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Sample records for tokamak disruptions sensitivity

  1. Internal disruption in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Savrukhin, P.V.

    1990-01-01

    A review of results of experimental and theoretical investigations of internal disruption in tokamaks is given. Specific features of various types of saw-tooth oscillations are described and their classification is performed. Theoretical models of the process of development of internal disruption instability are discussed. Effect of internal disruption on parameters of plasma, confined in tokamak, is considered. Scalings of period and amplitude of saw-tooth oscillations, as well as version radius are presented. Different methods for stabilizing instability of internal disruption are described

  2. Internal disruptions in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Savrukhin, P.V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of the phenomenon of internal disruptions in tokamaks are reviewed. A classification scheme is introduced and the features of different types of sawtooth oscillations are described. A theoretical model for the development of the internal disruption instability is discussed. The effect of internal disruptions on the parameters of plasma confined in tokamaks is discussed. Scaling laws for the period and amplitude of sawtooth oscillations, as well as for the inversion radius, are presented. Different methods of stabilizing the internal disruption instability are described

  3. Disruptions in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondeson, A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses major and minor disruptions in Tokamaks. A number of models and numerical simulations of disruptions based on resistive MHD are reviewed. A discussion is given of how disruptive current profiles are correlated with the experimentally known operational limits in density and current. It is argued that the q a =2 limit is connected with stabilization of the m=2/n=1 tearing mode for a approx.< 2.7 by resistive walls and mode rotation. Experimental and theoretical observations indicate that major disruptions usually occur in at least two phases, first a 'predisruption', or loss of confinement in the region 1 < q < 2, leaving the q approx.= 1 region almost unaffected, followed by a final disruption of the central part, interpreted here as a toroidal n = 1 external kink mode. (author)

  4. Major disruption process in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Gen-ichi; Azumi, Masafumi; Tuda, Takashi; Takizuka, Tomonori; Tsunematsu, Toshihide; Tokuda, Shinji; Itoh, Kimitaka; Takeda, Tatsuoki

    1981-11-01

    The major disruption in a cylindrical tokamak is investigated by using the multi-helicity code, and the destabilization of the 3/2 mode by the mode coupling with the 2/1 mode is confirmed. The evolution of the magnetic field topology caused by the major disruption is studied in detail. The effect of the internal disruption on the 2/1 magnetic island width is also studied. The 2/1 magnetic island is not enhanced by the flattening of the q-profile due to the internal disruption. (author)

  5. Simulation of a major tokamak disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.; Monticello, D.A.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1977-08-01

    It is known that the internal tokamak disruption leads to a current profile which is flattened inside the surface where the safety factor equals unity. It is shown that such a profile can lead to m = 2 magnetic islands which grow to fill a substantial part of the tokamak cross section in a time consistent with the observations of the major disruption

  6. Criteria for initiation of tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopcraft, K.I.; Turner, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    The process by which a tokamak plasma evolves from an equilibrium state containing a saturated magnetic island to one which is disruptively unstable is discussed and illustrated by numerical simulation of a resistive magnetoplasma. Those elements which are required to initiate a disruption are delineated

  7. Periodic disruptions in the MT-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoletnik, S.

    1988-11-01

    Disruptive instabilities are common phenomena in toroidal devices, especially in tokamaks. Three types can be distinguished: internal, minor and major disruptions. Periodic minor disruptions in the MT-1 tokamak were measured systematically with values of the limiter safety factor between 4 and 10. The density limit as a function of plasma current and horizontal displacement was investigated. Precursor oscillations always appear before the instability with increasing amplitude but can be observed at the density limit with quasi-stationary amplitude. Phase correlation between precursor oscillations were measured with Mirnov coils and x-ray detectors, and they show good agreement with a simple magnetic island model. (R.P.) 11 refs.; 6 figs

  8. Heat load material studies: Simulated tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahl, J.M.; McDonald, J.M.; Zakharov, A.; Tserevitinov, S.; Barabash, V.; Guseva, M.

    1991-01-01

    It is clear that an improved understanding of the effects of tokamak disruptions on plasma facing component materials is needed for the ITER program. very large energy fluxes are predicted to be deposited in ITER and could be very damaging to the machine. During 1991, Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico conducted cooperative tokamak disruption simulation experiments at several Soviet facilities. These facilities were located at the Efremov Institute in Leningrad, the Kurchatov Atomic Energy Institute (Troisk and Moscow) and the Institute for Physical Chemistry of the Soviet Adademy of Sciences in Moscow. Erosion of graphite from plasma stream impact is seen to be much less than that observed with laser or electron beams with similar energy fluxes. This, along with other data obtained, seem to suggest that the ''vapor shielding'' effect is a very important phenomenon in the study of graphite erosion during tokamak disruption

  9. Disruptions in the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janos, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.; Batha, S.H.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Efthimion, P.C.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Levinton, F.; Mansfield, D.; Meade, D.; Medley, S.S.; Monticello, D.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Post, D.E.; Schivell, J.; Strachan, J.D.; Taylor, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Goeler, S. von; Wilfrid, E.; Wong, K.L.; Yamada, M.; Young, K.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.; Drake, J.F.; Kleva, R.G.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1993-03-01

    For a successful reactor, it will be useful to predict the occurrence of disruptions and to understand disruption effects including how a plasma disrupts onto the wall and how reproducibly it does so. Studies of disruptions on TFTR at both high-β pol and high-density have shown that, in both types, a fast growing m/n=1/1 mode plays an important role. In highdensity disruptions, a newly observed fast m/n = 1/1 mode occurs early in the thermal decay phase. For the first time in TFTR q-profile measurements just prior to disruptions have been made. Experimental studies of heat deposition patterns on the first wall of TFTR due to disruptions have provided information on MHD phenomena prior to or during the disruption, how the energy is released to the wall, and the reproducibility of the heat loads from disruptions. This information is important in the design of future devices such as ITER. Several new processes of runaway electron generation are theoretically suggested and their application to TFTR and ITER is considered, together with a preliminary assessment of x-ray data from runaways generated during disruptions

  10. Anomalous periodic disruptions in tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montvai, A.; Tegze, M.; Valyi, I.

    1982-09-01

    Anomalously strong, periodic instabilities were observed in the MT-1 tokamak. Characteristics of these instabilities were partly similar to those of internal disruptions, but there were features making them different from the normal relaxational oscillations. Basic characteristics of the phenomenon were studied with the aid of generally used diagnostics. (author)

  11. Neural net prediction of tokamak plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.V.; Lin, Z.; Horton, W.; McCool, S.C.

    1994-10-01

    The computation based on neural net algorithms in predicting minor and major disruptions in TEXT tokamak discharges has been performed. Future values of the fluctuating magnetic signal are predicted based on L past values of the magnetic fluctuation signal, measured by a single Mirnov coil. The time step used (= 0.04ms) corresponds to the experimental data sampling rate. Two kinds of approaches are adopted for the task, the contiguous future prediction and the multi-timescale prediction. Results are shown for comparison. Both networks are trained through the back-propagation algorithm with inertial terms. The degree of this success indicates that the magnetic fluctuations associated with tokamak disruptions may be characterized by a relatively low-dimensional dynamical system

  12. An overview on plasma disruption mitigation and avoidance in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Kaihui; Pan Chuanhong; Feng Kaiming

    2002-01-01

    Plasma disruption, which seems to be unavoidable in Tokamak operation, occurs very fast and uncontrolled. In order to keep Tokamak plasma from disruption and mitigate the disruption frequency, the research on Tokamak plasma major disruption constitutes one of the main topics in plasma physics. The phenomena and processes of the precursor, thermal quench, current quench, VDE, halo current and runaway electrons generation during plasma disruption are analyzed in detail and systematically based on the data obtained from current Tokamaks such as TFTR, JET, JT-60U and ASDEX-U, etc. The methods to mitigate and avoid disruption in Tokamak are also highlighted schematically. Therefore, it is helpful and instructive for plasma disruption research in next generation large Tokamak such as ITER-FEAT

  13. Runaway electron generation in tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P.; Andersson, F.; Fueloep, T.; Smith, H.; Anderson, D.; Lisak, M.; Eriksson, L.-G.

    2005-01-01

    The time evolution of the plasma current during a tokamak disruption is calculated by solving the equations for runaway electron production simultaneously with the induction equation for the toroidal electric field. The resistive diffusion time in a post-disruption plasma is typically comparable to the runaway avalanche growth time. Accordingly, the toroidal electric field induced after the thermal quench of a disruption diffuses radially through the plasma at the same time as it accelerates runaway electrons, which in turn back-react on the electric field. When these processes are accounted for in a self-consistent way, it is found that (1) the efficiency and time scale of runaway generation agrees with JET experiments; (2) the runaway current profile typically becomes more peaked than the pre-disruption current profile; and (3) can easily become radially filamented. It is also shown that higher runaway electron generation is expected if the thermal quench is sufficiently fast. (author)

  14. Disruption generated secondary runaway electrons in present day tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankratov, I.M.; Jaspers, R.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of the runaway electron secondary generation during disruptions in present day tokamaks (JET, JT-60U, TEXTOR) was made. It was shown that even for tokamaks with the plasma current I approx 100 kA the secondary generation may dominate the runaway production during disruptions. In the same time in tokamaks with I approx 1 MA the runaway electron secondary generation during disruptions may be suppressed

  15. Technology and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, R.T.; Kellman, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    A workshop on the technology and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions was held April 3, 1992 in Monterey, California, as a satellite meeting of the 10th International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions. The objective was to bring together researchers working on disruption measurements in operating tokamaks, those performing disruption simulation experiments using pulsed plasma gun, electron beam and laser systems, and computational physicists attempting to model the evolution and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions. This is a brief report on the workshop. 4 refs

  16. The evolution of the plasma current during tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P.; Andersson, F.; Anderson, D.; Lisak, M.; Eriksson, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    In a tokamak disruption, the ohmic plasma current is partly replaced by a current carried by runaway electrons. This process is analysed by combining the equations for runaway electron generation with Maxwell's equations for the evolution of the electric field. This allows a quantitative understanding to be gained of runaway production in present experiments, and extrapolation to be made to ITER. The runaway current typically becomes more peaked on the magnetic axis than the pre-disruption current. In fact, the central current density can rise although the total current falls, which may have implications for post-disruption plasma stability. Furthermore, it is found that the runaway current easily spreads radially in a filament way due to the high sensitivity of the runaway generation efficiency to plasma parameters. (authors)

  17. Dynamic stabilization of disruption precursors in tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maoquan, Wang; Jianshan, Mao; Yuan, Pan [Academia Sinica, Hefei, AH (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    1994-12-01

    A method for dynamic stabilization of the disruption precursors in tokamak is proposed, that is a controlled ac current induced and added to the equilibrium current. The ac currents applied can be a sine alternative current with a relevant frequency, or a pulsed current with a suitable pulsed width {tau} and or a discontinuous pulsed current whose width {tau} is very shorter than the intervals between pulses, and or a `sawtooth` pulsed current with the time of ramp phase of the sawtooth is very much shorter than the sawtooth descending time, the ratio of them can be {<=}10{sup -3}. The physical model of the ac current drive is analyzed in detail. The suppression role of the ac current on the MHD perturbations was analyzed in theory and proved numerically. It is indicated that the ac current can make the discontinuous derivative, {Delta}`, more favorable for the tearing mode stabilities, and so, as long as the parameters of the applied ac currents are selected suitably, the MHD perturbations can be suppressed effectively, the perturbations will be in the zero-growing state, the profile of the plasma current and temperature remain in the initial states and not variate basically, the tokamak be in the stabilized operation state. (8 figs.).

  18. Tokamak plasma current disruption infrared control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Ulrickson, M.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a device for magnetically confining a plasma driven by a plasma current and contained within a toroidal vacuum chamber, the device having an inner toroidal limiter on an inside wall of the vacuum chamber and an arrangement for the rapid prediction and control in real time of a major plasma disruption. The arrangement is described which includes: scanning means sensitive to infrared radiation emanating from within the vacuum chamber, the infrared radiation indicating the temperature along a vertical profile of the inner toroidal limiter. The scanning means is arranged to observe the infrared radiation and to produce in response thereto an electrical scanning output signal representative of a time scan of temperature along the vertical profile; detection means for analyzing the scanning output signal to detect a first peaked temperature excursion occurring along the profile of the inner toroidal limiter, and to produce a detection output signal in repsonse thereto, the detection output signal indicating a real time prediction of a subsequent major plasma disruption; and plasma current reduction means for reducing the plasma current driving the plasma, in response to the detection output signal and in anticipation of a subsequent major plasma disruption

  19. Total magnetic reconnection during a tokamak major disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, J.A.

    1990-09-01

    Magnetic reconnection has long been considered to be the cause of sawtooth oscillations and major disruptions in tokamak experiments. Experimental confirmation of reconnection models has been hampered by the difficulty of direct measurement of reconnection, which would involve tracing field lines for many transits around the tokamak. Perhaps the most stringent test of reconnection in a tokamak involves measurement of the safety factor q. Reconnection arising from a single helical disturbance with mode numbers m and n should raise q to m/n everywhere inside of the original resonant surface. Total reconnection should also flatten the temperature and current density profiles inside of this surface. Disruptive instabilities have been studied in the Tokapole 2, a poloidal divertor tokamak. When Tokapole 2 is operated in the material limiter configuration, a major disruption results in current termination as in most tokamaks. However, when operated in the magnetic limiter configuration current termination is suppressed and major disruptions appear as giant sawtooth oscillations. The objective of this thesis is to determine if total reconnection is occurring during major disruptions. To accomplish this goal, the poloidal magnetic field has been directly measured in Tokapole 2 with internal magnetic coils. A full two-dimensional measurement over the central current channel has been done. From these measurements, the poloidal magnetic flux function is obtained and the magnetic surfaces are plotted. The flux-surface-averaged safety factor is obtained by integrating the local magnetic field line pitch over the experimentally obtained magnetic surface

  20. Simulations of Neon Pellets for Plasma Disruption Mitigation in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosviel, Nicolas; Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Numerical studies of the ablation of neon pellets in tokamaks in the plasma disruption mitigation parameter space have been performed using a time-dependent pellet ablation model based on the front tracking code FronTier-MHD. The main features of the model include the explicit tracking of the solid pellet/ablated gas interface, a self-consistent evolving potential distribution in the ablation cloud, JxB forces, atomic processes, and an improved electrical conductivity model. The equation of state model accounts for atomic processes in the ablation cloud as well as deviations from the ideal gas law in the dense, cold layers of neon gas near the pellet surface. Simulations predict processes in the ablation cloud and pellet ablation rates and address the sensitivity of pellet ablation processes to details of physics models, in particular the equation of state.

  1. Probabilistic analysis of tokamak plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanzo, D.L.; Apostolakis, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    An approximate analytical solution to the heat conduction equations used in modeling component melting and vaporization resulting from plasma disruptions is presented. This solution is then used to propagate uncertainties in the input data characterizing disruptions, namely, energy density and disruption time, to obtain a probabilistic description of the output variables of interest, material melted and vaporized. (orig.)

  2. Overvoltage protection for magnetic system during disruption in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ming; Li, Xiaolong; He, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongyong; Yu, Kexun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate the way to limit the plasma disruption overvoltage by using the MOVs. • An overvoltage model of plasma disruption is introduced. • The overvoltage protection scheme has been verified by disruption experiments. • The overvoltage during plasma disruption can be limited to 330 V. - Abstract: During a plasma disruption the magnetic flux in the tokamak changes rapidly, which in most cases will cause high-voltage surges among the magnetic systems and may bring severe damage to the components if there is no overvoltage protection. This paper investigates the way to limit the plasma disruption overvoltage and absorb the energy with the use of metal oxide varistors (MOVs). An overvoltage model of plasma disruption is introduced which can be used for the simulation of plasma disruption and the analysis of the overvoltage. The effectiveness of the overvoltage protection system is validated with disruption experiments. It shows that by optimizing the varistors voltage, the overvoltage during plasma disruption can be limited to an ideal low value. Now the overvoltage protection system has been deployed in J-TEXT tokamak and serves well for daily experiments.

  3. Analysis of disruptive instabilities in Aditya tokamak discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Asim Kumar; Anand, Arun; Rao, C.V.S.; Joisa, Shankar; Aditya team

    2006-01-01

    Major disruptions and sawteeth oscillations (internal disruptions) are routinely observed in ohmically heated Aditya tokamak discharges and their characteristics have been investigated with the help of soft x-ray (SXR) tomography along with other diagnostics. The SXR tomography is carried out with the help of single array of detectors assuming rigid rotation of the modes to analyse the mode structure of sawtooth internal disruptions. Coupling of m/n = 2/1 and m/n=1/1 modes could be the main mechanism for the major disruption. Sawteeth periods were measured and compared with the scaling laws and found to be in good agreement. (author)

  4. MHD precursor to disruption in Iran tokamak 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alireza, Hojabri; Fatemeh, Hajakbari; Alireza, Hojabri; Mahmmod, Ghoranneviss; Fatemeh, Hajakbari

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the major disruptions occurring in low-q(a) discharges in Iran Tokamak 1, and to compare the theoretical and experimental results for the rate of island growth. The study of precursor phase of disruption can be predicted and avoided using suitable control systems. In this paper are described the stability analysis and the observed growth rates indicating that the rotating modes are tearing modes. (authors)

  5. Total magnetic reconnection during a tokamak major disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, J.A.; Dexter, R.N.; Prager, S.C.

    1990-07-01

    The safety factor within a tokamak plasma has been measured during a major disruption. During the disruption, the central safety factor jumps from below one to above one, while the total current is unchanged. This implies that total reconnection has occurred. This observation is in contract to the absence of total reconnection observed during a sawtooth oscillation in the same device. 11 refs., 6 figs

  6. β limit disruptions in the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.; Janos, A.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.V.; Bush, C.E.; Manickam, J.; Mynick, H.; Nazikian, R.; Taylor, G.

    1994-11-01

    A disruptive β limit (β = plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) is observed in high performance plasmas in TFTR. The MHD character of these disruptions differs substantially from the disruptions in high density plasmas (density limit disruptions) on TFTR. The high β disruptions can occur with less than a milliseconds warning in the form of a fast growing precursor. The precursor appears to be an external kink or internal (m,n)=(1,1) kink strongly coupled through finite β effects and toroidal terms to higher m components. It does not have the open-quote cold bubble close-quote structure found in density limit disruptions. There is also no evidence for a change in the internal inductance, i.e., a major reconnection of the flux, at the time of the thermal quench

  7. Radiation transport effects in divertor plasmas generated during a tokamak reactor disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.R.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Wang, P.

    1994-01-01

    Vaporization of material from tokamak divertors during disruptions is a critical issue for tokamak reactors from ITER to commercial power plants. Radiation transport from the vaporized material onto the remaining divertor surface plays an important role in the total mass loss to the divertor. Radiation transport in such a vapor is very difficult to calculate in full detail, and this paper quantifies the sensitivity of the divertor mass loss to uncertainties in the radiation transport. Specifically, the paper presents the results of computer simulations of the vaporization of a graphite coated divertor during a tokamak disruption with ITER CDA parameters. The results show that a factor of 100 change in the radiation conductivity changes the mass loss by more than a factor of two

  8. Sideways wall force produced during tokamak disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, H.; Paccagnella, R.; Breslau, J.; Sugiyama, L.; Jardin, S.

    2013-07-01

    A critical issue for ITER is to evaluate the forces produced on the surrounding conducting structures during plasma disruptions. We calculate the non-axisymmetric ‘sideways’ wall force Fx, produced in disruptions. Simulations were carried out of disruptions produced by destabilization of n = 1 modes by a vertical displacement event (VDE). The force depends strongly on γτwall, where γ is the mode growth rate and τwall is the wall penetration time, and is largest for γτwall = constant, which depends on initial conditions. Simulations of disruptions caused by a model of massive gas injection were also performed. It was found that the wall force increases approximately offset linearly with the displacement from the magnetic axis produced by a VDE. These results are also obtained with an analytical model. Disruptions are accompanied by toroidal variation of the plasma current Iφ. This is caused by toroidal variation of the halo current, as verified computationally and analytically.

  9. Disruption-induced poloidal currents in the tokamak wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, V.D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Induction effects during disruptions and rapid transient events in tokamaks. • Plasma-wall electromagnetic interaction. • Flux-conserving evolution of plasma equilibrium. • Poloidal current induced in the vacuum vessel wall in a tokamak. • Complete analytical derivations and estimates. - Abstract: The poloidal current induced in the tokamak wall during fast transient events is analytically evaluated. The analysis is based on the electromagnetic relations coupled with plasma equilibrium equations. The derived formulas describe the consequences of both thermal and current quenches. In the final form, they give explicit dependence of the wall current on the plasma pressure and current. A comparison with numerical results of Villone et al. [F. Villone, G. Ramogida, G. Rubinacci, Fusion Eng. Des. 93, 57 (2015)] for IGNITOR is performed. Our analysis confirms the importance of the effects described there. The estimates show that the disruption-induced poloidal currents in the wall should be necessarily taken into account in the studies of disruptions and disruption mitigation in ITER.

  10. Reclosing of field lines and disruptive instability in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadomtsev, B.B.

    The mechanism of field line reclosing is proposed as the most natural explanation of disruptive instability in tokamaks. This mechanism adequately accounts for the internal disruptive instability, assuming that only mode m = 1 develops. It is extended to the presence of two or several modes. When there is a large number of allowed modes, one can speak of free reclosing, which leads to a force-free magnetic field in a diffusion discharge. In a tokamak, B/sub Z/ much greater than B/sub theta/, free reclosing leads to a uniform distribution of the current over the column cross section and to ejection of part of the poloidal flux beyond the confines of the diaphragm. It may be stated that the disruptive instability in a tokamak is an MHD activity that flares up for a short time and is permanently present in a diffusion column. The geometry of magnetic surfaces during reclosing has been analyzed, and qualitative arguments are given to show that disruptive instability begins to develop as a result of the interaction of the mode m = 2 with the inner mode m = 1

  11. Disruption-induced poloidal currents in the tokamak wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustovitov, V.D., E-mail: Pustovitov_VD@nrcki.ru [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Pl. Kurchatova 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409, Russia (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Induction effects during disruptions and rapid transient events in tokamaks. • Plasma-wall electromagnetic interaction. • Flux-conserving evolution of plasma equilibrium. • Poloidal current induced in the vacuum vessel wall in a tokamak. • Complete analytical derivations and estimates. - Abstract: The poloidal current induced in the tokamak wall during fast transient events is analytically evaluated. The analysis is based on the electromagnetic relations coupled with plasma equilibrium equations. The derived formulas describe the consequences of both thermal and current quenches. In the final form, they give explicit dependence of the wall current on the plasma pressure and current. A comparison with numerical results of Villone et al. [F. Villone, G. Ramogida, G. Rubinacci, Fusion Eng. Des. 93, 57 (2015)] for IGNITOR is performed. Our analysis confirms the importance of the effects described there. The estimates show that the disruption-induced poloidal currents in the wall should be necessarily taken into account in the studies of disruptions and disruption mitigation in ITER.

  12. Reclosing of field lines and disruptive instability in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadomtsev, B. B.

    1976-07-01

    The mechanism of field line reclosing is proposed as the most natural explanation of disruptive instability in tokamaks. This mechanism adequately accounts for the internal disruptive instability, assuming that only mode m = 1 develops. It is extended to the presence of two or several modes. When there is a large number of allowed modes, one can speak of free reclosing, which leads to a force-free magnetic field in a diffusion discharge. In a tokamak, B/sub Z/ much greater than B/sub theta/, free reclosing leads to a uniform distribution of the current over the column cross section and to ejection of part of the poloidal flux beyond the confines of the diaphragm. It may be stated that the disruptive instability in a tokamak is an MHD activity that flares up for a short time and is permanently present in a diffusion column. The geometry of magnetic surfaces during reclosing has been analyzed, and qualitative arguments are given to show that disruptive instability begins to develop as a result of the interaction of the mode m = 2 with the inner mode m = 1.

  13. A cross-tokamak neural network disruption predictor for the JET and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, C. G.; Pautasso, G.; Tichmann, C.; Buttery, R. J.; Hender, T. C.; EFDA Contributors, JET; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2005-05-01

    First results are reported on the prediction of disruptions in one tokamak, based on neural networks trained on another tokamak. The studies use data from the JET and ASDEX Upgrade devices, with a neural network trained on just seven normalized plasma parameters. In this way, a simple single layer perceptron network trained solely on JET correctly anticipated 67% of disruptions on ASDEX Upgrade in advance of 0.01 s before the disruption. The converse test led to a 69% success rate in advance of 0.04 s before the disruption in JET. Only one overall time scaling parameter is allowed between the devices, which can be introduced from theoretical arguments. Disruption prediction performance based on such networks trained and tested on the same device shows even higher success rates (JET, 86%; ASDEX Upgrade, 90%), despite the small number of inputs used and simplicity of the network. It is found that while performance for networks trained and tested on the same device can be improved with more complex networks and many adjustable weights, for cross-machine testing the best approach is a simple single layer perceptron. This offers the basis of a potentially useful technique for large future devices such as ITER, which with further development might help to reduce disruption frequency and minimize the need for a large disruption campaign to train disruption avoidance systems.

  14. A cross-tokamak neural network disruption predictor for the JET and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, C.G.; Buttery, R.J.; Hender, T.C.; Pautasso, G.; Tichmann, C.

    2005-01-01

    First results are reported on the prediction of disruptions in one tokamak, based on neural networks trained on another tokamak. The studies use data from the JET and ASDEX Upgrade devices, with a neural network trained on just seven normalized plasma parameters. In this way, a simple single layer perceptron network trained solely on JET correctly anticipated 67% of disruptions on ASDEX Upgrade in advance of 0.01 s before the disruption. The converse test led to a 69% success rate in advance of 0.04 s before the disruption in JET. Only one overall time scaling parameter is allowed between the devices, which can be introduced from theoretical arguments. Disruption prediction performance based on such networks trained and tested on the same device shows even higher success rates (JET, 86%; ASDEX Upgrade, 90%), despite the small number of inputs used and simplicity of the network. It is found that while performance for networks trained and tested on the same device can be improved with more complex networks and many adjustable weights, for cross-machine testing the best approach is a simple single layer perceptron. This offers the basis of a potentially useful technique for large future devices such as ITER, which with further development might help to reduce disruption frequency and minimize the need for a large disruption campaign to train disruption avoidance systems

  15. Computational model of surface ablation from tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.; Hassanein, A.

    1993-10-01

    Energy transfer to material surfaces is dominated by photon radiation through low temperature plasma vapors if tokamak disruptions are due to low kinetic energy particles ( < 100 eV). Simple models of radiation transport are derived and incorporated into a fast-running computer routine to model this process. The results of simulations are in fair agreement with plasma gun erosion tests on several metal targets

  16. Internal disruptions in Tokamak: a turbulent interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, M.A.; Pecquet, A.L.; Reverdin, C.

    1982-07-01

    High speed X-ray data of sawteeth in TFR are interpreted using a kinematic model. It is shown that the internal disruption begins for a small size of the q = 1 island, and that the sharp details observed on different chords are not reproduced by a total reconnection model. Conversely they are well simulated by a model where the temperature flattening is due to the propagation of a turbulent region starting from the q = 1 surface

  17. On the avalanche generation of runaway electrons during tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-01-01

    A simple zero dimensional model for a tokamak disruption is developed to evaluate the avalanche multiplication of a runaway primary seed during the current quench phase of a fast disruptive event. Analytical expressions for the plateau runaway current, the energy of the runaway beam, and the runaway energy distribution function are obtained allowing the identification of the parameters dominating the formation of the runaway current during disruptions. The effect of the electromagnetic coupling to the vessel and the penetration of the external magnetic energy during the disruption current quench as well as of the collisional dissipation of the runaway current at high densities are investigated. Current profile shape effects during the formation of the runaway beam are also addressed by means of an upgraded one-dimensional model

  18. Characterization of disruptions in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment, MTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Makowski, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) has a substantial number of fast diagnostics, especially for electrons, as part of its mission for pulsed, high-power electron cyclotron heating. As part of its contribution to ITER R ampersand D, these diagnostics are being used to characterize disruptions in MTX. This report is the first of two, with the second planned for submittal in September 1990, at the end of the ITER conceptual design activity. Here, we analyze the characteristics of disruptions during normal operation of MTX, discuss some new data pertaining to the ''Granetz limit,'' and describe preliminary data on ramped density shorts which will be used for fast measurements on density limit disruptions. The final report will discuss measurements using the fast diagnostics to characterize the disruption

  19. Toroidal current asymmetry in tokamak disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-10-01

    It was discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current I ϕ. It was found that the toroidal current asymmetry was proportional to the vertical current moment asymmetry with positive sign for an upward vertical displacement event (VDE) and negative sign for a downward VDE. It was observed that greater displacement leads to greater measured I ϕ asymmetry. Here, it is shown that this is essentially a kinematic effect produced by a VDE interacting with three dimensional MHD perturbations. The relation of toroidal current asymmetry and vertical current moment is calculated analytically and is verified by numerical simulations. It is shown analytically that the toroidal variation of the toroidal plasma current is accompanied by an equal and opposite variation of the toroidal current flowing in a thin wall surrounding the plasma. These currents are connected by 3D halo current, which is π/2 radians out of phase with the n = 1 toroidal current variations.

  20. Modeling plasma/material interactions during a tokamak disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1994-10-01

    Disruptions in tokamak reactors are still of serious concern and present a potential obstacle for successful operation and reliable design. Erosion of plasma-facing materials due to thermal energy dump during a disruption can severely limit the lifetime of these components, therefore diminishing the economic feasibility of the reactor. A comprehensive disruption erosion model which takes into account the interplay of major physical processes during plasma-material interaction has been developed. The initial burst of energy delivered to facing-material surfaces from direct impact of plasma particles causes sudden ablation of these materials. As a result, a vapor cloud is formed in front of the incident plasma particles. Shortly thereafter, the plasma particles are stopped in the vapor cloud, heating and ionizing it. The energy transmitted to the material surfaces is then dominated by photon radiation. It is the dynamics and the evolution of this vapor cloud that finally determines the net erosion rate and, consequently, the component lifetime. The model integrates with sufficient detail and in a self-consistent way, material thermal evolution response, plasma-vapor interaction physics, vapor hydrodynamics, and radiation transport in order to realistically simulate the effects of a plasma disruption on plasma-facing components. Candidate materials such as beryllium and carbon have been analyzed. The dependence of the net erosion rate on disruption physics and various parameters was analyzed and is discussed

  1. Simulations of tokamak disruptions including self-consistent temperature evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondeson, A.

    1986-01-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of tokamaks have been carried out, including self-consistent temperature evolution with a highly anisotropic thermal conductivity. The simulations extend over the transport time-scale and address the question of how disruptive current profiles arise at low-q or high-density operation. Sharply defined disruptive events are triggered by the m/n=2/1 resistive tearing mode, which is mainly affected by local current gradients near the q=2 surface. If the global current gradient between q=2 and q=1 is sufficiently steep, the m=2 mode starts a shock which accelerates towards the q=1 surface, leaving stochastic fields, a flattened temperature profile and turbulent plasma behind it. For slightly weaker global current gradients, a shock may form, but it will dissipate before reaching q=1 and may lead to repetitive minidisruptions which flatten the temperature profile in a region inside the q=2 surface. (author)

  2. Characterization of axisymmetric disruption dynamics toward VDE avoidance in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Disruption experiments on Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX-Upgrade tokamaks and axisymmetric MHD simulations using the TSC have explicated the underlying mechanisms of Vertical Displacement Events (VDEs) and a diversity of disruption dynamics. First, the neutral point, which is known as an initial vertical plasma position advantageous to VDE avoidance, is shown to be fairly insensitive to plasma shape and current profile parameters, while the VDE rate significantly depends on those parameters. Secondly, it is clarified that a rapid flattening of the plasma current profile frequently seen at the thermal quench drags a single null-diverted, up-down asymmetric plasma vertically toward divertor, whereas the dragging effect is absent in up-down symmetric limiter discharges. As a consequence, the occurrence of downward-going VDEs predominates over the upward-going ones in bottom-diverted discharges, being consistent with experiments in ASDEX-Upgrade. Together with the attractive force that arises from passive shell currents induced by the current quench and vanishes at the neutral point, the dragging effect explains many details of the VDE dynamics over the whole period of disruptive termination. (author)

  3. Characterization of axisymmetric disruption dynamics toward VDE avoidance in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Yoshino, R.; Granetz, R.S.; Pautasso, G.; Gruber, O.; Jardin, S.C.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments and axisymmetric MHD simulations on tokamak disruptions have explicated the underlying mechanisms of Vertical Displacement Events (VDEs) and a diversity of disruption dynamics. First, the neutral point, which is known as an advantageous vertical plasma position to avoiding VDEs during the plasma current quench, is shown to be fairly insensitive to plasma shape and current profile parameters. Secondly, a rapid flattening of the plasma current profile frequently seen at thermal quench is newly clarified to play a substantial role in dragging a single null-diverted plasma vertically towards the divertor. As a consequence, the occurrence of downward-going VDEs predominates over the upward-going ones in bottom diverted discharges. This dragging effect is absent in up-down symmetric limiter discharges. These simulation results are consistent with experiments. Together with the attractive force that arises from passive shell currents and essentially vanishes at the neutral point, the dragging effect explains many details of the VDE dynamics over the whole period of the disruptive termination. (author)

  4. Quick profile-reorganization driven by helical field perturbation for suppressing tokamak major disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Kawahata, K.; Ando, R.

    1986-09-01

    Disruptive behavior of magnetic field configuration leading to tokamak major disruption is found to be controlled by a mild ''mini-disruption'' which is induced by the compact external modular multipole-field coils with m = 3/n = 2 dominant helical field component in the JIPP T-IIU tokamak. This mini-disruption ergodizes the m = 2/n = 1 magnetic island quickly but mildly and then prevents the profile of electron temperature from flattening. This quick profile-reorganization is effective to avoid the two-step disruption (pre- and major disuptions) responsible for the chatastrophic current termination. (author)

  5. Local and integral disruption forces on the tokamak wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovitov, V. D.; Kiramov, D. I.

    2018-04-01

    The disruption-induced forces on the tokamak wall are evaluated analytically within the standard large-aspect-ratio model that implies axisymmetry, circular plasma and wall, and absence of halo currents. Additionally, the ideal-wall reaction is assumed. The disruptions are modelled as rapid changes in the plasma pressure (thermal quench (TQ)) and net current (current quench (CQ)). The force distribution over the poloidal angle is found as a function of these inputs. The derived formulas allow comparison of the TQ- and CQ-produced forces calculated differently, with and without account of the poloidal current induced in the wall. The latter variant represents the inherent property of the codes treating the wall as a set of toroidal filaments. It is proved here that such a simplification leads to unacceptably large errors in the simulated forces for both TQs and CQs. It is also shown that the TQ part of the force must prevail over that due to CQ in the high-β scenarios developed for JT-60SA and ITER.

  6. TSC [Tokamak Simulation Code] disruption scenarios and CIT [Compact Ignition Tokamak] vacuum vessel force evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayer, R.O.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Tokamak Simulation Code and the TWIR postprocessor code have been used to develop credible plasma disruption scenarios for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) in order to predict the evolution of forces on CIT conducting structures and to provide results required for detailed structural design analysis. The extreme values of net radial and vertical vacuum vessel (VV) forces were found to be F R =-12.0 MN/rad and F Z =-3.0 MN/rad, respectively, for the CIT 2.1-m, 11-MA design. Net VV force evolution was found to be altered significantly by two mechanisms not noted previously. The first, due to poloidal VV currents arising from increased plasma paramagnetism during thermal quench, reduces the magnitude of the extreme F R by 15-50% and modifies the distribution of forces substantially. The second effect is that slower plasma current decay rates give more severe net vertical VV loads because the current decay occurs when the plasma has moved farther from midplane than is the case for faster decay rates. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  7. Time-dependent analysis of the resistivity of post-disruption tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhtiari, M.; Whyte, D. G.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of neutrals on plasma resistivity due to electron-neutral collisions is studied with respect to its effect on tokamak disruptions. The resistivity of the tokamak plasma after the thermal quench is critical in determining the current quench rate, the plasma temperature, and runaway electron generation in tokamaks through the electric field, all features which are important for mitigating the damaging effect of disruptions. It is shown that the plasma resistivity during tokamak disruptions is a time-dependent parameter which may vary with disruption time scales due to the increasing fraction of neutrals. However the effect of neutrals on resistivity is found to be small for the expected neutral fraction, mostly due to power balance considerations between radiation and Ohmic heating in the plasma

  8. Present status of VDEs (Vertical Displacement Events) avoidance studies in tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yukiharu

    2001-01-01

    Present knowledge on the consequences of tokamak disruption and disruption-related effects are reviewed from a viewpoint of disruption mitigation and/or avoidance. The Vertical Displacement Events (VDEs), which are frequently observed in disruptive discharges of elongated tokamaks, are described in detail with an emphasis on the close relationships between the generation of halo currents and runaway electrons. The newly found 'neutral point', at which VDEs hardly occur, is also addressed. Finally, VDE-related issues remaining to be addressed in future works are discussed. (author)

  9. Divertor layer during the thermal phase of the disruption in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konkashbaev, I.K.

    1993-01-01

    Physical processes in the tokamak divertor with a poloidal field during plasma disruption are considered. It is shown that the processes differ qualitatively from the processes in a stationary mode. During the disruption the energy flux is increased by 10 4 times

  10. User's manual for DSTAR MOD1: A comprehensive tokamak disruption code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, B.J.; Jardin, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code, DSTAR, has recently been developed to quantify the surface erosion and induced forces that can occur during major tokamak plasma disruptions. The DSTAR code development effort has been accomplished by coupling a recently developed free boundary tokamak plasma transport computational model with other models developed to predict impurity transport and radiation, and the electromagnetic and thermal dynamic response of vacuum vessel components. The combined model, DSTAR, is a unique tool for predicting the consequences of tokamak disruptions. This informal report discusses the sequence of events of a resistive disruption, models developed to predict plasma transport and electromagnetic field evolution, the growth of the stochastic region of the plasma, the transport and nonequilibrium ionization/emitted radiation of the ablated vacuum vessel material, the vacuum vessel thermal and magnetic response, and user input and code output

  11. The study of heat flux for disruption on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhendong; Fang, Jianan; Luo, Jiarong; Cui, Zhixue; Gong, Xianzu; Gan, Kaifu; Zhao, Hailin; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Meiwen

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of the plasma is one of the most dangerous instabilities in tokamak. During the disruption, most of the plasma thermal energy is lost, which causes damages to the plasma facing components. Infrared (IR) camera is an effective tool to detect the temperature distribution on the first wall, and the energy deposited on the first wall can be calculated from the surface temperature profile measured by the IR camera. This paper concentrates on the characteristics of heat flux distribution onto the first wall under different disruptions, including the minor disruption and the vertical displacement events (VDE) disruption. Several minor disruptions have been observed before the major disruption under the high plasma density in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. During the minor disruption, the heat fluxes are mainly deposited on the upper/lower divertors. The magnetic configuration prior to the minor disruption is a lower single null with the radial distance between the two separatrices in the outer midplane dR_s_e_p = −2 cm, while it changes to upper single null (dR_s_e_p = 1.4 cm) during the minor disruption. As for the VDE disruption, the spatial distribution of heat flux exhibits strong toroidal and radial nonuniformity, and the maximum heat flux received on the dome plate can be up to 11 MW/m"2.

  12. The study of heat flux for disruption on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhendong; Fang, Jianan; Gong, Xianzu; Gan, Kaifu; Luo, Jiarong; Zhao, Hailin; Cui, Zhixue; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Meiwen

    2016-05-01

    Disruption of the plasma is one of the most dangerous instabilities in tokamak. During the disruption, most of the plasma thermal energy is lost, which causes damages to the plasma facing components. Infrared (IR) camera is an effective tool to detect the temperature distribution on the first wall, and the energy deposited on the first wall can be calculated from the surface temperature profile measured by the IR camera. This paper concentrates on the characteristics of heat flux distribution onto the first wall under different disruptions, including the minor disruption and the vertical displacement events (VDE) disruption. Several minor disruptions have been observed before the major disruption under the high plasma density in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. During the minor disruption, the heat fluxes are mainly deposited on the upper/lower divertors. The magnetic configuration prior to the minor disruption is a lower single null with the radial distance between the two separatrices in the outer midplane dRsep = -2 cm, while it changes to upper single null (dRsep = 1.4 cm) during the minor disruption. As for the VDE disruption, the spatial distribution of heat flux exhibits strong toroidal and radial nonuniformity, and the maximum heat flux received on the dome plate can be up to 11 MW/m2.

  13. Phenomenology of high density disruptions in the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.M.; Bell, M.G.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of high density disruptions on TFTR, including a comparison of minor and major disruptions at high density, provide important new information regarding the nature of the disruption mechanism. Further, for the first time, an (m,n)=(1,1) 'cold bubble' precursor to high density disruptions has been experimentally observed in the electron temperature profile. The precursor to major disruptions resembles the 'vacuum bubble' model of disruptions first proposed by B.B. Kadomtsev and O.P. Pogutse (Sov. Phys. - JETP 38 (1974) 283). (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 25 refs, 3 figs

  14. Runaway electrons in disruptions and perturbed magnetic topologies of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear fusion represents a valuable perspective for a safe and reliable energy supply from the middle of the 21st century on. Currently, the tokamak is the most advanced principle of confining a man-made fusion plasma. The operation of future, reactor sized tokamaks like ITER faces a crucial difficulty in the generation of runaway electrons. The runaway of electrons is a free fall acceleration into the relativistic regime which is known in various kinds of plasmas including astrophysical ones, thunderbolts and fusion plasmas. The tokamak disruption instability can include the conversion of a substantial part of the plasma current into a runaway electron current. When the high energetic runaways are lost, they can strike the plasma facing components at localised spots. Due to their high energies up to a few tens of MeV, the runaways carry the potential to reduce the lifetimes of wall components and even to destroy sensitive, i.e. actively cooled parts. The research for effective ways to suppress the generation of runaway electrons is hampered by the lack of a complete understanding of the physics of the runaways in disruptions. As it is practically impossible to use standard electron detectors in the challenging environment of a tokamak, the experimental knowledge about runaways is limited and it relies on rather indirect techniques of measurement. The main diagnostics used for this PhD work are three reciprocating probes which measure the runaway electrons directly at the plasma edge of the tokamak TEXTOR. A calorimetric probe and a material probe which exploits the signature that a runaway beam impact leaves in the probe were developed in the course of the PhD work. Novel observations of the burst-like runaway electron losses in tokamak disruptions are reported. The runaway bursts are temporally resolved and first-time measurements of the corresponding runaway energy spectra are presented. A characteristic shape and typical burst to burst variations of the

  15. Characteristics of current quenches during disruptions in the J-TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Chen, Z Y; Fang, D; Jin, W; Huang, Y H; Wang, Z J; Yang, Z J; Chen, Z P; Ding, Y H; Zhang, M; Zhuang, G

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of tokamak current quenches are an important issue for the determination of electro-magnetic forces that act on the in-vessel components and vacuum vessel during major disruptions. The characteristics of current quenches in spontaneous disruptions in the J-TEXT tokamak have been investigated. It is shown that the waveforms for the fastest current quenches are more accurately fitted by linear current decays than exponential, although neither is a good fit in many slower cases. The minimum current quench time is about 2.4 ms for the J-TEXT tokamak. The maximum instantaneous current quench rate is more than seven times the average current quench rate in J-TEXT. (paper)

  16. Thermal loads on tokamak plasma-facing components during normal operation and disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    Power loadings experienced by tokamak plasma-facing components during normal operation and during off-normal events are discussed. A model for power and particle flow in the tokamak boundary layer is presented and model predictions are compared to infrared measurements of component heating. The inclusion of the full three-dimensional geometry of the components and of the magnetic flux surface is very important in the modeling. Experimental measurements show that misalignment of component armour tile surfaces by only a millimeter can lead to significant localized heating. An application to the design of plasma-facing components for future machines is presented. Finally, thermal loads expected during tokamak disruptions are discussed. The primary problems are surface melting and vaporization due to localized intense heating during the disruption thermal quench and volumetric heating of the component armour and structure due to localised impact of runaway electrons. (author)

  17. Prediction of density limit disruptions on the J-TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S Y; Chen, Z Y; Huang, D W; Tong, R H; Yan, W; Wei, Y N; Ma, T K; Zhang, M; Zhuang, G

    2016-01-01

    Disruption mitigation is essential for the next generation of tokamaks. The prediction of plasma disruption is the key to disruption mitigation. A neural network combining eight input signals has been developed to predict the density limit disruptions on the J-TEXT tokamak. An optimized training method has been proposed which has improved the prediction performance. The network obtained has been tested on 64 disruption shots and 205 non-disruption shots. A successful alarm rate of 82.8% with a false alarm rate of 12.3% can be achieved at 4.8 ms prior to the current spike of the disruption. It indicates that more physical parameters than the current physical scaling should be considered for predicting the density limit. It was also found that the critical density for disruption can be predicted several tens of milliseconds in advance in most cases. Furthermore, if the network is used for real-time density feedback control, more than 95% of the density limit disruptions can be avoided by setting a proper threshold. (paper)

  18. Long-time impurity confinement as a precursor to disruptions in ohmically heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isler, R.C.; Rowan, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    It has been observed in several tokamaks that the confinement of test impurities increases dramatically when operating near density limits. The characteristics of the working gas transport coefficients also change character under these conditions. These changes appear to be caused by a suppression of the anomalous transport mechanisms. This series of vugraphs investigates the role of these changes in initiating disruptions

  19. Acceleration mechanism of vertical displacement event and its amelioration in tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yukiharu; Yoshino, Ryuji; Pomphrey, N.; Jardin, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    Vertical displacement events (VDEs), which are frequently observed in disruptive discharges of elongated tokamaks, are investigated using the Tokamak Simulation Code. We show that disruption events such as a sudden plasma pressure drop (β p collapse) and the subsequent plasma current quench (I p quench) can accelerate VDEs due to the adverse destabilizing effect of the resistive shell, which has previously been thought to stabilize VDEs. In a tokamak with a surrounding shell which is asymmetric with respect to the geometric midplane, the I p quench also causes an additional VDE acceleration due to the vertical imbalance of the attractive force. While the shell-geometry characterizes the VDE dynamics, the growth rate of VDEs depends strongly on the magnitude of the β p collapse, the speed of the I p quench and the n-index of the plasma equilibrium just before the disruption. An amelioration of I p quench-induced VDEs was experimentally established in the JT-60U tokamak by optimizing the vertical location of the plasma just prior to the disruption. The JT-60U vacuum vessel is shown to be suitable for preventing the β p collapse-induced VDE. (author)

  20. Parametric analysis of the thermal effects on the divertor in tokamaks during plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, M.L.

    1988-04-01

    Plasma disruptions are an ever present danger to the plasma-facing components in today's tokamak fusion reactors. This threat results from our lack of understanding and limited ability to control this complex phenomenon. In particular, severe energy deposition occurs on the divertor component of the double-null configured tokamak reactor during such disruptions. A hybrid computational model developed to estimate and graphically illustrate global thermal effects of disruptions on the divertor plates is described in detail. The quasi-two-dimensional computer code, TADDPAK (Thermal Analysis Divertor during Disruptions PAcKage), is used to conduct parametric analysis for the TIBER II Tokamak Engineering Test Reactor Design. The dependence of these thermal effects on divertor material choice, disruption pulse length, disruption pulse shape, and the characteristic thickness of the plasma scrape-off layer is investigated for this reactor design. Results and conclusions from this analysis are presented. Improvements to this model and issues that require further investigation are discussed. Cursory analysis for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is also presented in the appendix. 75 refs., 49 figs., 10 tabs

  1. Stabilization of tearing modes to suppress major disruptions in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.A.; Carreras, B.; Hicks, H.R.; Lynch, S.J.; Waddell, B.V.

    1979-02-01

    It is shown, for q-profiles which lead to a disruption, that the control of the amplitude of the 2/1 tearing mode avoids the disruption. Q-profiles measured in T-4 and PLT before a major disruption were studied. Two methods of controlling the 2/1 mode amplitude have been considered: (1) Feedback stabilization with the feedback signal locked in phase with the 2/1 mode. (2) Heating slightly outside the q = 2 surface. In both cases it is only necessary to decrease the 2/1 mode amplitude to suppress the disruption. It is not always necessary to stabilize the unstable modes fully

  2. Sensitivity of transient synchrotron radiation to tokamak plasma parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, N.J.; Kritz, A.H.

    1988-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from a hot plasma can inform on certain plasma parameters. The dependence on plasma parameters is particularly sensitive for the transient radiation response to a brief, deliberate, perturbation of hot plasma electrons. We investigate how such a radiation response can be used to diagnose a variety of plasma parameters in a tokamak. 18 refs., 13 figs

  3. Control, pressure perturbations, displacements, and disruptions in highly elongated tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.; Hofmann, F.; Tonetti, G.; Jardin, S.C.; Noll, P.

    1989-06-01

    The control and evolution of highly elongated tokamak plasmas with large growth rates are simulated with the axisymmetric, resistive MHD code TSC in the geometry of the TCV tokamak. Pressure perturbations such as sawteeth and externally programmed displacements create initial velocity perturbations which may be stabilized by low power, rapid response coils inside the passively stabilizing vacuum vessel, together with slower shaping coils outside the vessel. Vertical disruption induced voltages and forces on the rapid coils and vessel are investigated, and a model is proposed for an additional vertical force due to poloidal currents. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 26 refs

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of density-limit disruptions in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleva, R.G.; Drake, J.F.; Denton, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic simulations are presented which demonstrate that density limit disruptions can be triggered by edge radiation which destabilizes a q = 1 kink followed by a q = 2 tearing mode. A bubble of cold plasma is injected from the edge into the center by the q = 1 kink. The q = 2 mode then broadens the current profile and throws the hot plasma to the wall. The MHD simulations presented are the first to successfully reproduce several key features of density limit disruptions including (1) the rapid drop in the central temperature, (2) the rapid expansion of the current profile, (3) the m = 1 cold bubble which is seen to be injected from the edge into the center during density limit disruptions on JET, and (4) disruptions in sawtoothing discharges. (author)

  5. Hybrid neural network for density limit disruption prediction and avoidance on J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W.; Hu, F. R.; Zhang, M.; Chen, Z. Y.; Zhao, X. Q.; Wang, X. L.; Shi, P.; Zhang, X. L.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhou, Y. N.; Wei, Y. N.; Pan, Y.; J-TEXT team

    2018-05-01

    Increasing the plasma density is one of the key methods in achieving an efficient fusion reaction. High-density operation is one of the hot topics in tokamak plasmas. Density limit disruptions remain an important issue for safe operation. An effective density limit disruption prediction and avoidance system is the key to avoid density limit disruptions for long pulse steady state operations. An artificial neural network has been developed for the prediction of density limit disruptions on the J-TEXT tokamak. The neural network has been improved from a simple multi-layer design to a hybrid two-stage structure. The first stage is a custom network which uses time series diagnostics as inputs to predict plasma density, and the second stage is a three-layer feedforward neural network to predict the probability of density limit disruptions. It is found that hybrid neural network structure, combined with radiation profile information as an input can significantly improve the prediction performance, especially the average warning time ({{T}warn} ). In particular, the {{T}warn} is eight times better than that in previous work (Wang et al 2016 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 58 055014) (from 5 ms to 40 ms). The success rate for density limit disruptive shots is above 90%, while, the false alarm rate for other shots is below 10%. Based on the density limit disruption prediction system and the real-time density feedback control system, the on-line density limit disruption avoidance system has been implemented on the J-TEXT tokamak.

  6. Disruption mitigation studies on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, A.J., E-mail: at546@york.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of York, Helsington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gibson, K.J. [Department of Physics, University of York, Helsington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Harrison, J.R. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of York, Helsington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Kirk, A. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lisgo, S.W. [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, St. Paul-lez-Durance, Cedex (France); Lehnen, M. [Institute for Energy Research - Plasma Physics, FZJ, Association EURATOM/FZJ, D-52425 Julich (Germany); Martin, R.; Naylor, G.; Scannell, R.; Cullen, A. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-01

    Disruptions pose a significant challenge in future devices where the increased stored energy can lead to unacceptably large transient heat loads on plasma facing components (PFCs). One means of mitigating disruptions is that of massive gas injection (MGI), which produces a radiative collapse of the plasma discharge through the injection of impurity gases. The MAST disruption mitigation system is capable of injecting up to 1.95 bar litres into the MAST vacuum vessel over a timescale of 1-2 ms, corresponding to a particle inventory of 5 x 10{sup 22}, around 100 times the plasma particle inventory. High speed infrared thermography, offering full divertor coverage, has shown a 60-70% reduction in divertor power loads during mitigation. A combination of high temporal (0.2 ms) and spatial resolution (1 cm) Thomson scattering and soft X-ray camera array data show evidence for a cooling front associated with the inward propagation of the injected impurities.

  7. Kinetic and collision process effects on magnetic structures in pre-disruption phase of tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farshi, Esmaeil [Kyushu Univ., Advanced Energy Engineering Sciences, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Goudarzi, Shervin [AEOI, Plasma Physics Department, Tehran (Iran); Amrollahi, Reza [K-N Toosi Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran); Sato, Kohnosuke [Kyushu Univ., Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Oscillations of the parallel and perpendicular neutral fluxes that are observed during pre-disruption stage in recent experiments, show possibility of a structure in pre-disruption phase of tokamak plasmas. This structure oscillates simultaneously with the m=2 mode until the damping of this mode. The perpendicular component of this structure is greater than the parallel one. From other side, there are a good correlation between MHD activity and behavior of charge exchange neutrals, and an enough good correlation between time behavior of charge exchange flux with high energy and OV line radiation in pre-disruption phase. These may witness possibility of a mechanism of losses-excitation of inner transition with help of heavy particles in pre-disruption phase. This mechanism plays an important role in magnetic structures in pre-disruption phase. (author)

  8. Kinetic and collision process effects on magnetic structures in pre-disruption phase of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farshi, Esmaeil; Goudarzi, Shervin; Amrollahi, Reza; Sato, Kohnosuke

    2001-01-01

    Oscillations of the parallel and perpendicular neutral fluxes that are observed during pre-disruption stage in recent experiments, show possibility of a structure in pre-disruption phase of tokamak plasmas. This structure oscillates simultaneously with the m=2 mode until the damping of this mode. The perpendicular component of this structure is greater than the parallel one. From other side, there are a good correlation between MHD activity and behavior of charge exchange neutrals, and an enough good correlation between time behavior of charge exchange flux with high energy and OV line radiation in pre-disruption phase. These may witness possibility of a mechanism of losses-excitation of inner transition with help of heavy particles in pre-disruption phase. This mechanism plays an important role in magnetic structures in pre-disruption phase. (author)

  9. Wave form of current quench during disruptions in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Masayoshi; Gribov, Yuri; Shimada, Michiya; Lukash, Victor; Kawano, Yasunori; Yoshino, Ryuji; Miki, Nobuharu; Ohmori, Junji; Khayrutdinov, Rustam

    2003-01-01

    The time dependence of the current decay during the current quench phase of disruptions, which can significantly influence the electro-magnetic force on the in-vessel components due to the induced eddy currents, is investigated using data obtained in JT-60U experiments in order to derive a relevant physics guideline for the predictive simulations of disruptions in ITER. It is shown that an exponential decay can fit the time dependence of current quench for discharges with large quench rate (fast current quench). On the other hand, for discharges with smaller quench rate (slow current quench), a linear decay can fit the time dependence of current quench better than exponential. (author)

  10. VDE characteristics during disruption process and its underlying acceleration mechanism in the ITER-EDA tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yukiharu; Nishio, Satoshi; Yoshino, Ryuji; Kessel, C.E.; Jardin, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of vertical displacement events (VDEs) during a disruption and acceleration mechanisms that govern VDEs in the ITER-EDA tokamak are investigated using the Tokamak Simulation Code. A sudden plasma pressure drop (β p collapse) does not accelerate VDEs for the ITER tokamak. The geometry of the ITER resistive shell is shown to be suitable for preventing a β p collapse-induced VDE, because the magnetic field decay n-index after the β p collapse does not considerably degrade. On the other hand, it is shown that the plasma current quench (I p quench) following the energy quench can accelerate VDEs due to the vertical imbalance of the attractive force arising from the up-down asymmetric shell. The vertical location of the neutral point where the I p quench-induced VDE almost disappears is found to lie at ∼22 cm below the plasma magnetic axis of the nominal equilibrium (Z = 1.44 m). An upward and moderate I p quench-induced VDE can be expected for the nominal configuration in the ITER-EDA tokamak. It is shown that the ITER tokamak has an advantage of avoiding the fatal damage of the complicated structures of the bottom-divertor. (author)

  11. 3D MHD simulations of pellet injection and disruptions in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear MHD simulation results of pellet injection show that MHD forces can accelerate large pellets, injected on the high field side of a tokamak, to the plasma center. Magnetic reconnection can produce a reverse shear q profile. Ballooning instability caused by pellets is also reduced by high field side injection. Studies are also reported of the current quench phase of disruptions, which can cause 3D halo currents and runaway electrons. (author)

  12. 3D MHD simulations of pellet injection and disruptions in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nonlinear MHD simulation results of pellet injection show that MHD forces can accelerate large pellets, injected on the high field side of a tokamak, to the plasma center. Magnetic reconnection can produce a reverse shear q profile. Ballooning instability caused by pellets is also reduced by high field side injection. Studies are also reported of the current quench phase of disruptions, which can cause 3D halo currents and runaway electrons. (author)

  13. Successor oscillations of internal disruptive instabilities in the PLT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.; von Goeler, S.; Eames, D.R.; Stodiek, W.

    1979-06-01

    The experimentally observed persistence of the m = 1 mode following an internal disruption is described. The hot central region appears to spiral outward, being pared by interception with the radius of q = 1 (as deduced from the radial extend of the m = 1 mode). The outward motion of the axis can be arrested and the surviving helical filament can subsequently spiral inward, rather than being annihilated as expected from nonlinear resistive internal kink mode simulations

  14. The Theory of the Kink Mode during the Vertical Plasma Disruption Events in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper explains the locked m/n = 1/1 kink mode during the vertical disruption event when the plasma has an electrical contact with the plasma facing conducting surfaces. It is shown that the kink perturbation can be in equilibrium state even with a stable safety factor q > 1, if the halo currents, excited by the kink mode, can flow through the conducting structure. This suggests a new explanation of the so-called sideway forces on the tokamak in-vessel components during the disruption event.

  15. Observation of disruptions in tokamak plasma under the influence of resonant helical magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, M.; Vannucci, A.; Caldas, I.

    1996-01-01

    Disruptive instabilities were investigated in the small tokamak TBR-1 during the application of resonant helical magnetic fields created by external helical windings. Indications were found that the main triggering mechanism of the disruptions was the rapid increase of the m=2/n=1 mode which, apparently after reaching a certain amplitude, interacts with other resistive modes: the internal 1/1 mode in the case of minor disruptions. After the coupling, the growth of the associated islands would create a chaotic field line distribution in the region between the corresponding rational magnetic surfaces which caused the gross particle transport and, finally, destroyed the confinement. In addition, investigations on higher Z eff discharges in which a mixture of helium and hydrogen was used resulted in much more unstable plasmas but apparently did not alter basic characteristics of the disruptions

  16. Disruptive instabilities in the discharges of the TBR-1 small Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannucci, A.; Nascimento, I.C.; Caldas, I.L.

    1989-01-01

    Minor and major disruptions as well as sawteeth oscillations (internal disruptions) were identified in the small Tokamak TBR-1, and their main characteristics were investigated. The coupling of a growing m=2 resistive mode with an m=1 perturbation seems to be the basic process for the development of a major disruption, while the minor disruption could be associated with the growth of a stochastic region of the plasma between the q=2 and q=3 islands. Measured sawteeth periods were compared with those predicted by scaling laws and good agreement was found. The time necessary for the sawteeth crashes also agrees with the values expected from KADOMTSEV's model. However, there are some sawteeth oscillations, corresponding to conditions of higher plasma Z eff , which showed longer crashes and could not be explained by this model. (author)

  17. Disruption avoidance in the SINP-Tokamak by means of electrode-biasing at the plasma edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Debjyoti [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064, WB (India); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares-UNAM, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Pal, Rabindranath [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064, WB (India); Martinell, Julio J. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares-UNAM, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Ghosh, Joydeep; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2013-05-15

    Control of plasma disruption by a biased edge electrode is reported in SINP-Tokamak. The features that characterize a plasma disruption are reduced with increasing bias potential. The disruption can be completely suppressed with the concomitant stabilization of observed MHD modes that are allegedly precursors of the disruption. An m = 3/n = 1 tearing mode, which apparently causes disruption can be stabilized when a negative biasing potential is applied near the edge. These changes in the disruptive behavior with edge biasing are hypothesized to be due to changes in the current density profile.

  18. Disruption avoidance in the SINP-Tokamak by means of electrode-biasing at the plasma edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Debjyoti; Pal, Rabindranath; Martinell, Julio J.; Ghosh, Joydeep; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K.

    2013-01-01

    Control of plasma disruption by a biased edge electrode is reported in SINP-Tokamak. The features that characterize a plasma disruption are reduced with increasing bias potential. The disruption can be completely suppressed with the concomitant stabilization of observed MHD modes that are allegedly precursors of the disruption. An m = 3/n = 1 tearing mode, which apparently causes disruption can be stabilized when a negative biasing potential is applied near the edge. These changes in the disruptive behavior with edge biasing are hypothesized to be due to changes in the current density profile

  19. Neural Network Prediction of Disruptions Caused by Locked Modes on J-TEXT Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yonghua; Jin Xuesong; Chen Zhenzhen; Zhuang Ge

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of disruptions caused by locked modes using the Back-Propagation (BP) neural network is completed on J-TEXT tokamak. The network, which is based on the BP neural network, uses Mirnov coils and locked mode coils signals as input data, and outputs a signal including information of prediction of locked mode. The rate of successful prediction of locked modes is more than 90%. For intrinsic locked mode disruptions, the network can give a prewarning signal about 1 ms ahead of the locking-time. For the disruption caused by resonant magnetic perturbation (RMPs) locked modes, the network can give a prewarning signal about 10 ms ahead of the locking-time

  20. Axisymmetric disruption dynamics including current profile changes in the ASDEX-Upgrade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Pautasso, G.; Gruber, O.; Jardin, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Axisymmetric MHD simulations have revealed a new driving mechanism that governs the vertical displacement event (VDE) dynamics in tokamak disruptions. A rapid flattening of the plasma current profile during the disruption plays a substantial role in dragging a single null-diverted plasma vertically towards the divertor. As a consequence, the occurrence of downward-going VDEs predominates over the upward-going ones in bottom-diverted discharges. This dragging effect, due to an abrupt change in the current profile, is absent in up-down symmetric limiter discharges. These simulation results are consistent with experiments in ASDEX-Upgrade. Together with the attractive force that arises from passive shell currents induced by the plasma current quench, the dragging effect explains many details of the VDE dynamics over the whole period of the disruptive termination. (author)

  1. Electromagnetic loads and structural response of the CIT [Compact Ignition Tokamak] vacuum vessel to plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, S.L.; Listvinsky, G.; Lee, M.Y.; Bailey, C.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of the electromagnetic loads produced by a variety of plasma disruptions, and the resulting structural effects on the compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) vacuum vessel (VV), have been performed to help optimize the VV design. A series of stationary and moving plasmas, with disruption rates from 0.7--10.0 MA/ms, have been analyzed using the EMPRES code to compute eddy currents and electromagnetic pressures, and the NASTRAN code to evaluate the structural response of the vacuum vessel. Key factors contributing to the magnitude of EM forces and resulting stresses on the vessel have been found to include disruption rate, and direction and synchronization of plasma motion with the onset of plasma current decay. As a result of these analyses, a number of design changes have been made, and design margins for the present 1.75 meter design have been improved over the original CIT configuration. 1 ref., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Computation of electromagnetic effects in a tokamak due to a plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    To model the consequences of a plasma disruption in a tokamak one must combine a code that computes the detailed MHD behavior of the plasma with one that treats the three-dimensional features of the conducting toroidal components around the plasma. The NET (Next European Torus) Team have undertaken a treatment of electromagnetic effects from plasma disruptions using both open loop and closed loop integration of codes. In America, workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory have looked at plasma disruption effects on the ITER blanket using the codes TSC and EDDYNET. Results show how the forces on a blanket segment depend on the number and size of the segments and on the gap between them. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, John.

    1996-01-01

    This book is the first compiled collection about tokamak. At first chapter tokamak is represented from fusion point of view and also the necessary conditions for producing power. The following chapters are represent plasma physics, the specifications of tokamak, plasma heating procedures and problems related to it, equilibrium, confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability, instabilities, plasma material interaction, plasma measurement and experiments regarding to tokamak; an addendum is also given at the end of the book

  4. Mitigation and prediction of disruption on the HL-2A Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong-Zhen, Zheng; Ying, Qiu; Peng, Zhang; Yuan, Huang; Zheng-Ying, Cui; Ping, Sun; Qing-Wei, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Injection of high-Z impurities into plasma has been proved to be able to reduce the localized thermal load and mechanical forces on the in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel, caused by disruptions in Tokamaks. An advanced prediction and mitigation system of disruption is implemented in HL-2A to safely shut down plasmas by using the laser ablation of high-Z impurities with a perturbation real-time measuring and processing system. The injection is usually triggered by the amplitude and frequency of the MHD perturbation field which is detected with a Mirnov coil and leads to the onset of a mitigated disruption within a few milliseconds. It could be a simple and potential approach to significantly reducing the plasma thermal energy and magnetic energy before a disruption, thereby achieving safe plasma termination. The plasma response to impurity injection, a mechanism for improving plasma thermal and current quench in major disruptions, the design of the disruption prediction warner, and an evaluation of the mitigation success rate are discussed in the present paper. (fluids, plasmas and electric discharges)

  5. Viewgraphs presented at the ASDEX/DOE workshop on disruptions in divertor tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granetz, R.; Gruber, O.; Zohm, H. [and others

    1994-09-01

    The emphasis of this year`s ASDEX/DOE workshop was on disruptions in diverted tokamaks. The meeting was held here at MIT on 14--15 March. It is particularly appropriate that MIT hosted the workshop this year, since Alcator C-Mod had just recently completed its very first run campaign, and disruptions are one of the key areas of research in our program. There were a total of 14 speakers, with participants from IPP (Garching), CRPP (Lausanne), Culham, General Atomics, PPPL, Sandia, ORNL, the ITER JCT, and MIT. The subjects addressed included statistical analysis of disruption probabilities in ASDEX, modelling of the vertical axisymmetric plasma motion in DIII-D, impact of disruptions on the design of the ITER divertors, modelling of runaway electrons, and TSC calculations of disruption-induced currents and forces in TPX, etc. One item of particular interest to us was the experimental correlation of halo current magnitude with plasma current on ASDEX-Upgrade. The data indicates at least a linear, and possibly even a quadractic dependence. This has important implications for Alcator C-Mod, since it would predict halo currents of order 1 MA or more at full performance. At the conclusion of the talks, an informal discussion of disruption databases was held, primarily for the purpose of helping us develop a useful one for C-Mod.

  6. Viewgraphs presented at the ASDEX/DOE workshop on disruptions in divertor tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granetz, R.; Gruber, O.; Zohm, H.

    1994-01-01

    The emphasis of this year's ASDEX/DOE workshop was on disruptions in diverted tokamaks. The meeting was held here at MIT on 14--15 March. It is particularly appropriate that MIT hosted the workshop this year, since Alcator C-Mod had just recently completed its very first run campaign, and disruptions are one of the key areas of research in our program. There were a total of 14 speakers, with participants from IPP (Garching), CRPP (Lausanne), Culham, General Atomics, PPPL, Sandia, ORNL, the ITER JCT, and MIT. The subjects addressed included statistical analysis of disruption probabilities in ASDEX, modelling of the vertical axisymmetric plasma motion in DIII-D, impact of disruptions on the design of the ITER divertors, modelling of runaway electrons, and TSC calculations of disruption-induced currents and forces in TPX, etc. One item of particular interest to us was the experimental correlation of halo current magnitude with plasma current on ASDEX-Upgrade. The data indicates at least a linear, and possibly even a quadractic dependence. This has important implications for Alcator C-Mod, since it would predict halo currents of order 1 MA or more at full performance. At the conclusion of the talks, an informal discussion of disruption databases was held, primarily for the purpose of helping us develop a useful one for C-Mod

  7. The scrape-off layer of a tokamak during the thermal phase of disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konkashbaev, I.K.

    1993-01-01

    The physical processes taking place in the scrape-off layer of a tokamak with a poloidal diverter during disruption are considered. It is shown that the physical processes in the scrape-off layer during disruption differ qualitatively from those in steady state. The main difference is that the plasma parameters in the scrape-off layer changes so as to facilitate transport along the field lines to the diverter plates, increasing the energy flux through the separatrix to disruption by a factor of 10 4 . It is found that for this the plasma in the scrape-off layer must already be hot and collisionless. During the transit time hot ions from the tokamak reach the diverter plates with essentially no energy loss. Because the electron velocity is large, an oppositely directed flux the wall plasma can be treated as infinite, i.e., electron recycling occurs. The energy lost to the scrape-off layer by anomalous thermal conductivity (diffusion) is transferred through turbulence to this cold electron stream by means of the two-stream instability. The mean electron energy ≅ 1 keV is substantially greater than that is steady state, T e ≅ 50 eV. Thus, an ion flux with E i ≅ 10 keV and a collisionless gas with T e ≅ 1 keV interact with the diverter plates. 3 refs., 4 figs

  8. Planned upgrade to the coaxial plasma source facility for high heat flux plasma flows relevant to tokamak disruption simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caress, R.W.; Mayo, R.M.; Carter, T.A.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma disruptions in tokamaks remain serious obstacles to the demonstration of economical fusion power. In disruption simulation experiments, some important effects have not been taken into account. Present disruption simulation experimental data do not include effects of the high magnetic fields expected near the PFCs in a tokamak major disruption. In addition, temporal and spatial scales are much too short in present simulation devices to be of direct relevance to tokamak disruptions. To address some of these inadequacies, an experimental program is planned at North Carolina State University employing an upgrade to the Coaxial Plasma Source (CPS-1) magnetized coaxial plasma gun facility. The advantages of the CPS-1 plasma source over present disruption simulation devices include the ability to irradiate large material samples at extremely high areal energy densities, and the ability to perform these material studies in the presence of a high magnetic field. Other tokamak disruption relevant features of CPS-1U include a high ion temperature, high electron temperature, and long pulse length

  9. Adaptive high learning rate probabilistic disruption predictors from scratch for the next generation of tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, J.; Moreno, R.; Pereira, A.; Acero, A.; Murari, A.; Dormido-Canto, S.

    2014-01-01

    The development of accurate real-time disruption predictors is a pre-requisite to any mitigation action. Present theoretical models of disruptions do not reliably cope with the disruption issues. This article deals with data-driven predictors and a review of existing machine learning techniques, from both physics and engineering points of view, is provided. All these methods need large training datasets to develop successful predictors. However, ITER or DEMO cannot wait for hundreds of disruptions to have a reliable predictor. So far, the attempts to extrapolate predictors between different tokamaks have not shown satisfactory results. In addition, it is not clear how valid this approach can be between present devices and ITER/DEMO, due to the differences in their respective scales and possibly underlying physics. Therefore, this article analyses the requirements to create adaptive predictors from scratch to learn from the data of an individual machine from the beginning of operation. A particular algorithm based on probabilistic classifiers has been developed and it has been applied to the database of the three first ITER-like wall campaigns of JET (1036 non-disruptive and 201 disruptive discharges). The predictions start from the first disruption and only 12 re-trainings have been necessary as a consequence of missing 12 disruptions only. Almost 10 000 different predictors have been developed (they differ in their features) and after the chronological analysis of the 1237 discharges, the predictors recognize 94% of all disruptions with an average warning time (AWT) of 654 ms. This percentage corresponds to the sum of tardy detections (11%), valid alarms (76%) and premature alarms (7%). The false alarm rate is 4%. If only valid alarms are considered, the AWT is 244 ms and the standard deviation is 205 ms. The average probability interval about the reliability and accuracy of all the individual predictions is 0.811 ± 0.189. (paper)

  10. Adaptive high learning rate probabilistic disruption predictors from scratch for the next generation of tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, J.; Murari, A.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Moreno, R.; Pereira, A.; Acero, A.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2014-12-01

    The development of accurate real-time disruption predictors is a pre-requisite to any mitigation action. Present theoretical models of disruptions do not reliably cope with the disruption issues. This article deals with data-driven predictors and a review of existing machine learning techniques, from both physics and engineering points of view, is provided. All these methods need large training datasets to develop successful predictors. However, ITER or DEMO cannot wait for hundreds of disruptions to have a reliable predictor. So far, the attempts to extrapolate predictors between different tokamaks have not shown satisfactory results. In addition, it is not clear how valid this approach can be between present devices and ITER/DEMO, due to the differences in their respective scales and possibly underlying physics. Therefore, this article analyses the requirements to create adaptive predictors from scratch to learn from the data of an individual machine from the beginning of operation. A particular algorithm based on probabilistic classifiers has been developed and it has been applied to the database of the three first ITER-like wall campaigns of JET (1036 non-disruptive and 201 disruptive discharges). The predictions start from the first disruption and only 12 re-trainings have been necessary as a consequence of missing 12 disruptions only. Almost 10 000 different predictors have been developed (they differ in their features) and after the chronological analysis of the 1237 discharges, the predictors recognize 94% of all disruptions with an average warning time (AWT) of 654 ms. This percentage corresponds to the sum of tardy detections (11%), valid alarms (76%) and premature alarms (7%). The false alarm rate is 4%. If only valid alarms are considered, the AWT is 244 ms and the standard deviation is 205 ms. The average probability interval about the reliability and accuracy of all the individual predictions is 0.811 ± 0.189.

  11. Prevention of the current-quench phase of a major disruption in a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The 2-D Tokamak Simulation Code written by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was joined to a 3-D eddy-current code, which models periodic torus sectors. The combined system was found to be an efficient and accurate method for modeling the plasma/eddy current interaction during a major disruption. For modeling large highly compartmentalized structures, artificially increasing the self-inductance and limiting the mutual inductance of current elements were necessary to enhance numerical stability. Even with these modifications, a slowly growing instability made the results unreliable after 58 ms. This model was used to demonstrate prevention of the current quench phase of a major disruption in INTOR. The average plasma temperature was reduced to 150 eV over 3 ms. The (outboard) breeding blanket structure was constructed of CuBeNi and was electrically connected between torus sectors. Disruption recovery coils were provided inboard of the inboard shield (linking the toroidal field coils). It was necessary to supply to these coils a total of 500 MW for 0.6 s and to reheat the plasma to full beta in 6 s. The calculation shows a method of recovery from the most severe disruption probable. Determining the severity of the disruption from which recovery would be cost effective is beyond the scope of this study

  12. DSTAR: A comprehensive tokamak resistive disruption model for vacuum vessel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, B.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    A computer code, DSTAR, has recently been developed to quantify the surface erosion and induced forces than can occur during major tokamak plasma disruptions. A disruption analysis has been performed for the TFCX fusion device. The limiters and inboard first wall were assumed to be clad with beryllium. Disruption simulations were performed with and without these structures present, to determine their electromagnetic influence. The results with structure show that the ablated wall material is transported poloidally, as well as radially, in the plasma causing the outermost regions of the plasma to cool. The plasma moves downward and deforms while maintaining contact with the lower limiter. This motion maintains the peak impurity radiant source directly above the exposed surface. For the disruption simulation without the vacuum vessel included, the plasma moves radially along the lower limiter until it contacts the inboard wall, causing ablation of this surface as well. The conclusion is drawn that disruption simulations that do not include both the thermal and electromagnetic response of the vaccum vessel will not result in an accurate prediction. (orig.)

  13. Behavior of hard X-ray emission in discharges with current disruptions in the DAMAVAND and TVD tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farshi, E.; Amrollahy, R.; Bortnikov, A.V.; Brevnov, N.N.; Gott, Yu.V.; Shurygin, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented from studies of the behavior of hard X-ray emission in discharges with current disruptions in the DAMAVAND and TVD tokamaks. The current disruptions are caused by either an MHD instability or the instability related to the vertical displacement of the plasma column. Experiments were conducted at a fixed value of the safety factor at the plasma boundary (q a ≅ 2.3). Experimental data show that, during a disruption caused by an MHD instability, hard X-ray emission is suppressed by this instability if the amplitude of the magnetic field fluctuations exceeds a certain level. If the disruption is caused by the instability related to the vertical displacement of the plasma column, then hard X-ray emission is observed at the instant of disruption. The experimental results show that the physical processes resulting in the generation and suppression of runaway electron beams are almost identical in large and small tokamaks

  14. Scientific basis and engineering design to accommodate disruption and halo current loads for the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, P.M.; Bozek, A.S.; Hollerbach, M.A.; Humphreys, D.A.; Luxon, J.L.; Reis, E.E.; Schaffer, M.J.

    1996-10-01

    Plasma disruptions and halo current events apply sudden impulsive forces to the interior structures and vacuum vessel walls of tokamaks. These forces arise when induced toroidal currents and attached poloidal halo currents in plasma facing components interact with the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields respectively. Increasing understanding of plasma disruptions and halo current events has been developed from experiments on DIII-D and other machines. Although the understanding has improved, these events must be planned for in system design because there is no assurance that these events can be eliminated in the operation of tokamaks. Increased understanding has allowed an improved focus of engineering designs.

  15. Scientific basis and engineering design to accommodate disruption and halo current loads for the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.M.; Bozek, A.S.; Hollerbach, M.A.; Humphreys, D.A.; Luxon, J.L.; Reis, E.E.; Schaffer, M.J.

    1996-10-01

    Plasma disruptions and halo current events apply sudden impulsive forces to the interior structures and vacuum vessel walls of tokamaks. These forces arise when induced toroidal currents and attached poloidal halo currents in plasma facing components interact with the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields respectively. Increasing understanding of plasma disruptions and halo current events has been developed from experiments on DIII-D and other machines. Although the understanding has improved, these events must be planned for in system design because there is no assurance that these events can be eliminated in the operation of tokamaks. Increased understanding has allowed an improved focus of engineering designs

  16. Application of neural networks and its prospect. 4. Prediction of major disruptions in tokamak plasmas, analyses of time series data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Ryuji

    2006-01-01

    Disruption prediction of tokamak plasma has been studied by neural network. The disruption prediction performances by neural network are estimated by the prediction success rate, false alarm rate, and time prior to disruption. The current driving type disruption is predicted by time series data, and plasma lifetime, risk of disruption and plasma stability. Some disruptions generated by density limit, impurity mixture, error magnetic field can be predicted 100 % of prediction success rate by the premonitory symptoms. The pressure driving type disruption phenomena generate some hundred micro seconds before, so that the operation limits such as β N limit of DIII-D and density limit of ADITYA were investigated. The false alarm rate was decreased by β N limit training under stable discharge. The pressure driving disruption generated with increasing plasma pressure can be predicted about 90 % by evaluating plasma stability. (S.Y.)

  17. Synchronous oscillation prior to disruption caused by kink modes in HL-2A tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, M.; Hu, D.; Wang, X. G.; Shi, Z. B.; Xu, Y.; Chen, W.; Ding, X. T.; Zhong, W. L.; Dong, Y. B.; Ji, X. Q.; Zhang, Y. P.; Gao, J. M.; Li, J. X.; Yang, Z. C.; Li, Y. G.; Liu, Y.

    2015-08-01

    A class of evident MHD activities prior to major disruption has been observed during recent radiation induced disruptions of the HL-2A tokamak discharges. It can be named SOD, synchronous oscillations prior to disruption, characterized by synchronous oscillation of electron cyclotron emission (ECE), core soft x-ray, Mirnov coil, and {{D}α} radiation signals at the divertor plate. The SOD activity is mostly observed in a parametric regime where the poloidal beta is low enough before disruption, typically corresponding to those radiation-induced disruptions. It has been found that the m/n = 2/1 mode is dominant during the SODs, and consequently it is the drop of the mode frequency and the final mode locking that lead to thermal quench. The mode frequency before the mode locking corresponds to the toroidal rotation frequency of the edge plasma. It is also found that during SODs, the location of the q = 2 surface is moving outward, and most of the plasma current is enclosed within the surface. This demonstrates that the current channel lies inside the rational surface during SOD, and thus the resistive kink mode is unstable. Further analysis of the electron temperature perturbation structure shows that the plasma is indeed dominated by the resistive kink mode, with kink-like perturbation in the core plasma region. It suggests that it is the nonlinear growth of the m/n = 2/1 resistive kink mode and its higher order harmonics, rather than the spontaneous overlapping of multiple neighboring islands, that ultimately triggered the disruption.

  18. Relationship Between Locked Modes and Disruptions in the DIII-D Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Ryan

    This thesis is organized into three body chapters: (1) the first use of naturally rotating tearing modes to diagnose intrinsic error fields is presented with experimental results from the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch, (2) a large scale study of locked modes (LMs) with rotating precursors in the DIII-D tokamak is reported, and (3) an in depth study of LM induced thermal collapses on a few DIII-D discharges is presented. The amplitude of naturally rotating tearing modes (TMs) in EXTRAP T2R is modulated in the presence of a resonant field (given by the superposition of the resonant intrinsic error field, and, possibly, an applied, resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP)). By scanning the amplitude and phase of the RMP and observing the phase-dependent amplitude modulation of the resonant, naturally rotating TM, the corresponding resonant error field is diagnosed. A rotating TM can decelerate and lock in the laboratory frame, under the effect of an electromagnetic torque due to eddy currents induced in the wall. These locked modes often lead to a disruption, where energy and particles are lost from the equilibrium configuration on a timescale of a few to tens of milliseconds in the DIII-D tokamak. In fusion reactors, disruptions pose a problem for the longevity of the reactor. Thus, learning to predict and avoid them is important. A database was developed consisting of ˜ 2000 DIII-D discharges exhibiting TMs that lock. The database was used to study the evolution, the nonlinear effects on equilibria, and the disruptivity of locked and quasi-stationary modes with poloidal and toroidal mode numbers m = 2 and n = 1 at DIII-D. The analysis of 22,500 discharges shows that more than 18% of disruptions present signs of locked or quasi-stationary modes with rotating precursors. A parameter formulated by the plasma internal inductance li divided by the safety factor at 95% of the toroidal flux, q95, is found to exhibit predictive capability over whether a locked mode will

  19. Simulation of runaway electron generation and diffusion during major disruptions in the HL-2A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yanli; Sun, Jizhong; Zhang, Yipo; Sang, Chaofeng; Wu, Na; Wang, Dezhen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The strong and long duration magnetic perturbation (δB/B ∼ 1.0 × 10 −3 ) can restrain the RE generation effectively. • The REs are generated initially in the plasma core during disruptions. • The toroidal electric field does not exhibit a centrally hollow phenomenon. • The toroidal effects have little impact on the generation of RE and the evolution of toroidal electric field. - Abstract: The generation and diffusion of runaway electrons (REs) during major disruptions in the HL-2A tokamak has been studied numerically. The diffusion caused by the magnetic perturbation is especially addressed. The simulation results show that the strong magnetic perturbation (δB/B ∼ 1.0 × 10 −3 ) can cause a significant loss of REs due to the radial diffusion and restrain the RE avalanche effectively. The results also indicate that the REs are generated initially in the plasma core during disruptions, and that the toroidal electric field does not exhibit a centrally hollow phenomenon. In addition, it is found that the toroidal effects have little impact on the generation of RE and the evolution of toroidal electric field

  20. Disruption mitigation with high-pressure helium gas injection on EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. L.; Shen, B.; Granetz, R. S.; Qian, J. P.; Zhuang, H. D.; Zeng, L.; Duan, Y.; Shi, T.; Wang, H.; Sun, Y.; Xiao, B. J.

    2018-03-01

    High pressure noble gas injection is a promising technique to mitigate the effect of disruptions in tokamaks. In this paper, results of mitigation experiments with low-Z massive gas injection (helium) on the EAST tokamak are reported. A fast valve has been developed and successfully implemented on EAST, with valve response time  ⩽150 μs, capable of injecting up to 7 × 1022 particles, corresponding to 300 times the plasma inventory. Different amounts of helium gas were injected into stable plasmas in the preliminary experiments. It is seen that a small amount of helium gas (N_He≃ N_plasma ) can not terminate a discharge, but can trigger MHD activity. Injection of 40 times the plasma inventory impurity (N_He≃ 40× N_plasma ) can effectively radiate away part of the thermal energy and make the electron density increase rapidly. The mitigation result is that the current quench time and vertical displacement can both be reduced significantly, without resulting in significantly higher loop voltage. This also reduces the risk of runaway electron generation. As the amount of injected impurity gas increases, the gas penetration time decreases slowly and asymptotes to (˜7 ms). In addition, the impurity gas jet has also been injected into VDEs, which are more challenging to mitigate that stable plasmas.

  1. A simple ideal magnetohydrodynamical model of vertical disruption events in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    2009-01-01

    A simple model of axisymmetric vertical disruption events (VDEs) in tokamaks is presented in which the halo current force exerted on the vacuum vessel is calculated directly from linear, marginally stable, ideal-magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) stability analysis. The basic premise of the model is that the halo current force modifies pressure balance at the edge of the plasma, and therefore also modifies ideal-MHD plasma stability. In order to prevent the ideal vertical instability, responsible for the VDE, from growing on the very short Alfven time scale, the halo current force must adjust itself such that the instability is rendered marginally stable. The model predicts halo currents which are similar in magnitude to those observed experimentally. An approximate nonaxisymmetric version of the model is developed in order to calculate the toroidal peaking factor for the halo current force.

  2. Current density distribution during disruptions and sawteeth in a simple model of plasma current in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovskii, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    The processes that are likely to accompany discharge disruptions and sawteeth in a tokamak are considered in a simple plasma current model. The redistribution of the current density in plasma is supposed to be primarily governed by the onset of the MHD-instability-driven turbulent plasma mixing in a finite region of the current column. For different disruption conditions, the variation in the total plasma current (the appearance of a characteristic spike) is also calculated. It is found that the numerical shape and amplitude of the total current spikes during disruptions approximately coincide with those measured in some tokamak experiments. Under the assumptions adopted in the model, the physical mechanism for the formation of the spikes is determined. The mechanism is attributed to the diffusion of the negative current density at the column edge into the zero-conductivity region. The numerical current density distributions in the plasma during the sawteeth differ from the literature data.

  3. Comparison between 3D eddy current patterns in tokamak in-vessel components generated by disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakellaris, J.; Crutzen, Y.

    1996-01-01

    During plasma disruption events in Tokamaks, a large amount of magnetic energy is associated to the transfer of plasma current into eddy currents in the passive structures. In the ITER program two design concepts have been proposed. One approach (ITER CDA design) is based on copper stabilization loops (i.e., twin loops) attached to box-shaped blanket segments, electrically and mechanically separated along the toroidal direction. For another design concept (ITER EDA design) based on lower plasma elongation there is no need for specific stabilization loops. The passive stabilization is obtained by toroidally continuous components (i.e., the plasma facing wall of the blanket segments allows a continuity along the toroidal direction). Consequently, toroidal currents flow, when electromagnetic transients occur. Electromagnetic loads appear in the blanket structures in case of plasma disruptions and/or vertical displacement events either for the ITER CDA design concept or for the ITER EDA design concept. In this paper the influence of the in-vessel design configuration concepts--insulated segments or electrically continuous structures--in terms of magnetic shielding and electric insulation on the magnitude and the flow pattern of the eddy currents is investigated. This investigation will allow a performance evaluation of the two proposed design concepts

  4. Characteristics of disruptive plasma current decay in the HT-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Mitsushi; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro; Otsuka, Michio

    1993-01-01

    Motions of plasma current channel and time evolutions of eddy current distribution on the vacuum vessel during disruptive plasma current decay were studied experimentally in the Hitachi tokamak HT-2. The plasmas are vertically elongated and circularly shaped plasmas. A disruptive plasma current decay has three phases. During the first phase, a large displacement of the plasma position without plasma current decay is observed. Rapid plasma current decay is observed during the second phase and the decay rate is roughly constant with time. The eddy current distribution is like that due to the shell effect which creates a poloidal field to reduce the plasma displacement. During the third phase, the plasma current decays exponentially. The second phase is observed in slightly elongated and high plasma current (> 20 kA) circularly shaped plasmas. The plasma current decay rates in the second phase depend on the plasma cross sectional shape, but they do not in the third phase. The magnetic axis moves from the plasma area to the vacuum vessel wall between the second and third phases. (author)

  5. Lifetime evaluation of plasma-facing materials during a tokamak disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1995-09-01

    Erosion losses of plasma-facing materials in a tokamak reactor during major disruptions, giant ELMS, and large power excursions are serious concerns that influence component survivability and overall lifetime. Two different mechanisms lead to material erosion during these events: surface vaporization and loss of the melt layer. Hydrodynamics and radiation transport in the rapidly developed vapor-cloud region above the exposed area are found to control and determine the net erosion thickness from surface vaporization. A comprehensive self-consistent kinetic model has been developed in which the time-dependent optical properties and the radiation field of the vapor cloud are calculated in order to correctly estimate the radiation flux at the divertor surface. The developed melt layer of metallic divertor materials will, however, be free to move and can be eroded away due to various forces. , Physical mechanisms that affect surface vaporization and cause melt layer erosion are integrated in a comprehensive model. It is found that for metallic components such as beryllium and tungsten, lifetime due to these abnormal events will be controlled and dominated by the evolution and hydrodynamics of the melt layer during the disruption. The dependence of divertor plate lifetime on various aspects of plasma/material interaction physics is discussed

  6. Electromagneto-mechanical coupling analysis of a test module in J-TEXT Tokamak during plasma disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Haijie; Yuan, Zhensheng; Yuan, Hongwei; Pei, Cuixiang [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Shanxi Engineering Research Center for NDT and Structural Integrity Evaluation Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Chen, Zhenmao, E-mail: chenzm@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Shanxi Engineering Research Center for NDT and Structural Integrity Evaluation Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Yang, Jinhong; Wang, Weihua [Institute of Applied Physics of AOA, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the dynamic response during plasma disruption of a test blanket module in vacuum vessel (VV) of the Joint TEXT (J-TEXT), which is an experimental Tokamak device with iron core, was simulated by applying a program developed by authors on the ANSYS platform using its parametric design language (APDL). The moving coordinate method as well as the load transfer and sequential coupling strategy were adopted to cope with the electromagneto-mechanical coupling effect. To establish the numerical model, the influence of the iron core on the eddy current and electromagnetic (EM) force during disruption was numerically investigated at first and the influence was found not significant. Together with the geometrical features of the J-TEXT Tokamak structure, 180° sector models without magnetic core were finally established for the EM field and the structural response simulations. To obtain the source plasma current, the plasma current evolution during disruption was simulated by using the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC). With the numerical models and the source plasma current, the dynamic response of both the VV structure and the test module were calculated. The numerical results show that the maximum stress of the test module is in safe range, and the magnetic damping effect can weaken vibration of the test module. In addition, simulation without considering the coupling effect was carried out, which shows that the influence of coupling effect is not significant for the peak stress of the J-TEXT disruption problem.

  7. Critical density and disruptions in α-heated thermonuclear Tokamak discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotsaftis, M.; Firestone, M.; Wang, P.K.C.

    1985-02-01

    The study of existence of a critical density limit has been extended to the case of thermonuclear α-particle heated regime. To proceed, a 0-D model including sources and sinks affecting the evolution of ion and electron temperatures and of electron and α-particle densities with auxiliary neutral injected power has been developed. It is mainly shown when considering a Tokamak machine adapted for thermonuclear performances that, like in previous case, there is a critical density above which no other equilibrium point than 0 does exist. Temperatures then drop down the 0 past this critical value, leading to disruption. Analytic expression for critical density is given in terme of auxiliary projected power Psup(N). For Psup(N)=0, critical density value is low, but it increases fast enough for small Psup(N) to give a large safety margin once Psup(N) is moderate, much below the power required for reaching thermonuclear regime. So it is only at shutdown power periods that critical density can be crossed. But in this case, the heat content of particles in the discharge can significantly contribute to smooth out the temperature drop off. This typically operates up to the point where, due to change in magnetic islands configuration resulting from profile modification due to energy release at critical density crossing, heat transport doubles. Then on a fast thermal diffusion time scale, temperature drops now to a new equilibrium value, which can be made above the limiting value for which position control system of the plasma cannot forbid the plasma current to drop off itself, which is the important phenomenon of disruption. So on top of controls previously discussed, it is possible to use the α-particles themselves as a new preventive control against disruptions, making this phenomenon less dangerous for thermonuclear regime operation

  8. Axisymmetric MHD simulation of ITB crash and following disruption dynamics of Tokamak plasmas with high bootstrap current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takei, Nahoko; Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Tsuji-Iio, Shunji; Shimada, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Yukiharu; Kawano, Yasunori; Ozeki, Takahisa; Tobita, Kenji; Sugihara, Masayoshi

    2004-01-01

    Axisymmetric MHD simulation using the Tokamak Simulation Code demonstrated detailed disruption dynamics triggered by a crash of internal transport barrier in high bootstrap current, high β, reversed shear plasmas. Self-consistent time-evolutions of ohmic current bootstrap current and induced loop voltage profiles inside the disrupting plasma were shown from a view point of disruption characterization and mitigation. In contrast with positive shear plasmas, a particular feature of high bootstrap current reversed shear plasma disruption was computed to be a significant change of plasma current profile, which is normally caused due to resistive diffusion of the electric field induced by the crash of internal transport barrier in a region wider than the internal transport barrier. Discussion based on the simulation results was made on the fastest record of the plasma current quench observed in JT-60U reversed shear plasma disruptions. (author)

  9. Modeling of the L.F. turbulent spectrum during ohmic discharges, auxiliary heating and disruptions in Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truc, A.

    1983-07-01

    The spectrum of low frequency turbulence in the TFR tokamak, as observed along a central chord by a CO 2 laser light diffusion diagnostic, appears to be representable by four monomial branches joining to three vertices. This schematic representation permits to follow more easily the evolution of the turbulence during the life of the plasma, including the ohmic regime, the transitions to auxiliary heating and the minor and major disruptions

  10. Interpretation of the effects of electron cyclotron power absorption in pre-disruptive tokamak discharges in ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, S.; Lazzaro, E.; Granucci, G. [Associazione Euratom-CNR sulla Fusione, IFP-CNR, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Esposito, B. [Associazione Euratom-CNR sulla Fusione, CR Frascati, C.P. 65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Maraschek, M.; Zohm, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr.2, 85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Sauter, O.; Brunetti, D. [CRPP, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2012-09-15

    Tokamak disruptions are events of fatal collapse of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) confinement configuration, which cause a rapid loss of the plasma thermal energy and the impulsive release of magnetic energy and heat on the tokamak first wall components. The physics of the disruptions is very complex and non-linear, strictly associated with the dynamics of magnetic tearing perturbations. The crucial problem of the response to the effects of localized heat deposition and current driven by external (rf) sources to avoid or quench the MHD tearing instabilities has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The analysis of the conditions under which a disruption can be prevented by injection of electron cyclotron (EC) rf power, or, alternatively, may be caused by it, shows that the local EC heating can be more significant than EC current drive in ensuring neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) stability, due to two main reasons: first, the drop of temperature associated with the island thermal short circuit tends to reduce the neoclassical character of the instability and to limit the EC current drive generation; second, the different effects on the mode evolution of both the location of the power deposition relative to the island separatrix and the island shape deformation lead to less strict requirements of precise power deposition focussing. A contribution to the validation of theoretical models of the events associated with NTM is given and can be used to develop concepts for their control, relevant also for ITER-like scenarios.

  11. Electromagnetic forces on a metallic Tokamak vacuum vessel following a disruptive instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhartt, D.

    1979-04-01

    During a 'hard' disruptive instability of a Tokamak plasma the current-carrying plasma is lost within a very short time, typically few milliseconds. If the plasma is contained in a metallic vacuum vessel, electric currents are set up in the vessel following the disappearance of the plasma current. These vessel currents together with the magnetic fields intersecting the vessel generate electromagnetic forces which appear as mechanical loads on the vessel. In the following note it is assumed that the vacuum vessel is surrounded by an 'outer equivalent' or 'flux-conserving' shell having a characteristic time of magnetic field penetration which is long compared to the time of existence of the vessel currents. This property defines the distribution of vessel current densities (and hence the load distribution) without referring to the exact mechanism or time sequence of events by which the plasma current is lost. Numerical examples of the electromagnetic force distribution from this model refer to parameters of the JET-device with the simplifying assumption of circular cross-sections for plasma current, vacuum vessel, and outer equivalent shell. (orig.)

  12. Modeling of thermal effects on TIBER II [Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor] divertor during plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, M.L.; Perkins, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping the disruption power flow from the mid-plane of the TIBER Engineering Test Reactor to its divertor and calculating the resulting thermal effects are accomplished through the modification and coupling of three presently existing computer codes. The resulting computer code TADDPAK (Thermal Analysis Divertor during Disruption PAcKage) provides three-dimensional graphic presentations of time and positional dependent thermal effects on a poloidal cross section of the double-null-divertor configured reactor. These thermal effects include incident heat flux, surface temperature, vaporization rate, total vaporization, and melting depth. The dependence of these thermal effects on material choice, disruption pulse shape, and the characteristic thickness of the plasma scrape-off layer is determined through parametric analysis with TADDPAK. This computer code is designed to be a convenient, rapid, and user-friendly modeling tool which can be easily adapted to most tokamak double-null-divertor reactor designs. 14 refs

  13. Extremely fast vertical displacement event induced by a plasma βp collapse in high βp tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yukiharu; Yoshino, Ryuji; Pomphrey, N.; Jardin, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    In a vertically elongated (κ ∼ 1.5), high β p (β p ∼ 1.7) tokamak with a resistive shell, extremely fast vertical displacement events (VDE's) induced by a model of strong β p collapse were found through computer simulations using the Tokamak Simulation Code. Although the plasma current quench, which had been shown to be the prime cause of VDE's in a relatively low β p tokamak (β p ∼ 0.2), was not observed during the VDE evolution, the observed growth rate of VDE's was almost five times (γ ∼ 655 sec -1 ) faster than the growth rate of the usual positional instability (γ ∼ 149 sec -1 ). The essential mechanism of the β p collapse-induced VDE was clarified to be the significant destabilization of positional instability due to a large and sudden degradation of the decay n-index in addition to a reduction of the stability index n s . It is pointed out that the shell-geometry characterizes the VDE dynamics, and that the VDE rate depends strongly both on the magnitude of the β p collapse and the n-index of the equilibria just before the β p collapse occurs. A new guide line for designing the fusion reactor is proposed with considering the impact of disruptions. (author)

  14. Physics of the interaction between runaway electrons and the background plasma of the current quench in tokamak disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reux, Cedric

    2017-10-01

    Runaway electrons are created during disruptions of tokamak plasmas. They can be accelerated in the form of a multi-MA beam at energies up to several 10's of MeV. Prevention or suppression of runaway electrons during disruptions will be essential to ensure a reliable operation of future tokamaks such as ITER. Recent experiments showed that the suppression of an already accelerated beam with massive gas injection was unsuccessful at JET, conversely to smaller tokamaks. This was attributed to a dense, cold background plasma (up to several 1020 m-3 accompanying the runaway beam. The present contribution reports on the latest experimental results obtained at JET showing that some mitigation efficiency can be restored by changing the features of the background plasma. The density, temperature, position of the plasma and the energy of runaways were characterized using a combined analysis of interferometry, soft X-rays, bolometry, magnetics and hard X-rays. It showed that lower density background plasmas were obtained using smaller amounts of gas to trigger the disruption, leading to an improved penetration of the mitigation gas. Based on the observations, a physical model of the creation of the background plasma and its subsequent evolution is proposed. The plasma characteristics during later stages of the disruption are indeed dependent on the way it was initially created. The sustainment of the plasma during the runaway beam phase is then addressed by making a power balance between ohmic heating, power transfer from runaway electrons, radiation and atomic processes. Finally, a model of the interaction of the plasma with the mitigation gas is proposed to explain why massive gas injection of runaway beams works only in specific situations. This aims at pointing out which parameters bear the most importance if this mitigation scheme is to be used on larger devices like ITER. Acknowledgement: This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium

  15. A study of disruptive instabilities in the PLT tokamak using X-ray techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.; Goeler, S. von; Stodiek, W.

    1978-01-01

    Disruptive instabilities in PLT have been analysed by using an array of surface barrier X-ray detectors viewing the plasma cross-section along 20 chords. A wide variety of phenomena has been observed. A system of classification has been attempted, based upon: (1) the severity of the disruption, (2) the dominant precursor oscillations, and (3) the location of the onset of the disruption. Minor disruptions, in which the disruption does not appear at the location of the island of the precursor oscillation, have been observed, sometimes accompanied by seemingly independent higher-frequency oscillations of different helicity localized near the point of the disruption. Major disruptions exhibit flatter central q-profiles, slowing of the oscillations, asymmetry with respect to the centre of the discharge, and a correlation with high-Z impurity radiation. (author)

  16. Electron temperature and density relaxations during internal disruptions in TFR Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enriques, L.; Sand, F.

    1977-01-01

    Several diagnostics (soft X-ray, Thompson scattering, high frequency waves, and vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy) have been used on TFR Tokamak plasmas in order to show that the soft X-ray relaxations are mainly due to electron temperature relaxations, with only small variations of the electron density. Values of ΔTsub(eo)/Tsub(eo) up to 17% and of Δnsub(eo)/nsub(eo) of a few % or less have been measured. (author)

  17. Electron temperature and density relaxations during internal disruptions in TFR Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    Several diagnostics (soft X-ray, Thomson scattering, high frequency waves, and vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy) have been used on TFR Tokamak plasmas in order to show that the soft X-ray relaxations are mainly due to electron temperature relaxations, with only small variations of the electron density. Values of ΔTsub(e0)/Tsub(e0) up to 17% and of Δnsub(e0)/nsub(e0) of a few % or less have been measured

  18. βp-collapse-induced vertical displacement event in high βp tokamak disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Yoshino, R.; Pomphrey, N.; Jardin, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    Extremely fast vertical displacement events (VDEs) induced by a strong β p collapse were found in a vertically elongated (κ ∼ 1.5), high β p (β p ∼ 1.7) tokamak with a resistive shell through computer simulations using the tokamak simulation code. Although the plasma current quench which has been shown to be the prime cause of VDEs in a relatively low β p tokamak (β p ∼ 0.2) (Nakamura Y et al 1996 Nucl. Fusion 36 643), was not observed during the VDE evolution, the observed growth rate of VDEs was almost five times (γ ∼ 655 s -1 ) faster than the growth rate of the usual positional instability (γ ∼ 149 s -1 ). The essential mechanism of the β p -collapse-induced VDE was clarified to be the intense enhancement of positional instability due to a large and sudden degradation of the magnetic field decay n-index in addition to the significant destabilization due to a reduction in the stability index n s . The radial shift of the magnetic axis caused by the β p collapse induces eddy currents on the resistive shell, and these eddy currents produce a large degradation of the n-index. (author)

  19. Scoping and sensitivity analyses for the Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sink, D.A.; Gibson, G.

    1979-03-01

    The results of an extensive set of parametric studies are presented which provide analytical data of the effects of various tokamak parameters on the performance and cost of the DTHR (Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor). The studies were centered on a point design which is described in detail. Variations in the device size, neutron wall loading, and plasma aspect ratio are presented, and the effects on direct hardware costs, fissile fuel production (breeding), fusion power production, electrical power consumption, and thermal power production are shown graphically. The studies considered both ignition and beam-driven operations of DTHR and yielded results based on two empirical scaling laws presently used in reactor studies. Sensitivity studies were also made for variations in the following key parameters: the plasma elongation, the minor radius, the TF coil peak field, the neutral beam injection power, and the Z/sub eff/ of the plasma

  20. Nanoparticle Plasma Jet as Fast Probe for Runaway Electrons in Tokamak Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    Successful probing of runaway electrons (REs) requires fast (1 - 2 ms) high-speed injection of enough mass able to penetrate through tokamak toroidal B-field (2 - 5 T) over 1 - 2 m distance with large assimilation fraction in core plasma. A nanoparticle plasma jet (NPPJ) from a plasma gun is a unique combination of millisecond trigger-to-delivery response and mass-velocity of 100 mg at several km/s for deep direct injection into current channel of rapidly ( 1 ms) cooling post-TQ core plasma. After C60 NPPJ test bed demonstration we started to work on ITER-compatible boron nitride (BN) NPPJ. Once injected into plasma, BN NP undergoes ablative sublimation, thermally decomposes into B and N, and releases abundant B and N high-charge ions along plasma-traversing path and into the core. We present basic characteristics of our BN NPPJ concept and first results from B and N ions on Zeff > 1 effect on REs dynamics by using a self-consistent model for RE current density. Simulation results of BNQ+ NPPJ penetration through tokamak B-field to RE beam location performed with Hybrid Electro-Magnetic code (HEM-2D) are also presented. Work supported by U.S. DOE SBIR Grant.

  1. Structure of magnetic field disturbances under development of disruptive instability in the ''Tokamak-6''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merezhkin, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of disturbances of a poloidal field during the development of the breakaway instability in the Tokamak-6 are investigated. The behaviour of the symmetric and dipole field component, and the peculiarities of the structure of screw disturbances in a minor and major breakaways are analyzed. It was established that the structure of screw disturbances in minor breakaways is unchangeable and that the rearrangement in major breakaways is of a discrete nature. The relationship between the symmetric and screw components of disturbances of the poloidal field at the forward front of the disturbance increase was revealed. Data on the increments, scales and structure of screw disturbances, the ratios between the symmetric and screw components of field disturbances, and also on the magnitude of energy losses in typical breakaways are given

  2. Hydrodynamic effects of eroded materials on response of plasma-facing component during a tokamak disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-01-01

    Loss of plasma confinement causes surface and structural damage to plasma-facing materials (PFMs) and remains a major obstacle for tokamak reactors. The deposited plasma energy results in surface erosion and structural failure. The surface erosion consists of vaporization, spallation, and liquid splatter of metallic materials, while the structural damage includes large temperature increases in structural materials and at the interfaces between surface coatings and structural members. Comprehensive models (contained in the HEIGHTS computer simulation package) are being used self-consistently to evaluate material damage. Splashing mechanisms occur as a result of volume bubble boiling and liquid hydrodynamic instabilities and brittle destruction mechanisms of nonmelting materials. The effect of macroscopic erosion on total mass losses and lifetime is evaluated. The macroscopic erosion products may further protect PFMs from severe erosion (via the droplet-shielding effect) in a manner similar to that of the vapor shielding concept

  3. Implementing a finite-state off-normal and fault response system for disruption avoidance in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidietis, N. W.; Choi, W.; Hahn, S. H.; Humphreys, D. A.; Sammuli, B. S.; Walker, M. L.

    2018-05-01

    A finite-state off-normal and fault response (ONFR) system is presented that provides the supervisory logic for comprehensive disruption avoidance and machine protection in tokamaks. Robust event handling is critical for ITER and future large tokamaks, where plasma parameters will necessarily approach stability limits and many systems will operate near their engineering limits. Events can be classified as off-normal plasmas events, e.g. neoclassical tearing modes or vertical displacements events, or faults, e.g. coil power supply failures. The ONFR system presented provides four critical features of a robust event handling system: sequential responses to cascading events, event recovery, simultaneous handling of multiple events and actuator prioritization. The finite-state logic is implemented in Matlab®/Stateflow® to allow rapid development and testing in an easily understood graphical format before automated export to the real-time plasma control system code. Experimental demonstrations of the ONFR algorithm on the DIII-D and KSTAR tokamaks are presented. In the most complex demonstration, the ONFR algorithm asynchronously applies ‘catch and subdue’ electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) injection scheme to suppress a virulent 2/1 neoclassical tearing mode, subsequently shuts down ECCD for machine protection when the plasma becomes over-dense, and enables rotating 3D field entrainment of the ensuing locked mode to allow a safe rampdown, all in the same discharge without user intervention. When multiple ONFR states are active simultaneously and requesting the same actuator (e.g. neutral beam injection or gyrotrons), actuator prioritization is accomplished by sorting the pre-assigned priority values of each active ONFR state and giving complete control of the actuator to the state with highest priority. This early experience makes evident that additional research is required to develop an improved actuator sharing protocol, as well as a methodology to

  4. Ion heating at the disruptive instability in the LT-3 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.G.; Hutchinson, I.H.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the ion temperature and the toroidal current density and electric field during the disruptive instability in LT-3 are presented. Rapid ion heating and strong current inhibition have been observed. Fluctuation measurements suggest that these effects may be attributable to the excitation of ion cyclotron drift waves in the plasma

  5. Soft-x-ray imaging study on disruptions in the JIPP T-II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Shunji.

    1983-04-01

    A multi-channel soft X-ray imaging system (29 channels for viewing the plasma cross section, 3 channels for identifying poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, m and n, respectively) was installed on the JIPP T-II device to investigate external disruptions. A high-performance digital data acquisition system (12-bit resolution, 40 channels, 100 kHz/channel) was newly developed for data processing. A weak m=1/n=1 mode which is locked with an m=2/n=1 mode is observed preceding an external disruption. Once the disruption occured, the m=2/n=1 mode is converted into a strong m=1/n=1 mode. The internal thermal energy is swept out accompanied by vertically asymmetric collapse of soft X-ray profile due to the m=1/n=1 mode. A localized flash on the limiter is always observed due to a major disruption (a hard external disruption). These phenomena can be explained by the theory of asymmetric reconnections due to the interaction of the m=2/n=1 and m=1/n=1 modes proposed by B.B. Kadomtsev. If the amplitude of the m=2/n=1 mode becomes sufficiently large, the resulting islands begin to come closer and to produce a m=1/n=1 shift at the center. And eventually asymmetric reconnections will occur at the place where the shifted inner region due to the m=1/n=1 mode touches the X-point of the separatrix of the m=2/n=1 magnetic island. Since the modes with different helicities can not exist at the same place, the m=2/n=1 islands approach with each other and merge into an m=1/n=1 island. During this process the internal thermal energy is expelled in the same way as the usual internal disruption. If the reconnections extend to the plasma boundary, they may lead to a major diruption. Although the overlapping of the m=2/n=1 and m=3/n=2 islands is experimentally observed, the resulting ergodization of the magnetic surfaces only flatten the soft X-ray profile in the region between q = 2 and q = 3/2 surfaces. (author)

  6. Radiation in plasma target interaction events typical for ITER tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Bazylev, B.; Landman, I.; Safronov, V.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma wall interactions under conditions simulating ITER hard disruptions and ELMs are studied at the plasma gun facilities 2MK-200 CUSP and MK-200 UG at Troitsk. The experimental data for carbon plasma shields are used for validation of the theoretical modeling of the plasma wall interaction. The important features of the non-LTE plasma shield such as temperature and density distribution, its evolution and the conversion efficiency of the energy of the plasma stream into total and soft x-ray radiation from highly ionized evaporated target material and the energy balance are reproduced quite well. Thus a realistic modelling of ITER disruptive plasma wall interaction using the validated models is now possible. 8 refs., 6 figs

  7. Low-m magnetic modes activity and disruptions in Tokamaks discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotsaftis, Michel.

    1982-01-01

    It has been possible to follow the evolution of the low-m modes and discuss the various patterns of their interactions. The structure of the non linear mode has been studied, and shown to possess a periodic time dependence which, on a rational magnetic surface where q = m/n, and large aspect ratio case, reduces to the sum of two pure oscillations with different frequencies. The amplitude of the mode has been evaluated, and it is further shown that, in the limit cycle regime, the modes amplitudes is small enough for them not to interact. This is not the case when the limit cycle becomes unstable, where the modes can now intermix by direct coupling or overlapping, and create a disruption. For this reason, stability criteria, both linear and nonlinear, respectively corresponding to the beginning and the end of the existence of the limit cycle, have been explicitely set down, showing the three domains corresponding to the three previous steps in an adapted parameter space. It is possible to follow the detailed evolution of the low-m modes all along the discharge duration. For regular enough profiles, the mode (m = 2, n = 1) is shown to largely dominate and, when becoming nonlinearly unstable, to drive the disruptions ending the discharges. In other words, in the present picture, the disruption is interpreted as the instability of a limit cycle rather than the usual linear instability of the zero amplitude mode, ie, corresponds to a second branching, and not to a first one

  8. Face Inversion Disproportionately Disrupts Sensitivity to Vertical over Horizontal Changes in Eye Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookes, Kate; Hayward, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Presenting a face inverted (upside down) disrupts perceptual sensitivity to the spacing between the features. Recently, it has been shown that this disruption is greater for vertical than horizontal changes in eye position. One explanation for this effect proposed that inversion disrupts the processing of long-range (e.g., eye-to-mouth distance)…

  9. 3D eddy-current distribution in a tokamak first wall during a plasma disruption using 'TRIFOU'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussecourte, P.; Bossavit, A.; Verite, J.C.; Crutzen, Y.R.

    1989-01-01

    In fusion reactor studies there is a lack of knowledge concerning the electromagnetic-type of phenomena generated by a plasma disruption event (rapid quenching of the plasma current). The induced eddy current distribution in space and time in the passive conducting structural components surrounding the plasma ring needs to be accurately investigated. TRIFOU is a full 3D eddy-current computer program based on a mixed FEM and BIEM technique, using the magnetic field, h, as a state variable, It has already been used in various areas of interest including static or rotating machines, non-destructive testing, induction heating, and research devices such as tokamaks. It can take into account various geometries and a wide range of physical situations (time dependency, physical properties, etc.). The present application is related to the eddy-current situation arising from a strong electromagnetic transient generated in the NET (Next European Torus) first wall segment. With respect to previous numerical simulations, the general 3D approach for the current density shows different eddy current circulations in the front/side shells and in the stiff back plate. The results obtained by TRIFOU are illustrated by means of advanced computer graphic displays and an animation movie. (orig.)

  10. Structural response of a Tokamak first wall under electromagnetic forces caused by a plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, Y.R.; Biggio, M.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Antonacci, P.; Vitali, R.

    1987-01-01

    The modern computerized techniques of CAD/FEM analysis are extensively applied for the numerical simulation of the electromagnetic-mechanical coupling induced in the last design configuration of NET first wall during a plasma disruption event. A picture of the impact of the electromagnetic forces on the structural behaviour of the outboard DN first wall is presented an an improvement of the FW structural section is proposed. In any case, additional investigations will be performed during the long process of structural behaviour optimization of the first wall reactor components

  11. Measurements of the runaway electron energy during disruptions in the tokamak TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, M.; Finken, K. H.; Willi, O.; Lehnen, M.; Xu, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Calorimetric measurements of the total runaway electron energy are carried out using a reciprocating probe during induced TEXTOR disruptions. A comparison with the energy inferred from runaway energy spectra, which are measured with a scintillator probe, is used as an independent check of the results. A typical runaway current of 100 kA at TEXTOR contains 30 to 35 kJ of runaway energy. The dependencies of the runaway energy on the runaway current, the radial probe position, the toroidal magnetic field and the predisruptive plasma current are studied. The conversion efficiency of the magnetic plasma energy into runaway energy is calculated to be up to 26%.

  12. Mechanisms of disruptions caused by noble gas injection into tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, D.Kh.; Yurchenko, E.I.; Lukash, V.E.; Baronova, E.O.; Pozdnyakov, Yu.I.; Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.; Veselova, I.Yu.; Schneider, R.

    2005-01-01

    Noble gas injection for disruption mitigation in DIII-D is simulated. The simulation of the first two stages of the disruption is performed: the first one is the neutral gas jet penetration through the background plasmas, and the second one is the instability growth. In order to simulate the first stage, the MHD pellet code LLP with improved radiation model for noble gas is used. Plasma cooling at this stage is provided by the energy exchange with the jet. The opacity effects in radiation losses are found to be important in the energy balance calculations. The magnetic surfaces in contact with the jet are cooled significantly; however, the temperature as well as the electric conductivity, remains high. The cooling front propagates towards the plasma centre. It has been shown that the cooling front is accompanied by strongly localized 'shark fin-like' perturbation in toroidal current density profile. The simplified cylindrical model shows that the cooling front is able to produce the internal kink-like mode with growth rate significantly higher than the tearing mode. The unstable kink perturbation obtained is non-resonant for any magnetic surface, both inside the plasma column, and in the vacuum space outside the separatrix. The mode disturbs mainly the core region. The growth time of the 'shark fin-like' mode is higher than the Alfven time by a factor of 10-100 for DIII-D parameters

  13. Surface currents associated with external kink modes in tokamak plasmas during a major disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2017-10-01

    The surface current on the plasma-vacuum interface during a disruption event involving kink instability can play an important role in driving current into the vacuum vessel. However, there have been disagreements over the nature or even the sign of the surface current in recent theoretical calculations based on idealized step-function background plasma profiles. We revisit such calculations by replacing step-function profiles with more realistic profiles characterized by a strong but finite gradient along the radial direction. It is shown that the resulting surface current is no longer a delta-function current density, but a finite and smooth current density profile with an internal structure, concentrated within the region with a strong plasma pressure gradient. Moreover, this current density profile has peaks of both signs, unlike the delta-function case with a sign opposite to, or the same as the plasma current. We show analytically and numerically that such current density can be separated into two parts, with one of them, called the convective current density, describing the transport of the background plasma density by the displacement, and the other part that remains, called the residual current density. It is argued that consideration of both types of current density is important and can resolve past controversies.

  14. Edge stability and pedestal profile sensitivity of snowflake diverted equilibria in the TCV Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, S.Yu.; Ivanov, A.A.; Martynov, A.A.; Poshekhonov, Yu.Yu.; Behn, R.; Martin, Y.R.; Moret, J.M.; Piras, F.; Pitzschke, A.; Pochelon, A.; Sauter, O.; Villard, L.

    2010-01-01

    A second order null divertor (snowflake) has been successfully created and controlled in the TCV tokamak[1] (F. Piras et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, 2009). The results of ideal MHD edge stability computations show an enhancement of the edge stability properties of the snowflake equilibria compared to standard x-point configurations[2] (S. Yu. Medvedev et al., 36th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics, 2009). However, a sensitivity study of the stability limits to variations of the pedestal profiles is essential for making conclusions about possibilities of ELM control in snowflake plasmas. Variations of the edge stability and beta limits for several types of snowflake equilibria, different values of triangularity and various pedestal profiles are investigated (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Cross-section sensitivity analyses for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, E.L.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1977-09-01

    The objectives of this report were (1) to determine the sensitivity of neutronic responses in the preliminary design of the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor by Argonne National Laboratory, and (2) to develop the use of a neutron-gamma coupled cross-section set in the calculation of cross-section sensitivity analysis. Response functions such as neutron plus gamma kerma, Mylar dose, copper transmutation, copper dpa, and activation of the toroidal field coil dewar were investigated. Calculations revealed that the responses were most sensitive to the high-energy group cross sections of iron in the innermost regions containing stainless steel. For example, both the neutron heating of the toroidal field coil and the activation of the toroidal field coil dewar show an integral sensitivity of about -5 with respect to the iron total cross sections. Major contributors are the scattering cross sections of iron, with -2.7 and -4.4 for neutron heating and activation, respectively. The effects of changes in gamma cross sections were generally an order of 10 lower

  16. Disruption?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray......This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray...

  17. Importance of the fine structure in a tokamak for the abnormal transport and the internal disruptions; Importance de la structure magnetique fine dans un Tokamak pour le transport anormal et les disruptions internes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabot, R

    1996-02-28

    The problem of energy transport in a Tokamak, in presence of magnetic islets, has been treated by decomposing this problem in different bricks. To assembly the different bricks the model of dynamic percolation, which couples by the intermediate of scattering coefficient, the activity of transport sites (islets size) to the profile of transported quantity (temperature profile) has been chosen. The results, got with this model, results connected to the hypothesis of a limited number of islets, agree with the different observations. A possible application of this model could be the exploration of different operating conditions of Tokamak and a research of improved confinement running. (N.C.). 149 refs., 85 figs.

  18. Disruption model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Bronner, G.

    1982-07-01

    Calculations of disruption time and energy dissipation have been obtained by simulating the plasma as an electrical conducting loop that varies in resistivity, current density, major radius. The calculations provide results which are in good agreement with experimental observations. It is believed that this approach allows engineering designs for disruptions to be completed in large tokamaks such as INTOR or FED

  19. Structural safety assessment of a tokamak-type fusion facility for a through crack to cause cooling water leakage and plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahira, Masataka

    2004-01-01

    A tokamak-type fusion machine has inherent safety associated with plasma shutdown. A small water leak can cause a plasma disruption although there is another possibility to terminate plasma without disruption. This plasma disruption will induce electromagnetic (EM) forces acting in the vacuum vessel (VV). From a radiological safety viewpoint, the VV is designed to form a physical barrier that encloses tritium and activated dust. If the VV can sustain an unstable fracture by EM forces from a through crack to cause the small leak, the structural safety will be assured and the inherent safety will be demonstrated. Therefore, a systematic approach to assure the structural safety is developed. A new analytical model to evaluate the through crack and leak rate of cooling water is proposed, with verification by experimental leak measurements. Based on the analysis, the critical crack length to terminate plasma is evaluated as about 2mm. On the other hand, the critical crack length for unstable fracture is obtained as about 400 mm. It is concluded that EM forces induced by the small leak to terminate plasma will not cause unstable fracture of the VV; thus the inherent safety is demonstrated. (author)

  20. Tokamak and RFP ignition requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma model is applied to calculate numerically transport- confinement (nτ E ) requirements and steady-state operation tokamak. The CIT tokamak and RFP ignition conditions are examined. Physics differences between RFP and tokamaks, and their consequences for a DT ignition machine, are discussed. The ignition RFP, compared to a tokamak, has many physics advantages, including ohmic heating to ignition (no need for auxiliary heating systems), higher beta, low ignition current, less sensitivity of ignition requirements to impurity effects, no hard disruptions (associated with beta or density limits), and successful operation with high radiation fractions (f RAD ∼ 0.95). These physics advantages, coupled with important engineering advantages associated with lower external magnetic fields, larger aspect ratios, and smaller plasma cross sections translate into significant cost reductions for both ignition and power reactor. The primary drawback of the RFP is the uncertainty that the present confinement scaling will extrapolate to reactor regimes. The 4-MA ZTH was expected to extend the nτ E transport scaling data three order of magnitude above ZT-40M results, and if the present scaling held, to achieve a DT-equivalent scientific energy breakeven, Q=1. A basecase RFP ignition point is identified with a plasma current of 8.1 MA and no auxiliary heating. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Design, construction, and first operational results of a 5 megawatt feedback controlled amplifier system for disruption control on the Columbia University HBT-EP tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reass, W.A.; Alvestad, H.A.; Bartsch, R.R.; Wurden, G.A.; Ivers, T.H.; Nadle, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the electrical design and first operational results of a 5 Megawatt feedback controlled amplifier system designed to drive a 300 uH saddle coil set on the ''HBT-EP'' tokamak. It will be used to develop various plasma feedback techniques to control and inhibit the onset of plasma disruptions that are observed in high ''B'' plasmas. To provide a well characterized system, a high fidelity, high power closed loop amplifier system has been refurbished from the Los Alamos ''ZT-P'' equilibrium feedback system. In it's configuration developed for the Columbia HBT-EP tokamak, any desired waveform may be generated within a I 100 ampere and 16 kV peak to peak dynamic range. An energy storage capacitor bank presently limits the effective full power pulse width to 10 mS. The full power bandwidth driving the saddle coil set is ∼12 kHz, with bandwidth at reduced powers exceeding 30 kHz. The system is designed similar to a grounded cathode, push-pull, transformer coupled, tube type amplifier system. 'Me push pull amplifier consists of 6 each Machlett ML8618 magnetically beamed triodes, 3 on each end of the (center tapped) coupling transformer. The transformer has .I volt-seconds of core and a 1:1 turns ratio. The transformer is specially designed for high power, low leakage inductance, and high bandwidth. Each array of ML8618's is (grid) driven with a fiber optic controlled hotdeck with a 3CXI0,000A7 (triode) output. To linearize the ML8618 grid drive, a minor feedback loop in the hotdeck is utilized. Overall system response is controlled by active feedback of the saddle coil current, derived from a coaxial current viewing resistor. The detailed electrical design of the power amplifier, transformer, and feedback system will be provided in addition to recent HBT-EP operational results

  2. Inter-machine comparison of the termination phase and energy conversion in tokamak disruptions with runaway current plateau formation and implications for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-Solís, J.R.; Loarte, A.; Hollmann, E.M.; Esposito, B.; Riccardo, V.

    2014-01-01

    The termination of the current and the loss of runaway electrons following runaway current plateau formation during disruptions have been investigated in the JET, DIII-D and FTU tokamaks. Substantial conversion of magnetic energy into runaway kinetic energy, up to ∼10 times the initial plateau runaway kinetic energy, has been inferred for the slowest current terminations. Both modelling and experiment suggest that, in present devices, the efficiency of conversion into runaway kinetic energy is determined to a great extent by the characteristic runaway loss time, τ diff , and the resistive time of the residual ohmic plasma after the disruption, τ res , increasing with the ratio τ diff /τ res . It is predicted that, in large future devices such as ITER, the generation of runaways by the avalanche mechanism will play an important role, particularly for slow runaway discharge terminations, increasing substantially the amount of energy deposited by the runaways onto the plasma-facing components by the conversion of magnetic energy of the runaway plasma into runaway kinetic energy. Estimates of the power fluxes on the beryllium plasma-facing components during runaway termination in ITER indicate that for runaway currents of up to 2 MA no melting of the components is expected. For larger runaway currents, minimization of the effects of runaway impact on the first wall requires a reduction in the kinetic energy of the runaway beam before termination and, in addition, high plasma density n e and low ohmic plasma resistance (long τ res ) to prevent large conversion of magnetic into runaway kinetic energy during slow current terminations. (paper)

  3. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  4. Survey of Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The survey covers the following topics:- Introduction and history of tokamak research; review of tokamak apparatus, existing and planned; remarks on measurement techniques and their limitations; main results in terms of electron and ion temperatures, plasma density, containment times, etc. Empirical scaling; range of operating densities; impurities, origin, behaviour and control (including divertors); data on fluctuations and instabilities in tokamak plasmas; data on disruptive instabilities; experiments on shaped cross-sections; present experimental evidence on β limits; auxiliary heating; experimental and theoretical problems for the future. (author)

  5. Tokamak ARC damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  6. Chronotope Disruption as a Sensitizing Concept for Understanding Chronic Illness Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This article aims to elaborate chronotope disruption —a changed relation to time and space— as a sensitizing concept for understanding chronic illness narratives. Methods: Sixteen men and 16 women with Type 2 diabetes were purposefully sampled. Each was interviewed about his or her experience of diabetes self-management using the biographical-narrative interview method. Transcripts were inspected for key moments defined as emotionally laden stories relevant to the purpose of the research. We present dialogically inflected discursive analysis of exemplar extracts. Results: The analysis demonstrates how the concept of chronotope disruption helps identify, and understand, important aspects of patients’ chronic illness narratives. First, we investigate how medical advice can conflict with embodied experience and how progressive bodily deterioration can provoke a reevaluation of past illness (self-mis)management. Second, the increasing temporal and spatial intrusion of chronic illness into participants’ lives is examined. Finally, we focus on the masquerade of health as an attempt to manage, hide, or deny that one is physically challenged. Conclusions: Chronotope disruption offers a useful sensitizing concept for approaching chronic illness narratives and around which to organize analytical insights and to develop practice. Chronotope analysis fills an important gap in the science through compensating current health sciences’ focus on rationality, cognition, and prospective time (prediction) with a patient-oriented focus on emotionality, embodiment, and retrospective time (nostalgia). Chronotope disruption could be used to develop practice by gaining empathic understanding of patients’ life-worlds and provides a tool to examine how new technologies change the way in which the chronically ill have “being” in the world. PMID:25197985

  7. A new high sensitivity far-infrared laser interferometer for the HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. G.; Zhou, Y.; Li, Y.; Deng, Z. C.; Wang, H. X.; Yi, J.

    2017-08-01

    A new four-chord Michelson-type formic acid (HCOOH, λ = 432.5 μm) laser interferometer has been successfully commissioned on the HL-2A tokamak to measure the electron density and density fluctuations. Due to the employment of the two-laser heterodyne technique, the time resolution of the interferometer reached 1.0 microseconds (μs). Four chords of line electron densities with a line-averaged density resolution 2 × 1016/m3 were obtained in a recent HL-2A experimental campaign, and detailed electron density fluctuations, caused by events such as edge localized mode, sawtooth precursor-oscillations, and energetic particle driven instabilities, were distinctly measured. In particular, the high-frequency electron density fluctuations (up to 500 kHz) caused by the reversed shear Alfvénic eigenmode were observed by the internal two interferometry channels, and their fluctuation location could be approximately identified from the spectra characteristics of multi-chord line electron densities.

  8. Tokamak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical conditions required for breakeven in thermonuclear fusion are derived, and the early conceptual ideas of magnetic confinement and subsequent development are followed, leading to present-day large scale tokamak experiments. Confinement and diffusion are developed in terms of particle orbits, whilst magnetohydrodynamic stability is discussed from energy considerations. From these ideas are derived the scaling laws that determine the physical size and parameters of this fusion configuration. It becomes clear that additional heating is required. However there are currently several major gaps in our understanding of experiments; the causes of anomalous electron energy loss and the major current disruption, the absence of the 'bootstrap' current and what physics determines the maximum plasma pressure consistent with stability. The understanding of these phenomena is a major challenge to plasma physicists. (author)

  9. Magnetic ''islandography'' in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Waddell, B.V.; Hicks, H.R.

    1978-09-01

    Tearing modes are shown to be responsible for most of the experimentally observed macroscopic behavior of tokamak discharges. The effects of these collective magnetic perturbations on magnetic topology and plasma transport in tokamaks are shown to provide plausible explanations for: internal disruptions (m/n = 1); Mirnov oscillations (m/n = 2,3...); and major disruptions (coupling of 2/1-3/2 modes). The nonlinear evolution of the tearing modes is followed with fully three-dimensional computer codes. The effects on plasma confinement of the magnetic islands or stochastic field lines induced by the macroscopic tearing modes are discussed and compared with experiment. Finally, microscopic magnetic perturbations are shown to provide a natural model for the microscopic anomalous transport processes in tokamaks

  10. Sawtooth phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Savrukhin, P.V.

    1989-01-01

    A review of experimental and theoretical investigaions of sawtooth phenomena in tokamaks is presented. Different types of sawtooth oscillations, scaling laws and methods of interanl disruption stabilization are described. Theoretical models of the sawtooth instability are discussed. 122 refs.; 4 tabs

  11. Studies of the disruption prevention by ECRH at plasma current rise stage in limiter discharges/Possibility of an internal transport barrier producing under dominating electron transport in the T-10 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikaev, V.V.; Borshegovskij, A.A.; Chistyakov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    'Studies of the Disruption Prevention by ECRH at Plasma Current Rise Stage in Limiter Discharges' - Studies of disruption prevention by means of ECRH in T-10 at the plasma current rise phase in limiter discharges with circular plasma cross-section were performed. Reliable disruption prevention by ECRH at HF power (P HF ) min level equal to 20% of ohmic heating power P OH was demonstrated. m/n=2/1 mode MHD-activity developed before disruption (with characteristic time ∼ 120 ms) can be considered as disruption precursor and can be used in a feedback system. 'Possibility of an Internal Transport Barrier Producing under Dominating Electron Transport in the T-10 Tokamak' - The reversed shear experiments were carried out on T-10 at the HF power up to 1MW. The reversed shear in the core was produced by on-axis ECCD in direction opposite to the plasma current. There are no obvious signs of Internal Transport Barriers formation under condition when high-k turbulence determines the electron transport. (author)

  12. Dynamic replenishment, production, and pricing decisions in the face of supply disruption and random price-sensitive demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Stuart X.

    2013-01-01

    We study a joint decision problem for replenishment, production, pricing strategies in the face of both supply and demand uncertainties. The supply of the raw material suffers from a potential supply disruption while the demand for the finished goods is price-sensitive and random. We assume that the

  13. Developmental Thyroid Hormone (TH) Disruption: In Search of Sensitive Bioindicators of Altered TH-Dependent Signaling in Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for brain development, yet clear indicators of disruption at low levels of TH insufficiency have yet to be identified. Brain TH is difficult to measure, but TH-responsive genes can serve as sensitive indicators of TH action in brain. A large nu...

  14. Developmental Thyroid Hormone (TH) Disruption: In Search of Sensitive Bioindicators of Altered TH-Dependent Signaling in Brain###

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for brain development, yet clear indicators of disruption at low levels of TH insufficiency have yet to be identified. Brain TH is difficult to measure, but TH-responsive genes can serve as sensitive indicators of TH action in brain. A large nu...

  15. Disruption of the Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Toshiyasu; Tischkowitz, Marc; Ameziane, Najim; Hodgson, Shirley V; Mathew, Christopher G; Joenje, Hans; Mok, Samuel C; D'Andrea, Alan D

    2003-05-01

    Ovarian tumor cells are often genomically unstable and hypersensitive to cisplatin. To understand the molecular basis for this phenotype, we examined the integrity of the Fanconi anemia-BRCA (FANC-BRCA) pathway in those cells. This pathway regulates cisplatin sensitivity and is governed by the coordinate activity of six genes associated with Fanconi anemia (FANCA, FANCC, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF and FANCG) as well as BRCA1 and BRCA2 (FANCD1). Here we show that the FANC-BRCA pathway is disrupted in a subset of ovarian tumor lines. Mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2, a measure of the function of this pathway, and cisplatin resistance were restored by functional complementation with FANCF, a gene that is upstream in this pathway. FANCF inactivation in ovarian tumors resulted from methylation of its CpG island, and acquired cisplatin resistance correlated with demethylation of FANCF. We propose a model for ovarian tumor progression in which the initial methylation of FANCF is followed by FANCF demethylation and ultimately results in cisplatin resistance.

  16. First- and second-order contrast sensitivity functions reveal disrupted visual processing following mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Daniel P; Reynaud, Alexandre; Ruiz, Tatiana; Laguë-Beauvais, Maude; Hess, Robert; Farivar, Reza

    2016-05-01

    Vision is disrupted by traumatic brain injury (TBI), with vision-related complaints being amongst the most common in this population. Based on the neural responses of early visual cortical areas, injury to the visual cortex would be predicted to affect both 1(st) order and 2(nd) order contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs)-the height and/or the cut-off of the CSF are expected to be affected by TBI. Previous studies have reported disruptions only in 2(nd) order contrast sensitivity, but using a narrow range of parameters and divergent methodologies-no study has characterized the effect of TBI on the full CSF for both 1(st) and 2(nd) order stimuli. Such information is needed to properly understand the effect of TBI on contrast perception, which underlies all visual processing. Using a unified framework based on the quick contrast sensitivity function, we measured full CSFs for static and dynamic 1(st) and 2(nd) order stimuli. Our results provide a unique dataset showing alterations in sensitivity for both 1(st) and 2(nd) order visual stimuli. In particular, we show that TBI patients have increased sensitivity for 1(st) order motion stimuli and decreased sensitivity to orientation-defined and contrast-defined 2(nd) order stimuli. In addition, our data suggest that TBI patients' sensitivity for both 1(st) order stimuli and 2(nd) order contrast-defined stimuli is shifted towards higher spatial frequencies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Specificity of Reward Sensitivity and Parasympathetic-Based Regulation among Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity and Disruptive Behavior Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Rachel B; Musser, Erica D; Raiker, Joseph S; Coles, Erika K; Gnagy, Elizabeth M; Pelham, William E

    2018-07-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with disruptionsin reward sensitivity and regulatory processes. However, it is unclear whether thesedisruptions are better explained by comorbid disruptive behavior disorder (DBD)symptomology. This study sought to examine this question using multiple levels ofanalysis (i.e., behavior, autonomic reactivity). One hundred seventeen children (aged 6 to 12 years; 72.6% male; 69 with ADHD) completed theBalloon-Analogue Risk Task (BART) to assess external reward sensitivity behaviorally.Sympathetic-based internal reward sensitivity and parasympathetic-based regulationwere indexed via cardiac pre-ejection period (PEP) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia(RSA), respectively. Children with ADHD exhibited reduced internal reward sensitivity (i.e.,lengthened PEP; F(1,112)=4.01, p=0.047) compared to healthy controls and werecharacterized by greater parasympathetic-based dysregulation (i.e., reduced RSAaugmentation F(1,112)=10.12, p=0.002). However, follow-up analyses indicated theADHD effect was better accounted for by comorbid DBD diagnoses; that is, childrenwith ADHD and comorbid ODD were characterized by reduced internal rewardsensitivity (i.e., lengthened PEP; t=2.47, p=0.046) and by parasympathetic-baseddysregulation (i.e., reduced RSA augmentation; t=3.51, p=0.002) in response to rewardwhen compared to typically developing youth. Furthermore, children with ADHD and comorbid CD exhibited greater behaviorally-based external reward sensitivity (i.e.,more total pops; F(3,110)= 5.96, p=0.001) compared to children with ADHD only (t=3.87, p=0.001) and children with ADHD and ODD (t=3.56, p=0.003). Results suggest that disruptions in sensitivity to reward may be betteraccounted for, in part, by comorbid DBD.Key Words: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autonomic nervous system,disruptive behavior disorders, reward sensitivityPowered.

  18. Fast IR diodes thermometer for tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiangbo

    2001-01-01

    A 30 channel fast IR pyrometry array has been constructed for tokamak, which has 0.5 μs time response, 10 mm diameter spatial resolution and 5 degree C temperature resolution. The temperature measuring range is from 250 degree C to 1200 degree C. The two dimensional temperature profiles of the first wall during both major and minor disruptions can be measured with an accuracy of about 1% measuring temperature, which is adequate for tokamak experiments. This gives a very useful tool for the disruption study, especially for the divertor physics and edge heat flux research on tokamak and other magnetic confinement devices

  19. Continuous tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-04-01

    A tokamak configuration is proposed that permits the rapid replacement of a plasma discharge in a ''burn'' chamber by another one in a time scale much shorter than the elementary thermal time constant of the chamber first wall. With respect to the chamber, the effective duty cycle factor can thus be made arbitrarily close to unity minimizing the cyclic thermal stress in the first wall. At least one plasma discharge always exists in the new tokamak configuration, hence, a continuous tokamak. By incorporating adiabatic toroidal compression, configurations of continuous tokamak compressors are introduced. To operate continuous tokamaks, it is necessary to introduce the concept of mixed poloidal field coils, which spatially groups all the poloidal field coils into three sets, all contributing simultaneously to inducing the plasma current and maintaining the proper plasma shape and position. Preliminary numerical calculations of axisymmetric MHD equilibria in continuous tokamaks indicate the feasibility of their continued plasma operation. Advanced concepts of continuous tokamaks to reduce the topological complexity and to allow the burn plasma aspect ratio to decrease for increased beta are then suggested

  20. Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of the new large tokamaks JET, JT-60 and TFTR important advances in magnetic confinement have been made. These include the exploitation of radio frequency and neutral beam heating on a much larger scale than previously, the demonstration of regimes of improved confinement and the demonstration of current drive at the Megamp level. A number of small and medium sized tokamaks have also come into operation recently such as WT-3 in Japan with an emphasis on radio frequency current drive and HL-1 a medium sized tokamak in China. Each of these new tokamaks is addressing specific problems which remain for the future development of the system. Of these particular problems: β, density and q limits remain important issues for the future development of the tokamak. β limits are being addressed on the DIII-D device in the USA. The anomalous confinement that the tokamak displays is being explored in detail on the TEXT device in the USA. Two other problems are impurity control and current drive. There is significant emphasis on divertor configurations at the present time with their enhanced confinement in the so called H mode. Due to improved discharge cleaning techniques and the ability to repetitively refuel using pellets, purer plasmas can be obtained even without divertors. Current drive remains a crucial issue for quasi of near steady state operation of the tokamak in the future and many current drive schemes are being investigated. (author) [pt

  1. Microarray analysis identifies keratin loci as sensitive biomarkers for thyroid hormone disruption in the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Robert B; Monaghan, James R; Samuels, Amy K; Smith, Jeramiah J; Beachy, Christopher K; Voss, S Randal

    2007-02-01

    Ambystomatid salamanders offer several advantages for endocrine disruption research, including genomic and bioinformatics resources, an accessible laboratory model (Ambystoma mexicanum), and natural lineages that are broadly distributed among North American habitats. We used microarray analysis to measure the relative abundance of transcripts isolated from A. mexicanum epidermis (skin) after exogenous application of thyroid hormone (TH). Only one gene had a >2-fold change in transcript abundance after 2 days of TH treatment. However, hundreds of genes showed significantly different transcript levels at days 12 and 28 in comparison to day 0. A list of 123 TH-responsive genes was identified using statistical, BLAST, and fold level criteria. Cluster analysis identified two groups of genes with similar transcription patterns: up-regulated versus down-regulated. Most notably, several keratins exhibited dramatic (1000 fold) increases or decreases in transcript abundance. Keratin gene expression changes coincided with morphological remodeling of epithelial tissues. This suggests that keratin loci can be developed as sensitive biomarkers to assay temporal disruptions of larval-to-adult gene expression programs. Our study has identified the first collection of loci that are regulated during TH-induced metamorphosis in a salamander, thus setting the stage for future investigations of TH disruption in the Mexican axolotl and other salamanders of the genus Ambystoma.

  2. Statistical analysis of JET disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanga, A.; Johnson, M.F.

    1991-07-01

    In the operation of JET and of any tokamak many discharges are terminated by a major disruption. The disruptive termination of a discharge is usually an unwanted event which may cause damage to the structure of the vessel. In a reactor disruptions are potentially a very serious problem, hence the importance of studying them and devising methods to avoid disruptions. Statistical information has been collected about the disruptions which have occurred at JET over a long span of operations. The analysis is focused on the operational aspects of the disruptions rather than on the underlining physics. (Author)

  3. Study of current oscillations and hard x-ray emissions in pre-cursor phase of major disruptions in Damavand tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amrollahi, R.

    2002-01-01

    We notice that the hard x-ray activity before disruption consists of a series of spikes, uniformly distributed in time domain forming an orderly periodic series of oscillations at a frequency of 6.0 kHz. Disruption starts with an initial fast rise followed by decay. Current decay occurs in two regimes: the first corresponds to slow decay, in which the current is oscillating and reducing down to ∼70% its max value, and the second corresponds to fast decay, in which it totally vanishes abruptly in about 0.2 ms. In the first regime, the loop voltage also oscillates with considerable amplitude. The frequency of oscillations in the first regime is measured to be also about 6.0 kHz. As well, they follow the oscillation phase of hard x-rays. Thus the micro-instabilities driven by runaway electrons, being responsible for the production of hard x-rays bursts and small current oscillations, play a significant role in the disruption. (author)

  4. Disruption of the Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taniguchi, T; Tischkowitz, M; Ameziane, N.; Hodgson, SV; Mathew, C.G.; Joenje, H.; Mok, SC; Andrea, d' AD

    2003-01-01

    Ovarian tumor cells are often genomically unstable and hypersensitive to cisplatin. To understand the molecular basis for this phenotype, we examined the integrity of the Fanconi anemia-BRCA (FANC-BRCA) pathway in those cells. This pathway regulates cisplatin sensitivity and is governed by the

  5. Partial disruption of lipolysis increases postexercise insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle despite accumulation of DAG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Annette Karen Lundbeck; Alsted, Thomas Junker; Jordy, Andreas Børsting

    2016-01-01

    reactivity in vitro, we investigated if the described function of DAGs as mediators of lipid-induced insulin resistance was depending on the different DAG-isomers. We measured insulin stimulated glucose uptake in hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) knock out (KO) mice after treadmill exercise to stimulate...

  6. Understanding disruptions in tokamaksa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Galkin, Sergei A.; Gerasimov, Sergei N.; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes progress achieved since 2007 in understanding disruptions in tokamaks, when the effect of plasma current sharing with the wall was introduced into theory. As a result, the toroidal asymmetry of the plasma current measurements during vertical disruption event (VDE) on the Joint European Torus was explained. A new kind of plasma equilibria and mode coupling was introduced into theory, which can explain the duration of the external kink 1/1 mode during VDE. The paper presents first results of numerical simulations using a free boundary plasma model, relevant to disruptions.

  7. Genetic disruption of lactate/H+ symporters (MCTs) and their subunit CD147/BASIGIN sensitizes glycolytic tumor cells to phenformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiq, Ibtissam; Le Floch, Renaud; Roux, Danièle; Simon, Marie-Pierre; Pouyssegur, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing glycolytic tumors require energy and intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis through the activity of two major monocarboxylate transporters, MCT1 and the hypoxia-inducible MCT4, in intimate association with the glycoprotein CD147/BASIGIN (BSG). To further explore and validate the blockade of lactic acid export as an anticancer strategy, we disrupted, via zinc finger nucleases, MCT4 and BASIGIN genes in colon adenocarcinoma (LS174T) and glioblastoma (U87) human cell lines. First, we showed that homozygous loss of MCT4 dramatically sensitized cells to the MCT1 inhibitor AZD3965. Second, we demonstrated that knockout of BSG leads to a decrease in lactate transport activity of MCT1 and MCT4 by 10- and 6-fold, respectively. Consequently, cells accumulated an intracellular pool of lactic and pyruvic acids, magnified by the MCT1 inhibitor decreasing further pHi and glycolysis. As a result, we found that these glycolytic/MCT-deficient cells resumed growth by redirecting their metabolism toward OXPHOS. Third, we showed that in contrast with parental cells, BSG-null cells became highly sensitive to phenformin, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I. Phenformin addition to these MCT-disrupted cells in normoxic and hypoxic conditions induced a rapid drop in cellular ATP-inducing cell death by "metabolic catastrophe." Finally, xenograft analysis confirmed the deleterious tumor growth effect of MCT1/MCT4 ablation, an action enhanced by phenformin treatment. Collectively, these findings highlight that inhibition of the MCT/BSG complexes alone or in combination with phenformin provides an acute anticancer strategy to target highly glycolytic tumors. This genetic approach validates the anticancer potential of the MCT1 and MCT4 inhibitors in current development. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Disruption of ATP-sensitive potassium channel function in skeletal muscles promotes production and secretion of musclin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, Ana, E-mail: ana-sierra@uiowa.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Subbotina, Ekaterina, E-mail: ekaterina-subbotina@uiowa.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Zhu, Zhiyong, E-mail: zhiyong-zhu@uiowa.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Gao, Zhan, E-mail: zhan-gao@uiowa.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Koganti, Siva Rama Krishna, E-mail: sivaramakrishna.koganti@ttuhc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Coetzee, William A., E-mail: william.coetzee@nyumc.org [Department of Pediatrics, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Goldhamer, David J., E-mail: david.goldhamer@uconn.edu [Center for Regenerative Biology, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Advanced Technology Laboratory, University of Connecticut, 1392 Storrs Road Unit 4243, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M., E-mail: denice-zingman@uiowa.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Zingman, Leonid V., E-mail: leonid-zingman@uiowa.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, Medical Center, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2016-02-26

    Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels control skeletal muscle energy use through their ability to adjust membrane excitability and related cell functions in accordance with cellular metabolic status. Mice with disrupted skeletal muscle K{sub ATP} channels exhibit reduced adipocyte size and increased fatty acid release into the circulation. As yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying this link between skeletal muscle K{sub ATP} channel function and adipose mobilization have not been established. Here, we demonstrate that skeletal muscle-specific disruption of K{sub ATP} channel function in transgenic (TG) mice promotes production and secretion of musclin. Musclin is a myokine with high homology to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) that enhances ANP signaling by competing for elimination. Augmented musclin production in TG mice is driven by a molecular cascade resulting in enhanced acetylation and nuclear exclusion of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) – an inhibitor of transcription of the musclin encoding gene. Musclin production/secretion in TG is paired with increased mobilization of fatty acids and a clear trend toward increased circulating ANP, an activator of lipolysis. These data establish K{sub ATP} channel-dependent musclin production as a potential mechanistic link coupling “local” skeletal muscle energy consumption with mobilization of bodily resources from fat. Understanding such mechanisms is an important step toward designing interventions to manage metabolic disorders including those related to excess body fat and associated co-morbidities. - Highlights: • ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels regulate musclin production by skeletal muscles. • Lipolytic ANP signaling is promoted by augmented skeletal muscle musclin production. • Skeletal muscle musclin transcription is promoted by a CaMKII/HDAC/FOXO1 pathway. • Musclin links adipose mobilization to energy use in K{sub ATP} channel deficient skeletal muscle.

  9. Disruption of ATP-sensitive potassium channel function in skeletal muscles promotes production and secretion of musclin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra, Ana; Subbotina, Ekaterina; Zhu, Zhiyong; Gao, Zhan; Koganti, Siva Rama Krishna; Coetzee, William A.; Goldhamer, David J.; Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M.; Zingman, Leonid V.

    2016-01-01

    Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium (K_A_T_P) channels control skeletal muscle energy use through their ability to adjust membrane excitability and related cell functions in accordance with cellular metabolic status. Mice with disrupted skeletal muscle K_A_T_P channels exhibit reduced adipocyte size and increased fatty acid release into the circulation. As yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying this link between skeletal muscle K_A_T_P channel function and adipose mobilization have not been established. Here, we demonstrate that skeletal muscle-specific disruption of K_A_T_P channel function in transgenic (TG) mice promotes production and secretion of musclin. Musclin is a myokine with high homology to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) that enhances ANP signaling by competing for elimination. Augmented musclin production in TG mice is driven by a molecular cascade resulting in enhanced acetylation and nuclear exclusion of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) – an inhibitor of transcription of the musclin encoding gene. Musclin production/secretion in TG is paired with increased mobilization of fatty acids and a clear trend toward increased circulating ANP, an activator of lipolysis. These data establish K_A_T_P channel-dependent musclin production as a potential mechanistic link coupling “local” skeletal muscle energy consumption with mobilization of bodily resources from fat. Understanding such mechanisms is an important step toward designing interventions to manage metabolic disorders including those related to excess body fat and associated co-morbidities. - Highlights: • ATP-sensitive K"+ channels regulate musclin production by skeletal muscles. • Lipolytic ANP signaling is promoted by augmented skeletal muscle musclin production. • Skeletal muscle musclin transcription is promoted by a CaMKII/HDAC/FOXO1 pathway. • Musclin links adipose mobilization to energy use in K_A_T_P channel deficient skeletal muscle.

  10. Tokamak COMPASS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řípa, Milan; Křenek, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2011), s. 32-34 ISSN 1210-4612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : fusion * tokamak * Compass * Golem * Institute of Plasma Physics AVCR v.v * NBI * diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  11. Prenatal drug exposures sensitize noradrenergic circuits to subsequent disruption by chlorpyrifos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Seidler, Frederic J

    2015-12-02

    We examined whether nicotine or dexamethasone, common prenatal drug exposures, sensitize the developing brain to chlorpyrifos. We gave nicotine to pregnant rats throughout gestation at a dose (3mg/kg/day) producing plasma levels typical of smokers; offspring were then given chlorpyrifos on postnatal days 1-4, at a dose (1mg/kg) that produces minimally-detectable inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity. In a parallel study, we administered dexamethasone to pregnant rats on gestational days 17-19 at a standard therapeutic dose (0.2mg/kg) used in the management of preterm labor, followed by postnatal chlorpyrifos. We evaluated cerebellar noradrenergic projections, a known target for each agent, and contrasted the effects with those in the cerebral cortex. Either drug augmented the effect of chlorpyrifos, evidenced by deficits in cerebellar β-adrenergic receptors; the receptor effects were not due to increased systemic toxicity or cholinesterase inhibition, nor to altered chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics. Further, the deficits were not secondary adaptations to presynaptic hyperinnervation/hyperactivity, as there were significant deficits in presynaptic norepinephrine levels that would serve to augment the functional consequence of receptor deficits. The pretreatments also altered development of cerebrocortical noradrenergic circuits, but with a different overall pattern, reflecting the dissimilar developmental stages of the regions at the time of exposure. However, in each case the net effects represented a change in the developmental trajectory of noradrenergic circuits, rather than simply a continuation of an initial injury. Our results point to the ability of prenatal drug exposure to create a subpopulation with heightened vulnerability to environmental neurotoxicants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Disruption modeling in support of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, I.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma current disruptions and Vertical Displacement Events (VDEs) are one of the major concerns in any tokamak as they lead to large electromagnetic forces to tokamak first wall components and vacuum vessel. Their occurrence also means disruption to steady state operations of tokamaks. Thus future fusion reactors like ITER must ensure that disruptions and VDEs are minimized. However, since there is still finite probability of their occurrence, one must be able to characterize disruptions and VDEs and able to predict, for example, the plasma current quench time and halo current amplitude, which mainly determine the magnitude of the electromagnetic forces. There is a concerted effort globally to understand and predict plasma and halo current evolution during disruption in tokamaks through MHD simulations. Even though Disruption and VDEs are often 3D MHD perturbations in nature, presently they are mostly simulated using 2D axisymmetric MHD codes like the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) and DINA. These codes are also extensively benchmarked against experimental data in present day tokamaks to improve these models and their ability to predict these events in ITER. More detailed 3D models like M3D are only recently being developed, but they are yet to be benchmarked against experiments, as also they are massively computationally exhaustive

  13. Spectral measurements of runway electrons in the TEXTOR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudyakov, Timur

    2009-01-01

    ergodic divertor (DED) runaway electrons with different energies demonstrate a different sensitivity to the DED. Again, highly relativistic electrons are less sensitive to the stochastic magnetic field than the low energy ones. Measurements of runaway electrons during the plasma disruptions have been carried out by the new probe. The probe has shown two distinct losses of runaways during the thermal quench (runaways were produced at the start up of the discharge) and during the current quench (runaways were produced due to the dissipation of the magnetic field). Important parameters, such as the runaway flux, the energy distribution, the temporal evolution and the thermal load in materials have been studied. The obtained results allow to estimate the thermal load due to runaway electrons in the ITER tokamak. (orig.)

  14. Spectral measurements of runway electrons in the TEXTOR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudyakov, Timur

    2009-07-22

    ergodic divertor (DED) runaway electrons with different energies demonstrate a different sensitivity to the DED. Again, highly relativistic electrons are less sensitive to the stochastic magnetic field than the low energy ones. Measurements of runaway electrons during the plasma disruptions have been carried out by the new probe. The probe has shown two distinct losses of runaways during the thermal quench (runaways were produced at the start up of the discharge) and during the current quench (runaways were produced due to the dissipation of the magnetic field). Important parameters, such as the runaway flux, the energy distribution, the temporal evolution and the thermal load in materials have been studied. The obtained results allow to estimate the thermal load due to runaway electrons in the ITER tokamak. (orig.)

  15. Affective Disruption from Social Rhythm and Behavioral Approach System (BAS) Sensitivities: A Test of the Integration of the Social Zeitgeber and BAS Theories of Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Elaine M; Stange, Jonathan P; Labelle, Denise R; Shapero, Benjamin G; Weiss, Rachel B; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2016-05-01

    The Behavioral Approach System (BAS)/Reward Hypersensitivity Theory and the Social Zeitgeber Theory are two biopsychosocial theories of bipolar spectrum disorders (BSD) that may work together to explain affective dysregulation. The present study examined whether BAS sensitivity is associated with affective symptoms via a) increased social rhythm disruption in response to BAS-relevant life events, or b) greater exposure to BAS events leading to social rhythm disruption and subsequent symptoms. Results indicated that high BAS individuals were more likely to experience social rhythm disruption following BAS-relevant events. Social rhythm disruption mediated the association between BAS-relevant events and symptoms (hypothesis a). High BAS individuals experienced significantly more BAS-relevant events, which predicted greater social rhythm disruption, which predicted greater levels of affective symptoms (hypothesis b). Individuals at risk for BSD may be sensitive to BAS-relevant stimuli, experience more BAS-relevant events, and experience affective dysregulation due to the interplay of the BAS and circadian rhythms.

  16. Velocity-space sensitivities of neutron emission spectrometers at the tokamaks JET and ASDEX upgrade in deuterium plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, A.S.; Binda, F.; Cazzaniga, C.

    2017-01-01

    systems such as neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron resonance heating. In order to diagnose these fast ions, several different fast-ion diagnostics have been developed and implemented in the various experiments around the world. The velocity-space sensitivities of fast-ion diagnostics are given by so......Future fusion reactors are foreseen to be heated by the energetic alpha particles produced in fusion reactions. For this to happen, it is important that the energetic ions are sufficiently confined. In present day fusion experiments, energetic ions are primarily produced using external heating...

  17. Robust Sliding Mode Control for Tokamaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Garrido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion has arisen as an alternative energy to avoid carbon dioxide emissions, being the tokamak a promising nuclear fusion reactor that uses a magnetic field to confine plasma in the shape of a torus. However, different kinds of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities may affect tokamak plasma equilibrium, causing severe reduction of particle confinement and leading to plasma disruptions. In this sense, numerous efforts and resources have been devoted to seeking solutions for the different plasma control problems so as to avoid energy confinement time decrements in these devices. In particular, since the growth rate of the vertical instability increases with the internal inductance, lowering the internal inductance is a fundamental issue to address for the elongated plasmas employed within the advanced tokamaks currently under development. In this sense, this paper introduces a lumped parameter numerical model of the tokamak in order to design a novel robust sliding mode controller for the internal inductance using the transformer primary coil as actuator.

  18. Varennes Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumyn, P.B.

    A consortium of five organizations under the leadership of IREQ, the Institute de Recherche d'Hydro-Quebec has completed a conceptual design study for a tokamak device, and in January 1981 its construction was authorized with funding being provided principally by Hydro-Quebec and the National Research Council, as well as by the Ministre d'Education du Quebec and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). The device will form the focus of Canada's magnetic-fusion program and will be located in IREQ's laboratories in Varennes. Presently the machine layout is being finalized from the physics point of view and work has started on equipment design and specification. The Tokamak de Varennes will be an experimental device, the purpose of which is to study plasma and other fusion related phenomena. In particular it will study: 1. Plasma impurities and plasma/liner interaction; 2. Long pulse or quasi-continuous operation using plasma rampdown and eventually plasma current reversal in order to maintain the plasma; and 3. Advanced diagnostics

  19. JET and COMPASS asymmetrical disruptions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gerasimov, S.N.; Abreu, P.; Baruzzo, M.; Drozdov, V.; Dvornova, A.; Havlíček, Josef; Hender, T.C.; Hronová-Bilyková, Olena; Kruezi, U.; Li, X.; Markovič, Tomáš; Pánek, Radomír; Rubinacci, G.; Tsalas, M.; Ventre, S.; Villone, F.; Zakharov, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 11 (2015), s. 113006-113006 ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * asymmetrical disruption * JET * COMPASS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015

  20. Plasma radiation in tokamak disruption simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Safronov, V.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Zhitlukhin, A.; Wuerz, H.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma impact results in sudden evaporation of divertor plate material and produces a plasma cloud which acts as a protective shield. The incoming energy flux is absorbed in the plasma shield and is converted mainly into radiation. Thus the radiative characteristics of the target plasma determine the dissipation of the incoming energy and the heat load at the target. Radiation of target plasma is studied at the two plasma gun facility 2MK-200 at Troitsk. Space- and time-resolved spectroscopy and time-integrated space-resolved calorimetry are employed as diagnostics. Graphite and tungsten samples are exposed to deuterium plasma streams. It is found that the radiative characteristics depend strongly on the target material. Tungsten plasma arises within 1 micros close to the surface and shows continuum radiation only. Expansion of tungsten plasma is restricted. For a graphite target the plasma shield is a mixture of carbon and deuterium. It expands along the magnetic field lines with a velocity of v = (3--4) 10 6 cm/s. The plasma shield is a two zone plasma with a hot low dense corona and a cold dense layer close to the target. The plasma corona emits intense soft x-ray (SXR) line radiation in the frequency range from 300--380 eV mainly from CV ions. It acts as effective dissipation system and converts volumetrically the incoming energy flux into SXR radiation

  1. Erosion products in disruption simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Barsuk, V.; Kurkin, S.; Mironova, E.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Zhitlukhin, A.; Arkhipov, I.; Werle, H.; Wuerz, H.

    1998-01-01

    Erosion of divertor materials under tokamak disruption event presents a serious problem of ITER technology. Erosion restricts the divertor lifetime and leads to production of redeposited layers of the material retaining large amount of tritium, which is a major safety issue for future fusion reactor. Since ITER disruptive heat loads are not achievable in existing tokamaks, material erosion is studied in special simulation experiments. Till now the simulation experiments have focused mainly on investigation of shielding effect and measurement of erosion rate. In the present work the properties of eroded and redeposited graphite are studied under condition typical for hard ITER disruption. (author)

  2. Tokamaks - Third Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A L

    2004-01-01

    an introduction to diagnostics for tokamaks. The complexity of fusion plasmas is attested to by the discovery of new phenomena and new operational regimes as machine size and power increased and the diagnostic tools improved over the forty years of research on magnetic confinement. The history of those discoveries in the devices which have been built worldwide after the results obtained on the first tokamaks at the Kurchatov Institute had been confirmed is outlined in chapters 11-12. Particular emphasis is naturally given to the results from the larger tokamaks: ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, TFTR, JT-60/JT-60U and JET. Chapter 13 is devoted to the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor and prospects beyond ITER. Examples of operational regimes and of often unexpected phenomena are the linear and saturated ohmic confinement modes, confinement degradation when auxiliary heating is applied, the high energy confinement mode, the formation of internal transport barriers in weak or negative central shear discharges, sawtooth relaxations, disruptions, multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge, edge localised modes, etc. The relevant observations are described very thoroughly with the support of numerous selected figures and their physical interpretation, a major topic of the book, is carefully discussed on the basis of simplified but convincing mathematical models. With respect to the previous edition (1997), a few additions have been introduced; those concern plasma rotation (section 3.13), internal transport barriers (4.14), the role of radial electric field shear (4.19), turbulence simulations (4.21), impurity transport (4.22) and neoclassical drive of tearing modes (7.3). It is my personal feeling that some of those additions should have been somewhat more elaborated. A few pages have finally been added concerning the TCV, START, MAST, NSTX and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks. With this book, John Wesson offers the fusion community a very precious and thorough survey of

  3. Runaway acceleration during magnetic reconnection in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P; Eriksson, L-G; Andersson, F

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the basic theory of runaway electron production is reviewed and recent progress is discussed. The mechanisms of primary and secondary generation of runaway electrons are described and their dynamics during a tokamak disruption is analysed, both in a simple analytical model and through numerical Monte Carlo simulation. A simple criterion for when these mechanisms generate a significant runaway current is derived, and the first self-consistent simulations of the electron kinetics in a tokamak disruption are presented. Radial cross-field diffusion is shown to inhibit runaway avalanches, as indicated in recent experiments on JET and JT-60U. Finally, the physics of relativistic post-disruption runaway electrons is discussed, in particular their slowing down due to emission of synchrotron radiation, and their ability to produce electron-positron pairs in collisions with bulk plasma ions and electrons

  4. PPPL tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1984-10-01

    The economic prospects of the tokamak are reviewed briefly and found to be favorable - if the size of ignited tokamak plasmas can be kept small and appropriate auxiliary systems can be developed. The main objectives of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory tokamak program are: (1) exploration of the physics of high-temperature toroidal confinement, in TFTR; (2) maximization of the tokamak beta value, in PBX; (3) development of reactor-relevant rf techniques, in PLT

  5. Executive Functions and Child Problem Behaviors Are Sensitive to Family Disruption: A Study of Children of Mothers Working Overseas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewage, Chandana; Bohlin, Gunilla; Wijewardena, Kumudu; Lindmark, Gunilla

    2011-01-01

    Mothers in Sri Lanka are increasingly seeking overseas employment, resulting in disruption of the childcare environment. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of maternal migration on executive function (EF) and behavior, thereby also contributing to the scientific understanding of environmental effects--or more specifically…

  6. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The technical reports in this document were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting ''Research on Small Tokamaks'', September 1990, in three sessions, viz., (1) Plasma Modes, Control, and Internal Phenomena, (2) Edge Phenomena, and (3) Advanced Configurations and New Facilities. In Section (1) experiments at controlling low mode number modes, feedback control using external coils, lower-hybrid current drive for the stabilization of sawtooth activity and continuous (1,1) mode, and unmodulated and fast modulated ECRH mode stabilization experiments were reported, as well as the relation to disruptions and transport of low m,n modes and magnetic island growth; static magnetic perturbations by helical windings causing mode locking and sawtooth suppression; island widths and frequency of the m=2 tearing mode; ultra-fast cooling due to pellet injection; and, finally, some papers on advanced diagnostics, i.e., lithium-beam activated charge-exchange spectroscopy, and detection through laser scattering of discrete Alfven waves. In Section (2), experimental edge physics results from a number of machines were presented (positive biasing on HYBTOK II enhancing the radial electric field and improving confinement; lower hybrid current drive on CASTOR improving global particle confinement, good current drive efficiency in HT-6B showing stabilization of sawteeth and Mirnov oscillations), as well as diagnostic developments (multi-chord time resolved soft and ultra-soft X-ray plasma radiation detection on MT-1; measurements on electron capture cross sections in multi-charged ion-atom collisions; development of a diagnostic neutral beam on Phaedrus-T). Theoretical papers discussed the influence of sheared flow and/or active feedback on edge microstability, large edge electric fields, and two-fluid modelling of non-ambipolar scrape-off layers. Section (3) contained (i) a proposal to construct a spherical tokamak ''Proto-Eta'', (ii) an analysis of ultra-low-q and runaway

  7. Status of tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, J.M.

    1979-10-01

    An overall review of the tokamak program is given with particular emphasis upon developments over the past five years in the theoretical and experimental elements of the program. A summary of the key operating parameters for the principal tokamaks throughout the world is given. Also discussed are key issues in plasma confinement, plasma heating, and tokamak design

  8. Steady State Advanced Tokamak (SSAT): The mission and the machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.; Goldston, R.; Nevins, B.; Neilson, H.; Shannon, T.; Montgomery, B.

    1992-03-01

    Extending the tokamak concept to the steady state regime and pursuing advances in tokamak physics are important and complementary steps for the magnetic fusion energy program. The required transition away from inductive current drive will provide exciting opportunities for advances in tokamak physics, as well as important impetus to drive advances in fusion technology. Recognizing this, the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee and the US National Energy Strategy identified the development of steady state tokamak physics and technology, and improvements in the tokamak concept, as vital elements in the magnetic fusion energy development plan. Both called for the construction of a steady state tokamak facility to address these plan elements. Advances in physics that produce better confinement and higher pressure limits are required for a similar unit size reactor. Regimes with largely self-driven plasma current are required to permit a steady-state tokamak reactor with acceptable recirculating power. Reliable techniques of disruption control will be needed to achieve the availability goals of an economic reactor. Thus the central role of this new tokamak facility is to point the way to a more attractive demonstration reactor (DEMO) than the present data base would support. To meet the challenges, we propose a new ''Steady State Advanced Tokamak'' (SSAT) facility that would develop and demonstrate optimized steady state tokamak operating mode. While other tokamaks in the world program employ superconducting toroidal field coils, SSAT would be the first major tokamak to operate with a fully superconducting coil set in the elongated, divertor geometry planned for ITER and DEMO

  9. High performance operational limits of tokamak and helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Kozo; Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    The plasma operational boundaries of tokamak and helical systems are surveyed and compared with each other. Global confinement scaling laws are similar and gyro-Bohm like, however, local transport process is different due to sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks and ripple transport loss in helical systems. As for stability limits, achievable tokamak beta is explained by ideal or resistive MHD theories. On the other hand, beta values obtained so far in helical system are beyond ideal Mercier mode limits. Density limits in tokamak are often related to the coupling between radiation collapse and disruptive MHD instabilities, but the slow radiation collapse is dominant in the helical system. The pulse length of both tokamak and helical systems is on the order of hours in small machines, and the longer-pulsed good-confinement plasma operations compatible with radiative divertors are anticipated in both systems in the future. (author)

  10. Abnormal energy deposition on the wall through plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    The dissipation of plasma kinetic and magnetic energy during sawtooth oscillations and disruptions in tokamak is analyzed using Kadomtsev's disruption model and the plasma-circuit equations. New simple scalings of several characteristic times are obtained for sawteeth and for thermal and magnetic energy quenches of disruptions. The abnormal energy deposition on the wall during major or minor disruptions, estimated from this analysis, is compared with bolometric measurements in the PDX tokamak. Especially, magnetic energy dissipation during the current termination period is shown to be reduced by the strong coupling of the plasma current with external circuits. These analyses are found to be useful to predict the phenomenological behavior of plasma disruptions in large future tokamaks, and to estimate abnormal heat deposition on the wall during plasma disruptions. (orig.)

  11. Abnormal energy deposition on the wall through plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1984-07-01

    The dissipation of plasma kinetic and magnetic energy during sawtooth oscillstions and disruptions in tokamaks is analyzed using Kadomtsev's disruption model and the plasma-circuit equations. New simple scalings of several characteristic times are obtained for sawteeth and for thermal and magnetic energy quenches of disruptions. The abnormal energy deposition on the wall during major or minor disruptions, estimated from this analysis, is compared with bolometric measurements in the PDX tokamak. Especially, magnetic energy dissipation during current termination period is shown to be reduced by the strong coupling of the plasma current with external circuits. These analyses are found to be useful to predict the phenomenological behavior of plasma disruptions in large future tokamaks, and to estimate abnormal heat deposition on the wall during plasma disruptions. (author)

  12. Tokamak Systems Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged

  13. Diffusion in a tokamak with helical magnetic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, Masahiro

    1975-05-01

    In a tokamak with helical magnetic cells produced by a resonant helical magnetic field, diffusion in the collisional regime is studied. The diffusion coefficient is greatly enhanced near the resonant surface even for a weak helical magnetic field. A theoretical model for disruptive instabilities based on the enhanced transport due to helical magnetic cells is discussed. This may explain experiments of the tokamak with resonant helical fields qualitatively. (author)

  14. Mitigation of current quench by runaway electrons in LHCD discharges in the HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, H.W.; Hu, L.Q.; Lin, S.Y.; Zhong, G.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Production of runaway electrons during a major disruption has been observed in HT-7 Tokamak. The runaway current plateaus, which can carry part of the pre-disruptive current, are observed in lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) limiter discharges. It is found that the runaway current can mitigate the disruptions effectively. Detailed observations are presented on the runaway electrons generated following disruptions in the HT-7 tokamak with carbon limited discharges. The results indicate that the magnetic oscillations play an important role in the activity of runaway electrons in disruption. (author)

  15. Current disruption in toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    Attempts at raising the density or the plasma current in a tokamak above certain critical values generally result in termination of the discharge by a disruption. This sudden end of the plasma current and plasma confinement is accompanied by large induced voltages and currents in the outer structures which, in large tokamaks, can only be handled with considerable effort, and which will probably only be tolerable in reactors as rare accidents. Because of its crucial importance for the construction and operation of tokamaks, this phenomenon and its theoretical interpretation were the subject of a three-day symposium organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik at Garching from February 14 to 16. (orig./HT)

  16. Tokamak devices: towards controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocheris, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Tokamak family is from Soviet Union. These devices were exclusively studied at the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow for more than ten years. The first occidental Tokamak started in 1970 at Princeton. The TFR (Tokamak Fontenay-aux-Roses) was built to be superior to the Russian T4. Tokamak future is now represented by the JET (Joint European Tokamak) [fr

  17. Configuration studies for a small-aspect-ratio tokamak stellarator hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Ware, A.

    1996-08-01

    The use of modulated toroidal coils offers a new path to the tokamak-stellarator hybrids. Low-aspect-ratio configurations can be found with robust vacuum flux surfaces and rotational transform close to the transform of a reverse-shear tokamak. These configurations have clear advantages in minimizing disruptions and their effect and in reducing tokamak current drive needs. They also allow the study of low-aspect-ratio effects on stellarator confinement in small devices

  18. Responsive and resilient supply chain network design under operational and disruption risks with delivery lead-time sensitive customers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattahi, Mohammad; Govindan, Kannan; Keyvanshokooh, Esmaeil

    2017-01-01

    We address a multi-period supply chain (SC) network design where demands of customers depend on facilities serving them based on their delivery lead-times. Potential customer demands are stochastic, and facilities’ capacity varies randomly because of possible disruptions. Accordingly, we develop...... a multi-stage stochastic program, and model disruptions’ effect on facilities’ capacity. The SC responsiveness risk is limited and, to obtain a resilient network, both mitigation and contingency strategies are exploited. Computational results on a real-life case study and randomly generated problem...... instances demonstrate the model's applicability, risk-measurement policies’ performance, and the influence of mitigation and contingency strategies on SC's resiliency....

  19. Preliminary results of MHD stability in HL-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongzhen; Ma Tengcai; Xiao Zhenggui Cai Renfang

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, MHD activities of HL-1 tokamak plasma are studied with Fourier transform and correlatio analysis. The poloidal modes m = 1, 2, 3,4 and toroidal modes n of MHD magnetic fluctuation signals are detected. Methods for suppressing MHD instabilities are suggested and tested, after MHD instabilities are studied in HL-1. The effects of MHD characteristics in the beginning stage of discharge on the whole process of discharge are analyzed. The disruption, in HL-1 device could be divided into three kinds: internal disruption, minor disruption and major disruption. The result shows that HL-1 will have a better operation condition if internal disruption appears. In is end, the stable operation region of HL-1 tokamak is also given

  20. Improvements in disruption prediction at ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aledda, R., E-mail: raffaele.aledda@diee.unica.it; Cannas, B., E-mail: cannas@diee.unica.it; Fanni, A., E-mail: fanni@diee.unica.it; Pau, A., E-mail: alessandro.pau@diee.unica.it; Sias, G., E-mail: giuliana.sias@diee.unica.it

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A disruption prediction system for AUG, based on a logistic model, is designed. • The length of the disruptive phase is set for each disruption in the training set. • The model is tested on dataset different from that used during the training phase. • The generalization capability and the aging of the model have been tested. • The predictor performance is compared with the locked mode detector. - Abstract: In large-scale tokamaks disruptions have the potential to create serious damage to the facility. Hence disruptions must be avoided, but, when a disruption is unavoidable, minimizing its severity is mandatory. A reliable detection of a disruptive event is required to trigger proper mitigation actions. To this purpose machine learning methods have been widely studied to design disruption prediction systems at ASDEX Upgrade. The training phase of the proposed approaches is based on the availability of disrupted and non-disrupted discharges. In literature disruptive configurations were assumed appearing into the last 45 ms of each disruption. Even if the achieved results in terms of correct predictions were good, it has to be highlighted that the choice of such a fixed temporal window might have limited the prediction performance. In fact, it generates confusing information in cases of disruptions with disruptive phase different from 45 ms. The assessment of a specific disruptive phase for each disruptive discharge represents a relevant issue in understanding the disruptive events. In this paper, the Mahalanobis distance is applied to define a specific disruptive phase for each disruption, and a logistic regressor has been trained as disruption predictor. The results show that enhancements on the achieved performance on disruption prediction are possible by defining a specific disruptive phase for each disruption.

  1. Improvements in disruption prediction at ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aledda, R.; Cannas, B.; Fanni, A.; Pau, A.; Sias, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A disruption prediction system for AUG, based on a logistic model, is designed. • The length of the disruptive phase is set for each disruption in the training set. • The model is tested on dataset different from that used during the training phase. • The generalization capability and the aging of the model have been tested. • The predictor performance is compared with the locked mode detector. - Abstract: In large-scale tokamaks disruptions have the potential to create serious damage to the facility. Hence disruptions must be avoided, but, when a disruption is unavoidable, minimizing its severity is mandatory. A reliable detection of a disruptive event is required to trigger proper mitigation actions. To this purpose machine learning methods have been widely studied to design disruption prediction systems at ASDEX Upgrade. The training phase of the proposed approaches is based on the availability of disrupted and non-disrupted discharges. In literature disruptive configurations were assumed appearing into the last 45 ms of each disruption. Even if the achieved results in terms of correct predictions were good, it has to be highlighted that the choice of such a fixed temporal window might have limited the prediction performance. In fact, it generates confusing information in cases of disruptions with disruptive phase different from 45 ms. The assessment of a specific disruptive phase for each disruptive discharge represents a relevant issue in understanding the disruptive events. In this paper, the Mahalanobis distance is applied to define a specific disruptive phase for each disruption, and a logistic regressor has been trained as disruption predictor. The results show that enhancements on the achieved performance on disruption prediction are possible by defining a specific disruptive phase for each disruption.

  2. Fusion technology applications of the spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.C.; Akers, R.; Allfrey, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Fusion technology applications of the spherical tokamak are presented, exploiting its high β capability, normal conducting TF coils, compact core, high natural elongation, disruption resilience and low capital cost. We concentrate here on two particular applications: a volume neutron source (VNS) for component testing and a power plant, addressing engineering and physics issues for steady state operation. The prospect of nearer term burning plasma ST devices are discussed in the conclusions. (author)

  3. Fusion technology applications of the spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.C.; Akers, R.; Allfrey, S.J.

    2001-01-01

    Fusion technology applications of the spherical tokamak are presented, exploiting its high β capability, normal conducting TF coils, compact core, high natural elongation, disruption resilience and low capital cost. We concentrate here on two particular applications: a volume neutron source (VNS) for component testing and a power plant, addressing engineering and physics issues for steady state operation. The prospect of nearer term burning plasma ST devices are discussed in the conclusions. (author)

  4. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yuntao; Wu, Weiyue; Du, Shijun

    2014-01-01

    Provides a systematic introduction to tokamaks in engineering mechanics. Includes design guides based on full mechanical analysis, which makes it possible to accurately predict load capacity and temperature increases. Presents comprehensive information on important design factors involving materials. Covers the latest advances in and up-to-date references on tokamak devices. Numerous examples reinforce the understanding of concepts and provide procedures for design. Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study of mechanical/fusion engineering with a general understanding of tokamak engineering mechanics.

  5. Half- coalescence of the m/n = 1 magnetic island in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussac, M.N.; Pellat, R.

    1986-01-01

    We show that a configuration containing an m/n = 1 magnetic island is unstable to an ideal MHD mode. The expected nonlinear implications of this instability could explain the disruptive phase of the classical sawtooth behaviour of Tokamak plasmas

  6. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yuntao; Du, Shijun

    2013-01-01

    Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study

  7. Advanced Tokamak Stability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linjin

    2015-03-01

    The intention of this book is to introduce advanced tokamak stability theory. We start with the derivation of the Grad-Shafranov equation and the construction of various toroidal flux coordinates. An analytical tokamak equilibrium theory is presented to demonstrate the Shafranov shift and how the toroidal hoop force can be balanced by the application of a vertical magnetic field in tokamaks. In addition to advanced theories, this book also discusses the intuitive physics pictures for various experimentally observed phenomena.

  8. Simulation of the scrape-off layer plasma during a disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T.D.; Crotinger, J.A.; Porter, G.D.; Smith, G.R.; Kellman, A.G.; Taylor, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of the scrape-off layer (SOL) during a disruption in the DIII-D tokamak is modeled using the 2-D UEDGE transport code. The focus is on the thermal quench phase when most of the energy content of the discharge is rapidly transported across the magnetic separatrix where it then flows to material surfaces or is radiated. Comparisons between the simulation and an experiment on the DIII-D tokamak are made with the heat flux to the divertor plate, and temperature and density profiles at the SOL midplane. The temporal response of the separate electron and ion heat-flux components to the divertor plate is calculated. The sensitivity of the solution to assumptions of electron heat-flux models and impurity radiation is investigated

  9. Tokamak confinement scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.

    1998-01-01

    The scaling of energy confinement with engineering parameters, such as plasma current and major radius, is important for establishing the size of an ignited fusion device. Tokamaks exhibit a variety of modes of operation with different confinement properties. At present there is no adequate first principles theory to predict tokamak energy confinement and the empirical scaling method is the preferred approach to designing next step tokamaks. This paper reviews a number of robust theoretical concepts, such as dimensional analysis and stability boundaries, which provide a framework for characterising and understanding tokamak confinement and, therefore, generate more confidence in using empirical laws for extrapolation to future devices. (author)

  10. Tokamak concept innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    This document contains the results of the IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Tokamak Concept Innovations held 13-17 January 1986 in Vienna. Although it is the most advanced fusion reactor concept the tokamak is not without its problems. Most of these problems should be solved within the ongoing R and D studies for the next generation of tokamaks. Emphasis for this meeting was placed on innovations that would lead to substantial improvements in a tokamak reactor, even if they involved a radical departure from present thinking

  11. Thermal deposition analysis during disruptions on DIII-D using infrared scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.L.; Hyatt, A.W.; Kellman, A.G.; Taylor, P.L.; Lasnier, C.J.

    1995-12-01

    The DIII-D tokamak generates plasma discharges with currents up to 3 MA and auxiliary input power up to 20 MW from neutral beams and 4 MW from radio frequency systems. In a disruption, a rapid loss of the plasma current and internal thermal energy occurs and the energy is deposited onto the torus graphite wall. Quantifying the spatial and temporal characteristics of the heat deposition is important for engineering and physics-related issues, particularly for designing future machines such as ITER. Using infrared scanners with a time resolution of 120 micros, measurements of the heat deposition onto the all-graphite walls of DIII-D during two types of disruptions have been made. Each scanner contains a single point detector sensitive to 8--12 microm radiation, allowing surface temperatures from 20 C to 2,000 C to be measured. A zinc selenide window that transmits in the infrared is used as the vacuum window. Views of the upper and lower divertor regions and the centerpost provide good coverage of the first wall for single and double null divertor discharges. During disruptions, the thermal energy is not deposited evenly onto the inner surface of the tokamak, but is deposited primarily in the divertor region when operating diverted discharges. Analysis of the heat deposition during a radiative collapse disruption of a 1.5 MA discharge revealed power densities of 300--350 MW/m 2 in the divertor region. During the thermal quench of the disruption, the energy deposited onto the divertor region was more than 70% of the stored thermal energy in the discharge prior to the disruption. The spatial distribution and temporal behavior of power deposition during high β disruptions will also be presented

  12. Disruption studies on ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautasso, G.; Egorov, S.; Finken, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    Disruptions generate large thermal and mechanical stresses on the tokamak components and are occasionally responsible for damages to the machine. For a future reactor disruptions have a significant impact on the design since all loading conditions must be analyzed in accordance with stricter design criteria (due to safety or difficult maintenance). Therefore the uncertainties affecting the predicted stresses must be reduced as much as possible with a more comprehensive set of measurements and analyses in this generation of experimental machines, and avoidance/predictive methods must be developed further. Disruption studies on ASDEX Upgrade are focused on these subjects, namely on: (1) understanding the physical mechanisms leading to this phenomenon in order to learn to avoid it or to predict its occurrence and to mitigate its effects; (2) analyzing the effects of disruptions on the machine to determine the functional dependence of the thermal and mechanical loads upon the discharge parameters. This allows, firstly, to dimension or reinforce the machine components to withstand these loads and, secondly, to extrapolate them to tokamaks still in the design phase; (3) learning to mitigate the consequence of disruptions, i.e. thermal loads, mechanical forces and runaways with injection of impurity pellets or gas. This paper is focused on most recent results concerning points, i.e. on the analysis of the degree of asymmetry of the forces and on the use of impurity puff for mitigation

  13. Disruption studies in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautasso, G.

    2002-01-01

    Disruption generate large thermal and mechanical stresses on the tokamak components. For a future reactor disruptions have a significant impact on the design since all loading conditions must be analyzed in accordance with stricter design criteria (due to safety or difficult maintenance). Therefore the uncertainties affecting the predicted stresses must be reduced as much as possible with a more comprehensive set of measurements and analyses in this generation of experimental machines, and avoidance/ predictive methods must be developed further. The study of disruptions on ASDEX Upgrade is focused on these subjects, namely on: (1) understanding the physical mechanisms leading to this phenomenon and learning to avoid it or to predict its occurrence (with neural networks, for example) and to mitigate its effects; (2) analyzing the effects of disruptions on the machine to determine the functional dependence of the thermal and mechanical loads upon the discharge parameters. This allows to dimension or reinforce the machine components to withstand these loads and to extrapolate them to tokamaks still in the design phase; (3) learning to mitigate the consequence of disruptions. (author)

  14. Adenoviral gene transfer of PLD1-D4 enhances insulin sensitivity in mice by disrupting phospholipase D1 interaction with PED/PEA-15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Cassese

    Full Text Available Over-expression of phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PED/PEA-15 causes insulin resistance by interacting with the D4 domain of phospholipase D1 (PLD1. Indeed, the disruption of this association restores insulin sensitivity in cultured cells over-expressing PED/PEA-15. Whether the displacement of PLD1 from PED/PEA-15 improves insulin sensitivity in vivo has not been explored yet. In this work we show that treatment with a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the human D4 cDNA (Ad-D4 restores normal glucose homeostasis in transgenic mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Tg ped/pea-15 by improving both insulin sensitivity and secretion. In skeletal muscle of these mice, D4 over-expression inhibited PED/PEA-15-PLD1 interaction, decreased Protein Kinase C alpha activation and restored insulin induced Protein Kinase C zeta activation, leading to amelioration of insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Interestingly, Ad-D4 administration improved insulin sensitivity also in high-fat diet treated obese C57Bl/6 mice. We conclude that PED/PEA-15-PLD1 interaction may represent a novel target for interventions aiming at improving glucose tolerance.

  15. Integrated disruption avoidance and mitigation in KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jayhyun; Woo, M.H.; Han, H.; In, Y.; Bak, J.G.; Eidietis, N.W.

    2014-01-01

    The final target of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) aims advanced tokamak operation at plasma current 2 MA and toroidal field 3.5 T. In order to safely achieve the target, disruption counter-measures are unavoidable when considering the disruption risks, inevitably accompanied with high performance discharges, such as electro-magnetic load on conducting structures, collisional damage by run-away electrons, and thermal load on plasma facing components (PFCs). In this reason, the establishment of integrated disruption mitigation system (DMS) has been started for routine mega-ampere class operations of KSTAR since 2013 campaign. The DMS mainly consists of the disruption prediction and its avoidance/mitigation in company with logical/technical integration of them. We present the details of KSTAR DMS and the related experimental results in this article. (author)

  16. Effect of recycling in the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongzhen

    2004-01-01

    Tokamak plasma discharge disruption at high density is investigated. The instability analysis on model indicates that the disruption is resulted from the energy loss arising from hydrogen recycling on the edge of the plasma. This energy loss could lead to a contraction of the current channel and the production of a disruptively unstable configuration. Using a simple model we shall investigate the implications of recycling for disruptions. The critical high-density n≤1.6 x 10 20 m -3 is reached in HL-1M. (author)

  17. Tokamak control simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelbaum, T.N.; Serben, S.; Var, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A computer model of a tokamak experimental power reactor and its control system is being constructed. This simulator will allow the exploration of various open loop and closed loop strategies for reactor control. This paper provides a brief description of the simulator and some of the potential control problems associated with this class of tokamaks

  18. 3D simulation studies of tokamak plasmas using MHD and extended-MHD models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) tokamak simulation project aims at the simulation of tokamak plasmas using a multi-level tokamak code package. Several current applications using MHD and Extended-MHD models are presented; high-β disruption studies in reversed shear plasmas using the MHD level MH3D code, ω *i stabilization and nonlinear island saturation of TAE mode using the hybrid particle/MHD level MH3D-K code, and unstructured mesh MH3D ++ code studies. In particular, three internal mode disruption mechanisms are identified from simulation results which agree which agree well with experimental data

  19. Realizing steady-state tokamak operation for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, T. C.

    2011-01-01

    Continuous operation of a tokamak for fusion energy has clear engineering advantages but requires conditions beyond those sufficient for a burning plasma. The fusion reactions and external sources must support both the pressure and the current equilibrium without inductive current drive, leading to demands on stability, confinement, current drive, and plasma-wall interactions that exceed those for pulsed tokamaks. These conditions have been met individually, and significant progress has been made in the past decade to realize scenarios where the required conditions are obtained simultaneously. Tokamaks are operated routinely without disruptions near pressure limits, as needed for steady-state operation. Fully noninductive sustainment with more than half of the current from intrinsic currents has been obtained for a resistive time with normalized pressure and confinement approaching those needed for steady-state conditions. One remaining challenge is handling the heat and particle fluxes expected in a steady-state tokamak without compromising the core plasma performance.

  20. Plasma-material interaction under simulated disruption conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhtin, V.P.; Safronov, V.M.; Toporkov, D.A.; Vasenin, S.G.; Wurz, H.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Sudden evaporation of divertor plate surface under high heat load during tokamak plasma disruption instantaneously produces a vapor shield. The cloud of vaporized material prevents the divertor plates from the bulk of incoming energy flux and thus reduces the further material erosion. Dynamics and effectiveness of the vapor shield are studied experimentally at the 2MK-200 facility under simulated disruption conditions. (orig.)

  1. Developments in tokamak transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger; Lao, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of numerical methods for solving the time-dependent fluid transport equations for tokamak plasmas is presented. Among the problems discussed are techniques for solving the sometimes very stiff parabolic equations for particle and energy flow, treating convection-dominated energy transport that leads to large cell Reynolds numbers, optimizing the flow of a code to reduce the time spent updating the particle and energy source terms, coupling the one-dimensional (1-D) flux-surface-averaged fluid transport equations to solutions of the 2-D Grad-Shafranov equation for the plasma geometry, handling extremely fast transient problems such as internal MHD disruptions and pellet injection, and processing the output to summarize the physics parameters over the potential operating regime for reactors. Emphasis is placed on computational efficiency in both computer time and storage requirements

  2. Measurements of plasma position in TJ-I Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, J.; Ascasibar, E.; Navarro, A.P.; Ochando, M.A.; Pastor, I.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Rodriguez, L.; Sanchez, J.; Team, TJ-I.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the experimental measurements of plasma position in TJ-I tokamak by using small magnetic probes. The basis of method has been described in our previous work (1) in which the plasma current is considered as a filament current. The observed relations between the disruptive instabilities and plasma displacements are also show here. (Author) 7 refs

  3. Hypoxia disrupts the Fanconi anemia pathway and sensitizes cells to chemotherapy through regulation of UBE2T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramaekers, Chantal H.M.A.; Beucken, Twan van den; Meng, Alice; Kassam, Shaqil; Thoms, John; Bristow, Robert G.; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxia is a common feature of the microenvironment of solid tumors which has been shown to promote malignancy and poor patient outcome through multiple mechanisms. The association of hypoxia with more aggressive disease may be due in part to recently identified links between hypoxia and genetic instability. For example, hypoxia has been demonstrated to impede DNA repair by down-regulating the homologous recombination protein RAD51. Here we investigated hypoxic regulation of UBE2T, a ubiquitin ligase required in the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway. Materials and methods: We analysed UBE2T expression by microarray, quantitative PCR and western blot analysis in a panel of cancer cell lines as a function of oxygen concentration. The importance of this regulation was assessed by measuring cell survival in response to DNA damaging agents under normoxia or hypoxia. Finally, HIF dependency was determined using knockdown cell lines and RCC4 cells which constitutively express HIF1α. Results: Hypoxia results in rapid and potent reductions in mRNA levels of UBE2T in a panel of cancer cell lines. Reduced UBE2T mRNA expression is HIF independent and was not due to changes in mRNA or protein stability, but rather reflected reduced promoter activity. Exposure of tumor cells to hypoxia greatly increased their sensitivity to treatment with the interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agent mitomycin C. Conclusions: Exposure to hypoxic conditions down-regulates UBE2T expression which correlates with an increased sensitivity to crosslinking agents consistent with a defective Fanconi anemia pathway. This pathway can potentially be exploited to target hypoxic cells in tumors.

  4. Tokamaks. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, John; Campbell, D.J.; Connor, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    It is interesting to recall the state of tokamak research when the first edition of this book was written. My judgement of the level of real understanding at that time is indicated by the virtual absence of comparisons of experiment with theory in that edition. The need then was for a 'handbook' which collected in a single volume the concepts and models which form the basis of everyday tokamak research. The experimental and theoretical endeavours of the subsequent decade have left almost all of this intact, but have brought a massive development of the subject. Firstly, there are now several areas where the experimental behaviour is described in terms of accepted theory. This is particularly true of currents parallel to the magnetic field, and of the stability limitations on the plasma pressure. Next there has been the research on large tokamaks, hardly started at the writing of the first edition. Now our thinking is largely based on the results from these tokamaks and this work has led to the long awaited achievement of significant amounts of fusion power. Finally, the success of tokamak research has brought us face to face with the problems involved in designing and building a tokamak reactor. The present edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes an account of the advances outlined above. (Author)

  5. Disruption of growth hormone receptor gene causes diminished pancreatic islet size and increased insulin sensitivity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Li; Coschigano, Karen T; Robertson, Katie; Lipsett, Mark; Guo, Yubin; Kopchick, John J; Kumar, Ujendra; Liu, Ye Lauren

    2004-09-01

    Growth hormone, acting through its receptor (GHR), plays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism and in promoting postnatal growth. GHR gene-deficient (GHR(-/-)) mice exhibit severe growth retardation and proportionate dwarfism. To assess the physiological relevance of growth hormone actions, GHR(-/-) mice were used to investigate their phenotype in glucose metabolism and pancreatic islet function. Adult GHR(-/-) mice exhibited significant reductions in the levels of blood glucose and insulin, as well as insulin mRNA accumulation. Immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic sections revealed normal distribution of the islets despite a significantly smaller size. The average size of the islets found in GHR(-/-) mice was only one-third of that in wild-type littermates. Total beta-cell mass was reduced 4.5-fold in GHR(-/-) mice, significantly more than their body size reduction. This reduction in pancreatic islet mass appears to be related to decreases in proliferation and cell growth. GHR(-/-) mice were different from the human Laron syndrome in serum insulin level, insulin responsiveness, and obesity. We conclude that growth hormone signaling is essential for maintaining pancreatic islet size, stimulating islet hormone production, and maintaining normal insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis.

  6. Tokamak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of tokamak reactor studies with particular attention to commercial reactor concepts developed within the last three years. Emphasis is placed on DT fueled reactors for electricity production. A brief history of tokamak reactor studies is presented. The STARFIRE, NUWMAK, and HFCTR studies are highlighted. Recent developments that have increased the commercial attractiveness of tokamak reactor designs are discussed. These developments include smaller plant sizes, higher first wall loadings, improved maintenance concepts, steady-state operation, non-divertor particle control, and improved reactor safety features

  7. Currents in the DIII-D Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, A.; Eidietis, N. W.

    2012-10-01

    Loss of vertical control of an elongated tokamak plasma results in a vertical displacement event (VDE) which can induce large currents on open field lines and exert high JxB forces on in-vessel components. An array of first-wall tile current monitors on DIII-D provides direct measurement of the poloidal halo currents. These measurements are analyzed to create a database of halo current magnitude and asymmetry, which are found to lie within the ranges seen by numerous other tokamaks in the ITPA Disruption Database. In addition, an analysis of halo asymmetry rotation is presented, as rotation at the resonance frequencies of in-vessel components could lead to significant amplification of the halo forces. Halo current rotation is found to be far more prevalent in old (1997-2002) DIII-D halo current data than recent data (2009), perhaps due to a change in divertor geometry over that time.

  8. Magnetic sensor for steady state tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyatani, Yuzuru; Mori, Katsuharu; Oguri, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Mitsuru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-06-01

    A new type of magnetic sensor has been developed for the measurement of steady state magnetic fields without DC-drift such as integration circuit. The electromagnetic force induced to the current which leads to the sensor was used for the measurement. For the high frequency component which exceeds higher than the vibration frequency of sensor, pick-up coil was used through the high pass filter. From the results using tokamak discharges, this sensor can measure the magnetic field in the tokamak discharge. During {approx}2 hours measurement, no DC drift was observed. The sensor can respond {approx}10ms of fast change of magnetic field during disruptions. We confirm the extension of measured range to control the current which leads to the sensor. (author).

  9. Density turbulence and disruption phenomena in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waidmann, G.; Kuang, G.; Jadoul, M.

    1992-01-01

    Disruptive processes are observed in tokamak plasmas not only at the operating limits (density limit or q-limit) but can be found under a variety of experimental conditions. Large forces are exerted then on vessel components and support structures. The sudden release of stored plasma energy presents a serious erosion problem for the first wall already in the next generation of large tokamak machines. Strong energy losses from the plasma and an influx of impurities are already present in minor plasma disruptions which do not immediately lead to a plasma current termination. The rapid loss of energy confinement was investigated within the framework of a systematic study on plasma disruption phenomena in TEXTOR. (author) 4 refs., 4 figs

  10. Statistical analysis of disruptions in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vries, P.C.; Johnson, M.F.; Segui, I.

    2009-01-01

    The disruption rate (the percentage of discharges that disrupt) in JET was found to drop steadily over the years. Recent campaigns (2005-2007) show a yearly averaged disruption rate of only 6% while from 1991 to 1995 this was often higher than 20%. Besides the disruption rate, the so-called disruptivity, or the likelihood of a disruption depending on the plasma parameters, has been determined. The disruptivity of plasmas was found to be significantly higher close to the three main operational boundaries for tokamaks; the low-q, high density and β-limit. The frequency at which JET operated close to the density-limit increased six fold over the last decade; however, only a small reduction in disruptivity was found. Similarly the disruptivity close to the low-q and β-limit was found to be unchanged. The most significant reduction in disruptivity was found far from the operational boundaries, leading to the conclusion that the improved disruption rate is due to a better technical capability of operating JET, instead of safer operations close to the physics limits. The statistics showed that a simple protection system was able to mitigate the forces of a large fraction of disruptions, although it has proved to be at present more difficult to ameliorate the heat flux.

  11. Disruptions and Their Mitigation in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, K.H.; Jaspers, R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Savtchkov, A.; Lehnen, M.; Waidmann, G.

    2005-01-01

    Disruptions remain a major concern for tokamak devices, particularly for large machines. The critical issues are the induced (halo) currents and the resulting forces, the excessive heating of exposed surfaces by the instantaneous power release, and the possible occurrence of highly energetic runaway electrons. The key topics of the investigations on TEXTOR in the recent years concerned (a) the power deposition pattern recorded by a fast infrared scanner, (b) the runaway generation measured by synchrotron radiation in the infrared spectral region, (c) method development for 'healing' discharges that are going to disrupt, and (d) massive gas puffing for mitigating the adverse effects of disruptions

  12. Plea for stellarator funding raps tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, M.

    1992-01-01

    The funding crunch in magnetic confinement fusion development has moved the editor of a largely technical publication to speak out on a policy issue. James A. Rome, who edits Stellarator News from the Fusion Energy Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, wrote an editorial that appeared on the front page of the May 1992 issue. It was titled open-quotes The US Stellarator Program: A Time for Renewal,close quotes and while it focused chiefly on that subject (and lamented the lack of funding for the operation of the existing ATF stellarator at Oak Ridge), it also cited some of the problems inherent in the mainline MCF approach--the tokamak--and stated that if the money can be found for further tokamak design upgrades, it should also be found for stellarators. Rome wrote, open-quotes There is growing recognition in the US, and elsewhere, that the conventional tokamak does not extrapolate to a commercially competitive energy source except with very high field coils ( 1000 MWe).close quotes He pointed up open-quotes the difficulty of simultaneously satisfying conflicting tokamak requirements for efficient current drive, high bootstrap-current fraction, complete avoidance of disruptions, adequate beta limits, and edge-plasma properties compatible with improved (H-mode) confinement and acceptable erosion of divertor plates.close quotes He then called for support for the stellarator as open-quotes the only concept that has performance comparable to that achieved in tokamaks without the plasma-current-related limitations listed above.close quotes

  13. Kinetic modelling of runaway electron avalanches in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, E; Peysson, Y; Saint-Laurent, F; Decker, J; Granetz, R S; Vlainic, M

    2015-01-01

    Runaway electrons can be generated in tokamak plasmas if the accelerating force from the toroidal electric field exceeds the collisional drag force owing to Coulomb collisions with the background plasma. In ITER, disruptions are expected to generate runaway electrons mainly through knock-on collisions (Hender et al 2007 Nucl. Fusion 47 S128–202), where enough momentum can be transferred from existing runaways to slow electrons to transport the latter beyond a critical momentum, setting off an avalanche of runaway electrons. Since knock-on runaways are usually scattered off with a significant perpendicular component of the momentum with respect to the local magnetic field direction, these particles are highly magnetized. Consequently, the momentum dynamics require a full 3D kinetic description, since these electrons are highly sensitive to the magnetic non-uniformity of a toroidal configuration. For this purpose, a bounce-averaged knock-on source term is derived. The generation of runaway electrons from the combined effect of Dreicer mechanism and knock-on collision process is studied with the code LUKE, a solver of the 3D linearized bounce-averaged relativistic electron Fokker–Planck equation (Decker and Peysson 2004 DKE: a fast numerical solver for the 3D drift kinetic equation Report EUR-CEA-FC-1736, Euratom-CEA), through the calculation of the response of the electron distribution function to a constant parallel electric field. The model, which has been successfully benchmarked against the standard Dreicer runaway theory now describes the runaway generation by knock-on collisions as proposed by Rosenbluth (Rosenbluth and Putvinski 1997 Nucl. Fusion 37 1355–62). This paper shows that the avalanche effect can be important even in non-disruptive scenarios. Runaway formation through knock-on collisions is found to be strongly reduced when taking place off the magnetic axis, since trapped electrons can not contribute to the runaway electron population. Finally

  14. Tokamak simulation code manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Kyoo; Oh, Byung Hoon; Hong, Bong Keun; Lee, Kwang Won

    1995-01-01

    The method to use TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code) developed by Princeton plasma physics laboratory is illustrated. In KT-2 tokamak, time dependent simulation of axisymmetric toroidal plasma and vertical stability have to be taken into account in design phase using TSC. In this report physical modelling of TSC are described and examples of application in JAERI and SERI are illustrated, which will be useful when TSC is installed KAERI computer system. (Author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Use of the disruption mitigation valve in closed loop for routine protection at JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reux, C.; Lehnen, M.; Kruezi, U.; Jachmich, S.; Card, P.; Heinola, K.; Joffrin, E.; Lomas, P. J.; Marsen, S.; Matthews, G.; Riccardo, V.; Rimini, F.; P. de Vries,

    2013-01-01

    Disruptions are a major concern for next-generation tokamaks, including ITER. Heat loads, electromagnetic forces and runaway electrons generated by disruptions have to be mitigated for a reliable operation of future machines. Massive gas injection is one of the methods proposed for disruption

  16. Comparison of Advanced Machine Learning Tools for Disruption Prediction and Disruption Studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Odstrčil, Michal; Murari, A.; Mlynář, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 7 (2013), s. 1751-1759 ISSN 0093-3813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2055 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Learning Machines * Support Vector Machines * Neural Network * ASDEX Upgrade * JET * Disruption mitigation * Tokamaks * ITER Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.950, year: 2013

  17. Investigating Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard, Stine Schmieg; Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss

    This book shares knowledge collected from 2015 and onward within the Consortium for Digital Disruption anchored at Aalborg University (www.dd.aau.dk). Evidenced by this publication, the field of disruptive innovation research has gone through several stages of operationalizing the theory. In recent...... years, researchers are increasingly looking back towards the origins of the theory in attempts to cure it from its most obvious flaws. This is especially true for the use of the theory in making predictions about future disruptions. In order to continue to develop a valuable theory of disruption, we...... find it useful to first review what the theory of disruptive innovation initially was, how it has developed, and where we are now. A cross section of disruptive innovation literature has been reviewed in order to form a general foundation from which we might better understand the changing world...

  18. Control of plasma position in the CASTOR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valovic, M.

    1988-11-01

    A simple servo-system designed for plasma position control in the CASTOR tokamak is described. Both radial and vertical plasma displacements were minimized using two servo-loops consisting of detection coils, a conventional electric controller and an amplifier operated as an unipolar voltage-controlled current source. To ensure the optimum conditions in the start-up phase of the discharge, currents in the servo-systems were externally preprogrammed. The prescribed plasma position was maintained with the accuracy of 3 mm. The feedback control improves plasma parameters, e.g. it removes the positional disruption at the end of the tokamak discharge. (J.U.). 4 figs., 3 refs

  19. Plasma disruption modeling and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1994-01-01

    Disruptions in tokamak reactors are considered a limiting factor to successful operation and reliable design. The behavior of plasma-facing components during a disruption is critical to the overall integrity of the reactor. Erosion of plasma facing-material (PFM) surfaces due to thermal energy dump during the disruption can severely limit the lifetime of these components and thus diminish the economic feasibility of the reactor. A comprehensive understanding of the interplay of various physical processes during a disruption is essential for determining component lifetime and potentially improving the performance of such components. There are three principal stages in modeling the behavior of PFM during a disruption. Initially, the incident plasma particles will deposit their energy directly on the PFM surface, heating it to a very high temperature where ablation occurs. Models for plasma-material interactions have been developed and used to predict material thermal evolution during the disruption. Within a few microseconds after the start of the disruption, enough material is vaporized to intercept most of the incoming plasma particles. Models for plasma-vapor interactions are necessary to predict vapor cloud expansion and hydrodynamics. Continuous heating of the vapor cloud above the material surface by the incident plasma particles will excite, ionize, and cause vapor atoms to emit thermal radiation. Accurate models for radiation transport in the vapor are essential for calculating the net radiated flux to the material surface which determines the final erosion thickness and consequently component lifetime. A comprehensive model that takes into account various stages of plasma-material interaction has been developed and used to predict erosion rates during reactor disruption, as well during induced disruption in laboratory experiments

  20. Dust remobilization experiments on the COMPASS tokamak.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weinzettl, Vladimír; Matějíček, Jiří; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; De Angeli, M.; Riva, G.; Dimitrova, Miglena; Havlíček, Josef; Adámek, Jiří; Seidl, Jakub; Tomeš, Matěj; Cavalier, Jordan; Imríšek, Martin; Havránek, Aleš; Pánek, Radomír; Peterka, Matěj

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, November (2017), s. 446-449 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-10723S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Dust remobilization * Tungsten * Disruption * ELM * Plasma * Tokamak Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617300650

  1. Present status of TCA/BR Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, I.C.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Tuszel, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The TCA tokamak is being partially reconstructed and reassembled in the Plasma Laboratory of The University of Sao Paulo, and afterwards it will be named TCA/BR. The first discharges are expected by June/July of next year. The main scientific objectives envisaged for the machine are: Alfven wave heating and current drive, confinement improvement, disruptions and turbulence. In this paper we also describe: (i) the present status of the project; (ii) the diagnostic system; (iii) the control and data acquisition system; (iv) the RF system for the excitation of Alfven waves, that are being developed, and also the results of predictive transport simulations of its performance. (author)

  2. Joint research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Del Bosco, E.; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Oost, G. van

    2005-01-01

    Small tokamaks have an important role in fusion research. More than 40 small tokamaks are operational. Research on small tokamaks has created a scientific basis for the scaling-up to larger tokamaks. Well-known scientific and engineering schools, which are now determining the main directions of fusion science and technology, have been established through research on small tokamaks. Combined efforts within a network of small and medium size tokamaks will further enhance the contribution of small tokamaks. A new concept of interactive co-ordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project is presented. (author)

  3. Joint research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Bosco, E. Del; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Oost, G. van; He, Yexi; Hegazy, H.; Hirose, A.; Hron, M.; Kuteev, B.; Ludwig, G.O.; Nascimento, I.C.; Silva, C.; Vorobyev, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Small tokamaks have an important role in fusion research. More than 40 small tokamaks are operational. Research on small tokamaks has created a scientific basis for the scaling-up to larger tokamaks. Well-known scientific and engineering schools, which are now determining the main directions of fusion science and technology, have been established through research on small tokamaks. Combined efforts within a network of small and medium size tokamaks will further enhance the contribution of small tokamaks. A new concept of interactive coordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project, is presented

  4. Advanced commercial tokamak study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, S.L.; Dabiri, A.E.; Keeton, D.C.; Brown, T.G.; Bussell, G.T.

    1985-12-01

    Advanced commercial tokamak studies were performed by the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) as a participant in the Tokamak Power Systems Studies (TPSS) project coordinated by the Office of Fusion Energy. The FEDC studies addressed the issues of tokamak reactor cost, size, and complexity. A scoping study model was developed to determine the effect of beta on tokamak economics, and it was found that a competitive cost of electricity could be achieved at a beta of 10 to 15%. The implications of operating at a beta of up to 25% were also addressed. It was found that the economics of fusion, like those of fission, improve as unit size increases. However, small units were found to be competitive as elements of a multiplex plant, provided that unit cost and maintenance time reductions are realized for the small units. The modular tokamak configuration combined several new approaches to develop a less complex and lower cost reactor. The modular design combines the toroidal field coil with the reactor structure, locates the primary vacuum boundary at the reactor cell wall, and uses a vertical assembly and maintenance approach. 12 refs., 19 figs

  5. Advanced statistics for tokamak transport colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, K.S.

    1989-03-01

    This is a compendium of three separate articles on the statistical analysis of tokamak transport. The first article is an expository introduction to advanced statistics and scaling laws. The second analyzes two important problems of tokamak data---colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation in detail. The third article generalizes the Swamy random coefficient model to the case of degenerate matrices. Three papers have been processed separately

  6. Microwave Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. The experiment, soon to be operational, provides an opportunity to study dense plasmas heated by powers unprecedented in the electron-cyclotron frequency range required by the especially high magnetic fields used with the MTX and needed for reactors. 1 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  7. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported

  8. Accelerator technology in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustom, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    This article presents the similarities in the technology required for high energy accelerators and tokamak fusion devices. The tokamak devices and R and D programs described in the text represent only a fraction of the total fusion program. The technological barriers to producing successful, economical tokamak fusion power plants are as many as the plasma physics problems to be overcome. With the present emphasis on energy problems in this country and elsewhere, it is very likely that fusion technology related R and D programs will vigorously continue; and since high energy accelerator technology has so much in common with fusion technology, more scientists from the accelerator community are likely to be attracted to fusion problems

  9. ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Embrechts, M.

    1990-07-01

    This is a status report on technical progress relative to the tasks identified for the fifth year of Grant No. FG02-85-ER52118. The ARIES tokamak reactor study is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of the tokamak as an attractive fusion reactor with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The ARIES study is being coordinated by UCLA and involves a number of institutions, including RPI. The RPI group has been pursuing the following areas of research in the context of the ARIES-I design effort: MHD equilibrium and stability analyses; plasma-edge modeling and blanket materials issues. Progress in these areas is summarized herein

  10. Overview of Tokamak Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unterberg, Bernhard; Samm, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    An overview is given of recent results obtained in tokamak devices. We introduce basic confinement scenarios as L-mode, H-mode and plasmas with an internal transport barrier and discuss methods for profile control. Important findings in DT-experiments at JET as α-particle heating are described. Methods for power exhaust like plasma regimes with a radiating mantle and radiative divertor scenarios are discussed. The overall impact of plasma edge conditions on the general plasma performance in tokamaks is illustrated by describing the impact of wall conditions on confinement and the edge operational diagram of H-mode plasmas

  11. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition disrupts nuclear factor-kappaB activity in pancreatic cancer, but fails to sensitize to gemcitabine chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamaghani Shadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant activation NF-kappaB has been proposed as a mechanism of drug resistance in pancreatic cancer. Recently, inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 has been shown to exert anti-tumor effects on pancreatic cancer cells by suppressing NF-kappaB. Consequently, we investigated whether inhibition of GSK-3 sensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine. Methods GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using the pharmacological agent AR-A014418 or siRNA against GSK-3 alpha and beta isoforms. Cytotoxicity was measured using a Sulphorhodamine B assay and clonogenic survival following exposure of six different pancreatic cancer cell lines to a range of doses of either gemcitabine, AR-A014418 or both for 24, 48 and 72 h. We measured protein expression levels by immunoblotting. Basal and TNF-alpha induced activity of NF-kappaB was assessed using a luciferase reporter assay in the presence or absence of GSK-3 inhibition. Results GSK-3 inhibition reduced both basal and TNF-alpha induced NF-kappaB luciferase activity. Knockdown of GSK-3 beta reduced nuclear factor kappa B luciferase activity to a greater extent than GSK-3 alpha, and the greatest effect was seen with dual knockdown of both GSK-3 isoforms. GSK-3 inhibition also resulted in reduction of the NF-kappaB target proteins XIAP, Bcl-XL, and cyclin D1, associated with growth inhibition and decreased clonogenic survival. In all cell lines, treatment with either AR-A014418, or gemcitabine led to growth inhibition in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, with the exception of PANC-1 where drug synergy occurred with some dose schedules, the inhibitory effect of combined drug treatment was additive, sub-additive, or even antagonistic. Conclusion GSK-3 inhibition has anticancer effects against pancreatic cancer cells with a range of genetic backgrounds associated with disruption of NF-kappaB, but does not significantly sensitize these cells to the standard

  12. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition disrupts nuclear factor-kappaB activity in pancreatic cancer, but fails to sensitize to gemcitabine chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamaghani, Shadi; Patel, Satish; Hedley, David W

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant activation NF-kappaB has been proposed as a mechanism of drug resistance in pancreatic cancer. Recently, inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 has been shown to exert anti-tumor effects on pancreatic cancer cells by suppressing NF-kappaB. Consequently, we investigated whether inhibition of GSK-3 sensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine. GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using the pharmacological agent AR-A014418 or siRNA against GSK-3 alpha and beta isoforms. Cytotoxicity was measured using a Sulphorhodamine B assay and clonogenic survival following exposure of six different pancreatic cancer cell lines to a range of doses of either gemcitabine, AR-A014418 or both for 24, 48 and 72 h. We measured protein expression levels by immunoblotting. Basal and TNF-alpha induced activity of NF-kappaB was assessed using a luciferase reporter assay in the presence or absence of GSK-3 inhibition. GSK-3 inhibition reduced both basal and TNF-alpha induced NF-kappaB luciferase activity. Knockdown of GSK-3 beta reduced nuclear factor kappa B luciferase activity to a greater extent than GSK-3 alpha, and the greatest effect was seen with dual knockdown of both GSK-3 isoforms. GSK-3 inhibition also resulted in reduction of the NF-kappaB target proteins XIAP, Bcl-X L , and cyclin D1, associated with growth inhibition and decreased clonogenic survival. In all cell lines, treatment with either AR-A014418, or gemcitabine led to growth inhibition in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, with the exception of PANC-1 where drug synergy occurred with some dose schedules, the inhibitory effect of combined drug treatment was additive, sub-additive, or even antagonistic. GSK-3 inhibition has anticancer effects against pancreatic cancer cells with a range of genetic backgrounds associated with disruption of NF-kappaB, but does not significantly sensitize these cells to the standard chemotherapy agent gemcitabine. This lack of synergy might be

  13. The 'Hub Disruption Index', a reliable index sensitive to the brain networks reorganization. A study of the contralesional hemisphere in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Termenon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke, resulting in focal structural damage, induces changes in brain function at both local and global levels. Following stroke, cerebral networks present structural and functional reorganization to compensate for the dysfunctioning provoked by the lesion itself and its remote effects. As some recent studies underlined the role of the contralesional hemisphere during recovery, we studied its role %of the contralesional hemispherein the reorganization of brain function of stroke patients using resting state fMRI and graph theory. We explored this reorganization using the 'hub disruption index' (kappa, a global index sensitive to the reorganization of nodes within the graph. For a given graph metric, kappa of a subject corresponds to the slope of the linear regression model between the mean local network measures of a reference group, and the difference between that reference and the subject under study. In order to translate the use of kappa in clinical context, a prerequisite to achieve meaningful results is to investigate the reliability of this index. In a preliminary part, we studied the reliability of kappa by computing the intraclass correlation coefficient in a cohort of 100 subjects from the Human Connectome Project. Then, we measured intra-hemispheric kappa index in the contralesional hemisphere of 20 subacute stroke patients compared to 20 age-matched healthy controls. Finally, due to the small number of patients, we tested the robustness of our results repeating the experiment 1000 times by bootstrapping on the Human Connectome Project database. Statistical analysis showed a significant reduction of kappa for the contralesional hemisphere of right stroke patients compared to healthy controls. Similar results were observed for the right contralesional hemisphere of left stroke patients. We showed that kappa, is more reliable than global graph metrics and more sensitive to detect differences between groups of patients as compared to

  14. Disrupted Disclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause Hansen, Hans; Uldam, Julie

    appearances become challenged through disruptive disclosures in mediaenvironments characterized by multiple levels of visibility, with companies both observing andbeing observed by civil society groups that criticize them; (c) why and how the mobilization aroundtransparency and ensuing practices...

  15. Family Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Disruptions Page Content Article Body No matter how ...

  16. Digital Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss

    det digitale domæne ud over det niveau, der kendetegner den nuværende debat, så præsenteres der ny viden om digital disruption. Som noget nyt udlægges Clayton Christens teori om disruptiv innovation med et særligt fokus på små organisationers mulighed for eksponentiel vækst. Specielt udfoldes...... forholdet mellem disruption og den stadig accelererende digitale udvikling i konturerne til ny teoridannelse om digital disruption. Bogens undertitel ”faretruende og fascinerende forandringer” peger på, at der er behov for en nuanceret debat om digital disruption i modsætning til den tone, der er slået an i...... videre kalder et ”disruption-råd”. Faktisk er rådet skrevet ind i 2016 regeringsgrundlaget for VLK-regeringen. Disruption af organisationer er ikke et nyt fænomen; men hastigheden, hvormed det sker, er stadig accelererende. Årsagen er den globale mega-trend: Digitalisering. Og derfor er specielt digital...

  17. Disruption studies in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellman, A.G.; Evans, T.E.; Cuthbertson, J.W.

    1996-09-01

    Characteristics of disruptions in the DIII-D tokamak including the current decay rate, halo current magnitude and toroidal asymmetry, and heat pulse to the divertor are described. Neon and argon pellet injection is shown to be an effective method for mitigating the halo currents and the heat pulse with a 50% reduction in both quantities achieved. The injection of these impurity pellets frequently gives rise to runaway electrons

  18. High beta tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, R.A.; Berger, D.P.; Charlton, L.A.; Hogan, J.T.; Munro, J.K.; Nelson, D.B.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Sigmar, D.J.; Strickler, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    MHD equilibrium, stability, and transport calculations are made to study the accessibility and behavior of ''high beta'' tokamak plasmas in the range β approximately 5 to 15 percent. For next generation devices, beta values of at least 8 percent appear to be accessible and stable if there is a conducting surface nearby

  19. Reconnection in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pare, V.K.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations with several different computer codes based on the resistive MHD equations have shown that (m = 1, n = 1) tearing modes in tokamak plasmas grow by magnetic reconnection. The observable behavior predicted by the codes has been confirmed in detail from the waveforms of signals from x-ray detectors and recently by x-ray tomographic imaging

  20. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This document consists of a collection of papers presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Research Using Small Tokamaks. It contains 22 papers on a wide variety of research aspects, including diagnostics, design, transport, equilibrium, stability, and confinement. Some of these papers are devoted to other concepts (stellarators, compact tori). Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The technical reports contained in this collection of papers on research using small tokamaks fall into four main categories, i.e., (i) experimental work (heating, stability, plasma radial profiles, fluctuations and transport, confinement, ultra-low-q tokamaks, wall physics, a.o.), (ii) diagnostics (beam probes, laser scattering, X-ray tomography, laser interferometry, electron-cyclotron absorption and emission systems), (iii) theory (strong turbulence, effects of heating on stability, plasma beta limits, wave absorption, macrostability, low-q tokamak configurations and bootstrap currents, turbulent heating, stability of vortex flows, nonlinear islands growth, plasma-drift-induced anomalous transport, ergodic divertor design, a.o.), and (iv) new technical facilities (varistors applied to establish constant current and loop voltage in HT-6M), lower-hybrid-current-drive systems for HT-6B and HT-6M, radio-frequency systems for HT-6M ICR heating experimentation, and applications of fiber optics for visible and vacuum ultraviolet radiation detection as applied to tokamaks and reversed-field pinches. A total number of 51 papers are included in the collection. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Compact tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.; Wiley, J.C.; Edmonds, P.H.; Ross, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The possible use of tokamaks for thermonuclear power plants is discussed, in particular tokamaks with low aspect ratio and copper toroidal field coils. Three approaches are presented. First, the existing literature is reviewed and summarized. Second, using simple analytic estimates, the size of the smallest tokamak to produce an ignited plasma is derived. This steady state energy balance analysis is then extended to determine the smallest tokamaks power plant, by including the power required to drive the toroidal field and by considering two extremes of plasma current drive efficiency. Third, the analytic results are augmented by a numerical calculation that permits arbitrary plasma current drive efficiency and different confinement scaling relationships. Throughout, the importance of various restrictions is emphasized, in particular plasma current drive efficiency, plasma confinement, plasma safety factor, plasma elongation, plasma beta, neutron wall loading, blanket availability and recirculation of electric power. The latest published reactor studies show little advantage in using low aspect ratios to obtain a more compact device (and a low cost of electricity) unless either remarkably high efficiency plasma current drive and low safety factor are combined, or unless confinement (the H factor), the permissible elongation and the permissible neutron wall loading increase as the aspect ratio is reduced. These results are reproduced with the analytic model. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs

  3. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1990-04-01

    This paper discusses the following work on the text tokamak: data systems; particle confinement; impurity transport; plasma rotation; runaway electrons; electron cyclotron heating; FIR system; transient transport; internal turbulence; edge turbulence; ion temperature; EML experiments; impurity pellet experiments; MHD experiments and analysis; TEXT Upgrade; and Upgrade diagnostics

  4. Estimation of the radial force on the tokamak vessel wall during fast transient events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustovitov, V. D., E-mail: pustovitov-vd@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The radial force balance in a tokamak during fast transient events with a duration much shorter than the resistive time of the vacuum vessel wall is analyzed. The aim of the work is to analytically estimate the resulting integral radial force on the wall. In contrast to the preceding study [Plasma Phys. Rep. 41, 952 (2015)], where a similar problem was considered for thermal quench, simultaneous changes in the profiles and values of the pressure and plasma current are allowed here. Thereby, the current quench and various methods of disruption mitigation used in the existing tokamaks and considered for future applications are also covered. General formulas for the force at an arbitrary sequence or combination of events are derived, and estimates for the standard tokamak model are made. The earlier results and conclusions are confirmed, and it is shown that, in the disruption mitigation scenarios accepted for ITER, the radial forces can be as high as in uncontrolled disruptions.

  5. The radiation asymmetry in MGI rapid shutdown on J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Ruihai; Chen, Zhongyong; Huang, Duwei; Cheng, Zhifeng; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Ge; J-TEXT Team

    2017-10-01

    Disruptions, the sudden termination of tokamak fusion plasmas by instabilities, have the potential to cause severe material wall damage to large tokamaks like ITER. The mitigation of disruption damage is an essential part of any fusion reactor system. Massive gas injection (MGI) rapid shutdown is a technique in which large amounts of noble gas are injected into the plasma in order to safely radiate the plasma energy evenly over the entire plasma-facing first wall. However, the radiated energy during the thermal quench (TQ) in massive gas injection (MGI) induced disruptions is found toroidal asymmetric, and the degrees of asymmetry correlate with the gas penetration and MGI induced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) activities. A toroidal and poloidal array of ultraviolet photodiodes (AXUV) has been developed to investigate the radiation asymmetry on J-TEXT tokamak. Together with the upgraded mirnov probe arrays, the relation between MGI triggered MHD activities with radiation asymmetry is studied.

  6. Automatic location of disruption times in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, R.; Vega, J.; Murari, A.

    2014-11-01

    The loss of stability and confinement in tokamak plasmas can induce critical events known as disruptions. Disruptions produce strong electromagnetic forces and thermal loads which can damage fundamental components of the devices. Determining the disruption time is extremely important for various disruption studies: theoretical models, physics-driven models, or disruption predictors. In JET, during the experimental campaigns with the JET-C (Carbon Fiber Composite) wall, a common criterion to determine the disruption time consisted of locating the time of the thermal quench. However, with the metallic ITER-like wall (JET-ILW), this criterion is usually not valid. Several thermal quenches may occur previous to the current quench but the temperature recovers. Therefore, a new criterion has to be defined. A possibility is to use the start of the current quench as disruption time. This work describes the implementation of an automatic data processing method to estimate the disruption time according to this new definition. This automatic determination allows both reducing human efforts to locate the disruption times and standardizing the estimates (with the benefit of being less vulnerable to human errors).

  7. Automatic location of disruption times in JET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, R; Vega, J; Murari, A

    2014-11-01

    The loss of stability and confinement in tokamak plasmas can induce critical events known as disruptions. Disruptions produce strong electromagnetic forces and thermal loads which can damage fundamental components of the devices. Determining the disruption time is extremely important for various disruption studies: theoretical models, physics-driven models, or disruption predictors. In JET, during the experimental campaigns with the JET-C (Carbon Fiber Composite) wall, a common criterion to determine the disruption time consisted of locating the time of the thermal quench. However, with the metallic ITER-like wall (JET-ILW), this criterion is usually not valid. Several thermal quenches may occur previous to the current quench but the temperature recovers. Therefore, a new criterion has to be defined. A possibility is to use the start of the current quench as disruption time. This work describes the implementation of an automatic data processing method to estimate the disruption time according to this new definition. This automatic determination allows both reducing human efforts to locate the disruption times and standardizing the estimates (with the benefit of being less vulnerable to human errors).

  8. Disruption problematics in segmented blanket concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, Y.; Fantechi, S.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.

    1994-01-01

    In Tokamaks, the hostile operating environment originated by plasma disruption events requires that the first wall/blanket/shield components sustain the large induced electromagnetic (EM) forces without significant structural deformation and within allowable material stresses. As a consequence there is a need to improve the safety features of the blanket design concepts satisfying the disruption problematics and to formulate guidelines on the required internal reinforcements of the blanket components. The present paper describes the recent investigations on blanket reinforcement systems needed in order to optimize the first-wall/blanket/shield structural design for next step and commercial fusion reactors in the context of ITER, DEMO and SEAFP activities

  9. Engineering aspects of disruption current decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.

    1983-11-01

    Engineering features associated with the configuration of a tokamak can affect the amount of energy that produces melting and damage to the limiters or internal wall surfaces as the result of a major disruption. During the current decay period of a major thermal disruption, the energy that can damage a wall or limiter comes from the external magnetic field. By providing a good conducting torus near the plasma and increasing the plasma circuit resistance, this magnetic energy (transferred by way of the plasma circuit) can be minimized. This report addresses engineering design features to reduce the energy deposited on the inner torus surface that produces melting of the structures

  10. Development of disruption thermal analysis code DREAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Kobayahsi, Takeshi [Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Seki, Masahiro

    1989-07-01

    When a plasma disruption takes place in a tokamak type fusion reactor, plasma facing componenets such as first wall and divertor/limiter are subjected to a intensse heat load in a short duration. At the surface of the wall, temperature rapidly rises, and melting and evaporation occurs. It causes reduction of wall thickness and crack initiation/propagation. As lifetime of the components is significantly affected by them, the transient analysis in consideration of phase changes and radiation heat loss in required in the design of these components. This paper describes the computer code DREAM, developed to perform the disruption thermal analysis, taking phase changes and radiation into account. (author).

  11. Development of disruption thermal analysis code DREAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Kobayahsi, Takeshi; Seki, Masahiro.

    1989-01-01

    When a plasma disruption takes place in a tokamak type fusion reactor, plasma facing componenets such as first wall and divertor/limiter are subjected to a intensse heat load in a short duration. At the surface of the wall, temperature rapidly rises, and melting and evaporation occurs. It causes reduction of wall thickness and crack initiation/propagation. As lifetime of the components is significantly affected by them, the transient analysis in consideration of phase changes and radiation heat loss in required in the design of these components. This paper describes the computer code DREAM, developed to perform the disruption thermal analysis, taking phase changes and radiation into account. (author)

  12. Tokamaks (Second Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stott, Peter [JET, UK (United Kingdom)

    1998-10-01

    The first edition of John Wesson's book on tokamaks, published in 1987, established itself as essential reading for researchers in the field of magnetic confinement fusion: it was an excellent introduction for students to tokamak physics and also a valuable reference work for the more experienced. The second edition, published in 1997, has been completely rewritten and substantially enlarged (680 pages compared with 300). The new edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes discussion of the substantial advances in fusion research during the past decade. The new book, like its predecessor, is well written and commendable for its clarity and accuracy. In fact many of the chapters are written by a series of co-authors bringing the benefits of a wide range of expertise but, by careful editing, Wesson has maintained a uniformity of style and presentation. The chapter headings and coverage for the most part remain the same - but are expanded considerably and brought up to date. The most substantial change is that the single concluding chapter in the first edition on 'Experiments' has been replaced by three chapters: 'Tokamak experiments' which deals with some of the earlier key experiments plus a selection of recent small and medium-sized devices, 'Large experiments' which gives an excellent summary of the main results from the four large tokamaks - TFTR, JET, JT60/JT60U and DIII-D, and 'The future' which gives a very short (possibly too short in my opinion) account of reactors and ITER. This is an excellent book, which I strongly recommend should have a place - on the desk rather than in the bookshelf - of researchers in magnetic confinement fusion. (book review)

  13. Tokamaks (Second Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stott, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The first edition of John Wesson's book on tokamaks, published in 1987, established itself as essential reading for researchers in the field of magnetic confinement fusion: it was an excellent introduction for students to tokamak physics and also a valuable reference work for the more experienced. The second edition, published in 1997, has been completely rewritten and substantially enlarged (680 pages compared with 300). The new edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes discussion of the substantial advances in fusion research during the past decade. The new book, like its predecessor, is well written and commendable for its clarity and accuracy. In fact many of the chapters are written by a series of co-authors bringing the benefits of a wide range of expertise but, by careful editing, Wesson has maintained a uniformity of style and presentation. The chapter headings and coverage for the most part remain the same - but are expanded considerably and brought up to date. The most substantial change is that the single concluding chapter in the first edition on 'Experiments' has been replaced by three chapters: 'Tokamak experiments' which deals with some of the earlier key experiments plus a selection of recent small and medium-sized devices, 'Large experiments' which gives an excellent summary of the main results from the four large tokamaks - TFTR, JET, JT60/JT60U and DIII-D, and 'The future' which gives a very short (possibly too short in my opinion) account of reactors and ITER. This is an excellent book, which I strongly recommend should have a place - on the desk rather than in the bookshelf - of researchers in magnetic confinement fusion. (book review)

  14. Disruptions in ITER and strategies for their control and mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnen, M., E-mail: michael.lehnen@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Aleynikova, K.; Aleynikov, P.B.; Campbell, D.J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Drewelow, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald branch, EURATOM Ass., D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Eidietis, N.W. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Gasparyan, Yu. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Granetz, R.S. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gribov, Y. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Hartmann, N. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research—Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Hollmann, E.M. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Izzo, V.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Jachmich, S. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM – Belgian State, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Kim, S.-H.; Kočan, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Koslowski, H.R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research—Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kovalenko, D. [SRC RF TRINITI, ul. Pushkovykh, vladenie 12, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Kruezi, U. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-08-15

    The thermal and electromagnetic loads related to disruptions in ITER are substantial and require careful design of tokamak components to ensure they reach the projected lifetime and to ensure that safety relevant components fulfil their function for the worst foreseen scenarios. The disruption load specifications are the basis for the design process of components like the full-W divertor, the blanket modules and the vacuum vessel and will set the boundary conditions for ITER operations. This paper will give a brief overview on the disruption loads and mitigation strategies for ITER and will discuss the physics basis which is continuously refined through the current disruption R&D programs.

  15. Present status of Tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Jayanta

    1991-01-01

    The scenario of thermonuclear fusion research is presented, and the tokamak which is the most promising candidate as a fusion reactor is introduced. A brief survey is given of the most noteworthy tokamaks in the global context, and fusion programmes relating to Next Step devices are outlined. Supplementary heating of tokamak plasma by different methods is briefly reviewed; the latest achievements in heating to fusion temperatures are also reported. The progress towards the high value of the fusion product necessary for ignition is described. The improvement in plasma confinement brought about especially by the H-mode, is discussed. The latest situation in pushing up Β for increasing the efficiency of a tokamak is elucidated. Mention is made of the different types of wall treatment of the tokamak vessel for impurity control, which has led to a significant improvement in tokamak performance. Different methods of current drive for steady state tokamak operation are reviewed, and the issue of current drive efficiency is addressed. A short resume is given of the various diagnostic methods which are employed on a routine basis in the major tokamak centres. A few diagnostics recently developed or proposed in the context of the advanced tokamaks as well as the Next Step devices are indicated. The important role of the interplay between theory, experiment and simulation is noted, and the areas of investigation requiring concerted effort for further progress in tokamak research are identified. (author). 17 refs

  16. Hiro and Evans currents in Vertical Disruption Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid; Xujing Li Team; Sergei Galkin Team

    2014-10-01

    The notion of Tokamak Magneto-Hydrodynamics (TMHD), which explicitly reflects the anisotropy of a high temperature tokamak plasma is introduced. The set of TMHD equations is formulated for simulations of macroscopic plasma dynamics and disruptions in tokamaks. Free from the Courant restriction on the time step, this set of equations is appropriate for high performance plasmas and does not require any extension of the MHD plasma model. At the same time, TMHD requires the use of magnetic field aligned numerical grids. The TMHD model was used for creation of theory of the Wall Touching Kink and Vertical Modes (WTKM and WTVM), prediction of Hiro and Evans currents, design of an innovative diagnostics for Hiro current measurements, installed on EAST device. While Hiro currents have explained the toroidal asymmetry in the plasma current measurements in JET disruptions, the Evans currents explain the tile current measurements in tokamaks. The recently developed Vertical Disruption Code (VDE) have demonstrated 5 regimes of VDE and confirmed the generation of both Hiro and Evans currents. The results challenge the 24 years long misinterpretation of the tile currents in tokamaks as ``halo'' currents, which were a product of misuse of equilibrium reconstruction for VDE. This work is supported by US DoE Contract No. DE-AC02-09-CH1146.

  17. The major tokamak distruption in cylindrical plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jeong Sik; Choi, Eun Ha; Choi, Duk In

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of the major disruption in tokamak plasma which involves the nonlinear interaction of tearing models is numerically studied in two and three dimensional formulations. In this study, it is found that in the two dimensional case with a flattened current density profile the magnetic islands of the m=2; n=1 mode do not saturate nonlinearly and but strongly interact with the limiter. Thus it is suggested that the helical perturbation of the m=2;n=1 mode plays the dominant role in the major disruption. We also show that the m=2;n=1 mode nonlinearly destablizes other tearing modes, especially the m=3;n=2 mode, from the nonlinear coupling of different helicities as also shown in other studies. The plasma extends across the plasma cross section, and the plasma core shifts inward along the major radius during the major disruption. The numerical result for the major disruption time measured using the nonlinear 3-D procedure for the initial value problem with PLT parameters is about 450 μsec which agrees reasonably well with the experimental value of 500 μsec. (Author)

  18. Disruption mitigation studies in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Evans, T.E.

    1999-01-01

    Data on the discharge behavior, thermal loads, halo currents, and runaway electrons have been obtained in disruptions on the DIII-D tokamak. These experiments have also evaluated techniques to mitigate the disruptions while minimizing runaway electron production. Experiments injecting cryogenic impurity killer pellets of neon and argon and massive amounts of helium gas have successfully reduced these disruption effects. The halo current generation, scaling, and mitigation are understood and are in good agreement with predictions of a semianalytic model. Results from killer pellet injection have been used to benchmark theoretical models of the pellet ablation and energy loss. Runaway electrons are often generated by the pellets and new runaway generation mechanisms, modifications of the standard Dreicer process, have been found to explain the runaways. Experiments with the massive helium gas puff have also effectively mitigated disruptions without the formation of runaway electrons that can occur with killer pellets

  19. Sawtooth-induced loss of runaway electrons in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Longwen; Shi Bingren; Jiao Yiming

    2001-01-01

    A model based on banana orbit loss has been proposed to explain the sawtooth effect on the loss of the runaway electrons in tokamaks. Circulating runaway electrons can be transferred into the trapped ones due to magnetic perturbation during sawtooth crashes, then they are repelled to the limiter via toroidal precession drift with a time delay. This model may also clarify the hard X-ray oscillations correlated with the m = 2 mode and the hard X-ray bursts during outer disruptions

  20. Politisk disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Dette blogindlæg giver en kort analyse af hvordan de sociale medier ved at give en ny tid har åbnet for den disruption af de politiske processer som især Trump stå som et eksempel på.......Dette blogindlæg giver en kort analyse af hvordan de sociale medier ved at give en ny tid har åbnet for den disruption af de politiske processer som især Trump stå som et eksempel på....

  1. Disrupting Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff; Bazzichelli, Tatiana

    Disruptive Business explores some of the interconnections between art, activism and the business concept of disruptive innovation. With a backdrop of the crisis of financial capitalism, austerity cuts in the cultural sphere, the idea is to focus on potential art strategies in relation to a broken...... economy. In a perverse way, we ask whether this presents new opportunities for cultural producers to achieve more autonomy over their production process. If it is indeed possible, or desirable, what alternative business models emerge? The book is concerned broadly with business as material for reinvention...

  2. Disruption mitigation on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Sourd, F.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Bucalossi, J.; Eriksson, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    During disruptions, the plasma energy is lost on the first wall within 1 ms, forces up to hundred tons are applied to the structures and kA of electrons are accelerated up to 50 MeV (runaway electrons). Already sources of concern in present day tokamaks, extrapolation to ITER shows the necessity of mitigation procedures, to avoid serious damages to in-vessel components. Massive gas injection was proposed, and encouraging tests have been done on Textor and DIII-D. Similar experiments where performed on Tore Supra, with the goal to validate their effect on runaway electrons, observed during the majority of disruptions. 0.1 mole of helium was injected within 5 ms in ohmic plasmas, up to 1.2 MA, either stable, or in a pre-disruptive phase (argon puffing). Beneficial effects where obtained: reduction of the current fall rate and eddy currents, total disappearance of runaway electrons and easy recovery for the next pulse, without noticeable helium pollution of following plasmas. Analysis of the 4 ms period between injection and disruption indicates that to reach these goals, one need to inject enough helium to keep it only partially ionised. It correspond to 0.1 g for Tore Supra, and extrapolate to hundred's of grams for ITER. (author)

  3. Disruption mitigation on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Sourd, F.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Bucalossi, J.; Eriksson, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    During disruptions, the plasma energy is lost on the first wall within 1 ms, forces up to hundred tons are applied to the structures and kA of electrons are accelerated up to 50 MeV (runaway electrons). Already sources of concern in present day tokamaks, extrapolation to ITER shows the necessity of mitigation procedures, to avoid serious damages to in-vessel components. Massive gas injection was proposed, and encouraging tests have been done on Textor and DIII-D. Similar experiments where performed on Tore Supra, with the goal to validate their effect on runaway electrons, observed during the majority of disruptions. 0.1 mole of helium was injected within 5 ms in ohmic plasmas, up to 1.2 MA, either stable, or in a pre-disruptive phase (argon puffing). Beneficial effects where obtained: reduction of the current fall rate and eddy currents, total disappearance of runaway electrons and easy recovery for the next pulse, without noticeable helium pollution of following plasmas. Analysis of the 4 ms period between injection and disruption indicates that to reach these goals, one need to inject enough helium to keep it only partially ionised. It corresponds to 0.1 g for Tore Supra, and extrapolate to hundreds of grams for ITER. (authors)

  4. MHD stability, operational limits and disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The present physics understandings of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of tokamak plasmas, the threshold conditions for onset of MHD instability, and the resulting operational limits on attainable plasma pressure (beta limit) and density (density limit), and the consequences of plasma disruption and disruption related effects are reviewed and assessed in the context of their application to a future DT burning reactor prototype tokamak experiment such as ITER. The principal considerations covered within the MHD stability and beta limit assessments are (i) magnetostatic equilibrium, ideal MHD stability and the resulting ideal MHD beta limit; (ii) sawtooth oscillations and the coupling of sawtooth activity to other types of MHD instability; (iii) neoclassical island resistive tearing modes and the corresponding limits on beta and energy confinement; (iv) wall stabilization of ideal MHD instabilities and resistive wall instabilities; (v) mode locking effects of non-axisymmetric error fields; (vi) edge localized MHD instabilities (ELMs, etc.); and (vii) MHD instabilities and beta/pressure gradient limits in plasmas with actively modified current and magnetic shear profiles. The principal considerations covered within the density limit assessments are (i) empirical density limits; (ii) edge power balance/radiative density limits in ohmic and L-mode plasmas; and (iii) edge parameter related density limits in H-mode plasmas. The principal considerations covered in the disruption assessments are (i) disruption causes, frequency and MHD instability onset; (ii) disruption thermal and current quench characteristics; (iii) vertical instabilities (VDEs), both before and after disruption, and plasma and in-vessel halo currents; (iv) after disruption runaway electron formation, confinement and loss; (v) fast plasma shutdown (rapid externally initiated dissipation of plasma thermal and magnetic energies); (vi) means for disruption avoidance and disruption effect mitigation; and

  5. Membrane raft organization is more sensitive to disruption by (n-3) PUFA than nonraft organization in EL4 and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Franklin, Andrew; Harris, Mitchel; Teague, Heather; Rockett, Alexis; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2011-06-01

    Model membrane and cellular detergent extraction studies show (n-3) PUFA predominately incorporate into nonrafts; thus, we hypothesized (n-3) PUFA could disrupt nonraft organization. The first objective of this study was to determine whether (n-3) PUFA disrupted nonrafts of EL4 cells, an extension of our previous work in which we discovered an (n-3) PUFA diminished raft clustering. EPA or DHA treatment of EL4 cells increased plasma membrane accumulation of the nonraft probe 1,1'-dilinoleyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate by ~50-70% relative to a BSA control. Förster resonance energy transfer imaging showed EPA and DHA also disrupted EL4 nanometer scale nonraft organization by increasing the distance between nonraft molecules by ~25% compared with BSA. However, changes in nonrafts were due to an increase in cell size; under conditions where EPA or DHA did not increase cell size, nonraft organization was unaffected. We next translated findings on EL4 cells by testing if (n-3) PUFA administered to mice disrupted nonrafts and rafts. Imaging of B cells isolated from mice fed low- or high-fat (HF) (n-3) PUFA diets showed no change in nonraft organization compared with a control diet (CD). However, confocal microscopy revealed the HF (n-3) PUFA diet disrupted lipid raft clustering and size by ~40% relative to CD. Taken together, our data from 2 different model systems suggest (n-3) PUFA have limited effects on nonrafts. The ex vivo data, which confirm previous studies with EL4 cells, provide evidence that (n-3) PUFA consumed through the diet disrupt B cell lipid raft clustering.

  6. Membrane Raft Organization Is More Sensitive to Disruption by (n-3) PUFA Than Nonraft Organization in EL4 and B Cells123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Franklin, Andrew; Harris, Mitchel; Teague, Heather; Rockett, Alexis; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2011-01-01

    Model membrane and cellular detergent extraction studies show (n-3) PUFA predominately incorporate into nonrafts; thus, we hypothesized (n-3) PUFA could disrupt nonraft organization. The first objective of this study was to determine whether (n-3) PUFA disrupted nonrafts of EL4 cells, an extension of our previous work in which we discovered an (n-3) PUFA diminished raft clustering. EPA or DHA treatment of EL4 cells increased plasma membrane accumulation of the nonraft probe 1,1′-dilinoleyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate by ~50–70% relative to a BSA control. Förster resonance energy transfer imaging showed EPA and DHA also disrupted EL4 nanometer scale nonraft organization by increasing the distance between nonraft molecules by ~25% compared with BSA. However, changes in nonrafts were due to an increase in cell size; under conditions where EPA or DHA did not increase cell size, nonraft organization was unaffected. We next translated findings on EL4 cells by testing if (n-3) PUFA administered to mice disrupted nonrafts and rafts. Imaging of B cells isolated from mice fed low- or high-fat (HF) (n-3) PUFA diets showed no change in nonraft organization compared with a control diet (CD). However, confocal microscopy revealed the HF (n-3) PUFA diet disrupted lipid raft clustering and size by ~40% relative to CD. Taken together, our data from 2 different model systems suggest (n-3) PUFA have limited effects on nonrafts. The ex vivo data, which confirm previous studies with EL4 cells, provide evidence that (n-3) PUFA consumed through the diet disrupt B cell lipid raft clustering. PMID:21525263

  7. Edge plasma physical investigations of tokamak plasmas in CRIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakos, J.; Ignacz, P.; Koltai, L.; Paszti, F.; Petravich, G.; Szigeti, J.; Zoletnik, S.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the measurements performed in the field of thermonuclear high temperature plasma physics in CRIP (Hungary) are summarized. In the field of the edge plasma physics solid probes were used to test the external zone of plasma edges, and atom beams and balls were used to investigate both the external and internal zones. The plasma density distribution was measured by laser blow-off technics, using Na atoms, which are evaporated by laser pulses. The excitation of Na atom ball by tokamak plasma gives information on the status of the plasma edge. The toroidal asymmetry of particle transport in tokamak plasma was measured by erosion probes. The evaporated and transported impurities were collected on an other part of the plasma edge and were analyzed by SIMS and Rutherford backscattering. The interactions in plasma near the limiter were investigated by a special limiter with implemented probes. Recycling and charge exchange processes were measured. Disruption phenomena of tokamak plasma were analyzed and a special kind of disruptions, 'soft disruptions' and the related preliminary perturbations were discovered. (D.Gy.) 10 figs

  8. Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1980-06-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated the potential for producing a viable longburn tokamak reactor by enhancing the volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer through the use of high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were assessed in the context of extended burn operation. Using a one-dimensional transport code plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the startup and shutdown portions of the tokamak cycle. A representative large aspect ratio tokamak with an aspect ratio of 8 was found to achieve a burn time of 3.5 h at capital cost only approx. 25% greater than that of a moderate aspect ratio design tokamak

  9. Membrane Raft Organization Is More Sensitive to Disruption by (n-3) PUFA Than Nonraft Organization in EL4 and B Cells123

    OpenAIRE

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Franklin, Andrew; Harris, Mitchel; Teague, Heather; Rockett, Alexis; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2011-01-01

    Model membrane and cellular detergent extraction studies show (n-3) PUFA predominately incorporate into nonrafts; thus, we hypothesized (n-3) PUFA could disrupt nonraft organization. The first objective of this study was to determine whether (n-3) PUFA disrupted nonrafts of EL4 cells, an extension of our previous work in which we discovered an (n-3) PUFA diminished raft clustering. EPA or DHA treatment of EL4 cells increased plasma membrane accumulation of the nonraft probe 1,1′-dilinoleyl-3,...

  10. Enhanced Turbulence During the Energy Quench of Disruptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remkes, G. J. J.; Schüller, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    Enhanced electron density fluctuation levels with frequencies in the megahertz range have been observed during the energy quench phase of minor disruptions in the TORTUR Tokamak. The high frequencies of the phenomena indicate that the enhanced transport during the energy quench is caused by

  11. Tokamak reactor startup power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weldon, D.M.; Murray, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Tokamak startup with ohmic heating (OH)-induced voltages requires rather large voltages and power supplies. On present machines, with no radiofrequency (rf)-assist provisions, hundreds of volts have been specified for their designs. With the addition of electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) assist, the design requirements have been lowered. To obtain information on the cost and complexity associated with this ECRH-assisted, OH-pulsed startup voltage for ignition-type machines, a trade-off study was completed. The Fusion Engineering Device (FED) configuration was selected as a model because information was available on the structure. The data obtained are applicable to all tokamaks of this general size and complexity, such as the Engineering Test Reactor

  12. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.F.A.; Harbour, P.J.; Hotston, E.S.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  13. Theory of tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R B [Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1989-01-01

    The book covers the consequences of ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamics, these theories being responsible for most of what is well understood regarding the physics of tokamak discharges. The focus is on the description of equilibria, the linear and nonlinear theory of large scale modes, and single particle guiding center motion, including simple neoclassical effects. modern methods of general magnetic coordinates are used, and the student is introduced to the onset of chaos in Hamiltonian systems in the discussion of destruction of magnetic surfaces. Much of the book is devoted to the description of the limitations placed on tokamak operating parameters given by ideal and resistive modes, and current ideas about how to extend and optimize these parameters. (author). refs.; figs.

  14. Axisymmetric tokamak scapeoff transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.; Langer, W.D.

    1982-08-01

    We present the first self-consistent estimate of the magnitude of each term in a fluid treatment of plasma transport for a plasma lying in regions of open field lines in an axisymmetric tokamak. The fluid consists of a pure hydrogen plasma with sources which arise from its interaction with neutral hydrogen atoms. The analysis and results are limited to the high collisionality regime, which is optimal for a gaseous neutralizer divertor, or to a cold plasma mantle in a tokamak reactor. In this regime, both classical and neoclassical transport processes are important, and loss of particles and energy by diamagnetic flow are also significant. The prospect of extending the analysis to the lower collisionality regimes encountered in many existing experiments is discussed

  15. Density limits in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, M.

    1984-06-01

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to neutral hydrogen radiation and recycling is of great importance for the energy balance at the periphery. It is shown that the requirement for thermal equilibrium implies a constraint on the maximum attainable edge density. The relation to other density limits is discussed. The average plasma density is shown to be a strong function of the refuelling deposition profile. (author)

  16. Tokamak pump limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been done with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a region may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased edge electron temperature are observed in discharges with improved confinement. The injection of small amounts of neon into ISX-B has more clearly shown an improved electron core energy confinement during neutral beam injection. While carried out with a regular limiter, this Z-mode of operation is ideal for use with pump limiters and should be a way to achieve energy confinement times similar to values for H-mode tokamak plasmas. The implication of all these results for the design of a reactor pump limiter is described

  17. Modular tokamak magnetic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a tokamak reactor including a vacuum vessel, toroidal confining magnetic field coils disposed concentrically around the minor radius of the vacuum vessel, and poloidal confining magnetic field coils, an ohmic heating coil system comprising at least one magnetic coil disposed concentrically around a toroidal field coil, wherein the magnetic coil is wound around the toroidal field coil such that the ohmic heating coil enclosed the toroidal field coil

  18. Tokamak pump limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; California Univ., Los Angeles

    1984-01-01

    Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6 MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been performed with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scrape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a regime may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased edge electron temperature are observed in discharges with improved confinement. The injection of small amounts of neon into ISX-B has more clearly shown an improved electron core energy confinement during neutral beam injection. While carried out with a regular limiter, this 'Z-mode' of operation is ideal for use with pump limiters and should be a way to achieve energy confinement times similar to values for H-mode tokamak plasmas. The implication of all these results for the design of a reactor pump limiter is described. (orig.)

  19. TPX tokamak construction management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, D.; Kungl, D.; Seidel, P.; Halfast, C.

    1995-01-01

    A construction management contract normally involves the acquisition of a construction management firm to assist in the design, planning, budget conformance, and coordination of the construction effort. In addition the construction management firm acts as an agent in the awarding of lower tier contracts. The TPX Tokamak Construction Management (TCM) approach differs in that the construction management firm is also directly responsible for the assembly and installation of the tokamak including the design and fabrication of all tooling required for assembly. The Systems Integration Support (SIS) contractor is responsible for the architect-engineering design of ancillary systems, such as heating and cooling, buildings, modifications and site improvements, and a variety of electrical requirements, including switchyards and >4kV power distribution. The TCM will be responsible for the procurement of materials and the installation of the ancillary systems, which can either be performed directly by the TCM or subcontracted to a lower tier subcontractor. Assurance that the TPX tokamak is properly assembled and ready for operation when turned over to the operations team is the primary focus of the construction management effort. To accomplish this a disciplined constructability program will be instituted. The constructability effort will involve the effective and timely integration of construction expertise into the planning, component design, and field operations. Although individual component design groups will provide liaison during the machine assembly operations, the construction management team is responsible for assembly

  20. Experimental simulation and numerical modeling of vapor shield formation and divertor material erosion for ITER typical plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhtin, V.P.; Konkashbaev, I.; Landman, I.; Safronov, V.M.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The high divertor heat load during a tokamak plasma disruption results in sudden evaporation of a thin layer of divertor plate material, which acts as vapor shield and protects the target from further excessive evaporation. Formation and effectiveness of the vapor shield are theoretically modeled and are experimentally analyzed at the 2MK-200 facility under conditions simulating the thermal quench phase of ITER tokamak plasma disruptions. ((orig.))

  1. Runaway electron beam generation and mitigation during disruptions at JET-ILW

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Boboc, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Coffey, I.; Decker, J.; Drewelow, P.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P.C.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Giacomelli, L.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E.M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Lupelli, I.; Lomas, P. J.; Manzanares, A.; Martin De Aguilera, A.; Matthews, G.F.; Mlynář, Jan; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Perez von Thun, C.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A.E.; Sips, G.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 9 (2015), 093013-093013 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : runaway electrons * disruptions * tokamak * JET * massive gas injection * disruption mitigation * runaway background plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/55/9/093013

  2. Design and construction of Alborz tokamak vacuum vessel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardani, M.; Amrollahi, R.; Koohestani, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. ► As one of the key components for the device, the vacuum vessel can provide ultra-high vacuum and clean environment for the plasma operation. ► A limiter is a solid surface which defines the edge of the plasma and designed to protect the wall from the plasma, localizes the plasma–surface interaction and localizes the particle recycling. ► Structural analyses were confirmed by FEM model for dead weight, vacuum pressure and plasma disruptions loads. - Abstract: The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. At the heart of the tokamak is the vacuum vessel and limiter which collectively are referred to as the vacuum vessel system. As one of the key components for the device, the vacuum vessel can provide ultra-high vacuum and clean environment for the plasma operation. The VV systems need upper and lower vertical ports, horizontal ports and oblique ports for diagnostics, vacuum pumping, gas puffing, and maintenance accesses. A limiter is a solid surface which defines the edge of the plasma and designed to protect the wall from the plasma, localizes the plasma–surface interaction and localizes the particle recycling. Basic structure analyses were confirmed by FEM model for dead weight, vacuum pressure and plasma disruptions loads. Stresses at general part of the VV body are lower than the structure material allowable stress (117 MPa) and this analysis show that the maximum stresses occur near the gravity support, and is about 98 MPa.

  3. Status of the tokamak program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, J.

    1981-08-01

    For a specific configuration of magnetic field and plasma to be economically attractive as a commercial source of energy, it must contain a high-pressure plasma in a stable fashion while thermally isolating the plasma from the walls of the containment vessel. The tokamak magnetic configuration is presently the most successful in terms of reaching the considered goals. Tokamaks were developed in the USSR in a program initiated in the mid-1950s. By the early 1970s tokamaks were operating not only in the USSR but also in the U.S., Australia, Europe, and Japan. The advanced state of the tokamak program is indicated by the fact that it is used as a testbed for generic fusion development - for auxiliary heating, diagnostics, materials - as well as for specific tokamak advancement. This has occurred because it is the most economic source of a large, reproducible, hot, dense plasma. The basic tokamak is considered along with tokamak improvements, impurity control, additional heating, particle and power balance in a tokamak, aspects of microscopic transport, and macroscopic stability.

  4. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization

  5. The density limit in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alladio, F.

    1985-01-01

    A short summary of the present status of experimental observations, theoretical ideas and understanding of the density limit in tokamaks is presented. It is the result of the discussion that was held on this topic at the 4th European Tokamak Workshop in Copenhagen (December 4th to 6th, 1985). 610 refs

  6. Engineering analysis of TFTR disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers an engineering approach quantifying the currents, forces, and times, as well as plasma position, for the worst-case disruption based on engineerign circuit assumptions for the plasma. As the plasma moves toward the wall during the current-decay phase of disruption, the wall currents affect the rate of movement and, hence, the decay time. The calculated structure-induced currents differ considerably from those calculated using a presently available criterion, which specifies that the plasma remains stationary in the center of the torus while decaying in 10 ms. This report outlines the method and basis for the engineering calculation used to determine the current and forces as a function of the circuit characteristics. It provides specific calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with variations in parameters such as the thermal decay time, the torus resistance, and plasma temperature during the current decay. The study reviews possible ways to reduce the disruption damage of TFTR by reducing the magnitude of the plasma external field energy that is absorbed by the plasma during the current decay

  7. Engineering analysis of TFTR disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers an engineering approach quantifying the currents, forces, and times, as well as plasma position, for the worst-case disruption based on engineerign circuit assumptions for the plasma. As the plasma moves toward the wall during the current-decay phase of disruption, the wall currents affect the rate of movement and, hence, the decay time. The calculated structure-induced currents differ considerably from those calculated using a presently available criterion, which specifies that the plasma remains stationary in the center of the torus while decaying in 10 ms. This report outlines the method and basis for the engineering calculation used to determine the current and forces as a function of the circuit characteristics. It provides specific calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with variations in parameters such as the thermal decay time, the torus resistance, and plasma temperature during the current decay. The study reviews possible ways to reduce the disruption damage of TFTR by reducing the magnitude of the plasma external field energy that is absorbed by the plasma during the current decay.

  8. TRAIL: a tokamak rail gun limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, W.S.; Powell, J.R.; Usher, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    An attractive new limiter concept is investigated. The TRAIL (Tokamak Rail Gun Limiter) system impacts a stream of moderate velocity pellets (100 to 200 m/sec through the plasma edge region to absorb energy and define the plasma boundary. The pellets are recycled after cooling, to the injector of an E-M mass accelerator. Heat fluxes of approx. 30,000 W/cm 2 can be readily accommodated by the pellets, with very low recirculating power requirements (approx. 0.1%) for the accelerator. The mass accelerator velocity requirements are well within the present state of the art (several Km/sec). Accelerators injecting pellets at approx. 1 Km/sec can be used to control local plasma temperature and current profiles and to act as energy absorbers to shut down the plasma without damage to the first wall if a plasma disruption occurs

  9. Instrumentation and controls of an ignited tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becraft, W.R.; Golzy, J.; Houlberg, W.A.; Kukielka, C.A.; Onega, R.J.; Raju, G.V.S.; Stone, R.S.

    1980-10-01

    The instrumentation and controls (I and C) of an ignited plasma magnetically confined in a tokamak configuration needs increased emphasis in the following areas: (1) physics implications for control; (2) plasma shaping/position control; and (3) control to prevent disruptive instabilities. This document reports on the FY 1979 efforts in these and other areas. Also presented are discusssions in the areas of: (1) diagnostics suitable for the Engineering Test Facility (ETF); and (2) future research and development (R and D) needs. The appendices focus attention on some preliminary ideas about the measurement of the deuteron-triton (D-T) ratio in the plasma, synchrotron radiation, and divertor control. Finally, an appendix documenting the thermal consequences to the first wall of a MPD is presented

  10. Saturated tearing modes in tokamaks with divertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, G.

    1982-12-01

    We have developed a self-consistent theory of saturated tearing modes capable of predicting multiple magnetic island widths in tokamaks with no assumptions on the cross-sectional shape, aspect ratio, or plasma pressure. We are in the process of implementing this algorithm in the form of a computer code. We propose: (1) to complete, refine, document and publish this computer code; (2) to carry out a survey in which we vary the current profile, aspect ratio, cross-sectional shape, and pressure profile in order to determine their effect on saturated tearing mode magnetic island widths; and (3) to determine the effect of some externally applied magnetic perturbation harmonics on these magnetic island widths. Particular attention will be paid to the coupling between different helical harmonics, the effect of multiple magnetic islands on the profiles of temperature, pressure and current, and the potential of magnetic island overlap leading to a disruptive instability

  11. Coupling of tearing modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The simultaneous presence of tearing modes of different helical pitches leads to the destruction of magnetic surfaces, which has been suggested as the mechanism leading to the onset of the disruptive instability in tokamaks. For current profiles in which the m = 2 mode is unstable, but the m = 3 is stable, the coupling of the m = 3 to the m = 2 through the poloidal variation of the toroidal field can drive the m = 3 amplitude psi 3 to order psi 2 times the inverse aspect ratio. Detailed calculations, both analytical and numerical, have been performed for two models for the equilibrium and m = 2 mode structure. A slab model and incompressible m = 3 perturbations are assumed. The m = 3 amplitude increases with shear, up to a point, showing that as the current channel shrinks, overlap of resonances becomes more likely. The results also apply qualitatively to other m, m +- 1 interactions

  12. Tokamak Simulation Code modeling of NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Kaye, S.; Menard, J.; Kessel, C.; Glasser, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    The Tokamak Simulation Code [TSC] is widely used for the design of new axisymmetric toroidal experiments. In particular, TSC was used extensively in the design of the National Spherical Torus eXperiment [NSTX]. The authors have now benchmarked TSC with initial NSTX results and find excellent agreement for plasma and vessel currents and magnetic flux loops when the experimental coil currents are used in the simulations. TSC has also been coupled with a ballooning stability code and with DCON to provide stability predictions for NSTX operation. TSC has also been used to model initial CHI experiments where a large poloidal voltage is applied to the NSTX vacuum vessel, causing a force-free current to appear in the plasma. This is a phenomenon that is similar to the plasma halo current that sometimes develops during a plasma disruption

  13. Loop-voltage tomography in tokamaks using transient synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, N.J.; Kritz, A.H.; Hunter Coll., New York, NY

    1989-07-01

    The loop voltage in tokamaks is particularly difficult to measure anywhere but at the plasma periphery. A brief, deliberate, perturbation of hot plasma electrons, however, produces a transient radiation response that is sensitive to this voltage. We investigate how such a radiation response can be used to diagnose the loop voltage. 24 refs., 6 figs

  14. Macroscopic erosion of divertor and first wall armour in future tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würz, H.; Bazylev, B.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Safronov, V.

    2002-12-01

    Sputtering, evaporation and macroscopic erosion determine the lifetime of the 'in vessel' armour materials CFC, tungsten and beryllium presently under discussion for future tokamaks. For CFC armour macroscopic erosion means brittle destruction and dust formation whereas for metallic armour melt layer erosion by melt motion and droplet splashing. Available results on macroscopic erosion from hot plasma and e-beam simulation experiments and from tokamaks are critically evaluated and a comprehensive discussion of experimental and numerical macroscopic erosion and its extrapolation to future tokamaks is given. Shielding of divertor armour materials by their own vapor exists during plasma disruptions. The evolving plasma shield protects the armour from high heat loads, absorbs the incoming energy and reradiates it volumetrically thus reducing drastically the deposited energy. As a result, vertical target erosion by vaporization turns out to be of the order of a few microns per disruption event and macroscopic erosion becomes the dominant erosion source.

  15. 3D simulation studies of tokamak plasmas using MHD and extended-MHD models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Pomphrey, N.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) tokamak simulation project aims at the simulation of tokamak plasmas using a multi-level tokamak code package. Several current applications using MHD and Extended-MHD models are presented; high-β disruption studies in reversed shear plasmas using the MHD level MH3D code, ω *i stabilization and nonlinear island rotation studies using the two-fluid level MH3D-T code, studies of nonlinear saturation of TAE modes using the hybrid particle/MHD level MH3D-K code, and unstructured mesh MH3D ++ code studies. In particular, three internal mode disruption mechanisms are identified from simulation results which agree well with experimental data

  16. Macroscopic erosion of divertor and first wall armour in future tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Bazylev, B.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Safronov, V.

    2002-01-01

    Sputtering, evaporation and macroscopic erosion determine the lifetime of the 'in vessel' armour materials CFC, tungsten and beryllium presently under discussion for future tokamaks. For CFC armour macroscopic erosion means brittle destruction and dust formation whereas for metallic armour melt layer erosion by melt motion and droplet splashing. Available results on macroscopic erosion from hot plasma and e-beam simulation experiments and from tokamaks are critically evaluated and a comprehensive discussion of experimental and numerical macroscopic erosion and its extrapolation to future tokamaks is given. Shielding of divertor armour materials by their own vapor exists during plasma disruptions. The evolving plasma shield protects the armour from high heat loads, absorbs the incoming energy and reradiates it volumetrically thus reducing drastically the deposited energy. As a result, vertical target erosion by vaporization turns out to be of the order of a few microns per disruption event and macroscopic erosion becomes the dominant erosion source

  17. The tokamak as a neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendel, H.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1989-11-01

    This paper describes the tokamak in its role as a neutron source, with emphasis on experimental results for D-D neutron production. The sections summarize tokamak operation, sources of fusion and non-fusion neutrons, principal neutron detection methods and their calibration, neutron energy spectra and fluxes outside the tokamak plasma chamber, history of neutron production in tokamaks, neutron emission and fusion power gain from JET and TFTR (the largest present-day tokamaks), and D-T neutron production from burnup of D-D tritons. This paper also discusses the prospects for future tokamak neutron production and potential applications of tokamak neutron sources. 100 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Effects of q and high beta on tokamak stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brickhouse, N.S.; Callen, J.D.; Dexter, R.N.

    1984-08-01

    In the Columbia University Torus II tokamak plasmas have been studied with volume averaged toroidal beta values as high as 15%. Experimental equilibria have been compared with a 2D free boundary MHD equilibrium code PSEC. The stability of these equilibria has been computed using PEST, the predictions of which are compatible with an observed instability in Torus II which may be characterized as a high toroidal mode number ballooning fluctuation. In the University of Wisconsin Tokapole II tokamak disruptive instability behavior is investigated, with plasma able to be confined on closed magnetic surfaces in the scrape-off region, as the cylindrical edge safety factor is varied from q approx. 3 to q approx. 0.5. It is observed that at q/sub a/ approx. 3 major disruption activity occurs without current terminations, at q/sub a/ less than or equal to 2 well-confined plasmas are obtained without major disruption, and at q/sub a/ approx. 0.5 only partial reconnection accompanies minor disruptions

  19. Development in Diagnostics Application to Control Advanced Tokamak Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Y.

    2008-01-01

    For continuous operation expected in DEMO, all the plasma current must be non-inductively driven, with self-generated neoclassical bootstrap current being maximized. The control of such steady state high performance tokamak plasma (so-called 'Advanced Tokamak Plasma') is a challenge because of the strong coupling between the current density, the pressure profile and MHD stability. In considering diagnostic needs for the advanced tokamak research, diagnostics for MHD are the most fundamental, since discharges which violate the MHD stability criteria either disrupt or have significantly reduced confinement. This report deals with the development in diagnostic application to control advanced tokamak plasma, with emphasized on recent progress in active feedback control of the current profile and the pressure profile under DEMO-relevant high bootstrap-current fraction. In addition, issues in application of the present-day actuators and diagnostics for the advanced control to DEMO will be briefly addressed, where port space for the advanced control may be limited so as to keep sufficient tritium breeding ratio (TBR)

  20. A model for disruption generated runaway electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.J.; Campbell, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    One of the possible consequences of disruptions in tokamaks is the generation of runaway electrons which can impact plasma facing components and cause damage, owing to high local energy deposition. This problem becomes more serious as the machine size and plasma current increase. Since large size and high currents are characteristics of proposed future machines, control of runaway generation is an important design consideration. A lumped circuit model for disruption runaway electron generation indicates that impurity concentration and type, as well as plasma motion, can strongly influence runaway behaviour. A comparison of disruption data from several runs on JET and DIII-D with model results demonstrate the effects of impurities, and plasma motion, on runaway number density and energy. The model is also applied to the calculation of runaway currents for ITER. (author). 16 refs, 13 figs

  1. Tokamak instrumentation and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becraft, W.R.; Bettis, E.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Onega, R.J.; Stone, R.S.

    1979-02-01

    The three areas of study emphasis to date are: (1) Physics implications for controls, (2) Computer simulation, and (3) Shutdown/aborts. This document reports on the FY 78 efforts (the first year of these studies) to address these problems. Transient scenario options for the startup of a tokamak are developed, and the implications for the control system are discussed. This document also presents a hybrid computer simulation (analog and digital) of the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) which is now being used for corroborative controls investigations. The simulation will be expanded to represent a TNS/ETF machine

  2. Demonstration tokamak power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.; Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Mattas, R.; Smith, D.L.; DeFreece, D.; Morgan, G.D.; Trachsel, C.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design for a tokamak demonstration power plant (DEMO) was developed. A large part of the study focused on examining the key issues and identifying the R and D needs for: (1) current drive for steady-state operation, (2) impurity control and exhaust, (3) tritium breeding blanket, and (4) reactor configuration and maintenance. Impurity control and exhaust will not be covered in this paper but is discussed in another paper in these proceedings, entitled Key Issues of FED/INTOR Impurity Control System

  3. Maximum entropy tokamak configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minardi, E.

    1989-01-01

    The new entropy concept for the collective magnetic equilibria is applied to the description of the states of a tokamak subject to ohmic and auxiliary heating. The condition for the existence of steady state plasma states with vanishing entropy production implies, on one hand, the resilience of specific current density profiles and, on the other, severe restrictions on the scaling of the confinement time with power and current. These restrictions are consistent with Goldston scaling and with the existence of a heat pinch. (author)

  4. Erosion of melt layers developed during a plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1995-01-01

    Material erosion of plasma-facing components during a tokamak disruption is a serious problem that limits reactor operation and economical reactor lifetime. In particular, metallic low-Z components such as Be will be subjected to severe melting during disruptions and edge localized modes (ELMs). Loss of the developed melt layer will critically shorten the lifetime of these components, severely contaminate the plasma, and seriously inhibit successful and reliable operation of the reactor. In this study mechanisms responsible for melt-layer loss during a disruption are modeled and evaluated. Implications of melt-layer loss on the performance of metallic facing components in the reactor environment are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Erosion of melt layers developed during a plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1994-08-01

    Material erosion of plasma-facing components during a tokamak disruption is a serious problem that limits reactor operation and economical reactor lifetime. In particular, metallic low-Z components such as Be will be subjected to severe melting during disruptions and edge localized models (ELMs). Loss of the developed melt layer will critically shorten the lifetime of these components, severely contaminate the plasma, and seriously inhibit successful and reliable operation of the reactor. In this study mechanisms responsible for melt-layer loss during a disruption are modeled and evaluated. Implications of melt-layer loss on the performance of metallic facing components in the reactor environment are discussed

  6. Non-Axisymmetric Shaping of Tokamaks Preserving Quasi-Axisymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long-Poe Ku and Allen H. Boozer

    2009-06-05

    If quasi-axisymmetry is preserved, non-axisymmetric shaping can be used to design tokamaks that do not require current drive, are resilient to disruptions, and have robust plasma stability without feedback. Suggestions for addressing the critical issues of tokamaks can only be validated when presented with sufficient specificity that validating experiments can be designed. The purpose of this paper is provide that specificity for non-axisymmetric shaping. To our knowledge, no other suggestions for the solution of a number of tokamak issues, such as disruptions, have reached this level of specificity. Sequences of three-field-period quasi-axisymmetric plasmas are studied. These sequences address the questions: (1) What can be achieved at various levels of non-axisymmetric shaping? (2) What simplifications to the coils can be achieved by going to a larger aspect ratio? (3) What range of shaping can be achieved in a single experimental facility? The sequences of plasmas found in this study provide a set of interesting and potentially important configurations.

  7. Topology of tokamak orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, J.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-09-01

    Guiding center orbits in noncircular axisymmetric tokamak plasmas are studied in the constants of motion (COM) space of (v, zeta, psi/sub m/). Here, v is the particle speed, zeta is the pitch angle with respect to the parallel equilibrium current, J/sub parallels/, and psi/sub m/ is the maximum value of the poloidal flux function (increasing from the magnetic axis) along the guiding center orbit. Two D-shaped equilibria in a flux-conserving tokamak having β's of 1.3% and 7.7% are used as examples. In this space, each confined orbit corresponds to one and only one point and different types of orbits (e.g., circulating, trapped, stagnation and pinch orbits) are represented by separate regions or surfaces in the space. It is also shown that the existence of an absolute minimum B in the higher β (7.7%) equilibrium results in a dramatically different orbit topology from that of the lower β case. The differences indicate the confinement of additional high energy (v → c, within the guiding center approximation) trapped, co- and countercirculating particles whose orbit psi/sub m/ falls within the absolute B well

  8. ITER tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, J.; Salpietro, E.; Shatalov, G.

    1991-01-01

    The results of the Conceptual Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are summarized. These activities, carried out between April 1988 and December 1990, produced a consistent set of technical characteristics and preliminary plans for co-ordinated research and development support of ITER; and a conceptual design, a description of design requirements and a preliminary construction schedule and cost estimate. After a description of the design basis, an overview is given of the tokamak device, its auxiliary systems, facility and maintenance. The interrelation and integration of the various subsystems that form the ITER tokamak concept are discussed. The 16 ITER equatorial port allocations, used for nuclear testing, diagnostics, fuelling, maintenance, and heating and current drive, are given, as well as a layout of the reactor building. Finally, brief descriptions are given of the major ITER sub-systems, i.e., (i) magnet systems (toroidal and poloidal field coils and cryogenic systems), (ii) containment structures (vacuum and cryostat vessels, machine gravity supports, attaching locks, passive loops and active coils), (iii) first wall, (iv) divertor plate (design and materials, performance and lifetime, a.o.), (v) blanket/shield system, (vi) maintenance equipment, (vii) current drive and heating, (viii) fuel cycle system, and (ix) diagnostics. 11 refs, figs and tabs

  9. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-01-01

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 (micro)m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics

  10. Axisymmetric control in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, D.A.

    1991-02-01

    Vertically elongated tokamak plasmas are intrinsically susceptible to vertical axisymmetric instabilities as a result of the quadrupole field which must be applied to produce the elongation. The present work analyzes the axisymmetric control necessary to stabilize elongated equilibria, with special application to the Alcator C-MOD tokamak. A rigid current-conserving filamentary plasma model is applied to Alcator C-MOD stability analysis, and limitations of the model are addressed. A more physically accurate nonrigid plasma model is developed using a perturbed equilibrium approach to estimate linearized plasma response to conductor current variations. This model includes novel flux conservation and vacuum vessel stabilization effects. It is found that the nonrigid model predicts significantly higher growth rates than predicted by the rigid model applied to the same equilibria. The nonrigid model is then applied to active control system design. Multivariable pole placement techniques are used to determine performance optimized control laws. Formalisms are developed for implementing and improving nominal feedback laws using the C-MOD digital-analog hybrid control system architecture. A proportional-derivative output observer which does not require solution of the nonlinear Ricatti equation is developed to help accomplish this implementation. The nonrigid flux conserving perturbed equilibrium plasma model indicates that equilibria with separatrix elongation of at least κ sep = 1.85 can be stabilized robustly with the present control architecture and conductor/sensor configuration

  11. Characteristics of low frequency MHD fluctuations in the PRETEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochanski, T.P.

    1981-05-01

    The temporal and spectral characteristics of low frequency (< 100KHz) MHD fluctuations, which are commonly associated with disruptions, have been investigated in the PRETEXT tokamak. There exists rigid phase coherence between the internal m = 1, and externally detected m = 2 modes indicative of strong mode coupling. A parametric study of the frequency of the mode, in the saturated state, indicates that the frequency scales with the toroidal magnetic field, and is inversely proportional to the plasma current. The frequency is observed to decrease abruptly as the mode amplitude rapidly increases prior to a plasma disruption. The burst type growth of the m = 2 mode appears to be inextricably linked to the occurrence of the disruptive instability

  12. Conversion of magnetic energy to runaway kinetic energy during the termination of runaway current on the J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, A. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Zhang, J.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Wang, X. L.; Yang, H. Y.; Gao, H. L.; Pan, Y.; the J-TEXT Team

    2018-05-01

    A large number of runaway electrons (REs) with energies as high as several tens of mega-electron volt (MeV) may be generated during disruptions on a large-scale tokamak. The kinetic energy carried by REs is eventually deposited on the plasma-facing components, causing damage and posing a threat on the operation of the tokamak. The remaining magnetic energy following a thermal quench is significant on a large-scale tokamak. The conversion of magnetic energy to runaway kinetic energy will increase the threat of runaway electrons on the first wall. The magnetic energy dissipated inside the vacuum vessel (VV) equals the decrease of initial magnetic energy inside the VV plus the magnetic energy flowing into the VV during a disruption. Based on the estimated magnetic energy, the evolution of magnetic-kinetic energy conversion are analyzed through three periods in disruptions with a runaway current plateau.

  13. Modelling dust transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.D.; Martin, J.D.; Bacharis, M.; Coppins, M.; Counsell, G.F.; Allen, J.E.; Counsell, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    The DTOKS code, which models dust transport through tokamak plasmas, is described. The floating potential and charge of a dust grain in a plasma and the fluxes of energy to and from it are calculated. From this model, the temperature of the dust grain can be estimated. A plasma background is supplied by a standard tokamak edge modelling code (B2SOLPS5.0), and dust transport through MAST (the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak) and ITER plasmas is presented. We conclude that micron-radius tungsten dust can reach the separatrix in ITER. (authors)

  14. Study of runaway current generation following disruptions in KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z Y; Kim, W C; Yu, Y W; England, A C; Yoo, J W; Hahn, S H; Yoon, S W; Lee, K D; Oh, Y K; Kwak, J G; Kwon, M

    2013-01-01

    The high fraction of runaway current conversion following disruptions has an important effect on the first wall for next-generation tokamaks. Because of the potentially severe consequences of a large full current runaway beam on the first wall in an unmitigated disruption, runaway suppression is given a high priority. The behavior of runaway currents both in spontaneous disruptions and in D 2 massive gas injection (MGI) shutdown experiments is investigated in the KSTAR tokamak. The experiments in KSTAR show that the toroidal magnetic field threshold, B T >2 T, for runaway generation is not absolute. A high fraction of runaway current conversion following spontaneous disruptions is observed at a much lower toroidal magnetic field of B T = 1.3 T. A dedicated fast valve for high-pressure gas injection with 39.7 bar is developed for the study of disruptions. A study of runaway current parameters shows that the conversion efficiency of pre-disruptive plasma currents into runaway current can reach over 80% both in spontaneous disruptions and in D 2 MGI shutdown experiments in KSTAR. (paper)

  15. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development....... The tools have been applied in practice in collaboration with 11 small and medium sized companies (SMEs). The study investigates these approaches to further understand how design thinking can contribute to sustainable transition in a business context. The study and the findings are relevant to organizations...... invested in the issue of sustainable business development, in particular the leaders and employees of SMEs, but also to design education seeking new ways to consciously handle and teach the complexity inherent in sustainable transformation. Findings indicate that the SD design thinking approach contributes...

  16. Tokamak building-design considerations for a large tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.; Thomson, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    Design and construction of a satisfactory tokamak building to support FED appears feasible. Further, a pressure vessel building does not appear necessary to meet the plant safety requirements. Some of the building functions will require safety class systems to assure reliable and safe operation. A rectangular tokamak building has been selected for FED preconceptual design which will be part of the confinement system relying on ventilation and other design features to reduce the consequences and probability of radioactivity release

  17. Disruption Physics and Mitigation on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.G.; Humphreys, D.A.; Kellman, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    The contributions of the DIII-D tokamak toward the understanding and control of disruptions are reviewed. Disruptions are found to be deterministic, and the underlying causes of disruption can therefore be predicted and avoided. With sufficiently rapid detection, possible damage from disruptions can be mitigated using an understanding of disruption phenomenology and plasma physics. Regimes of high β are readily available in DIII-D and provide access to relatively high energy density disruptions, despite DIII-D's moderate magnetic field and size. DIII-D, with all-graphite wall armor and wall conditioning between discharges, has proven highly resilient to the deleterious effects that disruptions can have on plasma operations. Simultaneously, exploitation and adaptation of DIII-D's extensive core and edge plasma diagnostic set have allowed for unique plasma measurements during disruptions. These measurements have tied into the development of several physical models used to understand aspects of disruptions, such as magnetohydrodynamic growth at the disruption onset, radiation energy balance through the thermal quench, and halo currents during the current quench. Based on this fundamental understanding, DIII-D has developed techniques to mitigate the harmful effects of disruptions by radiative dissipation of the plasma energy and extrapolated these techniques for possible use on larger devices like ITER

  18. Ovotoxicants 4-vinylcyclohexene 1,2-monoepoxide and 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide disrupt redox status and modify different electrophile sensitive target enzymes and genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos O. Abolaji

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The compounds 4-vinylcyclohexene 1,2-monoepoxide (VCM and 4-Vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD are the two downstream metabolites of 4-vinylcyclohexene (VCH, an ovotoxic agent in mammals. In addition, VCM and VCD may be found as by-products of VCH oxidation in the environment. Recently, we reported the involvement of oxidative stress in the toxicity of VCH in Drosophila melanogaster. However, it was not possible to determine the individual contributions of VCM and VCD in VCH toxicity. Hence, we investigated the toxicity of VCM and VCD (10–1000 µM in flies after 5 days of exposure via the diet. Our results indicated impairments in climbing behaviour and disruptions in antioxidant balance and redox status evidenced by an increase in DCFH oxidation, decreases in total thiol content and glutathione-S-transferase (GST activity in the flies exposed to VCM and VCD (p<0.05. These effects were accompanied by disruptions in the transcription of the genes encoding the proteins superoxide dismutase (SOD1, kelch-like erythroid-derived cap-n-collar (CNC homology (ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap-1, mitogen activated protein kinase 2 (MAPK-2, catalase, Cyp18a1, JAFRAC 1 (thioredoxin peroxidase 1 and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR-1 (p<0.05. VCM and VCD inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE and delta aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALA D activities in the flies (p<0.05. Indeed, here, we demonstrated that different target enzymes and genes were modified by the electrophiles VCM and VCD in the flies. Thus, D. melanogaster has provided further lessons on the toxicity of VCM and VCD which suggest that the reported toxicity of VCH may be mediated by its transformation to VCM and VCD.

  19. Natural current profiles in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biskamp, D.

    1986-01-01

    It is proposed that a certain class of equilibrium, which follow from an elementary variational principle, are the natural current profiles in tokamaks, to which actual discharge profiles tend to relax. (orig.)

  20. Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Alcator C-Mod at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is operated as a DOE national user facility. Alcator C-Mod is a unique, compact tokamak facility that uses...

  1. JUST: Joint Upgraded Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizov, E.A.; Dvorkin, N.Ya.; Filatov, O.G.

    1997-01-01

    The main goals, ideas and the programme of JUST, spherical tokamak (ST) for the plasma burn investigation, are presented. The place and prospects of JUST in thermonuclear investigations are discussed. (author)

  2. Preliminary Design of Alborz Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, M.; Amrollahi, R.; Saramad, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. The most important part of the tokamak design is the design of TF coils. In this paper a refined design of the TF coil system for the Alborz tokamak is presented. This design is based on cooper cable conductor with 5 cm width and 6 mm thickness. The TF coil system is consist of 16 rectangular shape coils, that makes the magnetic field of 0.7 T at the plasma center. The stored energy in total is 160 kJ, and the power supply used in this system is a capacitor bank with capacity of C = 1.32 mF and V max = 14 kV.

  3. New directions in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    New directions for tokamak research are briefly mentioned. Some of the areas for new considerations are the following: reactor size, beta ratio, current drivers, blankets, impurity control, and modular designs

  4. The Tokamak IST-TOK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.; Manso, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    A small tokamak is under construction at the Portuguese Technical Superior Institute. The main objective is to create a home based laboratory in which an independent scientific program might be developed. (L.C.J.A.). 14 refs, 6 figs

  5. Numerical Tokamak Project code comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, R.E.; Cohen, B.I.; Beer, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Numerical Tokamak Project undertook a code comparison using a set of TFTR tokamak parameters. Local radial annulus codes of both gyrokinetic and gyrofluid types were compared for both slab and toroidal case limits assuming ion temperature gradient mode turbulence in a pure plasma with adiabatic electrons. The heat diffusivities were found to be in good internal agreement within ± 50% of the group average over five codes

  6. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J.G.; Berni, L.A.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Ueda, M.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J.; Barbosa, L.F.W.; Patire Junior, H.; The high-power microwave sources group

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  7. Confinement and diffusion in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliams, R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of electric field fluctuations on confinement and diffusion in tokamak is discussed. Based on the experimentally determined cross-field turbolent diffusion coefficient, D∼3.7*cT e /eB(δn i /n i ) rms which is also derived by a simple theory, the cross-field diffusion time, tp=a 2 /D, is calculated and compared to experimental results from 51 tokamak for standard Ohmic operation

  8. Enhancement of confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis begins by identifying a hypothetical model of tokamak confinement that is designed to take into account the conflict between Tsub(e)(r)-profile shapes arising from microscopic transport and J(r)-profile shapes required for gross stability. On the basis of this model, a number of hypothetical lines of advance are developed. Some TFTR experiments that may point the way to a particularly attractive type of tokamak reactor regime are discussed. (author)

  9. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] (and others)

    2003-07-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  10. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J.G.; Berni, L.A.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Ueda, M.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma; Barbosa, L.F.W. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Mecanica Espacial e Controle; The high-power microwave sources group

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  11. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes

    2003-01-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  12. High Beta Tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, G.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Ivers, T.H.; Sankar, M.K.V.; Eisner, E.; Gates, D.; Garofalo, A.; Kombargi, R.; Maurer, D.; Nadle, D.; Xiao, Q.

    1993-01-01

    During the past 6 months, experiments have been conducted with the HBT-EP tokamak in order to (1) test and evaluate diagnostic systems, (2) establish basic machine operation, (3) document MHD behavior as a function of global discharge parameters, (4) investigate conditions leading to passive stabilization of MHD instabilities, and (5) quantify the external saddle coil current required for DC mode locking. In addition, the development and installation of new hardware systems has occurred. A prototype saddle coil was installed and tested. A five-position (n,m) = (1,2) external helical saddle coil was attached for mode-locking experiments. And, fabrication of the 32-channel UV tomography and the multipass Thomson scattering diagnostics have begun in preparation for installation later this year

  13. Anomalous transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented of what is known about anomalous transport in tokamaks. It is generally thought that this anomalous transport is the result of fluctuations in various plasma parameters. In the plasma edge detailed measurements of the quantities required to directly determine the fluctuation driven fluxes are available. The total flux of particles is well explained by the measured electrostatic fluctuation driven flux. However, a satisfactory model to explain the origin of the fluctuations has not been identified. The processes responsible for determining the edge energy flux are less clear, but electrostatic convection plays an important part. In the confinement region experimental observations are presently restricted to measurements of density and potential fluctuations and their correlations. The characteristics of the measured fluctuations are discussed and compared with the predictions of various models. Comparisons between measured particle, electron heat and ion heat fluxes, and those fluxes predicted to result from the measured fluctuations, are made. Magnetic fluctuations is discussed

  14. Tokamak hybrid study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.

    1976-09-01

    A report on one year of study of a tokamak hybrid reactor is presented. The plasma is maintained by both D and T beams. To obtain long burn times a poloidal field divertor is required. Both the single null and the double null style of divertor are considered. The blanket consists of a neutron multiplier region containing natural uranium followed by burner regions of molten salt (flibe) loaded with PuF 3 to enhance the energy multiplication. Economic analysis has been applied only recently to a variety of reactor sizes and plasma conditions. Early indications suggest that the most attractive hybrids will have large plasmas of major radius in excess of 8 meters

  15. Tokamak hybrid study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.

    1976-01-01

    A report on one year of study of a tokamak hybrid reactor is given. The plasma is maintained by both D and T beams. To obtain long burn times a poloidal field divertor is required. Both the single null and the double null style of divertor are considered. The blanket consists of a neutron multiplier region containing natural uranium followed by burner regions of molten salt (flibe) loaded with PuF 3 to enhance the energy multiplication. Economic analysis has been applied only recently to a variety of reactor sizes and plasma conditions. Early indications suggest that the most attractive hybrids will have large plasmas of major radius in excess of 8 meters

  16. The Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses his lab's plan for completing the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) conceptual design during calendar year 1987. Around July 1 they froze the subsystem envelopes on the device to continue with the conceptual design. They did this by formalizing a general requirements document. They have been developing the management plan and submitted a version to the DOE July 10. He describes a group of management activities. They released the vacuum vessel Request For Proposals (RFP) on August 5. An RFP to do a major part of the system engineering on the device is being developed. They intend to assemble the device outside of the test cell, then move it into the the test cell, install it there, and bring to the test cell many of the auxiliary facilities from TFTR, for example, power supplies

  17. Plasma turbulence in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldas, Ibere L.; Heller, M.V.A.P.; Brasilio, Z.A. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-12-31

    Full text. In this work we summarize the results from experiments on electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations in tokamak plasmas. Spectral analyses show that these fluctuations are turbulent, having a broad spectrum of wavectors and a broad spectrum of frequencies at each wavector. The electrostatic turbulence induces unexpected anomalous particle transport that deteriorates the plasma confinement. The relationship of these fluctuations to the current state of plasma theory is still unclear. Furthermore, we describe also attempts to control this plasma turbulence with external magnetic perturbations that create chaotic magnetic configurations. Accordingly, the magnetic field lines may become chaotic and then induce a Lagrangian diffusion. Moreover, to discuss nonlinear coupling and intermittency, we present results obtained by using numerical techniques as bi spectral and wavelet analyses. (author)

  18. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D 3 He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions

  19. Detection of tokamak plasma positrons using annihilation photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guanying, Yu; Liu, Jian; Xie, Jinlin [University of Science and Technology, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Li, Jiangang, E-mail: j_li@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A design for detection of tokamak plasma positrons is given. • Identify the main obstacle toward experimental confirmation of fusion plasma positrons. • Signal to noise ratio in a plasma disruption is estimated. • Unique potential applications of fusion plasma positrons are discussed. - Abstract: A massive amount of positrons (plasma positrons), produced by the collision between runaway electrons and nuclei during fusion plasma disruption, was first predicted theoretically in 2003. To help confirm this prediction, we report here the design of an experimental system to detect tokamak plasma positrons. Because a substantial amount of positrons (material positrons) are produced when runaway electrons impact plasma-facing materials, we proposed maximizing the ratio of plasma to material positrons by inserting a thin carbon target at the plasma edge as a plasma positron bombing target and producing a plasma disruption scenario triggered by massive gas injection. Meanwhile, the coincidence detection of positron annihilation photons was used to filter out the noise of annihilation photons from locations other than the carbon target and that of bremsstrahlung photons near 511 keV. According to our simulation, the overall signal-to-noise ratio should be more than 10:1.

  20. Modeling SOL evolution during disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T.D.; Cohen, R.H.; Crotinger, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    We present the status of our models and transport simulations of the 2-D evolution of the scrape-off layer (SOL) during tokamak disruptions. This evolution is important for several reasons: It determines how the power from the core plasma is distributed on material surfaces, how impurities from those surfaces or from gas injection migrate back to the core region, and what are the properties of the SOL for carrying halo currents. We simulate this plasma in a time-dependent fashion using the SOL transport code UEDGE. This code models the SOL plasma using fluid equations of plasma density, parallel momentum (along the magnetic field), electron energy, ion energy, and neutral gas density. A multispecies model is used to follow the density of different charge-states of impurities. The parallel transport is classical but with kinetic modifications; these are presently treated by flux limits, but we have initiated more sophisticated models giving the correct long-mean-free path limit. The cross-field transport is anomalous, and one of the results of this work is to determine reasonable values to characterize disruptions. Our primary focus is on the initial thermal quench phase when most of the core energy is lost, but the total current is maintained. The impact of edge currents on the MHD equilibrium will be discussed

  1. Poloidal magnetic field profile measurements on the microwave tokamak experiment using far-infrared polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    The measurement of plasma poloidal magnetic field (B) profiles in tokamaks with good temporal and spatial resolution has proven to be a difficult but important measurement. A large range of toroidal confinement phenomena is expected to depend sensitively on the radial variation of B including the tearing instability, sawtooth oscillations, disruptions, and transport. Experimental confirmation of theoretical models describing these phenomena has been hampered by the lack of detailed B measurements. A fifteen chord far-infrared (FIR) polarimeter has been developed to measure B in the Microwave Tokamak, Experiment (MTX). Polarimetry utilizes the well known Faraday rotation effect, which causes a rotation of the polarization of an FIR beam propagating in the poloidal plane. The rotation angle is proportional to the component of B parallel to the beam. A new technique for determining the Faraday rotation angle is introduced, based on phase measurements of a rotating polarization ellipse. This instrument has been used successfully to measure B profiles for a wide range of experiments on MTX. For ohmic discharges, measurements of the safety factor on axis give q 0 ∼ 0.75 during sawteeth and q 0 > 1 without sawteeth. Large perturbations to the polarimeter signals correlated with the sawtooth crash are observed during some discharges. Measurements in discharges with electron cyclotron heating (ECH) show a transition from a hollow to peaked J profile that is triggered by the ECH pulse. Current-ramp experiments were done to perturb the J profile from the nominal Spitzer conductivity profile. Profiles for initial current ramps and ramps starting from a stable equilibrium have been measured and are compared with a cylindrical diffusion model. Finally, the tearing mode stability equation is solved using measured J profiles. Stability predictions are in good agreement with the existence of oscillations observed on the magnetic loops

  2. Application of the Disruption Predictor Feature Developer to developing a machine-portable disruption predictor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Matthew; Tang, William; Feibush, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    Plasma disruptions pose a major threat to the operation of tokamaks which confine a large amount of stored energy. In order to effectively mitigate this damage it is necessary to predict an oncoming disruption with sufficient warning time to take mitigative action. Machine learning approaches to this problem have shown promise but require further developments to address (1) the need for machine-portable predictors and (2) the availability of multi-dimensional signal inputs. Here we demonstrate progress in these two areas by applying the Disruption Predictor Feature Developer to data from JET and NSTX, and discuss topics of focus for ongoing work in support of ITER. The author is also supported under the Fulbright U.S. Student Program as a graduate student in the department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  3. MHD Effects of a Ferritic Wall on Tokamak Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Paul E.

    It has been recognized for some time that the very high fluence of fast (14.1MeV) neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion will represent a major materials challenge for the development of next-generation fusion energy projects such as a fusion component test facility and demonstration fusion power reactor. The best-understood and most promising solutions presently available are a family of low-activation steels originally developed for use in fission reactors, but the ferromagnetic properties of these steels represent a danger to plasma confinement through enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and increased susceptibility to error fields. At present, experimental research into the effects of ferromagnetic materials on MHD stability in toroidal geometry has been confined to demonstrating that it is still possible to operate an advanced tokamak in the presence of ferromagnetic components. In order to better quantify the effects of ferromagnetic materials on tokamak plasma stability, a new ferritic wall has been installated in the High Beta Tokamak---Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The development, assembly, installation, and testing of this wall as a modular upgrade is described, and the effect of the wall on machine performance is characterized. Comparative studies of plasma dynamics with the ferritic wall close-fitting against similar plasmas with the ferritic wall retracted demonstrate substantial effects on plasma stability. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied, demonstrating a 50% increase in n = 1 plasma response amplitude when the ferritic wall is near the plasma. Susceptibility of plasmas to disruption events increases by a factor of 2 or more with the ferritic wall inserted, as disruptions are observed earlier with greater frequency. Growth rates of external kink instabilities are observed to be twice as large in the presence of a close-fitting ferritic wall. Initial studies are made of the influence of mode rotation frequency

  4. Final technical report for DE-SC00012633 AToM (Advanced Tokamak Modeling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Christopher [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Orlov, Dmitri [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Izzo, Valerie [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2018-02-05

    This final report for the AToM project documents contributions from University of California, San Diego researchers over the period of 9/1/2014 – 8/31/2017. The primary focus of these efforts was on performing validation studies of core tokamak transport models using the OMFIT framework, including development of OMFIT workflow scripts. Additional work was performed to develop tools for use of the nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics code NIMROD in OMFIT, and its use in the study of runaway electron dynamics in tokamak disruptions.

  5. Overview of recent experimental results from the Aditya tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanna, R. L.; Ghosh, J.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Raj, Harshita; Patel, Sharvil; Dhyani, P.; Gupta, C. N.; Jadeja, K. A.; Patel, K. M.; Bhatt, S. B.; Panchal, V. K.; Patel, N. C.; Chavda, Chhaya; Praveenlal, E. V.; Shah, K. S.; Makawana, M. N.; Jha, S. K.; Gopalkrishana, M. V.; Tahiliani, K.; Sangwan, Deepak; Raju, D.; Nagora, Umesh; Pathak, S. K.; Atrey, P. K.; Purohit, S.; Raval, J.; Joisa, Y. S.; Rao, C. V. S.; Chowdhuri, M. B.; Banerjee, S.; Ramaiya, N.; Manchanda, R.; Thomas, J.; Kumar, Ajai; Ajay, Kumar; Sharma, P. K.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Shukla, B. K.; Das, Amita; Jha, R.; Saxena, Y. C.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.; Bora, D.; the ADITYA Team

    2017-10-01

    Several experiments, related to controlled thermonuclear fusion research and highly relevant for large size tokamaks, including ITER, have been carried out in ADITYA, an ohmically heated circular limiter tokamak. Repeatable plasma discharges of a maximum plasma current of ~160 kA and discharge duration beyond ~250 ms with a plasma current flattop duration of ~140 ms have been obtained for the first time in ADITYA. The reproducibility of the discharge reproducibility has been improved considerably with lithium wall conditioning, and improved plasma discharges are obtained by precisely controlling the position of the plasma. In these discharges, chord-averaged electron density ~3.0-4.0  ×  1019 m-3 using multiple hydrogen gas puffs, with a temperature of the order of ~500-700 eV, have been achieved. Novel experiments related to disruption control are carried out and disruptions, induced by hydrogen gas puffing, are successfully mitigated using the biased electrode and ion cyclotron resonance pulse techniques. Runaway electrons are successfully mitigated by applying a short local vertical field (LVF) pulse. A thorough disruption database has been generated by identifying the different categories of disruption. Detailed analysis of several hundred disrupted discharges showed that the current quench time is inversely proportional to the q edge. Apart from this, for volt-sec recovery during the plasma formation phase, low loop voltage start-up and current ramp-up experiments have been carried out using electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). Successful recovery of volt-sec leads to the achievement of longer plasma discharge durations. In addition, the neon gas puff assisted radiative improved confinement mode has also been achieved in ADITYA. All of the above mentioned experiments will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Transport Bifurcation in a Rotating Tokamak Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highcock, E. G.; Barnes, M.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Parra, F. I.; Roach, C. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of flow shear on turbulent transport in tokamaks is studied numerically in the experimentally relevant limit of zero magnetic shear. It is found that the plasma is linearly stable for all nonzero flow shear values, but that subcritical turbulence can be sustained nonlinearly at a wide range of temperature gradients. Flow shear increases the nonlinear temperature gradient threshold for turbulence but also increases the sensitivity of the heat flux to changes in the temperature gradient, except over a small range near the threshold where the sensitivity is decreased. A bifurcation in the equilibrium gradients is found: for a given input of heat, it is possible, by varying the applied torque, to trigger a transition to significantly higher temperature and flow gradients.

  7. Experimental measurement of electron heat diffusivity in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Jahns, G.L.

    1976-06-01

    The electron temperature perturbation produced by internal disruptions in the center of the Oak Ridge Tokamak (ORMAK) is followed with a multi-chord soft x-ray detector array. The space-time evolution is found to be diffusive in character, with a conduction coefficient larger by a factor of 2.5 - 15 than that implied by the energy containment time, apparently because it is a measurement for the small group of electrons whose energies exceed the cut-off energy of the detectors

  8. Assessing the Sensitivity of Different Life Stages for Sexual Disruption in Roach (Rutilus rutilus) Exposed to Effluents from Wastewater Treatment Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liney, Katherine E.; Jobling, Susan; Shears, Jan A.; Simpson, Peter; Tyler, Charles R.

    2005-01-01

    Surveys of U.K. rivers have shown a high incidence of sexual disruption in populations of wild roach (Rutilus rutilus) living downstream from wastewater treatment works (WwTW), and the degree of intersex (gonads containing both male and female structural characteristics) has been correlated with the concentration of effluent in those rivers. In this study, we investigated feminized responses to two estrogenic WwTWs in roach exposed for periods during life stages of germ cell division (early life and the postspawning period). Roach were exposed as embryos from fertilization up to 300 days posthatch (dph; to include the period of gonadal sex differentiation) or as postspawning adult males, and including fish that had received previous estrogen exposure, for either 60 or 120 days when the annual event of germ cell proliferation occurs. Both effluents induced vitellogenin synthesis in both life stages studied, and the magnitude of the vitellogenic responses paralleled the effluent content of steroid estrogens. Feminization of the reproductive ducts occurred in male fish in a concentration-dependent manner when the exposure occurred during early life, but we found no effects on the reproductive ducts in adult males. Depuration studies (maintenance of fish in clean water after exposure to WwTW effluent) confirmed that the feminization of the reproductive duct was permanent. We found no evidence of ovotestis development in fish that had no previous estrogen exposure for any of the treatments. In wild adult roach that had previously received exposure to estrogen and were intersex, the degree of intersex increased during the study period, but this was not related to the immediate effluent exposure, suggesting a previously determined programming of ovotestis formation. PMID:16203238

  9. Bibliography of fusion product physics in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1989-09-01

    Almost 700 citations have been compiled as the first step in reviewing the recent research on tokamak fusion product effects in tokamaks. The publications are listed alphabetically by the last name of the first author and by subject category

  10. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... Hormones and Health › Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) EDCs Myth vs. ...

  11. Safety in the ARIES Tokamak Design Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.S.; Wong, C.P.-C.; Cheng, E.T.; Grotz, S.

    1989-01-01

    Safety is one of the primary goals of the ARIES Tokamak Design Study. Public safety goals are the achievement passive safety which is demonstrable in tests that could precede operation and the assurance that releases from accidents be passively limited such that no evacuation plan in necessary. Strategies for safety of the plant investment are factory fabrication, short construction times and a design such that no off-normal operational transient results in damage which could not be repaired in routine maintenance. ARIES-I, the first of three 'visions' of potential tokamak reactors, will use He at 5 MPa as a blanket coolant and SiC/composite ceramic for the first wall and blanket materials. Both the coolant and the structural material were chosen for their low activation, both in the short term after accidents and for long term waste management. The breeder, Li 4 SiO 4 , was also chosen for low activation. Contemporary plasma physics and aggressive technology are used in ARIES-I, which results in very high toroidal fields (24 T maximum at the coil). The stored TF energy will be about 130 GJ. A central concern is the safe discharge of this stored energy under electrical fault conditions and prevention of a failure in the magnet set from propagating into systems containing radioactive inventories. The TF coil system consists of 16 coils, each containing two separate windings powered by two independent power supplies. Arcs and shorts between the two power supply systems and across individual windings have been modeled. In addition, delay or failure in circuit breaker opening has been modeled. The safety impacts of LOCA, LOFA and disruptive events have also been evaluated. 8 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs

  12. Tokamak engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1975-07-01

    The design criteria for a tokamak engineering test reactor can be met by operating in the two-component mode with reacting ion beams, together with a new blanket-shield design based on internal neutron spectrum shaping. A conceptual reactor design achieving a neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m 2 is presented. The tokamak has a major radius of 3.05 m, the plasma cross-section is noncircular with a 2:1 elongation, and the plasma radius in the midplane is 55 cm. The total wall area is 149 m 2 . The plasma conditions are T/sub e/ approximately T/sub i/ approximately 5 keV, and ntau approximately 8 x 10 12 cm -3 s. The plasma temperature is maintained by injection of 177 MW of 200-keV neutral deuterium beams; the resulting deuterons undergo fusion reactions with the triton-target ions. The D-shaped toroidal field coils are extended out to large major radius (7.0 m), so that the blanket-shield test modules on the outer portion of the torus can be easily removed. The TF coils are superconducting, using a cryogenically stable TiNb design that permits a field at the coil of 80 kG and an axial field of 38 kG. The blanket-shield design for the inner portion of the torus nearest the machine center line utilizes a neutron spectral shifter so that the first structural wall behind the spectral shifter zone can withstand radiation damage for the reactor lifetime. The energy attenuation in this inner blanket is 8 x 10 -6 . If necessary, a tritium breeding ratio of 0.8 can be achieved using liquid lithium cooling in the []outer blanket only. The overall power consumption of the reactor is about 340 MW(e). A neutron wall loading greater than 1 MW/m 2 can be achieved by increasing the maximum magnetic field or the plasma elongation. (auth)

  13. START: the creation of a spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Alan

    1992-01-01

    The START (Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak) plasma fusion experiment is now operational at AEA Fusion's Culham Laboratory. It is the world's first experiment to explore an extreme limit of the tokamak - the Spherical Tokamak - which theoretical studies predict may have substantial advantages in the search for economic fusion power. The Head of the START project, describes the concept, some of the initial experimental results and the possibility of developing a spherical tokamak power reactor. (author)

  14. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Zhang, H.

    2009-01-01

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions

  15. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high β-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect

  16. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high {beta}-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect.

  17. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.J. Zweben, H. Zhang

    2009-02-12

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions.

  18. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    TPX is a national project involving a large number of US fusion laboratories, universities, and industries. The element of the TPX requirements that is a primary driver for the hardware design is the fact that TPX tokamak hardware is being designed to accommodate steady state operation if the external systems are upgraded from the 1,000 second initial operation. TPX not only incorporates new physics, but also pioneers new technologies to be used in ITER and other future reactors. TPX will be the first tokamak with fully superconducting magnetic field coils using advanced conductors, will have internal nuclear shielding, will use robotics for machine maintenance, and will remove the continuous, concentrated heat flow from the plasma with new dispersal techniques and with special materials that are actively cooled. The Conceptual Design for TPX was completed during Fiscal Year 1993. The Preliminary Design formally began at the beginning of Fiscal Year 1994. Industrial contracts have been awarded for the design, with options for fabrication, of the primary tokamak hardware. A large fraction of the design and R and D effort during FY94 was focused on the tokamak and in turn on the tokamak magnets. The reason for this emphasis is because the magnets require a large design and R and D effort, and are critical to the project schedule. The magnet development is focused on conductor development, quench protection, and manufacturing R and D. The Preliminary Design Review for the Magnets is planned for fall, 1995

  19. Resistive instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, P.H.

    1985-10-01

    Low-m tearing modes constitute the dominant instability problem in present-day tokamaks. In this lecture, the stability criteria for representative current profiles with q(0)-values slightly less than unit are reviewed; ''sawtooth'' reconnection to q(0)-values just at, or slightly exceeding, unity is generally destabilizing to the m = 2, n = 1 and m = 3, n = 2 modes, and severely limits the range of stable profile shapes. Feedback stabilization of m greater than or equal to 2 modes by rf heating or current drive, applied locally at the magnetic islands, appears feasible; feedback by island current drive is much more efficient, in terms of the radio-frequency power required, then feedback by island heating. Feedback stabilization of the m = 1 mode - although yielding particularly beneficial effects for resistive-tearing and high-beta stability by allowing q(0)-values substantially below unity - is more problematical, unless the m = 1 ideal-MHD mode can be made positively stable by strong triangular shaping of the central flux surfaces. Feedback techniques require a detectable, rotating MHD-like signal; the slowing of mode rotation - or the excitation of non-rotating modes - by an imperfectly conducting wall is also discussed

  20. Tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Brooks, J.N.

    1978-01-01

    A tokamak experimental power reactor has been designed that is capable of producing net electric power over a wide range of possible operating conditions. A net production of 81 MW of electricity is expected from the design reference conditions that assume a value of 0.07 for beta-toroidal, a maximum toroidal magnetic field of 9 T and a thermal conversion efficiency of 30%. Impurity control is achieved through the use of a low-Z first wall coating. This approach allows a burn time of 60 seconds without the incorporation of a divertor. The system is cooled by a dual pressurized water/steam system that could potentially provide thermal efficiencies as high as 39%. The first surface facing the plasma is a low-Z coated water cooled panel that is attached to a 20 cm thick blanket module. The vacuum boundary is removed a total of 22 cm from the plasma, thereby minimizing the amount of radiation damage in this vital component. Consideration is given in the design to the possible use of the EPR as a materials test reactor. It is estimated that the total system could be built for less than 550 million dollars

  1. Classical tokamak transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocentini, Aldo

    1982-01-01

    A qualitative treatment of the classical transport theory of a magnetically confined, toroidal, axisymmetric, two-species plasma is presented. The 'weakly collisional' ('banana' and 'plateau') and 'collision dominated' ('Pfirsch-Schlueter' and 'highly collisional') regimes, as well as the Ware effect are discussed. The method used to evaluate the diffusion coffieicnts of particles and heat in the weakly collisional regime is based on stochastic argument, that requires an analysis of the characteristic collision frequencies and lengths for particles moving in a tokamak-like magnetic field. The same method is used to evaluate the Ware effect. In the collision dominated regime on the other hand, the particle and heat fluxes across the magnetic field lines are dominated by macroscopic effects so that, although it is possible to present them as diffusion (in fact, the fluxes turn out to be proportional to the density and temperature gradients), a macroscopic treatment is more appropriate. Hence, fluid equations are used to inveatigate the collision dominated regime, to which particular attention is devoted, having been shown relatively recently that it is more complicated than the usual Pfirsch-Schlueter regime. The whole analysis presented here is qualitative, aiming to point out the relevant physical mechanisms involved in the various regimes more than to develop a rigorous mathematical derivation of the diffusion coefficients, for which appropriate references are given. (author)

  2. Tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bertoncini, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to operate at net electrical power conditions with a plant capacity factor of 50 percent for 10 yr. The EPR operates in a pulsed mode at a frequency of approximately 1/min, with approximately 75 percent duty cycle, is capable of producing approximately 72 MWe and requires 42 MWe. The annual tritium consumption is 16 kg. The EPR vacuum chamber is 6.25 m in major radius and 2.4 m in minor radius, is constructed of 2 cm thick stainless steel, and has 2 cm thick detachable, beryllium-coated coolant panels mounted on the interior. A 0.28 m stainless steel blanket and a shield ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 m surround the vacuum vessel. The coolant is H 2 O. Sixteen niobium-titanium superconducting toroidal field coils provide a field of 10 T at the coil and 4.47 T at the plasma. Superconducting ohmic heating and equilibrium field coils provide 135 V-s to drive the plasma current. Plasma heating is accomplished by 12 neutral beam injectors which provide 60 MW. The energy transfer and storage system consists of a central superconducting storage ring, a homopolar energy storage unit, and a variety of inductor-convertors

  3. Disruption Studies in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Y.; Yoshino, R.; Neyatani, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Tokuda, S.; Tamai, H.

    2002-01-01

    Intensive studies on the physics of disruptions and developments of avoidance/mitigation methods of disruption-related phenomena have being carried out in JT-60U. The characteristics of the disruption sequence were well understood from the observation of the relationship between the heat pulse onto divertor plates during thermal quench and the impurity influx into the plasma, which determined the speed of the following current quench. A fast shutdown was first demonstrated by injecting impurity ice pellets to the plasma and intensively reducing the heat flux on first wall. The halo current and its toroidal asymmetry were precisely measured, and the halo current database was made for ITER in a wide parameter range. It was found that TPF x I h /I p0 was 0.52 at the maximum in a large tokamak like the JT-60U, whereas the higher factor of 0.75 had been observed in medium-sized tokamaks such as Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX-Upgrade. The vertical displacement event (VDE) at the start of the current quench was carefully investigated, and the neutral point where the VDE hardly occurs was discovered. MHD simulations clarified the onset mechanisms of the VDE, in which the eddy current effect of the up-down asymmetric resistive shell was essential. The real-time Z j measurement was improved for avoiding VDEs during slow current quench, and plasma-wall interaction was avoided by a well-optimized plasma equilibrium control. Magnetic fluctuations that were spontaneously generated at the disruption and/or enhanced by the externally applied helical field have been shown to avoid the generation of runaway electrons. Numerical analysis clarified an adequate rate of collisionless loss of runaway electrons in turbulent magnetic fields, which was consistent with the avoidance of runaway electron generation by magnetic fluctuations observed in JT-60U. Once generated, runaway electrons were suppressed when the safety factor at the plasma surface was reduced to 3 or 2

  4. The role of the spherical tokamak in clarifying tokamak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, A.W.; Akers, R.J.; Connor, J.W.; Counsell, G.F.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Hender, T.C.; Maddison, G.P.; Martin, T.J.; McClements, K.G.; Roach, C.M.; Robinson, D.C.; Sykes, A.; Valovic, M.; Wilson, H.R.; Fonck, R.J.; Gusev, V.; Kaye, S.M.; Majeski, R.; Peng, Y.-K.M.; Medvedev, S.; Sharapov, S.; Walsh, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The spherical tokamak (ST) provides a unique environment in which to perform complementary and exacting tests of the tokamak physics required for a burning plasma experiment of any aspect ratio, while also having the potential for long-term fusion applications in its own right. New experiments are coming on-line in the UK (MAST), USA (NSTX, Pegasus), Russia (Globus-M), Brazil (ETE) and elsewhere, and the status of these devices will be reported, along with newly-analysed data from START. Those physics issues where the ST provides an opportunity to remove degeneracy in the databases or clarify one's understanding will be emphasized. (author)

  5. Runaway beam studies during disruptions at JET-ILW

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Brezinsek, S.; Decker, J.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Lupelli, I.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E.M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Manzanares, A.; Mlynář, Jan; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A.E.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 463, August (2015), s. 143-149 ISSN 0022-3115. [PLASMA-SURFACE INTERACTIONS 21: International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Controlled Fusion Devices. Kanazawa, 26.05.2014-30.05.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * JET * runaway electrons * disruptions * ILW Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 2.199, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311514006850

  6. Estimation of post disruption plasma temperature for fast current quench Aditya plasma shots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, S.; Chowdhuri, M.B.; Joisa, Y.S.; Raval, J.V.; Ghosh, J.; Jha, R.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of tokamak current quenches are an important issue for the determination of electromagnetic forces that act on the in-vessel components and vacuum vessel during major disruptions. It is observed that thermal quench is followed by a sharp current decay. Fast current quench disruptive plasma shots were investigated for ADITYA tokamak. The current decay time was determined for the selected shots, which were in the range of 0.8 msec to 2.5 msec. This current decay information was then applied to L/R model, frequently employed for the estimation of the current decay time in tokamak plasmas, considering plasma inductance and plasma resistivity. This methodology was adopted for the estimation of the post disruption plasma temperature using the experimentally observed current decay time for the fast current quench disruptive ADITYA plasma shots. The study reveals that for the identified shots there is a constant increase in the current decay time with the post disruption plasma temperature. The investigations also explore the behavior post disruption plasma temperature and the current decay time as a function of the edge safety factor, Q. Post disruption plasma temperature and the current decay time exhibits a decrease with the increase in the value Q. (author)

  7. Use of the disruption mitigation valve in closed loop for routine protection at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reux, Cédric; Lehnen, Michael; Kruezi, Uron; Jachmich, Stefan; Card, Peter; Heinola, Kalle; Joffrin, Emmanuel; Lomas, Peter J.; Marsen, Stefan; Matthews, Guy; Riccardo, Valeria; Rimini, Fernanda; Vries, Peter de

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A massive gas injection valve was used for disruption routine mitigation at JET. ► A disruption mitigation valve was integrated in JET real time systems. ► Simple triggering schemes such as mode lock were used for disruption detection. ► High forces disruptions were prevented by the use of the gas valve. ► Radiated energy is higher in mitigated disruption than in unmitigated ones. -- Abstract: Disruptions are a major concern for next-generation tokamaks, including ITER. Heat loads, electromagnetic forces and runaway electrons generated by disruptions have to be mitigated for a reliable operation of future machines. Massive gas injection is one of the methods proposed for disruption mitigation. This article reports the first use of massive gas injection as an active disruption protection system at JET. During the 2011–2012 campaigns, 67 disruptions have been mitigated by the disruption mitigation valve (DMV) following a detection by mode lock amplitude and loop voltage changes. Most of disruptions where the valve was intended to be used were successfully mitigated by the DMV, although at different stages of the typical slow disruptions of the ITER-like wall. The fraction of magnetic and thermal energy radiated during the disruption was found to be increased by the action of the DMV. Vertical forces dispersion was also reduced. No non-sustained breakdown was observed following pulses terminated by the disruption mitigation valve

  8. Use of the disruption mitigation valve in closed loop for routine protection at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reux, Cédric, E-mail: cedric.reux@ccfe.ac.uk [Ecole Polytechnique, LPP, CNRS UMR 7648, 91128 Palaiseau (France); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lehnen, Michael; Kruezi, Uron [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany); Jachmich, Stefan [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association EURATOM-Belgian State Institute ERM/KMS, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); EFDA-CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Card, Peter [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM/CCFE Association, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Heinola, Kalle [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Joffrin, Emmanuel [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Lomas, Peter J. [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM/CCFE Association, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Marsen, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Teilinstitut Greifswald, EURATOM-Assoziation, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Matthews, Guy; Riccardo, Valeria; Rimini, Fernanda [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM/CCFE Association, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Vries, Peter de [FOM Institute DIFFER, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► A massive gas injection valve was used for disruption routine mitigation at JET. ► A disruption mitigation valve was integrated in JET real time systems. ► Simple triggering schemes such as mode lock were used for disruption detection. ► High forces disruptions were prevented by the use of the gas valve. ► Radiated energy is higher in mitigated disruption than in unmitigated ones. -- Abstract: Disruptions are a major concern for next-generation tokamaks, including ITER. Heat loads, electromagnetic forces and runaway electrons generated by disruptions have to be mitigated for a reliable operation of future machines. Massive gas injection is one of the methods proposed for disruption mitigation. This article reports the first use of massive gas injection as an active disruption protection system at JET. During the 2011–2012 campaigns, 67 disruptions have been mitigated by the disruption mitigation valve (DMV) following a detection by mode lock amplitude and loop voltage changes. Most of disruptions where the valve was intended to be used were successfully mitigated by the DMV, although at different stages of the typical slow disruptions of the ITER-like wall. The fraction of magnetic and thermal energy radiated during the disruption was found to be increased by the action of the DMV. Vertical forces dispersion was also reduced. No non-sustained breakdown was observed following pulses terminated by the disruption mitigation valve.

  9. Advanced tokamak burning plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Ramos, J.; Schultz, J.; Nevins, W.N.

    2001-01-01

    A new reduced size ITER-RC superconducting tokamak concept is proposed with the goals of studying burn physics either in an inductively driven standard tokamak (ST) mode of operation, or in a quasi-steady state advanced tokamak (AT) mode sustained by non-inductive means. This is achieved by reducing the radiation shield thickness protecting the superconducting magnet by 0.34 m relative to ITER and limiting the burn mode of operation to pulse lengths as allowed by the TF coil warming up to the current sharing temperature. High gain (Q≅10) burn physics studies in a reversed shear equilibrium, sustained by RF and NB current drive techniques, may be obtained. (author)

  10. Large aspect ratio tokamak study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Sardella, C.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) investigated the potential for producing a viable long burn tokamak reactor through enhanced volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer by employing high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were accessed in the context of extended burn operation. Plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed using a one-dimensional transport code. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the field in the ohmic heating coil and the wave shape of the ohmic heating discharge. A high aspect ratio reference reactor was chosen and configured

  11. Plasma boundary phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangeby, P.C.

    1989-06-01

    The focus of this review is on processes occurring at the edge, and on the connection between boundary plasma - the scrape-off layer (SOL) and the radiating layer - and central plasma processes. Techniques used for edge diagnosis are reviewed and basic experimental information (n e and T e ) is summarized. Simple models of the SOL are summarized, and the most important effects of the boundary plasma - the influence on the fuel particles, impurities, and energy - on tokamak operation dealt with. Methods of manipulating and controlling edge conditions in tokamaks and the experimental data base for the edge during auxiliary heating of tokamaks are reviewed. Fluctuations and asymmetries at the edge are also covered. (9 tabs., 134 figs., 879 refs.)

  12. Computational studies of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Tomonori; Tsunematsu, Toshihide; Tokuda, Shinji

    1981-02-01

    Computational studies of tokamak plasmas are extensively advanced. Many computational codes have been developed by using several kinds of models, i.e., the finite element formulation of MHD equations, the time dependent multidimensional fluid model, and the particle model with the Monte-Carlo method. These codes are applied to the analyses of the equilibrium of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma (SELENE), the time evolution of the high-beta tokamak plasma (APOLLO), the low-n MHD stability (ERATO-J) and high-n ballooning mode stability (BOREAS) in the INTOR tokamak, the nonlinear MHD stability, such as the positional instability (AEOLUS-P), resistive internal mode (AEOLUS-I) etc., and the divertor functions. (author)

  13. Midplane Faraday rotation: A densitometer for large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobes, F.C.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    The density in a large tokamak such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), or any of the proposed future US machines, can be determined by measuring the Faraday rotation of a 10.6 μm laser directed tangent to the toroidal field. If there is a horizontal array of such beams, then n e (R) can be readily obtained with a simple Abel inversion about the center line of the tokamak. For a large machine, operated at a full field of 30 T m and a density of 2x10 20 /m 3 , the rotation angle would be quite large-about 60 degree for two passes. A layout in which a single laser beam is fanned out in the horizontal midplane of the tokamak, with a set of retroreflectors on the far side of the vacuum vessel, would provide good spatial resolution, depending only upon the number of reflectors. With this proposed layout, only one window would be needed. Because the rotation angle is never more than 1 ''fringe,'' the data is always good, and it is also a continuous measurement in time. Faraday rotation is dependent only upon the plasma itself, and thus is not sensitive to vibration of the optical components. Simulations of the expected results show that ITER, or any large tokamak, existing or proposed, would be well served even at low densities by a midplane Faraday rotation densitometer of ∼64 channels

  14. Electromagnetic effects involving a tokamak reactor first wall and blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Evans, K. Jr.; Gelbard, E.; Prater, R.

    1980-01-01

    Four electromagnetic effects experienced by the first wall and blanket of a tokamak reactor are considered. First, the first wall provides reduction of the growth rate of vertical axisymmetric instability and stabilization of low mode number interval kink modes. Second, if a rapid plasma disruption occurs, a current will be induced on the first wall, tending to maintain the field formerly produced by the plasma. Third, correction of plasma movement can begin on a time scale much faster than the L/R time of the first wall and blanket. Fourth, field changes, especially those from plasma disruption or from rapid discharge of a toroidal field coil, can cause substantial eddy current forces on elements of the first wall and blanket. These effects are considered specifically for the first wall and blanket of the STARFIRE commercial reactor design study

  15. Preliminary investigation into aerosol mobilization resulting from fusion reactor disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, J.P.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental system has been developed to study disruption-induced aerosol mobilization for fusion accident analysis. The SIRENS high heat flux facility at North Carolina State University has been modified to closely simulate disruption conditions expected in tokamak reactors. A hot vapor is formed by an ablation-controlled arc and expansion cooled into a glass chamber, where particle condensation and growth occur. The particles are collected and analyzed for relevant transport properties (e.g. size distribution and shape). Particle characterization methods are discussed, and preliminary results based on simple analysis techniques are given. 2 refs., 6 figs

  16. Dissipation of magnetic energy during disruptive current termination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The magnetic coupling during a disruption between the plasma and the various coil systems on the PDX tokamak has been modeled. Using measured coil currents, the model indicates that dissipation of magnetic energy in the plasma equal to 75 % of the energy stored in the poloidal field of the plasma current does occur and that coupling between the plasma and the coil systems can reduce such dissipation. In the case of PDX ohmic discharges, bolometric measurements of radiation and charge exchange, integrated over a disruption, account for 90 % of the calculated energy dissipation. (author)

  17. Enhanced turbulence during the energy quench of disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remkes, G.J.J.; Schueller, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    Enhanced electron density fluctuation levels with frequencies in the megahertz range have been observed during the energy quench phase of minor disruptions in the TORTUR Tokamak. The high frequencies of the phenomena indicate that the enhanced transport during the energy quench is caused by turbulence, and not by the coherent low mode number MHD modes themselves, which initiate the disruptions. Both the growth rate and wavelength of the fluctuations increase to such a level that a corresponding diffusivity would increase by two orders of magnitude. This is in good agreement with the observed temperature redistribution. (author)

  18. Safety and deterministic failure analyses in high-beta D-D tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    Safety and deterministic failure analyses were performed to compare major component failure characteristics for different high-beta D-D tokamak reactors. The primary focus was on evaluating damage to the reactor facility. The analyses also considered potential hazards to the general public and operational personnel. Parametric designs of high-beta D-D tokamak reactors were developed, using WILDCAT as the reference. The size, and toroidal field strength were reduced, and the fusion power increased in an independent manner. These changes were expected to improve the economics of D-D tokamaks. Issues examined using these designs were radiation induced failurs, radiation safety, first wall failure from plasma disruptions, and toroidal field magnet coil failure

  19. Summary discussion: An integrated advanced tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    The tokamak concept improvement workshop addressed a wide range of issues involved in the development of a more attractive tokamak. The agenda for the workshop progressed from a general discussion of the long-range energy context (with the objective being the identification of a set of criteria and ''figures of merit'' for measuring the attractiveness of a tokamak concept) to particular opportunities for the improvement of the tokamak concept. The discussions concluded with a compilation of research program elements leading to an improved tokamak concept

  20. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an interim status report on the STARFIRE project for the period of May to September 1979. The basic objective of the STARFIRE project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. Another key goal of the project is to give careful attention to the safety and environmental features of a commercial fusion reactor

  1. LHCD experiments on tokamak CASTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, F.; Badalec, J.; Jakubka, J.; Kryska, L.; Preinhaelter, J.; Stoeckel, J.; Valovic, M.; Nanobashvili, S.; Weixelbaum, L.; Wenzel, U.; Spineanu, F.; Vlad, M.

    1990-10-01

    A short survey is given of the experimental activities at the small Prague tokamak CASTOR. They concern primarily the LH current drive using multijunction waveguide grills as launching antennae. During two last years the, efforts were focused on a study of the electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations under conditions of combined inductive/LHCD regimes and of the relation of the level of these fluctuations to the anomalous particles transport in tokamak CASTOR. Results of the study are discussed in some detail. (author). 24 figs., 51 refs

  2. Computational study of axisymmetric modes in noncircular cross section tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.; Chance, M.S.; Greene, J.M.; Grimm, R.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Kerner, W.; Manickam, J.; Weimer, K.E.

    1976-09-01

    A major computational program to investigate the MHD equilibrium, stability, and nonlinear evolution properties of realistic tokamak configurations is proceeding. Preliminary application is made to the Princeton PDX device. Both axisymmetric (n = 0) modes and kink (n = 1) modes are found; the growth rates depend sensitively on the configuration. A study of the nonlinear evolution of axisymmetric modes in such a device shows that flux conservation in the vacuum region can limit their growth

  3. The tokamak hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.L.; Rose, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    At a time when the potential benefits of various energy options are being seriously evaluated in many countries through-out the world, it is both timely and important to evaluate the practical application of fusion reactors for their economical production of nuclear fissile fuels from fertile fuels. The fusion hybrid reactor represents a concept that could assure the availability of adequate fuel supplies for a proven nuclear technology and have the potential of being an electrical energy source as opposed to an energy consumer as are the present fuel enrichment processes. Westinghouse Fusion Power Systems Department, under Contract No. EG-77-C-02-4544 with the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy, has developed a preliminary conceptual design for an early twenty-first century fusion hybrid reactor called the commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR). This design was developed as a first generation commercial plant producing fissile fuel to support a significant number of client Light Water Reactor (LWR) Plants. To the depth this study has been performed, no insurmountable technical problems have been identified. The study has provided a basis for reasonable cost estimates of the hybrid plants as well as the hybrid/LWR system busbar electricity costs. This energy system can be optimized to have a net cost of busbar electricity that is equivalent to the conventional LWR plant, yet is not dependent on uranium ore prices or standard enrichment costs, since the fusion hybrid can be fueled by numerous fertile fuel resources. A nearer-term concept is also defined using a beam driven fusion driver in lieu of the longer term ignited operating mode. (orig.)

  4. Disruption, vertical displacement event and halo current characterization for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, J.; Fujisawa, N.; Ortolani, S.; Putvinski, S.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1997-01-01

    Characteristics, in ITER, of plasma disruptions, vertical displacement events (VDEs) and the conversion of plasma current to runaway electron current in a disruption are presented. In addition to the well known potential of disruptions to produce rapid thermal energy and plasma current quenches and theoretical predictions that show the likelihood of ∼ 50% runaway conversion, an assessment of VDE and halo current characteristics in vertically elongated tokamaks shows that disruptions in ITER will result in VDEs with peak in-vessel halo currents of up to 50% of the predisruption plasma current and with toroidal peaking factors (peak/average current density) of up to 4:1. However, the assessment also shows an inverse correlation between the halo current magnitude and the toroidal peaking factor; hence, ITER VDEs can be expected to have a product of normalized halo current magnitude times toroidal peaking factor of ≤ 75%. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  5. Stability at high performance in the MAST spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttery, R.J.; Akers, R.; Arends, E. =

    2003-01-01

    The development of reliable H-modes on MAST, together with advances in heating power and a range of powerful diagnostics, has provided a platform to enable MAST to address some of he most important issues of tokamak stability. In particular the high β potential of the ST is highlighted with stable operation at β N ∼5-6 , β T ∼ 16% and β p as high as 1.9, confirmed by a range of profile diagnostics. Calculations indicate that β N levels are in the vicinity of no-wall stability limits. Studies have provided the first identification of the Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTM) in the ST, using its behaviour to quantitatively validate predictions of NTM theory, previously only applied to conventional tokamaks. Experiments have demonstrated that sawteeth play a strong role in triggering NTMs - by avoiding large sawteeth much higher β N can, and has, been reached. Further studies have confirmed the NTM's significance, with large islands observed using the 300 point Thomson diagnostic, and locking of large n=1 modes frequently leading to disruptions. H-mode plasmas are also limited by ELMs, with confinement degraded as ELM frequency rises. However, unlike the conventional tokamak, the ELMs in high performing regimes on MAST (H IPB98Y2 ∼1) appear to be type III in nature. Modelling identifies instability to peeling modes, consistent with a type III interpretation, and shows considerable scope to raise pressure gradients (despite n=∞ ballooning theory predictions of instability) before ballooning type modes (perhaps associated with type I ELMs) occur. Finally sawteeth are shown not to remove the q=1 surface in the ST - other promising models are being explored. Thus research on MAST is not only demonstrating stable operation at high performance levels, and developing methods to control instabilities; it is also providing detailed tests of the stability physics and models applicable to conventional tokamaks, such as ITER. (author)

  6. Tokamak Plasmas : Mirnov coil data analysis for tokamak ADITYA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spatial and temporal structures of magnetic signal in the tokamak ADITYA is analysed using recently developed singular value decomposition (SVD) technique. The analysis technique is first tested with simulated data and then applied to the ADITYA Mirnov coil data to determine the structure of current peturbation as ...

  7. Studies of runaway electrons via Cherenkov effect in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrowski, J.; Jakubowski, L.; Rabinski, M.; Sadowski, M. J.; Jakubowski, M. J.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Malinowski, K.; Mirowski, R.; Mlynar, J.; Ficker, O.; Weinzettl, V.; Causa, F.; COMPASS; FTU Teams

    2018-01-01

    The paper concerns measurements of runaway electrons (REs) which are generated during discharges in tokamaks. The control of REs is an important task in experimental studies within the ITER-physics program. The NCBJ team proposed to study REs by means of Cherenkov-type detectors several years ago. The Cherenkov radiation, induced by REs in appropriate radiators, makes it possible to identify fast electron beams and to determine their spatial- and temporal-characteristics. The results of recent experimental studies of REs, performed in two tokamaks - COMPASS in Prague and FTU in Frascati, are summarized and discussed in this paper. Examples of the electron-induced signals, as recorded at different experimental conditions and scenarios, are presented. Measurements performed with a three-channel Cherenkov-probe in COMPASS showed that the first fast electron peaks can be observed already during the current ramp-up phase. A strong dependence of RE-signals on the radial position of the Cherenkov probe was observed. The most distinct electron peaks were recorded during the plasma disruption. The Cherenkov signals confirmed the appearance of post-disruptive RE beams in circular-plasma discharges with massive Ar-puffing. During experiments at FTU a clear correlation between the Cherenkov detector signals and the rotation of magnetic islands was identified.

  8. Density limit in FTU tokamak during Ohmic operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigione, D.; Pieroni, L.

    1993-01-01

    The understanding of the physical mechanisms that regulate the density limit in a Tokamak is very important in view of a future fusion reactor. On one hand density enters as a factor in the figure of merit needed to achieve a burning plasma, and on the other hand a high edge density is a prerequisite for avoiding excessive erosion of the first walls and to limit the impurity influx into the hot plasma core. Furthermore a reactor should work in a safe zone of the operation parameters in order to avoid disruptive instabilities. The density limit problem has been tackled since the 70's, but so far a unique physics picture has not still emerged. In the last few years, due to the availability of better diagnostics, especially for the plasma edge, the use of pellet injectors to fuel the plasma and the experience gained on many different Tokamak, a consensus has been reached on the edge density as the real parameter responsible for the density limit. There are still two main mechanisms invoked to explain this limit: one refers to the power balance between the heat conducted and/or convected across the plasma radius and the power lost by impurity line radiation at the edge. When the latter overcomes the former, shrinking of the current channel occurs, which leads to instabilities due to tearing modes (usually the m/n=2/1) and then to disruption. The other explanation, for now valid for divertor machines, is based on the particle and energy balance in the scrape off layer (SOL). The limit in the edge density is then associated with the thermal collapse of the divertor plasma. In this work we describe the experiments on the density limit in FTU with Ohmic heating, the reason why we also believe that the limit is on the edge density, and discuss its relation to a simple model based on the SOL power balance valid for a limiter Tokamak. (author) 7 refs., 4 figs

  9. Disruptive instabilities in the TBR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannucci, A.

    1987-01-01

    The disruptive instabilities in the TBR-1 tokamak of the Plasma Physics Laboratory of the Institute of Physics-USP were investigated by using surface-barrier detectors and Mirnov magnetic coils, measuring soft X-ray emited by the plasma and poloidal magnetic fluctuations, respectively. Minor and major disruptions, as well sawteeth oscillations, were identified at the TBR-1 discharges, and their main characteristics were studied. Comparing the measured period of the internal disruptions (sawteeth) with the ones expected from scaling laws, good agreements is reached. The measured sawteeth crashes agree with the values expected from the Kadomtsev's model. External helical fields (CHR), corresponding to m/n=2/1 helicity were produced in order to inhibit or criate disruptive instabilities. A strong weakening of the mhd activity, present in the TBR-1 discharges, was clearly detected. The soft X-ray detection system, projected and constructed for this work, was used to obtain the electron temperatures of regions close to the center of the plasma column (T(r=0) ∼ 205 eV and T(r ± 3,8) ∼ 85 eV), using the absorbing foils method. Using the Spitzer formula, Z sub (eff) values were also obtained. (author) [pt

  10. Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Suckewer, S.; Hirshman, S.P.

    1978-10-01

    Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks was simulated with a one-dimensional impurity transport model including both neoclassical and anomalous transport. The neoclassical fluxes are due to collisions between the background plasma and impurity ions as well as collisions between the various ionization states. The evaluation of the neoclassical fluxes takes into account the different collisionality regimes of the background plasma and the impurity ions. A limiter scrapeoff model is used to define the boundary conditions for the impurity ions in the plasma periphery. In order to account for the spectroscopic measurements of power radiated by the lower ionization states, fluxes due to anomalous transport are included. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainties in rate coefficients and plasma parameters in the periphery are investigated. The implications of the transport model for spectroscopic evaluation of impurity concentrations, impurity fluxes, and radiated power from line emission measurements are discussed

  11. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Krægpøth, Morten; Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    2015-01-01

    This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving school-cohort. We...... identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...

  12. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. Grøne; Krægpøth, Morten; Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving school-cohort. We...... identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...

  13. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Krægpøth, Morten Visby; Skyt Nielsen, Helena

    This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving schoolcohort. We...... identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...

  14. Experiments to Measure Hydrogen Release from Graphite Walls During Disruptions in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, E.M.; Pablant, N.A.; Rudakov, D.L.; Boedo, J.A.; Brooks, N.H.; Jernigan, Thomas C.; Pigarov, A.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopy and wall the bake-out measurements are performed in the DIII-D tokamak to estimate the amount of hydrogen stored in and released from the walls during disruptions. Both naturally occurring disruptions and disruptions induced by massive gas injection (MGI) are investigated. The measurements indicate that both types of disruptions cause a net release of order 10(21) hydrogen (or deuterium) atoms from the graphite walls. This is comparable to the pre-disruptions plasma particle inventory, so the released hydrogen is important for accurate modeling of disruptions. However, the amount of hydrogen released is small compared to the total saturated wall inventory of order 10(22)-10(23), So it appears that many disruptions are necessary to provide full pump-out of the vessel walls. (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Energy losses on tokamak startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1983-01-01

    During the startup of a tokamak reactor using poloidal field (PF) coils to induce plasma currents, the conducting structures carry induced currents. The associated energy losses in the circuits must be provided by the startup coils and the PF system. This paper provides quantitative and comparitive values for the energies required as a function of the thickness or resistivity of the torus shells

  16. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant

  17. Integral torque balance in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, V.D.

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at clarifying the balance between the sinks and sources in the problem of intrinsic plasma rotation in tokamaks reviewed recently by deGrassie (2009 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51 124047). The integral torque on the toroidal plasma is calculated analytically using the most general magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma model taking account of plasma anisotropy and viscosity. The contributions due to several mechanisms are separated and compared. It is shown that some of them, though, possibly, important in establishing the rotation velocity profile in the plasma, may give small input into the integral torque, but an important contribution can come from the magnetic field breaking the axial symmetry of the configuration. In tokamaks, this can be the error field, the toroidal field ripple or the magnetic perturbation created by the correction coils in the dedicated experiments. The estimates for the error-field-induced electromagnetic torque show that the amplitude of this torque is comparable to the typical values of torques introduced into the plasma by neutral beam injection. The obtained relations allow us to quantify the effect that can be produced by the existing correction coils in tokamaks on the plasma rotation, which can be used in experiments to study the origin and physics of intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Several problems are proposed for theoretical studies and experimental tests.

  18. ECRH Studies on Tokamak Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-10

    r.I*cru.Dtrtibution uUnliited 300 Unicorn Pork Drive Woburn, Massachusetts 04801 ECRH STUDIES ON TOKAMAK PLASMAS JAYCOR Project No. 6183 Final Report...up techniques now in use or being suggested, include growing the plasma from a small minor radius or applying a negative voltage spike immediately

  19. Tokamak impurity-control techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is given of the impurity-control functions in tokamaks, their relative merits and disadvantages and some prominent edge-interaction-control techniques, and there is a discussion of a new proposal, the particle scraper, and its potential advantages. (author)

  20. An enhanced tokamak startup model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Rajiv; Artaud, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    The startup of tokamaks has been examined in the past in varying degree of detail. This phase typically involves the burnthrough of impurities and the subsequent rampup of plasma current. A zero-dimensional (0D) model is most widely used where the time evolution of volume averaged quantities determines the detailed balance between the input and loss of particle and power. But, being a 0D setup, these studies do not take into consideration the co-evolution of plasma size and shape, and instead assume an unchanging minor and major radius. However, it is known that the plasma position and its minor radius can change appreciably as the plasma evolves in time to fill in the entire available volume. In this paper, an enhanced model for the tokamak startup is introduced, which for the first time takes into account the evolution of plasma geometry during this brief but highly dynamic period by including realistic one-dimensional (1D) effects within the broad 0D framework. In addition the effect of runaway electrons (REs) has also been incorporated. The paper demonstrates that the inclusion of plasma cross section evolution in conjunction with REs plays an important role in the formation and development of tokamak startup. The model is benchmarked against experimental results from ADITYA tokamak.

  1. Multimegawatt neutral beams for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1979-03-01

    Most of the large magnetic confinement experiments today and in the near future use high-power neutral-beam injectors to heat the plasma. This review briefly describes this remarkable technique and summarizes recent results as well as near term expectations. Progress has been so encouraging that it seems probable that tokamaks will achieve scientific breakeven before 1990

  2. Joint research using small tokamaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Del Bosco, E.; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Van Oost, G.; He, Yexi; Hegazy, H.; Hirose, A.; Hron, Martin; Kuteev, B.; Ludwig, G.O.; Nascimento, I.C.; Silva, C.; Vorobyev, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 10 (2005), S245-S254 ISSN 0029-5515. [Fusion Energy Conference contributions. Vilamoura, 1.11.2004-6.11.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : small tokamaks * thermonuclear fusion Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.418, year: 2005

  3. First results from the T-10 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlizov, A.B.; Bobrovskij, G.A.; Bagdasarov, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of plasma parameters are made on the T-10 tokamak with a toroidal magnetic field of 3.5 T and a plasma current of 0.4 MA. In macroscopically stable discharges of 1 s duration, the central electron temperature is Tsub(e)(0)=1.2 keV, the mean electron density reaches a value of nsub(e)=5X10 13 cm -3 , and the central ion temperature is measured to be 0.6-0.8 keV. The thermonuclear neutron yield reaches a value of 4X10 9 neutrons per shot, in agreement with the Tsub(i)(0) value measured by charge exchange. Sawtooth X-ray oscillations are observed. The effective ionic charge is found to be less than 2 for the inner region of the plasma column. The energy confinement time tausub(E) is calculated from the experimental profiles of the plasma parameters. The value of tausub(E) is 40 ms and increases up to 60 ms, while nsub(e) is increased up to 8.5X10 13 cm -3 as a result of cold-gas injection by a pulse valve. Violent disruption is observed in several regimes. Hard-X-ray and neutron radiation bursts take place during the disruption, both in hydrogen and in deuterium. More intensive and prolonged radiation fluxes of hard X-rays and non-thermonuclear neutrons are observed in some discharges where very intensive beams of relativistic runaway electrons seem to exist. (author)

  4. First Results from Tests of High Temperature Superconductor Magnets on Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryaznevich, M.; Todd, T.T., E-mail: mikhail.gryaznevich@ccfe.ac.uk [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Svoboda, V.; Markovic, T.; Ondrej, G. [Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Stockel, J.; Duran, I.; Kovarik, K. [IPP Prague, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Sykes, A.; Kingham, D. [Tokamak Solutions, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Melhem, Z.; Ball, S.; Chappell, S. [Oxford Instruments, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Lilley, M. K.; De Grouchy, P.; Kim, H. -T. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: It has long been known that high temperature superconductors (HTS) could have an important role to play in the future of tokamak fusion research. Here we report on first results of the use of HTS in a tokamak magnet and on the progress in design and construction of the first fully-HTS tokamak. In the experiment, the two copper vertical field coils of the small tokamak GOLEM were replaced by two coils each with 6 turns of HTS (Re)BCO tape. Liquid nitrogen was used to cool the coils to below the critical temperature at which HTS becomes superconducting. Little effect on the HTS critical current has been observed for perpendicular field up to 0.5 T and superconductivity has been achieved at {approx} 90.5K during bench tests. There had been concerns that the plasma pulses and pulsed magnetic fields might cause a 'quench' in the HTS, i.e., a sudden and potentially damaging transition from superconductor to normal conductor. However, many plasma pulses were fired without any quenches even when disruptions occurred with corresponding induced electrical fields. In addition, experiments without plasma have been performed to study properties of the HTS in a tokamak environment, i.e., critical current and its dependence on magnetic and electrical fields generated in a tokamak both in DC and pulsed operations, maximum current ramp-up speed, performance of the HTS tape after number of artificially induced quenches etc. No quench has been observed at DC currents up to 200 A (1.2 kA-turns through the coil). In short pulses, current up to 1 kA through the tape (6 kA-turns) has been achieved with no subsequent degradation of the HTS performance with a current ramp rate up to 0.6 MA/s. In future experiments, increases in both the plasma current and pulse duration are planned. Considerable experience has been gained during design and fabrication of the cryostat, coils, isolation and insulation, feeds and cryosystems, and GOLEM is now routinely operated with HTS coils. The

  5. Analytic modeling of axisymmetric disruption halo currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, D.A.; Kellman, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    Currents which can flow in plasma facing components during disruptions pose a challenge to the design of next generation tokamaks. Induced toroidal eddy currents and both induced and conducted poloidal ''halo'' currents can produce design-limiting electromagnetic loads. While induction of toroidal and poloidal currents in passive structures is a well-understood phenomenon, the driving terms and scalings for poloidal currents flowing on open field lines during disruptions are less well established. A model of halo current evolution is presented in which the current is induced in the halo by decay of the plasma current and change in enclosed toroidal flux while being convected into the halo from the core by plasma motion. Fundamental physical processes and scalings are described in a simplified analytic version of the model. The peak axisymmetric halo current is found to depend on halo and core plasma characteristics during the current quench, including machine and plasma dimensions, resistivities, safety factor, and vertical stability growth rate. Two extreme regimes in poloidal halo current amplitude are identified depending on the minimum halo safety factor reached during the disruption. A 'type I' disruption is characterized by a minimum safety factor that remains relatively high (typically 2 - 3, comparable to the predisruption safety factor), and a relatively low poloidal halo current. A 'type II' disruption is characterized by a minimum safety factor comparable to unity and a relatively high poloidal halo current. Model predictions for these two regimes are found to agree well with halo current measurements from vertical displacement event disruptions in DIII-D [T. S. Taylor, K. H. Burrell, D. R. Baker, G. L. Jackson, R. J. La Haye, M. A. Mahdavi, R. Prater, T. C. Simonen, and A. D. Turnbull, open-quotes Results from the DIII-D Scientific Research Program,close quotes in Proceedings of the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, Yokohama, 1998, to be published in

  6. Can tokamaks PFC survive a single event of any plasma instabilities?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanein, A., E-mail: hassanein@purdue.edu [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Sizyuk, V.; Miloshevsky, G.; Sizyuk, T. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Plasma instability events such as disruptions, edge-localized modes (ELMs), runaway electrons (REs), and vertical displacement events (VDEs) are continued to be serious events and most limiting factors for successful tokamak reactor concept. The plasma-facing components (PFCs), e.g., wall, divertor, and limited surfaces of a tokamak as well as coolant structure materials are subjected to intense particle and heat loads and must maintain a clean and stable surface environment among them and the core/edge plasma. Typical ITER transient events parameters are used for assessing the damage from these four different instability events. HEIGHTS simulation showed that a single event of a disruption, giant ELM, VDE, or RE can cause significant surface erosion (melting and vaporization) damage to PFC, nearby components, and/or structural materials (VDE, RE) melting and possible burnout of coolant tubes that could result in shut down of reactor for extended repair time.

  7. Can tokamaks PFC survive a single event of any plasma instabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, A.; Sizyuk, V.; Miloshevsky, G.; Sizyuk, T.

    2013-07-01

    Plasma instability events such as disruptions, edge-localized modes (ELMs), runaway electrons (REs), and vertical displacement events (VDEs) are continued to be serious events and most limiting factors for successful tokamak reactor concept. The plasma-facing components (PFCs), e.g., wall, divertor, and limited surfaces of a tokamak as well as coolant structure materials are subjected to intense particle and heat loads and must maintain a clean and stable surface environment among them and the core/edge plasma. Typical ITER transient events parameters are used for assessing the damage from these four different instability events. HEIGHTS simulation showed that a single event of a disruption, giant ELM, VDE, or RE can cause significant surface erosion (melting and vaporization) damage to PFC, nearby components, and/or structural materials (VDE, RE) melting and possible burnout of coolant tubes that could result in shut down of reactor for extended repair time.

  8. Can tokamaks PFC survive a single event of any plasma instabilities?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Sizyuk, V.; Miloshevsky, G.; Sizyuk, T.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma instability events such as disruptions, edge-localized modes (ELMs), runaway electrons (REs), and vertical displacement events (VDEs) are continued to be serious events and most limiting factors for successful tokamak reactor concept. The plasma-facing components (PFCs), e.g., wall, divertor, and limited surfaces of a tokamak as well as coolant structure materials are subjected to intense particle and heat loads and must maintain a clean and stable surface environment among them and the core/edge plasma. Typical ITER transient events parameters are used for assessing the damage from these four different instability events. HEIGHTS simulation showed that a single event of a disruption, giant ELM, VDE, or RE can cause significant surface erosion (melting and vaporization) damage to PFC, nearby components, and/or structural materials (VDE, RE) melting and possible burnout of coolant tubes that could result in shut down of reactor for extended repair time

  9. Advanced statistics for tokamak transport colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is an expository introduction to advanced statistics and scaling laws and their application to tokamak devices. Topics of discussion are as follows: implicit assumptions in the standard analysis; advanced regression techniques; specialized tools in statistics and their applications in fusion physics; and improved datasets for transport studies

  10. Bodily illusions disrupt tactile sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Sarah; Pritchett, Lisa M; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-02-01

    To accurately interpret tactile information, the brain needs to have an accurate representation of the body to which to refer the sensations. Despite this, body representation has only recently been incorporated into the study of tactile perception. Here, we investigate whether distortions of body representation affect tactile sensations. We perceptually altered the length of the arm and the width of the waist using a tendon vibration illusion and measured spatial acuity and sensitivity. Surprisingly, we found reduction in both tactile acuity and sensitivity thresholds when the arm or waist was perceptually altered, which indicates a general disruption of low-level tactile processing. We postulate that the disruptive changes correspond to the preliminary stage as the body representation starts to change and may give new insights into sensory processing in people with long-term or sudden abnormal body representation such as are found in eating disorders or following amputation.

  11. Nonequilibrium effects and structure of X-ray lines in tokamak plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontis, V. G.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    1986-02-01

    The sensitivity of X-ray spectra to a number of typical non-equilibrium effects occurring in modern tokamaks is examined. Experimental data from the T-10 and ST Tokamaks are cited to illustrate the degree of deviation from coronal equilibrium. The analysis exploits recent atomic data for radiation and autoionization line widths; standard semiempirical formulas are used to calculate the rates of collision processes. Ion diffusion and impurity distribution by degrees of ionization are investigated. The sensitivity of K radiation to electron nonequilibrium and ion charge exchange is examined.

  12. Multi-channel bolometer system on JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Hiroshi; Maeno, Masaki; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Matoba, Tohru

    1988-07-01

    Multi-channel bolometer system is designed and installed to observe the radiation profile on JFT-2M tokamak. Sensor head is made of Thinistor, which is a kind of semiconductor, because it has the advantage of higher sensitivity of about one order of magnitude than the conventional metal foil bolometer and is suitable for the profile measurement in which the signal from the plasma is relatively small. The response and cooling characteristics of the bolometer sensor are suitable for the condition of JFT-2M tokamak plasma. Low noise circuit of bridge and differentiator is developed to optimize the signal to noise ratio in the JFT-2M operating condition. With use of the bolometer system, the radiation profile in joule heating plasma as well as additional heating plasma especially in H-mode plasma is successfully observed. (author)

  13. The dynamics of locked mode development in the T-11M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Recent results of locked mode (LM) development studies in the T-11M tokamak are submitted. A particular interest in this type of plasma MHD-activity arises from the circumstance that an appropriate plasma perturbation is quasi-stationary and potentially could destroy plasma confinement, if it exceeds the same critical level. There are evidences to believe that LM amplitude approaches this critical level in the stage preceding a major disruption, resulting in the reduction of the magnetic shear in the plasma center, which finally initiates the disruption. (author)

  14. Contribution of ASDEX Upgrade to disruption studies for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautasso, G.; Reiter, B.; Giannone, L.; Gruber, O.; Herrmann, A.; Kardaun, O.; Maraschek, M.; Mlynek, A.; Schneider, W.; Zhang, Y.; Khayrutdinov, K.K.; Lukash, V.E.; Nakamura, Y.; Sias, G.; Sugihara, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the most recent contributions of ASDEX Upgrade to ITER in the field of disruption studies. (1) The ITER specifications for the halo current magnitude are based on data collected from several tokamaks and summarized in the plot of the toroidal peaking factor versus the maximum halo current fraction. Even if the maximum halo current in ASDEX Upgrade reaches 50% of the plasma current, the duration of this maximum lasts a fraction of a ms. (2) Long-lasting asymmetries of the halo current are rare and do not give rise to a large asymmetric component of the mechanical forces on the machine. Differently from JET, these asymmetries are neither locked nor exhibit a stationary harmonic structure. (3) Recent work on disruption prediction has concentrated on the search for a simple function of the most relevant plasma parameters, which is able to discriminate between the safe and pre-disruption phases of a discharge. For this purpose, the disruptions of the last four years have been classified into groups and then discriminant analysis is used to select the most significant variables and to derive the discriminant function. (4) The attainment of the critical density for the collisional suppression of the runaway electrons seems to be technically and physically possible on our medium size tokamak. The CO 2 interferometer and the AXUV diagnostic provide information on the highly 3D impurity transport process during the whole plasma quench.

  15. Microwave Tokamak Experiment: Overview and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. 3 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Combined confinement system applied to tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1986-01-01

    From particle orbit point of view, a tokamak is a combined confinement configuration where a closed toroidal volume is surrounded by an open confinement system like a magnetic mirror. By eliminating a cold halo plasma, the energy loss from the plasma becomes convective. The H-mode in diverted tokamaks is an example. Because of the favorable scaling of the energy confinement time with temperature, the performance of the tokamak may be significantly improved by taking advantage of this effect. (author)

  17. Presheath profiles in simulated tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBombard, B.; Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Lehmer, R.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Ra, Y.; Tynan, G.

    1988-04-01

    The PISCES plasma surface interaction facility at UCLA generates plasmas with characteristics similar to those found in the edge plasmas of tokamaks. Steady state magnetized plasmas produced by this device are used to study plasma-wall interaction phenomena which are relevant to tokamak devices. We report here progress on some detailed investigations of the presheath region that extends from a wall surface into these /open quotes/simulated tokamak/close quotes/ edge plasma discharges along magnetic field lines

  18. Development of an ITER prototype disruption mitigation valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czymek, G., E-mail: g.czymek@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D52425 Jülich (Germany); Giesen, B., E-mail: ingenieurbuero.giesen@gmx.de [IBG, Sibertstr. 22, D-52525 Heinsberg (Germany); Charl, A.; Panin, A.; Hiller, A.; Nicolai, D.; Neubauer, O.; Koslowski, H.R.; Sandri, N. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • An ITER-DMV prototype for 100 bar, D = 80 mm, opening time 3.5 ms, is ready for fabrication. • The vacuum part is sealed against the working gas by stainless steel bellows for 110 bar. • The conical Laval gas outlet allows maximal mass flow rate. • The eddy current drive turn ratio was optimized for low tilting moment. • Polyimide is used for the head sealing, the decelerator and for the bearing of the guide tube. - Abstract: Disruptions in tokamaks seem to be unavoidable. Consequences of disruptions are (i) high heat loads on plasma-facing components, (ii) large forces on the vacuum vessel, and (iii) the generation of runaway electron beams. In ITER, the thermal energy of the plasma needs to be evenly distributed on the first wall in order to prevent melting, forces from vertical displacement events have to be minimized, and the generation of runaway electrons suppressed. Massive gas injection using fast valves is a concept for disruption mitigation which is presently being explored in many tokamaks. Fast disruption mitigation valves based on an electromagnetic eddy current drive have been developed in Jülich since the 1990s and models of various sizes have been built and are in operation in the TEXTOR, MAST, and JET tokamaks. A disruption mitigation valve for ITER is of necessity larger with an estimated injected gas volume of ∼20 kPa m{sup 3}[7] for runaway electron suppression and all materials used have to be resistant to much higher levels of neutron and gamma radiation than in existing tokamaks. During the last 5 years, the concept for an ITER prototype disruption mitigation valve has been developed up to the stage that a fully functional valve could be built and tested. Special emphasis was given to the development and functional testing of some critical items: (i) the injection chamber seal, (ii) the piston seal, (iii) the eddy current drive, and (iv) a braking mechanism to avoid too fast closure of the valve, which could damage

  19. Improvement of the tokamak concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, L

    1994-12-31

    Improvement of the tokamak concept is highly desirable to reduce the size and capital cost of a device able to ignite to increase the plasma pressure, i.e. the power density to reduce the cost of electricity, and to increase the fraction of bootstrap current to render the tokamak compatible with continuous operation. The most important results obtained in this field are summarized, and the options are shown which are still open and explored by the various experiments. Various effects of the plasma shaping are discussed, plasma configurations with both high {beta}{sub N} and H{sub G} are explored, and the issues of stable steady state and of the plasma edge are briefly discussed. (R.P.). 65 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Advanced commercial Tokamak optimization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, R.H.; Berwald, D.H.; Gordon, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Our recent studies have concentrated on developing optimal high beta (bean-shaped plasma) commercial tokamak configurations using TRW's Tokamak Reactor Systems Code (TRSC) with special emphasis on lower net electric power reactors that are more easily deployable. A wide range of issues were investigated in the search for the most economic configuration: fusion power, reactor size, wall load, magnet type, inboard blanket and shield thickness, plasma aspect ratio, and operational β value. The costs and configurations of both steady-state and pulsed reactors were also investigated. Optimal small and large reactor concepts were developed and compared by studying the cost of electricity from single units and from multiplexed units. Multiplexed units appear to have advantages because they share some plant equipment and have lower initial capital investment as compared to larger single units

  1. Flux driven turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, P.; Ottaviani, M.; Sarazin, Y.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.; Waltz, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with tokamak plasma turbulence in the case where fluxes are fixed and profiles are allowed to fluctuate. These systems are intermittent. In particular, radially propagating fronts, are usually observed over a broad range of time and spatial scales. The existence of these fronts provide a way to understand the fast transport events sometimes observed in tokamaks. It is also shown that the confinement scaling law can still be of the gyroBohm type in spite of these large scale transport events. Some departure from the gyroBohm prediction is observed at low flux, i.e. when the gradients are close to the instability threshold. Finally, it is found that the diffusivity is not the same for a turbulence calculated at fixed flux than at fixed temperature gradient, with the same time averaged profile. (author)

  2. Options for an ignited tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.

    1984-02-01

    It is expected that the next phase of the fusion program will involve a tokamak with the goals of providing an ignited plasma for pulses of hundreds of seconds. A simple model is described in this memorandum which establishes the physics conditions for such a self-sustaining plasma, for given ion and electron thermal diffusivities, in terms of R/a, b/a, I, B/q, epsilon β/sub p/, anti T/sub i/, and anti T/sub e//anti T/sub i/. The model is used to produce plots showing the wide range of tokamaks that may ignite or have a given ignition margin. The constraints that limit this range are discussed

  3. Plasma diagnostics on large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlinskij, D.V.; Magyar, G.

    1988-01-01

    The main tasks of the large tokamaks which are under construction (T-15 and Tore Supra) and of those which have already been built (TFTR, JET, JT-60 and DIII-D) together with their design features which are relevant to plasma diagnostics are briefly discussed. The structural features and principal characteristics of the diagnostic systems being developed or already being used on these devices are also examined. The different diagnostic methods are described according to the physical quantities to be measured: electric and magnetic diagnostics, measurements of electron density, electron temperature, the ion components of the plasma, radiation loss measurements, spectroscopy of impurities, edge diagnostics and study of plasma stability. The main parameters of the various diagnostic systems used on the six large tokamaks are summarized in tables. (author). 351 refs, 44 figs, 22 tabs

  4. Starfire: a commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Abdou, M.A.; DeFreece, D.A.; Trachsel, C.A.; Graumann, D.; Kokoszenski, J.

    1979-01-01

    The basic objective of the STARFIRE Project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. Another key goal of the project is to give careful attention to the safety and environmental features of a commercial fusion reactor. The STARFIRE Project was initiated in May 1979, with the goal of completing the design study by October 1980. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the major parameters and design features that have been tentatively selected for STARFIRE

  5. Comprehensive numerical modelling of tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.; Dubois, P.F.

    1991-01-01

    We outline a plan for the development of a comprehensive numerical model of tokamaks. The model would consist of a suite of independent, communicating packages describing the various aspects of tokamak performance (core and edge transport coefficients and profiles, heating, fueling, magnetic configuration, etc.) as well as extensive diagnostics. These codes, which may run on different computers, would be flexibly linked by a user-friendly shell which would allow run-time specification of packages and generation of pre- and post-processing functions, including workstation-based visualization of output. One package in particular, the calculation of core transport coefficients via gyrokinetic particle simulation, will become practical on the scale required for comprehensive modelling only with the advent of teraFLOP computers. Incremental effort at LLNL would be focused on gyrokinetic simulation and development of the shell

  6. Magnetic island formation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1989-04-01

    The size of a magnetic island created by a perturbing helical field in a tokamak is estimated. A helical equilibrium of a current- carrying plasma is found in a helical coordinate and the helically flowing current in the cylinder that borders the plasma is calculated. From that solution, it is concluded that the helical perturbation of /approximately/10/sup /minus/4/ of the total plasma current is sufficient to cause an island width of approximately 5% of the plasma radius. 6 refs

  7. Equilibrium Reconstruction in EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jinping; Wan Baonian; Shen Biao; Sun Youwen; Liu Dongmei; Xiao Bingjia; Ren Qilong; Gong Xianzu; Li Jiangang; Lao, L. L.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction of experimental axisymmetric equilibria is an important part of tokamak data analysis. Fourier expansion is applied to reconstruct the vessel current distribution in EFIT code. Benchmarking and testing calculations are performed to evaluate and validate this algorithm. Two cases for circular and non-circular plasma discharges are presented. Fourier expansion used to fit the eddy current is a robust method and the real time EFIT can be introduced to the plasma control system in the coming campaign. (magnetically confined plasma)

  8. Relaxed states of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucinski, M.Y.; Okano, V.

    1993-01-01

    The relaxed states of tokamak plasmas are studied. It is assumed that the plasma relaxes to a quasi-steady state which is characterized by a minimum entropy production rate, compatible with a number of prescribed conditions and pressure balance. A poloidal current arises naturally due to the anisotropic resistivity. The minimum entropy production theory is applied, assuming the pressure equilibrium as fundamental constraint on the final state. (L.C.J.A.)

  9. Runaway electrons during tokamak startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.S.; Jayakumar, R.

    1988-01-01

    Runaway electrons significantly affect the plasma and impurity evolution during tokamak startup. During its rise, a runaway pulse stores magnetic flux inductively; this is then released during the decay phase of the runaway pulse. This process affects plasma formation, current initiation and current buildup. Because of their relativistic velocities the runaway electrons have higher ionization and excitation rates than the plasma electrons. This leads to a significant modification of the impurity behaviour and consequently the plasma evolution. (author). 20 refs, 8 figs

  10. Minimum scaling laws in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1986-10-01

    Scaling laws governing anomalous electron transport in tokamaks with ohmic and/or auxiliary heating are derived using renormalized Vlasov-Ampere equations for low frequency electromagnetic microturbulence. It is also shown that for pure auxiliary heating (or when auxiliary heating power far exceeds the ohmic power), the energy confinement time scales as tau/sub E/ ∼ P/sub inj//sup -1/3/, where P/sub inj/ is the injected power

  11. Gyrosheath near the tokamak edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Xiao, H.; Valanju, P.M.

    1993-03-01

    A new model for the structure of the radial electric field profile in the edge during the H-mode is proposed. Charge separation caused by the difference between electron and ion gyromotion, or more importantly in a tokamak, the banana motion (halo effect) can self-consistently produce an electric dipole moment that causes the sheared radial electric field. The calculated results based on the model are consistent with D-III D and TEXTOR experimental results

  12. Tokamak plasma boundary layer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, T.F.; Kirillov, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    A model has been developed for the limiter layer and for the boundary region of the plasma column in a tokamak to facilitate analytic calculations of the thickness of the limiter layers, the profiles and boundary values of the temperature and the density under various conditions, and the difference between the electron and ion temperatures. This model can also be used to analyze the recycling of neutrals, the energy and particle losses to the wall and the limiter, and other characteristics

  13. Shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieras, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Shear Alfven waves in an axisymmetric tokamak are examined within the framework of the linearized ideal MHD equations. Properties of the shear Alfven continuous spectrum are studied both analytically and numerically. Implications of these results in regards to low frequency rf heating of toroidally confined plasmas are discussed. The structure of the spatial singularities associated with these waves is determined. A reduced set of ideal MHD equations is derived to describe these waves in a very low beta plasma

  14. Discharge cleaning for a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Shigeyuki

    1983-01-01

    Various methods of discharge cleaning for tokamaks are described. The material of the first walls of tokamaks is usually stainless steel, inconel, titanium and so on. Hydrogen is exclusively used as the discharge gas. Glow discharge cleaning (GDC), Taylor discharge cleaning (TDC), and electron cyclotron resonance discharge cleaning (ECR-DC) are discussed in this paper. The cleaning by GDC is made by moving a movable anode to the center of a tokamak vassel. Taylor found the good cleaning effect of induced discharge by high pressure and low power discharge. This is called TDC. When the frequency of high frequency discharge in a magnetic field is equal to that of the electron cyclotron resonance, the break down potential is lowered if the pressure is sufficiently low. The ECR-CD is made by using this effect. In TDC and ECR-DC, the electron temperature, which has a close relation to the production rate of H 0 , can be controlled by the pressure. In GDC, the operating pressure was improved by the radio frequency glow (RG) method. However, there is still the danger of arcing. In case of GDC and ECR-DC, the position of plasma can be controlled, but not in case of TDC. The TDC is accepted by most of takamak devices in the world. (Kato, T.)

  15. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM'y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nTτ's ∼ 2.5x greater than ELM'ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices

  16. Runaway electrons beams in ITER disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, H.H.

    1993-01-01

    In agreement with the initial projections, the potential generation of runaway beams in disruptions of ITER discharges was performed. This analysis was based on the best-available present projections of plasma parameters existing in large-tokamak disruptions. Using these parameters, the potential contributions from various basic mechanisms for the generation of runway electrons were estimated. The envisioned mechanisms included (i) the well-known Dreicer process (assuming an evaporation of the runways from the thermal distribution), (ii) the seeding of runaway beams resulting from the potential presence of trapped high-temperature electrons from the original discharge still remaining in the disruption plasma at time of reclosure of the magnetic surfaces, and (iii) the generation of runaway beams through avalanche exponentiation of low-level seed runaways resulting via close collisions of existing runaways with cold plasma electrons. Finally, the prospective behavior of the any generated runaway beams -- in particular during their decay -- as well as their potential avoidance and/or damage controlled extraction through the use of magnetic perturbation fields also was considered in some detail

  17. Simulation of Plasma Disruptions for HL-2M with the DINA Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Lei; Duan Xu-Ru; Zheng Guo-Yao; Yan Shi-Lei; Liu Yue-Qiang; Dokuka, V. V.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.; Lukash, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma disruption is often an unavoidable aspect of tokamak operations. It may cause severe damage to in-vessel components such as the vacuum vessel conductors, the first wall and the divertor target plates. Two types of disruption, the hot-plasma vertical displacement event and the major disruption with a cold-plasma vertical displacement event, are simulated by the DINA code for HL-2M. The time evolutions of the plasma current, the halo current, the magnetic axis, the minor radius, the elongation as well as the electromagnetic force and eddy currents on the vacuum vessel during the thermal quench and the current quench are investigated. By comparing the electromagnetic forces before and after the disruption, we find that the disruption causes great damage to the vacuum vessel conductors. In addition, the hot-plasma vertical displacement event is more dangerous than the major disruption with the cold-plasma vertical displacement event. (paper)

  18. Statistical study of TCV disruptivity and H-mode accessibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Y.; Deschenaux, C.; Lister, J.B.; Pochelon, A.

    1997-01-01

    Optimising tokamak operation consists of finding a path, in a multidimensional parameter space, which leads to the desired plasma characteristics and avoids hazards regions. Typically the desirable regions are the domain where an L-mode to H-mode transition can occur, and then, in the H-mode, where ELMs and the required high density< y can be maintained. The regions to avoid are those with a high rate of disruptivity. On TCV, learning the safe and successful paths is achieved empirically. This will no longer be possible in a machine like ITER, since only a small percentage of disrupted discharges will be tolerable. An a priori knowledge of the hazardous regions in ITER is therefore mandatory. This paper presents the results of a statistical analysis of the occurrence of disruptions in TCV. (author) 4 figs

  19. Effect of disruptions on plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilligan, J.G.; Bourham, M.A.; Tucker, E.C.

    1995-01-01

    Erosion of plasma-facing components during disruptions is a limiting factor in the design of large tokamaks like ITER. During a disruption, much of the stored thermal energy of the plasma will be dumped onto divertor plates, resulting in local heat fluxes, which may exceed 100 GW/m 2 over a period of about 0.1--1.0 msec. Melted and/or vaporized material is produced which is redistributed in the divertor region. Simulation of disruption damage is summarized from code results and from experimental exposure of materials to high heat-flux plasmas in plasma guns. In the US several codes have been used to predict both melt/vaporization and heat transfer on surfaces as well as energy and momentum transport in the vapor/plasma shield produced at the surface

  20. On modeling of beryllium molten depths in simulated plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsotridis, G.; Rother, H.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma-facing components in tokamak-type fusion reactors are subjected to intense heat loads during plasma disruptions. The influence of high heat fluxes on the depth of heat-affected zones of pure beryllium metal and beryllium containing very low levels of surface active impurities is studied by using a two-dimensional transient computer model that solves the equations of motion and energy. Results are presented for a range of energy densities and disruption times. Under certain conditions, impurities, through their effect on surface tension, create convective flows and hence influence the flow intensities and the resulting depths of the beryllium molten layers during plasma disruptions. The calculated depths of the molten layers are also compared with other mathematical models that are based on the assumption that heat is transported through the material by conduction only. 32 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  1. Electrostatic Dust Detector with Improved Sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, D.P.; Skinner, C.H.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    Methods to measure the inventory of dust particles and to remove dust if it approaches safety limits will be required in next-step tokamaks such as ITER. An electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces, biased to 30 or 50 V, has been developed for the detection of dust on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Gaining operational experience of dust detection on surfaces in tokamaks is important, however the level of dust generated in contemporary short-pulse tokamaks is comparatively low and high sensitivity is necessary to measure dust on a shot-by-shot basis. We report on modifications in the detection electronics that have increased the sensitivity of the electrostatic dust detector by a factor of up to 120, - a level suitable for measurements on contemporary tokamaks.

  2. Heterodyne ECE diagnostic in the mode detection and disruption avoidance at TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Finken, K.H.; Larue, H.; Udintsev, V.S.; TEXTOR - team

    2003-01-01

    Disruptions cause major concerns for the operation of tokamaks. During disruption large forces act on the tokamak vessel and its interior parts. The huge amount of plasma energy deposited on the first wall components within one millisecond causes serious damage. Therefore disruptions should be avoided. One way to avoid disruptions is the operation of a tokamak in a regime which is easy to handle from the control point of view. However, the operation in the advanced scenarios or improved confinement modes is very complicated and even small deviation in one of the control parameters can cause a disruption. In this cases a method should be available to detect the disruption in advance and mitigate or even better avoid the energy quench by appropriate means. At TEXTOR we developed a method to detect the disruption precursor. The module is integrated in the plasma control system. The detection method was tested at TEXTOR for (i) combination with tangential neutral beam injection to increase the toroidal rotation profile and to tear apart the m = 2 disruption precursor by a steep rotation gradient across the island (ii) gas puff experiments with He used to mitigate the disruption effects specially to suppress the generation of the runaway electrons. The paper demonstrates the possibility to detect disruptions precursors and to avoid disruptions using two ECE-channels out of the standard electron temperature diagnostic. The system demonstrated its reliability during the last month of TEXTOR operation. The injection of co- as well as counter neutral beam to avoid the disruption was successful tested and a detailed analysis of the mode development is presented. The measured rotation profiles show the development of a step in the toroidal velocity in the vicinity of the q = 2 surface which prevents the plasma from a disruption. Furthermore detailed analysis of the frequency development of the m = 2 mode could explain the observed sudden increase in the mode frequency

  3. Electron and current density measurements on tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammeren, A.C.A.P. van.

    1991-01-01

    The first part of this thesis describes the Thomson-scattering diagnostic as it was present at the TORTUR tokamak. For the first time with this diagnostic a complete tangential scattering spectrum was recorded during one single laser pulse. From this scattering spectrum the local current density was derived. Small deviations from the expected gaussian scattering spectrum were observed indicating the non-Maxwellian character of the electron-velocity distribution. The second part of this thesis describes the multi-channel interferometer/ polarimeter diagnostic which was constructed, build and operated on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP) tokamak. The diagnostic was operated routinely, yielding the development of the density profiles for every discharge. When ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating) is switched on the density profile broadens, the central density decreases and the total density increases, the opposite takes place when ECRH is switched off. The influence of MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) activity on the density was clearly observable. In the central region of the plasma it was measured that in hydrogen discharges the so-called sawtooth collapse is preceded by an m=1 instability which grows rapidly. An increase in radius of this m=1 mode of 1.5 cm just before the crash is observed. In hydrogen discharges the sawtooth induced density pulse shows an asymmetry for the high- and low-field side propagation. This asymmetry disappeared for helium discharges. From the location of the maximum density variations during an m=2 mode the position of the q=2 surface is derived. The density profiles are measured during the energy quench phase of a plasma disruption. A fast flattening and broadening of the density profile is observed. (author). 95 refs.; 66 figs.; 7 tabs

  4. Magnetic confinement by Tokamak: physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachon, J.

    1980-01-01

    After describing the Tokamak configuration concept, the author provides an analysis of the principal physical aspects of this type of installation and concludes by estimating that the Tokamak concept is a 'plausible candidate' as a means of producing controlled thermonuclear fusion [fr

  5. Economic evaluation of tokamak power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Steiner, D.

    1977-01-01

    This study reports the impact of plasma operating characteristics, engineering options, and technology on the capital cost trends of tokamak power plants. Tokamak power systems are compared to other advanced energy systems and found to be economically competitive. A three-phase strategy for demonstrating commercial feasibility of fusion power, based on a common-site multiple-unit concept, is presented

  6. Diagnostics for the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The research program of the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project is concentrated on the study of plasma transport processes. The RTP tokamak is therefore equipped with an extensive set of multichannel diagnostics, including a 19-channel FIR interferometer, a 20-channel heterodyne ECE system, an 80-channel

  7. MAST: a Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darke, A.C.; Harbar, J.R.; Hay, J.H.; Hicks, J.B.; Hill, J.W.; McKenzie, J.S.; Morris, A.W.; Nightingale, M.P.S.; Todd, T.N.; Voss, G.M.; Watkins, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The highly successful tight aspect ratio tokamak research pioneered on the START machine at Culham, together with the attractive possibilities of the concept, suggest a larger device should be considered. The design of a Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak is described, operating at much higher currents and over longer pulses than START and compatible with strong additional heating. (orig.)

  8. Mercier criterion for high-β tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, R.M.O.

    1984-01-01

    An expression, for the application of the Mercier criterion to numerical studies of diffuse high-β tokamaks (β approximatelly Σ,q approximatelly 1), which contains only leading order contributions in the high-β tokamak approximation is derived. (L.C.) [pt

  9. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains an overview of the Aries-I tokamak reactor study. The following topics are discussed on this tokamak: Systems studies; equilibrium, stability, and transport; summary and conclusions; current drive; impurity control system; tritium systems; magnet engineering; fusion-power-core engineering; power conversion; Aries-I safety design and analysis; design layout and maintenance; and start-up and operations

  10. Engineering Design of KSTAR tokamak main structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, K.H.; Cho, S.; Her, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    The main components of the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak including vacuum vessel, plasma facing components, cryostat, thermal shield and magnet supporting structure are in the final stage of engineering design. Hundai Heavy Industries (HHI) has been involved in the engineering design of these components. The current configuration and the final engineering design results for the KSTAR main structure are presented. (author)

  11. MHD stability limits in the TCV Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimerdes, H.

    2001-07-01

    of this limit with elongation is also in qualitative agreement with ideal MHD theory. Edge localised modes (ELMs), occurring in TCV Ohmic high-confinement mode discharges, were observed to be preceded by coherent magnetic oscillations. The detected poloidal and toroidal mode structures are consistent with a resonant flux surface close to the plasma edge. Unlike conventional MHD modes, these precursors start at a random toroidal location and then grow in amplitude and toroidal extent until they encompass the whole toroidal circumference. Thus, the asymmetry causing and maintaining the toroidal localisation of the ELM precursor must be intrinsic to the plasma. Soft X-ray measurements show that the localised precursor always coincides with a central m = 1 mode, which can usually be associated with the sawtooth pre- or postcursor mode. A comparison of the phases indicates a correlation with the maximum of the central mode preceding the toroidal location of the ELM precursor and, therefore, a hitherto unobserved coupling between central modes and ELMs. Highly elongated plasmas promise several advantages, among them higher current and beta limits. During TCV experiments dedicated to an increasing of the plasma elongation, a new disruptive current limit, at values well below the conventional current limit corresponding to q a > 2, was encountered for κ > 2.3. This limit, which is preceded by a kink-type mode, is found to be consistent with ideal MHD stability calculations. The TCV observations, therefore, provide the first experimental confirmation of a deviation of the linear Troyon-scaling of the ideal beta limit with normalised current at high elongation, which was predicted over 10 years ago. Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs), which have been observed to limit the achievable beta in a number of tokamaks, arise from a helical perturbation of the bootstrap current caused by an existing seed island. Neoclassical m/n = 2/1 tearing modes have been identified in TCV

  12. MHD stability limits in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimerdes, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    observed decrease of this limit with elongation is also in qualitative agreement with ideal MHD theory. Edge localised modes (ELMs), occurring in TCV Ohmic high-confinement mode discharges, were observed to be preceded by coherent magnetic oscillations. The detected poloidal and toroidal mode structures are consistent with a resonant flux surface close to the plasma edge. Unlike conventional MHD modes, these precursors start at a random toroidal location and then grow in amplitude and toroidal extent until they encompass the whole toroidal circumference. Thus, the asymmetry causing and maintaining the toroidal localisation of the ELM precursor must be intrinsic to the plasma. Soft X-ray measurements show that the localised precursor always coincides with a central m = 1 mode, which can usually be associated with the sawtooth pre- or postcursor mode. A comparison of the phases indicates a correlation with the maximum of the central mode preceding the toroidal location of the ELM precursor and, therefore, a hitherto unobserved coupling between central modes and ELMs. Highly elongated plasmas promise several advantages, among them higher current and beta limits. During TCV experiments dedicated to an increasing of the plasma elongation, a new disruptive current limit, at values well below the conventional current limit corresponding to q{sub a} > 2, was encountered for {kappa} > 2.3. This limit, which is preceded by a kink-type mode, is found to be consistent with ideal MHD stability calculations. The TCV observations, therefore, provide the first experimental confirmation of a deviation of the linear Troyon-scaling of the ideal beta limit with normalised current at high elongation, which was predicted over 10 years ago. Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs), which have been observed to limit the achievable beta in a number of tokamaks, arise from a helical perturbation of the bootstrap current caused by an existing seed island. Neoclassical m/n = 2/1 tearing modes have been

  13. Probabilistic analysis of divertor plate lifetime in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golinescu, R.P.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Defining a methodology for a reliability estimate of the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor is the objective of the study summarized in this paper. If ITER could be designed such that no transients of any type occurred, the divertor reliability would be controlled by erosion of material during normal operation. The occurrence of several transient events results in important contribution to the expected divertor failure rate. Some transients cause the temperature in the divertor plate (DP) to rise; if these temperatures get too high, the structural elements in the DP will weaken and subsequently suffer structural failure and possibly reach the melting temperature. Using the limited data available leads to the result that there is a high probability that the DP will reliably withstand a peak heat flux of 11 MW/m 2 . However, transient events will lead to a much shorter lifetime than desirable for DP's, mainly due to the expected severe effects of plasma disruptions. If transients occurred, but the shutdown mechanism succeeded to perform without inducing a disruption, divertor reliability could be significantly improved. Improved characterization of the disruption conditions, and enlarged scope of failure modes should be pursued to gain confidence in the present conclusions

  14. Summary report on tokamak confinement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    There are currently five major US tokamaks being operated and one being constructed under the auspices of the Division of Toroidal Confinement Systems. The currently operating tokamaks include: Alcator C at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Doublet III at the General Atomic Company, the Impurity Studies Experiment (ISX-B) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is under construction at Princeton and should be completed by December 1982. There is one major tokamak being funded by the Division of Applied Plasma Physics. The Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) is being operated as a user facility by the University of Texas. The TEXT facility includes a complete set of standard diagnostics and a data acquisition system available to all users

  15. Finite pressure effects on the tokamak sawtooth crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasutaro

    1998-07-01

    The sawtooth crash is a hazardous, disruptive phenomenon that is observed in tokamaks whenever the safety factor at the magnetic axis is below unity. Recently, Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR) experimental data has revealed interesting features of the dynamical pressure evolution during the crash phase. Motivated by the experimental results, this dissertation focuses on theoretical modeling of the finite pressure effects on the nonlinear stage of the sawtooth crash. The crash phase has been studied numerically employed a toroidal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) initial value code deduced from the FAR code. For the first time, by starting from a concentric equilibrium, it has been shown that the evolution through an m/n = 1/1 magnetic island induces secondary high-n ballooning instabilities. The magnetic island evolution gives rise to convection of the pressure inside the inversion radius and builds up a steep pressure gradient across the island separatrix, or current sheet, and thereby triggers ballooning instabilities below the threshold for the axisymmetric equilibrium. Due to the onset of secondary ballooning modes, concomitant fine scale vortices and magnetic stochasticity are generated. These effects produce strong flows across the current sheet, and thereby significant modify the m = 1 driven magnetic reconnection process. The resultant interaction of the high-n ballooning modes with the magnetic reconnection process is discussed

  16. The Research Progress of the J-TEXT Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ge; Wang, Zhijiang; Ding, Yonghua; Zhang, Ming; Yang, Zhoujun; Gao, Li; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Hu, Xiwei; Pan, Yuan

    2010-11-01

    In 2004, the TEXT-U tokamak was disassembled and shipped to China, and later on settle down in Huazhong University of Science and Technology. The machine was renamed as the Joint TEXT (J-TEXT) tokamak and obtained its first plasma in 2007. The typical J-TEXT Ohmic discharge was performed in the limiter configuration with the main parameters as follows: major radius R=1.05 m, minor radius a=0.27m, toroidal magnetic field BT=2.2T, plasma current Ip>200kA, line-averaged density ne˜ 2-3 . 1019/m^3, and electron temperature Te0˜ 700eV. Up till now, a few diagnostic systems used to facilitate routine operation and experimental studies were designed and developed. Benefiting from these diagnostic tools, the observation of MHD activities and the statistical analysis of disruption events were done. And measurements of the electrostatic fluctuations in the edge region and conditional analysis of the intermittent burst events near the LCFS were also made as well. The preliminary results will be presented in detail in the meeting.

  17. Comments on experimental results of energy confinement of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.K.

    1989-04-01

    The results of energy-confinement experiments on steady-state tokamak plasmas are examined. For plasmas with auxiliary heating, an analysis based on the heat diffusion equation is used to define heat confinement time (the incremental energy confinement time). For ohmically sustained plasmas, experiments show that the onset of the saturation regime of energy confinement, marfeing, detachment, and disruption are marked by distinct values of the parameter /bar n//sub e///bar j/. The confinement results of the two types of experiments can be described by a single surface in 3-dimensional space spanned by the plasma energy, the heating power, and the plasma density: the incremental energy confinement time /tau//sub inc/ = ΔW/ΔP is the correct concept for describing results of heat confinement in a heating experiment; the commonly used energy confinement time defined by /tau//sub E/ = W/P is not. A further examination shows that the change of edge parameters, as characterized by the change of the effective collision frequency ν/sub e/*, governs the change of confinement properties. The totality of the results of tokamak experiments on energy confinement appears to support a hypothesis that energy transport is determined by the preservation of the pressure gradient scale length. 70 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  18. Progress in diagnostics of the COMPASS tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzettl, V.; Adamek, J.; Berta, M.; Bilkova, P.; Bogar, O.; Bohm, P.; Cavalier, J.; Dejarnac, R.; Dimitrova, M.; Ficker, O.; Fridrich, D.; Grover, O.; Hacek, P.; Havlicek, J.; Havranek, A.; Horacek, J.; Hron, M.; Imrisek, M.; Komm, M.; Kovarik, K.; Krbec, J.; Markovic, T.; Matveeva, E.; Mitosinkova, K.; Mlynar, J.; Naydenkova, D.; Panek, R.; Paprok, R.; Peterka, M.; Podolnik, A.; Seidl, J.; Sos, M.; Stockel, J.; Tomes, M.; Varavin, M.; Varju, J.; Vlainic, M.; Vondracek, P.; Zajac, J.; Zacek, F.; Stano, M.; Anda, G.; Dunai, D.; Krizsanoczi, T.; Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Silva, A.; Gomes, R.; Pereira, T.; Popov, Tsv.; Sarychev, D.; Ermak, G. P.; Zebrowski, J.; Jakubowski, M.; Rabinski, M.; Malinowski, K.; Nanobashvili, S.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Gauthier, E.; Gunn, J. P.; Devitre, A.

    2017-12-01

    The COMPASS tokamak at IPP Prague is a small-size device with an ITER-relevant plasma geometry and operating in both the Ohmic as well as neutral beam assisted H-modes since 2012. A basic set of diagnostics installed at the beginning of the COMPASS operation has been gradually broadened in type of diagnostics, extended in number of detectors and collected channels and improved by an increased data acquisition speed. In recent years, a significant progress in diagnostic development has been motivated by the improved COMPASS plasma performance and broadening of its scientific programme (L-H transition and pedestal scaling studies, magnetic perturbations, runaway electron control and mitigation, plasma-surface interaction and corresponding heat fluxes, Alfvenic and edge localized mode observations, disruptions, etc.). In this contribution, we describe major upgrades of a broad spectrum of the COMPASS diagnostics and discuss their potential for physical studies. In particular, scrape-off layer plasma diagnostics will be represented by a new concept for microsecond electron temperature and heat flux measurements - we introduce a new set of divertor Langmuir and ball-pen probe arrays, newly constructed probe heads for reciprocating manipulators as well as several types of standalone probes. Among optical tools, an upgraded high-resolution edge Thomson scattering diagnostic for pedestal studies and a set of new visible light and infrared (plasma-surface interaction investigations) cameras will be described. Particle and beam diagnostics will be covered by a neutral particle analyzer, diagnostics on a lithium beam, Cherenkov detectors (for a direct detection of runaway electrons) and neutron detectors. We also present new modifications of the microwave reflectometer for fast edge density profile measurements.

  19. A general comparison between tokamak and stellarator plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Xu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper generally compares the essential features between tokamaks and stellarators, based on previous review work individually made by authors on several specific topics, such as theories, bulk plasma transport and edge divertor physics, along with some recent results. It aims at summarizing the main results and conclusions with regard to the advantages and disadvantages in these two types of magnetic fusion devices. The comparison includes basic magnetic configurations, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD instabilities, operational limits and disruptions, neoclassical and turbulent transport, confinement scaling and isotopic effects, plasma rotation, and edge and divertor physics. Finally, a concept of quasi-symmetric stellarators is briefly referred along with a comparison of future application for fusion reactors.

  20. Interpreting Disruption Prediction Models to Improve Plasma Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    In order for the tokamak to be a feasible design for a fusion reactor, it is necessary to minimize damage to the machine caused by plasma disruptions. Accurately predicting disruptions is a critical capability for triggering any mitigative actions, and a modest amount of attention has been given to efforts that employ machine learning techniques to make these predictions. By monitoring diagnostic signals during a discharge, such predictive models look for signs that the plasma is about to disrupt. Typically these predictive models are interpreted simply to give a `yes' or `no' response as to whether a disruption is approaching. However, it is possible to extract further information from these models to indicate which input signals are more strongly correlated with the plasma approaching a disruption. If highly accurate predictive models can be developed, this information could be used in plasma control schemes to make better decisions about disruption avoidance. This work was supported by a Grant from the 2016-2017 Fulbright U.S. Student Program, administered by the Franco-American Fulbright Commission in France.

  1. Experimental observations of surface electrostatic wave on KT-5B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shiyao; Han Shensheng

    1991-01-01

    Shear Alfven waves have been successfully excited in KT-5B small tokamak by means of the one turn longitudinal loop antenna located in the shadow area. The measured antenna loadings show their rich structure, and the loadings are also found to be sensitive to the plasma current. Preliminary evidence of surface electrostatic wave was observed

  2. Physics and Control of Locked Modes in the DIII-D Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    This Final Technical Report summarizes an investigation, carried out under the auspices of the DOE Early Career Award, of the physics and control of non-rotating magnetic islands (''locked modes'') in tokamak plasmas. Locked modes are one of the main causes of disruptions in present tokamaks, and could be an even bigger concern in ITER, due to its relatively high beta (favoring the formation of Neoclassical Tearing Mode islands) and low rotation (favoring locking). For these reasons, this research had the goal of studying and learning how to control locked modes in the DIII-D National Fusion Facility under ITER-relevant conditions of high pressure and low rotation. Major results included: the first full suppression of locked modes and avoidance of the associated disruptions; the demonstration of error field detection from the interaction between locked modes, applied rotating fields and intrinsic errors; the analysis of a vast database of disruptive locked modes, which led to criteria for disruption prediction and avoidance.

  3. Physics and Control of Locked Modes in the DIII-D Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpe, Francesco [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics

    2017-01-30

    This Final Technical Report summarizes an investigation, carried out under the auspices of the DOE Early Career Award, of the physics and control of non-rotating magnetic islands (“locked modes”) in tokamak plasmas. Locked modes are one of the main causes of disruptions in present tokamaks, and could be an even bigger concern in ITER, due to its relatively high beta (favoring the formation of Neoclassical Tearing Mode islands) and low rotation (favoring locking). For these reasons, this research had the goal of studying and learning how to control locked modes in the DIII-D National Fusion Facility under ITER-relevant conditions of high pressure and low rotation. Major results included: the first full suppression of locked modes and avoidance of the associated disruptions; the demonstration of error field detection from the interaction between locked modes, applied rotating fields and intrinsic errors; the analysis of a vast database of disruptive locked modes, which led to criteria for disruption prediction and avoidance.

  4. Feedback-Assisted Extension of the Tokamak Operating Space to Low Safety Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments have demonstrated stable operation at very low edge safety factor, q95 instability. The performance of tokamak fusion devices may benefit from increased plasma current, and thus, decreased q. However, disruptive stability limits are commonly encountered in experiments at qedge ~ 2 (limited plasmas) and q95 ~ 2 (diverted plasmas), limiting exploration of low q regimes. In the recent DIII-D experiments, the impact and control of key disruptive instabilities was studied. Locked n = 1 modes with exponential growth times on the order of the wall eddy current decay timescale τw preceded disruptions at q95 = 2 . The instabilities have a poloidal structure that is consistent with VALEN simulations of the RWM mode structure at q95 = 2 . Applying proportional gain magnetic feedback control of the n = 1 mode resulted in stabilized operation with q95 reaching 1.9, and an extension of the discharge lifetime for > 100τw . Loss of feedback control was accompanied by power supply saturation, followed by a rapidly growing n = 1 mode and disruption. Comparisons of the feedback dynamics with VALEN simulations will be presented. The DIII-D results complement and will be discussed alongside recent RFX-MOD demonstrations of RWM control using magnetic feedback in limited tokamak discharges with qedge economical fusion power production. Supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-04ER54761 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  5. Who will save the tokamak - Harry Potter, Arnold Schwarzenegger, or Shaquille O'Neil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidberg, J.; Mangiarotti, F.; Minervini, J.

    2014-10-01

    The tokamak is the current leading contender for a fusion power reactor. The reason for the preeminence of the tokamak is its high quality plasma physics performance relative to other concepts. Even so, it is well known that the tokamak must still overcome two basic physics challenges before becoming viable as a DEMO and ultimately a reactor: (1) the achievement of non-inductive steady state operation, and (2) the achievement of robust disruption free operation. These are in addition to the PMI problems faced by all concepts. The work presented here demonstrates by means of a simple but highly credible analytic calculation that a ``standard'' tokamak cannot lead to a reactor - it is just not possible to simultaneously satisfy all the plasma physics plus engineering constraints. Three possible solutions, some more well-known than others, to the problem are analyzed. These visual image generating solutions are defined as (1) the Harry Potter solution, (2) the Arnold Schwarzenegger solution, and (3) the Shaquille O'Neil solution. Each solution will be described both qualitatively and quantitatively at the meeting.

  6. Cluster storage for COMPASS tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Písačka, Jan; Hron, Martin; Janky, Filip; Pánek, Radomír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 12 (2012), s. 2238-2241 ISSN 0920-3796. [IAEA Technical Meeting on Control, Data Acquisition, and Remote Participation for Fusion Research/8./. San Francisco, 20.06.2011-24.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2470; GA MŠk 7G10072; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : COMPASS * Tokamak * Codac * Cluster * GlusterFS * Storage Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.842, year: 2012 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fusengdes.2012.09.006

  7. Surface tearing modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Tomonori; Kurita, Gen-ichi; Azumi, Masafumi; Takeda, Tatsuoki

    1985-10-01

    Surface tearing modes in tokamaks are studied numerically and analytically. The eigenvalue problem is solved to obtain the growth rate and the mode structure. We investigate in detail dependences of the growth rate of the m/n = 2/1 resistive MHD modes on the safety factor at the plasma surface, current profile, wall position, and resistivity. The surface tearing mode moves the plasma surface even when the wall is close to the surface. The stability diagram for these modes is presented. (author)

  8. Electron density fluctuation measurements in the TORTUR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remkes, G.J.J.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis deals with measurements of electron-density fluctuations in the TORTUR tokamak. These measurements are carried out by making use of collective scattering of electromagnetic beams. The choice of the wavelength of the probing beam used in collective scattering experiments has important consequences. in this thesis it is argued that the best choice for a wavelength lies in the region 0.1 - 1 mm. Because sources in this region were not disposable a 2 mm collective scattering apparatus has been used as a fair compromise. The scattering theory, somewhat adapted to the specific TORTUR situation, is discussed in Ch. 2. Large scattering angles are admitted in scattering experiments with 2 mm probing beams. This had consequences for the spatial response functions. Special attention has been paid to the wave number resolution. Expressions for the minimum source power have been determined for two detection techniques. The design and implementation of the scattering apparatus has been described in Ch. 3. The available location of the scattering volume and values of the scattering angle have been determined. The effect of beam deflection due to refraction effects is evaluated. The electronic system is introduced. Ch. 4 presents the results of measurements of density fluctuations in the TORTUR tokamak in the frequency range 1 kHz to 100 MHz end the wave number region 400 - 4000 m -1 in different regions of the plasma. Correlation between density and magnetic fluctuations has been found in a number of cases. During the current decay at the termination of several plasma discharges minor disruptions occurred. The fluctuations during these disruptions have been monitored. Measurements have been performed in hydrogen as well as deuterium. A possible dependence of the wave number on the ion gyroradius has been investigated. The isotropy of the fluctuations in the poloidal plane was investigated. A theoretical discussion of the measured results is given in ch. 5. ( H.W.). 63

  9. Elements of a method to scale ignition reactor Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotsaftis, M.

    1984-08-01

    Due to unavoidable uncertainties from present scaling laws when projected to thermonuclear regime, a method is proposed to minimize these uncertainties in order to figure out the main parameters of ignited tokamak. The method mainly consists in searching, if any, a domain in adapted parameters space which allows Ignition, but is the least sensitive to possible change in scaling laws. In other words, Ignition domain is researched which is the intersection of all possible Ignition domains corresponding to all possible scaling laws produced by all possible transports

  10. Disruptions in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, J.A.; Gill, R.D.; Hugon, M.

    1989-01-01

    In JET, both high density and low-q operation are limited by disruptions. The density limit disruptions are caused initially by impurity radiation. This causes a contraction of the plasma temperature profile and leads to an MHD unstable configuration. There is evidence of magnetic island formation resulting in minor disruptions. After several minor disruptions, a major disruption with a rapid energy quench occurs. This event takes place in two stages. In the first stage there is a loss of energy from the central region. In the second stage there is a more rapid drop to a very low temperature, apparently due to a dramatic increase in impurity radiation. The final current decay takes place in the resulting cold plasma. During the growth of the MHD instability the initially rotating mode is brought to rest. This mode locking is believed to be due to an electromagnetic interaction with the vacuum vessel and external magnetic field asymmetries. The low-q disruptions are remarkable for the precision with which they occur at q ψ = 2. These disruptions do not have extended precursors or minor disruptions. The instability grows and locks rapidly. The energy quench and current decay are generally similar to those of the density limit. (author). 43 refs, 35 figs, 3 tabs

  11. Nuclear fusion research at Tokamak Energy Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windridge, Melanie J.; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Kingham, David

    2017-01-01

    Tokamak Energy's approach is close to the mainstream of nuclear fusion, and chooses a spherical tokamak, which is an economically developed form of Tokamak reactor design, as research subjects together with a high-temperature superconducting magnet. In the theoretical prediction, it is said that spherical tokamak can make tokamak reactor's scale compact compared with ITER or DEMO. The dependence of fusion energy multiplication factor on reactor size is small. According to model studies, it has been found that the center coil can be protected from heat and radiation damage even if the neutron shielding is optimized to 35 cm instead of 1 m. As a small tokamak with a high-temperature superconducting magnet, ST25 HTS, it demonstrated in 2015 continuous operation for more than 24 hours as a world record. Currently, this company is constructing a slightly larger ST40 type, and it is scheduled to start operation in 2017. ST40 is designed to demonstrate that it can realize a high magnetic field with a compact size and aims at attaining 8-10 keV (reaching the nuclear fusion reaction temperature at about 100 million degrees). This company will verify the startup and heating technology by the coalescence of spherical tokamak expected to have plasma current of 2 MA, and will also use 2 MW of neutral particle beam heating. In parallel with ST40, it is promoting a development program for high-temperature superconducting magnet. (A.O.)

  12. Enhancement of confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1986-05-01

    A plausible interpretation of the experimental evidence is that energy confinement in tokamaks is governed by two separate considerations: (1) the need for resistive MHD kink-stability, which limits the permissible range of current profiles - and therefore normally also the range of temperature profiles; and (2) the presence of strongly anomalous microscopic energy transport near the plasma edge, which calibrates the amplitude of the global temperature profile, thus determining the energy confinement time tau/sub E/. Correspondingly, there are two main paths towards the enhancement of tokamak confinement: (1) Configurational optimization, to increase the MHD-stable energy content of the plasma core, can evidently be pursued by varying the cross-sectional shape of the plasma and/or finding stable radial profiles with central q-values substantially below unity - but crossing from ''first'' to ''second'' stability within the peak-pressure region would have the greatest ultimate potential. (2) Suppression of edge turbulence, so as to improve the heat insulation in the outer plasma shell, can be pursued by various local stabilizing techniques, such as use of a poloidal divertor. The present confinement model and initial TFTR pellet-injection results suggest that the introduction of a super-high-density region within the plasma core should be particularly valuable for enhancing ntau/subE/. In D-T operation, a centrally peaked plasma pressure profile could possibly lend itself to alpha-particle-driven entry into the second-stability regime

  13. CAT-D-T tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Blue, T.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    The domains of plasma fuel cycles bounded by the D-T and Cat-D, and by the D-T and SCD modes of operation are examined. These domains, referred to as, respectively, the Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation, are characterized by the number (γ) of tritons per fusion neutron available from external (to the plasma) sources. Two external tritium sources are considered - the blankets of the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) reactors and fission reactors supported by the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) driven hybrid reactors. It is found that by using 6 Li for the active material of the control elements of the fission reactors, it is possible to achieve γ values close to unity. Cat-D-T tokamaks could be designed to have smaller size, higher power density, lower magnetic field and even lower plasma temperature than Cat-D tokamaks; the difference becomes significant for γ greater than or equal to .75. The SCD-T mode of operation appears to be even more attractive. Promising applications identified for these Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation include hybrid reactors, fusion synfuel factories and fusion reactors which have difficulty in providing all their tritium needs

  14. Internal magnetic probe measurements of MHD activity and current profiles in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, L.; Cross, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Mirnov oscillations and plasma disruptions in the TORTUS tokamak have been studied by using both internal and external magnetic probe arrays. The internal probe was also used to measure the plasma current distribution so that results could be compared with resistive tearing mode calculations. The growth of m = 3, 4 and 5 modes was found to be consistent with linear tearing mode theory before a disruption but not after it. The observed mode amplitudes, typically b θ /B θ ∼ 5%, were much larger than theoretical estimates based on the magnetic energy available to drive the modes. Despite the presence of large islands near the limiter, most of the disruptions observed were associated with rapid growth of internal modes. (author). 23 refs, 14 figs

  15. Internal magnetic probe measurements of MHD activity and current profiles in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, L.; Cross, R C; Hutchinson, I H

    1987-01-01

    Mirnov oscillations and plasma disruptions in the TORTUS tokamak have been studied by using both internal and external magnetic probe arrays. The internal probe was also used to measure the plasma current distribution so that results could be compared with resistive tearing mode calculations. The growth of m = 3, 4 and 5 modes was found to be consistent with linear tearing mode theory before a disruption but not after it. The observed mode amplitudes, typically b/sub theta//B/sub theta/ approx. 5%, were much larger than theoretical estimates based on the magnetic energy available to drive the modes. Despite the presence of large islands near the limiter, most of the disruptions observed were associated with rapid growth of internal modes. (author). 23 refs, 14 figs.

  16. Plasma position control in TCABR Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, R.M.O.; Kuznetsov, Yu. K.; Nascimento, I.C.; Fonseca, A.M.M.; Silva, R.P. da; Ruchko, L.F.; Tuszel, A.G.; Reis, A.P. dos; Sanada, E.K.

    1998-01-01

    The plasma control position in the TCABR tokamak is described. The TCA tokamak was transferred from the Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Lausanne, to the Institute of Physics of University of Sao Paulo, renamed TCABR (α=0.18 m, R = 0.62 m, B = 1 T,I p = 100 kA). The control system was reconstructed using mainly components obtained from the TCA tokamak. A new method of plasma position determination is used in TCABR to improve its accuracy. A more detailed theoretical analysis of the feed forward and feedback control is performed as compared with. (author)

  17. Estimation of Zeff in Novillo Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia, R.; Olayo, G.; Cruz, G.; Lopez, R.; Chavez, E.; Melendez, L.; Flores, A.; Gaytan, E.

    1996-01-01

    We estimated the Z eff in the Novillo Tokamak after having applied a HeGDC process through two different methods: anomaly factor and mass spectrometry. The first one gave a Z eff value of 2.07 for a tokamak discharge of 4350 A plasma current and 3 V of loop voltage. By mass spectrometry 30 s after the discharge had finished a Z eff of 4.19 was obtained for the same discharge. By mass spectrometry we observed that the Z eff value is a time function. Furthermore this method is helpful for evaluating the level of impurities after many discharges in Novillo Tokamak. (orig.)

  18. Global gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furnish, G.; Horton, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.

    1998-10-01

    A kinetic simulation code based on the gyrokinetic ion dynamics in global general metric (including a tokamak with circular or noncircular cross-section) has been developed. This gyrokinetic simulation is capable of examining the global and semi-global driftwave structures and their associated transport in a tokamak plasma. The authors investigate the property of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) or η i (η i ≡ ∂ ell nT i /∂ ell n n i ) driven drift waves in a tokamak plasma. The emergent semi-global drift wave modes give rise to thermal transport characterized by the Bohm scaling

  19. Alfven wave experiments on the TORTUS tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballico, M.J.; Bowden, M.; Brand, G.F.; Brennan, M.H.; Cross, R.C.; Fekete, P.; James, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on the first observations of the Discrete Alfven Wave (DAW) and the first measurements of laser scattering off the kinetic Alfven wave in the TORTUS tokamak. TORTUS is a relatively small device, with major radius R=0.44m, minor radius 0.1m and has previously been operated routinely with B Φ =0.7T, I p =20 kA and n e ∼ 1x10 19 m -3 . Under these conditions, and over a wide frequency range (1-14 MHz), there has been no evidence of the DAW modes observed on TCA. Recently, a minor upgrade of TORTUS has permitted routine operation at B Φ =1.0 T, I p =39 kA, q(a)∼5 and n e ∼1-4 x 10 19 m -3 . At the operating frequency, 3.2 MHz, chosen for this study, DAW modes are observed clearly at both low and high densities. The appearance of DAW modes appears to be due to a steeper current profile at the higher plasma currents now generated in TORTUS. The general behaviour of DAW modes is in fact quite sensitive to the density and current profiles, indicating that DAW modes should provide a useful current profile diagnostic. (author) 6 refs., 2 figs

  20. Radiated power measurement with AXUV photodiodes in EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Yanmin; Hu Liqun; Du Wei; Mao Songtao; Chen Kaiyun; Zhang Jizhong

    2013-01-01

    The fast bolometer diagnostic system for absolute radiated power measurement on EAST tokamak is introduced, which is based on the absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) photodiodes. The relative calibration of AXUV detectors is carried out using X-ray tube and standard luminance source in order to evaluate the sensitivity degradation caused by cumulative radiation damage during experiments. The calibration result shows a 23% sensitivity decrease in the X-ray range for the detector suffering ∼27000 discharges, but the sensitivity for the visible light changes little. The radiated power measured by AXUV photodiodes is compared with that measured by resistive bolometer. The total radiated power in main plasma deduced from AXUV detector is lower a factor of 1∼4 than that deduced from resistive bolometer. Some typical measurement results are also shown in this article. (author)