. (author)

  7. Tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, Kiyohiko

    2009-01-01

    The structural material is one of key issues for the development of reliable superconducting magnets and peripheral equipments of fusion reactors. Standard stainless steels like SUS 304 and 316 steels available at present do not meet requirements. We are developing a new austenitic steel that has proposed target properties named 'JAERI BOX'. Additions of N and V at different amounts were tested to improve strength and fracture toughness of a base alloy SUS316LN at 4.2 K. Mechanical properties of the developed steel were examined. It is found that the charpy absorbed energy and the fracture toughness of the developed steel at 4.2 K are within JAERI BOX. (T.I.)

  8. Stability at high performance in the MAST spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttery, R.J.; Akers, R.; Arends, E. =

    2003-01-01

    The development of reliable H-modes on MAST, together with advances in heating power and a range of powerful diagnostics, has provided a platform to enable MAST to address some of he most important issues of tokamak stability. In particular the high β potential of the ST is highlighted with stable operation at β N ∼5-6 , β T ∼ 16% and β p as high as 1.9, confirmed by a range of profile diagnostics. Calculations indicate that β N levels are in the vicinity of no-wall stability limits. Studies have provided the first identification of the Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTM) in the ST, using its behaviour to quantitatively validate predictions of NTM theory, previously only applied to conventional tokamaks. Experiments have demonstrated that sawteeth play a strong role in triggering NTMs - by avoiding large sawteeth much higher β N can, and has, been reached. Further studies have confirmed the NTM's significance, with large islands observed using the 300 point Thomson diagnostic, and locking of large n=1 modes frequently leading to disruptions. H-mode plasmas are also limited by ELMs, with confinement degraded as ELM frequency rises. However, unlike the conventional tokamak, the ELMs in high performing regimes on MAST (H IPB98Y2 ∼1) appear to be type III in nature. Modelling identifies instability to peeling modes, consistent with a type III interpretation, and shows considerable scope to raise pressure gradients (despite n=∞ ballooning theory predictions of instability) before ballooning type modes (perhaps associated with type I ELMs) occur. Finally sawteeth are shown not to remove the q=1 surface in the ST - other promising models are being explored. Thus research on MAST is not only demonstrating stable operation at high performance levels, and developing methods to control instabilities; it is also providing detailed tests of the stability physics and models applicable to conventional tokamaks, such as ITER. (author)

  9. Summary report on tokamak confinement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    There are currently five major US tokamaks being operated and one being constructed under the auspices of the Division of Toroidal Confinement Systems. The currently operating tokamaks include: Alcator C at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Doublet III at the General Atomic Company, the Impurity Studies Experiment (ISX-B) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is under construction at Princeton and should be completed by December 1982. There is one major tokamak being funded by the Division of Applied Plasma Physics. The Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) is being operated as a user facility by the University of Texas. The TEXT facility includes a complete set of standard diagnostics and a data acquisition system available to all users

  10. Resolution of regulatory issues facing the DOE in situ vitrification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corathers, L.A.

    1992-03-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is being developed by researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as a technology for remediating soils, underground storage tank residuals, and buried materials that have been contaminated with hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes (i.e., wastes containing both radioactive and hazardous wastes) at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the DOE ISV technology development program (i.e., the ISV Integrated Program) is to ensure that ISV is a workable technology for environmental restoration applications for DOE and other agencies. A DOE complex-wide plan was prepared during Fiscal Year 1991 to coordinate all levels of activities associated with the deployment of ISV. As part of this plan, a programmatic regulatory strategy was developed which focused on the federal environmental, health, safety, and nuclear regulations, including the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and DOE regulations, believed to have the most significant near-term impact on the use of ISV as a remediation technology. The portion of the programmatic regulatory strategy addressing compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, as amended, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, is presented in this paper

  11. Maximizing potential for impact: Measuring and addressing issues of sharing and diversion in MAM management programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Beatrice; Webb, Patrick; Marcus, Shelley; Maganga, Gray; Ashong, Joseph; Jayson, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Programs to prevent and treat moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) commonly depend on providing supplementary foods to children. The Prevention of Malnutrition in Children Under Two Years of Age (PM2A) approach recommends providing nutritional supplements to pregnant and lactating women and to children six months to two years; some treatment programs reach older children and may provide family rations. Typically, the supplements used in such programs are variants of corn-soy blend (CSB), a micronutrient-enhanced blended food cooked as porridge, sometimes mixed with oil, or a lipid-based nutritional supplement (LNS). A comprehensive review of USAID-supported programs found that the size of the CSB ration targeting children ranged from 17.5g to 400g/ day; one reason for this disparity was differing assumptions about sharing of supplementary food, from none to equal sharing among all household members. WFP bases its ration calculation on the presumed need to provide twice the ration intended for the target child, to account for sharing. Expectations of sharing are thus a critical determinant of the amount of food needed to ensure that the target child receives an effective dose. Little empirical information is available about sharing supplementary foods, and the majority of such studies have appeared in the non-refereed literature. What literature exists suggests that sharing of supplementary food, at least among children in the household, is the norm. There is little evidence that one type of food is more likely to be shared than another (e.g., that LNS shows different patterns of sharing from CSB variants or that the CSBs vary), and little systematic evidence concerning their perception as a food or a medical treatment (or both). Factors affecting the degree of sharing or diversion of the supplement may include household composition, food insecurity, effectiveness of social and behavioural communication, mother’s involvement in child feeding, child age, desirability

  12. Regional Studies Program. Extraction of North Dakota lignite: environmental and reclamation issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFevers, J.R.; Johnson, D.O.; Dvorak, A.J.

    1976-12-01

    This study, sponsored by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, addresses the environmental implications of extraction of coal in North Dakota. These implications are supported by details of the geologic and historical background of the area of focus, the lignite resources in the Fort Union coalfield portion. The particular concentration is on the four-county area of Mercer, Dunn, McLean, and Oliver where substantial coal reserves exist and a potential gasification plant site has been identified. The purposes of this extensive study are to identify the land use and environmental problems and issues associated with extraction; to provide a base of information for assessing the impacts of various levels of extraction; to examine the economics and feasibility of reclamation; and to identify research that needs to be undertaken to evaluate and to improve reclamation practices. The study also includes a description of the physical and chemical soil characteristics and hydrological and climatic factors entailed in extraction, revegetation, and reclamation procedures.

  13. Psychosocial issues on-orbit: results from two space station programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanas, N. A.; Salnitskiy, V. P.; Ritsher, J. B.; Gushin, V. I.; Weiss, D. S.; Saylor, S. A.; Marmar, C. R.

    PURPOSE Psychosocial issues affecting people working in isolated and confined environments such as spacecraft can jeopardize mental health and mission safety Our team has completed two large NASA-funded studies involving missions to the Mir and International Space Stations where crewmembers were on-orbit for four to seven months Combining these two datasets allows us to generalize across these two settings and maximize statistical power in testing our hypotheses This paper presents results from three sets of hypotheses concerning possible changes in mood and social climate over time displacement of negative emotions to outside monitoring personnel and the task and support roles of the leader METHODS The combined sample of 216 participants included 13 American astronauts 17 Russian cosmonauts and 150 U S and 36 Russian mission control personnel Subjects completed a weekly questionnaire that included items from the Profile of Mood States the Group Environment Scale and the Work Environment Scale producing 20 subscale scores The analytic strategy included piecewise linear regression and general linear modeling and it accounted for the effects of multiple observations per person and multiple analyses RESULTS There was little evidence to suggest that universal changes in levels of mood and group climate occurred among astronauts and cosmonauts over time Although a few individuals experienced decrements in the second half of the mission the majority did not However there was evidence that subjects displaced negative emotions to outside

  14. Program-oriented approach to resource saving issues in construction materials industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikova Galina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction as a sector of the economy is one of the largest consumers of energy resources, and the building materials industry is today one of the most energy-intensive construction industry. At the enterprises of the building materials industry the different approaches and methods are used to solve resource and energy problems. Energy saving is considered not as an complex approach in the enterprise activity, but as activity for the implementation of specific energy-saving projects, which have limitations in time and in resources. The authors suggest to use a softwareoriented approach to solving the problems of resource and energy saving. For practical application of program-oriented approach we offer to use a structuring method of the decision-making, not previously used to solve problems of resource and energy saving.

  15. Insights from the interim reliability evaluation program pertinent to reactor safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Interim Reliability Evaluation Program (IREP) consisted of concurrent probabilistic analyses of four operating nuclear power plants. This paper presents and integrated view of the results of the analyses drawing insights pertinent to reactor safety. The importance to risk of accident sequences initiated by transients and small loss-of-coolant accidents was confirmed. Support systems were found to contribute significantly to the sets of dominant accident sequences, either due to single failures which could disable one or more mitigating systems or due to their initiating plant transients. Human errors in response to accidents also were important risk contributors. Consideration of operator recovery actions influences accident sequence frequency estimates, the list of accident sequences dominating core melt, and the set of dominant risk contributors. Accidents involving station blackout, reactor coolant pump seal leaks and ruptures, and loss-of-coolant accidents requiring manual initiation of coolant injection were found to be risk significant

  16. Cluster storage for COMPASS tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Písačka, Jan; Hron, Martin; Janky, Filip; Pánek, Radomír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 12 (2012), s. 2238-2241 ISSN 0920-3796. [IAEA Technical Meeting on Control, Data Acquisition, and Remote Participation for Fusion Research/8./. San Francisco, 20.06.2011-24.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2470; GA MŠk 7G10072; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : COMPASS * Tokamak * Codac * Cluster * GlusterFS * Storage Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.842, year: 2012 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fusengdes.2012.09.006

  17. Surface tearing modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Tomonori; Kurita, Gen-ichi; Azumi, Masafumi; Takeda, Tatsuoki

    1985-10-01

    Surface tearing modes in tokamaks are studied numerically and analytically. The eigenvalue problem is solved to obtain the growth rate and the mode structure. We investigate in detail dependences of the growth rate of the m/n = 2/1 resistive MHD modes on the safety factor at the plasma surface, current profile, wall position, and resistivity. The surface tearing mode moves the plasma surface even when the wall is close to the surface. The stability diagram for these modes is presented. (author)

  18. Major disruption process in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Gen-ichi; Azumi, Masafumi; Tuda, Takashi; Takizuka, Tomonori; Tsunematsu, Toshihide; Tokuda, Shinji; Itoh, Kimitaka; Takeda, Tatsuoki

    1981-11-01

    The major disruption in a cylindrical tokamak is investigated by using the multi-helicity code, and the destabilization of the 3/2 mode by the mode coupling with the 2/1 mode is confirmed. The evolution of the magnetic field topology caused by the major disruption is studied in detail. The effect of the internal disruption on the 2/1 magnetic island width is also studied. The 2/1 magnetic island is not enhanced by the flattening of the q-profile due to the internal disruption. (author)

  19. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for edge plasma analysis in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe project presented in this document is part of an international collaboration in magnetic confinement fusion energy research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research (Confinement Systems Division) and the Centre Canadian de Fusion Magnetique. The overall objective of the effort is to apply a neutral particle beam to the study of edge plasma dynamics in discharges on the Tokamak de Varennes facility in Montreal, Canada. To achieve this goal, a research and development project was started in December, 1990 to produce the necessary hardware to make such measurements and meet the scheduling requirements of the program. At present, satisfactory progress has been achieved. The ion gun is fully operational with the neutralizer in the final assembly stage in preparation for testing. The beam diagnostics have been completed and mounted in the computer automated test stand. The analyzer design and detailed trajectory calculations are nearing completion to allow for the vacuum interface construction. The CAMAC based data acquisition system hardware was integrated into the test stand. Part of this hardware is a component of the Tokamak de Varennes' contribution to the collaboration. Next steps on the critical path include the beginning of the neutralization tests and the start of the analyzer construction. Anticipated installation of the diagnostic on the tokamak is Spring 1992

  20. Engineering parameters for four ignition TNS tokamak reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varljen, T.C.; Gibson, G.; French, J.W.; Heck, F.M.

    1977-01-01

    The ORNL/Westinghouse program for The Next Step (TNS) tokamak beyond TFTR has examined a large number of potential configurations for D-T burning ignition tokamak systems. An objective of this work has been to quantify the trade-offs associated with the assumption of certain plasma physics criteria and toroidal field coil technologies. Four tokamak system point designs are described, each representative of the TF coil technologies considered, to illustrate the engineering features associated with each concept. Point designs, such as the ones discussed herein, have been used to develop component size, performance and cost scaling relationships which have been incorporated in a digital computer code to facilitate an examination of the total design and cost impact of candidate design approaches. The point designs which are described are typical, however, they have not been individually optimized. The options are distinguished by the TF coil technology chosen and include: (1) a high field water-cooled copper TF system, (2) a moderate field NbTi superconducting TF system, (3) a high field Nb 3 Sn superconducting TF system, and (4) a high field hybrid TF system with outer NbTi superconducting windings and inner water-cooled copper windings. Descriptions are provided for the major device components and all major support systems including power supplies, vacuum systems, fuel systems, heat transport and facility systems

  1. Equilibrium reconstruction in the TCA/Br tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa, Wanderley Pires de

    1996-01-01

    The accurate and rapid determination of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium configuration in tokamaks is a subject for the magnetic confinement of the plasma. With the knowledge of characteristic plasma MHD equilibrium parameters it is possible to control the plasma position during its formation using feed-back techniques. It is also necessary an on-line analysis between successive discharges to program external parameters for the subsequent discharges. In this work it is investigated the MHD equilibrium configuration reconstruction of the TCA/BR tokamak from external magnetic measurements, using a method that is able to fast determine the main parameters of discharge. The thesis has two parts. Firstly it is presented the development of an equilibrium code that solves de Grad-Shafranov equation for the TCA/BR tokamak geometry. Secondly it is presented the MHD equilibrium reconstruction process from external magnetic field and flux measurements using the Function Parametrization FP method. this method. This method is based on the statistical analysis of a database of simulated equilibrium configurations, with the goal of obtaining a simple relationship between the parameters that characterize the equilibrium and the measurements. The results from FP are compared with conventional methods. (author)

  2. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Jin, W.; Huang, D. W.; Ding, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-01-01

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase

  3. Fusion-product ash buildup in tokamak with radial electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downum, W.B.; Choi, C.K.; Miley, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The buildup of thermalized fusion products (ash) in a tokamak can seriously limit burn times. Prior studies have concentrated on deposition profile effects on alpha particle transport in tokamaks but have not considered the effect on ash of radial electric fields (either created internally, e.g. due to high-energy alpha leakage, or generated externally). The present study focuses on this issue since it appears that electric fields might offer one approach to control of the ash. Approximate field and source profiles are used, based on prior calculations

  4. Recent developments in Bayesian inference of tokamak plasma equilibria and high-dimensional stochastic quadratures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Nessi, G T; Hole, M J

    2014-01-01

    We present recent results and technical breakthroughs for the Bayesian inference of tokamak equilibria using force-balance as a prior constraint. Issues surrounding model parameter representation and posterior analysis are discussed and addressed. These points motivate the recent advancements embodied in the Bayesian Equilibrium Analysis and Simulation Tool (BEAST) software being presently utilized to study equilibria on the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) experiment in the UK (von Nessi et al 2012 J. Phys. A 46 185501). State-of-the-art results of using BEAST to study MAST equilibria are reviewed, with recent code advancements being systematically presented though out the manuscript. (paper)

  5. Present status of VDEs (Vertical Displacement Events) avoidance studies in tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yukiharu

    2001-01-01

    Present knowledge on the consequences of tokamak disruption and disruption-related effects are reviewed from a viewpoint of disruption mitigation and/or avoidance. The Vertical Displacement Events (VDEs), which are frequently observed in disruptive discharges of elongated tokamaks, are described in detail with an emphasis on the close relationships between the generation of halo currents and runaway electrons. The newly found 'neutral point', at which VDEs hardly occur, is also addressed. Finally, VDE-related issues remaining to be addressed in future works are discussed. (author)

  6. Tabulations of Responses from the 1999 Survey of Active Duty Personnel: Volume 2 Programs, Services, Family and Individual Information, and Economic Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deak, Mary

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 Active Duty Surveys (ADS) gather information on military assignments, retention issues, personal and military background, preparedness, mobilizations and deployments, family composition, use of military programs and services...

  7. Simulations of finite beta turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenko, F.

    2002-01-01

    One of the central open questions in our attempt to understand microturbulence in fusion plasmas concerns the role of finite beta effects. Nonlinear codes trying to investigate this issue must go beyond the commonly used adiabatic electron approximation - a task which turns out to be a serious computational challenge. This step is necessary because the electrons are the prime contributor to the parallel currents which in turn produce the magnetic field fluctuations. Results at both ion and electron space-time scales from gyrokinetic and gyrofluid models are presented which shed light on the character of finite beta turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators. (author)

  8. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Hogan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors

  9. Scrape-off layer flows in the Tore Supra tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gunn, J. P.; Boucher, C.; Dionne, M.; Ďuran, Ivan; Fuchs, Vladimír; Loarer, T.; Pánek, Radomír; Saint Laurent, F.; Stöckel, Jan; Adámek, Jiří; Bucalossi, J.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Devynck, P.; Hertout, P.; Hron, Martin; Nanobashvili, I.; Rimini, F.G.; Sarkissian, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 812, - (2006), s. 27-34 ISSN 0094-243X. [AIP Conference Proceedings. Opole-Turawa, 06.09.2006-09.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP202/03/P062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : tokamak * scrape-off layer * plasma flow * radial transport * Mach probe Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://proceedings.aip.org/dbt/dbt.jsp?KEY=APCPCS&Volume=812&Issue=1

  10. Interpretation of heat and density pulse propagation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sips, A.C.C.; Costley, A.E.; O'Rourke, J.O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses two key issues in current research on sawtooth induced heat and density pulse measurements in Tokamaks and their interpretation. First, heat and density pulses in JET and TXT show different qualitative behaviour implying substantially different transport coefficients. Second, a new description of the heat pulse has been used to describe measurements cannot be simulated with the widely used diffusive model. In this paper, we show that consistency between all these measurements can be obtained assuming a diffusive propagation for the heat and density pulses and using linearised coupled transport equations. (author) 6 refs., 5 figs

  11. Simulations of finite β turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenko, F.; Scott, B.; Kendl, A.; Strintzi, D.; Dorland, W.

    2003-01-01

    One of the central open questions in our attempt to understand microturbulence in fusion plasmas concerns the role of finite β effects. Nonlinear codes trying to investigate this issue must go beyond the commonly used adiabatic electron approximation - a task which turns out to be a serious computational challenge. This step is necessary because the passing electrons are the prime contributor to the parallel currents which in turn produce the magnetic field fluctuations. Results at both ion and electron space-time scales from gyrokinetic and gyro fluid models are presented which shed light on the character of finite β turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators. (author)

  12. Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contributions to wildlife habitat, management issues, challenges and policy choices--an annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Arthur W.; Vandever, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The following bibliography presents brief summaries of documents relevant to Conservation Reserve Program relations to wildlife habitat, habitat management in agriculturally dominated landscapes, and conservation policies potentially affecting wildlife habitats in agricultural ecosystems. Because the literature summaries furnished provide only sweeping overviews, users are urged to obtain and evaluate those papers appearing useful to obtain a more complete understanding of study findings and their implications to conservation in agricultural ecosystems. The bibliography contains references to reports that reach beyond topics that directly relate to the Conservation Reserve Program. Sections addressing grassland management and landowner surveys/opinions, for example, furnish information useful for enhancing development and administration of conservation policies affecting lands beyond those enrolled in conservation programs. Some sections of the bibliography (for example, agricultural conservation policy, economics, soils) are far from inclusive of all relevant material written on the subject. Hopefully, these sections will serve as fundamental introductions to related issues. In a few instances, references may be presented in more than one section of the bibliography. For example, individual papers specifically addressing both non-game and game birds are included in respective sections of the bibliography. Duplication of citations and associated notes has, however, been kept to a minimum.

  13. Radiation transport effects in divertor plasmas generated during a tokamak reactor disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.R.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Wang, P.

    1994-01-01

    Vaporization of material from tokamak divertors during disruptions is a critical issue for tokamak reactors from ITER to commercial power plants. Radiation transport from the vaporized material onto the remaining divertor surface plays an important role in the total mass loss to the divertor. Radiation transport in such a vapor is very difficult to calculate in full detail, and this paper quantifies the sensitivity of the divertor mass loss to uncertainties in the radiation transport. Specifically, the paper presents the results of computer simulations of the vaporization of a graphite coated divertor during a tokamak disruption with ITER CDA parameters. The results show that a factor of 100 change in the radiation conductivity changes the mass loss by more than a factor of two

  14. Characteristics of current quenches during disruptions in the J-TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Chen, Z Y; Fang, D; Jin, W; Huang, Y H; Wang, Z J; Yang, Z J; Chen, Z P; Ding, Y H; Zhang, M; Zhuang, G

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of tokamak current quenches are an important issue for the determination of electro-magnetic forces that act on the in-vessel components and vacuum vessel during major disruptions. The characteristics of current quenches in spontaneous disruptions in the J-TEXT tokamak have been investigated. It is shown that the waveforms for the fastest current quenches are more accurately fitted by linear current decays than exponential, although neither is a good fit in many slower cases. The minimum current quench time is about 2.4 ms for the J-TEXT tokamak. The maximum instantaneous current quench rate is more than seven times the average current quench rate in J-TEXT. (paper)

  15. First physics results from the MAST Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Akers, R.; Arends, E.; Carolan, P.G.; Counsell, G.F.; Fielding, S. J.; Gryaznevich, M.; Martin, R.; Price, M.; Roach, C.; Shevchenko, V.; Tournianski, M.; Valovic, M.; Walsh, M.J.; Wilson, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    First physics results are presented from MAST (Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak), one of the new generation of purpose built spherical tokamaks (STs) now commencing operation. Some of these results demonstrate, for the first time, the novel effects of low aspect ratio, for example, the enhancement of resistivity due to neo-classical effects. H-mode is achieved and the transition to H-mode is accompanied by a tenfold steepening of the edge density gradient which may enable the successful application of electron Bernstein wave heating in STs. Studies of halo currents show that these less than expected from conventional tokamak results, and measurements of divertor power loading confirm that most of the power flows to the outer strike points, easing the power handling on the inner points (a critical issue for STs)

  16. A generic data structure for integrated modelling of tokamak physics and subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbeaux, F.; Huysmans, G.T.A.; Airaj, M.; Guillerminet, B.; Ottaviani, M.; Peysson, Y.; Signoret, J.; Basiuk, V.; Lister, J.B.; Sauter, O.; Zwingmann, W.; Eriksson, L.G.; Appel, L.; Coster, D.; Konz, C.; Pereverzev, G.; Kalupin, D.; Manduchi, G.; Strand, P.

    2010-01-01

    The European Integrated Tokamak Modelling Task Force (ITM-TF) is developing a new type of fully modular and flexible integrated tokamak simulator, which will allow a large variety of simulation types This ambitious goal requires new concepts of data structure and work-flow organisation, which are described for the first time in this paper The backbone of the system is a physics- and work-flow-oriented data structure which allows for the deployment of a fully modular and flexible work-flow organisation. The data structure is designed to be generic for any tokamak device and can be used to address physics simulation results, experimental data (including description of subsystem hardware) and engineering issues. (authors)

  17. Safety and deterministic failure analyses in high-beta D-D tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    Safety and deterministic failure analyses were performed to compare major component failure characteristics for different high-beta D-D tokamak reactors. The primary focus was on evaluating damage to the reactor facility. The analyses also considered potential hazards to the general public and operational personnel. Parametric designs of high-beta D-D tokamak reactors were developed, using WILDCAT as the reference. The size, and toroidal field strength were reduced, and the fusion power increased in an independent manner. These changes were expected to improve the economics of D-D tokamaks. Issues examined using these designs were radiation induced failurs, radiation safety, first wall failure from plasma disruptions, and toroidal field magnet coil failure

  18. Enhancement of confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1986-05-01

    A plausible interpretation of the experimental evidence is that energy confinement in tokamaks is governed by two separate considerations: (1) the need for resistive MHD kink-stability, which limits the permissible range of current profiles - and therefore normally also the range of temperature profiles; and (2) the presence of strongly anomalous microscopic energy transport near the plasma edge, which calibrates the amplitude of the global temperature profile, thus determining the energy confinement time tau/sub E/. Correspondingly, there are two main paths towards the enhancement of tokamak confinement: (1) Configurational optimization, to increase the MHD-stable energy content of the plasma core, can evidently be pursued by varying the cross-sectional shape of the plasma and/or finding stable radial profiles with central q-values substantially below unity - but crossing from ''first'' to ''second'' stability within the peak-pressure region would have the greatest ultimate potential. (2) Suppression of edge turbulence, so as to improve the heat insulation in the outer plasma shell, can be pursued by various local stabilizing techniques, such as use of a poloidal divertor. The present confinement model and initial TFTR pellet-injection results suggest that the introduction of a super-high-density region within the plasma core should be particularly valuable for enhancing ntau/subE/. In D-T operation, a centrally peaked plasma pressure profile could possibly lend itself to alpha-particle-driven entry into the second-stability regime

  19. CAT-D-T tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Blue, T.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    The domains of plasma fuel cycles bounded by the D-T and Cat-D, and by the D-T and SCD modes of operation are examined. These domains, referred to as, respectively, the Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation, are characterized by the number (γ) of tritons per fusion neutron available from external (to the plasma) sources. Two external tritium sources are considered - the blankets of the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) reactors and fission reactors supported by the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) driven hybrid reactors. It is found that by using 6 Li for the active material of the control elements of the fission reactors, it is possible to achieve γ values close to unity. Cat-D-T tokamaks could be designed to have smaller size, higher power density, lower magnetic field and even lower plasma temperature than Cat-D tokamaks; the difference becomes significant for γ greater than or equal to .75. The SCD-T mode of operation appears to be even more attractive. Promising applications identified for these Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation include hybrid reactors, fusion synfuel factories and fusion reactors which have difficulty in providing all their tritium needs

  20. Strategy for an Australian research program into possible health issues associated with exposure to communications radiofrequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, C.R.; Barnett, S.B.; Lokan, K.H.; Kossoff, G.; Anderson, H.

    1998-01-01

    Telecommunications in Australia has expanded rapidly in recent years. Growth in personal and mobile telecommunications has resulted in the construction of numerous base station antennae. These antennae are highly visible and are often sited in public or high traffic areas. There has also been an increase in the number of mobile phone handsets-the small, low power transmitters held close to the head during use. In the last 2-3 years there has been considerable public concern and media coverage about the possible health effects resulting from exposure to radiofrequency fields or radiofrequency radiation (RFR) which is used for communicating between handsets and base stations. National and international scientific opinion is that at the present time there is no substantiated evidence that exposure to RFR at levels typically found in the community results in adverse health effects but there is a need for further study. Although considerable research has been undertaken on exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) 50/60 Hz fields, limited information is available on human exposure to RFR in the frequency range 100 kHz to 300 GHz. The frequency bands used for the mobile phone networks are mainly in the 800-900 MHz spectrum region with developing technology using the 1.8-2.2 GHz band. In the digital GSM system pulse modulation occurs at 217 Hz. Radio and television broadcasts are in the 0.3-600 MHz range. Other sources include paging systems, personal communication systems and industrial sources. The discussion paper outlines possible priority areas and makes recommendation for further study under the Australian Research Program