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Sample records for tokamak physics experiment

  1. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    TPX is a national project involving a large number of US fusion laboratories, universities, and industries. The element of the TPX requirements that is a primary driver for the hardware design is the fact that TPX tokamak hardware is being designed to accommodate steady state operation if the external systems are upgraded from the 1,000 second initial operation. TPX not only incorporates new physics, but also pioneers new technologies to be used in ITER and other future reactors. TPX will be the first tokamak with fully superconducting magnetic field coils using advanced conductors, will have internal nuclear shielding, will use robotics for machine maintenance, and will remove the continuous, concentrated heat flow from the plasma with new dispersal techniques and with special materials that are actively cooled. The Conceptual Design for TPX was completed during Fiscal Year 1993. The Preliminary Design formally began at the beginning of Fiscal Year 1994. Industrial contracts have been awarded for the design, with options for fabrication, of the primary tokamak hardware. A large fraction of the design and R and D effort during FY94 was focused on the tokamak and in turn on the tokamak magnets. The reason for this emphasis is because the magnets require a large design and R and D effort, and are critical to the project schedule. The magnet development is focused on conductor development, quench protection, and manufacturing R and D. The Preliminary Design Review for the Magnets is planned for fall, 1995

  2. Tokamak physics experiment: Diagnostic windows study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrigan, M.; Wurden, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    We detail the study of diagnostic windows and window thermal stress remediation in the long-pulse, high-power Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) operation. The operating environment of the TPX diagnostic windows is reviewed, thermal loads on the windows estimated, and cooling requirements for the windows considered. Applicable window-cooling technology from other fields is reviewed and its application to the TPX windows considered. Methods for TPX window thermal conditioning are recommended, with some discussion of potential implementation problems provided. Recommendations for further research and development work to ensure performance of windows in the TPX system are presented

  3. Physics evaluation of compact tokamak ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    At present, several approaches for compact, high-field tokamak ignition experiments are being considered. A comprehensive method for analyzing the potential physics operating regimes and plasma performance characteristics of such ignition experiments with O-D (analytic) and 1-1/2-D (WHIST) transport models is presented. The results from both calculations are in agreement and show that there are regimes in parameter space in which a class of small (R/sub o/ approx. 1-2 m), high-field (B/sub o/ approx. 8-13 T) tokamaks with aB/sub o/ 2 /q/sub */ approx. 25 +- 5 and kappa = b/a approx. 1.6-2.0 appears ignitable for a reasonable range of transport assumptions. Considering both the density and beta limits, an evaluation of the performance is presented for various forms of chi/sub e/ and chi/sub i/, including degradation at high power and sawtooth activity. The prospects of ohmic ignition are also examined. 16 refs., 13 figs

  4. Industry roles in the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is the first major fusion project opportunity in many years for US industry. Both the TPX management and the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy are committed to creating industry roles that are integrated throughout the project and that appropriately use the capabilities they offer. To address industry roles in TPX it is first appropriate to describe the collaborative national approach taken for this program. The Director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) was asked by DOE to set up this national team structure, and the current senior management positions and delegated responsibilities reflect that approach. While reporting lines and delegated roles are clear in the organization chart for TPX, one way to view, it, different from that of the individuals responsible upward through this management structure for various elements of the project, is through institutional responsibilities to the senior management team. In this view the management team relies on several national laboratories, each using industry contracts for major sub-systems and components, to execute the project. These responsibilities for design and for contracting are listed, showing that all major contracts will come through three national laboratories, forming teams for their responsible activities

  5. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) power supply design and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeyer, C.; Bronner, G.; Lu, E.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This new feature requires a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes. This paper describes the plan for the adaptation of the PPPL/FTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Five major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF, PF and Fast Plasma Position Control (FPPC) power supplies, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems. Special emphasis is placed on the development of new power supply and protection schemes

  6. A programmatic framework for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.; Goldston, R.J.; Neilson, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the confinement of reactor-grade plasmas, so that the authors are now preparing for experiments at the open-quotes power breakevenclose quotes level in the JET and TFTR experiments. In ITER the authors will extend the performance of tokamaks into the burning plasma regime, develop the technology of fusion reactors, and produce over a gigawatt of fusion power. Besides taking these crucial steps toward the technical feasibility of fusion, the authors must also take steps to ensure its economic acceptability. The broad requirements for economically attractive tokamak reactors based on physics advancements have been set forth in a number of studies. An advanced physics data base is emerging from a physics program of concept improvement using existing tokamaks around the world. This concept improvements program is emerging as the primary focus of the US domestic tokamak program, and a key element of that program is the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). With TPX the authors can develop the scientific data base for compact, continuously-operating fusion reactors, using advanced steady-state control techniques to improve plasma performance. The authors can develop operating techniques needed to ensure the success of ITER and provide first-time experience with several key fusion reactor technologies. This paper explains the relationships of TPX to the current US fusion physics program, to the ITER program, and to the development of an attractive tokamak demonstration plant for this next stage in the fusion program

  7. Physics design requirements for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, G.H.; Goldston, R.J.; Jardin, S.C.; Reiersen, W.T.; Porkolab, M.; Ulrickson, M.

    1993-01-01

    The design of TPX is driven by physics requirements that follow from its mission. The tokamak and heating systems provide the performance and profile controls needed to study advanced steady state tokamak operating modes. The magnetic control systems provide substantial flexibility for the study of regimes with high beta and bootstrap current. The divertor is designed for high steady state power and particle exhaust

  8. Divertor design for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.N.; Braams, B.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the present divertor design for the planned TPX tokamak, which will explore the physics and technology of steady-state (1000s pulses) heat and particle removal in high confinement (2--4x L-mode), high beta (β N ≥ 3) divertor plasmas sustained by non-inductive current drive. The TPX device will operate in the double-null divertor configuration, with actively cooled graphite targets forming a deep (0.5 m) slot at the outer strike point. The peak heat flux on, the highly tilted (74 degrees from normal) re-entrant (to recycle ions back toward the separatrix) will be in the range of 4--6 MW/m 2 with 18 MW of neutral beams and RF heating power. The combination of active pumping and gas puffing (deuterium plus impurities), along with higher heating power (45 MW maximum) will allow testing of radiative divertor concepts at ITER-like power densities

  9. Tokamak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical conditions required for breakeven in thermonuclear fusion are derived, and the early conceptual ideas of magnetic confinement and subsequent development are followed, leading to present-day large scale tokamak experiments. Confinement and diffusion are developed in terms of particle orbits, whilst magnetohydrodynamic stability is discussed from energy considerations. From these ideas are derived the scaling laws that determine the physical size and parameters of this fusion configuration. It becomes clear that additional heating is required. However there are currently several major gaps in our understanding of experiments; the causes of anomalous electron energy loss and the major current disruption, the absence of the 'bootstrap' current and what physics determines the maximum plasma pressure consistent with stability. The understanding of these phenomena is a major challenge to plasma physicists. (author)

  10. The engineering design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    A mission and supporting physics objectives have been developed, which establishes an important role for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) in developing the physic basis for a future fusion reactor. The design of TPX include advanced physics features, such as shaping and profile control, along with the capability of operating for very long pulses. The development of the superconducting magnets, actively cooled internal hardware, and remote maintenance will be an important technology contribution to future fusion projects, such as ITER. The Conceptual Design and Management Systems for TPX have been developed and reviewed, and the project is beginning Preliminary Design. If adequately funded the construction project should be completed in the year 2000

  11. Long pulse neutral beam system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Bowen, O.N.; Dahlgren, F.; Edwards, J.W.; Kamperschroer, J.; Newman, R.; O'Connor, T.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Rossi, G.; Stevenson, T.; Halle, A. von; Wright, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is planned as a long-pulse or steady-state machine to serve as a successor to the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The neutral beam component of the heating and current drive systems will be provided by a TFTR beamline modified to allow operation for pulse lengths of 1000s. This paper presents a brief overview of the conceptual design which has been carried out to determine the changes to the beamline and power supply components that will be required to extend the pulse length from its present limitation of 1s at full power. The modified system, like the present one, will be capable of injecting about 8MW of power as neutral deuterium. The initial operation will be with a single beamline oriented co-directional to the plasma current, but the TPX system design is capable of accommodating an additional co-directional beamline and a counter-directional beamline. ((orig.))

  12. The physics of magnetic confinement configurations : Tokamak theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Several aspects, both theoretical and experimental, in plasma physics are discussed. The problem of magnetic confinement in Tokamak devices is treated. A discussion on the history of the development and on the future problems to be solved in Tokamaks is made. (L.C.) [pt

  13. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, C.G.; Bonney, R.F.; Levine, J.D.; Masson, L.S.; Commander, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    This Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), includes an indication of the magnitude of facility hazards, complexity of facility operations, and the stage of the facility life-cycle. It presents the results of safety analyses, safety assurance programs, identified vulnerabilities, compensatory measures, and, in general, the rationale describing why the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) can be safely operated. It discusses application of the graded approach to the TPX safety analysis, including the basis for using Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 and DOE-STD-3009-94 in the development of the PSAR

  14. The cryogenic helium cooling system for the Tokamak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felker, B.; Slack, D.S.; Wendland, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will use supercritical helium to cool all the magnets and supply helium to the Vacuum cryopumping subsystem. The heat loads will come from the standard steady state conduction and thermal radiation sources and from the pulsed loads of the nuclear and eddy currents caused by the Central Solenoid Coils and the plasma positioning coils. The operations of the TPX will begin with pulses of up to 1000 seconds in duration every 75 minutes. The helium system utilizes a pulse load leveling scheme to buffer out the effects of the pulse load and maintain a constant cryogenic plant operation. The pulse load leveling scheme utilizes the thermal mass of liquid and gaseous helium stored in a remote dewar to absorb the pulses of the tokamak loads. The mass of the stored helium will buffer out the temperature pulses allowing 5 K helium to be delivered to the magnets throughout the length of the pulse. The temperature of the dewar will remain below 5 K with all the energy of the pulse absorbed. This paper will present the details of the heat load sources, of the pulse load leveling scheme operations, a partial helium schematic, dewar temperature as a function of time, the heat load sources as a function of time and the helium temperature as a function of length along the various components that will be cooled

  15. Electron-cyclotron current drive in the tokamak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.; Kritz, A.H.; Radin, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    Ray-tracking calculations provide estimates of the electron-cyclotron heating (ECH) power required to suppress tearing modes near the q=2 surface in the Tokamak Physics Experiment. Effects of finite beam width and divergence are included, as are the effects of scattering of the ECH power by drift-wave turbulence. A frequency of about 120 GHz allows current drive on the small-R (high-B) portion of q=2, while 80 GHz drives current on the large-R (low-B) portion. The higher frequency has the advantages of less sensitivity to wave and plasma parameters and of no trapped-electron degradation of current-drive efficiency. Less than 1 MW suffices to suppress tearing modes even with high turbulence levels

  16. The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, D.D.; Bulmer, R.J.; Chaplin, M.R.; O'Connor, T.G.; Slack, D.S.; Wong, R.L.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Schultz, J.H.; Diatchenko, N.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics eXperiment (TPX) will be the first all superconducting magnet system for a Tokamak, where the poloidal field coils, in addition to the toroidal field coils are superconducting. The magnet system is designed to operate in a steady state mode, and to initiate the plasma discharge ohmically. The toroidal field system provides a peak field of 4.0 Tesla on the plasma axis at a plasma major radius of 2.25 m. The peak field on the niobium 3-tin, cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is 8.4 Tesla for the 16 toroidal field coils. The toroidal field coils must absorb approximately 5 kW due to nuclear heating, eddy currents, and other sources. The poloidal field system provides a total of 18 volt seconds to initiate the plasma and drive a plasma current up to 2 MA. The poloidal field system consists of 14 individual coils which are arranged symmetrically above and below the horizontal mid plane. Four pairs of coils make up the central solenoid, and three pairs of poloidal ring coils complete the system. The poloidal field coils all use a cable-in-conduit conductor, using either niobium 3-tin (Nb 3 Sn) or niobium titanium (NbTi) superconducting strands depending on the operating conditions for that coil. All of the coils are cooled by flowing supercritical helium, with inlet and outlet connections made on each double pancake. The superconducting magnet system has gone through a conceptual design review, and is in preliminary design started by the LLNL/MIT/PPPL collaboration. A number of changes have been made in the design since the conceptual design review, and are described in this paper. The majority of the design and all fabrication of the superconducting magnet system will be ,accomplished by industry, which will shortly be taking over the preliminary design. The magnet system is expected to be completed in early 2000

  17. HL-1 tokamak data acquisition system and its initial application in the physical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Huichen; Fu Bo; Dong Jiafu

    1989-11-01

    A HL-1 tokamak data acquisition system has been developed and has been used in the physical experiment. The hardware and software configuration of the system, as well as the typical acquired data in the HL-1 experiment are introduced

  18. Quench Detection and Instrumentation for the Tokamak Physics Experiment magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplin, M.R.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Schultz, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The design of the Local Instrumentation ampersand Control (I ampersand C) System for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) superconducting PF ampersand TF magnets is presented. The local I ampersand C system monitors the status of the magnet systems and initiates the proper control sequences to protect the magnets from any foreseeable fault. Local I ampersand C also stores magnet-system data for analysis and archiving. Quench Detection for the TPX magnets must use a minimum of two independent sensing methods and is allowed a detection time of one second. Proposed detection methods include the measurement of; (1) normal-zone resistive voltage, (2) cooling-path helium flow, (3) local temperature in the winding pack, (4) local pressure in the winding pack. Fiber-optic based isolation systems are used to remove high common-mode magnet voltages and eliminate ground loops. The data acquisition and fault-detection systems are computer based. The design of the local I ampersand C system incorporates redundant, fault-tolerant, and/or fail-safe features at all component levels. As part of a quench detection R ampersand D plan, a Quench Detection Model Coil has been proposed to test all detection methods. Initial cost estimates and schedule for the local I ampersand C system are presented

  19. Technology and physics in the Tokamak Program: The need for an integrated, steady-state RandD tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The Steady-state Tokamak (STE) Experiment is a proposed superconducting-coil, hydrogen-plasma tokamak device intended to address the integrated non-nuclear issues of steady state, high-power tokamak physics and technology. Such a facility has been called for in the US program plan for the mid 1990's, and will play a unique role in the world-wide fusion effort. Information from STE on steady-state current drive, plasma control, and high power technology will contribute significantly to the operating capabilities of future steady-state devices. This paper reviews preliminary designs and expected technological contributions to the US and world fusion reactor research from each of the above mentioned reactor systems. This document is intended as a proposal and feasibility discussion and does not include exhaustive technical reviews. 12 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of the new large tokamaks JET, JT-60 and TFTR important advances in magnetic confinement have been made. These include the exploitation of radio frequency and neutral beam heating on a much larger scale than previously, the demonstration of regimes of improved confinement and the demonstration of current drive at the Megamp level. A number of small and medium sized tokamaks have also come into operation recently such as WT-3 in Japan with an emphasis on radio frequency current drive and HL-1 a medium sized tokamak in China. Each of these new tokamaks is addressing specific problems which remain for the future development of the system. Of these particular problems: β, density and q limits remain important issues for the future development of the tokamak. β limits are being addressed on the DIII-D device in the USA. The anomalous confinement that the tokamak displays is being explored in detail on the TEXT device in the USA. Two other problems are impurity control and current drive. There is significant emphasis on divertor configurations at the present time with their enhanced confinement in the so called H mode. Due to improved discharge cleaning techniques and the ability to repetitively refuel using pellets, purer plasmas can be obtained even without divertors. Current drive remains a crucial issue for quasi of near steady state operation of the tokamak in the future and many current drive schemes are being investigated. (author) [pt

  1. Review Committee report on the conceptual design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the conceptual design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment: Role and mission of TPX; overview of design; physics design assessment; engineering design assessment; evaluation of cost, schedule, and management plans; and, environment safety and health

  2. Alpha particle physics experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.

    2000-01-01

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on TFTR during its DT run from 1993 to 1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single particle confinement model in MHD quiescent discharges. The alpha loss due to toroidal field ripple was identified in some cases, and the low radial diffusivity inferred for high energy alphas was consistent with orbit averaging over small scale turbulence. Finally, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and ICRF waves were approximately consistent with theoretical modelling. What was learned is reviewed and what remains to be understood is identified. (author)

  3. MTX [Microwave Tokamak Experiment] diagnostic and auxiliary systems for confinement, transport, and plasma physics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1989-01-01

    This note describes the diagnostics and auxiliary systems on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) for confinement, transport, and other plasma physics studies. It is intended as a reference on the installed and planned hardware on the machine for those who need more familiarity with this equipment. Combined with the tokamak itself, these systems define the opportunities and capabilities for experiments in the MTX facility. We also illustrate how these instruments and equipment are to be used in carrying out the MTX Operations Plan. Near term goals for MTX are focussed on the absorption and heating by the microwave beam from the FEL, but the Plan also includes using the facility to study fundamental phenomena in the plasma, to control MHD activity, and to drive current noninductively

  4. Divertor plasma physics experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Allen, S.L.; Evans, T.E.

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the results and conclusions of our most recent divertor physics and development work. Using an array of new divertor diagnostics we have measured the plasma parameters over the entire divertor volume and gained new insights into several divertor physics issues. We present direct experimental evidence for momentum loss along the field lines, large heat convection, and copious volume recombination during detachment. These observations are supported by improved UEDGE modeling incorporating impurity radiation. We have demonstrated divertor exhaust enrichment of neon and argon by action of a forced scrape off layer (SOL) flow and demonstrated divertor pumping as a substitute for conventional wall conditioning. We have observed a divertor radiation zone with a parallel extent that is an order of magnitude larger than that estimated from a 1-D conduction limited model of plasma at coronal equilibrium. Using density profile control by divertor pumping and pellet injection we have attained H-mode confinement at densities above the Greenwald limit. Erosion rates of several candidate ITER plasma facing materials are measured and compared with predictions of a numerical model

  5. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-27

    If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  6. Survey of Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The survey covers the following topics:- Introduction and history of tokamak research; review of tokamak apparatus, existing and planned; remarks on measurement techniques and their limitations; main results in terms of electron and ion temperatures, plasma density, containment times, etc. Empirical scaling; range of operating densities; impurities, origin, behaviour and control (including divertors); data on fluctuations and instabilities in tokamak plasmas; data on disruptive instabilities; experiments on shaped cross-sections; present experimental evidence on β limits; auxiliary heating; experimental and theoretical problems for the future. (author)

  7. The National Spherical Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1108, evaluating the environmental effects of the proposed construction and operation of the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) within the existing C-Stellarator (CS) Building at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey. The purpose of the NSTX is to investigate the physics of spherically shaped plasmas as an alternative path to conventional tokamaks for development of fusion energy. Fusion energy has the potential to help compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Construction of the NSTX in the CS Building would require the dismantling and removal of the existing unused Princeton Large Torus (PLT) device, part of which would be reused to construct the NSTX. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4,321 et seq. The preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. Thus, the DOE is issuing a FONSI pursuant to the Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500--1508) and the DOE NEPA implementing regulations (10 CFR Part 1021)

  8. Structural analysis of a superconducting central solenoid for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Heim, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) concept design uses superconducting coils to accomplish magnetic confinement. The central solenoid (CS) magnet is divided vertically into 8 equal segments which are powered independently. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is too high for a case type construction; therefore, a open-quotes no caseclose quotes design has been chosen. This open-quotes no caseclose quotes design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation as a structural adhesive. This electrical insulation is the open-quotes weak linkclose quotes in the coil winding pack structure and needs to be modeled in detail. A global finite element model with smeared winding pack properties was used to study the CS magnet structural behavior. The structural analysis results and peak stresses will be presented

  9. Microwave Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. The experiment, soon to be operational, provides an opportunity to study dense plasmas heated by powers unprecedented in the electron-cyclotron frequency range required by the especially high magnetic fields used with the MTX and needed for reactors. 1 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  10. Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, John.

    1996-01-01

    This book is the first compiled collection about tokamak. At first chapter tokamak is represented from fusion point of view and also the necessary conditions for producing power. The following chapters are represent plasma physics, the specifications of tokamak, plasma heating procedures and problems related to it, equilibrium, confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability, instabilities, plasma material interaction, plasma measurement and experiments regarding to tokamak; an addendum is also given at the end of the book

  11. The role of the spherical tokamak in clarifying tokamak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, A.W.; Akers, R.J.; Connor, J.W.; Counsell, G.F.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Hender, T.C.; Maddison, G.P.; Martin, T.J.; McClements, K.G.; Roach, C.M.; Robinson, D.C.; Sykes, A.; Valovic, M.; Wilson, H.R.; Fonck, R.J.; Gusev, V.; Kaye, S.M.; Majeski, R.; Peng, Y.-K.M.; Medvedev, S.; Sharapov, S.; Walsh, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The spherical tokamak (ST) provides a unique environment in which to perform complementary and exacting tests of the tokamak physics required for a burning plasma experiment of any aspect ratio, while also having the potential for long-term fusion applications in its own right. New experiments are coming on-line in the UK (MAST), USA (NSTX, Pegasus), Russia (Globus-M), Brazil (ETE) and elsewhere, and the status of these devices will be reported, along with newly-analysed data from START. Those physics issues where the ST provides an opportunity to remove degeneracy in the databases or clarify one's understanding will be emphasized. (author)

  12. High heat flux testing of CFC composites for the tokamak physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, P. G.; Nygren, R. E.; Burns, R. W.; Rocket, P. D.; Colleraine, A. P.; Lederich, R. J.; Bradley, J. T.

    1996-10-01

    High heat flux (HHF) testing of carbon fiber reinforced carbon composites (CFC's) was conducted under the General Atomics program to develop plasma-facing components (PFC's) for Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's tokamak physics experiment (TPX). As part of the process of selecting TPX CFC materials, a series of HHF tests were conducted with the 30 kW electron beam test system (EBTS) facility at Sandia National Laboratories, and with the plasma disruption simulator I (PLADIS-I) facility at the University of New Mexico. The purpose of the tests was to make assessments of the thermal performance and erosion behavior of CFC materials. Tests were conducted with 42 different CFC materials. In general, the CFC materials withstood the rapid thermal pulse environments without fracturing, delaminating, or degrading in a non-uniform manner; significant differences in thermal performance, erosion behavior, vapor evolution, etc. were observed and preliminary findings are presented below. The CFC's exposed to the hydrogen plasma pulses in PLADIS-I exhibited greater erosion rates than the CFC materials exposed to the electron-beam pulses in EBTS. The results obtained support the continued consideration of a variety of CFC composites for TPX PFC components.

  13. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization

  14. Structural design of the superconducting Poloidal Field coils for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment concept design uses superconducting coils made from cable-in-conduit conductor to accomplish both magnetic confinement and plasma initiation. The Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system is divided into two subsystems, the central solenoid and the outer ring coils, the latter is focus of this paper. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is excessive for a case type construction; therefore, a ''no case'' design has been chosen. This ''no case'' design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation (fiberglass/epoxy wrap) as a structural adhesive. The model integrates electromagnetic analysis and structural analysis into the finite element code ANSYS to solve the problem. PF coil design is assessed by considering a variety of coil current wave forms, corresponding to various operating modes and conditions. The structural analysis shows that the outer ring coils are within the requirements of the fatigue life and fatigue crack growth requirements. The forces produced by the Toroidal Field coils on the PF coils have little effect on the maximum stresses in the PF coils. In addition in an effort to reduce the cost of the coils new elongated PF coils design was proposed which changes the aspect ratio of the outer ring coils to reduce the number of turns in the coils. The compressive stress in the outer ring coils is increased while the tensile stress is decreased

  15. Summary report on tokamak confinement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    There are currently five major US tokamaks being operated and one being constructed under the auspices of the Division of Toroidal Confinement Systems. The currently operating tokamaks include: Alcator C at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Doublet III at the General Atomic Company, the Impurity Studies Experiment (ISX-B) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is under construction at Princeton and should be completed by December 1982. There is one major tokamak being funded by the Division of Applied Plasma Physics. The Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) is being operated as a user facility by the University of Texas. The TEXT facility includes a complete set of standard diagnostics and a data acquisition system available to all users

  16. Numerical modelling of ICRF physics experiments in the Alcator C-mod tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Boivin, R.L.; Brambilla, M.

    2001-01-01

    A full-wave spectral code (TORIC) has been used to simulate mode converted ion Bernstein wave (IBW) propagation and absorption for the first time at high poloidal mode number (-80< m<+80). Converged wave solutions for the mode converted wave are obtained in this limit and the predicted electron damping of the IBW is found to be consistent with experimental measurements from the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The TORIC code has also been coupled to a bounce-averaged Fokker Planck module FPPRF and the combined codes are now run within the transport analysis tool TRANSP. This model was used to analyze off-axis hydrogen minority heating experiments in C-Mod where an internal transport barrier was obtained. (author)

  17. Physics parameter space of tokamak ignition devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Uckan, N.A.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study to explore the physics parameter space of tokamak ignition experiments. A new physics systems code has been developed to perform the study. This code performs a global plasma analysis using steady-state, two-fluid, energy-transport models. In this paper, we discuss the models used in the code and their application to the analysis of compact ignition experiments. 8 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  18. Start of the international tokamak physics activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.

    2001-01-01

    This newsletter comprises a summary on the start of the International Tokamak Physics activity (ITPA) by Dr. D. Campbell, Chair of the ITPA Co-ordinating Committee. As the ITER EDA drew to a close, it became clear that it was desirable to establish a new mechanism in order to promote the continued development of the physics basis for burning plasma experiments and to preserve the invaluable collaborations between the major international fusion communities which had been established through the ITER physics expert groups. As a result of the discussions of the representatives of the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States the agreed principles for conducting the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) were elaborated and ITPA topical physics groups were organized

  19. Advanced tokamak burning plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Ramos, J.; Schultz, J.; Nevins, W.N.

    2001-01-01

    A new reduced size ITER-RC superconducting tokamak concept is proposed with the goals of studying burn physics either in an inductively driven standard tokamak (ST) mode of operation, or in a quasi-steady state advanced tokamak (AT) mode sustained by non-inductive means. This is achieved by reducing the radiation shield thickness protecting the superconducting magnet by 0.34 m relative to ITER and limiting the burn mode of operation to pulse lengths as allowed by the TF coil warming up to the current sharing temperature. High gain (Q≅10) burn physics studies in a reversed shear equilibrium, sustained by RF and NB current drive techniques, may be obtained. (author)

  20. Short-term power sources for tokamaks and other physical experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zajac, Jaromír; Žáček, František; Brettschneider, Zbyněk; Lejsek, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 4 (2007), s. 369-379 ISSN 0920-3796 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak * Impulse power sources * Energy accumulation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.058, year: 2007 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/09203796

  1. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM'y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nTτ's ∼ 2.5x greater than ELM'ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices

  2. Comments on thermal runaway experiments in sub-ignition tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.

    1982-09-01

    Justification of deuterium-tritium operations is discussed from the physics viewpoint and optimal thermal runaway experiments in high-field, high-density compact tokamaks are suggested within the minimization of the induced radioactivation. (author)

  3. Magnetic confinement by Tokamak: physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachon, J.

    1980-01-01

    After describing the Tokamak configuration concept, the author provides an analysis of the principal physical aspects of this type of installation and concludes by estimating that the Tokamak concept is a 'plausible candidate' as a means of producing controlled thermonuclear fusion [fr

  4. First experiments with SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Y.C.

    2005-01-01

    SST-1, a steady state superconducting tokamak, is undergoing commissioning tests at the Institute for Plasma Research. The objectives of SST-1 include studying the physics of the plasma processes in a tokamak under steady state conditions and learning technologies related to the steady state operation of the tokamak. These studies are expected to contribute to the tokamak physics database for very long pulse operations. Superconducting (SC) magnets are deployed for both the toroidal and poloidal field coils in SST-1. An Ohmic transformer is provided for plasma breakdown and initial current ramp up. SST-1 deploys a fully welded ultra high vacuum vessel. Liquid nitrogen cooled radiation shield are deployed between the vacuum vessel and SC magnets as well as SC magnets and cryostat, to minimize the radiation losses at the SC magnets. The auxiliary current drive is based on 1.0 MW of Lower Hybrid current drive (LHCD) at 3.7 GHz. Auxiliary heating systems include 1 MW of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency system (ICRF) at 22 MHz to 91 MHz, 0.2 MW of Electron Cyclotron Resonance heating at 84 GHz and a Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) system with peak power of 0.8 MW (at 80 keV) with variable beam energy in range of 10-80 keV. The ICRF system would also be used for initial breakdown and wall conditioning experiments. Detailed commissioning tests on the cryogenic system and experiments on the hydraulic characters and cool down features of single TF coils have been completed prior to the cool down of the entire superconducting system. Results of the single TF magnet cool down, and testing of the magnet system are presented. First experiments related to the breakdown and the current ramp up will subsequently be carried out. (author)

  5. The physics of an ignited tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyon, F.

    1990-10-01

    There appears to be a consensus that time has come to embark on the design and construction of the next generation of tokamaks which is at the origin of the ITER initiative. Different proposals have been made based on different appreciation as to the size of the step which can be taken, related to considerations of cost, risk and duration of construction. A class of devices which may be considered the last the very high-field, high density ALCATOR-Frascati line of tokamaks have been proposed for some years specifically for this purpose. Today there remain three such projects: Ignitor, Ignitex and CIT. The technology chosen limits the pulse length to a few seconds. These devices have evolved through the years becoming larger and much more expensive than originally anticipated, increasing the pressure to do more than just a simple demonstration of ignition. There is another class of more ambitious devices which aim at creating long burning plasmas in conditions as close as possible to those of a tokamak reactor in order to address all the plasma physics problems associated with long burn. Three such projects, NET, the european next step after JET, ITER and JIT are good examples of this approach. The ideal would be to design a device with sufficient margin to study burning plasmas over a wide range of parameters. The object of this didactic presentation is to describe the common physics basis of all these projects, compare their expected performance using present knowledge and list the physics problems associated with a burning plasma experiment. The comparison is not meant to be a judgement since the important parameter is the cost/benefit ratio which is a matter of appreciation at this stage. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. Microwave Tokamak Experiment: Overview and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. 3 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Data acquisition and processing based on the multi-microcomputers data communication system for the physics experiments of HL-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Libo; Liu Aiping; Xu Wenbin; Ao Xueling; Gao Lanbin; Yan Derong

    1989-08-01

    The data acquisition and processing system and automatic monitor system based on the data communication of multimicrocomputers for the physics experiments of HL-1 tokamak are described. The data communications between microcomputers are completed with parallel and serial interfaces. The signals from Rokofski coils, single loop turn, soft X-ray absorb spectrometer, microwave interfermeter, bolometer, soft X-ray sawtooth Au-Si surface barrier detectors and magnetic probes have been acquired and processed. Plasma parameters have been obtained. Specially, the electron density profiles have been obtained for the first time, and the simulation about plasma radius, horizontal displacement, electron temperature and electron line-average density has been completed

  8. LHCD experiments on tokamak CASTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, F.; Badalec, J.; Jakubka, J.; Kryska, L.; Preinhaelter, J.; Stoeckel, J.; Valovic, M.; Nanobashvili, S.; Weixelbaum, L.; Wenzel, U.; Spineanu, F.; Vlad, M.

    1990-10-01

    A short survey is given of the experimental activities at the small Prague tokamak CASTOR. They concern primarily the LH current drive using multijunction waveguide grills as launching antennae. During two last years the, efforts were focused on a study of the electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations under conditions of combined inductive/LHCD regimes and of the relation of the level of these fluctuations to the anomalous particles transport in tokamak CASTOR. Results of the study are discussed in some detail. (author). 24 figs., 51 refs

  9. Physics issues of high bootstrap current tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozeki, T.; Azumi, M.; Ishii, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Physics issues of a tokamak plasma with a hollow current profile produced by a large bootstrap current are discussed based on experiments in JT-60U. An internal transport barrier for both ions and electrons was obtained just inside the radius of zero magnetic shear in JT-60U. Analysis of the toroidal ITG microinstability by toroidal particle simulation shows that weak and negative shear reduces the toroidal coupling and suppresses the ITG mode. A hard beta limit was observed in JT-60U negative shear experiments. Ideal MHD mode analysis shows that the n = 1 pressure-driven kink mode is a plausible candidate. One of the methods to improve the beta limit against the kink mode is to widen the negative shear region, which can induce a broader pressure profile resulting in a higher beta limit. The TAE mode for the hollow current profile is less unstable than that for the monotonic current profile. The reason is that the continuum gaps near the zero shear region are not aligned when the radius of q min is close to the region of high ∇n e . Finally, a method for stable start-up for a plasma with a hollow current profile is describe, and stable sustainment of a steady-state plasma with high bootstrap current is discussed. (Author)

  10. Physics aspects of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, D.; Bateman, G.; Houlberg, W.

    1986-11-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is a proposed modest-size ignition experiment designed to study the physics of alpha-particle heating. The basic concept is to achieve ignition in a modest-size minimum cost experiment by using a high plasma density to achieve the condition of ntau/sub E/ ∼ 2 x 10 20 sec m -3 required for ignition. The high density requires a high toroidal field (10 T). The high toroidal field allows a large plasma current (10 MA) which improves the energy confinement, and provides a high level of ohmic heating. The present CIT design also has a gigh degree of elongation (k ∼ 1.8) to aid in producing the large plasma current. A double null poloidal divertor and a pellet injector are part of the design to provide impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for improving the plasma profiles. Since auxiliary heating is expected to be necessary to achieve ignition, 10 to 20 MW of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) is to be provided

  11. Experiments with Liquid Metal Walls: Status of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Kozub, Thomas; Berzak, Laura; Hammett, Gregory; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Jacobson, Craig M.; Lucia, Matthew; Jones, Andrew; Lundberg, Daniel; Timberlake, John; Majeski, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in Ohmically-heated tokamak plasmas wa...

  12. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 15, System design description. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-22

    This System Design Description, prepared in accordance with the TPX Project Management Plan provides a summary or TF Magnet System design features at the conclusion of Phase I, Preliminary Design and Manufacturing Research. The document includes the analytical and experimental bases for the design, and plans for implementation in final design, manufacturing, test, and magnet integration into the tokamak. Requirements for operation and maintenance are outlined, and references to sources of additional information are provided.

  13. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 15, System design description. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This System Design Description, prepared in accordance with the TPX Project Management Plan provides a summary or TF Magnet System design features at the conclusion of Phase I, Preliminary Design and Manufacturing Research. The document includes the analytical and experimental bases for the design, and plans for implementation in final design, manufacturing, test, and magnet integration into the tokamak. Requirements for operation and maintenance are outlined, and references to sources of additional information are provided

  14. The physics of tokamak start-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.

    2013-01-01

    Tokamak start-up on present-day devices usually relies on inductively induced voltage from a central solenoid. In some cases, inductive startup is assisted with auxiliary power from electron cyclotron radio frequency heating. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade and JT60, now under construction, will make use of the understanding gained from present-day devices to ensure successful start-up. Design of a spherical tokamak (ST) with DT capability for nuclear component testing would require an alternative to a central solenoid because the small central column in an ST has insufficient space to provide shielding for the insulators in the solenoid. Alternative start-up techniques such as induction using outer poloidal field coils, electron Bernstein wave start-up, coaxial helicity injection, and point source helicity injection have been used with success, but require demonstration of scaling to higher plasma current

  15. Physics of transport in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbet, X [Assoc. EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC CEA-Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Mantica, P [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma EURATOM-ENEA/CNR, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milan (Italy); Angioni, C [MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoz., D-8046 Garching (Germany)] [and others

    2004-12-01

    This paper is an overview of recent results relating to turbulent particle and heat transport, and to the triggering of internal transport barriers (ITBs). The dependence of the turbulent particle pinch velocity on plasma parameters has been clarified and compared with experiment. Magnetic shear and collisionality are found to play a central role. Analysis of heat transport has made progress along two directions: dimensionless scaling laws, which are found to agree with the prediction for electrostatic turbulence, and analysis of modulation experiments, which provide a stringent test of transport models. Finally the formation of ITBs has been addressed by analysing electron transport barriers. It is confirmed that negative magnetic shear, combined with the Shafranov shift, is a robust stabilizing mechanism. However, some well established features of internal barriers are not explained by theory.

  16. Physics of transport in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Asp, E.; Bourdelle, C.; Hoang, T.; Imbeaux, F.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X.; Angioni, C.; Manini, A.; Peeter, A.; Ryter, F.; Baranov, Y.; Cordey, G.; McDonald, D.C.; Parail, V.; Valovic, M.; Thyagaraja, A.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Budny, R.; Kirneva, N.; Hogeweij, D.; Nordman, H.; Weilland, J.; Tala, T.; Weisen, H.; Zabolotsky, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is an overview of recent results related to turbulent particle and heat transport, and triggering of Internal Transport Barriers. Particle transport is characterised by a pinch velocity that is found to be larger than the value predicted by theory of collisional transport (Ware pinch) in L-mode plasmas. Also it increases with magnetic shear. In H-mode, density peaking decreases with collisionality. Pinch velocity reaches the Ware value for large collision frequencies. Heat transport has made progress along two directions: dimensionless scaling laws and analysis of modulation experiments. Dimensionless scaling law of thermal confinement agrees with the prediction for electrostatic turbulence. Dependence with collisionality remains to be understood. Heat modulation experiments have been investigated in several devices using a critical gradient model, micro-stability analysis and predictive modelling. Thresholds and stiffness are correctly reproduced by stability analysis and modelling with Weiland model. Analysis with a critical gradient model leads to a large variability of stiffness. Finally the question of triggering Internal Transport Barriers has been addressed by analysing electron transport barriers. It is confirmed that negative magnetic shear combined with Shafranov shift is a robust stabilizing mechanism. However, some well established features of internal barriers are hardly explained by theory, in particular the role of low order rational values of the minimum safety factor, and the existence of multiple barriers. (authors)

  17. The Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.; Sheffield, G.V.; Bushnell, C.

    1985-01-01

    The basic objective of the next major step in the US fusion programme has been defined as the achievement of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn of a fusion plasma in the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) device. Preconceptual design studies have seen completion of four candidate versions to provide the comparative information needed to narrow down the range of TFCX options before proceeding to the conceptual design phase. All four designs share the same objective and conform to common physics, engineering and costing criteria. The four base options considered differed mainly in the toroidal field coil design, two employing superconducting coils and the other two copper coils. In each case (copper and superconducting), one relatively conventional version was carried as well as a version employing more exotic toroidal field coil design assumptions. Sizes range from R=2.6 m for the smaller of the two copper versions to R=4.08 m for the larger superconducting option. In all cases, the plasma current was about 10 MA and the toroidal field about 4 T. (author)

  18. Bibliography of fusion product physics in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1989-09-01

    Almost 700 citations have been compiled as the first step in reviewing the recent research on tokamak fusion product effects in tokamaks. The publications are listed alphabetically by the last name of the first author and by subject category

  19. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment maintenance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, A.M.; Watts, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    The recently completed Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design project was carried out to investigate potential next generation tokamak concepts. An important aspect of this project was the early development and incorporation of remote maintainability throughout the design process. This early coordination and incorporation of maintenance aspects to the design of the device and facilities would assure that the machine could ultimately be maintained and repaired in an efficient and cost effective manner. To meet this end, a rigorously formatted engineering trade study was performed to determine the preferred configuration for the TFCX reactor based primarily on maintenance requirements. The study indicated that the preferred design was one with an external vacuum vessel and torrodial field coils that could be removed via a simple radial motion. The trade study is presented and the preferred TFCX configuration is described

  20. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Hogan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors

  1. Tokamak advanced pump limiter experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1983-06-01

    Experiments with pump limiter modules on several operating tokamaks establish such limiters as efficient collectors of particles and has demonstrated the importance of ballistic scattering as predicted theoretically. Plasma interaction with recycling neutral gas appears to become important as the plasma density increases and the effective ionization mean free path within the module decreases. In limiters with particle collection but without active internal pumping, the neutral gas pressure is found to vary nonlinearly with the edge plasma density at the highest densities studies. Both experiments and theory indicate that the energy spectrum of gas atoms in the pump ducting is non-thermal, consistent with the results of Monte Carlo neutral atom transport calculations. The distribution of plasma power over the front surface of such modules has been measured and appears to be consistent with the predictions of simple theory. Initial results from the latest experiment on the ISX-B tokamak with an actively pumped limiter module demonstrates that the core plasma density can be controlled with a pump limiter and that the scrape-off layer plasma can partially screen the core plasma from gas injection. The results from module pump limiter experiments and from the theory and design analysis of advanced pump limiters for reactors are used to suggest the major features of a definitive, axisymmetric, toroidal belt pump limiter experiment

  2. Tokamak fusion test reactor FELIX plate experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, T.O.; Nygren, R.E.; Turner, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    For a conducting material exposed to both a time-varying and a static magnetic field, such as a limiter blade in a tokamak, the induced eddy currents and the deflection arising from those eddy currents can be strongly coupled. The coupling effects reduce the currents and deflections markedly, sometimes an order of magnitude, from the values predicted if coupling is neglected. A series of experiments to study current-deflection coupling were performed using the Fusion Electromagnetic Inductance Experiment (FELIX) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness resulting from the coupling are discussed, and analytical expressions for induced eddy current and rigid body rotation in the FELIX plate experiment are compared with the experimental results. Predictions for the degree of coupling based on various parameters are made using the analytical model

  3. System studies for quasi-steady-state advanced physics tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1983-11-01

    Parametric studies were conducted using the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code to investigate the impact of veriation in physics parameters and technology limits on the performance and cost of a low q/sub psi/, high beta, quasi-steady-state tokamak for the purpose of fusion engineering experimentation. The features and characteristics chosen from each study were embodied into a single Advanced Physics Tokamak design for which a self-consistent set of parameters was generated and a value of capital cost was estimated

  4. ICRF heating experiments in JFT-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    This is an experimental study of ICRF heating on JFT-2 Tokamak in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In this study, we first clarified physical and engineering problems of ICRF heating of tokamak plasma. Next, we optimized the design of the ICRF heating system, and the plasma parameters for the heating. Finally, we could demonstrate a high efficiency of this additional heating method by launching RF power which is two or three times as large as an ohmic input power to a plasma. And we achieved following things. (1) We optimized a design of an antenna, and we improved a durability of the system for high voltage. With the result that we achieved the maximum power density on an antenna. (2) We demonstrated that electron heating regime and ion heating regime can be easily accessed by controlling plasma parameters. Also we found the optimum heating conditions in each heating regime. (3) We experimentally clarified the production mechanism of impurities during ICRF heating. We could reduce the influx of metal impurity ions to a plasma by employing low z materials for limiters and antenna shields. Consequently, we improved a heating efficiency of electrons. Next, we studied a power balance of plasma during ICRF heating, and we could compare heating characteristics of ICRF with other additional heatings on JFT-2. (author)

  5. Physics design of an ultra-long pulsed tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Inoue, N.; Wang, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Okano, K.

    1993-01-01

    A pulsed tokamak reactor driven only by inductive current drive has recently revived, because the non-inductive current drive efficiency seems to be too low to realize a steady-state tokamak reactor with sufficiently high energy gain Q. Essential problems in pulsed operation mode is considered to be material fatigue due to cyclic operation and expensive energy storage system to keep continuous electric output during a dwell time. To overcome these problems, we have proposed an ultra-long pulsed tokamak reactor called IDLT (abbr. Inductively operated Day-Long Tokamak), which has the major and minor radii of 10 m and 1.87 m, respectively, sufficiently to ensure the burning period of about ten hours. Here we discuss physical features of inductively operated tokamak plasmas, employing the similar constraints with ITER CDA design for engineering issues. (author) 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Results from deuterium-tritium tokamak confinement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. The key scientific issues in the reacting plasma core are plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, and the confinement and loss of energetic fusion products from the reacting fuel ions. Progress in the development of regimes of operation which have both good confinement and are MHD stable have enabled a broad study of burning plasma physics issues. A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues

  7. Advanced tokamak physics in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Politzer, P.A.; Bray, B.; Burrell, K.H.; Chu, M.S.; Ferron, J.R.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C.M.; Hsieh, C.-L.; Hyatt, A.W.; La Haye, R.J.; Lao, L.L.; Leonard, A.W.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Lohr, J.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Petrie, T.W.; Pinsker, R.I.; Prater, R.; Scoville, J.T.; Staebler, G.M.; Strait, E.J.; Taylor, T.S.; West, W.P. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA (United States); Wade, M.R.; Lazarus, E.A.; Murakami, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Jayakumar, R.; Lasnier, C.J.; Makowski, M.A.; Rice, B.W.; Wolf, N.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Austin, M.E. [University of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Fredrickson, E.D.; Gorelov, I.; Johnson, L.C.; Okabayashi, M.; Wong, K.-L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Garofalo, A.M.; Navratil, G.A. [Columbia University, New York (United States); Heidbrink, W. [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Kinsey, J.E. [Leheigh University, Bethlehem, PA (United States); McKee, G.R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Rettig, C.L.; Rhodes, T.L. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Watkins, J.G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Advanced tokamaks seek to achieve a high bootstrap current fraction without sacrificing fusion power density or fusion gain. Good progress has been made towards the DIII-D research goal of demonstrating a high-{beta} advanced tokamak plasma in steady state with a relaxed, fully non-inductive current profile and a bootstrap current fraction greater than 50%. The limiting factors for transport, stability, and current profile control in advanced operating modes are discussed in this paper. (author)

  8. Lower hybrid heating experiments in tokamaks: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkolab, M.

    1985-10-01

    Lower hybrid wave propagation theory relevant to heating fusion grade plasmas (tokamaks) is reviewed. A brief discussion of accessibility, absorption, and toroidal ray propagation is given. The main part of the paper reviews recent results in heating experiments on tokamaks. Both electron and ion heating regimes will be discussed. The prospects of heating to high temperatures in reactor grade plasmas will be evaluated

  9. Lower hybrid experiments in the PETULA Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melin, G.; Bardet, R.; Bernard, M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with the application of high RF power near the lower hybrid (LH) frequency to a Tokamak discharge. A double waveguide grill antenna has been used to launch a 1.25 GHz-500kW-6 ms RF pulse in PETULA. One of the objectives of this study is to investigate the technological problems associated with LH heating and caused by the high level of RF power involved. Two aspects have been carefully studied: grill conditioning and grill coupling. The latter is strongly dependent on the scrape-off layer of the PETULA plasma and the observations are possibly not significant. The former aspect though not really understood is probably to be expected in other LH experiments. Plasma experiments have been carried out with a wide range of electron density 2. 13 cm -3 in both hydrogen and deuterium. For hydrogen this allows theoretically linear mode conversion to take place in the discharge. Although some heating has been observed, the experiments are not, as yet, very conclusive. The actual RF pulse duration is hardly larger than the ion energy confinement time, and the radial plasma displacement caused by the RF is not feedback controlled. The main discharge parameters were the following: plasma radius 14 cm, toroidal magnetic field 27 kG, plasma current 75 kA, loop voltage 1.6 V, Zsub(eff) < 2., 800 < Tsub(e)(o)< 1100eV, 200 < Tsub(i)(o)< 350 eV

  10. Physics design and experimental study of tokamak divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jiancheng; Gao Qingdi; Yan Longwen; Wang Mingxu; Deng Baiquan; Zhang Fu; Zhang Nianman; Ran Hong; Cheng Fayin; Tang Yiwu; Chen Xiaoping

    2007-06-01

    The divertor configuration of HL-2A tokamak is optimized, and the plasma performance in divertor is simulated with B2-code. The effects of collisionality on plasma-wall transition in the scrape-off layer of divertor are investigated, high performances of the divertor plasma in HL-2A are simulated, and a quasi- stationary RS operation mode is established with the plasma controlled by LHCD and NBI. HL-2A tokamak has been successfully operated in divertor configuration. The major parameters: plasma current I p =320 kA, toroidal field B t =2.2 T, plasma discharger duration T d =1580 ms ware achieved at the end of 2004. The preliminary experimental researches of advanced diverter have been carried out. Design studies of divertor target plate for high power density fusion reactor have been carried out, especially, the physical processes on the surface of flowing liquid lithium target plate. The exploration research of improving divertor ash removal efficiency and reducing tritium inventory resulting from applying the RF ponderomotive force potential is studied. The optimization structure design studies of FEB-E reactor divertor are performed. High flux thermal shock experiments were carried on tungsten and carbon based materials. Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) method was employed to bond tungsten to copper alloys. Electron beam simulated thermal fatigue tests were also carried out to W/Cu bondings. Thermal desorption and surface modification of He + implanted into tungsten have been studied. (authors)

  11. Project and analysis of the toroidal magnetic field production circuits and the plasma formation of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Luis Filipe F.P.W.; Bosco, Edson del.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the project and analysis of the circuit for production of the toroidal magnetic field in the Tokamak ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment). The ETE is a Tokamak with a small-aspect-ratio parameter to be used for studying the plasma physics for the research on thermonuclear fusion. This machine is being constructed at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP) of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) in Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, Brazil. (author). 20 refs., 39 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Experiments in the HT-7 Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Baonian

    2002-01-01

    The HT-7 tokamak experiment research has made important progress. The main efforts have dealt with quasi-steady-state operation, lower-hybrid (LH) current drive (LHCD), plasma heating with ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), ion Bernstein waves (IBWs), fueling with pellets and supersonic molecular beams, first-wall conditioning techniques, and plasma and wall interaction. Plasma parameters in the experiments were much improved; for example, n e = 6.5 x 10 19 m -3 , and a plasma pulse length of >10 s was achieved. ICRF boronization and conditioning resulted in Z eff close to unity. Steady-state full LH wave current drive has been achieved for >3 s. LHCD rampup and recharge have also been demonstrated. The best [eta] CD exp of 10 19 m -2 A/W is achieved. Quasi-steady-state H-mode-like plasmas with a density close to the Greenwald limit were obtained by LHCD, where energy confinement time was nearly five times longer than in the ohmic case. The synergy between the IBW, pellet, and LHCD was investigated. New doped graphite as limiter material and ferritic steel used to reduce the ripples have been developed. Research on the mechanism of microturbulence has been extensively carried out experimentally

  13. Ignition experiment in a single-turn-coil tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, R.; Driga, M.; Gully, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    A novel concept for a fusion ignition experiment, IGNITEX proposed along the lines of previous ideas for a compact thermonuclear device is analyzed. A single-turn-coil tokamak is analyzed. A single-turn-coil tokamak supplied by homopolar generators can ohmically heat a DT plasma to ignition conditions and maintain a thermally stable ignited phase for about ten energy confinement times. The IGNITEX experiment can provide a simple and relatively inexpensive way to produce and control ignited plasmas for scientific study

  14. Free-electron laser experiments in the microwave tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Cummings, J.C.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hooper, E.B.; Jong, R.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Lasnier, C.J.; Matsuda, Y.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M.; Nexsen, W.E.; Rice, B.W.; Rognlien, T.D.; Smith, G.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Thomassen, K.I.; Throop, A.L.; Turner, W.C.; Wood, R.D.; Cook, D.R.; Makowski, M.A.; Oasa, K.; Ogawa, T.

    1990-08-01

    Microwave pulses have been injected from a free electron-laser (FEL) into the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at up to 0.2 GW at 140 GHz in short pulses (10-ns duration) with O-mode polarization. The power transmitted through the plasma was measured in a first experimental study of high power pulse propagation in the plasma; no nonlinear effects were found at this power level. Calculations indicate that nonlinear effects may be found at the higher power densities expected in future experiments. 9 refs., 2 figs

  15. Compression experiments on the TOSKA tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cima, G.; McGuire, K.M.; Robinson, D.C.; Wootton, A.J.

    1980-10-01

    Results from minor radius compression experiments on a tokamak plasma in TOSCA are reported. The compression is achieved by increasing the toroidal field up to twice its initial value in 200μs. Measurements show that particles and magnetic flux are conserved. When the initial energy confinement time is comparable with the compression time, energy gains are greater than for an adiabatic change of state. The total beta value increases. Central beta values approximately 3% are measured when a small major radius compression is superimposed on a minor radius compression. Magnetic field fluctuations are affected: both the amplitude and period decrease. Starting from low energy confinement times, approximately 200μs, increases in confinement times up to approximately 1 ms are measured. The increase in plasma energy results from a large reduction in the power losses during the compression. When the initial energy confinement time is much longer than the compression time, the parameter changes are those expected for an adiabatic change of state. (author)

  16. Pump limiter experiment in the TFR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Pump limiter experiments are carried out in the TFR Tokamak. The first TFR pump limiter is located in the outer part of the torus, its double-throat head is made of graphite tiles, the neutralizer plates are made of stainless steel, and it is pumped by a 3500 l s -1 titanium sublimation pump. The first attempts showed that the exhaust efficiency ε of this pump limiter was low (1.5% of the total plasma particle efflux). To improve on these results, a new limiter head with a single longer throat has been built. The particles were better trapped and the pumping achieved an important decrease of the recycling coefficient. Geometric features and also the highly non linear regime of pressure in the pump limiter as a function of the density at the entrance slot could explain the increase by a factor 3.5 of the exhaust efficiency (ε = 5%). Ion temperatures of the order of a few eV have been deduced from Doppler broadening measurements at the neutralizer plate of the pump limiter. (orig.)

  17. Equilibrium system analysis in a tokamak ignition experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, R.; Weldon, W.F.; Woodson, H.H.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of the IGNITEX Project is to produce and control ignited plasmas for scientific study in the simplest and least expensive way possible. The original concept was proposed by both physics and engineering researchers along the following line of thought. Question: Is there any theoretically simple, compact and reliable way of achieving fusion ignition according to the results of the fusion research program for the last decades? Answer: Yes. An experiment to be carried out in an ohmically heated compact tokamak device with 20 T field on plasma axis. Question: Is there any practical way to carry out that experiment at low cost in the near term? Answer: Yes. Using a single-turn coil magnet system with homopolar power supplies

  18. Equilibrium system analysis in a tokamak ignition experiment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera, R.; Weldon, W.F.; Woodson, H.H.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of the IGNITEX Project is to produce and control ignited plasmas for scientific study in the simplest and least expensive way possible. The original concept was proposed by both physics and engineering researchers along the following line of thought. Question: Is there any theoretically simple, compact and reliable way of achieving fusion ignition according to the results of the fusion research program for the last decades? Answer: Yes. An experiment to be carried out in an ohmically heated compact tokamak device with 20 T field on plasma axis. Question: Is there any practical way to carry out that experiment at low cost in the near term? Answer: Yes. Using a single-turn coil magnet system with homopolar power supplies.

  19. Equilibrium system analysis in a tokamak ignition experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera, R.; Weldon, W.F.; Woodson, H.H.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of the IGNITEX Project is to produce and control ignited plasmas for scientific study in the simplest and least expensive way possible. The original concept was proposed by both physics and engineering researchers along the following line of thought. Question: Is there any theoretically simple, compact and reliable way of achieving fusion ignition according to the results of the fusion research program for the last decades Answer: Yes. An experiment to be carried out in an ohmically heated compact tokamak device with 20 T field on plasma axis. Question: Is there any practical way to carry out that experiment at low cost in the near term Answer: Yes. Using a single-turn coil magnet system with homopolar power supplies.

  20. Plasma boundary experiments on DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Brooks, N.; Jackson, G.L.; Langhorn, A.; Leikind, B.; Lippmann, S.; Luxon, J.; Petersen, P.; Petrie, P.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Simonen, T.C.; Staebler, G.; Buchenauer, D.; Futch, A.; Hill, D.N.; Rensink, M.; Hogan, J.; Menon, M.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Owen, L.; Matthews, G.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of the boundary physics research on the DIII-D tokamak and an outline of the DIII-D Advanced Divertor Program (ADP) is presented. We will present results of experiments on impurity control, impurity transport, neutral particle transport, and particle effects on core confinement over a wide range of plasma parameters, I p T < or approx.10.7%, P(auxiliary)< or approx.20 MW. Based on the understanding gained in these studies, we in collaboration with a number of other laboratories have devised a series of experiments (ADP) to modify the core plasma conditions through changes in the edge electric field, neutral recycling, and plasma-surface interactions. (orig.)

  1. Plasma boundary experiments on DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Brooks, N.; Jackson, G.L.; Langhorn, A.; Leikind, B.; Lippmann, S.; Luxon, J.; Petersen, P.; Petrie, T.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Simonen, T.C.; Staebler, G.; Buchenauer, D.; Futch, A.; Hill, D.N.; Rensink, M.; Hogan, J.; Menon, M.; Mioduszewski, P.; Owen, L.; Matthews, G.

    1990-06-01

    A survey of the boundary physics research on the DIII-D tokamak and an outline of the DIII-D Advanced Divertor Program (ADP) is presented. We will present results of experiments on impurity control, impurity transport, neutral particle transport, and particle effects on core confinement over a wide range of plasma parameters, I p approx-lt 3 MA, β T approx-lt 10.7%, P(auxiliary) approx-lt 20 MW. Based on the understanding gained in these studies, we in collaboration with a number of other laboratories have devised a series of experiments (ADP) to modify the core plasma conditions through changes in the edge electric field, neutral recycling, and plasma surface interactions. 41 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  2. Design of a microwave calorimeter for the microwave tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinak, M.

    1988-01-01

    The initial design of a microwave calorimeter for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment is presented. The design is optimized to measure the refraction and absorption of millimeter rf microwaves as they traverse the toroidal plasma of the Alcator C tokamak. Techniques utilized can be adapted for use in measuring high intensity pulsed output from a microwave device in an environment of ultra high vacuum, intense fields of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and intense magnetic fields. 16 refs

  3. q=1 advanced tokamak experiments in JET and comparison with ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffrin, E.; Wolf, R.; Alper, B.

    2002-01-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade advanced tokamak scenario with central q close to 1 has been reproduced on JET. For almost identical q profiles, the comparative analysis does show similar features like the fishbone activity and the current profile evolution. In JET, transport analyses indicates that an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been produced. Gradient length criterions based on the ion temperature gradient turbulence stabilization are used to characterize the ITBs in both devices. The trigger of ITBs is associated with rational surfaces in both devices although the underlying physics for this triggering seems different. This experiment has the prospect to get closer to identity experiments between the two tokamaks. (author)

  4. Edge Plasma Physics and Relevant Diagnostics on the CASTOR tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stöckel, Jan; Devynck, P.; Gunn, J.; Martines, E.; Bonhomme, G.; Van Oost, G.; Hron, Martin; Ďuran, Ivan; Pánek, Radomír; Stejskal, Pavel; Adámek, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2004), s. 1-6 ISSN 1433-5581. [First Cairo Conference on Plasma Physics & Applications. Cairo, 11.10.2003-15.10.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0786; GA ČR GP202/03/P062 Keywords : tokamak * edge plasma * probe diagnostics * biasing * turbulence * polarization Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  5. Pellet injection experiments on tokamaks in ASIPP, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.; Bao, Y.; Li, J.; Gu, X.; He, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Pellet injection has been proved to be an effective method for deep fueling of fusion devices. Improvements of both the particle confinement and the energy confinement were observed in many experiments. In HT-6M and HT-7 tokamaks, single and multi-pellet experiments are tried, and attractive results are obtained. (author)

  6. Pellet injection experiments on tokamaks in ASIPP, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.; Bao, Y.; Li, J.; Gu, X.; He, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Pellet Injection has been proven to be an effective method for deep fuelling of fusion devices. Improvements of both the particle confinement and the energy confinement were observed in many experiments. In HT-6M and HT-7 tokamaks, single and multi-pellet experiments are tried, and attractive results are obtained

  7. Overview of physics research on the TCV tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fasoli, A.; Alberti, S.; Amorim, P.; Angioni, C.; Asp, E.; Behn, R.; Bencze, A.; Berrino, J.; Blanchard, P.; Bortolon, A.; Brunner, S.; Camenen, Y.; Cirant, S.; Coda, S.; Curchod, L.; DeMeijere, K.; Duval, B. P.; Fable, E.; Fasel, D.; Felici, F.; Furno, I.; Garcia, O.E.; Giruzzi, G.; Gnesin, S.; Goodman, T.; Graves, J.; Gudozhnik, A.; Gulejova, B.; Henderson, M.; Hogge, J. Ph.; Horáček, Jan; Joye, B.; Karpushov, A.; Kim, S.-H.; Laqua, H.; Lister, J. B.; Llobet, X.; Madeira, T.; Marinoni, A.; Marki, J.; Martin, Y.; Maslov, M.; Medvedev, S.; Moret, J.-M.; Paley, J.; Pavlov, I.; Piffl, Vojtěch; Piras, F.; Pitts, R.A.; Pitzschke, A.; Pochelon, A.; Porte, L.; Reimerdes, H.; Rossel, J.; Sauter, O.; Scarabosio, A.; Schlatter, C.; Sushkov, A.; Testa, D.; Tonetti, G.; Tskhakaya, D.; Tran, M. Q.; Turco, F.; Turri, G.; Tye, R.; Udintsev, V.; Véres, G.; Villard, L.; Weisen, H.; Zhuchkova, A.; Zucca, C.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 10 (2009), s. 104005-104005 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : overview highlights * fusion research * tokamak TCV * self-generated current * H-mode physics * Electron internal transport barrier * electron cyclotron heating * electron cyclotron current drive physics * density peaking * MHDactivity * edge physics * reciprocating Mach probe * Pfirsch–Schlueter component. Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.270, year: 2009 http://stacks.iop.org/NF/49/104005

  8. Real-time control of Tokamak plasmas: from control of physics to physics-based control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felici, F. A. A.

    2011-11-01

    Stable, high-performance operation of a tokamak requires several plasma control problems to be handled simultaneously. Moreover, the complex physics which governs the tokamak plasma evolution must be studied and understood to make correct choices in controller design. In this thesis, the two subjects have been merged, using control solutions as experimental tool for physics studies, and using physics knowledge for developing new advanced control solutions. The TCV tokamak at CRPP-EPFL is ideally placed to explore issues at the interface between plasma physics and plasma control, by combining a digital realtime control system with a flexible and powerful set of actuators, in particular the electron cyclotron heating and current drive system (ECRH/ECCD). This experimental platform has been used to develop and test new control strategies for three plasma physics instabilities: sawtooth, edge localized mode (ELM) and neoclassical tearing mode (NTM). The period of the sawtooth crash, a periodic MHD instability in the core of a tokamak plasma, can be varied by localized deposition of ECRH/ECCD near the q = 1 surface (q: safety factor). A sawtooth pacing controller was developed which is able to control the time of appearance of the next sawtooth crash. Each individual sawtooth period can be controlled in real-time. A similar scheme is applied to H-mode plasmas with type-I ELMs, where it is shown that pacing regularizes the ELM period. The regular, reproducible and therefore predictable sawtooth crashes have been used to study the relationship between sawteeth and NTMs. Postcrash MHD activity can provide the ‘seed’ island for an NTM, which then grows under its neoclassical bootstrap drive. The seeding of 3/2 NTMs by long sawtooth crashes can be avoided by preemptive, crash-synchronized EC power injection pulses at the q = 3/2 rational surface location. NTM stabilization experiments in which the ECRH deposition location is moved in real-time with steerable mirrors have

  9. Dust remobilization experiments on the COMPASS tokamak.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weinzettl, Vladimír; Matějíček, Jiří; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; De Angeli, M.; Riva, G.; Dimitrova, Miglena; Havlíček, Josef; Adámek, Jiří; Seidl, Jakub; Tomeš, Matěj; Cavalier, Jordan; Imríšek, Martin; Havránek, Aleš; Pánek, Radomír; Peterka, Matěj

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, November (2017), s. 446-449 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-10723S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Dust remobilization * Tungsten * Disruption * ELM * Plasma * Tokamak Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617300650

  10. Tokamak physics studies using x-ray diagnostic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.

    1987-03-01

    X-ray diagnostic measurements have been used in a number of experiments to improve our understanding of important tokamak physics issues. The impurity content in TFTR plasmas, its sources and control have been clarified through soft x-ray pulse-height analysis (PHA) measurements. The dependence of intrinsic impurity concentrations and Z/sub eff/ on electron density, plasma current, limiter material and conditioning, and neutral-beam power have shown that the limiter is an important source of metal impurities. Neoclassical-like impurity peaking following hydrogen pellet injection into Alcator C and a strong effect of impurities on sawtooth behavior were demonstrated by x-ray imaging (XIS) measurements. Rapid inward motion of impurities and continuation of m = 1 activity following an internal disruption were demonstrated with XIS measurements on PLT using injected aluminum to enhance the signals. Ion temperatures up to 12 keV and a toroidal plasma rotation velocity up to 6 x 10 5 m/s have been measured by an x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) with up to 13 MW of 85-keV neutral-beam injection in TFTR. Precise wavelengths and relative intensities of x-ray lines in several helium-like ions and neon-like ions of silver have been measured in TFTR and PLT by the XCS. The data help to identify the important excitation processes predicted in atomic physics. Wavelengths of n = 3 to 2 silver lines of interest for x-ray lasers were measured, and precise instrument calibration techniques were developed. Electron thermal conductivity and sawtooth dynamics have been studied through XIS measurements on TFTR of heat-pulse propagation and compound sawteeth. A non-Maxwellian electron distribution function has been measured, and evidence of the Parail-Pogutse instability identified by hard x-ray PHA measurements on PLT during lower-hybrid current-drive experiments

  11. Spectral emission measurements of lithium on the lithium tokamak experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, T. K.; Biewer, T. M.; Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Boyle, D. P.; Granstedt, E. M.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    There has been a long-standing collaboration between ORNL and PPPL on edge and boundary layer physics. As part of this collaboration, ORNL has a large role in the instrumentation and interpretation of edge physics in the lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). In particular, a charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) diagnostic is being designed and undergoing staged testing on LTX. Here we present results of passively measured lithium emission at 5166.89 A in LTX in anticipation of active spectroscopy measurements, which will be enabled by the installation of a neutral beam in 2013. Preliminary measurements are made in transient LTX plasmas with plasma current, I{sub p} < 70 kA, ohmic heating power, P{sub oh}{approx} 0.3 MW and discharge lifetimes of 10-15 ms. Measurements are made with a short focal length spectrometer and optics similar to the CHERS diagnostics on NSTX [R. E. Bell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68(2), 1273-1280 (1997)]. These preliminary measurements suggest that even without the neutral beam for active spectroscopy, there is sufficient passive lithium emission to allow for line-of-sight profile measurements of ion temperature, T{sub i}; toroidal velocity and v{sub t}. Results show peak T{sub i} = 70 eV and peak v{sub t} = 45 km/s were reached 10 ms into the discharge.

  12. Edge plasma physical investigations of tokamak plasmas in CRIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakos, J.; Ignacz, P.; Koltai, L.; Paszti, F.; Petravich, G.; Szigeti, J.; Zoletnik, S.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the measurements performed in the field of thermonuclear high temperature plasma physics in CRIP (Hungary) are summarized. In the field of the edge plasma physics solid probes were used to test the external zone of plasma edges, and atom beams and balls were used to investigate both the external and internal zones. The plasma density distribution was measured by laser blow-off technics, using Na atoms, which are evaporated by laser pulses. The excitation of Na atom ball by tokamak plasma gives information on the status of the plasma edge. The toroidal asymmetry of particle transport in tokamak plasma was measured by erosion probes. The evaporated and transported impurities were collected on an other part of the plasma edge and were analyzed by SIMS and Rutherford backscattering. The interactions in plasma near the limiter were investigated by a special limiter with implemented probes. Recycling and charge exchange processes were measured. Disruption phenomena of tokamak plasma were analyzed and a special kind of disruptions, 'soft disruptions' and the related preliminary perturbations were discovered. (D.Gy.) 10 figs

  13. Lower hybrid experiments in the Petula tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, C.M.; Briand, P.; Dupas, I.

    1978-01-01

    The study of lower hybrid waves on Petula Tokamak addresses itself to the following questions: wave excitation by phased waveguide arrays, technological problems encountered with high power microwave circuitry, and nonlinear processes induced by large amplitude pump waves. An r.f. generator was used to deliver a maximum power of 1.0 MW, 100 μs at 1.25 GHz to a two waveguide grill (Emax=4 kV/cm). The data reported here were taken in a deuterium plasma, n(e)=3.5x10 13 cm -3 , T(e) 500 eV, T(i) 200 eV and B=15 kG. The choice of the plasma parameters and the frequency of the pump was made so as to avoid the linear mode conversion layer in the plasma

  14. Integrated Tokamak modeling: When physics informs engineering and research planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Francesca Maria

    2018-05-01

    Modeling tokamaks enables a deeper understanding of how to run and control our experiments and how to design stable and reliable reactors. We model tokamaks to understand the nonlinear dynamics of plasmas embedded in magnetic fields and contained by finite size, conducting structures, and the interplay between turbulence, magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities, and wave propagation. This tutorial guides through the components of a tokamak simulator, highlighting how high-fidelity simulations can guide the development of reduced models that can be used to understand how the dynamics at a small scale and short time scales affects macroscopic transport and global stability of plasmas. It discusses the important role that reduced models have in the modeling of an entire plasma discharge from startup to termination, the limits of these models, and how they can be improved. It discusses the important role that efficient workflows have in the coupling between codes, in the validation of models against experiments and in the verification of theoretical models. Finally, it reviews the status of integrated modeling and addresses the gaps and needs towards predictions of future devices and fusion reactors.

  15. Plasma edge physics in an actively cooled tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.P.; Adamek, A.; Boucher, C.

    2005-01-01

    Tore Supra is a large tokamak with a plasma of circular cross section (major radius 2.4 m and minor radius 0.72 m) lying on a toroidal limiter. Tore Supra's main mission is the development of technology to inject up to 25 MW of microwave heating power and extract it continuously for up to 1000 s in steady state without uncontrolled overheating of, or outgassing from, plasma-facing components. The entire first wall of the tokamak is actively cooled by a high pressure water loop and special carbon fiber composite materials have been designed to handle power fluxes up to 10 MW/m 2 . The edge plasma on open magnetic flux surfaces that intersect solid objects plays an important role in the overall behaviour of the plasma. The transport of sputtered impurity ions and the fueling of the core plasma are largely governed by edge plasma density, temperature, and flow profiles. Measurements of these quantities are becoming more reliable and frequent in many tokamaks, and it has become clear that we do not understand them very well. Classical two-dimensional fluid modelling fails to reproduce many aspects of the experimental observations such as the significant thickness of the edge plasma, and the near-sonic flows that occur where none should be expected. It is suspected that plasma turbulence is responsible for these anomalies. In the Tore Supra tokamak, various kinds of Langmuir probes are used to characterize the edge plasma. We will present original measurements that demonstrate the universality of many phenomena that have been observed in X-point divertor tokamaks, especially concerning the ion flows. As in the JET tokamak, surprisingly large values of parallel Mach number are measured midway between the two strike zones, where one would expect to find nearly stagnant plasma if the particle source were poloidally uniform. We will present results of a novel experiment that provides evidence for a poloidally localized particle and energy source on the outboard midplane of

  16. Project and analysis of the toroidal magnetic field production circuits and the plasma formation of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) tokamak; Projeto e analise dos circuitos de producao de campo magnetico toroidal e de formacao do plasma do Tokamak ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Luis Filipe F.P.W.; Bosco, Edson del

    1994-12-31

    This report presents the project and analysis of the circuit for production of the toroidal magnetic field in the Tokamak ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment). The ETE is a Tokamak with a small-aspect-ratio parameter to be used for studying the plasma physics for the research on thermonuclear fusion. This machine is being constructed at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP) of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) in Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, Brazil. (author). 20 refs., 39 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Alfven wave experiments on the TORTUS tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballico, M.J.; Bowden, M.; Brand, G.F.; Brennan, M.H.; Cross, R.C.; Fekete, P.; James, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on the first observations of the Discrete Alfven Wave (DAW) and the first measurements of laser scattering off the kinetic Alfven wave in the TORTUS tokamak. TORTUS is a relatively small device, with major radius R=0.44m, minor radius 0.1m and has previously been operated routinely with B Φ =0.7T, I p =20 kA and n e ∼ 1x10 19 m -3 . Under these conditions, and over a wide frequency range (1-14 MHz), there has been no evidence of the DAW modes observed on TCA. Recently, a minor upgrade of TORTUS has permitted routine operation at B Φ =1.0 T, I p =39 kA, q(a)∼5 and n e ∼1-4 x 10 19 m -3 . At the operating frequency, 3.2 MHz, chosen for this study, DAW modes are observed clearly at both low and high densities. The appearance of DAW modes appears to be due to a steeper current profile at the higher plasma currents now generated in TORTUS. The general behaviour of DAW modes is in fact quite sensitive to the density and current profiles, indicating that DAW modes should provide a useful current profile diagnostic. (author) 6 refs., 2 figs

  18. Aluminum limiter experiment in ST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meservey, E.B.; Bretz, N.; Dimock, D.L.; Hinnov, E.

    1976-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of a light-element limiter on plasma parameters, aluminum rail limiters interchangeable with Mo rails were installed top, bottom, and outside directions in the ST tokamak. The inside limiter remained a fixed Mo rail. Compared with discharges produced immediately before and after with the usual Mo limiters, the ''aluminum'' discharges showed an increase of T/sub e/ (by factors of 1.4-2 near the center) and of energy confinement (by factors of 2 to 3 in el. energy/power input, depending on time of observation). H 2 and He discharges showed practically identical effects. In plasma composition, the Mo concentration dropped significantly, but Fe only slightly if at all; the Al concentration was about 3-5 percent (i.e., large compared to the heavier metals), whereas oxygen, about 4 to 8 percent to start with, dropped to insignificance, probably as a result of Al evaporation. The z/sub eff/ from resistivity increased 20-30 percent although the resistance dropped because of the higher T/sub e/. The improved T/sub e/ and energy confinement are thought to be the result of cumulative effects of more favorable radial current and power input distributions rather than direct energy losses by radiation

  19. Edge localized mode physics and operational aspects in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, M; Huysmans, G; Sarazin, Y; Garbet, X; Ghendrih, Ph; Rimini, F; Joffrin, E; Litaudon, X; Monier-Garbet, P; Ane, J-M; Thomas, P; Grosman, A; Parail, V; Wilson, H; Lomas, P; Vries, P de; Zastrow, K-D; Matthews, G F; Lonnroth, J; Gerasimov, S; Sharapov, S; Gryaznevich, M; Counsell, G; Kirk, A; Valovic, M; Buttery, R; Loarte, A; Saibene, G; Sartori, R; Leonard, A; Snyder, P; Lao, L L; Gohil, P; Evans, T E; Moyer, R A; Kamada, Y; Chankin, A; Oyama, N; Hatae, T; Asakura, N; Tudisco, O; Giovannozzi, E; Crisanti, F; Perez, C P; Koslowski, H R; Eich, T; Sips, A; Horton, L; Hermann, A; Lang, P; Stober, J; Suttrop, W; Beyer, P; Saarelma, S

    2003-01-01

    Recent progress in experimental and theoretical studies of edge localized mode (ELM) physics is reviewed for the reactor relevant plasma regimes, namely the high confinement regimes, that is, H-modes and advanced scenarios. Theoretical approaches to ELM physics, from a linear ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability analysis to non-linear transport models with ELMs are discussed with respect to experimental observations, in particular the fast collapse of pedestal pressure profiles, magnetic measurements and scrape-off layer transport during ELMs. High confinement regimes with different types of ELMs are addressed in this paper in the context of development of operational scenarios for ITER. The key parameters that have been identified at present to reduce the energy losses in Type I ELMs are operation at high density, high edge magnetic shear and high triangularity. However, according to the present experimental scaling for the energy losses in Type I ELMs, the extrapolation of such regimes for ITER leads to unacceptably large heat loads on the divertor target plates exceeding the material limits. High confinement H-mode scenarios at high triangularity and high density with small ELMs (Type II), mixed regimes (Type II and Type I) and combined advanced regimes at high beta p are discussed for present-day tokamaks. The optimum combination of high confinement and small MHD activity at the edge in Type II ELM scenarios is of interest to ITER. However, to date, these regimes have been achieved in a rather narrow operational window and far from ITER parameters in terms of collisionality, edge safety factor and beta p . The compatibility of the alternative internal transport barrier (ITB) scenario with edge pedestal formation and ELMs is also addressed. Edge physics issues related to the possible combination of small benign ELMs (Type III, Type II ELMs, quiescent double barrier) and high performance ITBs are discussed for present-day experiments (JET, JT-60U, DIII-D) in

  20. Edge localized mode physics and operational aspects in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becoulet, M [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Huysmans, G [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sarazin, Y [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Garbet, X [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ghendrih, Ph [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Rimini, F [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Joffrin, E [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Litaudon, X [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Monier-Garbet, P [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ane, J-M [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Thomas, P [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Grosman, A [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Parail, V [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Wilson, H [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Lomas, P [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Vries, P de[Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Zastrow, K-D [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Matthews, G F [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Lonnroth, J [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Gerasimov, S [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2003-12-01

    Recent progress in experimental and theoretical studies of edge localized mode (ELM) physics is reviewed for the reactor relevant plasma regimes, namely the high confinement regimes, that is, H-modes and advanced scenarios. Theoretical approaches to ELM physics, from a linear ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability analysis to non-linear transport models with ELMs are discussed with respect to experimental observations, in particular the fast collapse of pedestal pressure profiles, magnetic measurements and scrape-off layer transport during ELMs. High confinement regimes with different types of ELMs are addressed in this paper in the context of development of operational scenarios for ITER. The key parameters that have been identified at present to reduce the energy losses in Type I ELMs are operation at high density, high edge magnetic shear and high triangularity. However, according to the present experimental scaling for the energy losses in Type I ELMs, the extrapolation of such regimes for ITER leads to unacceptably large heat loads on the divertor target plates exceeding the material limits. High confinement H-mode scenarios at high triangularity and high density with small ELMs (Type II), mixed regimes (Type II and Type I) and combined advanced regimes at high beta{sub p} are discussed for present-day tokamaks. The optimum combination of high confinement and small MHD activity at the edge in Type II ELM scenarios is of interest to ITER. However, to date, these regimes have been achieved in a rather narrow operational window and far from ITER parameters in terms of collisionality, edge safety factor and beta{sub p}. The compatibility of the alternative internal transport barrier (ITB) scenario with edge pedestal formation and ELMs is also addressed. Edge physics issues related to the possible combination of small benign ELMs (Type III, Type II ELMs, quiescent double barrier) and high performance ITBs are discussed for present-day experiments (JET, JT-60U

  1. Pellet injection experiments on the TFR Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    Single pellet injection experiments have been carried out on TFR with the aim to improve the experimental knowledge of ablation physical processes and also to get a better description of the heat and matter transport during and after pellet evaporation. Ablation clouds have been photographed, providing experimental penetration depths in rough agreement with the neutral shielding model. Observation of striations in the cloud has led to an experimental determination of the safety factor profile. Parameters of the plasma in the ablation cloud have been spectroscopically determined. Fast heat transport has been evidenced during pellet evaporation (∼ 100 μs) which exhibits some features of minor or major disruptions (appearance of a m = 1, n = 1 island on the q = 1 surface, bursts of density fluctuations, comparable heat diffusivity, ...). Matter transport takes place on a larger time scale (∼ 10 ms). This long temporal relaxation is well accounted for by the 1D-MAKOKOT computer code without changing the transport coefficients after pellet injection. Heat and matter transport are affected by the presence of the m = 1, n = 1 island on the q = 1 surface

  2. The physics of an ignited tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyon, F.

    1991-01-01

    A next step device which can demonstrate long burn with a high probability of success is possible, without speculating on the accumulation of favorable effects and ignoring the other ones. From the data base available today this appears possible only with large devices such ans NET, ITER or JIT. If such a device is to provide the needed database to go to DEMO it must be able to explore a sufficiently wide range of parameter. From our present knowledge this can be obtained by choosing a conservative value of the reference magnetic field away from technological limits and compensate with a larger size. There remains for all devices very serious physics problems to solve, the most acute being the exhaust which must be compatible with a good qualtity enhanced confinement regime and a sufficiently high wall load to make a reactor. (orig.)

  3. Sustained spheromak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Bulmer, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.

    2001-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX, will study spheromak physics with particular attention to energy confinement and magnetic fluctuations in a spheromak sustained by electrostatic helicity injection. In order to operate in a low collisionality mode, requiring T e >100 eV, vacuum techniques developed for tokamaks will be applied, and a divertor will be used for the first time in a spheromak. The discharge will operate for pulse lengths of several milliseconds, long compared to the time to establish a steady-state equilibrium but short compared to the L/R time of the flux conserver. The spheromak and helicity injector ('gun') are closely coupled, as shown by an ideal MHD model with force-free injector and edge plasmas. The current from the gun passes along the symmetry axis of the spheromak, and the resulting toroidal magnetic field causes the safety factor, q, to diverge on the separatrix. The q-profile depends on the ratio of the injector current to spheromak current and on the magnetic flux coupling the injector to the spheromak. New diagnostics include magnetic field measurements by a reflectometer operating in combined O- and X-modes and by a transient internal probe (TIP). (author)

  4. Sustained spheromak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Bulmer, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.

    1999-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX, will study spheromak physics with particular attention to energy confinement and magnetic fluctuations in a spheromak sustained by electrostatic helicity injection. In order to operate in a low collisionality mode, requiring T e > 100 eV, vacuum techniques developed for tokamaks will be applied, and a divertor will be used for the first time in a spheromak. The discharge will operate for pulse lengths of several milliseconds, long compared to the time to establish a steady-state equilibrium but short compared to the L/R time of the flux conserver. The spheromak and helicity injector ('gun') are closely coupled, as shown by an ideal MHD model with force-free injector and edge plasmas. The current from the gun passes along the symmetry axis of the spheromak, and the resulting toroidal magnetic field causes the safety factor, q, to diverge on the separatrix. The q-profile depends on the ratio of the injector current to spheromak current and on the magnetic flux coupling the injector to the spheromak. New diagnostics include magnetic field measurements by a reflectometer operating in combined O- and X-modes and by a transient internal probe (TIP). (author)

  5. Experiments with liquid metal walls: Status of the lithium tokamak experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, Robert, E-mail: kaita@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Berzak, Laura; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M.; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor; Timberlake, John [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Abstarct: Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the current drive experiment-upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in ohmically heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS). Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions.

  6. Experiments with Liquid Metal Walls: Status of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, Robert; Berzak, Laura; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M.; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor; Timberlak, John

    2010-01-01

    Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in Ohmically-heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions.

  7. Neoclassical Physics for Current Drive in Tokamak Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duthoit, F.X.

    2012-03-01

    The Lie transform formalism is applied to charged particle dynamics in tokamak magnetic topologies, in order to build a Fokker-Planck type operator for Coulomb collisions usable for current drive. This approach makes it possible to reduce the problem to three dimensions (two in velocity space, one in real space) while keeping the wealth of phase-space cross-term coupling effects resulting from conservation of the toroidal canonical momentum (axisymmetry). This kinetic approach makes it possible to describe physical phenomena related to the presence of strong pressure gradients in plasmas of an unspecified form, like the bootstrap current which role will be paramount for the future ITER machine. The choice of coordinates and the method used are particularly adapted to the numerical resolution of the drift kinetic equation making it possible to calculate the particle distributions, which may present a strong variation with respect to the Maxwellian under the effect of an electric field (static or produced by a radio-frequency wave). This work, mainly dedicated to plasma physics of tokamaks, was extended to those of space plasmas with a magnetic dipole configuration. (author)

  8. On the physics of the pressure and temperature gradients in the edge of tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2018-04-01

    An extended plasma fluid theory including atomic physics, radiation, electromagnetic and themodynamic forces, external sources of particles, momentum and energy, and kinetic ion orbit loss is employed to derive theoretical expressions that display the role of the various factors involved in the determination of the pressure and temperature gradients in the edge of tokamak plasmas. Calculations for current experiments are presented to illustrate the magnitudes of various effects including strong radiative and atomic physics edge cooling effects and strong reduction in ion particle and energy fluxes due to ion orbit loss in the plasma edge. An important new insight is the strong relation between rotation and the edge pressure gradient.

  9. Recent advances in the HL-2A tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Ding, X.T.; Yang, Q.W.; Yan, L.W.; Liu, D.Q.; Xuan, W.M.; Chen, L.Y.; Song, X.M.; Cao, Z.; Zhang, J.H.; Mao, W.C.; Zhou, C.P.; Li, X.D.; Wang, S.J.; Yan, J.C.; Bu, M.N.; Chen, Y.H.; Cui, C.H.; Cui, Z.Y.; Deng, Z.C.; Hong, W.Y.; Hu, H.T.; Huang, Y.; Kang, Z.H.; Li, B.; Li, W.; Li, F.Z.; Li, G.S.; Li, H.J.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.G.; Li, Z.J.; Liu, Yi; Liu, Z.T.; Luo, C.W.; Mao, X.H.; Pan, Y.D.; Rao, J.; Shao, K.; Song, X.Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.X.; Wang, Q.M.; Xiao, Z.G.; Xie, Y.F.; Yao, L.H.; Yao, L.Y.; Zheng, Y.J.; Zhong, G.W.; Zhou, Y.; Pan, C.H.

    2005-01-01

    Two experiment campaigns were conducted on the HL-2A tokamak in 2003 and 2004 after the first plasma was obtained at the end of 2002. Progresses in many aspects have been made, especially in the divertor discharge and feedback control of plasma configuration. Up to now, the following operation parameters have been achieved: I p = 320 kA, B t = 2.2 T and discharge duration T d = 1580 ms. With the feedback control of plasma current and horizontal position, an excellent repeatability of the discharge has been achieved. The tokamak has been operated at both limiter configuration and single null (SN) divertor configuration. The HL-2A SN divertor configuration is simulated with the MHD equilibrium code SWEQU. When the divertor configuration is formed, the impurity radiation in the main plasma decreases remarkably

  10. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Global Turbulent Transport Properties in Tokamak Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.X.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.; Ethier, S.; Lewandowski, J.L.V.; Rewoldt, G.; Hahm, T.S.; Manickam, J.

    2006-01-01

    A general geometry gyro-kinetic model for particle simulation of plasma turbulence in tokamak experiments is described. It incorporates the comprehensive influence of noncircular cross section, realistic plasma profiles, plasma rotation, neoclassical (equilibrium) electric fields, and Coulomb collisions. An interesting result of global turbulence development in a shaped tokamak plasma is presented with regard to nonlinear turbulence spreading into the linearly stable region. The mutual interaction between turbulence and zonal flows in collisionless plasmas is studied with a focus on identifying possible nonlinear saturation mechanisms for zonal flows. A bursting temporal behavior with a period longer than the geodesic acoustic oscillation period is observed even in a collisionless system. Our simulation results suggest that the zonal flows can drive turbulence. However, this process is too weak to be an effective zonal flow saturation mechanism.

  11. Limiter biasing experiments on the tokamak ISTTOK

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Silva, C.; Nedzelskiy, I.; Figueiredo, H.; Cabral, J. A. C.; Varandas, C. A. F.; Stöckel, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 10 (2003), s. 937-944 ISSN 0011-4626. [Workshop "Electric Fields Structures and Relaxation in Edge Plasmas"/6th./. St. Petersburg, 13.06.2003-14.06.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : biasing, edge plasma, particle confinement Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.263, year: 2003

  12. Plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report contains the papers delivered at the AEB - Natal University summer school on plasma physics held in Durban during January 1979. The following topics were discussed: Tokamak devices; MHD stability; trapped particles in tori; Tokamak results and experiments; operating regime of the AEB Tokamak; Tokamak equilibrium; high beta Tokamak equilibria; ideal Tokamak stability; resistive MHD instabilities; Tokamak diagnostics; Tokamak control and data acquisition; feedback control of Tokamaks; heating and refuelling; neutral beam injection; radio frequency heating; nonlinear drift wave induced plasma transport; toroidal plasma boundary layers; microinstabilities and injected beams and quasilinear theory of the ion acoustic instability

  13. Performance Projections For The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.L.; Berzak, T.; Gray, R.; Kaita, T.; Kozub, F.; Levinton, D.P.; Lundberg, J.; Manickam, G.V.; Pereverzev, K.; Snieckus, V.; Soukhanovskii, J.; Spaleta, D.; Stotler, T.; Strickler, J.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Zakharov, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium limiter in the CDX-U tokamak produced the largest relative increase (an enhancement factor of 5-10) in Ohmic tokamak confinement ever observed. The confinement results from CDX-U do not agree with existing scaling laws, and cannot easily be projected to the new lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). Numerical simulations of CDX-U low recycling discharges have now been performed with the ASTRA-ESC code with a special reference transport model suitable for a diffusion-based confinement regime, incorporating boundary conditions for nonrecycling walls, with fueling via edge gas puffing. This model has been successful at reproducing the experimental values of the energy confinement (4-6 ms), loop voltage (<0.5 V), and density for a typical CDX-U lithium discharge. The same transport model has also been used to project the performance of the LTX, in Ohmic operation, or with modest neutral beam injection (NBI). NBI in LTX, with a low recycling wall of liquid lithium, is predicted to result in core electron and ion temperatures of 1-2 keV, and energy confinement times in excess of 50 ms. Finally, the unique design features of LTX are summarized

  14. Tritium Experience in Large Tokamaks: Application to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Gentile, C.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D; Gentile, C.; Federici, G.; Haanges, R.

    1998-05-01

    Recent experience with the use of tritium fuel in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, together with progress in developing the technical design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor has expanded the technical knowledge base for tritium issues in fusion. This paper reports on an IEA workshop that brought together scientists and engineers to share experience and expertise on all fusion-related tritium issues. Extensive discussion periods were devoted to exploring outstanding issues and identifying potential R ampersand D avenues to address them. This paper summarizes the presentations, discussions, and recommendations

  15. Simulation experiment on magnetic field reconnection processes in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiwamoto, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Two experimental studies on magnetic field line reconnection processes relevant to tokamak physics are going on in Japan. In Yokohama National University, reconnection of poloidal magnetic field lines is studied by the author when reversing the toroidal current of a small toroidal plasma in a short period (typically less than 4 μsec). Interaction of two current carrying plasma (linear) columns is being studied by Kawashima and his coleagues in Institute of Space and Aeronautical Sciences. Mutual attraction and merging of the plasma columns and resulting plasma heating are reported. (author)

  16. Exhaust, ELM and Halo physics using the MAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counsell, G.F.; Ahn, J-W.; Kirk, A.; Helander, P.; Martin, R.; Tabasso, A.; Wilson, H.R.; Cohen, R.H.; Ryutov, D.D.; Yang, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The scrape-off layer (Sol) and divertor target plasma of a large spherical tokamak (ST) is characterised in detail for the first time. Scalings for the SOL heat flux width in MAST are developed and compared to conventional tokamaks. Modelling reveals the significance of the mirror force to the ST SOL. Core energy losses, including during ELMs, in MAST arrive predominantly (>80%) to the outboard targets in all geometries. Convective transport dominates energy losses during ELMs and MHD analysis suggests ELMs in MAST are Type III even at auxiliary heating powers well above the L-H threshold. ELMs are associated with a poloidally and/or toroidally localised radial efflux at ∼1 km/s well into the far SOL but not with any broadening of the target heat flux width. Toroidally asymmetric divertor biasing experiments have been conducted in an attempt to broaden the target heat flux width, with promising results. During vertical displacement events, the maximum product of the toroidal peaking factor and halo current fraction remains below 0.3, around half the ITER design limit. Evidence is presented that the resistance of the halo current path may have an impact on the distribution of halo current. (author)

  17. Plasma shape experiments for an optimized tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyatt, A.W.; Osborne, T.H.; Lazarus, E.A.

    1994-07-01

    In this paper we present results from recent experiments at DIII-D which measured the plasma stability and confinement performance product, βτ E , in one previously studied and three new plasma shapes. One important goal of these experiments was to identify performance vs shape trends which would identify a shape compatible with both high performance and the planned effort to decrease the power flux to the divertor floor using a closed ''slot'' divertor geometry. power flux to the divertor floor using a closed ''slot'' divertor geometry. The closed divertor hardware must be designed for a reduced set of plasma shapes, so care must be taken to choose the shape that optimizes βτ E and divertor performance. The four shapes studied form a matrix of moderate and high elongations (κ congruent 1.8 and 2.1) and low and high triangularities (δ congruent 0.3 and 0.9). All configurations were double-null diverted (DND), held fixed during a shot, with neutral beam heating. The shapes span a range of X-point locations compatible with the envisioned closed divertor. We find that from shape to shape, a shot's transient normalized performance, β N H, where β N ≡ β/(I p )/aB T and H ≡ τ E /τ E ITER-89P , increases strongly with triangularity, but depends only weakly on elongation. However, the normalized performance during quasi stationary ELMing H-mode, to which these discharges eventually relax, is insensitive to both triangularity and elongation. The moderate elongation, high triangularity DND shape is shown to be near optimum for future studies on DIII-D

  18. Plasma shape experiments for an optimized tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyatt, A.W.; Osborne, T.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazarus, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In this paper we present results from recent experiments at DIII-D which measured the plasma stability and confinement performance product, {beta}{sub {tau}E}, in one previously studied and three new plasma shapes. One important goal of these experiments was to identify performance vs shape trends which would identify a shape compatible with both high performance and the planned effort to decrease the power flux to the divertor floor using a closed `slot` divertor geometry. The closed divertor hardware must be designed for a reduced set of plasma shapes, so care must be taken to choose the shape that optimizes {beta}{sub {tau}E} and divertor performance. The four shapes studied form a matrix of moderate and high elongations ({kappa} {approx_equal} 1.8 and 2.1) and low and high triangularities ({delta} {approx_equal} 0.3 and 0.9). All configurations were double-null diverted (DND), held fixed during a shot, with neutral beam heating. The shapes span a range of X-point locations compatible with the envisioned closed divertor. We find that from shape to shape, a shot`s transient normalized performance, {beta}{sub N}H, where {beta}{sub N} = {beta}/(I{sub p}/aB{sub T}) and H = {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E}{sup ITER-89P}, increases strongly with triangularity, but depends only weakly on elongation. However, the normalized performance during quasi stationary ELMing H-mode, to which these discharges eventually relax, is insensitive to both triangularity and elongation. The moderate elongation, high triangularity DND shape is shown to be near optimum for future studies on DIII-D. (author) 7 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Economic trends of tokamak power plants independent of physics scaling models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Steiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    This study examines the effects of plasma radius, field on axis, plasma impurity level, and aspect ratio on power level and unit capital cost, $/kW/sub e/, of tokamak power plants sized independent of plasma physics scaling models. It is noted that tokamaks sized in this manner are thermally unstable based on trapped particle scaling relationships. It is observed that there is an economic advantage for larger power level tokamaks achieved by physics independent sizing; however, the incentive for increased power levels is less than that for fission reactors. It is further observed that the economic advantage of these larger power level tokamaks is decreased when plasma thermal stability measures are incorporated, such as by increasing the plasma impurity concentration. This trend of economy with size obtained by physics independent sizing is opposite to that observed when the tokamak designs are constrained to obey the trapped particle and empirical scaling relationships

  20. Physics design of the HL-2A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Qingdi; Li Fangzhu; Zhang Jinhua; Pan Yudong; Jiao Yiming

    2005-10-01

    An overview report for the physics design of the HL-2A tokamak is presented. By numerically analyzing the plasma shaping and the vertical instability due to plasma elongation, the requirements for the currents of poloidal magnetic field coils and the control system are put forward. Controlling the plasma profile by using NBI (neutral beam injection) and LHCD (lower hybrid current drive) is investigated, and the high performance modes of operation in HL-2A and modeled and designed. The magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in improved confinement configuration (RS configuration) are studied so as to point out the way of plasma control to perform stationary high performance discharges in HL-2A. In order to offer data for updating the HL-2A divertor, performances of the divertor plasma are simulated. (authors)

  1. Physics analysis database for the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.; Bramson, G.; DeBoo, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report on a centralized database for handling reduced data for physics analysis implemented for the DIII-D tokamak. Each database record corresponds to a specific snapshot in time for a selected discharge. Features of the database environment include automatic updating, data integrity checks, and data traceability. Reduced data from each diagnostic comprises a dedicated data bank (a subset of the database) with quality assurance provided by a physicist. These data banks will be used to create profile banks which will be input to a transport code to create a transport bank. Access to the database is initially through FORTRAN programs. One user interface, PLOTN, is a command driven program to select and display data subsets. Another user interface, PROF, compares and displays profiles. The database is implemented on a Digital Equipment Corporation VAX 8600 running VMS

  2. Physics objectives of PI3 spherical tokamak program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen; Laberge, Michel; Reynolds, Meritt; O'Shea, Peter; Ivanov, Russ; Young, William; Carle, Patrick; Froese, Aaron; Epp, Kelly

    2017-10-01

    Achieving net energy gain with a Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) system requires the initial plasma state to satisfy a set of performance goals, such as particle inventory (1021 ions), sufficient magnetic flux (0.3 Wb) to confine the plasma without MHD instability, and initial energy confinement time several times longer than the compression time. General Fusion (GF) is now constructing Plasma Injector 3 (PI3) to explore the physics of reactor-scale plasmas. Energy considerations lead us to design around an initial state of Rvessel = 1 m. PI3 will use fast coaxial helicity injection via a Marshall gun to create a spherical tokamak plasma, with no additional heating. MTF requires solenoid-free startup with no vertical field coils, and will rely on flux conservation by a metal wall. PI3 is 5x larger than SPECTOR so is expected to yield magnetic lifetime increase of 25x, while peak temperature of PI3 is expected to be similar (400-500 eV) Physics investigations will study MHD activity and the resistive and convective evolution of current, temperature and density profiles. We seek to understand the confinement physics, radiative loss, thermal and particle transport, recycling and edge physics of PI3.

  3. Pioneering superconducting magnets in large tokamaks: evaluation after 16 years of operating experience in tore supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Gravil, B.; Tena, E.; Henry, D.; Journeaux, J.Y.; Libeyre, P.

    2004-01-01

    The toroidal field (TF) system of Tore Supra (TS) is superconducting. After 16 years of operation it is possible to give an overview of the experience gained on a large superconducting system integrated in a large Tokamak. Quantitative data will be given, about the TF system for the cryogenic system and for the magnet system as well, concerning the number of plasmas shots and the availability of the machine. The origin and the number of breakdowns or incidents will be described, with emphasis on cryogenics, to document repairs and changes on the system components. Concerning the behaviour during operation, the Fast Safety Discharges (FSD) in operation are of particular interest for the Tokamak operation, as they interrupt it on a significant time of the order of one hour. This aspect is particularly documented. The approach followed to decrease the number of these FSD will be reported and explained. The Tore Supra Tokamak was the first important meeting between Superconductivity and Plasma Physics on a large scale. Overall, despite the differences in design and size, the accumulated experience over 16 years of operation is a useful tool to prepare the manufacturing and the operation of the ITER magnets. (authors)

  4. Pioneering superconducting magnets in large tokamaks: Evaluation after 16 years of operating experience in tore supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libeyre, P.; Duchateau, J.L.; Gravil, B.; Tena, E.; Henry, D.; Journeaux, J.Y.

    2005-01-01

    The toroidal field (TF) system of TORE SUPRA (TS) is superconducting. After 16 years of operation it is possible to give an overview of the experience gained on a large superconducting system integrated in a large Tokamak. Quantitative data will be given, about the TF system for the cryogenic system and for the magnet system as well, concerning the number of plasmas shots and the availability of the machine. The origin and the number of breakdowns or incidents will be described, with emphasis on cryogenics and associated repairs and changes on the system components along the time. As concerns the behaviour during operation, the fast safety discharges (FSD) in operation are of particular interest for the Tokamak operation, as they interrupt it for a significant time of the order of 1 h. This aspect is particularly documented. The approach followed to decrease the number of these FSD will be reported and explained. The TORE SUPRA Tokamak was the first important application of superconductivity in plasma physics on a large scale. Overall, despite the differences in design and size, the accumulated experience over 16 years of operation is a useful tool to prepare the manufacture and the operation of the ITER magnets

  5. Progress of the ECH·ECCD experiments. Research progress of the ECH·ECCD experiments in tokamaks and spherical tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isayama, Akihiko; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in the ECH·ECCD study in tokamak and spherical tokamak devices is described. As for the tokamak study, results on the control of neoclassical tearing modes and sawtooth oscillations, the current profile, the internal transport barrier, the plasma start-up and the discharge cleaning are given. As for the spherical tokamak study, the plasma start-up by ECH·ECCD and the electron-Bernstein-wave heating and the current drive are described. (T.I.)

  6. Particle physics experiments 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    The report describes work carried out in 1983 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  7. Physics of the Tokamak Pedestal, and Implications for Magnetic Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Philip

    2017-10-01

    High performance in tokamaks is achieved via the spontaneous formation of a transport barrier in the outer few percent of the confined plasma. This narrow insulating layer, referred to as a ``pedestal,'' typically results in a >30x increase in pressure across a 0.4-5cm layer. Predicted fusion power scales with the square of the pedestal top pressure (or ``pedestal height''), hence a fusion reactor strongly benefits from a high pedestal, provided this can be attained without large Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), which may erode plasma facing materials. The overlap of drift orbit, turbulence, and equilibrium scales across this narrow layer leads to rich and complex physics, and challenges traditional analytic and computational approaches. We review studies employing gyrokinetic, neoclassical, MHD, and other methods, which have explored how a range of instabilities, influenced by complex geometry, and strong ExB flows and bootstrap current, drive transport across the pedestal and guide its structure and dynamics. Development of high resolution diagnostics, and coordinated experiments on several tokamaks, have validated understanding of important aspects of the physics, while highlighting open issues. A predictive model (EPED) has proven capable of predicting the pedestal height and width to 20-25% accuracy in large statistical studies. This model was used to predict a new, high pedestal ``Super H-Mode'' regime, which was subsequently discovered on DIII-D, and motivated experiments on Alcator C-Mod which achieved world record, reactor relevant pedestal pressure. We review open issues including improved formalism, particle and momentum transport, the role of neutrals and impurities, ELM control, and pedestal formation. Finally we discuss coupling pedestal and core predictive models to enable more comprehensive optimization of the tokamak fusion concept. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-95ER54309, FC02-06ER54873, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  8. Ion Bernstein wave heating experiments in HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yanping

    2005-01-01

    Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) experiments have been carried out in recent years in the HT-7 superconducting Tokamak. The electron heating experiment has been concentrated on deuterium plasma with an injecting RF power up to 350 kw. The globe heating and localized heating can be seen clearly by controlling the ICRF resonance layer's position. On-axis and off-axis electron heating have been realized by properly setting the target plasma parameters. Experimental results show that the maximum increment in electron temperature has been more than 1 keV, the electron temperature profile has been modified by IBW under different plasma conditions, and both energy and particle confinement improvements have been obtained. (author)

  9. Lower hybrid heating experiment in JFT-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchara, K.; Nagashima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Lower hybrid heating experiments in JFT-2 are reviewed. Good maintenance and controlling of the coupling structure are very important in the injection of RF power before heating experiments. Accessibility of waves and the existence of the mode conversion region are necessary for ion heating in the main plasma. Parametric instabilities which may bring undesirable power deposition are suppressed by enough electron heating in the boundary region. Optimizing the Nsub(z) spectrum and the improvement of the plasma confinement may lead the electron heating in the high density region. Current generation by use of quasi-linear Landau damping is confirmed and is suggested to bring the improvement of plasma confinement. High power and long pulse klystrons may be expected to open a frontier toward a stational reactor plasma in tokamaks. (author)

  10. Experience with high heat flux components in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappuis, P.; Dietz, K.J.; Ulrickson, M.

    1991-01-01

    The large present day tokamaks. i.e.JET, TFTR, JT-60, DIII-D and Tore Supra are machines capable of sustaining plasma currents of several million amperes. Pulse durations range from a few seconds up to a minute. These large machines have been in operation for several years and there exists wide experience with materials for plasma facing components. Bare and coated metals, bare and coated graphites and beryllium were used for walls, limiters and divertors. High heat flux components are mainly radiation cooled, but stationary cooling for long pulse duration is also employed. This paper summarizes the experience gained in the large machines with respect to material selection, component design, problem areas, and plasma performance. 2 tabs., 26 figs., 50 refs

  11. The Thomson Scattering System on the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, T.; Majeski, R.; Kaita, R.; LeBlanc, B.

    2008-01-01

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R0 = 0.4m, a = 0.26m, BTF ∼ 3.4kG, IP ∼ 400kA, and pulse length ∼ 0.25s. The goal of LTX is to investigate tokamak plasmas that are almost entirely surrounded by a lithium-coated plasma-facing shell conformal to the last closed magnetic flux surface. Based on previous experimental results and simulation, it is expected that the low-recycling liquid lithium surfaces will result in higher temperatures at the plasma edge, flatter overall temperature profiles, centrally-peaked density profiles, and an increased confinement time. To test these predictions, the electron temperature and density profiles in LTX will be measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering system (TVTS). Initially, TS measurements will be made at up to 12 simultaneous points between the plasma center and plasma edge. Later, high resolution edge measurements will be deployed to study the lithium edge physics in greater detail. Technical challenges to implementing the TS system included limited 'line of sight' access to the plasma due to the plasma-facing shell and problems associated with the presence of liquid lithium.

  12. Development of Tokamak experiment technology - Study of ICRF coupling in the KAIST tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Duk In; Chang, Hang Young; Lee, Soon Chil; Kwon, Gi Chung; Seo, Sung Hun; Jeon, Sang Jin; Heo, Sung Hee; Heo, Eun Gi; Lee, Dae Hang; Lee, Chan Hee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-01

    Research objectives are to design and fabricate antenna, measure the property of absorption transmitted to the plasma, and research the physical phenomena about the ICRF coupling. Main heating method is ohmic heating at the KAIST tokamak. So, the plasma current produced is more than 30 kA and, the loop voltage of the plasma is 2 {approx} 3V. The power of the plasma by ohmic heating is about 100 kW. Because the toroidal field is 5 {approx} 8 kG, it is needed RF system with more than 100 kW in 7 {approx} 15 MHz. In the first year a RF amplifier with 1 kW in 300 khz {approx} 35 MHz was bought. The manufacture of ICRF system will start from next years. In the research on antenna, we study the method how to measure electric field emitted from antenna using piezo elements. Experimentally, we obtain the results that the signal of piezo element is proportional to the square of electric field. In the next year, we will research the type of antenna subsequently. 28 refs., 3 tabs., 18 figs. (author)

  13. Characterization of disruptions in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment, MTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Makowski, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) has a substantial number of fast diagnostics, especially for electrons, as part of its mission for pulsed, high-power electron cyclotron heating. As part of its contribution to ITER R ampersand D, these diagnostics are being used to characterize disruptions in MTX. This report is the first of two, with the second planned for submittal in September 1990, at the end of the ITER conceptual design activity. Here, we analyze the characteristics of disruptions during normal operation of MTX, discuss some new data pertaining to the ''Granetz limit,'' and describe preliminary data on ramped density shorts which will be used for fast measurements on density limit disruptions. The final report will discuss measurements using the fast diagnostics to characterize the disruption

  14. First neutral beam injection experiments on KSTAR tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S H; Chang, D H; Kim, T S; In, S R; Lee, K W; Jin, J T; Chang, D S; Oh, B H; Bae, Y S; Kim, J S; Park, H T; Watanabe, K; Inoue, T; Kashiwagi, M; Dairaku, M; Tobari, H; Hanada, M

    2012-02-01

    The first neutral beam (NB) injection system of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak was partially completed in 2010 with only 1∕3 of its full design capability, and NB heating experiments were carried out during the 2010 KSTAR operation campaign. The ion source is composed of a JAEA bucket plasma generator and a KAERI large multi-aperture accelerator assembly, which is designed to deliver a 1.5 MW, NB power of deuterium at 95 keV. Before the beam injection experiments, discharge, and beam extraction characteristics of the ion source were investigated. The ion source has good beam optics in a broad range of beam perveance. The optimum perveance is 1.1-1.3 μP, and the minimum beam divergence angle measured by the Doppler shift spectroscopy is 0.8°. The ion species ratio is D(+):D(2)(+):D(3)(+) = 75:20:5 at beam current density of 85 mA/cm(2). The arc efficiency is more than 1.0 A∕kW. In the 2010 KSTAR campaign, a deuterium NB power of 0.7-1.5 MW was successfully injected into the KSTAR plasma with a beam energy of 70-90 keV. L-H transitions were observed within a wide range of beam powers relative to a threshold value. The edge pedestal formation in the T(i) and T(e) profiles was verified through CES and electron cyclotron emission diagnostics. In every deuterium NB injection, a burst of D-D neutrons was recorded, and increases in the ion temperature and plasma stored energy were found.

  15. Experiences on vacuum conditioning in the cryostat of KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Pyo, E-mail: kpkim@nfri.er.ke [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Woo, I.S.; Chang, Y.B.; Kwag, S.W.; Song, N.H.; Bang, E.N.; Hong, J.S.; Chu, Y.; Park, K.R. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The vacuum of the cryostat has been stably maintained during the KSTAR operation. ► The detected cold leak at the PF/CS coils and CS structure. ► The present helium leak makes no issue for the cryostat operation. -- Abstract: Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device has been successfully operated for the plasma experiment from KSTAR 1st campaign to 4th campaign. The main pumping system for the cryostat has to maintain the target pressure below 1.0 × 10{sup −4} mbar at room temperature and 1.0 × 10{sup −5} mbar at extremely low temperature for the plasma experiment against the air leak coming from ports of vessel and/or the helium leak from cooling loops in the cryostat. No leak has been detected at room temperature. Unexpectedly, the cold-leak appeared in the cryostat at temperature around 50 K during the cool-down in the KSTAR 2nd campaign. We carefully analyzed the characteristics of detected cold leak because it can cause the increase of the base pressure in the cryostat. After the cool-down, the leak detection was performed to locate the position and size of the leak by the pressurizing the loops. As a result, it is found that the cold leak was located at cooling loops for PF/CS coils and CS structure. Nevertheless, the vacuum inside the cryostat was well maintained below 6.0 × 10{sup −8} mbar during the entire operation period. The impact of the He-leak in present status on the plasma operation is negligible. However, we have found that the leak rate increases as a function of time. Therefore careful monitoring on cold-leak is an important technical issue for the operation of superconducting tokamak.

  16. HT-7U superconducting tokamak: Physics design, engineering progress and schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Yuanxi

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting tokamak research program begun in China in ASIPP since 1994. The program is included in existent superconducting tokamak HT-7 and the next new superconducting tokamak HT-7U which is one of national key research projects in China. With the elongation cross-section, divertor and higher plasma parameter the main objectives of HT-7U are widely investigation both of the physics and technology for steady state advanced tokamak as well as the investigation of power and particle handle under steady-state operation condition. The physics and engineering design have been completed and significant progresses on R and D and fabrication have been achieved. HT-7U will begin assembly at 2003 and possible to get first plasma around 2004. (author)

  17. Emissive limiter bias experiment for improved confinement of tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Pribyl, P.A.; Liberati, J.R.; Taylor, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed in Ohmic discharges of the UCLA CCT tokamak with a LaB 6 biased limiter, capable of emitting energetic electrons as a technique to improve confinement in tokamaks. To study the effects of emitted electrons, the limiter position, bias voltage, and plasma position were varied. The results have shown that the plasma positioning with respect to the emissive limiter plays an important role in obtaining H-mode plasmas. The emissive cathode must be located close to the last closed flux surface in order to charge up the plasma. As the cathode is moved closer to the wall, the positioning of the plasma becomes more critical since the plasma can easily detach from the cathode and reattach to the wall, resulting in the termination of H-mode. The emissive capability appears to be important for operating at lower bias voltage and reducing impurity levels in the plasma. With a heated cathode, transition to H-mode was observed for V bias ≤ 50 V and I inj ≥ 30 A. At a lower cathode heater current, a higher bias voltage is required for the transition. Moreover, with a lower cathode heater current, the time delay for inducing H-mode becomes longer, which can be attributed to the required time for the self-heating of the cathode to reach the emissive temperature. From this result, we conclude that the capacity for emission can significantly improve the performance of limiter biasing for inducing H-mode transition. With L-mode plasmas, the injection current flowing out of the cathode was generally higher than 100 A

  18. Material Surface Characteristics and Plasma Performance in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Matthew James

    The performance of a tokamak plasma and the characteristics of the surrounding plasma facing component (PFC) material surfaces strongly influence each other. Despite this relationship, tokamak plasma physics has historically been studied more thoroughly than PFC surface physics. The disparity is particularly evident in lithium PFC research: decades of experiments have examined the effect of lithium PFCs on plasma performance, but the understanding of the lithium surface itself is much less complete. This latter information is critical to identifying the mechanisms by which lithium PFCs affect plasma performance. This research focused on such plasma-surface interactions in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX), a spherical torus designed to accommodate solid or liquid lithium as the primary PFC. Surface analysis was accomplished via the novel Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) diagnostic system. In a series of experiments on LTX, the MAPP x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) capabilities were used for in vacuo interrogation of PFC samples. This represented the first application of XPS and TDS for in situ surface analysis of tokamak PFCs. Surface analysis indicated that the thin (dLi ˜ 100nm) evaporative lithium PFC coatings in LTX were converted to Li2O due to oxidizing agents in both the residual vacuum and the PFC substrate. Conversion was rapid and nearly independent of PFC temperature, forming a majority Li2O surface within minutes and an entirely Li2O surface within hours. However, Li2O PFCs were still capable of retaining hydrogen and sequestering impurities until the Li2 O was further oxidized to LiOH, a process that took weeks. For hydrogen retention, Li2O PFCs retained H+ from LTX plasma discharges, but no LiH formation was observed. Instead, results implied that H+ was only weakly-bound, such that it almost completely outgassed as H 2 within minutes. For impurity sequestration, LTX plasma performance

  19. Operation of the tokamak fusion test reactor tritium systems during initial tritium experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Gentile, C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kozub, T.; LaMarche, P.; Murray, H.; Nagy, A.; Raftopoulos, S.; Rossmassler, R.; Sissingh, R.; Swanson, J.; Tulipano, F.; Viola, M.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R.T.

    1995-01-01

    The high power D-T experiments on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory commenced in November 1993. During initial operation of the tritium systems a number of start-up problems surfaced and had to be corrected. These were corrected through a series of system modifications and upgrades and by repair of failed or inadequate components. Even as these operational concerns were being addressed, the tritium systems continued to support D-T operations on the tokamak. During the first six months of D-T operations more than 107kCi of tritium were processed successfully by the tritium systems. D-T experiments conducted at TFTR during this period provided significant new data. Fusion power in excess of 9MW was achieved in May 1994. This paper describes some of the early start-up issues, and reports on the operation of the tritium system and the tritium tracking and accounting system during the early phase of TFTR D-T experiments. (orig.)

  20. Particle physics experiments 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairstow, R.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1989 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  1. Particle physics experiments 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1987 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel (United Kingdom). The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  2. Particle physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    The report of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory describes the work carried out in 1985 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  3. Enhanced lower hybrid current drive experiments on HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Weici; Kuang Guangli; Liu Yuexiu; Ding Bojiang; Shi Yaojiang

    2003-01-01

    Effective Lower Hybrid Current Driving (LHCD) and improved confinement experiments in higher plasma parameters (I p >200 kA, n e >2 x 10 13 cm -3 , T e ≥1 keV) have been curried out in optimized LH wave spectrum and plasma parameters in HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The dependence of current driving efficiency on LH power spectrum, plasma density (anti n e ) and toroidal magnetic field B T has been obtained under optimal conditions. A good CD efficiency was obtained at higher plasma current and higher electron density. The improvement of the energy confinement time is accompanied with the increase in line averaged electron density, and in ion and electron temperatures. The highest current driving efficiency reached η CD =I p (anti n e )R/P RF ≅1.05 x 10 19 Am -2 /W. Wave-plasma coupling was sustained in a good state and the reflective coefficient was less than 5%. The experiments have also demonstrated the ability of LH wave in the start-up and ramp-up of the plasma current. The measurement of the temporal distribution of plasma parameter shows that lower hybrid leads to a broader profile in plasma parameter. The LH power deposition profile and the plasma current density profile were modeled with a 2D Fokker-Planck code corresponding to the evolution process of the hard x-ray detector array

  4. Engineering of the divertor injection tokamak experiment (DITE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plummer, K.M.; Bayes, D.V.; Bell, D.; Burt, J.; Galloway, F.; Sanders, B.C.; Skelton, D.E.; Varley, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    The DITE assembly has been constructed to study the effect of powerful neutral injection and the use of magnetic divertors in Tokamak systems. In addition, the plasma is stabilized by a position controlled feed-back vertical field system developed from results on the CLEO experiment, and added to DITE later in the design stage. The machine is designed for an ultimate plasma current of 340 kA, having a minor radius of 23 cm at q = 2, on a major radius of 113 cm. The 28 kG Bphi field, from 16 liquid nitrogen cooled coils has a 2% ripple at the edge of the plasma. The divertor is a ''bundle'' type, the present design of which is limited to operating in a Bphi field of 18 kG. Neutral Injection, initially by two, and ultimately by four injectors, is intended to supply about 1,500 kW of beam power. The engineering is now complete and the machine commissioned; this paper describes the up-to-date design of the machine and includes some of our experiences during design, construction and commissioning

  5. Discharge initiation experiments in the Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, D.A.

    1984-06-01

    Experiments in the Tokapole II tokamak demonstrate the benefits of high density (n/sub e//n 0 greater than or equal to 0.01) preionization by reducing four quantities at startup: necessary toroidal loop voltage (V 1 ) (50%), volt-second consumption (40 to 50%), impurity radiation (25 to 50%), and runaway electron production (approx. 80 to 100%). A zero-dimensional code models the loop voltage reduction dependence on preionization density and predicts a similar result for reactor scale devices. The code shows low initial resistivity and a high resistivity time derivative contribute to loop voltage reduction. The power balance of the ECR plasma in a toroidal-field-only case was studied. Langmuir probes and impurity doping were used. The vertical electric field (E/sub v/) and current (I/sub v/), which result from curvature drift, were measured (E/sub v/ approx. 10 V/cm and I/sub v/ approx. 50 Amps) and exceeded expected values for the bulk electron temperature (approx. 10 eV). A series of experiments with external windings to simulate field errors perpendicular to the toroidal field was done. The results imply that an error field of 0.1% of the toroidal field is deleterious to ECR plasma density

  6. Tokamak-7 operation in experiments with a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzanki, V.V.; Bychkov, A.V.; Denisov, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    The results of experiments with plasma at the Tokamak-7 (T-7) device are presented. The experiments have been carried out with a constant diaphragm of 31,5 cm radius and two movable graphite diaphragms at the 26-28 cm plasma filament radius and 1,6-1,9 T magnetic field. Two stable regimes with 150 and 200 kA and 250 ms discharge current length have been investigated. It is shown that the strongest poloidal filed perturhations have been observed at the beginning of the discharge. Electron plasma temperature Tsub(e) has been determined from the spectrum analysis of soft X radiation by the foil method. Stable plasma regimes with current up to 200 kA, bypass voltage being equal 1,58V electron density -0,5-5,0 x 10 13 cm -3 , Tsub(e)=1,1-1,3 keV ion temperature-490 eV. The range between discharge pulses has reached 3 min. at the discharge current-240 kA. No considerable effect of magnetic field variables on the superconducting magnetic system has been observed

  7. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Adler, J.H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.

    1994-09-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to ∼9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the PFUS ∼6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at PFUS > 7 MW and its effect on performance in under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored

  8. Vacuum physics analysis of HT-7 superconducting tokamak pump limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jiansheng; Li Chengfu; He Yexi

    1998-10-01

    The pump limiter is analysed with HT-7 superconducting tokamak parameter and the pump limiter construction. The particle exhaust of the pump limiter can be to achieve about 7.7%. So the pump limiter can be applied in the HT-7 device and will make good affection in plasma discharge

  9. Health physics measurement of Princeton Tokamaks, 1977-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, J.R.; Gilbert, J.D.; Couch, J.G.; Griesbach, O.A.; Fennimore, J.J.; Greco, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) began fusion experiments in 1951. In the early years, the major health physics concerns were associated with x radiation produced by energetic electrons in the plasma. Within the past year, neutron and 3 H production from 2H-2H (represented hereafter as D-D) reactions has increased significantly on the larger fusion devices. Tritium retention noted in graphite tiles underscores the significance of material selection in present and future 3 H-fueled fusion devices. This paper reports on operational health physics radiation measurements made on various PPPL machines over the past 10 y

  10. Automated Fault Detection for DIII-D Tokamak Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.L.; Scoville, J.T.; Johnson, R.D.; Hyatt, A.W.; Lee, J.

    1999-01-01

    An automated fault detection software system has been developed and was used during 1999 DIII-D plasma operations. The Fault Identification and Communication System (FICS) executes automatically after every plasma discharge to check dozens of subsystems for proper operation and communicates the test results to the tokamak operator. This system is now used routinely during DIII-D operations and has led to an increase in tokamak productivity

  11. Selected highlights of ECH/ECCD physics studies in the TCV tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman T.P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tokamak a Configuration Variable, TCV, has used Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive as its only auxiliary heating system for nearly two decades. In addition to basic plasma heating and current profiling, ECH and ECCD under either feedforward or real-time (feedback control allows control of plasma parameters and MHD behaviour to aid in physics studies and measurements. This paper describes four such studies in which EC control has proved crucial – increased resolution Thomson Scattering measurements in the plasma edge, time-resolved plasma rotation modification during the sawtooth cycle, robust neoclassical tearing mode (NTM suppression, and double pass transmission measurements of EC waves for scattering and polarization studies. The relative merits of feedforward and feedback methods for recent TCV experiments are discussed.

  12. Discharge initiation experiments in the Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments in the Tokapole II tokamak demonstrate the benefits of high density (n/sub e//n/sub o/ greater than or equal to 0.01) preionization by reducing four quantities at startup: necessary toroidal loop voltage (V 1 ) (50%), volt-second consumption (40-50%), impurity radiation (25-50%), and runaway electron production (approx. 80-100%). A zero-dimensional code models the loop voltage reduction dependence on preionization density and predicts a similar result for reactor scale devices. The code shows low initial resistivity and a high resistivity time derivative contribute to loop voltage reduction. Microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) frequency and plasma gun injection produce high density preionization, which reduces the initial V 1 , volt-second consumption, and runaways. The ECR preionization also reduces impurity radiation by shortening the time from voltage application to current channel formation. This, evidently, reduces the total plasma-wall interaction at startup. The power balance of the ECR plasma in a toroidal-field-only case was studied using Langmuir probes and impurity doping. The vertical electric field and current, which result from curvature drift, were measured as approx. 10 V/cm and 50 amps, respectively, and exceeded expected values for the bulk electron temperature (approx. 10 eV)

  13. Perturbative transport experiments in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantica, P.; Gorini, G.; Sozzi, C. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Imbeaux, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X. [Association Euratom-CEA, St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Kinsey, J. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania (United States); Budny, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, New Jersey (United States); Coffey, I.; Parail, V.; Walden, A. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Dux, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Garzotti, L. [Istituto Gas Ionizzati, Padova (Italy); Ingesson, C. [FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kissick, M. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Perturbative transport experiments have been performed in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas either in conditions of fully developed Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) or during a phase where an ITB was not observed. Transient peripheral cooling was induced by either Laser Ablation or Shallow Pellet Injection and the ensuing travelling cold pulse was used to probe the plasma transport in the electron and, for the first time, also in the ion channel. Cold pulses travelling through ITBs are observed to erode the ITB outer part, but, if the inner ITB portion survives, it strongly damps the propagating wave. The result is discussed in the context of proposed possible pictures for ITB formation. In the absence of an ITB, the cold pulse shows a fast propagation in the outer plasma half, which is consistent with a region of stiff transport, while in the inner half it slows down but shows the peculiar feature of amplitude growing while propagating. The data are powerful tests for the validation of theoretical transport models. (author)

  14. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, J.H.; Barter, J.D.; Sewall, N.R.; Jolly, J.J.; Schlander, L.F.

    1990-01-01

    The Thomson-scattering diagnostic system (TSS) on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at LLNL routinely monitors electron temperature (T e ) and density. Typical measured values at the plasma center under clean conditions are 900 ± 70 eV and 1 to 2 x 10 14 (±30%) cm -3 . The TSS apparatus is compact, with all elements mounted on one sturdy, two-level optics table. Because of this, we maintain with minimum effort the alignment of both the ruby-laser input optics and the scattered-light collecting optics. Undesired background signals, e.g., plasma light as well as ruby-laser light scattered off obstacles and walls, are generally small compared with the Thomson-scattered signals we normally detect. In the MTX T e region, the TSS data are definitely fitted better when relativistic effects are included in the equations. Besides determining the temperature of the Maxwellian electron distribution, the system is designed to detect electron heating from GW-level free-electron laser (FEL) pulses by measuring large wavelength shifts of the scattered laser photons. TSS data suggest that we may indeed by able to detect these electrons, which can have energies up to 10 keV, according to computer simulation. 7 refs., 4 figs

  15. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the microwave tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, J.H.; Barter, J.D.; Sewall, N.R.; Jolly, J.J.; Schlander, L.F.

    1990-01-01

    The Thomson scattering diagnostic system (TSS) on the microwave tokamak experiment (MTX) at LLNL routinely monitors electron temperature (T e ) and density. Typical measured values at the plasma center under clean conditions are 900±70 eV and 1--2x10 14 (±30%) cm -3 . The TSS apparatus is compact, with all elements mounted on one sturdy, two-level optics table. Because of this, we maintain with minimum effort the alignment of both the ruby-laser input optics and the scattered-light collecting optics. Undesired background signals, e.g., plasma light as well as ruby-laser light scattered off obstacles and walls, are generally small compared with the Thomson-scattered signals we normally detect. In the MTX T e region, the TSS data are definitely fitted better when relativistic effects are included in the equations. Besides determining the temperature of the Maxwellian electron distribution, the system is designed to detect electron heating from GW-level free-electron laser (FEL) pulses by measuring large wavelength shifts of the scattered laser photons. TSS data suggest that we may indeed be able to detect these electrons, which can have energies up to 10 keV, according to computer simulation

  16. High gain requirements and high field Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    Operation at sufficiently high gain (ratio of fusion power to external heating power) is a fundamental requirement for tokamak power reactors. For typical reactor concepts, the gain is greater than 25. Self-heating from alpha particles in deuterium-tritium plasmas can greatly reduce ητ/temperature requirements for high gain. A range of high gain operating conditions is possible with different values of alpha-particle efficiency (fraction of alpha-particle power that actually heats the plasma) and with different ratios of self heating to external heating. At one extreme, there is ignited operation, where all of the required plasma heating is provided by alpha particles and the alpha-particle efficiency is 100%. At the other extreme, there is the case of no heating contribution from alpha particles. ητ/temperature requirements for high gain are determined as a function of alpha-particle heating efficiency. Possibilities for high gain experiments in deuterium-tritium, deuterium, and hydrogen plasmas are discussed

  17. Particle physics experiments 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Rutherford Appleton laboratory report describes work carried out in 1984 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics selection panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  18. Experiments in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, J M; Denaro, A R

    1968-01-01

    Experiments in Physical Chemistry, Second Edition provides a compilation of experiments concerning physical chemistry. This book illustrates the link between the theory and practice of physical chemistry. Organized into three parts, this edition begins with an overview of those experiments that generally have a simple theoretical background. Part II contains experiments that are associated with more advanced theory or more developed techniques, or which require a greater degree of experimental skill. Part III consists of experiments that are in the nature of investigations wherein these invest

  19. HIGH PERFORMANCE ADVANCED TOKAMAK REGIMES FOR NEXT-STEP EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREENFIELD, C.M.; MURAKAMI, M.; FERRON, J.R.; WADE, M.R.; LUCE, T.C.; PETTY, C.C.; MENARD, J.E; PETRIE, T.W.; ALLEN, S.L.; BURRELL, K.H.; CASPER, T.A; DeBOO, J.C.; DOYLE, E.J.; GAROFALO, A.M; GORELOV, Y.A; GROEBNER, R.J.; HOBIRK, J.; HYATT, A.W; JAYAKUMAR, R.J; KESSEL, C.E; LA HAYE, R.J; JACKSON, G.L; LOHR, J.; MAKOWSKI, M.A.; PINSKER, R.I.; POLITZER, P.A.; PRATER, R.; STRAIT, E.J.; TAYLOR, T.S; WEST, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced Tokamak (AT) research in DIII-D seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation in future devices. These regimes require high toroidal beta to maximize fusion output and poloidal beta to maximize the self-driven bootstrap current. Achieving these conditions requires integrated, simultaneous control of the current and pressure profiles, and active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability control. The building blocks for AT operation are in hand. Resistive wall mode stabilization via plasma rotation and active feedback with non-axisymmetric coils allows routine operation above the no-wall beta limit. Neoclassical tearing modes are stabilized by active feedback control of localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). Plasma shaping and profile control provide further improvements. Under these conditions, bootstrap supplies most of the current. Steady-state operation requires replacing the remaining Ohmic current, mostly located near the half-radius, with noninductive external sources. In DIII-D this current is provided by ECCD, and nearly stationary AT discharges have been sustained with little remaining Ohmic current. Fast wave current drive is being developed to control the central magnetic shear. Density control, with divertor cryopumps, of AT discharges with edge localized moding (ELMing) H-mode edges facilitates high current drive efficiency at reactor relevant collisionalities. A sophisticated plasma control system allows integrated control of these elements. Close coupling between modeling and experiment is key to understanding the separate elements, their complex nonlinear interactions, and their integration into self-consistent high performance scenarios. Progress on this development, and its implications for next-step devices, will be illustrated by results of recent experiment and simulation efforts

  20. Internal transport barrier physics for steady state operation in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakatani, Masahiro [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Engineering, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuda, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Connor, Jack W. [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM/UKAEA Association (United Kingdom); Garbet, Xavier [Culham Science Centre, EFDA-JET CSU (United Kingdom); Gormezano, Claude [Associazone EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione C.R. Frascati (Italy); Mukhovatov, Vladimir [ITER Naka Joint Work Site, ITER Physics Unit, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Experimental results for the ITB (Internal Transport Barrier) formation and sustainment are compiled in a unified manner to find common features of ITBs in tokamaks. Global scaling laws for threshold power to obtain the ITBs are discussed. Theoretical models for plasmas with ITBs are summarized from stability and transport point of view. Finally possibility to obtain steady-state ITBs will be discussed in addition to extrapolation to ITER. (author)

  1. Particle physics experiments 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, M.D.; Stuart, G.

    1983-01-01

    Work carried out in 1982 on 52 experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel is described. Each experiment is listed under title, collaboration, technique, accelerator, year of running, status and spokesman. Unedited contributions are given from each experiment. (U.K.)

  2. The importance of the toroidal magnetic field for the feasibility of a tokamak burning plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzucato, E.

    2000-01-01

    The next step in the demonstration of the scientific feasibility of a tokamak fusion reactor is a DT burning plasma experiment for the study and control of self-heated plasmas. In this paper, the authors examine the role of the toroidal magnetic field on the confinement of a tokamak plasma in the ELMy H-mode regime--the operational regime foreseen for ITER

  3. Particle physics experiments 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents research work carried out in 1986 on 52 elementary particle experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. Most of the experiments were collaborative and involved research groups from different countries. About half of the experiments were conducted at CERN, the remaining experiments employed the accelerators: LAMPT, LEP, PETRA, SLAC, and HERA. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (U.K.)

  4. A generic data structure for integrated modelling of tokamak physics and subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbeaux, F.; Huysmans, G.T.A.; Airaj, M.; Guillerminet, B.; Ottaviani, M.; Peysson, Y.; Signoret, J.; Basiuk, V.; Lister, J.B.; Sauter, O.; Zwingmann, W.; Eriksson, L.G.; Appel, L.; Coster, D.; Konz, C.; Pereverzev, G.; Kalupin, D.; Manduchi, G.; Strand, P.

    2010-01-01

    The European Integrated Tokamak Modelling Task Force (ITM-TF) is developing a new type of fully modular and flexible integrated tokamak simulator, which will allow a large variety of simulation types This ambitious goal requires new concepts of data structure and work-flow organisation, which are described for the first time in this paper The backbone of the system is a physics- and work-flow-oriented data structure which allows for the deployment of a fully modular and flexible work-flow organisation. The data structure is designed to be generic for any tokamak device and can be used to address physics simulation results, experimental data (including description of subsystem hardware) and engineering issues. (authors)

  5. Development of a visualized software for tokamak experiment data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jianyong; Ding Xuantong; Luo Cuiwen

    2004-01-01

    With the VBA programming in Microsoft Excel, the authors have developed a post-processing software of experimental data in tokamak. The standard formal data in the HL-1M and HL-2A tokamaks can be read, displayed in Excel, and transmitted directly into the MATLAB workspace, for displaying pictures in MATLAB with the software. The authors have also developed data post-processing software in MATLAB environment, which can read standard format data, display picture, supply visual graphical user interface and provide part of advanced signal processing ability

  6. Ion Bernstein wave experiments on the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, J.D.

    1988-09-01

    Ion Bernstein wave experiments are carried out on the Alcator C tokamak to study wave excitation, propagation, absorption, and plasma heating due to wave power absorption. It is shown that ion Bernstein wave power is coupled into the plasma and follows the expected dispersion relation. The antenna loading is maximized when the hydrogen second harmonic layer is positioned just behind the antenna. Plasma heating results at three values of the toroidal magnetic field are presented. Central ion temperature increases of ΔT/sub i//Ti /approx lt/ 0.1 and density increases Δn/n 6 s/sup /minus/1/ for plasmas within the density range 0.6 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/3/ ≤ /bar n//sub e/ ≤ 4 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/3/ and magnetic fields 2.4 ≥ ω/Ω/sub H/ ≥ 1.1. The density increases is usually accompanied by an improvement in the global particle confinement time relative to the Ohmic value. The ion heating rate is measured to be ΔT/sub i//P/sub rf/ ≅ 2-4.5 eV/kW at low densities. At higher densities /bar n//sub e/ ≤ 1.5 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/3/ the ion heating rate dramatically decreases. It is shown that the decrease in the ion heating rate can be explained by the combined effects of wave scattering through the edge turbulence and the decreasing on energy confinement of these discharges with density. The effect of observed edge turbulence is shown to cause a broadening of the rf power deposition profile with increasing density. It is shown that the inferred value of the Ohmic ion thermal conduction, when compared to the Chang-Hinton neoclassical prediction, exhibits an increasing anomaly with increasing plasma density

  7. Particle physics experiments 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairstow, R.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1988 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. More than forty projects at different accelerators (SPS, ISIS, PETRA, LAMPF, LEP, HERA, BNL, ILL, LEAR) are listed. Different organisations collaborate on different projects. A brief progress report is given. References to published articles are given. (author)

  8. Experiment of laser thomson scattering at HL-1 tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Henian; Chen Jiafu; Yan Derong; Liu Aiping; Shi Peilan; Wang Wei; Liu Xiaomei

    1989-05-01

    The structure and performance of the Ruby Laser Thomson Scattering apparatus for HL-1 tokamak device is described. The method of acquisition and calibration of multichannel scattered signals are presented. Examples of measured electron temperature T. with experimental error are given

  9. Physics of tokamak scrape-off layer confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    Confinement in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a tokamak is believed to be governed by classical flows along magnetic field lines terminated by sheaths, and turbulent transport across field lines. In this paper we review how these two effects conspire to establish the width of the SOL, and survey recent and ongoing work on mechanisms for turbulence in SOL's. The beneficial relationship between scrape-off layer turbulence in mitigating the heat flux density on divertors is noted, and tactics for actively altering SOL confinement so as to reduce the heat flux density are discussed

  10. Remote operation of the vertical plasma stabilization @ the GOLEM tokamak for the plasma physics education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, V., E-mail: svoboda@fjfi.cvut.cz [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Kocman, J.; Grover, O. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Krbec, J.; Stöckel, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, CZ-182 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: * Understandable remote operation of a vertical plasma position control system in the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes.* Two combinable modes of real-time plasma position control: position based feedback and a pre-defined waveform.* More than 20% plasma life prolongation with plasma position control in feedback mode. - Highlights: • Understandable remote operation of a vertical plasma position control system in the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes. • Two combinable modes of real-time plasma position control: position based feedback and a pre-defined waveform. • More than 20% plasma life prolongation with plasma position control in feedback mode. - Abstract: The GOLEM tokamak at the Czech Technical University has been established as an educational tokamak device for domestic and foreign students. Remote participation in the scope of several laboratory practices, plasma physics schools and workshops has been successfully performed from abroad. A new enhancement allowing understandable remote control of vertical plasma position in two modes (i) predefined and (ii) feedback control is presented. It allows to drive the current in the stabilization coils in any time-dependent scenario, which can include as a parameter the actual plasma position measured by magnetic diagnostics. Arbitrary movement of the plasma column in a vertical direction, stabilization of the plasma column in the center of the tokamak vessel as well as prolongation/shortening of plasma life according to the remotely defined request are demonstrated.

  11. First physics results from the MAST Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Akers, R.; Arends, E.; Carolan, P.G.; Counsell, G.F.; Fielding, S. J.; Gryaznevich, M.; Martin, R.; Price, M.; Roach, C.; Shevchenko, V.; Tournianski, M.; Valovic, M.; Walsh, M.J.; Wilson, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    First physics results are presented from MAST (Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak), one of the new generation of purpose built spherical tokamaks (STs) now commencing operation. Some of these results demonstrate, for the first time, the novel effects of low aspect ratio, for example, the enhancement of resistivity due to neo-classical effects. H-mode is achieved and the transition to H-mode is accompanied by a tenfold steepening of the edge density gradient which may enable the successful application of electron Bernstein wave heating in STs. Studies of halo currents show that these less than expected from conventional tokamak results, and measurements of divertor power loading confirm that most of the power flows to the outer strike points, easing the power handling on the inner points (a critical issue for STs)

  12. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high β-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect

  13. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high {beta}-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect.

  14. Tokamaks. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, John; Campbell, D.J.; Connor, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    It is interesting to recall the state of tokamak research when the first edition of this book was written. My judgement of the level of real understanding at that time is indicated by the virtual absence of comparisons of experiment with theory in that edition. The need then was for a 'handbook' which collected in a single volume the concepts and models which form the basis of everyday tokamak research. The experimental and theoretical endeavours of the subsequent decade have left almost all of this intact, but have brought a massive development of the subject. Firstly, there are now several areas where the experimental behaviour is described in terms of accepted theory. This is particularly true of currents parallel to the magnetic field, and of the stability limitations on the plasma pressure. Next there has been the research on large tokamaks, hardly started at the writing of the first edition. Now our thinking is largely based on the results from these tokamaks and this work has led to the long awaited achievement of significant amounts of fusion power. Finally, the success of tokamak research has brought us face to face with the problems involved in designing and building a tokamak reactor. The present edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes an account of the advances outlined above. (Author)

  15. Merging startup experiments on the UTST spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuma; Kamio, Shuji; Imazawa, Ryota

    2010-01-01

    The University of Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) was constructed to explore the formation of ultrahigh-beta spherical tokamak (ST) plasmas using double null plasma merging. The main feature of the UTST is that the poloidal field coils are located outside the vacuum vessel to demonstrate startup in a reactor-relevant situation. Initial operations used partially completed power supplies to investigate the appropriate conditions for plasma merging. The plasma current of the merged ST reached 100 kA when the central solenoid coil was used to assist plasma formation. Merging of two ST plasmas through magnetic reconnection was successfully observed using two-dimensional pickup coil arrays, which directly measure the toroidal and axial magnetic fields inside the UTST vacuum vessel. The resistivity of the current sheet was found to be anomalously high during merging. (author)

  16. Particle physics experiments 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.A.

    1993-03-01

    The research programs described here were carried out in 1992 at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and funded by the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council. The area covered in these experiments is particle physics. Unedited contributions from over forty experimental programs are included. Experiments are listed according to their current status, the accelerator used and its years of operation. (UK)

  17. Physics analysis of the Apollo D-3He tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarius, J.F.; Emmert, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in the analysis and conceptual design of Apollo, a D- 3 He Tokamak Reactor are presented. Encouraging experimental results on TEXT motivated a key change in the Apollo concept utilization of an ergodic magnetic limiter for impurity control instead of a divertor. Parameters for the updated Apollo design and an analysis of the ergoidc magnetic limiter are given. The Apollo reference case uses direct conversion of synchrotron radiation to electricity by rectifying antennas (rectennas) for its power conversion system. Previous analyses of this concept are expanded, including further details of the rectennas and of the loss of synchrotron power to the waveguides and walls. Although Apollo will burn D- 3 He fuel, a significant amount of unburned tritium will be generated by D4D reactions. The possibility of operating a short, dedicated, T+ 3 He burn phase to eliminate this tritium will be examined

  18. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G.; Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2015-01-01

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started

  19. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J. [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kubota, S. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.

  20. Theoretical considerations and preparatory experiments for poloidal field measurements in tokamaks by far-infrared polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, W; Dodel, G [Stuttgart Univ. (TH) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Plasmaforschung

    1978-12-01

    Numerical calculations give an optimum wavelength and show the precision requirements for determining poloidal field profiles in tokamaks on the basis of the Faraday effect. The required precision of the polarimetric measurements can be achieved in the far-infrared as is verified in a model experiment using a ferrite modulated HCN laser beam.

  1. Preliminary experiment results of EOH in HT-6M tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuedong, Meng; Jiangang, Li; Xiang, Gao [Academia Sinica, Hefei, AH (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    1994-04-01

    Confinement improvement over normal ohmic level has been achieved in HT-6M tokamak by current ramp up at the rate of 12 Ma/s. After the current ramp up, the H{sub {alpha}} drops and electron temperature becomes peak profile. The plasma current increases about 10% and edge plasma density increases quite a lot (more than 50%) after the ramp up and then becomes peaking later on. Radiation loss is reduced and its profile becomes broad. Corresponding to different density range, the MHD behaviour changes from strong m = 3 and m 2 Mirnov oscillations to weak ones, Mirnov oscillation to sawtooth oscillation and small quick sawtooth to large slow ones. The energy confinement time increases about 1.6 to 1.9 times and particle confinement time increases about a factor of four. The detail current penetration process is analysed and compared to classical diffusion process. All of these phenomena is very similar to the L-H transition.

  2. Modelling ohmic confinement experiments on the START tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, C.M.

    1996-05-01

    Ohmic confinement data from the tight aspect ratio tokamak START has been analysed using the ASTRA transport simulation code. Neoclassical expressions have been modified to describe tight aspect ratio configurations, and the comparison between START data and models of anomalous transport has been made quantitative using the standard χ 2 test from statistics. Four confinement models (T11, Rebut-Lallia-Watkins, Lackner-Gottardi, and Taroni et al's Bohm model) have been compared with the START data. Three of the models are found to simulate START's electron temperature data moderately well, while Taroni et al's Bohm model overestimates electron temperatures in START by an order of magnitude. Thus comparison with START data tends to discriminate against Bohm models; these models are pessimistic or ITER. (author)

  3. Axisymmetric instability in a noncircular tokamak: experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipschultz, B.; Prager, S.C.; Todd, A.M.M.; Delucia, J.

    1979-09-01

    The stability of dee, inverse-dee and square cross section plasmas to axisymmetric modes has been investigated experimentally in Tokapole II, a tokamak with a four-null poloidal divertor. Experimental results are closely compared with predictions of two numerical stability codes -- the PEST code (ideal MHD, linear stability) adapted to tokapole geometry and a code which follows the nonlinear evolution of shapes similar to tokapole equilibria. Experimentally, the square is vertically stable and both dee's unstable to a vertical nonrigid axisymmetric shift. The central magnetic axis displacement grows exponentially with a growth time approximately 10 3 poloidal Alfven times plasma time. Proper initial positioning of the plasma on the midplane allows passive feedback to nonlinearly restore vertical motion to a small stable oscillation. Experimental poloidal flux plots are produced directly from internal magnetic probe measurements

  4. Preliminary experiment results of EOH in HT-6M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Yuedong; Li Jiangang; Gao Xiang

    1994-04-01

    Confinement improvement over normal ohmic level has been achieved in HT-6M tokamak by current ramp up at the rate of 12 Ma/s. After the current ramp up, the H α drops and electron temperature becomes peak profile. The plasma current increases about 10% and edge plasma density increases quite a lot (more than 50%) after the ramp up and then becomes peaking later on. Radiation loss is reduced and its profile becomes broad. Corresponding to different density range, the MHD behaviour changes from strong m = 3 and m 2 Mirnov oscillations to weak ones, Mirnov oscillation to sawtooth oscillation and small quick sawtooth to large slow ones. The energy confinement time increases about 1.6 to 1.9 times and particle confinement time increases about a factor of four. The detail current penetration process is analysed and compared to classical diffusion process. All of these phenomena is very similar to the L-H transition

  5. Alfven wave experiments in the Phaedrus-T tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Probert, P.; Moroz, P.; Intrator, T.; Breun, R.; Brouchous, D.; Che, H.Y.; DeKock, J.R.; Diebold, D.; Doczy, M.; Fonck, R.; Hershkowitz, N.; Johnson, R.D.; Kishinevsky, M.; McKee, G.; Meyer, J.; Nonn, P.; Oliva, S.P.; Pew, J.; Sorensen, J.; Tanaka, T.; Vukovic, M.; Winz, G.

    1993-01-01

    Heating in the Alfven resonant regime has been demonstrated in the Phaedrus-T tokamak [Fusion Technol. 19, 1327 (1991)]. Electron heating during injection of radio-frequency (rf) power is indicated by a 30%--40% drop in loop voltage and modifications in sawtooth activity. Heating was observed at a frequency ω rf ∼0.7Ω i on axis, using a two-strap fast wave antenna operated at 7 and 9.2 MHz with 180 degree phasing (N parallel ∼100). Numerical modeling with the fast wave code FASTWA [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 33, 417 (1991)] indicates that for Phaedrus-T parameters the kinetic Alfven wave is excited via mode conversion from a surface fast wave at the Alfven resonance and is subsequently damped on electrons

  6. Preparations for deuterium tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, G.

    1994-04-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinet trademark system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of ∼ 10 megawatts (MW) of fusion power, evaluation of confinement and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of α-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined α-particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed

  7. Preparations for deuterium--tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L.A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Biglow, T.S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N.L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M.J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Jaeger, E.F.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Kwon, S.; Labik, G.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Laughlin, M.J.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F.M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D.E.; Marchlik, M.; Marmar, E.S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mastrocola, V.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.P.; Majeski, R.; Mauel, M.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Milora, S.L.; Monticello, D.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J.A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Nishitani, T.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S.F.; Pavlov, Y.I.; Pearson, G.; Perkins, F.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Pitcher, S.; Popovichev, S.; Qualls, A.L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Redi, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinert TM system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium--deuterium (D--D) run to simulate expected deuterium--tritium (D--T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D--T experiments using D--D have been performed. The physics objectives of D--T operation are production of ∼10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium--tritium plasmas, evaluation of α-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined α particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D--T experiments are reviewed

  8. Atomic physics studies of highly charged ions on tokamaks using x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.

    1989-07-01

    An overview is given of atomic physics issues which have been studied on tokamaks with the help resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The issues include the testing of model calculations predicting the excitation of line radiation, the determination of rate coefficients, and accurate atomic structure measurements. Recent research has focussed primarily on highly charged heliumlike (22 ≤ Z ≤ 28) and neonlike (34 ≤ Z ≤ 63) ions, and results are presented from measurements on the PLT and TFTR tokamaks. Many of the measurements have been aided by improved instrumental design and new measuring techniques. Remarkable agreement has been found between measurements and theory in most cases. However, in this review those areas are stressed where agreement is worst and where further investigations are needed. 19 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Spectroscopy and atomic physics of highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni for tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Cheng, C.-C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the spectroscopy and atomic physics for some highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni ions produced in tokamak plasmas. Forbidden and intersystem wavelengths for Cr and Ni ions are extrapolated and interpolated using the known wavelengths for Fe lines identified in solar-flare plasmas. Tables of transition probabilities for the B I, C I, N I, O I, and F I isoelectronic sequences are presented, and collision strengths and transition probabilities for Cr, Fe, and Ni ions of the Be I sequence are given. Similarities of tokamak and solar spectra are discussed, and it is shown how the atomic data presented may be used to determine ion abundances and electron densities in low-density plasmas.

  10. Microwave tokamak experiment (MTX) first year of operation and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began plasma operations in November 1988, and our main goal is the study of electron-cyclotron heating (ECH) in plasma discharges. The MTX tokamak was relocated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and we have re-created plasma parameters that are similar to those generated while the tokamak was at MIT. After stable ohmic operation was achieved, single-pulse FEL heating experiments began. During this phase, the FEL operated at low power levels on the way to its ultimate goal of 2 GW and 140 GHz with a 30-ns pulse length. We have developed a number of new diagnostics to measure these fast FEL pulses and the resulting plasma effects. In this paper, we present results that show the correlation of MTX data with MIT data, some of the operational modifications and procedures used, results to date from preliminary tokamak operations with the FEL, and our near-term operational plans. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  11. Fast wave current drive experiment on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, J.D.; James, R.A.; Kawashima, H.

    1992-06-01

    One method of radio-frequency heating which shows theoretical promise for both heating and current drive in tokamak plasmas is the direct absorption by electrons of the fast Alfven wave (FW). Electrons can directly absorb fast waves via electron Landau damping and transit-time magnetic pumping when the resonance condition ω - κ parallele υ parallele = O is satisfied. Since the FW accelerates electrons traveling the same toroidal direction as the wave, plasma current can be generated non-inductively by launching FW which propagate in one toroidal direction. Fast wave current drive (FWCD) is considered an attractive means of sustaining the plasma current in reactor-grade tokamaks due to teh potentially high current drive efficiency achievable and excellent penetration of the wave power to the high temperature plasma core. Ongoing experiments on the DIII-D tokamak are aimed at a demonstration of FWCD in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). Using frequencies in the ICRF avoids the possibility of mode conversion between the fast and slow wave branches which characterized early tokamak FWCD experiments in the lower hybrid range of frequencies. Previously on DIII-D, efficient direct electron heating by FW was found using symmetric (non-current drive) antenna phasing. However, high FWCD efficiencies are not expected due to the relatively low electron temperatures (compared to a reactor) in DIII-D

  12. The impact of lithium wall coatings on NSTX discharges and the engineering of the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Kugel, H.; Kaita, R.; Avasarala, S.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Berzak, L.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Gransted, E.; Gray, T.; Jacobson, C.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Lepson, J.; Lundberg, D.P.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D.; Paul, S.F.; Pereverzev, G.V.; Schneider, H.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Strickler, T.; Stotler, D.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown the benefits of solid lithium coatings on carbon PFC's to diverted plasma performance, in both L- and H-mode confinement regimes. Better particle control, with decreased inductive flux consumption, and increased electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate were observed. Successive increases in lithium coverage resulted in the complete suppression of ELM activity in H-mode discharges. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD), which will employ the porous molybdenum surface developed for the LTX shell, is being installed on NSTX for the 2010 run period, and will provide comparisons between liquid walls in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) and liquid divertor targets in NSTX. LTX, which recently began operations at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, is the world's first confinement experiment with full liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs). All materials and construction techniques in LTX are compatible with liquid lithium. LTX employs an inner, heated, stainless steel-faced liner or shell, which will be lithium-coated. In order to ensure that lithium adheres to the shell, it is designed to operate at up to 500-600 degrees C to promote wetting of the stainless by the lithium, providing the first hot wall in a tokamak to Operate at reactor-relevant temperatures. The engineering of LTX will be discussed.

  13. Energy confinement scaling in tokamaks: some implications of recent experiments with ohmic and strong auxiliary heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Recent results from confinement scaling experiments on tokamaks with ohmic and strong auxiliary heating are reviewed. An attempt is made to draw these results together into a low-density ohmic confinement scaling law, and a scaling law for confinement with auxiliary heating. The auxiliary heating confinement law may also serve to explain the saturation in tau/sub E/ vs anti n/sub e/ observed in some ohmic heating density scaling experiments

  14. Low cost alternative of high speed visible light camera for tokamak experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Odstrčil, T.; Odstrčil, Michal; Grover, O.; Svoboda, V.; Ďuran, Ivan; Mlynář, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 10 (2012), 10E505-10E505 ISSN 0034-6748. [Topical Conference High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics/19./. Monterey, 06.05.2012-10.05.2012] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma * tokamak * diagnostic * high speed camera * GOLEM Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.602, year: 2012 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4731003

  15. Development and Operational Experiences of the JT-60U Tokamak and Power Supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosogane, N.; Ninomiya, H.; Matsukawa, M.; Ando, T.; Neyatani, Y.; Horiike, H.; Sakurai, S.; Masaki, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Kodama, K.; Sasajima, T.; Terakado, T.; Ohmori, S.; Ohmori, Y.; Okano, J.

    2002-01-01

    The design of the JT-60U tokamak, the configuration of the coil power supplies, and the operational experiences gained to date are reviewed. JT-60U is a large tokamak upgraded from the original JT-60 in order to obtain high plasma current, large plasma volume, and highly elongated divertor configurations. All components inside the toroidal magnetic field coils, such as vacuum vessel, poloidal magnetic field coils, divertor, etc., were modified. Various technologies and ideas were introduced to develop these components; for example, a multi-arc double skin wall structure for the vacuum vessel and a functional poloidal magnetic field coil system with taps for obtaining various plasma configurations. Furthermore, boron-carbide coated carbon fiber composite (CFC) tiles were used as divertor tiles to reduce erosion of carbon-base tiles. Later, a semiclosed divertor with pumps, for which cryo-panels originally used for NBI units were converted, was installed in the replacement of the open divertor. These development and operational results provide data for future tokamaks. Major failures experienced in the long operational period of JT-60U, such as water leakage from the toroidal magnetic field coil, fracture of carbon tiles, and breakdown of a filter capacitor, are described. As a maintenance issue for tokamaks using deuterium fueling gas, a method for reducing radiation exposure of in-vessel workers is described

  16. About the Toroidal Magnetic Field of a Tokamak Burning Plasma Experiment with Superconducting Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzucato, E.

    2002-01-01

    In tokamaks, the strong dependence on the toroidal magnetic field of both plasma pressure and energy confinement is what makes possible the construction of small and relatively inexpensive burning plasma experiments using high-field resistive coils. On the other hand, the toroidal magnetic field of tokamaks using superconducting coils is limited by the critical field of superconductivity. In this article, we examine the relative merit of raising the magnetic field of a tokamak plasma by increasing its aspect ratio at a constant value of the peak field in the toroidal magnet. Taking ITER-FEAT as an example, we find that it is possible to reach thermonuclear ignition using an aspect ratio of approximately 4.5 and a toroidal magnetic field of 7.3 T. Under these conditions, fusion power density and neutron wall loading are the same as in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor], but the normalized plasma beta is substantially smaller. Furthermore, such a tokamak would be able to reach an energy gain of approximately 15 even with the deterioration in plasma confinement that is known to occur near the density limit where ITER is forced to operate

  17. Experiments on electron temperature profile resilience in FTU tokamak with continuous and modulated ECRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirant, S.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments performed on FTU tokamak, aiming at validation of physics-based transport models of the electron temperature profile resilience, are presented. ECRH is used to probe transport features, both in steady-state and in response to perturbations, while ECCD and LHCD are used for current density profile shaping. Observed confinement behaviour shows agreement with a critical temperature gradient length modelling. Central, low gradient plasma is characterized by low stiffness and low electron thermal diffusivity. Strong stiffness and high conduction are found in the confinement region. Resilience is experimentally characterized by an index of the resistance of the profile to adapt its shape to localized ECRH, while the diffusivity and its low-high transition are measured both by power balance and heat pulse propagation analysis. A particular attention is given to the investigation of the transition layer between low-high diffusivity and low-high stiffness regions. A dependence of LTc on magnetic shear, similar to what found in Tore Supra, and consistent with ETG based anomalous transport, is found. (author)

  18. Pellet injection in a tokamak hot plasma. Theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picchiottino, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The ultimate aim of pellet ablation studies is to predict what the plasma temperature and density profiles are just after a pellet injection. This requires description of the pellet ablation process, the parallel expansion of the ablatant and the fast outward motion of the deposited material since these three phenomena successively occur from the time of pellet injection to the moment when new axisymmetric profiles are reached. Only the two first points have been quantitatively modelled. If the most important processes of ablation physics are identified and although current models reproduce both measured penetrations and averaged characteristics of ablation clouds, some debatable points remain, mainly bearing on the drifts associated with the pellet motion and, consequently, on the effective shielding efficiency of the ionized part of the ablation cloud. During its parallel expansion, the ablated material experiences a strong poloidal rotation which depends on the ratio of the pellet and plasma masses and is due to the total kinetic momentum conservation on each magnetic surface. The fact that this rotation occurs on the same timescale as the outward motion suggests that both phenomena can be linked and that a comprehensive model of the whole fuelling process may emerge from considering the pellet and the plasma as a unique system. (author). 94 refs., 142 figs., 4 annexes

  19. PPPL tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1984-10-01

    The economic prospects of the tokamak are reviewed briefly and found to be favorable - if the size of ignited tokamak plasmas can be kept small and appropriate auxiliary systems can be developed. The main objectives of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory tokamak program are: (1) exploration of the physics of high-temperature toroidal confinement, in TFTR; (2) maximization of the tokamak beta value, in PBX; (3) development of reactor-relevant rf techniques, in PLT

  20. Results and future plans of the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, J.C.; Abrams, T.; Baylor, L.R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Biewer, T.; Bohler, D.; Boyle, D.; Granstedt, E.; Gray, T.; Hare, J.; Jacobson, C.M.; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B.; Lundberg, D.P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.

    2013-01-01

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with the unique capability of studying the low-recycling regime by coating nearly 90% of the first wall with lithium in either solid or liquid form. Several grams of lithium are evaporated onto the plasma-facing side of the first wall. Without lithium coatings, the plasma discharge is limited to less than 5 ms and only 10 kA of plasma current, and the first wall acts as a particle source. With cold lithium coatings, plasma discharges last up to 20 ms with plasma currents up to 70 kA. The lithium coating provides a low-recycling first wall condition for the plasma and higher fueling rates are required to realize plasma densities similar to that of pre-lithium walls. Traditional puff fueling, supersonic gas injection, and molecular cluster injection (MCI) are used. Liquid lithium experiments will begin in 2012

  1. Results and future plans of the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, J.C., E-mail: jschmitt@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Abrams, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Baylor, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Biewer, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bohler, D.; Boyle, D.; Granstedt, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Gray, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hare, J.; Jacobson, C.M.; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B.; Lundberg, D.P.; Lucia, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Majeski, R.; Merino, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); and others

    2013-07-15

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with the unique capability of studying the low-recycling regime by coating nearly 90% of the first wall with lithium in either solid or liquid form. Several grams of lithium are evaporated onto the plasma-facing side of the first wall. Without lithium coatings, the plasma discharge is limited to less than 5 ms and only 10 kA of plasma current, and the first wall acts as a particle source. With cold lithium coatings, plasma discharges last up to 20 ms with plasma currents up to 70 kA. The lithium coating provides a low-recycling first wall condition for the plasma and higher fueling rates are required to realize plasma densities similar to that of pre-lithium walls. Traditional puff fueling, supersonic gas injection, and molecular cluster injection (MCI) are used. Liquid lithium experiments will begin in 2012.

  2. Asymmetry of edge plasma turbulence in biasing experiments on tokamak TF-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budaev, V.P.

    1994-01-01

    It was observed in tokamaks the suppression of edge turbulence causes by setting a radial electric field at the plasma edge. The poloidal plasma rotation governed by this electric field is likely to result in changes in edge convention and poloidal asymmetry, however there is no experimental evidence about that of the experimental database concerning the biasing and conditions of edge plasma electrostatic turbulence excitation is not still complete. Also a relation between macroscopic convection and small-scale electrostatic turbulence have not yet revealed both in biasing and non biasing plasmas. In this paper results from biasing experiments carried on on ohmically heated tokamak TF-2 are presented. Changes in both equilibrium and fluctuated edge plasma parameters also convection and turbulence driven particle flux were demonstrated in probe measurements with biasing of electrode immersed within Last Closed Flux Surface (LCFS). Poloidal edge plasma structure and charge in asymmetry have demonstrated in the biasing experiments. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  3. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) special-purpose remote maintenance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, L.S.; Welland, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    A key element in the preconceptual design of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) was the development of design concepts for special-purpose remote maintenance systems. Included were systems for shield sector replacement, vacuum vessel sector and toroidal field coil replacement, limiter blade replacement, protective tile replacement, and general-purpose maintenance. This paper addresses these systems as they apply to the copper toroidal field (TF) coil version of the TFCX

  4. The Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) simulation of turbulent transport in the core plasma: A grand challenge in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    The long-range goal of the Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) is the reliable prediction of tokamak performance using physics-based numerical tools describing tokamak physics. The NTP is accomplishing the development of the most advanced particle and extended fluid model's on massively parallel processing (MPP) environments as part of a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary numerical study of tokamak core fluctuations. The NTP is a continuing focus of the Office of Fusion Energy's theory and computation program. Near-term HPCC work concentrates on developing a predictive numerical description of the core plasma transport in tokamaks driven by low-frequency collective fluctuations. This work addresses one of the greatest intellectual challenges to our understanding of the physics of tokamak performance and needs the most advanced computational resources to progress. We are conducting detailed comparisons of kinetic and fluid numerical models of tokamak turbulence. These comparisons are stimulating the improvement of each and the development of hybrid models which embody aspects of both. The combination of emerging massively parallel processing hardware and algorithmic improvements will result in an estimated 10**2--10**6 performance increase. Development of information processing and visualization tools is accelerating our comparison of computational models to one another, to experimental data, and to analytical theory, providing a bootstrap effect in our understanding of the target physics. The measure of success is the degree to which the experimentally observed scaling of fluctuation-driven transport may be predicted numerically. The NTP is advancing the HPCC Initiative through its state-of-the-art computational work. We are pushing the capability of high performance computing through our efforts which are strongly leveraged by OFE support

  5. The European Integrated Tokamak Modelling (ITM) effort: achievements and first physics results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falchetto, G.L.; Nardon, E.; Artaud, J.F.; Basiuk, V.; Huynh, Ph.; Imbeaux, F.; Coster, D.; Scott, B.D.; Coelho, R.; Alves, L.L.; Bizarro, João P.S.; Ferreira, J.; Figueiredo, A.; Figini, L.; Nowak, S.; Farina, D.; Kalupin, D.; Boulbe, C.; Faugeras, B.; Dinklage, A.

    2014-01-01

    A selection of achievements and first physics results are presented of the European Integrated Tokamak Modelling Task Force (EFDA ITM-TF) simulation framework, which aims to provide a standardized platform and an integrated modelling suite of validated numerical codes for the simulation and prediction of a complete plasma discharge of an arbitrary tokamak. The framework developed by the ITM-TF, based on a generic data structure including both simulated and experimental data, allows for the development of sophisticated integrated simulations (workflows) for physics application. The equilibrium reconstruction and linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability simulation chain was applied, in particular, to the analysis of the edge MHD stability of ASDEX Upgrade type-I ELMy H-mode discharges and ITER hybrid scenario, demonstrating the stabilizing effect of an increased Shafranov shift on edge modes. Interpretive simulations of a JET hybrid discharge were performed with two electromagnetic turbulence codes within ITM infrastructure showing the signature of trapped-electron assisted ITG turbulence. A successful benchmark among five EC beam/ray-tracing codes was performed in the ITM framework for an ITER inductive scenario for different launching conditions from the equatorial and upper launcher, showing good agreement of the computed absorbed power and driven current. Selected achievements and scientific workflow applications targeting key modelling topics and physics problems are also presented, showing the current status of the ITM-TF modelling suite. (paper)

  6. Physics of radiation-driven islands near the tokamak density limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, D.A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; White, R.B.

    2013-01-01

    In previous work (Gates and Delgado-Aparicio 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 165004), the onset criterion for radiation-driven islands (Rebut et al 1985 Proc. 10th Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1984 (London, UK, 1984) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) p 197) in combination with a simple cylindrical model of tokamak current channel behaviour was shown to be consistent with the empirical scaling of the tokamak density limit (Greenwald et al 1988 Nucl. Fusion 28 2199). A number of the unexplained phenomena at the density limit are consistent with this novel physics mechanism. In this work, a more formal theoretical underpinning, consistent with cylindrical tearing mode theory, is developed for the onset criteria of these modes. The appropriate derivation of the radiation-driven addition to the modified Rutherford equation (MRE) is discussed. Additionally, the ordering of the terms in the MRE is examined in a regime near the density limit. It is hoped that, given the apparent success of this simple model in explaining the observed global scalings, it will lead to a more comprehensive analysis of the possibility that radiation-driven islands are the physics mechanism responsible for the density limit. In particular, with modern diagnostic capabilities detailed measurements of current densities, electron densities and impurity concentrations at rational surfaces should be possible, enabling verification of the concepts described above. (paper)

  7. Density Modulation Experiments to Determine Particle Transport Coefficients on HT-7 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jie Yinxian; Gao Xiang; Tanaka, K; Sakamoto, R; Toi, K; Liu Haiqing; Gao Li; Asif, M; Liu Jin; Xu Qiang; Tong Xingde; Cheng Yongfei

    2006-01-01

    The particle diffusion coefficient and the convection velocity were studied based on the density modulation using D 2 gas puffing on the HT-7 tokamak. The density was measured by a five-channel FIR interferometer. The density modulation amplitude was 10% of the central chord averaged background density and the modulation frequency was 10 Hz in the experiments. The particle diffusion coefficient (D) and the convection velocity (V) were obtained for different background plasmas with the central chord averaged density e > = 1.5x10 19 m -3 and 3.0x10 19 m -3 respectively. It was observed that the influence of density modulation on the main plasma parameters was very weak. This technology is expected to be useful for the analysis of LHW and IBW heated plasmas on HT-7 tokamak in the near future

  8. Prediction of density limits in tokamaks: Theory, comparison with experiment, and application to the proposed Fusion Ignition Research Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2002-01-01

    A framework for the predictive calculation of density limits in future tokamaks is proposed. Theoretical models for different density limit phenomena are summarized, and the requirements for additional models are identified. These theoretical density limit models have been incorporated into a relatively simple, but phenomenologically comprehensive, integrated numerical calculation of the core, edge, and divertor plasmas and of the recycling neutrals, in order to obtain plasma parameters needed for the evaluation of the theoretical models. A comparison of these theoretical predictions with observed density limits in current experiments is summarized. A model for the calculation of edge pedestal parameters, which is needed in order to apply the density limit predictions to future tokamaks, is summarized. An application to predict the proximity to density limits and the edge pedestal parameters of the proposed Fusion Ignition Research Experiment is described

  9. Tokamak COMPASS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řípa, Milan; Křenek, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2011), s. 32-34 ISSN 1210-4612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : fusion * tokamak * Compass * Golem * Institute of Plasma Physics AVCR v.v * NBI * diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  10. Tokamaks (Second Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stott, Peter [JET, UK (United Kingdom)

    1998-10-01

    The first edition of John Wesson's book on tokamaks, published in 1987, established itself as essential reading for researchers in the field of magnetic confinement fusion: it was an excellent introduction for students to tokamak physics and also a valuable reference work for the more experienced. The second edition, published in 1997, has been completely rewritten and substantially enlarged (680 pages compared with 300). The new edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes discussion of the substantial advances in fusion research during the past decade. The new book, like its predecessor, is well written and commendable for its clarity and accuracy. In fact many of the chapters are written by a series of co-authors bringing the benefits of a wide range of expertise but, by careful editing, Wesson has maintained a uniformity of style and presentation. The chapter headings and coverage for the most part remain the same - but are expanded considerably and brought up to date. The most substantial change is that the single concluding chapter in the first edition on 'Experiments' has been replaced by three chapters: 'Tokamak experiments' which deals with some of the earlier key experiments plus a selection of recent small and medium-sized devices, 'Large experiments' which gives an excellent summary of the main results from the four large tokamaks - TFTR, JET, JT60/JT60U and DIII-D, and 'The future' which gives a very short (possibly too short in my opinion) account of reactors and ITER. This is an excellent book, which I strongly recommend should have a place - on the desk rather than in the bookshelf - of researchers in magnetic confinement fusion. (book review)

  11. Tokamaks (Second Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stott, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The first edition of John Wesson's book on tokamaks, published in 1987, established itself as essential reading for researchers in the field of magnetic confinement fusion: it was an excellent introduction for students to tokamak physics and also a valuable reference work for the more experienced. The second edition, published in 1997, has been completely rewritten and substantially enlarged (680 pages compared with 300). The new edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes discussion of the substantial advances in fusion research during the past decade. The new book, like its predecessor, is well written and commendable for its clarity and accuracy. In fact many of the chapters are written by a series of co-authors bringing the benefits of a wide range of expertise but, by careful editing, Wesson has maintained a uniformity of style and presentation. The chapter headings and coverage for the most part remain the same - but are expanded considerably and brought up to date. The most substantial change is that the single concluding chapter in the first edition on 'Experiments' has been replaced by three chapters: 'Tokamak experiments' which deals with some of the earlier key experiments plus a selection of recent small and medium-sized devices, 'Large experiments' which gives an excellent summary of the main results from the four large tokamaks - TFTR, JET, JT60/JT60U and DIII-D, and 'The future' which gives a very short (possibly too short in my opinion) account of reactors and ITER. This is an excellent book, which I strongly recommend should have a place - on the desk rather than in the bookshelf - of researchers in magnetic confinement fusion. (book review)

  12. Physics of energetic particle-driven instabilities in the START spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClements, K.G.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Akers, R.J.; Appel, L.C.; Counsell, G.F.; Roach, C.M.; Sharapov, S.E.; Majeski, R.

    1999-01-01

    The recent use of neutral beam injection (NBI) in the UKAEA small tight aspect ratio tokamak (START) has provided the first opportunity to study experimentally the physics of energetic ions in spherical tokamak (ST) plasmas. In such devices the ratio of major radius to minor radius R 0 /a is of order unity. Several distinct classes of NBI-driven instability have been observed at frequencies up to 1 MHz during START discharges. These observations are described, and possible interpretations are given. Equilibrium data, corresponding to times of beam-driven wave activity, are used to compute continuous shear Alfven spectra: toroidicity and high plasma beta give rise to wide spectral gaps, extending up to frequencies of several times the Alfven gap frequency. In each of these gaps Alfvenic instabilities could, in principle, be driven by energetic ions. Chirping modes observed at high beta in this frequency range have bandwidths comparable to or greater than the gap widths. Instability drive in START is provided by beam ion pressure gradients (as in conventional tokamaks), and also by positive gradients in beam ion velocity distributions, which arise from velocity-dependent charge exchange losses. It is shown that fishbone-like bursts observed at a few tens of kHz can be attributed to internal kink mode excitation by passing beam ions, while narrow-band emission at several hundred kHz may be due to excitation of fast Alfven (magnetosonic) eigenmodes. In the light of our understanding of energetic particle-driven instabilities in START, the possible existence of such instabilities in larger STs is discussed. (author)

  13. Microwave Tokamak Experiment: An overview of the construction and checkout phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, L.L.; Bell, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we constructed and presently operate the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) to demonstrate the feasibility of using microwave pulses produced from a free electron laser (FEL) to provide electron cyclotron heating (ECH) for use in tokamaks, particularly high-field machines. The MTX consists primarily of the ALCATOR C tokamak and power supplies that were documented and disassembled at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and shipped to LLNL in April 1987. We made many additions, including a new primary power system from the magnetic Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) substation, a new commutation system, substantially upgraded seismic support system for earthquake loading, a fast controls system for use with the FEL, a new data-acquisition system, and a new vault facility. We checked out these systems and put them into operation in October 1988; we achieved the first plasma in November 1988. We have also constructed and installed the microwave transmission system and the local microwave system to be used with the FEL. These systems transmit the microwaves to MTX quasi-optically through an evacuated tube. The ongoing plasma operations, both with and without FEL heating, are described in a companion paper. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Comparisons of theoretically predicted transport from ion temperature gradient instabilities to L-mode tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Wong, H.V.; Lyster, P.L.; Berk, H.L.; Denton, R.; Miner, W.H.; Valanju, P.

    1991-12-01

    The theoretical transport from kinetic micro-instabilities driven by ion temperature gradients is a sheared slab is compared to experimentally inferred transport in L-mode tokamaks. Low noise gyrokinetic simulation techniques are used to obtain the ion thermal transport coefficient X. This X is much smaller than in experiments, and so cannot explain L-mode confinement. Previous predictions based on fluid models gave much greater X than experiments. Linear and nonlinear comparisons with the fluid model show that it greatly overestimates transport for experimental parameters. In addition, disagreements among previous analytic and simulation calculations of X in the fluid model are reconciled

  15. Lower hybrid current drive experiments with graphite limiters in the HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Gao, X.; Hu, L.Q.; Asif, M.; Chen, Z.Y.; Ding, B.J.; Zhou, Q.; Liu, H.Q.; Jie, Y.X.; Kong, W.; Lin, S.Y.; Ding, Y.H.; Gao, L.; Xu, Q.

    2006-01-01

    Recent progress of lower hybrid (LH) experiments with new graphite limiters configuration in the HT-7 tokamak is presented. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) efficiency can be determined by fitting based on experimental data. Improved particle confinement was observed via LHCD (P LHW >300 kW) characterized by the particle confinement time τ p increased about 1.56 times. It is found that runaways are suppressed during loop voltage is decreasing at the flat-top phase of LH discharges. The main limitations of pulse length are presented in long-pulse experiments with new limiter configuration

  16. Physical experience enhances science learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontra, Carly; Lyons, Daniel J; Fischer, Susan M; Beilock, Sian L

    2015-06-01

    Three laboratory experiments involving students' behavior and brain imaging and one randomized field experiment in a college physics class explored the importance of physical experience in science learning. We reasoned that students' understanding of science concepts such as torque and angular momentum is aided by activation of sensorimotor brain systems that add kinetic detail and meaning to students' thinking. We tested whether physical experience with angular momentum increases involvement of sensorimotor brain systems during students' subsequent reasoning and whether this involvement aids their understanding. The physical experience, a brief exposure to forces associated with angular momentum, significantly improved quiz scores. Moreover, improved performance was explained by activation of sensorimotor brain regions when students later reasoned about angular momentum. This finding specifies a mechanism underlying the value of physical experience in science education and leads the way for classroom practices in which experience with the physical world is an integral part of learning. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Physics constraints on tokamak edge operational space and extrapolation to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igitkhanov, Yu.; Janeschitz, G.; Sugihara, M.; Pacher, H.D.; Post, D.E.; Pacher, G.W.; Pogutse, O.P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper emphasises the theoretical understanding of the physical processes in the edge tokamak plasma and their attendant uncertainties and constraints. The various operational boundaries are represented in the edge operational space (EOS) diagram, the space of edge density and temperature, defined at the top of the H-mode transport barrier. The EOS is governed by four boundaries representing physical constraints for the edge plasma parameters. The first boundary represents the onset of type I ELM instabilities in terms of a critical pressure gradient for MHD stability at the edge which defines the maximum pedestal temperature for a given density once the width of the H-mode transport barrier at the edge (pedestal width) is known. The ideal ballooning mode is a candidate for this instability. The second boundary defines the boundary between type III ELM's, which are probably resistive MHD modes, and the ELM-free region. (orig.)

  18. A ''SUPERCODE'' for systems analysis of tokamak experiments and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, S.W.; Barr, W.L.; Crotinger, J.A.; Perkins, L.J.; Solomon, C.J.; Chaniotakis, E.A.; Freidberg, J.P.; Wei, J.; Mandrekas, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new code, named SUPERCODE, has been developed to fill the gap between currently available zero dimensional systems codes and highly sophisticated, multidimensional plasma performance codes. The former are comprehensive in content, fast to execute, but rather simple in terms of the accuracy of their physics and engineering models. The latter contain state-of-the-art plasma physics modeling but are limited in engineering content and are time consuming to run. The SUPERCODE upgrades the reliability and accuracy of systems codes by calculating the self consistent 1 1/2-D plasma evolution in a realistic engineering environment. By a combination of variational techniques and careful formulation there is only a modest increase in CPU time over 0-D runs, thereby making the SUPERCODE suitable for use as a systems studies tool. In addition, we have expended considerable effort to make the code user- and programmer friendly, as well as operationally flexible, with the hope of encouraging wide usage throughout the fusion community

  19. Electrode and limiter biasing experiments on the tokamak ISTTOK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.; Figueiredo, H.; Cabral, J.A.C.; Nedzelsky, I.; Varandas, C.A.F.

    2003-01-01

    In this contribution limiter and electrode biasing experiments are compared, in particular in what concerns their effects on the edge plasma parameters. For electrode AC bias a substantial increase (>50%) in the average plasma density is observed with positive voltage, without significant changes in the edge density, leading to steeper profiles. The ratio n e /Hα also increases significantly (>20%), indicating an improvement in gross particle confinement. The plasma potential profile is strongly modified as both the edge E r and its shear increase significantly. For positive limiter bias an increase in the average plasma density and the radiation losses is observed, resulting in almost no modification, or a slight, in particle confinement. Preliminary results of simultaneous electrode and limiter bias experiments show that the control of the plasma potential profile is very limited, since negative voltages do not modify the plasma parameters significantly. (author)

  20. Results of Joint Experiments and other IAEA activities on research using small tokamaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brotánková, Jana; Dejarnac, Renaud; Dufková, Edita; Ďuran, Ivan; Hron, Martin; Sentkerestiová, Jana; Stöckel, Jan; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Zajac, Jaromír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 10 (2009), s. 104026-104026 ISSN 0029-5515. [IAEA Fusion Energy Conference/22nd./. Geneva, 13.10.2008-18.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak * probe diagnostics * sheared flows * edge plasma * turbulence Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.270, year: 2009 http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/49/10/104026

  1. Developing physics basis for the snowflake divertor in the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Allen, S. L.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Makowski, M. A.; McLean, A. G.; Meyer, W. H.; Ryutov, D. D.; Kolemen, E.; Groebner, R. J.; Hyatt, A. W.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Petrie, T. W.; Watkins, J.

    2018-03-01

    divertor was found. The results complement the initial SF divertor studies conducted in high-power H-mode discharges in the NSTX and DIII-D tokamaks, and, along with snowflake divertor results from TCV and other tokamaks, contribute to the physics basis of the SF divertor as a power exhaust concept for future high power density tokamaks.

  2. Pre-study of burn control in Tokamak reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elevant, T.; Anderson, D.; Hamnen, H.; Lisak, M.

    1991-04-01

    Findings from a general study of issues associated with control of burning fusion plasmas are reported, and applications to ITER are given. A number of control variables are discussed. A zerodimensional system has been developed and stability against coupled temperature and density variations are studied. Also space dependent energy balance and transition to thermonuclear burn are analysed as well as maximum obtainable Q-values under subignited operation conditions. Control designs with different input-output strategies are analysed and numerically simulated, and a numerical experiment of system identification is made. Requirements on diagnostics are discussed and areas for further studies are identified. (au) (64 refs.)

  3. Bounce Precession Fishbones in the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eric Fredrickson; Liu Chen; Roscoe White Eric Fredrickson; Liu Chen; Roscoe White

    2003-01-01

    Bursting modes are observed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557], which are identified as bounce-precession-frequency fishbone modes. They are predicted to be important in high-current, low-shear discharges with a significant population of trapped particles with a large mean-bounce angle, such as produced by near-tangential beam injection into a large aspect-ratio device. Such a distribution is often stable to the usual precession-resonance fishbone mode. These modes could be important in ignited plasmas, driven by the trapped-alpha-particle population

  4. Physics and Control of Locked Modes in the DIII-D Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    This Final Technical Report summarizes an investigation, carried out under the auspices of the DOE Early Career Award, of the physics and control of non-rotating magnetic islands (''locked modes'') in tokamak plasmas. Locked modes are one of the main causes of disruptions in present tokamaks, and could be an even bigger concern in ITER, due to its relatively high beta (favoring the formation of Neoclassical Tearing Mode islands) and low rotation (favoring locking). For these reasons, this research had the goal of studying and learning how to control locked modes in the DIII-D National Fusion Facility under ITER-relevant conditions of high pressure and low rotation. Major results included: the first full suppression of locked modes and avoidance of the associated disruptions; the demonstration of error field detection from the interaction between locked modes, applied rotating fields and intrinsic errors; the analysis of a vast database of disruptive locked modes, which led to criteria for disruption prediction and avoidance.

  5. Physics and Control of Locked Modes in the DIII-D Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpe, Francesco [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics

    2017-01-30

    This Final Technical Report summarizes an investigation, carried out under the auspices of the DOE Early Career Award, of the physics and control of non-rotating magnetic islands (“locked modes”) in tokamak plasmas. Locked modes are one of the main causes of disruptions in present tokamaks, and could be an even bigger concern in ITER, due to its relatively high beta (favoring the formation of Neoclassical Tearing Mode islands) and low rotation (favoring locking). For these reasons, this research had the goal of studying and learning how to control locked modes in the DIII-D National Fusion Facility under ITER-relevant conditions of high pressure and low rotation. Major results included: the first full suppression of locked modes and avoidance of the associated disruptions; the demonstration of error field detection from the interaction between locked modes, applied rotating fields and intrinsic errors; the analysis of a vast database of disruptive locked modes, which led to criteria for disruption prediction and avoidance.

  6. The MTX [Microwave Tokamak Experiment] data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butner, D.N.; Drlik, M.; Brown, M.D.; Casper, T.A.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The diagnostic data from the MTX experiment is acquired and processed by an expandable, distributed, multivendor computer network. The system blends a variety of software into a coordinated, unified, and highly flexible design. Using modular software design techniques, we created a system stressing distributed processing, portability, and transparent data access. In our approach to modularity, we standardized communication interfaces between modules and separated generic tasks from machine and application-specific implementations. For flexible distributed processing, we used modular, portable software and LLNL facility that provides an interprocess communication system (IPCS) in the multivendor network. With transparent data access, any program can access data stored anywhere in the network without knowing the specific location. The computer hardware includes a DEC VAX cluster, HP workstations and HP desktop computers. We are using commercial software in addition to packages from MIT, ORNL, and LLNL. 4 refs., 4 figs

  7. Magnet power system for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.C.; Musslewhite, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The system configuration, layout, and general philosophy for the MTX magnet power system is described. The vast majority of the magnet power equipment was quite successfully used on the ALCATOR-C experiment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The AC power for the magnet system at MIT was obtained from a 225MVA alternator. The power for the system at LLNL is obtained directly from the local utility's 230 kV line. This installation, therefore, necessitates the addition of a great deal of equipment in ranges from new switchgear in the substation to using existing switchgear obtained from MIT as contractors for intershop electrical isolation as well as safety isolation for personnel entry into the experimental area. Additionally, some discussion is made of the unique layout of this facility and the tradeoffs made to accommodate them. 2 refs., 6 figs

  8. Nonlocal neoclassical transport in tokamak and spherical torus experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W. X.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W. M.; Hinton, F. L.; Manickam, J.; Zakharov, L. E.; White, R. B.; Kaye, S.

    2006-01-01

    Large ion orbits can produce nonlocal neoclassical effects on ion heat transport, the ambipolar radial electric field, and the bootstrap current in realistic toroidal plasmas. Using a global δf particle simulation, it is found that the conventional local, linear gradient-flux relation is broken for the ion thermal transport near the magnetic axis. With regard to the transport level, it is found that details of the ion temperature profile determine whether the transport is higher or lower when compared with the predictions of standard neoclassical theory. Particularly, this nonlocal feature is suggested to exist in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, S. M. Kaye, Y.-K. M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)], being consistent with NSTX experimental evidence. It is also shown that a large ion temperature gradient can increase the bootstrap current. When the plasma rotation is taken into account, the toroidal rotation gradient can drive an additional parallel flow for the ions and then additional bootstrap current, either positive or negative, depending on the gradient direction. Compared with the carbon radial force balance estimate for the neoclassical poloidal flow, our nonlocal simulation predicts a significantly deeper radial electric field well at the location of an internal transport barrier of an NSTX discharge

  9. ASDEX upgrade - definition of a tokamak experiment with a reactor compatible polaoidal divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    ASDEX Upgrade is intended as the next experimental step after ASDEX. It is designed to investigate the physics of a divertor tokamak as closely as possible to fusion reactor requirements, without thermonuclear heating. It is characterized by a poloidal divertor configuration with divertor coils located outside the toroidal field coils, by machine parameters which allow a line density within the plasma boundary sufficient to screen fast CX particles from the plasma core, by a scrape-off layer essentially opaque to neutrals produced at the target plates, and, finally, by an auxiliary heating power high enough for producing a reactor-like power flux density through the plasma boundary. Design considerations on the basis of physical and technical constraints yielded the tokamak system optimized with respect to effort and costs as described in the following. It uses normal-conducting coil systems, is the size of ASDEX, and has a field of 3.9 T, a plasma current of up to 1.5 MA, and a pulse duration of 10 s. To provide the required power flux density, an ICRH power of 10 MW is needed. For comparison, a superconducting version is under investigation. (orig.)

  10. Physics of the interaction between runaway electrons and the background plasma of the current quench in tokamak disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reux, Cedric

    2017-10-01

    Runaway electrons are created during disruptions of tokamak plasmas. They can be accelerated in the form of a multi-MA beam at energies up to several 10's of MeV. Prevention or suppression of runaway electrons during disruptions will be essential to ensure a reliable operation of future tokamaks such as ITER. Recent experiments showed that the suppression of an already accelerated beam with massive gas injection was unsuccessful at JET, conversely to smaller tokamaks. This was attributed to a dense, cold background plasma (up to several 1020 m-3 accompanying the runaway beam. The present contribution reports on the latest experimental results obtained at JET showing that some mitigation efficiency can be restored by changing the features of the background plasma. The density, temperature, position of the plasma and the energy of runaways were characterized using a combined analysis of interferometry, soft X-rays, bolometry, magnetics and hard X-rays. It showed that lower density background plasmas were obtained using smaller amounts of gas to trigger the disruption, leading to an improved penetration of the mitigation gas. Based on the observations, a physical model of the creation of the background plasma and its subsequent evolution is proposed. The plasma characteristics during later stages of the disruption are indeed dependent on the way it was initially created. The sustainment of the plasma during the runaway beam phase is then addressed by making a power balance between ohmic heating, power transfer from runaway electrons, radiation and atomic processes. Finally, a model of the interaction of the plasma with the mitigation gas is proposed to explain why massive gas injection of runaway beams works only in specific situations. This aims at pointing out which parameters bear the most importance if this mitigation scheme is to be used on larger devices like ITER. Acknowledgement: This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium

  11. Plasma formation and first OH experiments in GLOBUS-M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.K.; Aleksandrov, S.V.; Burtseva, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper reports results of experimental campaigns on plasma ohmic heating, performed during 1999-2000 on the spherical tokamak Globus-M. Later experimental results with tokamak fed by thyristor rectifiers are presented in detail. The toroidal magnetic field and plasma pulse duration in these experiments were significantly increased. The method of stray magnetic field compensation is described. The technology of vacuum vessel conditioning, including boronization of the vessel performed at the end of the experiments, is briefly discussed. Also discussed is the influence of ECR preioniziation on the breakdown conditions. Experimental data on plasma column formation and current ramp-up in different regimes of operation with the magnetic flux of the central solenoid (CS) limited to ∼100 mVs are presented. Ramp-up of the plasma current of 0.25 MA for the time interval ∼0.03 s with about 0.02 s flat-top at the toroidal field (TF) strength of 0.35 T allows the conclusion that power supplies, control system and wall conditioning work well. The same conclusion can be drawn from observation of plasma density behavior the density is completely controlled with external gas puff and the influence of the wall is negligible after boronization. The magnetic flux consumption efficiency is discussed. The results of magnetic equilibrium simulations are presented and compared with experiment. (author)

  12. Experiments in Fundamental Neutron Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Nico, J. S.; Snow, W. M.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments using slow neutrons address a growing range of scientific issues spanning nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. The field of fundamental physics using neutrons has experienced a significant increase in activity over the last two decades. This review summarizes some of the recent developments in the field and outlines some of the prospects for future research.

  13. Fast IR diodes thermometer for tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiangbo

    2001-01-01

    A 30 channel fast IR pyrometry array has been constructed for tokamak, which has 0.5 μs time response, 10 mm diameter spatial resolution and 5 degree C temperature resolution. The temperature measuring range is from 250 degree C to 1200 degree C. The two dimensional temperature profiles of the first wall during both major and minor disruptions can be measured with an accuracy of about 1% measuring temperature, which is adequate for tokamak experiments. This gives a very useful tool for the disruption study, especially for the divertor physics and edge heat flux research on tokamak and other magnetic confinement devices

  14. Simulated experiments in modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirnini, Mahmud Hasan

    1981-01-01

    Author.In this thesis a number of the basic experiments of atomic and nuclear physics are simulated on a microcomputer interfaced to a chart recorder and CRT. These will induce the student to imagine that he is actually performing the experiments. He will collect data to be worked out. The thesis covers the relevant material to set up such experiments in the modern physics laboratory

  15. Physics and operation oriented activities in preparation of the JT-60SA tokamak exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giruzzi, G.; Yoshida, M.; Artaud, J. F.; Asztalos, Ö.; Barbato, E.; Bettini, P.; Bierwage, A.; Boboc, A.; Bolzonella, T.; Clement-Lorenzo, S.; Coda, S.; Cruz, N.; Day, Chr.; De Tommasi, G.; Dibon, M.; Douai, D.; Dunai, D.; Enoeda, M.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Fukumoto, M.; Galazka, K.; Galdon, J.; Garcia, J.; Garcia-Muñoz, M.; Garzotti, L.; Gil, C.; Gleason-Gonzalez, C.; Goodman, T.; Granucci, G.; Hayashi, N.; Hoshino, K.; Ide, S.; Imazawa, R.; Innocente, P.; Isayama, A.; Itami, K.; Joffrin, E.; Kamada, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kawano, Y.; Kawashima, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Kojima, A.; Kubo, H.; Lang, P.; Lauber, Ph.; de la Luna, E.; Maget, P.; Marchiori, G.; Mastrostefano, S.; Matsunaga, G.; Mattei, M.; McDonald, D. C.; Mele, A.; Miyata, Y.; Moriyama, S.; Moro, A.; Nakano, T.; Neu, R.; Nowak, S.; Orsitto, F. P.; Pautasso, G.; Pégourié, B.; Pigatto, L.; Pironti, A.; Platania, P.; Pokol, G. I.; Ricci, D.; Romanelli, M.; Saarelma, S.; Sakurai, S.; Sartori, F.; Sasao, H.; Scannapiego, M.; Shimizu, K.; Shinohara, K.; Shiraishi, J.; Soare, S.; Sozzi, C.; Stępniewski, W.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Szepesi, T.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, K.; Terranova, D.; Toma, M.; Urano, H.; Vega, J.; Villone, F.; Vitale, V.; Wakatsuki, T.; Wischmeier, M.; Zagórski, R.

    2017-08-01

    The JT-60SA tokamak, being built under the Broader Approach agreement jointly by Europe and Japan, is due to start operation in 2020 and is expected to give substantial contributions to both ITER and DEMO scenario optimisation. A broad set of preparation activities for an efficient start of the experiments on JT-60SA is being carried out, involving elaboration of the Research Plan, advanced modelling in various domains, feasibility and conception studies of diagnostics and other sub-systems in connection with the priorities of the scientific programme, development and validation of operation tools. The logic and coherence of this approach, as well as the most significant results of the main activities undertaken are presented and summarised.

  16. Review of ICRF antenna development and heating experiments up to advanced experiment I, 1989 on the JT-60 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tsuneyuki

    1992-03-01

    Two main subjects of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating on JT-60 are described in this paper from development phase of the JT-60 ICRF heating system up to advanced experiment I, 1989. One is antenna design and development for the high power JT-60 ICRF heating system (6 MW for 10 s at a frequency range of 108 - 132 MHz). The other is the experimental investigation of characteristics of second harmonic ICRF heating in a large tokamak. (J.P.N.)

  17. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  18. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations

  19. Particle control and plasma performance in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majeski, R.; Abrams, T.; Boyle, D.; Granstedt, E.; Hare, J.; Jacobson, C. M.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B.; Lundberg, D. P.; Lucia, M.; Merino, E.; Schmitt, J.; Stotler, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Biewer, T. M.; Canik, J. M.; Gray, T. K.; Maingi, R.; McLean, A. G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kubota, S. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment is a small, low aspect ratio tokamak [Majeski et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 055014 (2009)], which is fitted with a stainless steel-clad copper liner, conformal to the last closed flux surface. The liner can be heated to 350 °C. Several gas fueling systems, including supersonic gas injection and molecular cluster injection, have been studied and produce fueling efficiencies up to 35%. Discharges are strongly affected by wall conditioning. Discharges without lithium wall coatings are limited to plasma currents of order 10 kA, and discharge durations of order 5 ms. With solid lithium coatings discharge currents exceed 70 kA, and discharge durations exceed 30 ms. Heating the lithium wall coating, however, results in a prompt degradation of the discharge, at the melting point of lithium. These results suggest that the simplest approach to implementing liquid lithium walls in a tokamak—thin, evaporated, liquefied coatings of lithium—does not produce an adequately clean surface.

  20. Plasma jet source parameter optimisation and experiments on injection into Globus-M spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.K.; Petrov, Yu.V.; Sakharov, N.V.; Semenov, A.A.; Voronin, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental research on the plasma sources and injection of plasma and gas jet produced by the modified source into tokamak Globus-M are presented. An experimental test stand was developed for investigation of intense plasma jet generation. Optimisation of pulsed coaxial accelerator parameters by means of analytical calculations is performed with the aim of achieving the highest flow velocity at limited coaxial electrode length and discharge current. The optimal parameters of power supply to generate a plasma jet with minimal impurity contamination and maximum flow velocity were determined. A comparison of experimental and calculation results is made. Plasma jet parameters are measured, such as: impurity species content, pressure distribution across the jet, flow velocity, plasma density, etc. Experiments on the interaction of a higher kinetic energy plasma jet with the magnetic field and plasma of the Globus-M tokamak were performed. Experimental results on plasma and gas jet injection into different Globus-M discharge phases are presented and discussed. Results are presented on the investigation of plasma jet injection as the source for discharge breakdown, plasma current startup and initial density rise. (author)

  1. VUV study of impurity generation during ICRF heating experiments on the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, H.L.

    1986-06-01

    A 2.2 meter grazing incidence VUV monochromator has been converted into a time-resolving spectrograph by the addition of a new detector system, based on a microchannel plate image intensifier linked to a 1024-element linear photodiode array. The system covers the wavelength range 15 to 1200 A (typically 40 A at a time) with resolution of up to .3 A FWHM. Time resolution is selectable down to 0.5 msec. The system sensitivity was absolutely calibrated below 150 A by a soft x-ray calibration facility. The spectrograph was installed on the Alcator C tokamak at MIT to monitor plasma impurity emission. There, cross-calibration with a calibrated EUV monochromator was performed above 400 A. Calibration results, system performance characteristics, and data from Alcator C are presented. Observations of impurity behavior are presented from a series of ICRF heating experiments (180 MHz, 50 to 400 kW) performed on the Alcator C tokamak, using graphite limiters and stainless steel antenna Faraday shields

  2. Simulation of the MHD stabilities of the experiment on HL-2A tokamak by GATO code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Wei; Chen Liaoyuan; Dong Jiaqi; Shen Yong; Zhang Jinhua

    2009-01-01

    The ideal two-dimensional MHD stabilities code, GATO, has been successfully immigrated to the high-performance computing system of HL-2A and used to the simulation study of the ideal MHD stabilities of the plasmas produced by one of the pellets injection experiments on HL-2A tokamak. The EFIT code was used to reconstruct the equilibrium configures firstly and the GATO was used to compute their MHD stabilities secondly whose source data were obtained by the NO.4050 discharge of the experiments on HL-2A, and finally by analyzing these results the preliminary conclusion was devised that the confinement performance of the plasma was improved because of the stabilization effect of the anti-sheared configures created by the pellets injection. (authors)

  3. Observation of Flat Electron Temperature Profiles in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, D. P.; Majeski, R.; Schmitt, J. C.; Auburn University, AL; Hansen, C.

    2017-01-01

    It has been predicted for over a decade that low-recycling plasma-facing components in fusion devices would allow high edge temperatures and flat or nearly flat temperature profiles. In recent experiments with lithium wall coatings in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX), a hot edge (> 200 eV) and flat electron temperature profiles have been measured following the termination of external fueling. In this work, reduced recycling was demonstrated by retention of ~ 60% of the injected hydrogen in the walls following the discharge. Electron energy confinement followed typical Ohmic confinement scaling during fueling, but did not decrease with density after fueling terminated, ultimately exceeding the scaling by ~ 200% . Lastly, achievement of the low-recycling, hot edge regime has been an important goal of LTX and lithium plasma-facing component research in general, as it has potentially significant implications for the operation, design, and cost of fusion devices.

  4. Particle physics experiments, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    Data taking for this experiment was completed in December 1983. The samples include approximately 19,000 (ν) and 11,000 (ν-bar) charged current events. These constitute the largest data set of interactions on free protons. Work published to date includes studies of inclusive structure functions and final state properties, exclusive final states, neutral current cross sections and production of strange and charmed particles. During the past year results have been published on the production of f 2 (1270) and ν 0 (770) mesons in ρp and ρ-barp charged current interactions. In the case of the f 2 this represents the first observation of such production. It is found that the multiplicities are 0.047±0.017 in ρp and 0.17±0.018 in ρ-barp. The f 2 mesons are mostly produced at large hadronic invariant mass W and in the forward hemisphere. The production of ν 0 mesons can be observed with high statistics in both ρp and ρ-barp interactions and the differential cross section studied. The observations are compared with LUND Monte Carlo predictions, which are generally found to be too high. However qualitative features of the data are reproduced. Work continues on a precise determination of the neutral current/charged current ratio, on the study of charged and neutral current structure functions and on the production of strange particles. (author)

  5. Research into controlled fusion in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, F.

    1992-01-01

    During the thirty years of tokamak research, physicists have been approaching step by step the reactor breakeven condition defined by the Lawson criterion. JET, the European Community tokamak is probably the first candidate among the world largest tokamaks to reach the ignition threshold and thus to demonstrate the physical feasibility of thermonuclear reaction. The record plasma parameters achieved in JET at H plasma modes due to powerful additional plasma heating and due to substantial reduction of plasma impurities, opened the door to the first experiment with a deuterium-tritium plasma. In the paper, the conditions and results of these tritium experiments are described in detail. The prospects of the world tokamak research and of the participation of Czechoslovak physicists are also discussed. (J.U.) 3 figs., 6 refs

  6. Nuclear physics experiment at INS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Kenzo.

    1981-02-01

    Present activities at the Institute for Nuclear Study (INS) are presented. Selected topics are from recent experiments by use of the INS cyclotron, experiments at the Bevalac facility under the INS-LBL collaboration program, and preparatory works for the Numatron project, a new project for the high-energy heavy-ion physics. (author)

  7. Loss of beam ions to the inside of the PDX [Poloidal Divertor Experiment] tokamak during the fishbone instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    1986-11-01

    Using data from two vertical charge-exchange detectors on the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), we have identified a set of conditions for which loss of beam ions inward in major radius is observed during the fishbone instability. Previously, it was reported that beam ions were lost only to the outside of the PDX tokamak

  8. Poloidal magnetic field profile measurements on the microwave tokamak experiment using far-infrared polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    The measurement of plasma poloidal magnetic field (B) profiles in tokamaks with good temporal and spatial resolution has proven to be a difficult but important measurement. A large range of toroidal confinement phenomena is expected to depend sensitively on the radial variation of B including the tearing instability, sawtooth oscillations, disruptions, and transport. Experimental confirmation of theoretical models describing these phenomena has been hampered by the lack of detailed B measurements. A fifteen chord far-infrared (FIR) polarimeter has been developed to measure B in the Microwave Tokamak, Experiment (MTX). Polarimetry utilizes the well known Faraday rotation effect, which causes a rotation of the polarization of an FIR beam propagating in the poloidal plane. The rotation angle is proportional to the component of B parallel to the beam. A new technique for determining the Faraday rotation angle is introduced, based on phase measurements of a rotating polarization ellipse. This instrument has been used successfully to measure B profiles for a wide range of experiments on MTX. For ohmic discharges, measurements of the safety factor on axis give q 0 ∼ 0.75 during sawteeth and q 0 > 1 without sawteeth. Large perturbations to the polarimeter signals correlated with the sawtooth crash are observed during some discharges. Measurements in discharges with electron cyclotron heating (ECH) show a transition from a hollow to peaked J profile that is triggered by the ECH pulse. Current-ramp experiments were done to perturb the J profile from the nominal Spitzer conductivity profile. Profiles for initial current ramps and ramps starting from a stable equilibrium have been measured and are compared with a cylindrical diffusion model. Finally, the tearing mode stability equation is solved using measured J profiles. Stability predictions are in good agreement with the existence of oscillations observed on the magnetic loops

  9. Experimental determination of some equilibrium parameter of Damavand tokamak by magnetic probe measurements for representing a physical model for plasma vertical movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, N Darestani; Davani, F Abbasi

    2015-10-01

    This investigation is about plasma modeling for the control of vertical instabilities in Damavand tokamak. This model is based on online magnetic measurement. The algebraic equation defining the vertical position in this model is based on instantaneous force-balance. Two parameters in this equation, including decay index, n, and lambda, Λ, have been considered as functions of time-varying poloidal field coil currents and plasma current. Then these functions have been used in a code generated for modeling the open loop response of plasma. The main restriction of the suitability analysis of the model is that the experiments always have to be performed in the presence of a control loop for stabilizing vertical position. As a result, open loop response of the system has been identified from closed loop experimental data by nonlinear neural network identification method. The results of comparison of physical model with identified open loop response from closed loop experiments show root mean square error percentage less than 10%. The results are satisfying that the physical model is useful as a Damavand tokamak vertical movement simulator.

  10. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.F.A.; Harbour, P.J.; Hotston, E.S.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  11. Symplectic approach to calculation of magnetic field line trajectories in physical space with realistic magnetic geometry in divertor tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjabi, Alkesh; Ali, Halima

    2008-12-01

    A new approach to integration of magnetic field lines in divertor tokamaks is proposed. In this approach, an analytic equilibrium generating function (EGF) is constructed in natural canonical coordinates (ψ,θ) from experimental data from a Grad-Shafranov equilibrium solver for a tokamak. ψ is the toroidal magnetic flux and θ is the poloidal angle. Natural canonical coordinates (ψ,θ,φ) can be transformed to physical position (R,Z,φ) using a canonical transformation. (R,Z,φ) are cylindrical coordinates. Another canonical transformation is used to construct a symplectic map for integration of magnetic field lines. Trajectories of field lines calculated from this symplectic map in natural canonical coordinates can be transformed to trajectories in real physical space. Unlike in magnetic coordinates [O. Kerwin, A. Punjabi, and H. Ali, Phys. Plasmas 15, 072504 (2008)], the symplectic map in natural canonical coordinates can integrate trajectories across the separatrix surface, and at the same time, give trajectories in physical space. Unlike symplectic maps in physical coordinates (x,y) or (R,Z), the continuous analog of a symplectic map in natural canonical coordinates does not distort trajectories in toroidal planes intervening the discrete map. This approach is applied to the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. E. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The EGF for the DIII-D gives quite an accurate representation of equilibrium magnetic surfaces close to the separatrix surface. This new approach is applied to demonstrate the sensitivity of stochastic broadening using a set of perturbations that generically approximate the size of the field errors and statistical topological noise expected in a poloidally diverted tokamak. Plans for future application of this approach are discussed.

  12. Symplectic approach to calculation of magnetic field line trajectories in physical space with realistic magnetic geometry in divertor tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, Alkesh; Ali, Halima

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to integration of magnetic field lines in divertor tokamaks is proposed. In this approach, an analytic equilibrium generating function (EGF) is constructed in natural canonical coordinates (ψ,θ) from experimental data from a Grad-Shafranov equilibrium solver for a tokamak. ψ is the toroidal magnetic flux and θ is the poloidal angle. Natural canonical coordinates (ψ,θ,φ) can be transformed to physical position (R,Z,φ) using a canonical transformation. (R,Z,φ) are cylindrical coordinates. Another canonical transformation is used to construct a symplectic map for integration of magnetic field lines. Trajectories of field lines calculated from this symplectic map in natural canonical coordinates can be transformed to trajectories in real physical space. Unlike in magnetic coordinates [O. Kerwin, A. Punjabi, and H. Ali, Phys. Plasmas 15, 072504 (2008)], the symplectic map in natural canonical coordinates can integrate trajectories across the separatrix surface, and at the same time, give trajectories in physical space. Unlike symplectic maps in physical coordinates (x,y) or (R,Z), the continuous analog of a symplectic map in natural canonical coordinates does not distort trajectories in toroidal planes intervening the discrete map. This approach is applied to the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. E. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The EGF for the DIII-D gives quite an accurate representation of equilibrium magnetic surfaces close to the separatrix surface. This new approach is applied to demonstrate the sensitivity of stochastic broadening using a set of perturbations that generically approximate the size of the field errors and statistical topological noise expected in a poloidally diverted tokamak. Plans for future application of this approach are discussed.

  13. Real-time virtual EAST physical experiment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan, E-mail: lidan@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Xiao, B.J., E-mail: bjxiao@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Xia, J.Y., E-mail: jyxia@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Yang, Fei, E-mail: fyang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Department of Computer Science, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • 3D model of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak is established. • Interaction behavior is created that the users can get information from database. • The system integrates data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and simulation. • Browser-oriented system is web-based and more interactive, immersive and convenient. • The system provides the framework for virtual physical experimental environment. - Abstract: As a large fusion reaction device, experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST)’s internal structure is complicated and not easily accessible. Moreover, various diagnostic systems and complicated configuration bring about the inconveniency to the scientists who are unfamiliar with the system but interested in the data. We propose a virtual system to display the 3D model of EAST facility and enable people to view its inner structure and get access to the information of its components in various view sights. We would also provide most of the diagnostic configuration details together with their signal names and physical properties. Compared to the previous ways of viewing information by reference to collected drawings and videos, virtual EAST system is more interactive and immersive. We constructed the browser-oriented virtual EAST physical experiment system, integrated real-time experiment data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and experiment result simulation in order to reproduce physical experiments in a web browser. This system used B/S (Browser/Server) structure in combination with the technology of virtual reality – VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java 3D. In order to avoid the bandwidth limit across internet, we balanced the rendering speed and the precision of the virtual model components. Any registered user can view the experimental information visually and efficiently by logining the system through a web browser. The establishment of the system provides the

  14. Real-time virtual EAST physical experiment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Xiao, B.J.; Xia, J.Y.; Yang, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • 3D model of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak is established. • Interaction behavior is created that the users can get information from database. • The system integrates data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and simulation. • Browser-oriented system is web-based and more interactive, immersive and convenient. • The system provides the framework for virtual physical experimental environment. - Abstract: As a large fusion reaction device, experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST)’s internal structure is complicated and not easily accessible. Moreover, various diagnostic systems and complicated configuration bring about the inconveniency to the scientists who are unfamiliar with the system but interested in the data. We propose a virtual system to display the 3D model of EAST facility and enable people to view its inner structure and get access to the information of its components in various view sights. We would also provide most of the diagnostic configuration details together with their signal names and physical properties. Compared to the previous ways of viewing information by reference to collected drawings and videos, virtual EAST system is more interactive and immersive. We constructed the browser-oriented virtual EAST physical experiment system, integrated real-time experiment data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and experiment result simulation in order to reproduce physical experiments in a web browser. This system used B/S (Browser/Server) structure in combination with the technology of virtual reality – VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java 3D. In order to avoid the bandwidth limit across internet, we balanced the rendering speed and the precision of the virtual model components. Any registered user can view the experimental information visually and efficiently by logining the system through a web browser. The establishment of the system provides the

  15. Parametric system studies of candidate TF coil system options for the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiersen, W.T.; Flanagan, C.A.; Miller, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    System studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of hybrid and superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil system options to maximum field at the TF coil and to field enhancement due to resistive insert coils. The studies were performed using Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design assumptions, guidelines, and criteria and involved iterative execution of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) systems code, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium code, and EFFI (a code to evaluate magnetic field strength). The results indicate that for TFCX with no minimum wall loading specified, a design point chosen solely on the basis of cost would likely be in the low-field region of design space where the cost advantage of hybrids is least apparent. However, as the desired neutron wall loading increases, the hybrid option suggests an increasing cost advantage over the all-superconducting option; this cost advantage is countered by increased complexity in design -- particularly in assembly and maintenance

  16. Preliminary experiment of non-induced plasma current startup on SUNIST spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yexi; Zhang Liang; Xie Lifeng; Tang Yi; Yang Xuanzong; Fu Hongjun

    2005-01-01

    Non-inductive plasma current startup is an important motivation on the SUNIST spherical tokamak. In this experiment, a 100 kW, 2.45 GHz magnetron microwave system has been applied to the plasma current startup. Besides the toroidal field, a vertical field was applied to generate a preliminary toroidal plasma current without action of the central solenoid. As the evidence of the plasma current startup by the vertical field drift effect, the direction of the plasma current is changed with the changing direction of the vertical field during ECR startup discharge. We have also observed the plasma current maximum by scanning the vertical field in both directions. Additionally, we have used electrode discharge to assist the ECR current startup. (author)

  17. Feedback control and stabilization experiments on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.; Richards, B.; Wootton, A.J.; Bengtson, R.D.; Bravenec, R.; Carreras, B.A.; Li, G.X.; Hurwitz, P.; Phillips, P.E.; Rowan, W.L.; Tsui, H.Y.W.; Uglum, J.R.; Wen, Y.; Winslow, D.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma edge feedback experiments on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) have been successful in controlling the edge plasma potential fluctuation level. The feedback wave-launcher is driven by the local edge potential fluctuations. The edge potential fluctuations are modified in a broad frequency band. Moreover, the potential fluctuations can be reduced (≤100 kHz) without enhancing other modes, or excited (10 to 12 kHz), depending on the phase difference between the driver and the launcher signal, and gain of the system. This turbulence modification is achieved not only locally but also halfway around the torus and has about 2 cm of poloidal extent. The local plasma parameters at the edge and the estimated fluctuation-induced radial particle flux are somewhat affected by the edge feedback. ((orig.))

  18. Overview of steady-state tokamak operation and current drive experiments in TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zushi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Hanada, K.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments aiming at 'day long operation at high performance' have been carried out. The record value of the discharge duration was updated to 5 h and 16 min. Steady-state tokamak operation (SSTO) is studied under the localized PWI conditions. The distributions of the heat load, the particle recycling flux and impurity source are investigated to understand the co-deposition and wall pumping. Formation and sustainment of an internal transport barrier ITB in enhanced current drive mode (ECD) has been investigated by controlling the lower hybrid driven current profile by changing the phase spectrum. An ITER relevant remote steering antenna for electron cyclotron wave ECW injection was installed and a relativistic Doppler resonance of the oblique propagating extraordinary wave with energetic electrons driven by lower hybrid waves was studied. (author)

  19. ICRF experiments and synergy with LHCD on HT-6M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Yin, F.X.; Wan, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    The successful ion cyclotron heating (ICRH) experiment with high power density of nearly 1MW/m 3 was carried out in HT-6M tokamak. The good heating efficiency was achieved by using different wall conditioning techniques, such as He GDC, Ti gettering and boronization. With 300kW injected RF power, the ion temperature reach about 750eV and Te increases from 700eV to about 1keV. Synergy effects between lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ICRH have some unique features. The current driven efficiency improved in full current drive case from 0.8x10 19 AW -1 M -2 (without ICRH) to 1.75x10 19 AW -1 M -2 (with ICRH). The reason for this high current driven efficiency may because the mode conversion at ion-ion hybrid resonance to an Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) which is damped on the fast electron. (author)

  20. Parametric system studies of candidate TF coil system options for the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiersen, W.T.; Flanagan, C.A.; Miller, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    System studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of hybrid and superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil system options to maximum field at the TF coil and to field enhancement due to resistive insert coils. The studies were performed using Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design assumptions, guidelines, and criteria and involved iterative execution of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) systems code, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium code, and EFFI (a code to evaluate magnetic field strength). The results indicate that for TFCX with no minimum wall loading specified, a design point chosen solely on the basis of cost would likely be in the low-field region of design space where the cost advantage of hybrids is least apparent. However, as the desired neutron wall loading increases, the hybrid option suggests an increasing cost advantage over the all-superconducting option; this cost advantage is countered by increased complexity in design - particularly in assembly and maintenance

  1. Advanced Tokamak Stability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linjin

    2015-03-01

    The intention of this book is to introduce advanced tokamak stability theory. We start with the derivation of the Grad-Shafranov equation and the construction of various toroidal flux coordinates. An analytical tokamak equilibrium theory is presented to demonstrate the Shafranov shift and how the toroidal hoop force can be balanced by the application of a vertical magnetic field in tokamaks. In addition to advanced theories, this book also discusses the intuitive physics pictures for various experimentally observed phenomena.

  2. The Physics of Local Helicity Injection Non-Solenoidal Tokamak Startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, A. J.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Jardin, S.

    2013-10-01

    Non-solenoidal startup via Local Helicity Injection (LHI) uses compact current injectors to produce toroidal plasma current Ip up to 170 kA in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment, driven by 4-8 kA injector current on timescales of 5-20 milliseconds. Increasing the Ip buildup duration enables experimental demonstration of plasma position control on timescales relevant for high-current startup. LHI-driven discharges exhibit bursty MHD activity, apparently line-tied kinking of LHI-driven field lines, with the bursts correlating with rapid equilibrium changes, sharp Ip rises, and sharp drops in the injector impedance. Preliminary NIMROD results suggest that helical LHI-driven current channels remain coherent, with Ip increases due to reconnection between adjacent helical turns forming axisymmetric plasmoids, and corresponding sharp drops in the bias circuit impedance. The DC injector impedance is consistent with a space charge limit at low bias current and a magnetic limit at high bias current. Internal measurements show the current density profile starts strongly hollow and rapidly fills in during Ip buildup. Simulations of LHI discharges using the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) will provide insight into the detailed current drive mechanism and guide experiments on PEFASUS and NSTX-U. Work supported by US DOE Grants DE-FG02-96ER54375 and DE-SC0006928.

  3. Examining the temperature behavior of stainless steel surfaces exposed to hydrogen plasmas in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Felipe; Allain, Jean Paul; Kaita, Robert; Lucia, Matthew; St-Onge, Denis; Ellis, Robert; Majeski, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP) is an in-situ diagnostic designed to characterize plasma-facing components (PFCs) in tokamak devices. MAPP is installed in LTX at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. MAPP's capabilities include remotely operated XPS acquisition and temperature control of four samples. The recent addition of a focused ion beam allows XPS depth profiling analysis. Recent published results show an apparent correlation between hydrogen retention and temperature of Li coated stainless steel (SS) PFCs exposed to plasmas like those of LTX. According to XPS data, the retention of hydrogen by the coated surfaces decreases at above 180 °C. In the present study MAPP will be used to study the oxidation of Li coatings as a function of time and temperature of the walls when Li coatings are applied. Experiments in the ion-surface interaction experiment (IIAX) varying the hydrogen fluence on the SS samples will be also performed. Conclusions resulting from this study will be key to explain the PFC temperature-dependent variation of plasma performance observed in LTX. This work was supported by U.S. DOE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-SC0010717.

  4. Physical design of MW-class steady-state spherical tokamak, QUEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanada, K.; Sato, K.N.; Zushi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Higashizono, Y.; Yoshida, N.; Takase, Y.; Ejiri, A.; Ogawa, Y.; Ono, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Mitarai, O.; Maekawa, T.; Kishimoto, Y.; Ishiguro, M.; Yoshinaga, T.; Igami, H.; Hirooka, Y.; Komori, A.; Motojima, O.; Sudo, S.; Yamada, H.; Ando, A.; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Matsukawa, Makoto; Ishida, A.; Ohno, N.; Peng, M.

    2008-10-01

    QUEST (R=0.68 m, a=0.4 m) focuses on the steady state operation of the spherical tokamak (ST) by controlled PWI and electron Bernstain wave (EBW) current drive (CD). The QUEST project will be developed along two phases, phase I: steady state operation with plasma current, I p =20-30 kA on open divertor configuration and phase II: steady state operation with I p = 100 kA and β of 10% in short pulse on closed divertor configuration. Feasibility of the missions on QUEST was investigated and the suitable machine size of QUEST was decided based on the physical view of plasma parameters. Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) current drive are planned to establish the maintenance of plasma current in steady state. Mode conversion efficiency to EBW was calculated and the conversion of 95% will be expected. A new type antenna for QUEST has been fabricated to excite EBW effectively. The situation of heat and particle handling is challenging, and W and high temperature wall is adopted. The start-up scenario of plasma current was investigated based on the driven current by energetic electron and the most favorable magnetic configuration for start-up is proposed. (author)

  5. Diagnostics upgrade and capability available for physics study on EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Liqun

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of employment of many new techniques and upgrade of EAST superconducting tokamak to enhance divertor plasma performance, significant achievement has been realized in 2012, including 400s long pulse plasma, stationary 35s H-mode and 3.45s H-mode with only ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) etc. To approach steady-state (SS) operation of high-performance plasmas and address key physics on fusion reactor-relevent subjects, recently, capability of the plasma heating and current drive of EAST machine are doubled with total auxiliary injection power over 20 MW, including new methodology of neutral beam injection (NBI) and electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH). Most diagnostics have been upgraded to be more compact and integrated due to limited port window and space available, and new advanced neutral-beam related diagnostics have been developed as well, to provide profile of all key parameters for study and understanding critical issues specific to SS high performance plasma. (author)

  6. Physics conditions for robust control of tearing modes in a rotating tokamak plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, E.; Borgogno, D.; Brunetti, D.; Comisso, L.; Fevrier, O.; Grasso, D.; Lutjens, H.; Maget, P.; Nowak, S.; Sauter, O.; Sozzi, C.; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2018-01-01

    The disruptive collapse of the current sustained equilibrium of a tokamak is perhaps the single most serious obstacle on the path toward controlled thermonuclear fusion. The current disruption is generally too fast to be identified early enough and tamed efficiently, and may be associated with a variety of initial perturbing events. However, a common feature of all disruptive events is that they proceed through the onset of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and field reconnection processes developing magnetic islands, which eventually destroy the magnetic configuration. Therefore the avoidance and control of magnetic reconnection instabilities is of foremost importance and great attention is focused on the promising stabilization techniques based on localized rf power absorption and current drive. Here a short review is proposed of the key aspects of high power rf control schemes (specifically electron cyclotron heating and current drive) for tearing modes, considering also some effects of plasma rotation. From first principles physics considerations, new conditions are presented and discussed to achieve control of the tearing perturbations by means of high power ({P}{{EC}}≥slant {P}{{ohm}}) in regimes where strong nonlinear instabilities may be driven, such as secondary island structures, which can blur the detection and limit the control of the instabilities. Here we consider recent work that has motivated the search for the improvement of some traditional control strategies, namely the feedback schemes based on strict phase tracking of the propagating magnetic islands.

  7. Pedestal evolution physics in low triangularity JET tokamak discharges with ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C.; Dickinson, D.; Horvath, L.; Lunniss, A. E.; Wilson, H. R.; Cziegler, I.; Frassinetti, L.; Gibson, K.; Kirk, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Maggi, C. F.; Roach, C. M.; Saarelma, S.; Snyder, P. B.; Thornton, A.; Wynn, A.; Contributors, JET

    2018-01-01

    The pressure gradient of the high confinement pedestal region at the edge of tokamak plasmas rapidly collapses during plasma eruptions called edge localised modes (ELMs), and then re-builds over a longer time scale before the next ELM. The physics that controls the evolution of the JET pedestal between ELMs is analysed for 1.4 MA, 1.7 T, low triangularity, δ  =  0.2, discharges with the ITER-like wall, finding that the pressure gradient typically tracks the ideal magneto-hydrodynamic ballooning limit, consistent with a role for the kinetic ballooning mode. Furthermore, the pedestal width is often influenced by the region of plasma that has second stability access to the ballooning mode, which can explain its sometimes complex evolution between ELMs. A local gyrokinetic analysis of a second stable flux surface reveals stability to kinetic ballooning modes; global effects are expected to provide a destabilising mechanism and need to be retained in such second stable situations. As well as an electron-scale electron temperature gradient mode, ion scale instabilities associated with this flux surface include an electro-magnetic trapped electron branch and two electrostatic branches propagating in the ion direction, one with high radial wavenumber. In these second stability situations, the ELM is triggered by a peeling-ballooning mode; otherwise the pedestal is somewhat below the peeling-ballooning mode marginal stability boundary at ELM onset. In this latter situation, there is evidence that higher frequency ELMs are paced by an oscillation in the plasma, causing a crash in the pedestal before the peeling-ballooning boundary is reached. A model is proposed in which the oscillation is associated with hot plasma filaments that are pushed out towards the plasma edge by a ballooning mode, draining their free energy into the cooler plasma there, and then relaxing back to repeat the process. The results suggest that avoiding the oscillation and maximising the region

  8. H-mode transition physics close to DN on MAST and its applications to other tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: ELMy H-mode is the base-line operating scenario for the next step fusion device ITER. To improve active and passive pedestal control a deeper understanding of H- mode physics is desirable. MAST contributes towards this understanding with good edge diagnostics, and by accessing extreme parameter regimes. The first inter-machine comparisons with respect to the influence of the magnetic topology on the power threshold with ASDEX-Upgrade and NSTX reveal a reduction of the power threshold in true double null (C-DN) configuration opening new operation regimes in both devices. The 30% reduction in threshold power close to C-DN observed on ASDEX-Upgrade, though significant, is less than the factor of two or more observed in both large spherical tokamaks, MAST and NSTX. This points towards the importance of field line curvature for this effect. The power thresholds measured in C-DN on MAST and NSTX are very similar. Despite this strong effect on the power threshold, changes in most edge parameters in L-mode due to the different magnetic configurations are small. However, significant changes are seen in the toroidal impurity flow velocity, related to the radial electric field, and in the scrape-off-layer temperature decay length at the high field side. The statistical comparison of MAST data with various H-mode theories suggests that different instabilities need to be stabilised at different spatial positions in the region where the pedestal forms to access H-mode. Pedestal temperatures observed on MAST are two to five times lower than in MAST equivalent discharges at ASDEX-Upgrade. However, the pedestal densities are similar. The differences in L-mode are less significant. The usual DN operating regime with co current NBI in MAST has been extended to include single null (SN) configurations, to provide more direct comparisons with conventional tokamaks. The plasma edge in SN on MAST is more stable to ELMs and the typical type-III ELMs, often observed in C-DN, are

  9. Enhancing current density profile control in tokamak experiments using iterative learning control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felici, F.A.A.; Oomen, T.A.E.

    2015-01-01

    Tokamaks are toroidal devices to create and confine high-temperature plasmas, and are presently at the forefront of nuclear fusion research. Many parameters in a tokamak are feedback controlled, but some quantities that are either difficult to measure or difficult to control are still controlled by

  10. Neutral beam in ALVAND IIC tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghrannevisse, M.; Moradshahi, M.; Avakian, M.

    1992-01-01

    Neutral beams have a wide application in tokamak experiments. It used to heat; fuel; adjust electric potentials in plasmas and diagnose particles densities and momentum distributions. It may be used to sustain currents in tokamaks to extend the pulse length. A 5 KV; 500 mA ion source has been constructed by plasma physics group, AEOI and it used to produce plasma and study the plasma parameters. Recently this ion source has been neutralized and it adapted to a neutral beam source; and it used to heat a cylindrical DC plasma and the plasma of ALVAND IIC Tokamak which is a small research tokamak with a minor radius of 12.6 cm, and a major radius of 45.5 cm. In this paper we report the neutralization of the ion beam and the results obtained by injection of this neutral beam into plasmas. (author) 2 refs., 4 figs

  11. Utilization of fusion neutrons in the tokamak fusion test reactor for blanket performance testing and other nuclear engineering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, C.S.; Pettus, W.G.; Schmotzer, J.K.; Welfare, F.; Womack, R.

    1979-01-01

    In addition to developing a set of reacting-plasma/blanket-neutronics benchmark data, the TFTR fusion application experiments would provide operational experience with fast-neutron dosimetry and the remote handling of blanket modules in a tokamak reactor environment; neutron streaming and hot-spot information invaluable for the optimal design of penetrations in future fusion reactors; and the identification of the most damage-resistant insulators for a variety of fusion-reactor components

  12. Plasma features and alpha particle transport in low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qiang; Wang Shaojie

    1997-06-01

    The results of the experiment and theory from low-aspect ratio tokamak devices have proved that the MHD stability will be improved. Based on present plasma physics and extrapolation to reduced aspect ratio, the feature of physics of low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor is discussed primarily. Alpha particle confinement and loss in the self-justified low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor parameters and the effect of alpha particle confinement and loss for different aspect ratio are calculated. The results provide a reference for the feasible research of compact tokamak reactor. (9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.)

  13. Preliminary oscillating fluxes current drive experiment in DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Schaffer, M.; Kondoh, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary oscillating flux helicity injection experiment was done on DIII-D tokamak. The toroidal flux was modulated by programming the plasma elongation. Instead of programming the surface voltage directly, the plasma current was programmed with a periodic modulation at some phase shift. The theoretical basis of this modulation is discussed in terms of the helicity injection and also introduced by cross-field motion of the modulated plasma. Because the primary winding is well coupled with the plasma current and the power supply is strong, the plasma current behaves as programmed. However, as the plasma shape is not coupled strongly with the shaping and equilibrium coils, the elongation amplitude and phase are affected by the change of plasma current and do not behave as programmed. Because of this, the voltage induced by the helicity injection is low, and the experiment did not test the principle of helicity injection. The injection powers of helicity and energy, and the electric field intensity of the helicity injection model and the cross-field motion of plasma are compared with each other experimentally. The improvement necessary to do the experiment is also proposed. ((orig.))

  14. High frequency ion Bernstein wave heating experiment on JIPP T-IIU tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Watari, T.

    1992-08-01

    An experiment in a new regime of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating has been carried out using 130 MHz high power transmitters in the JIPP T-IIU tokamak. The heating regime utilized the IBW branch between the 3rd and 4th harmonics of the hydrogen ion cyclotron frequencies. This harmonic number is the highest among those used in the IBW experiments ever conducted. The net radio-frequency (RF) power injected into the plasma is around 400 kW, limited by the transmitter output power. Core heating of ions and electrons was confirmed in the experiment and density profile peaking was found to feature the IBW heating (IBWH). The peaking of the density profile was also found when IBW was applied to the neutral beam injection heated discharges. An analysis by use of a transport code with these experimental data indicates that the particle confinement should be improved in the plasma core region on the application of IBWH. It is also found that the ion energy distribution function observed during IBWH has less high energy tail than those in conventional ion cyclotron range of frequency heating regimes. The observed IBWH-produced ion energy distribution function is in a reasonable agreement with the calculation based on the quasi-linear RF diffusion / Fokker-Planck model. (author)

  15. Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1997-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment is proposed for experimental studies of spheromak confinement issues in a controlled way: in steady state relative to the confinement timescale and at low collisionality. Experiments in a flux - conserver will provide data on transport in the presence of resistive modes in shear-stabilized systems and establish operating regimes which pave the way for true steady-state experiments with the equilibrium field supplied by external coils. The proposal is based on analysis of past experiments, including the achievement of T e = 400 eV in a decaying spheromak in CTX. Electrostatic helicity injection from a coaxial ''''gun'''' into a shaped flux conserver will form and sustain the plasma for several milliseconds. The flux conserver minimizes fluxline intersection with the walls and provides MHD stability. Improvements from previous experiments include modem wall conditioning (especially boronization), a divertor for density and impurity control, and a bias magnetic flux for configurational flexibility. The bias flux will provide innovative experimental opportunities, including testing helicity drive on the large-radius plasma boundary. Diagnostics include Thomson scattering for T e measurements and ultra-short pulse reflectrometry to measure density and magnetic field profiles and turbulence. We expect to operate at T e of several hundred eV, allowing improved understanding of energy and current transport due to resistive MHD turbulence during sustained operation. This will provide an exciting advance in spheromak physics and a firm basis for future experiments in the fusion regime

  16. Tokamak instrumentation and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becraft, W.R.; Bettis, E.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Onega, R.J.; Stone, R.S.

    1979-02-01

    The three areas of study emphasis to date are: (1) Physics implications for controls, (2) Computer simulation, and (3) Shutdown/aborts. This document reports on the FY 78 efforts (the first year of these studies) to address these problems. Transient scenario options for the startup of a tokamak are developed, and the implications for the control system are discussed. This document also presents a hybrid computer simulation (analog and digital) of the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) which is now being used for corroborative controls investigations. The simulation will be expanded to represent a TNS/ETF machine

  17. Feedback control and stabilization experiments on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.; Carreras, B.A.; Richards, B.; Wootton, A.J.; Bengtson, R.D.; Bravenec, R.; Li, G.X.; Hurwitz, P.D.; Phillips, P.E.; Rowan, W.L.

    1994-06-01

    Plasma edge feedback experiments on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) have been successful in controlling the edge plasma potential fluctuation level. The feedback wave-launcher, consisting of electrostatic probes located in the shadow of the limiter, is driven by the local edge potential fluctuations. In general, the edge potential fluctuations are modified in a broad frequency band. Moreover, it is observed that the potential fluctuations can be reduced (≤100 kHz) without enhancing other modes, or excited (10 to 12 kHz), depending on the phase difference between the driver and the launcher signal, and gain of the system. This turbulence modification is achieved not only locally but also halfway around the torus and has about 2 cm of poloidal extent. Experiments on the characterization of the global plasma parameters with the edge feedback are discussed. Effects of the edge feedback on the estimated fluctuation-induced radial particle flux as well as on the local plasma parameters are presented

  18. Low-noise cable for diagnostics, control and instrumentation of the ASDEX tokamak fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gernhardt, J.

    1988-11-01

    ASDEX (Axially Symmetric Divertor EXperiment) is a large tokamak (R=1.65 m; a=0.4 m) with an air transformer. The relatively large stray field, Bz=10 mT=(100 G); for ρ=5 m, Bz=40 mT=(400 G); for ρ=3 m, BΦ=0.3 T=(3 kG); for ρ=3m, compared with that of an iron transformer, and the cable length 1≤30 m from the experiment to the control room, make mainly the magnetically induced and capacitively coupled noise signal in the cable relatively high. As a result of neutral injection (> 4 MW; 40 kV) and lower hybrid ion cyclotron and Alfven wave heating strong E-fields are produced and noise is coupled into the cables. These magnetic and electric field gradients during the plasma shot vary with time and location. This report tries to show how these noise signals can be reduced without reducing the broadcast frequency of the signal. The Electro Magnetic Compatibility and Interference (EMC, EMI) are discussed. The cost of diagnostic cable, connectors and cable ducts without mounting is approximately DM 700,000.--. (orig.)

  19. An experiment in diffractive physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Alberto

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this talk is to show one of the next future experiment in diffractive Physics which will be installed at the DO experiment at Tevatron/Fermilab for run II, and the importance for Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) as the theory of the strong interactions. The apparatus that we have developed is the Forward Proton Detector (FPD) to be introduced on the beam line of the Tevatron at both sides of the DO detector. The FPD is composed by a set of Roman Pots as we will see in the text below

  20. DEMONSTRATION IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK OF AN ALTERNATE BASELINE SCENARIO FOR ITER AND OTHER BURNING PLASMA EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUCE, T.C.; WADE, M.R.; FERRON, J.R.; HYATT, A.W.; KELLMAN, A.G.; KINSEY, J.E.; LAHAY, R.J.; LASNIER, C.J.; MURAKAMI, M.; POLITZER, P.A.; SCOVILLE, J.T.

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 DEMONSTRATION IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK OF AN ALTERNATE BASELINE SCENARIO FOR ITER AND OTHER BURNING PLASMA EXPERIMENTS. Discharges which can satisfy the high gain goals of burning plasma experiments have been demonstrated in the DIII-D tokamak in stationary conditions with relatively low plasma current (q 95 > 4). A figure of merit for fusion gain Β N H 89 /q 95 2 has been maintained at values corresponding to Q = 10 operation in a burning plasma for > 6 s or 36 τ E and 2 τ R . The key element is the relaxation of the current profile to a stationary state with q min > 1, which allows stable operation up to the no-wall ideal β limit. These plasmas maintain particle balance by active pumping rather than transient wall conditions. The reduced current lessens significantly the potential for structural damage in the event of a major disruption

  1. Modeling of sawtooth destabilization during radio-frequency heating experiments in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClements, K.G.; Dendy, R.O.; Hastie, R.J.; Martin, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    Sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks have been stabilized using ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), but often reappear while ICRH continues. It is shown that the reappearance of sawteeth during one particular ICRH discharge in the Joint European Torus (JET) [Campbell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 2148 (1988)] was correlated with a change of sign in the energy δW associated with m=1 internal kink displacements. To compute δW, a new analytical model is used for the distribution function of heated minority ions, which is consistent with Fokker endash Planck simulations of ICRH. Minority ions have a stabilizing influence, arising from third adiabatic invariant conservation, but also contribute to a destabilizing shift of magnetic flux surfaces. As the minor radius of the q=1 surface rises, the stabilizing influence of minority ions diminishes, and the shape of the plasma cross section becomes increasingly important. It is shown that an increase in ICRH power can destabilize the kink mode: this is consistent with observations of sawteeth in JET discharges with varying levels of ICRH. It is suggested that the sawtooth-free period could be prolonged by minimizing the vertical extent of the ICRH power deposition profile.1996 American Institute of Physics

  2. Impact of maximum TF magnetic field on performance and cost of an advanced physics tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric studies were conducted using the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code to investigate the impact of variation in the maximum value of the field at the toroidal field (TF) coils on the performance and cost of a low q/sub psi/, quasi-steady-state tokamak. Marginal ignition, inductive current startup plus 100 s of inductive burn, and a constant value of epsilon (inverse aspect ratio) times beta poloidal were global conditions imposed on this study. A maximum TF field of approximately 10 T was found to be appropriate for this device

  3. Integral torque balance in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, V.D.

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at clarifying the balance between the sinks and sources in the problem of intrinsic plasma rotation in tokamaks reviewed recently by deGrassie (2009 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51 124047). The integral torque on the toroidal plasma is calculated analytically using the most general magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma model taking account of plasma anisotropy and viscosity. The contributions due to several mechanisms are separated and compared. It is shown that some of them, though, possibly, important in establishing the rotation velocity profile in the plasma, may give small input into the integral torque, but an important contribution can come from the magnetic field breaking the axial symmetry of the configuration. In tokamaks, this can be the error field, the toroidal field ripple or the magnetic perturbation created by the correction coils in the dedicated experiments. The estimates for the error-field-induced electromagnetic torque show that the amplitude of this torque is comparable to the typical values of torques introduced into the plasma by neutral beam injection. The obtained relations allow us to quantify the effect that can be produced by the existing correction coils in tokamaks on the plasma rotation, which can be used in experiments to study the origin and physics of intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Several problems are proposed for theoretical studies and experimental tests.

  4. The Physics Basis For An Advanced Physics And Advanced Technology Tokamak Power Plant Configuration, ARIES-ACT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Kessel, et al

    2014-03-05

    The advanced physics and advanced technology tokamak power plant ARIES-ACT1 has a major radius of 6.25 m at aspect ratio of 4.0, toroidal field of 6.0 T, strong shaping with elongation of 2.2 and triangularity of 0.63. The broadest pressure cases reached wall stabilized βN ~ 5.75, limited by n=3 external kink mode requiring a conducting shell at b/a = 0.3, and requiring plasma rotation, feedback, and or kinetic stabilization. The medium pressure peaking case reached βN = 5.28 with BT = 6.75, while the peaked pressure case reaches βN < 5.15. Fast particle MHD stability shows that the alpha particles are unstable, but this leads to redistribution to larger minor radius rather than loss from the plasma. Edge and divertor plasma modeling show that about 75% of the power to the divertor can be radiated with an ITER-like divertor geometry, while over 95% can be radiated in a stable detached mode with an orthogonal target and wide slot geometry. The bootstrap current fraction is 91% with a q95 of 4.5, requiring about ~ 1.1 MA of external current drive. This current is supplied with 5 MW of ICRF/FW and 40 MW of LHCD. EC was examined and is most effective for safety factor control over ρ ~ 0.2-0.6 with 20 MW. The pedestal density is ~ 0.9x1020 /m3 and the temperature is ~ 4.4 keV. The H98 factor is 1.65, n/nGr = 1.0, and the net power to LH threshold power is 2.8- 3.0 in the flattop.

  5. The design of the poloidal divertor experiment tokamak wall armor and inner limiter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Ulrickson, M.

    1982-01-01

    The inner wall protective plates for the Poloidal Divertor Experiment Tokamak are designed to absorb 8 MW of neutral deuterium beam power at maximum power densities of 3 kW/cm 2 for pulse lengths of 0.5 s. Preliminary studies indicate that the design could survive several pulses of l-s duration. The design consists of a tile and mounting plate structure. The mounting plates are water cooled to allow short duty cycles and beam calorimetry. The temperature and flow of the coolant are measured to obtain the injected power. A thermocouple array on the tiles provides beam position and power density profiles. Several material combinations for the tiles were subjected to thermal tests using both electron and neutral beams, and titanium-carbidecoated graphite was selected as the tile material. The heat transfer coefficient of the tile backing plate structure was measured to determine the maximum pulse rate allowable. The design of the armor system allows the structure to be used as a neutral beam power diagnostic and as an inner plasma limiter. The electrical and cooling systems external to the vacuum vessel are discussed

  6. Study of LHW and IBW synergy experiment on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, X.

    2001-01-01

    A successful experiment on lower hybrid wave (LHW) and ion Bernstein wave (IBW) synergy has been carried out in the HT-7 superconducting tokamak. With 500 kW of LHW heating power and 200 kW of injected IBW power, it is observed that the ion temperature increases from 500 eV to about 850 eV, the electron temperature increases from 800 eV to 1.2 keV, and the averaged electron density increases from 0.9x10 19 m -3 to 2.6x10 19 m -3 . The plasma parameters were obviously enhanced by means of the LHW and IBW heating and their synergy. The charge-exchange spectra of the neutral particle analysis (NPA) diagnostics data clearly showed that the high-energy ion tail which was produced by the LHW was decreased by the synergy with the IBW, and the bulk ion temperature was increased. The mechanism of the LHW and IBW synergy effect is discussed. (author)

  7. High performance experiments on high pressure supersonic molecular beam injection in the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Lianghua; Dong Jiafu; Zhou Yan; Feng Beibing; Cao Jianyong; Li Wei; Feng Zhen; Zhang Jiquan; Hong Wenyu; Cui Zhengying; Wang Enyao; Liu Yong

    2004-01-01

    Supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) was first proposed and demonstrated on the HL-1 tokamak and was successfully developed and used on HL-1M. Recently, new results of SMBI experiments were obtained by increasing the gas pressure from 0.5 to over 1.0 MPa. A stair-shaped density increment was obtained with high-pressure multi-pulse SMBI that was similar to the density evolution behaviour during multi-pellet injection. This demonstrated the effectiveness of SMBI as a promising fuelling tool for steady-state operation. The penetration depth and injection speed of the high-pressure SMBI were roughly measured from the contour plot of the Hα emission intensity. It was shown that injected particles could penetrate into the core region of the plasma. The penetration speed of high-pressure SMBI particles in the plasma was estimated to be about 1200 m s -1 . In addition, clusters within the beam may play an important role in the deeper injection. (author)

  8. U.S.S.R. eyes role in U.S. compact tokamak ignition experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, M.

    1987-01-01

    Physicists working on nuclear fusion in the Soviet Union want to participate in America's next experiment, the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). Soviet scientists first mentioned the idea to Department of Energy (DOE) officials last spring but have not put forth any formal proposal. Department officials, however, say the Soviets are serious about working with the US on the project. From the outset, however, efforts to work more closely with the Soviets on fusion research have been stifled by concerns within the Administration that sensitive Western technology will be transferred to the Soviet Union's military establishment. The key to Soviet participation in CIT may depend on what they can contribute materially, as well as intellectually to the US project. Soviet scientists are currently defining how their country might contribute to the CIT, and they could submit a proposal to the US within a year. Indeed, the technology transfer issue has made DOE and State Department officials reluctant to discuss the possibility of the Soviet Union taking a role in the CIT. They fear that the concept will be rejected on ideological grounds before the merits of a Soviet proposal can be considered

  9. Tokamak power plant burn cycle options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1994-06-01

    Experiments show that tokamaks can operate in various fashions. Economic analyses show that steady state is most attractive provided the physics and technology of current drive (CD) can be modestly improved. Even with very conservative CD assumptions a hybrid operating mode seems superior to conventional, simple inductive operation

  10. Modular pulse sequencing in a tokamak system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, A.C.; Lee, S.; Saw, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    Pulse technique applied in the timing and sequencing of the various part of the MUT tokamak system are discussed. The modular architecture of the pulse generating device highlights the versatile application of the simple physical concepts in precise and complicated research experiment. (author)

  11. Physics Design of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, G.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Lyon, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    Compact quasi-axisymmetric stellarators offer the possibility of combining the steady-state low-recirculating power, external control, and disruption resilience of previous stellarators with the low-aspect ratio, high beta-limit, and good confinement of advanced tokamaks. Quasi-axisymmetric equilibria have been developed for the proposed National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) with average aspect ratio approximately 4.4 and average elongation approximately 1.8. Even with bootstrap-current consistent profiles, they are passively stable to the ballooning, kink, vertical, Mercier, and neoclassical-tearing modes for b > 4%, without the need for external feedback or conducting walls. The bootstrap current generates only 1/4 of the magnetic rotational transform at b = 4% (the rest is from the coils). Transport simulations show adequate fast-ion confinement and thermal neoclassical transport similar to equivalent tokamaks. Modular coils have been designed which reproduce the physics properties, provide good flux surfaces, and allow flexible variation of the plasma shape to control the predicted MHD stability and transport properties

  12. Tokamak simulation code manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Kyoo; Oh, Byung Hoon; Hong, Bong Keun; Lee, Kwang Won

    1995-01-01

    The method to use TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code) developed by Princeton plasma physics laboratory is illustrated. In KT-2 tokamak, time dependent simulation of axisymmetric toroidal plasma and vertical stability have to be taken into account in design phase using TSC. In this report physical modelling of TSC are described and examples of application in JAERI and SERI are illustrated, which will be useful when TSC is installed KAERI computer system. (Author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Calculation of triton confinement and burn-up in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.; Battistoni, P.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical investigation is made of the confinement and subsequent burn-up of fusion produced tritons in a deuterium Tokamak plasma. Explicit approximations are obtained for the triton confinement factor, clearly displaying the scaling with physical parameters. The importance of pitch angle scattering losses during the triton slowing down is also estimated. A comparison with experiments and numerical calculations on the FT Tokamak slows good qualitative agreement. (authors)

  14. Parametric dependence of density limits in the Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR): Comparison of thermal instability theory with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, F.A.; Stacey, W.M.; Rapp, J.

    2001-01-01

    The observed dependence of the TEXTOR [Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research: E. Hintz, P. Bogen, H. A. Claassen et al., Contributions to High Temperature Plasma Physics, edited by K. H. Spatschek and J. Uhlenbusch (Akademie Verlag, Berlin, 1994), p. 373] density limit on global parameters (I, B, P, etc.) and wall conditioning is compared with the predicted density limit parametric scaling of thermal instability theory. It is necessary first to relate the edge parameters of the thermal instability theory to n(bar sign) and the other global parameters. The observed parametric dependence of the density limit in TEXTOR is generally consistent with the predicted density limit scaling of thermal instability theory. The observed wall conditioning dependence of the density limit can be reconciled with the theory in terms of the radiative emissivity temperature dependence of different impurities in the plasma edge. The thermal instability theory also provides an explanation of why symmetric detachment precedes radiative collapse for most low power shots, while a multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge MARFE precedes detachment for most high power shots

  15. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant

  16. Kinetic simulations of scrape-off layer physics in the DIII-D tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Churchill

    2017-08-01

    The XGCa simulation of the DIII-D tokamak in a nominally sheath-limited regime show many noteworthy features in the SOL. The density and ion temperature are higher at the low-field side, indicative of ion orbit loss. The SOL ion Mach flows are at experimentally relevant levels (Mi ∼ 0.5, with similar shapes and poloidal variation as observed in various tokamaks. Surprisingly, the ion Mach flows close to the sheath edge remain subsonic, in contrast to the typical fluid Bohm criterion requiring ion flows to be above sonic at the sheath edge. Related to this are the presence of elevated sheath potentials, eΔΦ/Te∼3−4, over most of the SOL, with regions in the near-SOL close to the separatrix having eΔΦ/Te > 4. These two results at the sheath edge are a consequence of non-Maxwellian features in the ions and electrons there.

  17. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  18. Remote operation of the vertical plasma stabilization @ the GOLEM tokamak for the plasma physics education

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, V.; Kocman, J.; Grover, O.; Krbec, Jaroslav; Stöckel, Jan

    96-97, October (2015), s. 974-979 ISSN 0920-3796. [Symposium on Fusion Technology 2014(SOFT-28)/28./. San Sebastián, 29.09.2014-03.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak technology * remote participation * plasma stabilization Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.301, year: 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fusengdes.2015.06.044

  19. Fast wave ion cyclotron resonance heating experiments on the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, T.D.

    1988-09-01

    Minority regime fast wave ICRF heating experiments have been conducted on the Alcator C tokamak at rf power levels sufficient to produce significant changes in plasma properties, and in particular to investigate the scaling to high density of the rf heating efficiency. Up to 450 kW of rf power at frequency f = 180 MHz, was injected into plasmas composed of deuterium majority and hydrogen minority ion species at magnetic field B 0 = 12 T, density 0.8 ≤ /bar n/sub e// ≤ 5 /times/ 10 20 m -3 , ion temperature T/sub D/(0) /approximately/ 1 keV, electron temperature T/sub e/(0) /approximately/ 1.5--2.5 keV, and minority concentration 0.25 /approx lt/ /eta/sub H// ≤ 8%. Deuterium heating ΔT/sub D/(0) = 400 eV was observed at /bar n/sub e// = 1 /times/ 10 20 m -3 , with smaller temperature increases at higher density. However, there was no significant change in electron temperature and the minority temperatures were insufficient to account for the launched rf power. Minority concentration scans indicated most efficient deuterium heating at the lowest possible concentration, in apparent contradiction with theory. Incremental heating /tau/sub inc// /equivalent to/ ΔW/ΔP up to 5 ms was independent of density, in spite of theoretical predictions of favorable density scaling of rf absorption and in stark contrast to Ohmic confinement times /tau/sub E// /equivalent to/ W/P. After accounting for mode conversion and minority losses due to toroidal field ripple, unconfined orbits, asymmetric drag, neoclassical and sawtooth transport, and charge-exchange, it was found that the losses as well as the net power deposition on deuterium do scale very favorably with density. Nevertheless, when the net rf and Ohmic powers deposited on deuterium are compared, they are found to be equally efficient at heating the deuterium. 139 refs

  20. Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misti A Lillo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

  1. Perfecting of shielding calculation technique against the gamma rays arising from a Tokamak with the TFR experience. Application to the conceptual design Tokamak TORE 2 SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diop, Cheikh M'Backe.

    1980-09-01

    The conception of the necessary shielding around a conceptual design Tokamak requires to execute an estimated calculation of the doses due to the different radiation sources arising from the machine: the thermonuclear neutron source and the gamma ray source emitted during the interaction of the runaway electrons with the diaphragm. In this study, we propose a theorical method to calculate this gamma source. We tackle also the shielding problem of the conceptual design Tokamak: TORE 2 SUPRA [fr

  2. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, J A

    1994-11-30

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (10{sup 8} K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called `tokamak` this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high `fusion` temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This `anomalous transport` of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL).

  3. Generation of net electric power with a tokamak reactor under foreseeable physical and engineering conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiwatari, R.; Asaoka, Y.; Okano, K.; Yoshida, T.; Tomabechi, K.

    2004-01-01

    This study reveals for the first time the plasma performance required for a tokamak reactor to generate net electric power under foreseeable engineering conditions. It was found that the reference plasma performance of the ITER inductive operation mode with β N = 1.8, HH = 1.0, andf nGW 0.85 had sufficient potential to achieve the electric break-even condition (net electric power P e net = 0MW) under the following engineering conditions: machine major radius 6.5m ≤ R p ≤ 8.5m, the maximum magnetic field on TF coils B tmax = 16 T, thermal efficiency η e 30%, and NBI system efficiency η NBI = 50%. The key parameters used in demonstrating net electric power generation in tokamak reactors are β N and fη GW . ≥ 3.0 is required for P e net ∼ 600MW with fusion power P f ∼ 3000MW. On the other hand, fη GW ≥ 1.0 is inevitable to demonstrate net electric power generation, if high temperatures, such as average temperatures of T ave > 16 keV, cannot be selected for the reactor design. To apply these results to the design of a tokamak reactor for demonstrating net electric power generation, the plasma performance diagrams on the Q vs P f (energy multiplication factor vs fusion power) space for several major radii (i.e. 6.5, 7.5, and 8.5 m) were depicted. From these figures, we see that a design with a major radius R p ∼ 7.5m seems preferable for demonstrating net electric power generation when one aims at early realization of fusion energy. (author)

  4. Heat load material studies: Simulated tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahl, J.M.; McDonald, J.M.; Zakharov, A.; Tserevitinov, S.; Barabash, V.; Guseva, M.

    1991-01-01

    It is clear that an improved understanding of the effects of tokamak disruptions on plasma facing component materials is needed for the ITER program. very large energy fluxes are predicted to be deposited in ITER and could be very damaging to the machine. During 1991, Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico conducted cooperative tokamak disruption simulation experiments at several Soviet facilities. These facilities were located at the Efremov Institute in Leningrad, the Kurchatov Atomic Energy Institute (Troisk and Moscow) and the Institute for Physical Chemistry of the Soviet Adademy of Sciences in Moscow. Erosion of graphite from plasma stream impact is seen to be much less than that observed with laser or electron beams with similar energy fluxes. This, along with other data obtained, seem to suggest that the ''vapor shielding'' effect is a very important phenomenon in the study of graphite erosion during tokamak disruption

  5. On the choice of toroidal magnetic field for thermonuclear tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    The value of the magnetic field chosen for tokamak experiments is the result of a compromise between physics requirements, technological limits and financial constraints. The consequences of some physics requirements and limitations, in the light of recent results on the scaling of energy confinement and on limits of density are examined. (author)

  6. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported

  7. Varennes Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumyn, P.B.

    A consortium of five organizations under the leadership of IREQ, the Institute de Recherche d'Hydro-Quebec has completed a conceptual design study for a tokamak device, and in January 1981 its construction was authorized with funding being provided principally by Hydro-Quebec and the National Research Council, as well as by the Ministre d'Education du Quebec and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). The device will form the focus of Canada's magnetic-fusion program and will be located in IREQ's laboratories in Varennes. Presently the machine layout is being finalized from the physics point of view and work has started on equipment design and specification. The Tokamak de Varennes will be an experimental device, the purpose of which is to study plasma and other fusion related phenomena. In particular it will study: 1. Plasma impurities and plasma/liner interaction; 2. Long pulse or quasi-continuous operation using plasma rampdown and eventually plasma current reversal in order to maintain the plasma; and 3. Advanced diagnostics

  8. Physics of collisionless scrape-off-layer plasma during normal and off-normal Tokamak operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of a collisionless scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma in tokamak reactors is being studied to define the electron distribution function and the corresponding sheath potential between the divertor plate and the edge plasma. The collisionless model is shown to be valid during the thermal phase of a plasma disruption, as well as during the newly desired low-recycling normal phase of operation with low-density, high-temperature, edge plasma conditions. An analytical solution is developed by solving the Fokker-Planck equation for electron distribution and balance in the SOL. The solution is in good agreement with numerical studies using Monte-Carlo methods. The analytical solutions provide an insight to the role of different physical and geometrical processes in a collisionless SOL during disruptions and during the enhanced phase of normal operation over a wide range of parameters

  9. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990

  11. A generic access to shot-based data for European Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signoret, J.; Imbeaux, F. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA / DSM / Institut de Recherche sur la Fusion par confinement Magnetique, CEA-Cadarache, 13 - ST-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2009-07-01

    The EFDA Integrated Tokamak Modeling Task Force has defined a data structure offering a generic representation of the properties of physics problems and tokamak subsystem characteristics. It gathers the hardware description, modeling results and data measured during experiments, structured in terms of Consistent Physical Objects (CPOs). A generic tool has been developed to retrieve shot-based data from the various European tokamak databases: Exp2ITM. A tokamak specific XML 'mapping file' is used to map the local data formats to the ITM (Integrated Tokamak Modeling) data format. Exp2ITM is then dynamically generated from the ITM data structure and uses generic procedures to import the shot-based data. Successful tests show we have managed to import into the ITM DB experimental data from Jet and Tore-Supra. This document is a poster. (authors)

  12. Modelling of advanced tokamak physics scenarios in ALCATOR C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.; Ramos, J.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced tokamak modes of operation in Alcator C-Mod have been investigated using a simulation model which combines an MHD equilibrium and current profile control calculation with an ideal MHD stability analysis. Stable access to high β t operating modes with reversed shear current density profiles has been demonstrated using 2.4-3.0 MW of off-axis lower hybrid current drive (LHCD). Here β t =2μ 0 (p)/B 2 0 is the volume averaged toroidal plasma beta. Current profile control at the β-limit and beyond has also been demonstrated. The effects of LH power level as well as changes in the profiles of density and temperature on shear reversal radius have been quantified and are discussed. (author)

  13. Physics of the L-mode to H-mode transition in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K.H.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; Kim, J.; Osborne, T.H.; St. John, H.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Doyle, E.J.; Moyer, R.A.; Rettig, C.L.; Peebles, W.A.; Rhodes, T.L.; Finkenthal, D.; Hillis, D.L.; Wade, M.R.; Matsumoto, H.; Watkins, J.G.

    1992-07-01

    Combined theoretical and experimental work has resulted in the creation of a paradigm which has allowed semi-quantitative understanding of the edge confinement improvement that occurs in the H-mode. Shear in the E x B flow of the fluctuations in the plasma edge can lead to decorrelation of the fluctuations, decreased radial correlation lengths and reduced turbulent transport. Changes in the radial electric field, the density fluctuations and the edge transport consistent with shear stabilization of turbulence have been seen in several tokamaks. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the most recent data in the light of the basic paradigm of electric field shear stabilization and to critically compare the experimental results with various theories

  14. MRI Experiments for Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Sanaz; Lincoln, James

    2018-01-01

    The introductory physics classroom has long educated students about the properties of the atom and the nucleus. But absent from these lessons has been an informed discussion of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its parent science nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Physics teachers should not miss the opportunity to instruct upon this highly…

  15. MRI experiments for introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Sanaz; Lincoln, James

    2018-04-01

    The introductory physics classroom has long educated students about the properties of the atom and the nucleus. But absent from these lessons has been an informed discussion of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its parent science nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Physics teachers should not miss the opportunity to instruct upon this highly relevant application of modern physics, especially with so many of our students planning to pursue a career in medicine. This article provides an overview of the physics of MRI and gives advice on how physics teachers can introduce this topic. Also included are some demonstration activities and a discussion of a desktop MRI apparatus that may be used by students in the lab or as a demo.

  16. The basics of spherical tokamaks and progress in European research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V K; Alladio, F; Morris, A W

    2003-01-01

    When the aspect ratio of a tokamak (A = R/a) decreases significantly, there is a transformation of the well studied tokamak toroidal magnetic configuration into the spherical tokamak (ST) configuration. This configuration has high natural plasma elongation and triangularity and other unique equilibrium and stability properties of ST configuration, which are discussed in this paper. European research into ST physics is well advanced in spite of the young age of this branch of fusion science. An overview of selected experimental and theoretical results obtained at Ioffe, Culham and Frascati is given with the emphasis on their complementarity and links to the main stream of tokamak research, such as ITER. An outline of the basic ST advantages and the potential of ST research for new insights into magnetic confinement is also given. More detailed descriptions of recent advances in ST theory and experiment may be found in the invited papers by Akers and Ono in the proceedings of this conference

  17. START: the creation of a spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Alan

    1992-01-01

    The START (Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak) plasma fusion experiment is now operational at AEA Fusion's Culham Laboratory. It is the world's first experiment to explore an extreme limit of the tokamak - the Spherical Tokamak - which theoretical studies predict may have substantial advantages in the search for economic fusion power. The Head of the START project, describes the concept, some of the initial experimental results and the possibility of developing a spherical tokamak power reactor. (author)

  18. Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1980-06-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated the potential for producing a viable longburn tokamak reactor by enhancing the volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer through the use of high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were assessed in the context of extended burn operation. Using a one-dimensional transport code plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the startup and shutdown portions of the tokamak cycle. A representative large aspect ratio tokamak with an aspect ratio of 8 was found to achieve a burn time of 3.5 h at capital cost only approx. 25% greater than that of a moderate aspect ratio design tokamak

  19. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Zhang, H.

    2009-01-01

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions

  20. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.J. Zweben, H. Zhang

    2009-02-12

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions.

  1. Present status of Tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Jayanta

    1991-01-01

    The scenario of thermonuclear fusion research is presented, and the tokamak which is the most promising candidate as a fusion reactor is introduced. A brief survey is given of the most noteworthy tokamaks in the global context, and fusion programmes relating to Next Step devices are outlined. Supplementary heating of tokamak plasma by different methods is briefly reviewed; the latest achievements in heating to fusion temperatures are also reported. The progress towards the high value of the fusion product necessary for ignition is described. The improvement in plasma confinement brought about especially by the H-mode, is discussed. The latest situation in pushing up Β for increasing the efficiency of a tokamak is elucidated. Mention is made of the different types of wall treatment of the tokamak vessel for impurity control, which has led to a significant improvement in tokamak performance. Different methods of current drive for steady state tokamak operation are reviewed, and the issue of current drive efficiency is addressed. A short resume is given of the various diagnostic methods which are employed on a routine basis in the major tokamak centres. A few diagnostics recently developed or proposed in the context of the advanced tokamaks as well as the Next Step devices are indicated. The important role of the interplay between theory, experiment and simulation is noted, and the areas of investigation requiring concerted effort for further progress in tokamak research are identified. (author). 17 refs

  2. High-power heating experiment of spherical tokamaks by use of plasma merging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yoshinobu; Ono, Yasushi

    1999-01-01

    High-power heating of spherical tokamaks (STs) has been investigated experimentally by use of plasma merging effect. When two STs were coaxially collided, thermal energy of a colliding ST was injected into a target ST during short reconnection time (Alfven time). Though the thermal energy increment increased with decreasing plasma q value, thermal energy loss during the following relaxation, tended to be smaller with increasing q. The produced high-β STs had hallower current profiles and weaker paramagnetic toroidal field than those of single STs. Those heating properties indicate the plasma merging to be a promising initial heating method of ST plasmas. (author)

  3. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1990-04-01

    This paper discusses the following work on the text tokamak: data systems; particle confinement; impurity transport; plasma rotation; runaway electrons; electron cyclotron heating; FIR system; transient transport; internal turbulence; edge turbulence; ion temperature; EML experiments; impurity pellet experiments; MHD experiments and analysis; TEXT Upgrade; and Upgrade diagnostics

  4. Lithium capillary porous system behavior as PFM in FTU Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apichela, M.L.; Mazzitelli, G.; Lyublinski, I.E.; Lazarev, V.; Mirnov, S.; Vertkov, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Liquid lithium use on the base of capillary porous systems (CPS) application as plasma facing material (PFM) of tokamaks is advanced way to solve the problems of plasma contamination with high Z impurity, PFM degradation and tritium retention. In frame of joint program between ENEA (Italy) and FSUE 'Red Star' and TRINITI (RF) started at the end of 2005 die test of liquid lithium limiter (LLL) with CPS in a high field, medium size, carbon free tokamak FTU have been performed successfully. The LLL has been inserted in ohmic plasma discharges and at additional heating with LH and ECR at power levels in the MW range without any particular problem (BT = 6 T, Ip = 0.5- 0.9 MA, n e = 0.2 -2.6x10 20 m -3 , t = 1.5 s, P∼ 2-5 MW/m 2 at a normal discharge). The behavior of lithium CPS based on stainless steel wire mesh and its surface modification in normal discharges and at disruptions has been studied. Results of microscopic analyses of CPS structure after experimental campaigns are presented. The possibility to withstand heat load exceeding 5 MW/m 2 without damage, lithium surface renewal, mechanical stabilization of liquid lithium against MHD forces have been confirmed. Application of W, Mo as the base material and possible structure types of CPS have been considered for operating parameters improvement of long-living plasma facing components. (authors)

  5. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E., Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  6. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  7. Physics and experiments at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, will be the site of a series of experiments seeking to discover the quark-gluon plasma and elucidate its properties. Several observables should exhibit characteristic behaviors if a quark-gluon plasma is indeed created in the laboratory. Four experiments are now under construction for RHIC to measure certain of these observables over kinematic ranges where effects due to quark-gluon plasma formation should be manifest

  8. Recent developments towards steady state physics and technology of tokamaks in Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquinot, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, Tore Supra has undergone a total change of internal components in order to upgrade the heat extraction capability to 25 MW for 1000 s, and address long pulse operation of a tokamak at a level of power density owing through the separatrix relevant for next step. The present paper will both give an overview of the experimental results obtained during the last campaigns and highlight the related technology developments: industrial realisation and tests with plasma of about 600 actively cooled plasma limiter components, new experimental results concerning heating and current drive systems (ECRH, ICRH, LHCD), injection of matter for long pulses (supersonic injection, high repetition rate pellet injection), stability and control of high confinement steady-state discharges sustained by the LH wave, theoretical and experimental investigations of electron heat transport. Highlights of technology developments directly applicable to ITER are also presented. Finally, a brief account is given of the European studies for validating Cadarache as a possible site for ITER, concluding that all ITER technical site requests are fully met. (author)

  9. Increasing the Tokamak Pressure Limit: Tearing Mode Experiments in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Haye, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Since its reconfiguration in 1986, DIII-D has performed a number of experiments involving resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability. These were and are directed to understand the conditions in which confinement and beta reducing tearing mode islands form, how to avoid them, and if unavoidable, how to stabilize them. Coils for correction of toroidal nonaxisymmetry have been developed to avoid error field locked mode islands. Basic classical tearing mode stability physics has been confirmed with a state-of-the-art ensemble of profile diagnostics, MHD equilibrium reconstruction, and stability code analysis. Neoclassical tearing mode thresholds and seeding are now much better understood with future large higher field devices expected to be 'metastable'. DIII-D is the leader in sophisticated real-time alignment of stabilizing electron cyclotron current drive on otherwise unstable rational surfaces. In all, DIII-D experiments are showing how higher stable beta with good confinement can be maintained without tearing mode islands limiting the plasma pressure

  10. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The technical reports in this document were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting ''Research on Small Tokamaks'', September 1990, in three sessions, viz., (1) Plasma Modes, Control, and Internal Phenomena, (2) Edge Phenomena, and (3) Advanced Configurations and New Facilities. In Section (1) experiments at controlling low mode number modes, feedback control using external coils, lower-hybrid current drive for the stabilization of sawtooth activity and continuous (1,1) mode, and unmodulated and fast modulated ECRH mode stabilization experiments were reported, as well as the relation to disruptions and transport of low m,n modes and magnetic island growth; static magnetic perturbations by helical windings causing mode locking and sawtooth suppression; island widths and frequency of the m=2 tearing mode; ultra-fast cooling due to pellet injection; and, finally, some papers on advanced diagnostics, i.e., lithium-beam activated charge-exchange spectroscopy, and detection through laser scattering of discrete Alfven waves. In Section (2), experimental edge physics results from a number of machines were presented (positive biasing on HYBTOK II enhancing the radial electric field and improving confinement; lower hybrid current drive on CASTOR improving global particle confinement, good current drive efficiency in HT-6B showing stabilization of sawteeth and Mirnov oscillations), as well as diagnostic developments (multi-chord time resolved soft and ultra-soft X-ray plasma radiation detection on MT-1; measurements on electron capture cross sections in multi-charged ion-atom collisions; development of a diagnostic neutral beam on Phaedrus-T). Theoretical papers discussed the influence of sheared flow and/or active feedback on edge microstability, large edge electric fields, and two-fluid modelling of non-ambipolar scrape-off layers. Section (3) contained (i) a proposal to construct a spherical tokamak ''Proto-Eta'', (ii) an analysis of ultra-low-q and runaway

  11. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3 He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n) 3 He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3 He(d,p) 4 He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  12. Demonstration in the DIII-D tokamak of an alternate baseline scenario for ITER and other burning plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, T.C.; Ferron, J.R.; Wade, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Discharges which can satisfy the high gain goals of burning plasma experiments have been demonstrated in the DIII-D tokamak in stationary conditions with relatively low plasma current (q 95 > 4). A figure of merit for fusion gain β N H 89 / q 95 2 2 has been maintained at values corresponding to Q = 10 operation in a burning plasma for >6 s or 36 τ E and 2 τ R . The key element is the relaxation of the current profile to a stationary state with q min > 1, which allows stable operation up to the no-wall ideal β limit. These plasmas maintain particle balance by active pumping rather than transient wall conditioning. The reduced current lessens significantly the potential for structural damage in the event of a major disruption. (author)

  13. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Mau, T.K.; Miller, R.L.; Najmabadi, F.; Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; LaHaye, R.; Lao, L.L.; Petrie, T.W.; Politzer, P.; John, St. H.E.; Snyder, P.; Staebler, G.M.; Turnbull, A.D.; West, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented

  14. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.C. Jardin; C.E. Kessel; T.K. Mau; R.L. Miller; F. Najmabadi; V.S. Chan; M.S. Chu; R. LaHaye; L.L. Lao; T.W. Petrie; P. Politzer; H.E. St. John; P. Snyder; G.M. Staebler; A.D. Turnbull; W.P. West

    2003-10-07

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented.

  15. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-01-01

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers

  16. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  17. RF start-up and sustainment experiments on the TST-2-K spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejiri, A.; Takase, Y.; Kasahara, H.; Yamada, T.; Hanada, K.; Sato, K. N.; Zushi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Iyomasa, A.; Imamura, N.; Esaki, K.; Kitaguchi, M.; Sasaki, K.; Hoshika, H.; Mitarai, O.; Nishino, N.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma start-up and sustainment without an inductive field have been studied in the TST-2-K spherical tokamak using high power RF sources (8.2 GHz/up to 170 kW). Steady state discharges with a plasma current of 4 kA were achieved. The line integrated density was about 3 x 10 17 m -2 and the electron temperature was 160 eV. A truncated equilibrium was introduced to reproduce magnetic measurements. It was found that a positive Pfirsch-Schlueter current in the open field line region at the outboard boundary makes a significant contribution to the current. Insensitivity of the current to variations in the vertical field and RF power variation was also found

  18. A Neutral Beam for the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment Upgrade (LTX-U)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Enrique; Majeski, Richard; Kaita, Robert; Kozub, Thomas; Boyle, Dennis; Schmitt, John; Smirnov, Artem

    2015-11-01

    Neutral beam injection into tokamaks is a proven method of plasma heating and fueling. In LTX, high confinement discharges have been achieved with low-recycling lithium walls. To further improve plasma performance, a neutral beam (NB) will be installed as part of an upgrade to LTX (LTX-U). The NB will provide core plasma fueling with up to 700 kW of injected power. Requirements for accommodating the NB include the addition of injection and beam-dump ports onto the vessel and enhancement of the vacuum vessel pumping capability. Because the NB can also serve as a source of neutrals for charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy, ``active'' spectroscopic diagnostics will also be developed. An overview of these plans and other improvements for upgrading LTX to LTX-U will be presented. Supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Antenna loading and electron heating experiments of ICRF wave in TNT-A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Naito, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Kenro

    1984-01-01

    Antenna loading resistance and electron heating effects of ICRF wave were investigated in TNT-A tokamak. Lodaing resistance increased with the mean plasma density and decreased with the input power. The effect of the distance between the plasma and antenna surface on loading resistance was studied and had good agreements with the calculated results. The increase in the soft Xray emissivity was larger in the presence of ion-ion hybrid and/or ion cyclotron resonance layer in the plasma than that in the absence of them. With the absorbed power up to two times of the ohmic power, the central electron temperature increased by 20%, the soft Xray emissivity increased by 80% and the mean plasma density decreased by 10%, while the total radiation loss increased slightly (by 15%). (author)

  20. Accelerator physics experiments at Aladdin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Cornacchia, M.; Jackson, A.; Zisman, M.S.

    1985-07-01

    The Aladdin accelerator is a 1 GeV synchrotron light source located at the University of Wisconsin. The results of experimental studies of the Aladdin accelerator are described. The primary purpose of the experiments reported was to investigate reported anomalies in the behavior of the linear lattice, particularly in the vertical plane. A second goal was to estimate the ring broadband impedance. Experimental observations and interpretation of the linear properties of the Aladdin ring are described, including the beta function and dispersion measurements. Two experiments are described to measure the ring impedance, the first a measurement of the parasitic mode loss, and the second a measurement of the beam transfer function. Measurements of the longitudinal and transverse emittance at 100 and 200 MeV are described and compared with predictions. 10 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Exploding metallic fuse physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goforth, J.H.; Hackett, K.E.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Lopez, E.A.; McCullough, W.F.; Dona, H.; Reinovsky, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The ultimate practicality of inductive pulse compression systems as drivers for energetic plasma implosions hinges on the development of a suitable opening switch capable of interrupting tons of megamp currents in time scales of a few hundred nanoseconds while withstanding L(dI/dt) voltages of a megavolt or more. 1. Exploding metallic foils (fuses) are a candidate for switching elements in the inductive store pulsed power systems used in the Los Alamos and Air Force Weapons Laboratory foil implosion X-ray source generation programs. To verify or modify new theoretical and computational predictions about the electrical and hydrodynamic behavior of exploding metallic foils used as fuses. The authors have initiated a new series of small scale capacitor bank driven fuse experiments. The experiments represent an extension of previous experiments, but in the new series a foil geometry more amenable to theoretical and computational analysis is used. The metallic foil (aluminum or copper) is laminated between two thin layers of insulating material (mylar or kaptan). Adjacent to one layer of insulation is a much heavier backing insulator (polyethylene) whereas air is adjacent to the other layer. Because of the differing masses on the two sides of the foil, the foil expansion and hydrodynamic motion is essentially one-sided and the layer of insulation on the expanding side becomes a readily-characterizable ''flyer'' which provides a controlled amount of hydrodynamic tamping. In addition to the usual voltage, current, and dI/dt electrical measurements, time-resolved spectrometer measurements are used to determine the temperature of the expanding metallic foil. Post-shot examination of the flyer and the insulation impacted by the flyer gives insight into the experimental behavior

  2. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Armstrong, F.E.; von Przewoski, B.

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  3. Current experiments in elementary-particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    Microfiche are included which contain summaries of 479 experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments are included at the following laboratories: Brookhaven (BNL); CERN; CESR; DESY; Fermilab (FNAL); Institute for Nuclear Studies (INS); KEK; LAMPF; Serpukhov (SERP); SIN; SLAC; and TRIUMF. Also, summaries of proton decay experiments are included. A list of experiments and titles is included; and a beam-target-momentum index and a spokesperson index are given. Properties of beams at the facilities are tabulated

  4. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, F.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); von Przewoski, B. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  5. H-mode transition physics close to double null on MAST and its applications to other tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Carolan, P.G.; Cunningham, G.; Kirk, A.; Lloyd, B.; Saarelma, S.; Wilson, H.R.; Conway, G.D.; Horton, L.D.; Ryter, F.; Schirmer, J.; Suttrop, W.; Maingi, R.

    2005-01-01

    By accessing extreme parameter regimes combined with well diagnosed edge MAST data contribute towards the understanding of H-mode physics. The first inter-machine comparisons with respect to the influence of the magnetic topology on the power threshold with ASDEX Upgrade and NSTX reveal a reduction of the power threshold in true double null (C-DN) configuration opening new operation regimes in both devices. In L-mode, the negative radial electric field close to the separatrix was found to be more negative in C-DN than in single null (SN), whilst most of the other edge parameters are similar. Pedestal temperatures in MAST are lower than in ASDEX Upgrade in MAST-equivalent discharges, whereas the pedestal densities can be similar, although in long inter ELM periods the MAST density pedestal is higher than on ASDEX Upgrade. In order to test four leading H-mode theories MAST data are compared statistically to their H-mode access criteria. The usual DN operating regime with co current NBI in MAST has been extended to include single null (SN) configurations, to provide more direct comparisons with conventional tokamaks. The plasma edge in SN on MAST is more stable to ELMs and the typical type-III ELMs, often observed in C-DN, are absent, despite input powers close to the H-mode threshold power. In this respect, the stability of measured plasma edge profiles in SN and DN against ideal peeling-ballooning modes will be discussed. (author)

  6. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Dodder, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Serpukhov (Russian Federation); Illarionova, N.S. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lehar, F. [CEN Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Oyanagi, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Sciences; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frosch, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  7. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Oyanagi, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)); Dodder, D.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov (USSR). Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Frosch, R. (Swiss Inst. for Nuclear Research, Villigen (Switzerla

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  8. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R.; Olin, A.; Klumov, I.A.

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  9. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Dodder, D.C.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Illarionova, N.S.; Lehar, F.; Oyanagi, Y.; Frosch, R.

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  10. Steady-state operation of tokamaks: Key physics and technology developments on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquinot, J.

    2005-01-01

    Important technological and physics issues related to long pulse operation required for a reactor are now being addressed in Tore Supra. experimental results in conditions where all the plasma facing components are actively cooled during pulses exceeding six minutes. Important physics issues related to continuous operation are observed in non inductively driven plasmas. (author)

  11. A need for non-tokamak approaches to magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Focusing exclusively on conventional tokamak physics in the quest for commercial fusion power is premature, and the options for both advanced-tokamak and non-tokamak concepts need continued investigation. The basis for this claim is developed, and promising advanced-tokamak and non-tokamak options are suggested

  12. Continuous tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-04-01

    A tokamak configuration is proposed that permits the rapid replacement of a plasma discharge in a ''burn'' chamber by another one in a time scale much shorter than the elementary thermal time constant of the chamber first wall. With respect to the chamber, the effective duty cycle factor can thus be made arbitrarily close to unity minimizing the cyclic thermal stress in the first wall. At least one plasma discharge always exists in the new tokamak configuration, hence, a continuous tokamak. By incorporating adiabatic toroidal compression, configurations of continuous tokamak compressors are introduced. To operate continuous tokamaks, it is necessary to introduce the concept of mixed poloidal field coils, which spatially groups all the poloidal field coils into three sets, all contributing simultaneously to inducing the plasma current and maintaining the proper plasma shape and position. Preliminary numerical calculations of axisymmetric MHD equilibria in continuous tokamaks indicate the feasibility of their continued plasma operation. Advanced concepts of continuous tokamaks to reduce the topological complexity and to allow the burn plasma aspect ratio to decrease for increased beta are then suggested

  13. Decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) will complete its experimental lifetime with a series of deuterium-tritium pulses in 1994. As a result, the machine structures will become radioactive, and vacuum components will also be contaminated with tritium. Dose rate levels will range from less than 1 mr/h for external structures to hundreds of mr/h for the vacuum vessel. Hence, decommissioning operations will range from hands on activities to the use of remotely operated equipment. After 21 months of cool down, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations will commence and continue for approximately 15 months. The primary objective is to render the test cell complex re-usable for the next machine, the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). This paper presents an overview of decommissioning TFTR and discusses the D and D objectives

  14. Economic comparison of MHD equilibrium options for advanced steady state tokamak power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Kessel, C.E.; Jardin, S.C.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Mau, T.K.; Najmabadi, F.

    1998-01-01

    Progress in theory and in tokamak experiments leads to questions of the optimal development path for commercial tokamak power plants. The economic prospects of future designs are compared for several tokamak operating modes: (high poloidal beta) first stability, second stability and reverse shear. Using a simplified economic model and selecting uniform engineering performance parameters, this comparison emphasizes the different physics characteristics - stability and non- inductive current drive - of the various equilibria. The reverse shear mode of operation is shown to offer the lowest cost of electricity for future power plants. (author)

  15. Visible Spectrometer at the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment, the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment and the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak for Doppler Width and Shift Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, A; Howard, S; Horton, R; Hwang, D; May, M; Beiersdorfer, P; McLean, H; Terry, J

    2006-05-15

    A novel Doppler spectrometer is currently being used for ion or neutral velocity and temperature measurements on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak. The spectrometer has an f/No. of {approx}3.1 and is appropriate for visible light (3500-6700 {angstrom}). The full width at half maximum from a line emitting calibration source has been measured to be as small as 0.4 {angstrom}. The ultimate time resolution is line brightness light limited and on the order of ms. A new photon efficient detector is being used for the setup at C-Mod. Time resolution is achieved by moving the camera during a plasma discharge in a perpendicular direction through the dispersion plane of the spectrometer causing a vertical streaking across the camera face. Initial results from C-Mod as well as previous measurements from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) and the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) are presented.

  16. Tokamak experiments on JIPP T-II with pulsed gas injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K.; Itoh, S.; Fujita, J.; Kadota, K.; Kawahata, K.

    1978-02-01

    The confinement of tokamak plasma has been investigated in the wide range of electron density average n sub(e) from 1 x 10 13 to 5 x 10 13 cm -3 by using the pulsed gas injection. The gross energy confinement time increases with increase of electron density and reaches 14 msec. The averaged effective ionic charge derived from plasma conductivity = is about 1 to 2 in the regime of small streaming parameter ( = 0.01 -- 0.08). The ratio of ion temperature to electron one is in the range greater than 0.5. This fact means that the ion energy confinement time is greater than the electron-ion energy relaxation time. Excessive injection of cold neutral gas excites m = 2 MHD oscillations. Much more gas injection leads to the remarkable cooling of plasma periphery and disruptive instabilities. These MHD oscillations and disruptive instabilities have been suppressed by the heating of plasma periphery with the second rapid rise of plasma current. (auth.)

  17. Review of experiments on current drive in tokamaks by means of RF waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooke, W.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results on lower hybrid current drive in tokamak plasmas are reviewed. Pulse lengths of 3.5 seconds and currents above 400 kA have been generated at plasma densities such that the wave frequency is greater than about twice the lower hybrid frequency. Current drive ceases above a critical density, nsub(c). However, nsub(c) increases with wave frequency. So that for f = 4.6 GHz current drive has been seen at n-barsub(e) approx.= 10 14 cm -3 and a density limit has yet to be established. Evidence for a collisional scaling law for current-drive efficiency is summarized. Detailed measurements of bremsstrahlung x-rays show a distribution which is qualitatively similar to that predicted by quasilinear theory. Microwave emission at frequencies less than the plasma frequency may shed light on the current-drive mechanism. Applications of current drive including plasma and current start-up and transformer recharging are discussed. (author)

  18. Operational experience with reactive power control methods optimized for tokamak power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihler, C.; Huart, M.; Kaesemann, C.-P.; Streibl, B.

    2003-01-01

    The power and energy of the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak are provided by two separate 10.5 kV, 110-85 Hz networks based on the flywheel generators EZ3-EZ4 in addition to the generator EZ2 dedicated to the toroidal field coil. The 10.5 kV networks supply the thyristor converters allowing fast control of the DC currents in the AUG poloidal field coils. Two methods for improving the load power factor in the present experimental campaign of AUG have been investigated, namely the control of the phase-to-neutral voltage in thyristor converters fitted with neutral thyristors, such as the new 145 MVA modular thyristor converter system (Group 6), and reactive power control achieved by means of static VAr compensators (SVC). The paper shows that reliable compensation up to 90 MVAr was regularly achieved and that electrical transients in SVC modules can be kept at an acceptable level. The paper will discuss the results from the reactive power reduction by SVC and neutral thyristor control and draw a comparative conclusion

  19. Accelerator technology in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustom, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    This article presents the similarities in the technology required for high energy accelerators and tokamak fusion devices. The tokamak devices and R and D programs described in the text represent only a fraction of the total fusion program. The technological barriers to producing successful, economical tokamak fusion power plants are as many as the plasma physics problems to be overcome. With the present emphasis on energy problems in this country and elsewhere, it is very likely that fusion technology related R and D programs will vigorously continue; and since high energy accelerator technology has so much in common with fusion technology, more scientists from the accelerator community are likely to be attracted to fusion problems

  20. Active feedback control of kink modes in tokamaks: 3D VALEN modeling and HBT-EP experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Significant progress in the development of active feedback control as a robust technique for the suppression of the wall stabilized external kink or resistive wall mode (RWM) in tokamaks has been achieved through a combination of modeling and experiments. Results from the 3D feedback modeling code VALEN, which serves as the primary analysis and feedback control design tool for RWM studies on the HBT-EP and DIII-D experiments, are in good agreement with observations. VALEN modeling of proposed advanced control system designs on HBT-EP, DIII-D, NSTX, and FIRE are predicted to approach the ideal wall beta limit in agreement with design principles based on simple single mode analytic theory of RWM feedback control. Benchmark experiments on HBT-EP have shown suppression of plasma disruption at rational edge q values using active feedback control in agreement with model predictions. In addition, the observation in HBT-EP of the plasma amplification of static resonant magnetic fields in plasmas marginally stable to the RWM is in agreement with theory. (author)

  1. Current Experiments in Particle Physics (September 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Bilak, S.V.; Illarionova, N.S.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Strokovsky, E.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Kettle, P.-R.; Olin, A.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. This report contains full summaries of 180 approved current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. The focus of the report is on selected experiments which directly contribute to our better understanding of elementary particles and their properties such as masses, widths or lifetimes, and branching fractions.

  2. Major results of the electron cyclotron heating experiment in the PDX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsuan, H.; Bol, K.; Bowen, N.

    1984-07-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) experiments on PDX have been carried out with two 60 GHz pulsed gyrotrons each yielding up to approximately 100 kW. The ECH system used two waveguide runs each about 30 meters long. One run included 5 bends and the other, 7 bends. Predetermined waveguide modes were transmitted. The electron cyclotron waves were launched in narrow beams from both the high field and the low field sides of the plasma torus. The major new physics results are: (1) efficient central electron heating for both ohmic and neutral beam heated target plasmas; (2) alteration of MHD behavior using ECH; (3) identification of the trapped electron population with ECH; and (4) signature of velocity-space time evolution during ECH. In the best heating results obtained, Thomson scattering data indicated a central temperature increase from less than or equal to 1.5 keV to greater than or equal to 2.5 keV. This occurred with an average density of about 10 13 cm -3 and approximately 80 kW outside-launch ordinary-mode heating

  3. MHD limits in non-inductive tokamak plasmas: simulations and comparison to experiments on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maget, P.; Huysmans, G.; Ottaviani, M.; Garbet, X.; Moreau, Ph.; Segui, J.-L.; Luetjens, H.

    2008-01-01

    Non-inductive tokamak discharges with a flat or hollow current profile are prone to the triggering of large tearing modes when the minimum of the safety factor is just below a low order rational. This issue is of particular importance for discussing the optimal safety factor for MHD modes avoidance in Steady-State reactor plasmas. Different non-linear regimes of such magnetic configurations in Tore Supra are studied using the full MHD code XTOR. Numerical simulations show that the non-linear stage of the Double-Tearing Mode (DTM) is governed by the full reconnection model, but a single tearing mode in a low magnetic shear configuration can have a similar impact on the confinement. The different regimes observed experimentally are recovered in the simulations: a small amplitude (2,1) DTM for close resonant surfaces as seen in Tore Supra, a sawtooth-like behaviour of the (2,1) Double-Tearing Mode as first seen in TFTR, or a large amplitude (2,1) tearing mode that severely degrades the energy confinement, as reported in Tore Supra, JET or DIII-D. Situations where q min ≅1.5 with a stable n = 1 mode, as seen in Tore Supra longest discharges, seem to put specific constraints on the MHD model that is used. Indeed, curvature stabilisation without transport terms as could explain linear stability, but such effect vanishes in presence of heat transport. Electron diamagnetic rotation effect is investigated as a possible mechanism for n = 1 mode stabilization.

  4. Lithium pellet injection experiments on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, Darren Thomas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    A pellet enhanced performance mode, showing significantly reduced core transport, is regularly obtained after the injection of deeply penetrating lithium pellets into Alcator C-Mod discharges. These transient modes, which typically persist about two energy confinement times, are characterized by a steep pressure gradient (ℓp ℓ a/5) in the inner third of the plasma, indicating the presence of an internal transport barrier. Inside this barrier, particle and energy diffusivities are greatly reduced, with ion thermal diffusivity dropping to near neoclassical values. Meanwhile, the global energy confinement time shows a 30% improvement over ITER89-P L-mode scaling. The addition of ICRF auxiliary heating shortly after the pellet injection leads to high fusion reactivity with neutron rates enhanced by an order of magnitude over L-mode discharges with similar input powers. A diagnostic system for measuring equilibrium current density profiles of tokamak plasmas, employing high speed lithium pellets, is also presented. Because ions are confined to move along field lines, imaging the Li+ emission from the toroidally extended pellet ablation cloud gives the direction of the magnetic field. To convert from temporal to radial measurements, the 3-D trajectory of the pellet is determined using a stereoscopic tracking system. These measurements, along with external magnetic measurements, are used to solve the Grad-Shafranov equation for the magnetic equilibrium of the plasma. This diagnostic is used to determine the current density profile of PEP modes by injection of a second pellet during the period of good confinement. This measurement indicates that a region of reversed magnetic shear exists at the plasma core. This current density profile is consistent with TRANSP calculations for the bootstrap current created by the pressure gradient. MHD stability analysis indicates that these plasmas are near the n = ∞ and the n = 1 marginal stability limits.

  5. Lithium pellet injection experiments on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, D.T.

    1996-06-01

    A pellet enhanced performance mode, showing significantly reduced core transport, is regularly obtained after the injection of deeply penetrating lithium pellets into Alcator C-Mod discharges. These transient modes, which typically persist about two energy confinement times, are characterized by a steep pressure gradient (ell p ≤ a/5) in the inner third of the plasma, indicating the presence of an internal transport barrier. Inside this barrier, particle and energy diffusivities are greatly reduced, with ion thermal diffusivity dropping to near neoclassical values. Meanwhile, the global energy confinement time shows a 30% improvement over ITER89-P L-mode scaling. The addition of ICRF auxiliary heating shortly after the pellet injection leads to high fusion reactivity with neutron rates enhanced by an order of magnitude over L-mode discharges with similar input powers. A diagnostic system for measuring equilibrium current density profiles of tokamak plasmas, employing high speed lithium pellets, is also presented. Because ions are confined to move along field lines, imaging the Li + emission from the toroidally extended pellet ablation cloud gives the direction of the magnetic field. To convert from temporal to radial measurements, the 3-D trajectory of the pellet is determined using a stereoscopic tracking system. These measurements, along with external magnetic measurements, are used to solve the Grad-Shafranov equation for the magnetic equilibrium of the plasma. This diagnostic is used to determine the current density profile of PEP modes by injection of a second pellet during the period of good confinement. This measurement indicates that a region of reversed magnetic shear exists at the plasma core. This current density profile is consistent with TRANSP calculations for the bootstrap current created by the pressure gradient. MHD stability analysis indicates that these plasmas are near the n = ∞ and the n = 1 marginal stability limits

  6. Langmuir probe measurements in the TEXTOR tokamak during ALT-I pump limiter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, D.M.; Campbell, G.A.; Conn, R.W.; Leung, W.K.; Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H.; Thomas, G.J.; Pontau, A.E.

    1986-04-01

    Langmuir probes have been used to characterize the edge plasma of the TEXTOR tokamak and measure the parameters of the plasma incident on the ALT-I pump limiter during ohmic and ICRH heating. Probes mounted directly on the ALT limiter, and a scanning probe located 90 0 toroidally from the limiter, provide data for the evaluation of pump limiter performance and its effect on the edge plasma. The edge plasma is characterized by density and flux e-folding lengths of about 1.8cm when ALT is the main limiter. These scrape-off lengths do not vary significantly as ALT is moved between the normal 42-46cm minor radii, but increase to over 2.2cm when ALT is inserted to 40cm. The flux to probes at a fixed position in the limiter shadow varies by less than 25% for core density changes of a factor of five. This suggests that the global particle confinement time tau/sub p/, scales as the core density. Estimates from the probes indicate that tau/sub p/ is on the order of the energy confinement time, tau/sub E/. The edge electron temperature, T/sub e/, typically decreases by a factor of two when the core density is raised from 1 to 4 x 10 13 cm -3 . The T/sub e/ profile is essentially flat in the limiter shadow, with values of 10-25 eV depending on the core plasma density and ICRH power. ICRH heating increases the electron temperature and flux in proportion to the coupled power. With ALT as the primary limiter and no direct shadowing, the ion side receives 2 to 3 times the flux of the electron side during both ohmic and ICRH heating. The edge plasma is not directly modified by pump limiter operation, but changes with the core plasma density as particle removal lowers the recycling of neutrals in the boundary

  7. Overview of Tokamak Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unterberg, Bernhard; Samm, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    An overview is given of recent results obtained in tokamak devices. We introduce basic confinement scenarios as L-mode, H-mode and plasmas with an internal transport barrier and discuss methods for profile control. Important findings in DT-experiments at JET as α-particle heating are described. Methods for power exhaust like plasma regimes with a radiating mantle and radiative divertor scenarios are discussed. The overall impact of plasma edge conditions on the general plasma performance in tokamaks is illustrated by describing the impact of wall conditions on confinement and the edge operational diagram of H-mode plasmas

  8. Computer simulation of charged fusion-product trajectories and detection efficiency expected for future experiments within the COMPASS tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, Roch; Malinowski, Karol; Sadowski, Marek J

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results of computer simulations of charged particle motions and detection efficiencies for an ion-pinhole camera of a new diagnostic system to be used in future COMPASS tokamak experiments. A probe equipped with a nuclear track detector can deliver information about charged products of fusion reactions. The calculations were performed with a so-called Gourdon code, based on a single-particle model and toroidal symmetry. There were computed trajectories of fast ions (> 500 keV) in medium-dense plasma (n e  < 10 14  cm −3 ) and an expected detection efficiency (a ratio of the number of detected particles to that of particles emitted from plasma). The simulations showed that charged fusion products can reach the new diagnostic probe, and the expected detection efficiency can reach 2 × 10 −8 . Based on such calculations, one can determine the optimal position and orientation of the probe. The obtained results are of importance for the interpretation of fusion-product images to be recorded in future COMPASS experiments. (paper)

  9. Results from transient transport experiments in Rijnhuizen tokamak project: Heat convection, transport barriers and 'non-local' effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P.; Gorini, G.; Hogeweij, G.M.D.; Kloe, J. de; Lopez Cardozo, N.J.; Schilham, A.M.R.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of experimental transport studies performed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP) using transient transport techniques in both Ohmic and ECH dominated plasmas is presented. Modulated Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) and oblique pellet injection (OPI) have been used to induce electron temperature (T e ) perturbations at different radial locations. These were used to probe the electron transport barriers observed near low order rational magnetic surfaces in ECH dominated steady-state RTP plasmas. Layers of inward electron heat convection in off-axis ECH plasmas were detected with modulated ECH. This suggests that RTP electron transport barriers consist of heat pinch layers rather than layers of low thermal diffusivity. In a different set of experiments, OPI triggered a transient rise of the core T e due to an increase of the T e gradient in the 1< q<2 region. These transient transport barriers were probed with modulated ECH and found to be due to a transient drop of the electron heat diffusivity, except for off-axis ECH plasmas, where a transient inward pinch is also observed. Transient transport studies in RTP could not solve this puzzling interplay between heat diffusion and convection in determining an electron transport barrier. They nevertheless provided challenging experimental evidence both for theoretical modelling and for future experiments. (author)

  10. Magnetic ''islandography'' in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Waddell, B.V.; Hicks, H.R.

    1978-09-01

    Tearing modes are shown to be responsible for most of the experimentally observed macroscopic behavior of tokamak discharges. The effects of these collective magnetic perturbations on magnetic topology and plasma transport in tokamaks are shown to provide plausible explanations for: internal disruptions (m/n = 1); Mirnov oscillations (m/n = 2,3...); and major disruptions (coupling of 2/1-3/2 modes). The nonlinear evolution of the tearing modes is followed with fully three-dimensional computer codes. The effects on plasma confinement of the magnetic islands or stochastic field lines induced by the macroscopic tearing modes are discussed and compared with experiment. Finally, microscopic magnetic perturbations are shown to provide a natural model for the microscopic anomalous transport processes in tokamaks

  11. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments in LHCD plasmas using a remote steering antenna on the TRIAM-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idei, H.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Ohkubo, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Kubo, S.; Nishi, S.; Fukuyama, A.; Sato, K.N.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Iyomasa, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Notake, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Ito, S.; Hoshika, H.; Maezono, N.; Nakashima, K.; Ogawa, M.

    2006-01-01

    A remote steering antenna was recently developed for electron cyclotron heating and current drive (ECH/ECCD) experiments on the TRIAM-1M tokamak. This is the first application of the remote steering antenna concept for ECH/ECCD experiments, which have conditions relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Fundamental ECH and ECCD experiments were conducted in the ITER frequency from the low field using this antenna system. In addition to the angles near 0 0 , the launcher was a symmetric direction antenna with an extended steering-angle capability of ±(8 0 -19 0 ). The output beam from the antenna was a well-defined Gaussian with a proper steering angle. The Gaussian content and the steering-angle accuracy were 0.85 and -0.5 0 , respectively. The high power tests measured the antenna transmission efficiency at 0.90-0.94. The efficiencies obtained in the low and high power tests were consistent with the calculations using higher-order modes. In order to excite the pure O/X-modes in the oblique injection, two polarizers were used to control the elliptical polarization of the incident beam for the ECCD experiments. The fundamental O/X-mode ECH/ECCD was applied to lower hyrid current drive plasmas at the optimized incident polarization. In the X-mode experiment, at medium density (∼1 x 10 19 m -3 ), clear differences in the plasma current and the hard x-ray intensity were observed between the co- and counter-steering injections due to the ECCD effect on the coupling of forward fast electrons

  12. Generation of plasma rotation by ICRH in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.; Phillips, C.K.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.; Bonoli, P.T.; Rice, J.; Greenwald, M.; Grassie, J.S. de

    2001-01-01

    A physical mechanism to generate plasma rotation by ICRH is presented in a tokamak geometry. By breaking the omnigenity of resonant ion orbits, ICRH can induce a non-ambipolar minor-radial flow of resonant ions. This induces a return current j p r in the plasma, which then drives plasma rotation through the j p r xB force. It is estimated that the fast-wave power in the present-day tokamak experiments can be strong enough to give a significant modification to plasma rotation. (author)

  13. Cometary nucleus release experiments and ice physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    Some physical and chemical processes involved in the evaporation and sublimation of mixtures of frozen gases are discussed. Effects of zero gravity, vacuum and solar radiation are emphasized. Relevant experiments that can be carried out with the aid of the space shuttle are proposed. The ice surface and the space just above the surface, i.e., the physics and chemistry of ice sublimation are mainly considered

  14. Current Experiments in Particle Physics. 1996 Edition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, Hrvoje

    2003-06-27

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  15. DIRAC in Large Particle Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, F.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Arrabito, L.; Sailer, A.; Hara, T.; Zhang, X.; Consortium, DIRAC

    2017-10-01

    The DIRAC project is developing interware to build and operate distributed computing systems. It provides a development framework and a rich set of services for both Workload and Data Management tasks of large scientific communities. A number of High Energy Physics and Astrophysics collaborations have adopted DIRAC as the base for their computing models. DIRAC was initially developed for the LHCb experiment at LHC, CERN. Later, the Belle II, BES III and CTA experiments as well as the linear collider detector collaborations started using DIRAC for their computing systems. Some of the experiments built their DIRAC-based systems from scratch, others migrated from previous solutions, ad-hoc or based on different middlewares. Adaptation of DIRAC for a particular experiment was enabled through the creation of extensions to meet their specific requirements. Each experiment has a heterogeneous set of computing and storage resources at their disposal that were aggregated through DIRAC into a coherent pool. Users from different experiments can interact with the system in different ways depending on their specific tasks, expertise level and previous experience using command line tools, python APIs or Web Portals. In this contribution we will summarize the experience of using DIRAC in particle physics collaborations. The problems of migration to DIRAC from previous systems and their solutions will be presented. An overview of specific DIRAC extensions will be given. We hope that this review will be useful for experiments considering an update, or for those designing their computing models.

  16. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D 3 He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions

  17. On the HL-1M tokamak plasma confinement time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Yunwen

    2001-01-01

    Emphasizing that the tokamak plasma confinement time is the plasma particle or thermal energy loss characteristic time, the relevant physical concept and HL-1M tokamak experimental data analyses are reviewed

  18. Identification of waves by RF magnetic probes during lower hybrid wave injection experiments on the TST-2 spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinya, Takahiro; Ejiri, Akira; Takase, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    RF magnetic probes can be used to measure not only the wavevector, but also the polarization of waves in plasmas. A 5-channel RF magnetic probe (5ch-RFMP) was installed in the TST-2 spherical tokamak and the waves were studied in detail during lower hybrid wave injection experiments. From the polarization measurements, the poloidal RF magnetic field is found to be dominant. In addition to polarization, components of k perpendicular to the major radial direction were obtained from phase differences among the five channels. The radial wavenumber was obtained by scanning the radial position of the 5ch-RFMP on a shot by shot basis. The measured wavevector and polarization in the plasma edge region were consistent with those calculated from the wave equation for the slow wave branch. While the waves with small and large k ∥ were excited by the antenna, only the small k ∥ component was measured by the 5ch-RFMP; this suggests that the waves with larger k ∥ were absorbed by the plasma. (author)

  19. First tests of diagnostic mirrors in a tokamak divertor: An overview of experiments in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litnovsky, A.; Rudakov, D.L.; De Temmerman, G.; Wienhold, P.; Philipps, V.; Samm, U.; McLean, A.G.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.; Brooks, N.H.; Watkins, J.G.; Wampler, W.R.; Stangeby, P.C.; Boedo, J.A.; Moyer, R.A.; Allen, S.L.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Groth, M.; Lasnier, C.J.; Boivin, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Mirrors will be used in ITER in all optical diagnostic systems observing the plasma radiation in the ultraviolet, visible and infrared ranges. Diagnostic mirrors in ITER will suffer from electromagnetic radiation, energetic particles and neutron irradiation. Erosion due to impact of fast neutrals from plasma and deposition of plasma impurities may significantly degrade optical and polarization characteristics of mirrors influencing the overall performance of the respective diagnostics. Therefore, maintaining the best possible performance of mirrors is of the crucial importance for the ITER optical diagnostics. Mirrors in ITER divertor are expected to suffer from deposition of impurities. The dedicated experiment in a tokamak divertor was needed to address this issue. Investigations with molybdenum diagnostic mirrors were made in DIII-D divertor. Mirror samples were exposed at different temperatures in the private flux region to a series of ELMy H-mode discharges with partially detached divertor plasmas. An increase of temperature of mirrors during the exposure generally led to the mitigation of carbon deposition, primarily due to temperature-enhanced chemical erosion of carbon layers by D atoms. Finally, for the mirrors exposed at the temperature of ∼160 o C neither carbon deposition nor degradation of optical properties was detected

  20. Physics Experiments at the UNEDLabs Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan pedro Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available UNEDLabs is a web portal based on a free, modern, open source, and well-known learning management system: Moodle. This portal joins two theme networks of virtual and remote laboratories (one for Control Engineering and another one for Physics, named AutomatL@bs and FisL@bs, respectively together. AutomatL@bs has been operative for five years now. Following AutomatL@bs’ scheme, FisL@bs was created as a network of remote and virtual laboratories for physics university education via the Internet to offer students the possibility of performing hands-on experiences in different fields of physics in two ways: simulation and real remote operation. Now, both FisL@bs and AutomatL@bs join together (while maintaining their independency into an unique new web portal called UNEDLabs. This work focuses on this new web environment and gives a detailed account of a novel way in Physics to let distance learning students gain practical experience autonomously. This paper explains how the new portal works and the software tools used for creating it. In addition, it also describes the physics experiments which are already operative.

  1. Brahms Experiment at RHIC Day-1 Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videbaek, Flemming

    1999-01-01

    The BRAHMS experiment is designed to measure semi-inclusive spectra of charged hadron over a wide range of rapidity. It will yield information on particle production, both at central rapidity and in the baryon rich fragmentation region. The physics plans for measurements in the first year of running at RHIC are discussed

  2. Physics design of advanced steady-state tokamak reactor A-SSTR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Ushigusa, Kenkichi

    2000-10-01

    Based on design studies on the fusion power reactor such as the DEMO reactor SSTR, the compact power reactor A-SSTR and the DREAM reactor with a high environmental safety and high availability, a new concept of compact and economic fusion power reactor (A-SSTR2) with high safety and high availability is proposed. Employing high temperature superconductor, the toroidal filed coils supplies the maximum field of 23T on conductor which corresponds to 11T at the magnetic axis. A-SSTR2 (R p =6.2m, a p =1.5m, I p =12MA) has a fusion power of 4GW with β N =4. For an easy maintenance and for an enough support against a strong electromagnetic force on coils, a poloidal coils system has no center solenoid coils and consists of 6 coils located on top and bottom of the machine. Physics studies on the plasma equilibrium, controllability of the configuration, the plasma initiation and non-inductive current ramp-up, fusion power controllability and the diverter have shown the validity of the A-SSTR2 concept. (author)

  3. Module description of TOKAMAK equilibrium code MEUDAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masaei; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Ozeki, Takahisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of an axisymmetric MHD equilibrium serves as a foundation of TOKAMAK researches, such as a design of devices and theoretical research, the analysis of experiment result. For this reason, also in JAERI, an efficient MHD analysis code has been developed from start of TOKAMAK research. The free boundary equilibrium code ''MEUDAS'' which uses both the DCR method (Double-Cyclic-Reduction Method) and a Green's function can specify the pressure and the current distribution arbitrarily, and has been applied to the analysis of a broad physical subject as a code having rapidity and high precision. Also the MHD convergence calculation technique in ''MEUDAS'' has been built into various newly developed codes. This report explains in detail each module in ''MEUDAS'' for performing convergence calculation in solving the MHD equilibrium. (author)

  4. Runaway acceleration during magnetic reconnection in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P; Eriksson, L-G; Andersson, F

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the basic theory of runaway electron production is reviewed and recent progress is discussed. The mechanisms of primary and secondary generation of runaway electrons are described and their dynamics during a tokamak disruption is analysed, both in a simple analytical model and through numerical Monte Carlo simulation. A simple criterion for when these mechanisms generate a significant runaway current is derived, and the first self-consistent simulations of the electron kinetics in a tokamak disruption are presented. Radial cross-field diffusion is shown to inhibit runaway avalanches, as indicated in recent experiments on JET and JT-60U. Finally, the physics of relativistic post-disruption runaway electrons is discussed, in particular their slowing down due to emission of synchrotron radiation, and their ability to produce electron-positron pairs in collisions with bulk plasma ions and electrons

  5. Module description of TOKAMAK equilibrium code MEUDAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masaei; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Ozeki, Takahisa

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of an axisymmetric MHD equilibrium serves as a foundation of TOKAMAK researches, such as a design of devices and theoretical research, the analysis of experiment result. For this reason, also in JAERI, an efficient MHD analysis code has been developed from start of TOKAMAK research. The free boundary equilibrium code ''MEUDAS'' which uses both the DCR method (Double-Cyclic-Reduction Method) and a Green's function can specify the pressure and the current distribution arbitrarily, and has been applied to the analysis of a broad physical subject as a code having rapidity and high precision. Also the MHD convergence calculation technique in ''MEUDAS'' has been built into various newly developed codes. This report explains in detail each module in ''MEUDAS'' for performing convergence calculation in solving the MHD equilibrium. (author)

  6. Plasma edge physics in the TEXTOR tokamak with poloidal and toroidal limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samm, U.; Bogen, P.; Hartwig, H.; Hintz, E.; Hoethker, K.; Lie, Y.T.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Rusbueldt, D.; Schweer, B.; Yu, Y.J.

    1989-01-01

    Investigations of the plasma edge in TEXTOR are presented on the one hand by comparing results obtained with poloidal and toroidal limiters and on the other hand by discussing general problems of plasma edge physics which are independent of the limiter configuration. The characteristic properties of plasma flow to the different limiters are analyzed and show e.g. that the fraction of total ion flow to the limiter is much larger in the case of a toroidal limiter (80%). Density and heat flux profiles are presented which demonstrate that for both types of limiters a significant steepening of the scrape-off layer (SOL) occurs close to the limiter, leading to a small heat load e-folding length of 5-8 mm. The velocity distribution of recycled neutral hydrogen at a main limiter has been determined from the Doppler broadening of the H α line. The data clearly show that a large fraction of particles (30-50%) is reflected at the limiter surface having energies of about the sheath potential. Significant isotopic effects (H/D) concerning the plasma edge properties and the plasma core are presented and their relation to enhanced particle and energy transport in hydrogen compared to deuterium is discussed. A decrease of the cross field diffusion coefficient with increasing density can be deduced from density profile measurements in the SOL and a comparison with density fluctuations is given. The role of oxygen for impurity release is demonstrated. A new type of wall conditioning - boronization - is described, with two major improvements for quasi stationary conditions: reduction of oxygen and better density control. Best results with ICRH have been obtained under these conditions. (orig.)

  7. Discontinuous Galerkin methods for plasma physics in the scrape-off layer of tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michoski, C.; Meyerson, D.; Isaac, T.; Waelbroeck, F.

    2014-01-01

    A new parallel discontinuous Galerkin solver, called ArcOn, is developed to describe the intermittent turbulent transport of filamentary blobs in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of fusion plasma. The model is comprised of an elliptic subsystem coupled to two convection-dominated reaction–diffusion–convection equations. Upwinding is used for a class of numerical fluxes developed to accommodate cross product driven convection, and the elliptic solver uses SIPG, NIPG, IIPG, Brezzi, and Bassi–Rebay fluxes to formulate the stiffness matrix. A novel entropy sensor is developed for this system, designed for a space–time varying artificial diffusion/viscosity regularization algorithm. Some numerical experiments are performed to show convergence order on manufactured solutions, regularization of blob/streamer dynamics in the SOL given unstable parameterizations, long-time stability of modon (or dipole drift vortex) solutions arising in simulations of drift-wave turbulence, and finally the formation of edge mode turbulence in the scrape-off layer under turbulent saturation conditions

  8. Measurements of loop antenna loading in RF heating experiments on the KT-5C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Kan; Deng Bihe; Wen Yizhi; Wan Shude; Liu Wandong; Yu Wen; Yu Changxun

    1997-01-01

    A new method to measure the loop antenna loadings in the RF wave heating experiments (IBWH at reasonable RF power with relatively low frequency) on the KT-5C device is presented. The method is characterized by determining the RF current ratio only, so it eases the needs of instruments and simplifies the requirements for calibration and data processing in the experiments

  9. Nuclear physics experiments with low cost instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Bastos, Rodrigo; Adelar Boff, Cleber; Melquiades, Fábio Luiz

    2016-11-01

    One of the difficulties in modern physics teaching is the limited availability of experimental activities. This is particularly true for teaching nuclear physics in high school or college. The activities suggested in the literature generally symbolise real phenomenon, using simulations. It happens because the experimental practices mostly include some kind of expensive radiation detector and an ionising radiation source that requires special care for handling and storage, being subject to a highly bureaucratic regulation in some countries. This study overcomes these difficulties and proposes three nuclear physics experiments using a low-cost ion chamber which construction is explained: the measurement of 222Rn progeny collected from the indoor air; the measurement of the range of alpha particles emitted by the 232Th progeny, present in lantern mantles and in thoriated welding rods, and by the air filter containing 222Rn progeny; and the measurement of 220Rn half-life collected from the emanation of the lantern mantles. This paper presents the experimental procedures and the expected results, indicating that the experiments may provide support for nuclear physics classes. These practices may outreach wide access to either college or high-school didactic laboratories, and the apparatus has the potential for the development of new teaching activities for nuclear physics.

  10. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The technical reports contained in this collection of papers on research using small tokamaks fall into four main categories, i.e., (i) experimental work (heating, stability, plasma radial profiles, fluctuations and transport, confinement, ultra-low-q tokamaks, wall physics, a.o.), (ii) diagnostics (beam probes, laser scattering, X-ray tomography, laser interferometry, electron-cyclotron absorption and emission systems), (iii) theory (strong turbulence, effects of heating on stability, plasma beta limits, wave absorption, macrostability, low-q tokamak configurations and bootstrap currents, turbulent heating, stability of vortex flows, nonlinear islands growth, plasma-drift-induced anomalous transport, ergodic divertor design, a.o.), and (iv) new technical facilities (varistors applied to establish constant current and loop voltage in HT-6M), lower-hybrid-current-drive systems for HT-6B and HT-6M, radio-frequency systems for HT-6M ICR heating experimentation, and applications of fiber optics for visible and vacuum ultraviolet radiation detection as applied to tokamaks and reversed-field pinches. A total number of 51 papers are included in the collection. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Beat wave current drive experiment on the Davis Diverted Tokamak (DDT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D.Q.; Horton, R.D.; Rogers, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The beatwave current drive experiment is summarized. The first phase of the experiment was the construction of the microwave sources and the diagnostics needed to demonstrate the beat wave effects, i.e. the measurement of the electrostatic plasma wave produced by the beating of two high intensity electromagnetic waves. In order to keep the cost of the experiments to a minimum, a low density filament plasma source (10 8 ) to (10 10 particles cm -3 ) was employed and the magnetic field in the toroidal plasma was produced by a dc power supply

  12. Multifractal analysis of plasma turbulence in biasing experiments on Castor tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Budaev, V.P.; Dufková, Edita; Nanobashvili, S.; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Zajac, Jaromír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 55, C (2005), s. 1615-1621 ISSN 0011-4626. [Workshop “Electric Fields, Structures and Relaxation in Edge Plasmas". Tarragona, 5.7.2005-5.7.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma turbulence * multifractal analysis Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.360, year: 2005

  13. Investigation of steady-state tokamak issues by long pulse experiments on Tore Supra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giruzzi, G.; Abgrall, R.; Allegretti, L.; Ané, J.M.; Angelino, P.; Aniel, T.; Argouarch, A.; Artaud, J.F.; Balme, S.; Basiuk, V.; Bayetti, P.; Bécoulet, A.; Bécoulet, M.; Begrambekov, L.; Benkadda, M.S.; Benoit, F.; Berger-by, G.; Bertrand, B.; Beyer, P.; Blum, J.; Boilson, D.; Bottollier-Curtet, H.; Bouchand, C.; Bouquey, F.; Bourdelle, C.; Brémond, F.; Brémond, S.; Brosset, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Buravand, Y.; Cara, P.; Carpentier, S.; Casati, A.; Chaibi, O.; Chantant, M.; Chappuis, P.; Chatelier, M.; Chevet, G.; Ciazynski, D.; Ciraolo, G.; Clairet, F.; Clary, J.; Colas, L.; Corre, Y.; Courtois, X.; Crouseilles, N.; Darmet, G.; Davi, M.; Daviot, R.; De Esch, H.; Decker, J.; Decool, P.; Delchambre, E.; Delmas, E.; Delpech, L.; Desgranges, C.; Devynck, P.; Doceul, L.; Dolgetta, N.; Douai, D.; Dougnac, H.; Duchateau, J.L.; Dumont, R.; Dunand, A.; Durocher, A.; Ekedahl, A.; Elbeze, D.; Eriksson, L.G.; Escarguel, A.; Escourbiac, F.; Faisse, F.; Falchetto, G.; Farge, M.; Farjon, L.J.; Fedorczak, N.; Fenzi-Bonizec, C.; Garbet, X.; Garcia, J.; Gardarein, J.L.; Gargiulo, L.; Garibaldi, P.; Gauthier, E.; Géraud, A.; Gerbaud, T.; Geynet, M.; Ghendrih, P.; Gil, C.; Goniche, M.; Grandgirard, V.; Grisolia, C.; Gros, G.; Grosman, A.; Guigon, R.; Guilhem, D.; Guillerminet, B.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Hacquin, S.; Hatchressian, J.C.; Hennequin, P.; Henry, D.; Hernandez, C.; Hertout, P.; Heuraux, S.; Hillairet, J.; Hoang, G.T.; Hong, S.H.; Honore, C.; Hourtoule, J.; Houry, M.; Hutter, T.; Huynh, P.; Huysmans, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Joffrin, E.; Johner, J.; Journeaux, J.Y.; Jullien, F.; Kazarian, F.; Kočan, M.; Lacroix, B.; Lamaison, V.; Lasalle, J.; Latu, G.; Lausenaz, Y.; Laviron, C.; Le Niliot, C.; Lennholm, M.; Leroux, F.; Linez, F.; Lipa, M.; Litaudon, X.; Loarer, T.; Lott, F.; Lotte, P.; Luciani, J.F.; Lütjens, H.; Macor, A.; Madeleine, S.; Magaud, P.; Maget, P.; Magne, R.; Manenc, L.; Marandet, Y.; Marbach, G.; Maréchal, J.L.; Martin, C.; Martin, V.; Martinez, A.; Martins, J.P.; Masset, R.; Mazon, D.; Meunier, L.; Meyer, O.; Million, L.; Missirlian, M.; Mitteau, R.; Mollard, P.; Moncada, V.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Moreau, D.; Moreau, P.; Nannini, M.; Nardon, E.; Nehme, H.; Nguyen, C.; Nicollet, S.; Ottaviani, M.; Pacella, D.; Pamela, S.; Parisot, P.; Parrat, H.; Pastor, P.; Pecquet, A.L.; Pégourié, B.; Petržílka, Václav; Peysson, Y.; Portafaix, C.; Prou, M.; Ravenel, N.; Reichle, R.; Reux, C.; Reynaud, P.; Richou, M.; Rigollet, F.; Rimini, F.; Roche, H.; Rosanvallon, S.; Roth, J.; Roubin, P.; Sabot, R.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Salasca, S.; Salmon, T.; Samaille, F.; Santagiustina, A.; Saoutic, B.; Sarazin, Y.; Schlosser, J.; Schneider, K.; Schneider, M.; Schwander, F.; Ségui, J.L.; Signoret, J.; Simonin, A.; Song, S.; Sonnendruker, E.; Spuig, P.; Svensson, L.; Tamain, P.; Tena, M.; Theis, J.M.; Thonnat, M.; Torre, A.; Travère, J.M.; Trier, E.; Tsitrone, E.; Turco, F.; Vallet, J.C.; Vatry, A.; Vermare, L.; Villecroze, F.; Villegas, D.; Voyer, D.; Vulliez, K.; Xiao, W.; Yu, D.; Zani, L.; Zou, X.L.; Zwingmann, W.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 10 (2009), s. 104010-104010 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : SOL * LH wave * plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.270, year: 2009 http://www.iop.org/EJ/toc/0029-5515/49/10

  14. Simulations and Experiments in Astronomy and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, F. P.; Maurone, P. A.; Dewarf, L. E.

    1998-12-01

    There are new approaches to teaching astronomy and physics in the laboratory setting, involving the use of computers as tools to simulate events and concepts which can be illuminated in no other reasonable way. With the computer, it is possible to travel back in time to replicate the sky as Galileo saw it. Astronomical phenomena which reveal themselves only after centuries of real time may be compressed in the computer to a simulation of several minutes. Observations simulated on the computer do not suffer from the vagaries of weather, fixed time or geographic position, or non-repeatability. In physics, the computer allows us to secure data for experiments which, by their nature, may not be amenable to human interaction. These could include experiments with very fast or very slow timescales, large number of data samples, complex or tedious manipulation of the data which hides the fundamental nature of the experiment, or data sampling which would need a specialized probe, such as for acid rain. This innovation has become possible only recently, due to the availability and affordability of sophisticated computer hardware and software. We have developed a laboratory experience for non-scientists who need an introductory course in astronomy or physics. Our approach makes extensive use of computers in this laboratory. Using commercially available software, the students use the computer as a time machine and a space craft to explore and rediscover fundamental science. The physics experiments are classical in nature, and the computer acts as a data collector and presenter, freeing the student from the tedium of repetitive data gathering and replotting. In this way, the student is encouraged to explore, to try new things, to refine the measurements, and to discover the principles underlying the observed phenomena.

  15. Physics design requirements for the National Spherical Torus Experiment liquid lithium divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.; Bell, M.; Berzak, L.; Brooks, A.; Ellis, R.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.K.; Menard, J.; Stotler, D.; Zakharov, L.E.; Maingi, Rajesh; Nygren, R.E.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wakeland, P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) high-power divertor experiments have shown significant and recurring benefits of solid lithium coatings on plasma facing components (PFCs) to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H-mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. The next step in this work is installation of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) to achieve density control for inductionless current drive capability (e.g., about a 15 25% ne decrease from present highest non-inductionless fraction discharges which often evolve toward the density limit, ne/nGW 1), to enable ne scan capability (2) in the H-mode, to test the ability to operate at significantly lower density (e.g., ne/nGW = 0.25), for future reactor designs based on the Spherical Tokamak, and eventually to investigate high heat-flux power handling (10 MW/m2) with long pulse discharges (>1.5 s). The first step (LLD-1) physics design encompasses the desired plasma requirements, the experimental capabilities and conditions, power handling, radial location, pumping capability, operating temperature, lithium filling, MHD forces, and diagnostics for control and characterization.

  16. Experimental results from the TUMAN 3 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golant, V.E.; Andrejko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Korneev, V.A.; Krikunov, S.V.; Lipin, B.M.; Lebedev, S.V.; Levin, L.S.; Podushnikova, K.A.; Razdobarin, G.T.; Rozhansky, V.A.; Rozhdestvensky, V.V.; Tendler, M.; Tukachinsky, A.S.; Jaroshevich, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    The open-quote open-quote TUMAN-3 close-quote close-quote Tokamak programme concentrates on issues of improved confinement. In 1989 the transition from an ordinary Ohmic regime into an improved confinement mode was achieved. The signatures of the H-mode in auxiliary heated tokamaks have been observed in this regime. The crucial role of the boundary radial electric field was found in the experiments with internal bias probe. Other techniques were demonstrated to disturb the boundary plasma which led to H-mode triggering: short increase of working gas puffing, minor radius magnetic compression and pellet injection. The role scaling of the energy confinement time in the Ohmic H-mode was obtained, which differs dramatically from the scaling for the ordinary Ohmic regime. There were found a strong dependence of τ E on plasma current and a weak dependence on density. The maximum value of τ E was 10 times longer than in the ordinary Ohmic region. The τ E scaling for the Ohmic H-mode is consistent with the scaling proposed for devices with powerful auxiliary heating. The results shows that H-mode physics is universal in tokamaks with different geometries and heating methods. (AIP) copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  17. Connecting High School Physics Experiences, Outcome Expectations, Physics Identity, and Physics Career Choice: A Gender Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.; Shanahan, Marie-Claire

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how students' physics identities are shaped by their experiences in high school physics classes and by their career outcome expectations. The theoretical framework focuses on physics identity and includes the dimensions of student performance, competence, recognition by others, and interest. Drawing data from the Persistence…

  18. Neutrino physics with short baseline experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, E.D.

    2006-01-01

    Neutrino physics with low- to medium-energy beams has progressed steadily over the last several years. Neutrino oscillation searches at short baseline (defined as 2 - -> 0.1eV 2 . One positive signal, from the LSND collaboration, exists and is being tested by the MiniBooNE experiment. Neutrino cross-section measurements are being made by MiniBooNE and K2K, which will be important for reducing systematic errors in present and future oscillation measurements. In the near future, dedicated cross- section experiments will begin operating at Fermilab. (author)

  19. Enhancement of confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis begins by identifying a hypothetical model of tokamak confinement that is designed to take into account the conflict between Tsub(e)(r)-profile shapes arising from microscopic transport and J(r)-profile shapes required for gross stability. On the basis of this model, a number of hypothetical lines of advance are developed. Some TFTR experiments that may point the way to a particularly attractive type of tokamak reactor regime are discussed. (author)

  20. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] (and others)

    2003-07-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  1. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes

    2003-01-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  2. Compilation of current high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    This compilation of current high-energy physics experiments is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and the nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. Nominally, the compilation includes summaries of all high-energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about June 1978, and had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1975. The experimental summaries are supplemented with three indexes to the compilation, several vocabulary lists giving names or abbreviations used, and a short summary of the beams at each of the laboratories (except Rutherford). The summaries themselves are included on microfiche

  3. Introductory Physics Experiments Using the Wiimote

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, William; Rooney, Frank; Ochoa, Romulo

    2009-03-01

    The Wii, a video game console, is a very popular device with millions of units sold worldwide over the past two years. Although computationally it is not a powerful machine, to a physics educator its most important components can be its controllers. The Wiimote (or remote) controller contains three accelerometers, an infrared detector, and Bluetooth connectivity at a relatively low price. Thanks to available open source code, any PC with Bluetooth capability can detect the information sent out by the Wiimote. We have designed several experiments for introductory physics courses that make use of the accelerometers and Bluetooth connectivity. We have adapted the Wiimote to measure the: variable acceleration in simple harmonic motion, centripetal and tangential accelerations in circular motion, and the accelerations generated when students lift weights. We present the results of our experiments and compare them with those obtained when using motion and/or force sensors.

  4. Particle physics experiments at high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, John

    2011-01-01

    Written by one of the detector developers for the International Linear Collider, this is the first textbook for graduate students dedicated to the complexities and the simplicities of high energy collider detectors. It is intended as a specialized reference for a standard course in particle physics, and as a principal text for a special topics course focused on large collider experiments. Equally useful as a general guide for physicists designing big detectors. (orig.)

  5. Experiment and operation of a LHCD-35 kV/2.8 MW/1000 s high-voltage power supply on HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yiyun

    2002-01-01

    A-35 kV/2.8 MW/1000s high-voltage power supply (HVPS) for HT-7 superconducting tokamak has been built successfully. The HVPS is scheduled to run on a 2.45 GHz/1 MW lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system of HT-7 superconducting tokamak before the set-up of HT-7 superconducting tokamak in 2003. The HVPS has a series of advantages such as good steady and dynamic response, logical computer program controlling the HVPS without any fault, operational panel and experimental board for data acquisition, which both are grounded distinctively in a normative way to protect the main body of HVPS along with its attached equipment from dangers. Electric power cables and other control cables are disposed reasonably, to prevent signals from magnetic interference and ensure the precision of signal transfer. The author introduced the experiment and operation of a 35 kV/2.8 MW/1000 s HVPS for 2.45 GHz/1 MW LHCD system. The reliability and feasibility of the HVPS has been demonstrated in comparison with experimental results of original design and simulation data

  6. Flavour Physics with High-Luminosity Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    With the first dedicated B-factory experiments BaBar (USA) and BELLE (Japan) Flavour Physics has entered the phase of precision physics. LHCb (CERN) and the high luminosity extension of KEK-B together with the state of the art BELLE II detector will further push this precision frontier. Progress in this field always relied on close cooperation between experiment and theory, as extraction of fundamental parameters often is very indirect. To extract the full physics information from existing and future data, this cooperation must be further intensified. This MIAPP programme aims in particular to prepare for this task by joining experimentalists and theorists in the various relevant fields, with the goal to build the necessary tools in face of the challenge of new large data sets. The programme will begin with a focus on physics with non-leptonic final states, continued by semileptonic B meson decays and Tau decays, and on various aspects of CP symmetry violation closer to the end. In addition, in the final ...

  7. Controlled thermonuclear fusion and the latest progress on China's HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangang; Yang Yu

    2003-01-01

    After 50 years of research on controlled thermonuclear fusion, a new stage will be reached in 2003, when a site for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project will be chosen to start the construction. Scientists hope that this project could herald a new era in which the energy problem will be solved completely. The great progress made on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak in China has provided positive and powerful support for fusion research. The HT-7 is one of the only two superconducting tokamaks in the world that can carry out minute-scale high temperature plasma research, and has achieved a duration of 63.95s for the hot plasma discharge. This is a major step towards real steady-state operation of the tokamak configuration. We present an overview of the latest progress on the tokamak experiments in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

  8. A ''SuperCode'' for performing systems analysis of tokamak experiments and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, S.W.; Barr, W.L.; Crotinger, J.A.; Perkins, L.J.; Solomon, C.J.; Chaniotakis, E.A.; Freidberg, J.P.; Wei, J.; Galambos, J.D.; Mandrekas, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new code, named the ''SUPERCODE,'' has been developed to fill the gap between currently available zero dimensional systems codes and highly sophisticated, multidimensional plasma performance codes. The former are comprehensive in content, fast to execute, but rather simple in terms of the accuracy of the physics and engineering models. The latter contain state-of-the-art plasma physics modelling but are limited in engineering content and time consuming to run. The SUPERCODE upgrades the reliability and accuracy of systems codes by calculating the self consistent 1 1/2 dimensional MHD-transport plasma evolution in a realistic engineering environment. By a combination of variational techniques and careful formation, there is only a modest increase in CPU time over O-D runs, thereby making the SUPERCODE suitable for use as a systems studies tool. In addition, considerable effort has been expended to make the code user- and programming-friendly, as well as operationally flexible, with the hope of encouraging wide usage throughout the fusion community

  9. Fast-wave ICRF minority-regime heating experiments on the Tore Supra tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarici, G; Beaumont, B; Becoulet, A; Kuus, H; Saoutic, B; Martin, G [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d` Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (FR). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Shepard, T D; Haste, G R; Baity, F W [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Evans, T E [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (US)

    1992-12-31

    Up to 4 MW of rf power at 57 MHz has been coupled to Ohmic target plasmas during the first ICRF heating experiments on Tore Supra. A total of 12 MW of rf power will ultimately be available from six tetrode amplifiers and will be coupled to the plasmas using three ORNL/CEA-designed resonant double-loop antennas. During these first experiments, two antennas were used, with one or two energized at a time. The antenna loading with plasma was observed to be well over an order of magnitude greater than that without plasma. In addition, one kilo-electron-volt of electron heating, significant minority nonthermal ions, and significant increases in diamagnetic stored energy were observed. A comparison of in-phase and out-of-phase antenna operation showed the same increase in stored energy, less radiated power, and a larger drop in loop voltage for out-of-phase operation. Confinement scaling agrees with the ITER scaling law.

  10. Plasma current start-up experiments without the central solenoid in the TST-2 spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Y.; Ejiri, A.; Shiraiwa, S.; Adachi, Y.; Ishii, N.; Kasahara, H.; Nuga, H.; Ono, Y.; Oosako, T.; Sasaki, M.; Shimada, Y.; Sumitomo, N.; Taguchi, I.; Tojo, H.; Tsujimura, J.; Ushigome, M.; Yamada, T.; Hanada, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Idei, H.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Sasaki, K.; Sato, K.N.; Zushi, H.; Nishino, N.; Mitarai, O.

    2006-01-01

    Several techniques for initiating the plasma current without the use of the central solenoid are being developed in TST-2. While TST-2 was temporarily located at Kyushu University, two types of start-up scenarios were demonstrated. (1) A plasma current of 4 kA was generated and sustained for 0.28 s by either electron cyclotron wave or electron Bernstein wave, without induction. (2) A plasma current of 10 kA was obtained transiently by induction using only outboard poloidal field coils. In the second scenario, it is important to supply sufficient power for ionization (100 kW of EC power was sufficient in this case), since the vertical field during start-up is not adequate to maintain plasma equilibrium. In addition, electron heating experiments using the X-B mode conversion scenario were performed, and a heating efficiency of 60% was observed at a 100 kW RF power level. TST-2 is now located at the Kashiwa Campus of the University of Tokyo. Significant upgrades were made in both magnetic coil power supplies and RF systems, and plasma experiments have restarted. RF power of up to 400 kW is available in the high-harmonic fast wave frequency range around 20 MHz. Four 200 MHz transmitters are now being prepared for plasma current start-up experiments using RF power in the lower-hybrid frequency range. Preparations are in progress for a new plasma merging experiment (UTST) aimed at the formation and sustainment of ultra-high β ST plasmas

  11. Assessment of eddy current effects on compression experiments in the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Park, W.

    1986-05-01

    The eddy current induced on the TFTR vacuum vessel during compression experiments is estimated based on a cylindrical model. It produces an error magnetic field that generates magnetic islands at the rational magnetic surfaces. The widths of these islands are calculated and found to have some effect on electron energy confinement. However, resistive MHD simulation results indicate that the island formation process can be slowed down by plasma rotation

  12. Remote operation of the GOLEM tokamak for Fusion Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, O.; Kocman, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Odstrcil, M. [University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Odstrcil, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Matusu, M. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Stöckel, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague CZ-182 21 (Czech Republic); Svoboda, V., E-mail: svoboda@fjfi.cvut.cz [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Vondrasek, G. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Zara, J. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-166 27 (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The remote operation of the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes. - Abstract: Practically oriented education in the field of thermonuclear fusion is highly requested. However, the high complexity of appropriate experiments makes it difficult to develop and maintain laboratories where students can take part in hands-on experiments in this field of study. One possible solution is to establish centres with specific high temperature plasma experiments where students can visit such a laboratory and perform their experiments in-situ. With the advancements of IT technologies it naturally follows to make a step forward and connect these with necessary plasma physics technologies and thus allow to access even sophisticated experiments remotely. Tokamak GOLEM is a small, modest device with its infrastructure linked to web technologies allowing students to set-up necessary discharge parameters, submit them into a queue and within minutes obtain the results in the form of a discharge homepage.

  13. Remote operation of the GOLEM tokamak for Fusion Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, O.; Kocman, J.; Odstrcil, M.; Odstrcil, T.; Matusu, M.; Stöckel, J.; Svoboda, V.; Vondrasek, G.; Zara, J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The remote operation of the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes. - Abstract: Practically oriented education in the field of thermonuclear fusion is highly requested. However, the high complexity of appropriate experiments makes it difficult to develop and maintain laboratories where students can take part in hands-on experiments in this field of study. One possible solution is to establish centres with specific high temperature plasma experiments where students can visit such a laboratory and perform their experiments in-situ. With the advancements of IT technologies it naturally follows to make a step forward and connect these with necessary plasma physics technologies and thus allow to access even sophisticated experiments remotely. Tokamak GOLEM is a small, modest device with its infrastructure linked to web technologies allowing students to set-up necessary discharge parameters, submit them into a queue and within minutes obtain the results in the form of a discharge homepage.

  14. Critique of atomic physics instability mechanisms: Ionization-driven and radiative microinstabilities in the tokamak edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    The theory of atomic-process driven microinstabilities in the tokamak edge plasma is reexamined. It is found that these instabilities, as they are usually presented, do not exist. This assertion applies both to ionization-driven modes and to radiative condensation, or thermal-driven modes. The problem is that there exists no separation of time scales between the approach to equilibrium and the growth rate of the purported instabilities. Therefore, to describe the perturbation of an inhomogeneous plasma, it is essential either to establish an equilibrium that includes both perpendicular transport and the proposed source, or, alternatively, to follow the background evolution simultaneously with the growth of the modes. Neither has been done in theoretical or numerical studies of microinstabilities driven by atomic effects in tokamaks. Very near the density limit, macroscopic modes may be unstable, leading to marfes or disruptions, but perturbations of the equilibrium transport fluxes, when taken into account, are sufficient to stabilize the microscopic modes. If the equilibrium fluxes are not included a priori, the ordering breakdown persists into the nonlinear regime. Since the atomic driving terms are the same as in the linear limit, radial decorrelation lengths would have to approach background scale lengths to yield transport of significant magnitude. Under ordinary tokamak conditions, therefore, atomic processes are unlikely to provide an important driving mechanism for the microturbulence that is presumed to cause anomalous transport

  15. Microprocessors in physics experiments at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochester, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    The increasing size and complexity of high energy physics experiments is changing the way data are collected. To implement a trigger or event filter requires complex logic which may have to be modified as the experiment proceeds. Simply to monitor a detector, large amounts of data must be processed online. The use of microprocessors or other programmable devices can help to achieve these ends flexibly and economically. At SLAC, a number of microprocessor-based systems have been built and are in use in experimental setups, and others are now being developed. This talk is a review of existing systems and their use in experiments, and of developments in progress and future plans. (orig.)

  16. Microprocessors in physics experiments at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochester, L.S.

    1981-04-01

    The increasing size and complexity of high energy physics experiments is changing the way data are collected. To implement a trigger or event filter requires complex logic which may have to be modified as the experiment proceeds. Simply to monitor a detector, large amounts of data must be processed on line. The use of microprocessors or other programmable devices can help to achieve these ends flexibly and economically. At SLAC, a number of microprocessor-based systems have been built and are in use in experimental setups, and others are now being developed. This talk is a review of existing systems and their use in experiments, and of developments in progress and future plans

  17. Laser experiments for chemistry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Compton, Robert N

    2016-01-01

    Lasers are employed throughout science and technology, in fundamental research, the remote sensing of atmospheric gases or pollutants, communications, medical diagnostics and therapies, and the manufacturing of microelectronic devices. Understanding the principles of their operation, which underlie all of these areas, is essential for a modern scientific education. This text introduces the characteristics and operation of lasers through laboratory experiments designed for the undergraduate curricula in chemistry and physics. Introductory chapters describe the properties of light, the history of laser invention, the atomic, molecular, and optical principles behind how lasers work, and the kinds of lasers available today. Other chapters include the basic theory of spectroscopy and computational chemistry used to interpret laser experiments. Experiments range from simple in-class demonstrations to more elaborate configurations for advanced students. Each chapter has historical and theoretical background, as well...

  18. Divertor heat and particle control experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Baker, D.R.; Allen, S.L.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper we present a summary of recent DIII-D divertor physics activity and plans for future divertor upgrades. During the past year, DIII-D experimental effort was focused on areas of active heat and particle control and divertor target erosion studies. Using the DIII-D Advanced Divertor system we have succeeded for the first time to control the plasma density and demonstrate helium exhaust in H-mode plasmas. Divertor heat flux control by means of D 2 gas puffing and impurity injection were studied separately and in, both cases up to a factor of five reduction of the divertor peak heat flux was observed. Using the DiMES sample transfer system we have obtained erosion data on various material samples in well diagnosed plasmas and compared the results with predictions of numerical models

  19. Tokamak pump limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been done with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a region may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased edge electron temperature are observed in discharges with improved confinement. The injection of small amounts of neon into ISX-B has more clearly shown an improved electron core energy confinement during neutral beam injection. While carried out with a regular limiter, this Z-mode of operation is ideal for use with pump limiters and should be a way to achieve energy confinement times similar to values for H-mode tokamak plasmas. The implication of all these results for the design of a reactor pump limiter is described

  20. Tokamak pump limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; California Univ., Los Angeles

    1984-01-01

    Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6 MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been performed with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scrape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a regime may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased edge electron temperature are observed in discharges with improved confinement. The injection of small amounts of neon into ISX-B has more clearly shown an improved electron core energy confinement during neutral beam injection. While carried out with a regular limiter, this 'Z-mode' of operation is ideal for use with pump limiters and should be a way to achieve energy confinement times similar to values for H-mode tokamak plasmas. The implication of all these results for the design of a reactor pump limiter is described. (orig.)

  1. Ion temperature gradient driven transport in a density modification experiment on the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Lindberg, D.; Kim, J.Y.; Dong, J.Q.; Hammett, G.W.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Hamaguchi, S.

    1991-07-01

    TFTR profiles from a supershot density-modification experiment are analyzed for their local and ballooning stability to toroidal η i -modes in order to understand the initially puzzling results showing no increase in X i when a pellet is used to produce an abrupt and large increase in the η i parameter. The local stability analysis assumes that k parallel = 1/qR and ignores the effects of shear, but makes no assumption on the magnitude of k parallel v ti /ω. The ballooning stability analysis determines a self-consistent linear spectrum of k parallel's including the effect of shear and toroidicity, but it expands in k parallel v ti /ω ≤ 1, which is a marginal assumption for this experiment. Nevertheless, the two approaches agree well and show that the mixing length estimate of the transport rate does not change appreciably during the density-modification and has a value close to or less than the observed X i , in contrast to most previous theories which predicted X i 's which were over an order-of-magnitude too large. However, we are still unable to explain the observed increase X i (r) with minor radius by adding the effects of the finite beta drift - MHD mode coupling, the slab-like mode, or the trapped electron response. The experimental tracking 0.2 e /X i i and trapped-electron driving mechanisms are operating. 4 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  2. A submersible physics laboratory experiment. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehling, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1972, NOAA (OOE and MUSandT) and the University of Washington Physics Department, have been associated in the underwater detection and analysis of cosmic radiation flux. The purpose of experiments described in this paper has been to take advantage of the nuclear cosmic-ray related qualities of the ocean water mass by allowing the experimenter(s) to work in situ on the sea floor, rather than attempting to try an impractical alternative: lowering a prepared photoemulsion detector to the bottom from a surface vessel, a method that would yield an unacceptably surface-radiation-cluttered emulsion. This report describes briefly the four elements that motivated or comprised the subject experiment: basic physics which motivated the mission; applied physics, including particle detection, emulsion chemistry, calibration, and scanning; engineering, including design and fabrication of supporting apparatus, use of a submersible (JSL was modified slightly to permit lock-on to the bottom chamber), and a bottom lockout chamber; and operations, including submersible dives, ship support, emulsion preparation, deployment, recovery, and development

  3. Physics Potential of Long-Baseline Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of neutrino mixing and oscillations over the past decade provides firm evidence for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Recently, θ13 has been determined to be moderately large, quite close to its previous upper bound. This represents a significant milestone in establishing the three-flavor oscillation picture of neutrinos. It has opened up exciting prospects for current and future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments towards addressing the remaining fundamental questions, in particular the type of the neutrino mass hierarchy and the possible presence of a CP-violating phase. Another recent and crucial development is the indication of non-maximal 2-3 mixing angle, causing the octant ambiguity of θ23. In this paper, I will review the phenomenology of long-baseline neutrino oscillations with a special emphasis on sub-leading three-flavor effects, which will play a crucial role in resolving these unknowns. First, I will give a brief description of neutrino oscillation phenomenon. Then, I will discuss our present global understanding of the neutrino mass-mixing parameters and will identify the major unknowns in this sector. After that, I will present the physics reach of current generation long-baseline experiments. Finally, I will conclude with a discussion on the physics capabilities of accelerator-driven possible future long-baseline precision oscillation facilities.

  4. Initial testing of the tritium systems at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Sissingh, R.A.P.; Gentile, C.A.; Rossmassler, R.L.; Walters, R.T.; Voorhees, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton will start its D-T experiments in late 1993, introducing and operating the tokamak with tritium in order to begin the study of burning plasma physics in D-T. Trace tritium injection experiments, using small amounts of tritium will begin in the fall of 1993. In preparation for these experiments, a series of tests with low concentrations of tritium inn deuterium have been performed as an initial qualification of the tritium systems. These tests began in April 1993. This paper describes the initial testing of the equipment in the TFTR tritium facility

  5. Reactor physics experiment plan using TCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Shoichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-06-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is one of the next generation water-cooled reactors, which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up, long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. For verification of the feasibility, negative void reactivity coefficient and conversion ratio more than 1.0 must be confirmed. This report is to plan critical experiments using TCA in JAERI. Critical Experiments performed so far in Europe and Japan are reviewed, and no useful data are available for RMWR development. Critical experiments using TCA (Tank Type Critical Assembly) in JAERI are planned. MOX fuel rods should be prepared for the experiments and some modifications of equipment are needed for use of MOX fuel rods. This report describes the preliminary plan of physics experiments. The number of MOX-fuel rods used in the experiments is obtained by calculations and modification of the equipment for the experiments are shown. New MOX fuel and UO{sub 2} fuel rods are necessary for the RMWR critical experiments. Number of MOX fuel rods is 1000 for Plutonium fissile enrichment of 5 wt%, 1000 for 10 wt%, 1500 for 15 wt% and 500 for 20 wt%, respectively. Depleted UO{sub 2} fuel rods for blanket/buffer region are 4000. Driver fuel rods of 4.9 wt% UO{sub 2} are 3000. Modification of TCA facility is requested to treat the large amount of MOX fuels from safety point of view. Additional shielding device at the top of the tank for loading the MOX fuels and additional safety plates to ensure safety are requested. The core is divided into two regions by inserting an inner tank to avoid criticality in MOX region only. The test region is composed by MOX fuel rods in the inner tank. Criticality is established by UO{sub 2} driver fuel rods outside of the inner tank. (Tsuchihashi, K.)

  6. Reduction of toroidal magnetic field ripple in the advanced material tokamak experiment on JFT-2M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.; Miura, Y.; Kimura, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Koike, T.; Nakayama, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Urata, K.

    1998-01-01

    In order to reduce fast ion losses due to the toroidal field ripple, the reduction of ripple amplitude (δ) by inserting ferritic steel is studied, taking its toroidal mode number into account. The guideline of the design for reduction is wider and thicker ferritic board (FB) is located at further position from VV. The δ depends on the toroidal magnetic field. The value of B r21 /B t in the case of displacement of few cm is about 1 x 10 -5 which is one order smaller than the critical value. The offsetting of FB is not a problem for locked mode. Preliminary experiments with insertion of one or two FB's indicate no adverse effect on global plasma parameters. (author)

  7. Reduction of toroidal magnetic field ripple in the advanced material tokamak experiment on JFT-2M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Miura, Y.; Kimura, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Koike, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan); Nakayama, T. [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan); Hasegawa, M. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp. (Japan); Urata, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    In order to reduce fast ion losses due to the toroidal field ripple, the reduction of ripple amplitude ({delta}) by inserting ferritic steel is studied, taking its toroidal mode number into account. The guideline of the design for reduction is wider and thicker ferritic board (FB) is located at further position from VV. The {delta} depends on the toroidal magnetic field. The value of B{sub r21} /B{sub t} in the case of displacement of few cm is about 1 x 10{sup -5} which is one order smaller than the critical value. The offsetting of FB is not a problem for locked mode. Preliminary experiments with insertion of one or two FB's indicate no adverse effect on global plasma parameters. (author)

  8. Power system for tokamak fusion experiments. Motor generator with flywheel effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyachi, Kengo

    1997-01-01

    JT-60 requires an enormous electric power pulse about 1,300 MVA periodically for its plasma initiation, containment and heating. JT-60 could not receive all electric power from a commercial line for plasma experiment except about 160 MVA because the 275 kV commercial line has some limitations. Therefore JT-60 needs huge electric power sources. The power supply system of JT-60 has 3 motor generators (MG). The total capacity of MG is 1,115 MVA that consists of a toroidal MG (TMG), poloidal MG (PMG) and Heating power supply MG (HMG), and each MG has a huge flywheel effect. For example, TMG has a 4.02 GJ energy yield that consists of 6 disk flywheel. The total weight of flywheel of TMG is 650 ton. This report describes the structure, operating system, and maintenance history of 3 types of MG. (author)

  9. The basic physics of neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, F.

    1999-01-01

    The basic physical principles behind the well-established but also developing practice of neutron scattering experiments are presented. A few examples are given either to illustrate the physical principles or to give an idea of the variety, importance or magnitude of various phenomena. The evolution of neutron scattering experimental techniques is investigated from a special aspect: the increasing capability of taking into account more and more important and sometimes decisive finer details by using more and more realistic mathematical models of the evolution of the neutrons from birth do death, eventually passing by the sample and being scattered more than one times. Working with such numerical 'virtual instruments' one will have to go far beyond notions like resolution function, convolution etc, and actually eliminate a large number of approximations currently in use. (K.A.)

  10. Eight-shot pellet injector and fueling experiments at the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zhenggui; Li Bo; Li Li

    2001-01-01

    An Eight-shot Pellet Injection (EPI) system has been proposed and developed in collaboration between STU (St. Petersburg State Technical University) of Russia and SWIP. In the EPI, the I n-situ c ondensation technique was used to produce the pellets in eight gun barrels respectively. The nominal pellet size (diameter of 1.0 mm and of 1.4 mm or 1.2 mm) is limited by the gun barrel inner diameter. The pellet length is adjusted by changing the g radient temperature o n the gun barrels and the amounts of filling fuel gas. Pellets are fired at speed range of 200 - 1200 m/s by He propellant with pressure of 2 - 6 MPa and then transferred to HL-1M vessel through an injection line that consists of two set of differential vacuum pumped chambers and guide tube combined with fast valves. In addition, this unit is equipped with diagnostics for pellet velocity and shape measure. The EPI has installed on HL-1M since 1996 for the multi-shot pellet fueling experiments. The typical characteristics including the peaked density profile and improved confinement, the deep penetration and suppression of soft X-ray sawteeth, the variance of rotation and flow of plasma in edge region as well as the photographing of pellet ablation clouds are presented

  11. Experiences of Scientific Thinking in Physics Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fagundes Faria

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a contemporary demand on STEM education to support learning experiences in which students use scientific thinking to solve tasks. Scientific thinking involves domain-specific knowledge and general domain strategies of thinking. The object of interest in this research was the set of students’ experiences of scientific thinking in which they articulate domain-general strategies and domain-specific knowledge to solve physics tasks. Our goal was to characterize the experiences of scientific thinking of two groups of four students engaged in tasks about Newtonian Mechanics. The volunteers were 19 students, 15-17 years old, enrolled in electronics or computer science courses (11th grade of a Brazilian vocational high school at Belo Horizonte/Minas Gerais. All class activities proposed to the students have been regularly used since 2010, therefore, we made no special intervention to conduct the study. Data collection occurred during the classes and involved audio and video recordings of students working in group; field notes; and photographs of students’ notebooks and of the posters they made to conduct oral presentations. The choice of the groups was based on how assiduous the members were. We have transcribed episodes in which we identified experiences of scientific thinking. These transcriptions, the field notes and the photographs were analyzed together, in interaction with each other. Data analysis is based upon John Dewey’s Theory of Experience. Our results show that the experiences of scientific thinking of the two groups were educative experiences, although qualitatively different. This difference was due to the way students interacted with the conditions given to solve the tasks. Additional information is given about the school circumstances in which the study was conducted to allow a better evaluation of results quality.

  12. Theory of tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R B [Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1989-01-01

    The book covers the consequences of ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamics, these theories being responsible for most of what is well understood regarding the physics of tokamak discharges. The focus is on the description of equilibria, the linear and nonlinear theory of large scale modes, and single particle guiding center motion, including simple neoclassical effects. modern methods of general magnetic coordinates are used, and the student is introduced to the onset of chaos in Hamiltonian systems in the discussion of destruction of magnetic surfaces. Much of the book is devoted to the description of the limitations placed on tokamak operating parameters given by ideal and resistive modes, and current ideas about how to extend and optimize these parameters. (author). refs.; figs.

  13. Physics with Photons at the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Reale, V.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of photons in the ATLAS experiment is crucial for the study of a number of physics channels, including the search for a Higgs boson decaying to photon pairs, and measurements of direct production of single photons and photon pairs. The photon-photon and photon-jet channels are interesting in their own right, allowing the study of QCD at the new energy range of the LHC. The photon-identification strategy in ATLAS will be presented along with photon-jet cross section measurements and the potential ATLAS constrains on the gluon structure function

  14. Neutral beam injection on the PLT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, G.; Ashcroft, D.L.; Eubank, H.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Knauer, R.C.; Stewart, L.D.; Stooksberry, R.W.; Ulrickson, M.; Williams, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    We describe the operation of the neutral beam injection system on the PLT tokamak. Improvements, retrofits, and conditioning have changed the injection system from an experiment in itself to a fairly reliable and useful plasma heating tool. We will present a brief overview of our physics achievements and then describe the system as it exists now. This will include injector performance, conditioning needs, maintenance needs, reliability, and daily operating sequences. We will also include hardware modifications and additions, electrical and mechanical, and point out remaining problem areas

  15. The steady-state tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politzer, D.A.; Nevins, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a steady-state tokamak experiment (STE) needed to develop the technology and physics data base required for construction of a steady-state fusion power demonstration reactor in the early 21st century. The STE will provide an integrated facility for the development and demonstration of steady-state and particle handling, low-activation high-heat-flux components and materials, efficient current drive, and continuous plasma performance in steady-state, with reactor-like plasma conditions under severe conditions of heat and particle bombardment of the wall. The STE facility will also be used to develop operation and control scenarios for ITER

  16. The spheric tokamak programme at Culham

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, A.

    1999-01-01

    The Spherical Tokamak (ST) is the low aspect ratio limit of the conventional tokamak, and appears to offer attractive physics properties in a simpler device. The START (Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak) experiment provided the world's first demonstration of the properties of hot plasmas in an ST configuration, and was operational at Culham from January 1991 to March 1998, obtaining plasma current of up to 300 kA and pulse durations of ∼ 50 ms. Its successor, MAST is scheduled to obtain first plasma in Autumn 1998 and is a purpose built, high vacuum machine designed to have a tenfold increase in plasma volume with plasma currents up to 2 MA. Current drive and heating will be by a combination of induction-compression as on START, a high-performance central solenoid, 1.5 MW ECRH and 5 MW of Neutral Beam Injection. The promising results from START are reviewed, and the many challenges posed for the next generation of purpose-built STs (such as MAST) are described. (author)

  17. Experimental and theoretical basis for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.S.

    1994-09-01

    In this paper, arguments will be presented to support the attractiveness of advanced tokamaks as fusion reactors. The premise that all improved confinement regimes obtained to date were limited by magnetohydrodynamic stability will be established from experimental results. Accessing the advanced tokamak regime, therefore, requires means to overcome and enhance the beta limit. We will describe a number of ideas involving control of the plasma internal profiles, e.g. to achieve this. These approaches will have to be compatible with the underlying mechanisms for confinement improvement, such as shear rotation suppression of turbulence. For steady-state, there is a trade-off between full bootstrap current operation and the ability to control current profiles. The coupling between current drive and stability dictates the choice of sources and suggests an optimum for the bootstrap fraction. We summarize by presenting the future plans of the US confinement devices, DIII-D, PBX-M, C-Mod, to address the advanced tokamak physics issues and provide a database for the design of next-generation experiments

  18. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Warren; Lai, Anthony; Croonquist, Arvid; Chui, Talso; Eraker, J. H.; Abbott, Randy; Mills, Gary; Mohl, James; Craig, James; Balachandra, Balu; hide

    2000-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is being developed by NASA to provide long duration low temperature and microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS) for performing fundamental physics investigations. Currently, six experiments have been selected for flight definition studies. More will be selected in a two-year cycle, through NASA Research Announcement. This program is managed under the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The facility is being designed to launch and returned to earth on a variety of vehicles including the HII-A and the space shuttle. On orbit, the facility will be connected to the Exposed Facility on the Japanese Experiment Module, Kibo. Features of the facility include a cryostat capable of maintaining super-fluid helium at a temperature of 1.4 K for 5 months, resistance thermometer bridges, multi-stage thermal isolation system, thermometers capable of pico-Kelvin resolution, DC SQUID magnetometers, passive vibration isolation, and magnetic shields with a shielding factor of 80dB. The electronics and software architecture incorporates two VME buses run using the VxWorks operating system. Technically challenging areas in the design effort include the following: 1) A long cryogen life that survives several launch and test cycles without the need to replace support straps for the helium tank. 2) The minimization of heat generation in the sample stage caused by launch vibration 3) The design of compact and lightweight DC SQUID electronics. 4) The minimization of RF interference for the measurement of heat at pico-Watt level. 5) Light weighting of the magnetic shields. 6) Implementation of a modular and flexible electronics and software architecture. The first launch is scheduled for mid-2003, on an H-IIA Rocket Transfer Vehicle, out of the Tanegashima Space Center of Japan. Two identical facilities will be built. While one facility is onboard

  19. MDSplus integration at TCABR tokamak: Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sá, W.P. de; Ronchi, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The implementation of MDSplus in TCABR tokamak, current status. • Interfaces between the system already installed and the MDSplus. • Web MDSplus interface. - Abstract: Experimental data for the TCABR tokamak is currently stored in MDSplus (Model Driven System Plus) database. The access to the data recorded during the experiments is performed using tools and libraries available by MDSplus system. The MDSplus system is widely used in different physics experiments, especially in plasmas physics and nuclear fusion. This standardized environment enables easy interaction among scientists of different experiments in different countries without the need to understand the particular characteristics of control, data acquisition and analysis, and remote access (CODAS) customized in each laboratory. In the first phase of implementation, intermediate interfaces had been developed between the legacy proprietary system and the MDSplus. In a second phase, the new diagnostic systems had been directly included in the created MDSplus system in the laboratory. After three years of use, the system installed on TCABR proved extremely efficient and significantly increased productivity in data analysis by involved scientists, regardless of whether they are locally at the TCABR, or accessing the system remotely from their home laboratories. The third phase, and subject of this article, are the development and implementation of the following systems: (i) web tools for the visualization of data, integrated with the experiment logbook, (ii) integration of MDSplus with applications (LabVIEW + MDSplus) and newer data acquisition hardware.

  20. MDSplus integration at TCABR tokamak: Current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sá, W.P. de, E-mail: pires@if.usp.br; Ronchi, G., E-mail: gronchi@if.usp.br

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The implementation of MDSplus in TCABR tokamak, current status. • Interfaces between the system already installed and the MDSplus. • Web MDSplus interface. - Abstract: Experimental data for the TCABR tokamak is currently stored in MDSplus (Model Driven System Plus) database. The access to the data recorded during the experiments is performed using tools and libraries available by MDSplus system. The MDSplus system is widely used in different physics experiments, especially in plasmas physics and nuclear fusion. This standardized environment enables easy interaction among scientists of different experiments in different countries without the need to understand the particular characteristics of control, data acquisition and analysis, and remote access (CODAS) customized in each laboratory. In the first phase of implementation, intermediate interfaces had been developed between the legacy proprietary system and the MDSplus. In a second phase, the new diagnostic systems had been directly included in the created MDSplus system in the laboratory. After three years of use, the system installed on TCABR proved extremely efficient and significantly increased productivity in data analysis by involved scientists, regardless of whether they are locally at the TCABR, or accessing the system remotely from their home laboratories. The third phase, and subject of this article, are the development and implementation of the following systems: (i) web tools for the visualization of data, integrated with the experiment logbook, (ii) integration of MDSplus with applications (LabVIEW + MDSplus) and newer data acquisition hardware.

  1. Experiment and Modeling of ITER Demonstration Discharges in the DIII-D Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Myung; Doyle, E. J.; Ferron, J.R.; Holcomb, C.T.; Jackson, G.L.; Lao, L.L.; Luce, T.C.; Owen, Larry W.; Murakami, Masanori; Osborne, T.H.; Politzer, P.A.; Prater, R.; Snyder, P.B.

    2011-01-01

    DIII-D is providing experimental evaluation of 4 leading ITER operational scenarios: the baseline scenario in ELMing H-mode, the advanced inductive scenario, the hybrid scenario, and the steady state scenario. The anticipated ITER shape, aspect ratio and value of I/αB were reproduced, with the size reduced by a factor of 3.7, while matching key performance targets for β N and H 98 . Since 2008, substantial experimental progress was made to improve the match to other expected ITER parameters for the baseline scenario. A lower density baseline discharge was developed with improved stationarity and density control to match the expected ITER edge pedestal collisionality (ν* e ∼ 0.1). Target values for β N and H 98 were maintained at lower collisionality (lower density) operation without loss in fusion performance but with significant change in ELM characteristics. The effects of lower plasma rotation were investigated by adding counter-neutral beam power, resulting in only a modest reduction in confinement. Robust preemptive stabilization of 2/1 NTMs was demonstrated for the first time using ECCD under ITER-like conditions. Data from these experiments were used extensively to test and develop theory and modeling for realistic ITER projection and for further development of its optimum scenarios in DIII-D. Theory-based modeling of core transport (TGLF) with an edge pedestal boundary condition provided by the EPED1 model reproduces T e and T i profiles reasonably well for the 4 ITER scenarios developed in DIII-D. Modeling of the baseline scenario for low and high rotation discharges indicates that a modest performance increase of ∼ 15% is needed to compensate for the expected lower rotation of ITER. Modeling of the steady-state scenario reproduces a strong dependence of confinement, stability, and noninductive fraction (f NI ) on q 95 , as found in the experimental I p scan, indicating that optimization of the q profile is critical to simultaneously achieving the

  2. Tritium inventory control--the experience with DT tokamaks and its relevance for future machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, A.C.; Gentile, C.A.; Laesser, R.L.K.; Coad, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    At present, the commercial use of tritium is relatively small scale. The main source of supply is as a by-product of heavy water moderated fission reactors and the products are mainly discrete sources or tracers with activity typically in the GBq range. There are in general no restrictions on the use of tritium other than those, which would normally apply to the use of radioactive material. The future use of tritium as intermediate fuel for a fusion power plant series will involve an increase by several orders of magnitude in the industrial use of tritium and may increase concerns relating to safety, transport and waste disposal. In addition, the use of tritium in fusion power will be unable to be satisfied by current sources of supply and tritium production in future fusion power plants will be essential for the operation of the plants as well as for the start of new ones. Power plant studies have, however, shown that these issues can be satisfactorily addressed. In addition the values for clearance of tritiated materials in a number of countries are consistent with the low environmental impact of disposal of tritiated waste. There are, however, many practical operational and regulatory problems, which will need to be solved in the context of the experimental programmes. The current regulations for control and accountancy of tritium inventory, as applied internationally and in specific countries, are reviewed and their influence on the DT fuel cycle considered. The effect of safety case limits on the need for control of tritium inventory in TFTR, JET and ITER is analysed. The sensitivity of the fuel cycle to tritium inventory is considered. The experience of controlling tritium inventory in TFTR and JET is reviewed and the latest results from JET presented. This takes into account the limits and constraints, the differing requirements for tritium processing, in-vessel retention, the needs for waste management and decommissioning including detritiation, and

  3. Physics capabilities of the SNO+ experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arushanova, E.; Back, A. R.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    SNO+ will soon enter its first phase of physics data-taking. The Canadian-based detector forms part of the SNOLAB underground facility, in a Sudbury nickel mine; its location providing more than two kilometres of rock overburden. We present an overview of the SNO+ experiment and its physics capabilities. Our primary goal is the search for neutrinoless double-beta decay, where our expected sensitivity would place an upper limit of 1.9 × 1026 y, at 90% CL, on the half-life of neutrinoless double-beta decay in 130Te. We also intend to build on the success of SNO by studying the solar neutrino spectrum. In the unloaded scintillator phase SNO+ has the ability to make precision measurements of the fluxes of low-energy pep neutrinos and neutrinos from the CNO cycle. Other physics goals include: determining the spectrum of reactor antineutrinos, to further constrain Δ {m}122; detecting neutrinos produced by a galactic supernova and investigating certain modes of nucleon decay.

  4. Axisymmetric tokamak scapeoff transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.; Langer, W.D.

    1982-08-01

    We present the first self-consistent estimate of the magnitude of each term in a fluid treatment of plasma transport for a plasma lying in regions of open field lines in an axisymmetric tokamak. The fluid consists of a pure hydrogen plasma with sources which arise from its interaction with neutral hydrogen atoms. The analysis and results are limited to the high collisionality regime, which is optimal for a gaseous neutralizer divertor, or to a cold plasma mantle in a tokamak reactor. In this regime, both classical and neoclassical transport processes are important, and loss of particles and energy by diamagnetic flow are also significant. The prospect of extending the analysis to the lower collisionality regimes encountered in many existing experiments is discussed

  5. History of the T-10 tokamak: Creation and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strelkov, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    The heating and thermal insulation of a hot plasma with the purpose of achieving a controlled thermonuclear reaction have been investigated for almost 50 years. Experiments in the T-10 tokamak, which have been carried out for 25 years, have played an important role in such investigations. This paper presents a history of the device, the physical and technological foundations underlying the project, and the results obtained in the ohmic heating mode during the first years of the device operation

  6. Local Physics Basis of Confinement Degradation in JET ELMy H-Mode Plasmas and Implications for Tokamak Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budny, R.V.; Alper, B.; Borba, D.; Cordey, J.G.; Ernst, D.R.; Gowers, C.

    2001-01-01

    First results of gyrokinetic analysis of JET [Joint European Torus] ELMy [Edge Localized Modes] H-mode [high-confinement modes] plasmas are presented. ELMy H-mode plasmas form the basis of conservative performance predictions for tokamak reactors of the size of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor]. Relatively high performance for long duration has been achieved and the scaling appears to be favorable. It will be necessary to sustain low Z(subscript eff) and high density for high fusion yield. This paper studies the degradation in confinement and increase in the anomalous heat transport observed in two JET plasmas: one with an intense gas puff and the other with a spontaneous transition between Type I to III ELMs at the heating power threshold. Linear gyrokinetic analysis gives the growth rate, gamma(subscript lin) of the fastest growing modes. The flow-shearing rate omega(subscript ExB) and gamma(subscript lin) are large near the top of the pedestal. Their ratio decreases approximately when the confinement degrades and the transport increases. This suggests that tokamak reactors may require intense toroidal or poloidal torque input to maintain sufficiently high |gamma(subscript ExB)|/gamma(subscript lin) near the top of the pedestal for high confinement

  7. Integrated circuits for particle physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Snoeys, W; Campbell, M; Cantatore, E; Faccio, F; Heijne, Erik H M; Jarron, Pierre; Kloukinas, Kostas C; Marchioro, A; Moreira, P; Toifl, Thomas H; Wyllie, Ken H

    2000-01-01

    High energy particle physics experiments investigate the nature of matter through the identification of subatomic particles produced in collisions of protons, electrons, or heavy ions which have been accelerated to very high energies. Future experiments will have hundreds of millions of detector channels to observe the interaction region where collisions take place at a 40 MHz rate. This paper gives an overview of the electronics requirements for such experiments and explains how data reduction, timing distribution, and radiation tolerance in commercial CMOS circuits are achieved for these big systems. As a detailed example, the electronics for the innermost layers of the future tracking detector, the pixel vertex detector, is discussed with special attention to system aspects. A small-scale prototype (130 channels) implemented in standard 0.25 mu m CMOS remains fully functional after a 30 Mrad(SiO/sub 2/) irradiation. A full-scale pixel readout chip containing 8000 readout channels in a 14 by 16 mm/sup 2/ ar...

  8. Experiments on cleaning effects of TDC, GDC and ECR-DC in the JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Miura, Y.; Ohtsuka, H.; Suzuki, N.; Yamauchi, T.; Tani, T.; Mori, M.

    1987-01-01

    The cleaning effects of Taylor-type discharge cleaning (TDC), glow discharge cleaning (GDC) and ECR discharge cleaning (ECR-DC) were studied in the JFT-2M tokamak by comparing the properties of resulting tokamak plasmas, by observing the surface composition of samples and by residual gas analysis. The operational parameters of the three discharge cleaning techniques were as follows; the plasma current for TDC is 20 kA, the DC current for GDC is 3 A and the RF power for ECR-DC is 2.3 kW. Parameters of the tokamak plasmas such as loop voltages, radiation losses, spectra emission of oxygen, maximum mean electron densities and profiles of electron temperature were improved as the TDC and ECR-DC proceeded. Changes in the surface composition of samples were measured by Auger electron spectrosopy. The results showed that during the TDC and ECR-DC oxygen was reduced, while GDC reduced mainly carbon. Residual gas analysis performed during discharge cleaning corroborated these results. (orig.)

  9. The Thor Tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argenti, L.; Bonizzoni, G.; Cirant, S.

    1981-01-01

    The most significant characteristics of the plasma produced in Thor discharges are described. The results obtained show that the possibility of controlling both the plasma equilibrium and the discharge regime has been fully achieved

  10. Other physics experiments at the Homestake Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, M.L.; Davidson, I.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Marshall, E.; Steinberg, R.I.

    1982-01-01

    The Homestake Gold Mine presently houses the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment and a 300-ton water Cerenkov detector at a depth of 4200 meters water equivalent. The Cerenkov detector has been used to study nucleon decay, multiple muons, and neutrino bursts. An array of liquid scintillator, with surface area of 130 m 2 , is presently being constructed to measure magnetic monopoles, neutrino oscillations, underground muons, and neutrino bursts. At the same time, a 1 km 2 extensive air shower array is being built on the surface in order to measure the high energy cosmic ray composition with simultaneous surface and underground shower measurements. Future plans call for a 1406-ton liquid scintillator Tracking Spectrometer to measure nucleon decay, n-anti n transitions, and the low energy cosmic ray neutrino spectrum. We describe the present results and the possibilities for physics other than nucleon decay in the nucleon decay detectors

  11. Automatically processing physical data from LHD experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, M., E-mail: emoto.masahiko@nifs.ac.jp; Ida, K.; Suzuki, C.; Yoshida, M.; Akiyama, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshinuma, M.

    2014-05-15

    Physical data produced by large helical device (LHD) experiments is supplied by the Kaiseki server, and registers more than 200 types of diagnostic data. Dependencies exist amongst the data; i.e., in many cases, the calculation of one data requires other data. Therefore, to obtain unregistered data, one needs to calculate not only the diagnostic data itself but also the dependent data; however, because the data is registered by different scientists, each scientist must separately calculate and register their respective data. To simplify this complicated procedure, we have developed an automatic calculation system called AutoAna. The calculation programs of AutoAna are distributed on a network, and the number of such programs can be easily increased dynamically. Our system is therefore scalable and ready for substantial increases in the size of the target data.

  12. Tokamak plasma interaction with limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, C.S.

    1987-11-01

    The importance of plasma purity is first discussed in terms of the general requirements of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The tokamak approach to fusion and its inherent problem of plasma contamination are introduced. A main source of impurities is due to the bombardment of the limiter by energetic particles and thus the three main aspects of the plasma-limiter interaction are reviewed, boundary plasma conditions, fuelling/recycling and impurity production. The experiments, carried out on the DITE tokamak at Culham Laboratory, UK, investigated these three topics and the results are compared with predicted behaviour; new physical phenomena are presented in all three areas. Simple one-dimensional fluid equations are found to adequately describe the SOL plasma, except in regard to the pre-sheath electric field and ambipolarity; that is, the electric field adjacent to the limiter surface appears to be weak and the associated plasma flow can be non-ambipolar. Recycling of fuel particles from the limiter is observed to be near unity at all times. The break-up behaviour of recycled and gas puffed D 2 molecules is dependent on the electron temperature, as expected. Impurity production at the limiter is chemical erosion of graphite being negligible. Deposition of limiter and wall-produced impurities is found on the limiter. The spatial distributions of impurities released from the limiter are observed and are in good agreement with a sputtered atom transport code. Finally, preliminary experiments on the transport of impurity ions along field lines away from the limiter have been performed and compared with simple analytic theory. The results suggest that the pre-sheath electric field in the SOL is much weaker than the simple fluid model would predict

  13. FPGA fault tolerance in particle physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebelein, Jano; Engel, Heiko; Kebschull, Udo [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The behavior of matter in physically extreme conditions is in focus of many high-energy-physics experiments. For this purpose, high energy charged particles (ions) are collided with each other and energy- or baryon densities are created similar to those at the beginning of the universe or to those which can be found in the center of neutron stars. In both cases a plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP) is present, which immediately decomposes to hadrons within a short period of time. At this process, particles are formed, which allow statements about the beginning of the universe when captured by large detectors, but which also lead to the massive occurance of hardware failures within the detector's electronic devices. This contribution is about methods to mitigate radiation susceptibility for Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), enabling them to be used within particle detector systems to directly gain valid data in the readout chain or to be used as detector-control-system.

  14. Turbulent transport reduction by E x B velocity shear during edge plasma biasing in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Oost, G. [Dept. of Applied Physics, Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium); Adamek, J.; Antoni, V.; Balan, P.; Boedo, J.A.; Devynck, P.; Duran, I.; Eliseev, L.; Gunn, J.P.; Hron, M.; Ionita, C.; Jachmich, S.; Kirnev, G.S.; Martines, E.; Melnikov, A.; Peleman, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Silva, C.; Stoeckel, J.; Tendler, M.; Varandas, C.; Van Schoor, M.; Vershkov, V.; Weynants, R.R.

    2004-07-01

    Experiments in the tokamaks TEXTOR, CASTOR, T-10 and ISTTOK have provided new and complementary evidence on the physics of the universal mechanism of E x B velocity shear stabilization of turbulence, concomitant transport barrier formation and radial conductivity by using various edge biasing techniques. (orig.)

  15. Chain Experiment competition inspires learning of physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziob, Daniel; Górska, Urszula; Kołodziej, Tomasz

    2017-05-01

    The Chain Experiment is an annual competition which originated in Slovenia in 2005 and later expanded to Poland in 2013. For the purpose of the event, each participating team designs and builds a contraption that transports a small steel ball from one end to the other. At the same time the constructed machine needs to use a number of interesting phenomena and physics laws. In the competition’s finale, all contraptions are connected to each other to form a long chain transporting steel balls. In brief, they are all evaluated for qualities such as: creativity and advance in theoretical background, as well as the reliability of the constructed machine to work without human help. In this article, we present the contraptions developed by students taking part in the competition in order to demonstrate the advance in theoretical basis together with creativity in design and outstanding engineering skills of its participants. Furthermore, we situate the Chain Experiment in the context of other group competitions, at the same time demonstrating that—besides activating numerous group work skills—it also improves the ability to think critically and present one’s knowledge to a broader audience. We discussed it in the context of problem based learning, gamification and collaborative testing.

  16. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the Aries-I Tokamak: Design description; systems studies and economics; reactor plasma physics; magnet engineering; fusion-power-ore engineering; and environmental and safety features

  17. Physics Experiments at the Agesta Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelqvist, G.; Bliselius, P. Aa.; Blomberg, P.E.; Jonsson, E.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1966-09-01

    Part A. Dynamic measurements have been performed at the Aagesta reactor at power levels from 0.3 to 65 MW(th). The purposes of the experiments have been both to develop experimental methods and equipment for the dynamic studies and to measure the dynamic characteristics of the reactor in order to check the dynamic model. The experiments have been performed with four different perturbation functions: trapezoidal and step functions and two types of periodic multifrequency signals. Perturbations were introduced in the reactivity and in the load. The recordings were made of the responses of nuclear power, coolant inlet and outlet temperature and control rod position. The results are presented as step responses and transfer functions (Bode diagrams). Inmost cases the relative accuracy is ± 0.5 dB in amplitude and ± 5 deg in phase. The results from the experiments in general show rather good agreement with the results obtained from a dynamic model, which successively has been improved. Experience on reactor noise analysis based on measurements in the Agesta power reactor is discussed. It is shown that the noise measurements have given complementary dynamic information of the reactor. Part B. Static measurements of the physics parameters in the Agesta reactor are carried out to confirm theoretical methods for reactor calculations and to form a good basis for safe operation of the reactor. The reactivity worth of groups of control rods are determined with different methods and compared with calculations with the three-dimensional code HETERO. The excess reactivity as a function of burn up is obtained from the control rod positions. The temperature coefficient of the moderator is measured by lowering the moderator temperature at constant power and observing the change in control rod insertion. As burn up increases the experiments are repeated in order to follow the changes in the coefficient. The xenon poisoning effects are measured by changing the power level and

  18. Physics Experiments at the Agesta Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelqvist, G [State Power Board, Stockholm (Sweden); Bliselius, P Aa; Blomberg, P E; Jonsson, E; Aakerhielm, F [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1966-09-15

    Part A. Dynamic measurements have been performed at the Aagesta reactor at power levels from 0.3 to 65 MW(th). The purposes of the experiments have been both to develop experimental methods and equipment for the dynamic studies and to measure the dynamic characteristics of the reactor in order to check the dynamic model. The experiments have been performed with four different perturbation functions: trapezoidal and step functions and two types of periodic multifrequency signals. Perturbations were introduced in the reactivity and in the load. The recordings were made of the responses of nuclear power, coolant inlet and outlet temperature and control rod position. The results are presented as step responses and transfer functions (Bode diagrams). Inmost cases the relative accuracy is {+-} 0.5 dB in amplitude and {+-} 5 deg in phase. The results from the experiments in general show rather good agreement with the results obtained from a dynamic model, which successively has been improved. Experience on reactor noise analysis based on measurements in the Agesta power reactor is discussed. It is shown that the noise measurements have given complementary dynamic information of the reactor. Part B. Static measurements of the physics parameters in the Agesta reactor are carried out to confirm theoretical methods for reactor calculations and to form a good basis for safe operation of the reactor. The reactivity worth of groups of control rods are determined with different methods and compared with calculations with the three-dimensional code HETERO. The excess reactivity as a function of burn up is obtained from the control rod positions. The temperature coefficient of the moderator is measured by lowering the moderator temperature at constant power and observing the change in control rod insertion. As burn up increases the experiments are repeated in order to follow the changes in the coefficient. The xenon poisoning effects are measured by changing the power level and

  19. Health physics around a controlled fusion research device: the Tokamak at Fontenay-aux-Roses (T.F.R.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The X and neutron dosimetry measurement near the magnetic confinement device for hot plasma, called T.F.R. (Tokamak, Fontenay-aux-Roses) are presented. The biological shielding consists of an ordinary concrete wall 30 cm thick; the dose rate is thus limited at 10 -1 mrem per discharge (corresponding to 10 mrem per day) in the whole area frequented by people during T.F.R. operation. A numerical calculation, taking into account the true geometry and X ray reflexion by the walls and roof, and normalized to the measurements, gives some indications on the electron beam which produces X rays. The photoneutron source (up to 10 10 neutrons per dischage) and the activation of the vacuum vessel result from high energy electrons (>= 10 MeV) supporting a 10 to 1,000 A current [fr

  20. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 31, Magnet sensors. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirement for magnet sensors to verify the TF magnet system operation and aid in diagnostic assessment are defined. However, generally one does not specify such a system in the absence of a definition of the local I ampersand C system. Also, one would expect that there would be great benefit (economy, redundancy, compatibility, etc.) in specifying common components for all of the magnet system. Thus specifying the sensors requirement we have tried to be flexible to accommodate future adjustments to these systems

  1. Joint research using small tokamaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Del Bosco, E.; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Van Oost, G.; He, Yexi; Hegazy, H.; Hirose, A.; Hron, Martin; Kuteev, B.; Ludwig, G.O.; Nascimento, I.C.; Silva, C.; Vorobyev, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 10 (2005), S245-S254 ISSN 0029-5515. [Fusion Energy Conference contributions. Vilamoura, 1.11.2004-6.11.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : small tokamaks * thermonuclear fusion Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.418, year: 2005

  2. AGS experiments in nuclear/QCD physics at medium energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Presti, P.

    1998-07-01

    This report contains a diagram of the experimental setup for each experiment as well as giving a brief discussion of its purpose and list of collaborators for the experiment. Thirty-one experiments in the areas of nuclear physics and particle physics are covered. It concludes with a list of publications of the AGS experiments.

  3. AGS experiments in nuclear/QCD physics at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Presti, P.

    1998-07-01

    This report contains a diagram of the experimental setup for each experiment as well as giving a brief discussion of its purpose and list of collaborators for the experiment. Thirty-one experiments in the areas of nuclear physics and particle physics are covered. It concludes with a list of publications of the AGS experiments

  4. Tokamak WEST připraven ke startu!

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řípa, Milan

    Květen (2017) ISSN 2464-7888 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : fusion * ITER * tokamak * WEST * Tora Supra * divertor Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) http://www.3pol.cz/cz/rubriky/jaderna-fyzika-a-energetika/2014-tokamak-west-pripraven-ke- start u

  5. Control of plasma poloidal shape and position in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.L.; Humphreys, D.A.; Ferron, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    Historically, tokamak control design has been a combination of theory driving an initial control design and empirical tuning of controllers to achieve satisfactory performance. This approach was in line with the focus of past experiments on simply obtaining sufficient control to study many of the basic physics issues of plasma behavior. However, in recent years existing experimental devices have required increasingly accurate control. New tokamaks such as ITER or the eventual fusion power plant must achieve and confine burning fusion plasmas, placing unprecedented demands on regulation of plasma shape and position, heat flux, and burn characteristics. Control designs for such tokamaks must also function well during initial device operation with minimal empirical optimization required. All of these design requirements imply a heavy reliance on plasma modeling and simulation. Thus, plasma control design has begun to use increasingly modern and sophisticated control design methods. This paper describes some of the history of plasma control for the DIII-D tokamak as well as the recent effort to implement modern controllers. This effort improves the control so that one may obtain better physics experiments and simultaneously develop the technology for designing controllers for next-generation tokamaks

  6. Tore-Supra: a Tokamak with superconducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1987-07-01

    Tore Supra is a tokamak under construction on the site of Cen Cadarache by the Euratom-CEA Association. The machine technology integrates all problems related to the fabrication and the operation of large superconducting coils and of the associated cryogenic system. Tore Supra will provide a significant experience to prepare the next generation of machines for plasma physics and controlled fusion. Tore Supra is specially designed to implement a large physics program. The superconducting coils make possible the study of plasma confinement in long pulses (more than 60s), the impurities and the stability, and the efficiency of additional heating sources (neutral particle beams and radio frequency heating). The opportunity is taken to recall the particular features and requirements of the superconducting coils of the large future tokamaks in order to point out the problems that have to be faced by any new material (superconducting or not)

  7. A New Interpretation of Alpha-particle-driven Instabilities in Deuterium-Tritium Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Nazikian; G.J. Kramer; C.Z. Cheng; N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; S.E. Sharapov

    2003-01-01

    The original description of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in terms of Toroidal Alfvin Eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the anti-ballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time

  8. Large aspect ratio tokamak study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Sardella, C.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) investigated the potential for producing a viable long burn tokamak reactor through enhanced volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer by employing high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were accessed in the context of extended burn operation. Plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed using a one-dimensional transport code. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the field in the ohmic heating coil and the wave shape of the ohmic heating discharge. A high aspect ratio reference reactor was chosen and configured

  9. Turbulent and neoclassical toroidal momentum transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abiteboul, J.

    2012-10-01

    The goal of magnetic confinement devices such as tokamaks is to produce energy from nuclear fusion reactions in plasmas at low densities and high temperatures. Experimentally, toroidal flows have been found to significantly improve the energy confinement, and therefore the performance of the machine. As extrinsic momentum sources will be limited in future fusion devices such as ITER, an understanding of the physics of toroidal momentum transport and the generation of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks would be an important step in order to predict the rotation profile in experiments. Among the mechanisms expected to contribute to the generation of toroidal rotation is the transport of momentum by electrostatic turbulence, which governs heat transport in tokamaks. Due to the low collisionality of the plasma, kinetic modeling is mandatory for the study of tokamak turbulence. In principle, this implies the modeling of a six-dimensional distribution function representing the density of particles in position and velocity phase-space, which can be reduced to five dimensions when considering only frequencies below the particle cyclotron frequency. This approximation, relevant for the study of turbulence in tokamaks, leads to the so-called gyrokinetic model and brings the computational cost of the model within the presently available numerical resources. In this work, we study the transport of toroidal momentum in tokamaks in the framework of the gyrokinetic model. First, we show that this reduced model is indeed capable of accurately modeling momentum transport by deriving a local conservation equation of toroidal momentum, and verifying it numerically with the gyrokinetic code GYSELA. Secondly, we show how electrostatic turbulence can break the axisymmetry and generate toroidal rotation, while a strong link between turbulent heat and momentum transport is identified, as both exhibit the same large-scale avalanche-like events. The dynamics of turbulent transport are

  10. Advanced statistics for tokamak transport colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is an expository introduction to advanced statistics and scaling laws and their application to tokamak devices. Topics of discussion are as follows: implicit assumptions in the standard analysis; advanced regression techniques; specialized tools in statistics and their applications in fusion physics; and improved datasets for transport studies

  11. Fast wave current drive in reactor scale tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    1992-01-01

    The IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Fast Wave Current Drive in Reactor Scale Tokamaks, hosted by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Departement de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (Centres d'Etudes de Cadarache, under the Euratom-CEA Association for fusion) aimed at discussing the physics and the efficiency of non-inductive current drive by fast waves. Relevance to reactor size tokamaks and comparison between theory and experiment were emphasized. The following topics are described in the summary report: (i) theory and modelling of radiofrequency current drive (theory, full wave modelling, ray tracing and Fokker-Planck calculations, helicity injection and ponderomotive effects, and alternative radio-frequency current drive effects), (ii) present experiments, (iii) reactor applications (reactor scenarios including fast wave current drive; and fast wave current drive antennas); (iv) discussion and summary. 32 refs

  12. Statistical analysis of first period of operation of FTU Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisanti, F.; Apruzzese, G.; Frigione, D.; Kroegler, H.; Lovisetto, L.; Mazzitelli, G.; Podda, S.

    1996-09-01

    On the FTU Tokamak the plasma physics operations started on the 20/4/90. The first plasma had a plasma current Ip=0.75 MA for about a second. The experimental phase lasted until 7/7/94, when a long shut-down begun for installing the toroidal limiter in the inner side of the vacuum vessel. In these four years of operations plasma experiments have been successfully exploited, e.g. experiments of single and multiple pellet injections; full current drive up to Ip=300 KA was obtained by using waves at the frequency of the Lower Hybrid; analysis of ohmic plasma parameters with different materials (from the low Z silicon to high Z tungsten) as plasma facing element was performed. In this work a statistical analysis of the full period of operation is presented. Moreover, a comparison with the statistical data from other Tokamaks is attempted

  13. Tokamak and RFP ignition requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma model is applied to calculate numerically transport- confinement (nτ E ) requirements and steady-state operation tokamak. The CIT tokamak and RFP ignition conditions are examined. Physics differences between RFP and tokamaks, and their consequences for a DT ignition machine, are discussed. The ignition RFP, compared to a tokamak, has many physics advantages, including ohmic heating to ignition (no need for auxiliary heating systems), higher beta, low ignition current, less sensitivity of ignition requirements to impurity effects, no hard disruptions (associated with beta or density limits), and successful operation with high radiation fractions (f RAD ∼ 0.95). These physics advantages, coupled with important engineering advantages associated with lower external magnetic fields, larger aspect ratios, and smaller plasma cross sections translate into significant cost reductions for both ignition and power reactor. The primary drawback of the RFP is the uncertainty that the present confinement scaling will extrapolate to reactor regimes. The 4-MA ZTH was expected to extend the nτ E transport scaling data three order of magnitude above ZT-40M results, and if the present scaling held, to achieve a DT-equivalent scientific energy breakeven, Q=1. A basecase RFP ignition point is identified with a plasma current of 8.1 MA and no auxiliary heating. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Tokamaks - Third Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A L

    2004-01-01

    John Wesson's well known book, now re-edited for the third time, provides an excellent introduction to fusion oriented plasma physics in tokamaks. The author's task was a very challenging one, for a confined plasma is a complex system characterised by a variety of dimensionless parameters and its properties change qualitatively when certain threshold values are reached in this multi-parameter space. As a consequence, theoretical description is required at different levels, which are complementary: particle orbits, kinetic and fluid descriptions, but also intuitive and empirical approaches. Theory must be carried out on many fronts: equilibrium, instabilities, heating, transport etc. Since the properties of the confined plasma depend on the boundary conditions, the physics of plasmas along open magnetic field lines and plasma surface interaction processes must also be accounted for. Those subjects (and others) are discussed in depth in chapters 2-9. Chapter 1 mostly deals with ignition requirements and the tokamak concept, while chapter 14 provides a list of useful relations: differential operators, collision times, characteristic lengths and frequencies, expressions for the neoclassical resistivity and heat conduction, the bootstrap current etc. The presentation is sufficiently broad and thorough that specialists within tokamak research can either pick useful and up-to-date information or find an authoritative introduction into other areas of the subject. It is also clear and concise so that it should provide an attractive and accurate initiation for those wishing to enter the field and for outsiders who would like to understand the concepts and be informed about the goals and challenges on the horizon. Validation of theoretical models requires adequately resolved experimental data for the various equilibrium profiles (clearly a challenge in the vicinity of transport barriers) and the fluctuations to which instabilities give rise. Chapter 10 is therefore devoted to

  15. Statistical analysis of first period of operation of FTU Tokamak; Analisi statistica del primo periodo di operazioni del Tokamak FTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crisanti, F; Apruzzese, G; Frigione, D; Kroegler, H; Lovisetto, L; Mazzitelli, G; Podda, S [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Energia

    1996-09-01

    On the FTU Tokamak the plasma physics operations started on the 20/4/90. The first plasma had a plasma current Ip=0.75 MA for about a second. The experimental phase lasted until 7/7/94, when a long shut-down begun for installing the toroidal limiter in the inner side of the vacuum vessel. In these four years of operations plasma experiments have been successfully exploited, e.g. experiments of single and multiple pellet injections; full current drive up to Ip=300 KA was obtained by using waves at the frequency of the Lower Hybrid; analysis of ohmic plasma parameters with different materials (from the low Z silicon to high Z tungsten) as plasma facing element was performed. In this work a statistical analysis of the full period of operation is presented. Moreover, a comparison with the statistical data from other Tokamaks is attempted.

  16. Overview of physics results from the conclusive operation of the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Ahn, J-W.; Allain, J.; Andre, R.; Balbaky, A.; Bastasz, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Belova, E.; Berkery, J.; Betti, R.; Bialek, J.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Boedo, J.; Bonoli, P.; Boozer, A.; Bortolon, A.; Boyle, D.; Brennan, D.; Breslau, J.; Buttery, R.; Canik, J.; Caravelli, G.; Chang, C.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D.; Davis, B.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diallo, A.; Ding, S.; D’Ippolito, D.; Domier, C.; Dorland, W.; Ethier, S.; Evans, T.; Ferron, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Fonck, R.; Frazin, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.; Gates, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Glasser, A.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gray, T.; Guo, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hahm, T.; Harvey, R.; Hassanein, A.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.; Hirooka, Y.; Hooper, E.B.; Hosea, J.; Jardin, S.; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Katsuro-Hopkins, O.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J.; Kolemen, E.; Kramer, G.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R.J.; Lao, L.; LeBlanc, B.; Lee, W.; Lee, K.; Leuer, J.; Levinton, F.; Liang, Y.; Liu, D.; Lore, J.; Luhmann Jr, N.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D.; Maqueda, R.; McKee, G.; Medley, S.; Meier, E.; Menard, J.; Menon, M.; Meyer, H.; Mikkelsen, D.; Miloshevsky, G.; Mueller, D.; Munsat, T.; Myra, J.; Nelson, B.; Nishino, N.; Nygren, R.; Ono, M.; Osborne, T.; Park, J.; Park, Y.S.; Paul, S.; Peebles, W.; Penaflor, B.; Perkins, R.J.; Phillips, C.; Pigarov, A.; Podesta, M.; Preinhaelter, Josef; Raman, R.; Ren, Y.; Rewoldt, G.; Rognlien, T.; Ross, P.; Rowley, C.; Ruskov, E.; Russell, D.; Ruzic, D.; Ryan, P.; Schaffer, M.; Schuster, E.; Scotti, F.; Shaing, K.; Shevchenko, V.; Shinohara, K.; Sizyuk, V.; Skinner, C.H.; Smirnov, A.; Smith, A.; Snyder, P.; Solomon, W.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Takahashi, H.; Takase, Y.; Tamura, N.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, C.; Tritz, K.; Tsarouhas, D.; Umansky, M.; Urban, Jakub; Untergberg, E.; Walker, M.; Wampler, W.; Wang, W.; Whaley, J.; White, R.; Wilgen, J.; Wilson, R.; Wong, K.L.; Wright, J.; Xia, Z.; Youchison, D.; Yu, G.; Yuh, H.; Zakharov, L.; Zemlyanov, D.; Zimmer, G.; Zweben, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 10 (2013), s. 104007-104007 ISSN 0029-5515. [IAEA Fusion Energy Conference/24./. San Diego, 08.10.2012-13.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7G09042 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : NSTX * Spherical tokamaks * Overdense plasma * Conversion * Emission * Tokamaks * Electron Bernstein waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.243, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/53/10/104007/pdf/0029-5515_53_10_104007.pdf

  17. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Reisman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM, circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  18. Multimegawatt neutral beams for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1979-03-01

    Most of the large magnetic confinement experiments today and in the near future use high-power neutral-beam injectors to heat the plasma. This review briefly describes this remarkable technique and summarizes recent results as well as near term expectations. Progress has been so encouraging that it seems probable that tokamaks will achieve scientific breakeven before 1990

  19. Plasma position control in TCABR Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, R.M.O.; Kuznetsov, Yu. K.; Nascimento, I.C.; Fonseca, A.M.M.; Silva, R.P. da; Ruchko, L.F.; Tuszel, A.G.; Reis, A.P. dos; Sanada, E.K.

    1998-01-01

    The plasma control position in the TCABR tokamak is described. The TCA tokamak was transferred from the Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Lausanne, to the Institute of Physics of University of Sao Paulo, renamed TCABR (α=0.18 m, R = 0.62 m, B = 1 T,I p = 100 kA). The control system was reconstructed using mainly components obtained from the TCA tokamak. A new method of plasma position determination is used in TCABR to improve its accuracy. A more detailed theoretical analysis of the feed forward and feedback control is performed as compared with. (author)

  20. System studies of compact ignition tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Blackfield, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    A new version of the FEDC Tokamak System Code (TSC) has been developed to analyze the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). These proposed experiments have small (major radius F 1.5m) and high magnetic fields (B J 10T), and are characterized by reduced cost. Key design constraints of CIT include limits to the high stress levels in the magnetic coils, limits to the large temperature rises in the coils and on the first wall or divertor plate, minimizing power supply requirements, and assuring adequate plasma performance in fusion ignition and burn time consistent with the latest physics understanding. We present systems code level studies of CIT parameter space here for a range of design options with various design constraints. The present version of the TSC incorporates new models for key components of CIT. For example, new algorithms have been incorporated for calculating stress levels in the TFC and ohmic solenoid, temperature rise in the magnetic coils, peak power requirements, plasma MHD equilibrium and volt-second capability. The code also incorporates a numerical optimizer to find combinations of engineering quantities (device size, coil sizes, coil current densities etc.) and physics quantities (plasma density temperature, and beta, etc.) which satisfy all the constraints and can minimize or maximize a figure of merit (e.g., the major radius). This method was recently used in a mirror reactor system code (3) for the Minimara concept development

  1. Physics Experiments with Nintendo Wii Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Martyn D.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a detailed description of the use of Nintendo Wii game controllers in physics demonstrations. The main features of the controller relevant to physics are outlined and the procedure for communicating with a PC is described. A piece of software written by the author is applied to gathering data from a controller suspended from…

  2. The development for the particle physics experiments platform in university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Futian; Yao Yuan; Wang Zhaoqi; Liu Yuzhe; Sang Ziru; Chen Lian; Wen Fei; Jin Ge; Liu Hongbin

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear science and particle physics is an important subject in physics, and it is important to launch particle physics experiments in university to training students. We design an experiments platform based on particle physics experiments in university. By employing digitalization and reconfiguration techniques in our design, we achieve all kinds of device functions with only one device. With the customized software for particular experiments and a website for teaching assistance, the platform is easy to be employed in universities. Students can accomplish a classical particle physics experiment in a modern way with the help of the platform, and they can also try new ideals. The experiments platform is ready to be used, and some of the lab sessions in USTC have already begin to use our experiments platform. (authors)

  3. Electric conductivity and bootstrap current in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Jianshan; Wang Maoquan

    1996-12-01

    A modified Ohm's law for the electric conductivity calculation is presented, where the modified ohmic current can be compensated by the bootstrap current. A comparison of TEXT tokamak experiment with the theories shows that the modified Ohm's law is a more close approximation to the tokamak experiments than the classical and neoclassical theories and can not lead to the absurd result of Z eff <1, and the extended neoclassical theory would be not necessary. (3 figs.)

  4. The Physics of Bird Flight: An Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Michael D.; George, Thomas F.; Feldman, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an experiment that measures the forces acting on a flying bird during takeoff. The experiment uses a minimum of equipment and only an elementary knowledge of kinematics and Newton's second law. The experiment involves first digitally videotaping a bird during takeoff, analyzing the video to determine the bird's position as a…

  5. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  6. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  7. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  8. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89)

  9. Status of tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, J.M.

    1979-10-01

    An overall review of the tokamak program is given with particular emphasis upon developments over the past five years in the theoretical and experimental elements of the program. A summary of the key operating parameters for the principal tokamaks throughout the world is given. Also discussed are key issues in plasma confinement, plasma heating, and tokamak design

  10. Lecture note on circuit technology for high energy physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hirokazu.

    1992-07-01

    This lecture gives basic ideas and practice of the circuit technology for high energy physics experiment. The program of this lecture gives access to the integrated circuit technology to be applied for a high luminosity hadron collider experiment. (author)

  11. Accelerator based atomic physics experiments: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moak, C.D.

    1976-01-01

    Atomic Physics research with beams from accelerators has continued to expand and the number of papers and articles at meetings and in journals reflects a steadily increasing interest and an increasing support from various funding agencies. An attempt will be made to point out where interdisciplinary benefits have occurred, and where applications of the new results to engineering problems are expected. Drawing from material which will be discussed in the conference, a list of the most active areas of research is presented. Accelerator based atomic physics brings together techniques from many areas, including chemistry, astronomy and astrophysics, nuclear physics, solid state physics and engineering. An example is the use of crystal channeling to sort some of the phenomena of ordinary heavy ion stopping powers. This tool has helped us to reach a better understanding of stopping mechanisms with the result that now we have established a better base for predicting energy losses of heavy ions in various materials

  12. Physics experiments with Nintendo Wii controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Martyn D.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a detailed description of the use of Nintendo Wii game controllers in physics demonstrations. The main features of the controller relevant to physics are outlined and the procedure for communicating with a PC is described. A piece of software written by the author is applied to gathering data from a controller suspended from a spring undergoing simple harmonic motion, a pair of controllers mounted on colliding gliders on a linear air track, and a person jumping from a balance board.

  13. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC)

  14. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  15. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  16. Application studies of spherical tokamak plasma merging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Yasushi; Inomoto, Michiaki

    2012-01-01

    The experiment of plasma merging and heating has long history in compact torus studies since Wells. The study of spherical tokamak (ST), starting from TS-3 plasma merging experiment of Tokyo University in the late 1980s, is followed by START of Culham laboratory in the 1900s, TS-4 and UTST of Tokyo University and MAST of Culham laboratory in the 2000s, and last year by VEST of Soul University. ST has the following advantages: 1) plasma heating by magnetic reconnection at a MW-GW level, 2) rapid start-up of high beta plasma, 3) current drive/flux multiplication and distribution control of ST plasma, 4) fueling and helium-ash exhaust. In the present article, we emphasize that magnetic reconnection and plasma merging phenomena are important in ST plasma study as well as in plasma physics. (author)

  17. Current-drive and plasma formation experiments on the Versator-II tokamak using lower-hybrid and electron-cyclotron waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colborn, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    During lower-hybrid current-driven (LHCD) tokamak discharges with thermal electron temperature T e ∼ 150 eV, a two-parallel-temperature tail is observed in the electron distribution function. The cold tail extends to parallel energy E parallel ∼ 4.5 keV with temperature T cold tail ∼ 1.5 keV, and the hot tail extends to E parallel > 150 keV with T hot tail > 40 keV. Fokker-Planck computer simulations suggest the cold tail is created by low power, high-N parallel sidelobes in the lower-hybrid antenna spectrum, and that these sidelobes bridge the spectral gap, enabling current drive on small tokamaks such as Versator. During plasma-formation experiments using 28 GHz electroncyclotron (EC) waves, the plasma is born near the EC layer, then moves toward the upper-hybrid (UH) layer within 100-200μs. Wave power is detected in the plasma with frequency f = 300 MHz. Measured turbulent plasma fluctuations are correlated with decay-wave amplitude. Electron-cyclotron current-drive (ECCD) is observed with loop voltage V loop ≤ 0 and fully sustained plasma current I p approx-lt 15 kA at densities up to [n e ] = 2 x 10 12 cm -3 . The efficiency falls rapidly to zero as the density is raised, suggesting the ECCD depends on low collisonality. The EC waves enhance magnetic turbulence in the frequency range 50 kHz approx-lt f approx-lt 400 kHz by up to an order of magnitude. The time-of-arrival of the turbulence to probes at the plasma boundary is longer when the EC layer is farther from the probes

  18. Design constraints on magnet systems of future tokamaks based on experiences of present s.c. magnet development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, W.; Jeske, U.; Komarek, P.; Krauth, H.

    1983-01-01

    In view of the urgent need for superconductivity in the next generation of big fusion devices and the identified gap between aimed data and the state of the art, impressive development programs are running world-wide, e.g. the IEA-Large Coil Task (LCT) and magnets for near term experiments (T15, Tore Supra). During the development work for all these magnet systems and simultaneously running design studies, especially the INTOR-study, some critical problem areas, e.g. concerning NbTi-conductor design and manufacturing and coil fabrication could be solved, others like the limitations by fatigue stresses for coil case and support structure turned out to be more stringent than anticipated. This paper tries to show which plasma physics parameters place especially severe constraints to magnet design, like PF-pulse number and amplitude at the TF-coils, so that they should be chosen with strongest care. It further points out which technologies under these circumstances are still missing or unproven with respect to the INTOR-like generation of fusion experiments. Further effort is mainly required for fatigue load behaviour of materials and components, high field windings and poloidal field coils. (author)

  19. Creation of a magnetic barrier at a noble q close to physical midpoint between two resonant surfaces in the ASDEX UG tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Justin; Ali, Halima; Punjabi, Alkesh

    2009-11-01

    Ciraolo, Vittot and Chandre method of building invariant manifolds inside chaos in Hamiltonian systems [Ali H. and Punjabi A, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, 49, 1565--1582 (2007)] is used in the ASDEX UG tokamak. In this method, a second order perturbation is added to the perturbed Hamiltonian [op cit]. It creates an invariant torus inside the chaos, and reduces the plasma transport. The perturbation that is added to the equilibrium Hamiltonian is at least an order of magnitude smaller than the perturbation that causes chaos. This additional term has a finite, limited number of Fourier modes. Resonant magnetic perturbations (m,n) = (3,2)+(4,3) are added to the field line Hamiltonian for the ASDEX UG. An area-preserving map for the field line trajectories in the ASDEX UG is used. The common amplitude δ of these modes that gives complete chaos between the resonant surfaces ψ43 and ψ32 is determined. A magnetic barrier is built at a surface with noble q that is very nearly equals to the q at the physical midpoint between the two resonant surfaces. The maximum amplitude of magnetic perturbation for which this barrier can be sustained is determined. This work is supported by US Department of Energy grants DE-FG02-07ER54937, DE-FG02-01ER54624 and DE-FG02-04ER54793.

  20. A continuum self organized critically model of turbulent heat transport in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangri, V; Das, A; Kaw, P; Singh, R [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2003-09-01

    Based on the now well known and experimentally observed critical gradient length (R/L{sub Te} = RT/{nabla}T) in tokamaks, we present a continuum one dimensional model for explaining self organized heat transport in tokamaks. Key parameters of this model include a novel hysteresis parameter which ensures that the switch of heat transport coefficient {chi} upwards and downwards takes place at two different values of R/L{sub Te}. Extensive numerical simulations of this model reproduce many features of present day tokamaks such as submarginal temperature profiles, intermittent transport events, 1/f scaling of the frequency spectra, propagating fronts, etc. This model utilises a minimal set of phenomenological parameters, which may be determined from experiments and/or simulations. Analytical and physical understanding of the observed features has also been attempted. (author)