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Sample records for tmprss2-erg fusion-positive prostate

  1. TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion status in minute (minimal) prostatic adenocarcinoma.

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    Albadine, Roula; Latour, Mathieu; Toubaji, Antoun; Haffner, Michael; Isaacs, William B; A Platz, Elizabeth; Meeker, Alan K; Demarzo, Angelo M; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J

    2009-11-01

    Minute prostatic adenocarcinomas are considered to be of insufficient virulence. Given recent suggestions of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion association with aggressive prostatic adenocarcinoma, we evaluated the incidence of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion in minute prostatic adenocarcinomas. A total of 45 consecutive prostatectomies with minute adenocarcinoma were used for tissue microarray construction. A total of 63 consecutive non-minimal, Gleason Score 6 tumors, from a separate PSA Era prostatectomy tissue microarray, were used for comparison. FISH was carried out using ERG break-apart probes. Tumors were assessed for fusion by deletion (Edel) or split (Esplit), duplicated fusions and low-level copy number gain in normal ERG gene locus. Minute adenocarcinomas: Fusion was evaluable in 32/45 tumors (71%). Fifteen out of 32 (47%) tumors were positive for fusion. Six (19%) were of the Edel class and 7 (22%) were classified as combined Edel+Esplit. Non-minute adenocarcinomas (pT2): Fusion was identified in 20/30 tumors (67%). Four (13%) were of Edel class and 5 (17%) were combined Edel+Esplit. Duplicated fusions were encountered in 5 (16%) tumors. Non-minute adenocarcinomas (pT3): Fusion was identified in 19/33 (58%). Fusion was due to a deletion in 6 (18%) tumors. Seven tumors (21%) were classified as combined Edel+Esplit. One tumor showed Esplit alone. Duplicated fusions were encountered in 3 (9%) cases. The incidence of duplicated fusions was higher in non-minute adenocarcinomas (13 vs 0%; P=0.03). A trend for higher incidence of low-level copy number gain in normal ERG gene locus without fusion was noted in non-minute adenocarcinomas (10 vs 0%; P=0.07). We found a TMPRSS2-ERG fusion rate of 47% in minute adenocarcinomas. The latter is not significantly different from that of grade matched non-minute adenocarcinomas. The incidence of duplicated fusion was higher in non-minute adenocarcinomas. Our finding of comparable rate of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion in minute adenocarcinomas may argue

  2. TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions are infrequent in prostatic ductal adenocarcinomas.

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    Lotan, Tamara L; Toubaji, Antoun; Albadine, Roula; Latour, Mathieu; Herawi, Mehsati; Meeker, Alan K; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Platz, Elizabeth A; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J

    2009-03-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate is an unusual subtype that may be associated with a more aggressive clinical course, and is less responsive to conventional therapies than the more common prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma. However, given its frequent association with an acinar component at prostatectomy, some have challenged the concept of prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma as a distinct clinicopathologic entity. We studied the occurrence of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion, in 40 surgically resected ductal adenocarcinoma cases, and in their associated acinar component using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A group of 38 'pure' acinar adenocarcinoma cases matched with the ductal adenocarcinoma group for pathological grade and stage was studied as a control. Compared with the matched acinar adenocarcinoma cases, the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion was significantly less frequently observed in ductal adenocarcinoma (45 vs 11% of cases, P=0.002, Fisher's exact test). Here, of the ductal adenocarcinoma cases with the gene fusion, 75% were fused through deletion, and the remaining case was fused through translocation. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion was also rare in the acinar component of mixed ductal-acinar tumors when compared with the pure acinar adenocarcinoma controls (5 vs 45%, P=0.001, Fisher's exact test). In 95% of the ductal adenocarcinoma cases in which a concurrent acinar component was analyzed, there was concordance for presence/absence of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion between the different histologic subtypes. In the control group of pure acinar adenocarcinoma cases, 59% were fused through deletion and 41% were fused through translocation. The presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in some cases of prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma supports the concept that ductal adenocarcinoma and acinar adenocarcinoma may be related genetically. However, the significantly lower rate of the gene fusion in pure ductal adenocarcinoma cases underscores the fact that genetic and biologic

  3. Association of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion with clinical characteristics and outcomes: results from a population-based study of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald, Liesel M; Cox, Michael E; Ostrander, Elaine A; Stanford, Janet L; Huntsman, David G; Agalliu, Ilir; Johnson, Karynn; Miller, Melinda A; Kwon, Erika M; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Fazli, Ladan; Rajput, Ashish B; Gleave, Martin E

    2008-01-01

    The presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene in prostate tumors has recently been associated with an aggressive phenotype, as well as recurrence and death from prostate cancer. These associations suggest the hypothesis that the gene fusion may be used as a prognostic indicator for prostate cancer. In this study, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assays were used to assess TMPRSS2-ERG fusion status in a group of 214 prostate cancer cases from two population-based studies. The FISH assays were designed to detect both fusion type (deletion vs. translocation) and the number of fusion copies (single vs. multiple). Genotyping of four ERG and one TMPRSS2 SNPs using germline DNA was also performed in a sample of the cases (n = 127). Of the 214 tumors scored for the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, 64.5% were negative and 35.5% were positive for the fusion. Cases with the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion did not exhibit reduced prostate cancer survival (HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.22–3.93), nor was there a significant difference in cause-specific survival when stratifying by translocation or deletion (HR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.23–3.12) or by the number of retained fusion copies (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.45–3.34). However, evidence for reduced prostate cancer-specific survival was apparent in those cases whose tumor had multiple copies of the fusion. The variant T allele of the TMPRSS2 SNP, rs12329760, was positively associated with TMPRSS2-ERG fusion by translocation (p = 0.05) and with multiple copies of the gene fusion (p = 0.03). If replicated, the results presented here may provide insight into the mechanism by which the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion arises and also contribute to diagnostic evaluations for determining the subset of men who will go on to develop metastatic prostate cancer

  4. TMPRSS2-ERG -specific transcriptional modulation is associated with prostate cancer biomarkers and TGF-β signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brase, Jan C; Sirma, Hüseyin; Sauter, Guido; Simon, Ronald; Schlomm, Thorsten; Beißbarth, Tim; Korf, Ulrike; Kuner, Ruprecht; Sültmann, Holger; Johannes, Marc; Mannsperger, Heiko; Fälth, Maria; Metzger, Jennifer; Kacprzyk, Lukasz A; Andrasiuk, Tatjana; Gade, Stephan; Meister, Michael

    2011-01-01

    TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions occur in about 50% of all prostate cancer cases and represent promising markers for molecular subtyping. Although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion seems to be a critical event in prostate cancer, the precise functional role in cancer development and progression is still unclear. We studied large-scale gene expression profiles in 47 prostate tumor tissue samples and in 48 normal prostate tissue samples taken from the non-suspect area of clinical low-risk tumors using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST microarrays. Comparison of gene expression levels among TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-positive and negative tumors as well as benign samples demonstrated a distinct transcriptional program induced by the gene fusion event. Well-known biomarkers for prostate cancer detection like CRISP3 were found to be associated with the gene fusion status. WNT and TGF-β/BMP signaling pathways were significantly associated with genes upregulated in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-positive tumors. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion results in the modulation of transcriptional patterns and cellular pathways with potential consequences for prostate cancer progression. Well-known biomarkers for prostate cancer detection were found to be associated with the gene fusion. Our results suggest that the fusion status should be considered in retrospective and future studies to assess biomarkers for prostate cancer detection, progression and targeted therapy

  5. Loss of the NKX3.1 tumorsuppressor promotes the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene expression in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thangapazham, Rajesh; Saenz, Francisco; Katta, Shilpa; Mohamed, Ahmed A; Tan, Shyh-Han; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Srivastava, Shiv; Dobi, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In normal prostate epithelium the TMPRSS2 gene encoding a type II serine protease is directly regulated by male hormones through the androgen receptor. In prostate cancer ERG protooncogene frequently gains hormonal control by seizing gene regulatory elements of TMPRSS2 through genomic fusion events. Although, the androgenic activation of TMPRSS2 gene has been established, little is known about other elements that may interact with TMPRSS2 promoter sequences to modulate ERG expression in TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion context. Comparative genomic analyses of the TMPRSS2 promoter upstream sequences and pathway analyses were performed by the Genomatix Software. NKX3.1 and ERG genes expressions were evaluated by immunoblot or by quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) assays in response to siRNA knockdown or heterologous expression. QRT-PCR assay was used for monitoring the gene expression levels of NKX3.1-regulated genes. Transcriptional regulatory function of NKX3.1 was assessed by luciferase assay. Recruitment of NKX3.1 to its cognate elements was monitored by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation assay. Comparative analysis of the TMPRSS2 promoter upstream sequences among different species revealed the conservation of binding sites for the androgen inducible NKX3.1 tumor suppressor. Defects of NKX3.1, such as, allelic loss, haploinsufficiency, attenuated expression or decreased protein stability represent established pathways in prostate tumorigenesis. We found that NKX3.1 directly binds to TMPRSS2 upstream sequences and negatively regulates the expression of the ERG protooncogene through the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. These observations imply that the frequently noted loss-of-function of NKX3.1 cooperates with the activation of TMPRSS2-ERG fusions in prostate tumorigenesis

  6. Antineoplastic Effects of siRNA against TMPRSS2-ERG Junction Oncogene in Prostate Cancer.

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    Giorgia Urbinati

    Full Text Available TMPRSS2-ERG junction oncogene is present in more than 50% of patients with prostate cancer and its expression is frequently associated with poor prognosis. Our aim is to achieve gene knockdown by siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG and then to assess the biological consequences of this inhibition. First, we designed siRNAs against the two TMPRSS2-ERG fusion variants (III and IV, most frequently identified in patients' biopsies. Two of the five siRNAs tested were found to efficiently inhibit mRNA of both TMPRSS2-ERG variants and to decrease ERG protein expression. Microarray analysis further confirmed ERG inhibition by both siRNAs TMPRSS2-ERG and revealed one common down-regulated gene, ADRA2A, involved in cell proliferation and migration. The siRNA against TMPRSS2-ERG fusion variant IV showed the highest anti-proliferative effects: Significantly decreased cell viability, increased cleaved caspase-3 and inhibited a cluster of anti-apoptotic proteins. To propose a concrete therapeutic approach, siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG IV was conjugated to squalene, which can self-organize as nanoparticles in water. The nanoparticles of siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG-squalene injected intravenously in SCID mice reduced growth of VCaP xenografted tumours, inhibited oncoprotein expression and partially restored differentiation (decrease in Ki67. In conclusion, this study offers a new prospect of treatment for prostate cancer based on siRNA-squalene nanoparticles targeting TMPRSS2-ERG junction oncogene.

  7. Prognostic Significance of TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Gene in Prostate Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulda, V.; Topolčan, O.; Kučera, R.; Kripnerová, M.; Srbecká, K.; Hora, M.; Hes, O.; Klečka, J.; Babuška, V.; Rousárová, M.; Benson, Veronika; Pesta, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 7 (2016), s. 4787-4793 ISSN 0250-7005 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Prostate cancer * TMPRSS2-ERG * PSA Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.937, year: 2016

  8. TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion is not associated with outcome in patients treated by prostatectomy

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    Gopalan, Anuradha; Leversha, Margaret A.; Satagopan, Jaya M.; Zhou, Qin; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A.; Fine, Samson W.; Eastham, James A.; Scardino, Peter T.; Scher, Howard I.; Tickoo, Satish K.; Reuter, Victor E.; Gerald, William L.

    2009-01-01

    A significant number of prostate cancers have been shown to have recurrent chromosomal rearrangements resulting in the fusion of the androgen regulated TMPRSS2 promoter to a member of the ETS transcription factor family, most commonly ERG. This results in ERG overexpression which may have a direct causal role in prostate tumorigenesis or progression. However, the clinical significance of the rearrangement is unclear and, in particular, relationship to outcome has been inconsistent in recent reports. We analyzed TMPRSS2-ERG gene rearrangement status by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 521 cases of clinically localized surgically treated prostate cancer with 95 months median follow-up and also in 40 unmatched metastases. 42% of primary tumors and 40% of metastases had rearrangements. 11% had copy number increase (CNI) of the TMPRRS2-ERG region. Rearrangement alone was associated with lower grade, but not with stage, biochemical recurrence, metastases or death. CNI with and without rearrangement was associated with high grade and advanced stage. Further, a subgroup of cancers with CNI and rearrangement by deletion, with two or more copies of the deleted locus, tended to be more clinically aggressive. DNA index assessment revealed that the majority of tumors with CNI of TMPRSS2-ERG had generalized aneuploidy/ tetraploidy in contrast to tumors without TMPRSS2-ERG CNI, which were predominantly diploid. We therefore conclude that translocation of TMPRSS2-ERG is not associated with outcome and the aggressive clinical features associated with CNI of chromosome 21 reflect generalized aneuploidy and are not due to CNI specifically of rearranged TMPRSS2-ERG. PMID:19190343

  9. TMPRSS2- driven ERG expression in vivo increases self-renewal and maintains expression in a castration resistant subpopulation.

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    Orla M Casey

    Full Text Available Genomic rearrangements commonly occur in many types of cancers and often initiate or alter the progression of disease. Here we describe an in vivo mouse model that recapitulates the most frequent rearrangement in prostate cancer, the fusion of the promoter region of TMPRSS2 with the coding region of the transcription factor, ERG. A recombinant bacterial artificial chromosome including an extended TMPRSS2 promoter driving genomic ERG was constructed and used for transgenesis in mice. TMPRSS2-ERG expression was evaluated in tissue sections and FACS-fractionated prostate cell populations. In addition to the anticipated expression in luminal cells, TMPRSS2-ERG was similarly expressed in the Sca-1(hi/EpCAM(+ basal/progenitor fraction, where expanded numbers of clonogenic self-renewing progenitors were found, as assayed by in vitro sphere formation. These clonogenic cells increased intrinsic self renewal in subsequent generations. In addition, ERG dependent self-renewal and invasion in vitro was demonstrated in prostate cell lines derived from the model. Clinical studies have suggested that the TMPRSS2-ERG translocation occurs early in prostate cancer development. In the model described here, the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion alone was not transforming but synergized with heterozygous Pten deletion to promote PIN. Taken together, these data suggest that one function of TMPRSS2-ERG is the expansion of self-renewing cells, which may serve as targets for subsequent mutations. Primary prostate epithelial cells demonstrated increased post transcriptional turnover of ERG compared to the TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP cell line, originally isolated from a prostate cancer metastasis. Finally, we determined that TMPRSS2-ERG expression occurred in both castration-sensitive and resistant prostate epithelial subpopulations, suggesting the existence of androgen-independent mechanisms of TMPRSS2 expression in prostate epithelium.

  10. Contribution of Interstitial Deletion of 21q22.2-3 per se to Prostate Cancer Progression in Tumors Harboring TMPRSS2-ERG Translocations

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    2015-12-01

    harboring TMPRSS2- ERG translocations PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yan Dong CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Tulane University New Orleans, LA 70112...0485 to prostate cancer progression in tumors harboring TMPRSS2- ERG translocations 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0485 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT TMPRSS2- ERG gene fusions are present in close to 50% of human prostate cancers. Approximately half of the

  11. Antibody-Based Detection of ERG Rearrangement-Positive Prostate Cancer

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    Kyung Park

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions occur in 50% of prostate cancers and result in the overexpression of a chimeric fusion transcript that encodes a truncated ERG product. Previous attempts to detect truncated ERG products have been hindered by a lack of specific antibodies. Here, we characterize a rabbit anti-ERG monoclonal antibody (clone EPR 3864; Epitomics, Burlingame, CA using immunoblot analysis on prostate cancer cell lines, synthetic TMPRSS2-ERG constructs, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence. We correlated ERG protein expression with the presence of ERG gene rearrangements in prostate cancertissues using a combined immunohistochemistry(IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis. We independently evaluated two patient cohorts and observed ERG expression confined to prostate cancer cells and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial reoplasia associated with ERG-positive cancer, as well as vessels and lymphocytes (where ERG has a known biologic role. Image analysis of 131 cases demonstrated nearly 100% sensitivity for detecting ERG rearrangement prostate cancer, with only 2 (1.5% of 131 cases demonstrating strong ERG protein expression without any known ERG gene fusion. The combired pathology evaluation of 207 patient tumors for ERG protein expression had 95.7% sensitivity and 96.5% specificity for determining ERG rearrangement prostate cancer. Ir conclusion, this study qualifies a specific anti-ERG antibody and demonstrates exquisite association between ERG gene rearrangement and truncated ERG protein product expression. Giver the ease of performing IHC versus FISH, ERG protein expression may be useful for molecularly subtypirg prostate cancer based or ERG rearrangement status and suggests clinical utility it prostate needle biopsy evaluation.

  12. ERG induces epigenetic activation of Tudor domain-containing protein 1 (TDRD1) in ERG rearrangement-positive prostate cancer.

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    Kacprzyk, Lukasz A; Laible, Mark; Andrasiuk, Tatjana; Brase, Jan C; Börno, Stefan T; Fälth, Maria; Kuner, Ruprecht; Lehrach, Hans; Schweiger, Michal R; Sültmann, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of ERG transcription factor due to genomic ERG-rearrangements defines a separate molecular subtype of prostate tumors. One of the consequences of ERG accumulation is modulation of the cell's gene expression profile. Tudor domain-containing protein 1 gene (TDRD1) was reported to be differentially expressed between TMPRSS2:ERG-negative and TMPRSS2:ERG-positive prostate cancer. The aim of our study was to provide a mechanistic explanation for the transcriptional activation of TDRD1 in ERG rearrangement-positive prostate tumors. Gene expression measurements by real-time quantitative PCR revealed a remarkable co-expression of TDRD1 and ERG (r(2) = 0.77) but not ETV1 (r(2)prostate cancer in vivo. DNA methylation analysis by MeDIP-Seq and bisulfite sequencing showed that TDRD1 expression is inversely correlated with DNA methylation at the TDRD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo (ρ = -0.57). Accordingly, demethylation of the TDRD1 promoter in TMPRSS2:ERG-negative prostate cancer cells by DNA methyltransferase inhibitors resulted in TDRD1 induction. By manipulation of ERG dosage through gene silencing and forced expression we show that ERG governs loss of DNA methylation at the TDRD1 promoter-associated CpG island, leading to TDRD1 overexpression. We demonstrate that ERG is capable of disrupting a tissue-specific DNA methylation pattern at the TDRD1 promoter. As a result, TDRD1 becomes transcriptionally activated in TMPRSS2:ERG-positive prostate cancer. Given the prevalence of ERG fusions, TDRD1 overexpression is a common alteration in human prostate cancer which may be exploited for diagnostic or therapeutic procedures.

  13. Targeting TMPRSS2-ERG in Prostate Cancer

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    2017-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0212 TITLE: Targeting TMPRSS2-ERG in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David Takeda CONTRACTING...ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Boston, MA 02215 REPORT DATE: November 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research...Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0212 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) David Takeda 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  14. Structure and Function of the Splice Variants of TMPRSS2-ERG, a Prevalent Genomic Alteration in Prostate Cancer

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    2012-09-01

    expression in prostate cancer (4). Lower or no ERG expression in a subset of aggressive tumors with TMPRSS2-ERG fusion may reflect attenuation of androgen...Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda MD 20814, USA 2. Cancer Vaccine Development Laboratory, Department of Surgery, United...negative for ERG. The ERG MAb did not show cross reactivity to FLI-1 in LNCaP cells infected with a FLI-1 adenovirus expression vector (Fig 1A

  15. Current State of ERG as Biomarker in Prostatic Adenocarcinoma.

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    Acs, Balazs; Szarvas, Tibor; Szekely, Nora; Nyirady, Peter; Szasz, A Marcell

    2015-01-01

    In this review we briefly discuss the possible biomarkers of prostate cancer among them we focus and analyze the relevance of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene in line with ERG expression in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Starting at diagnosis and genetic alterations in prostate carcinomas, we examine the incidence and detection of the most common genetic aberration in this tumor and its protein product as well. We also examined the correlation of clinicopathological factors and prognosis with ERG and the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion oncogene and ERG expression as predictive markers.

  16. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and gene fusion pattern in prostate cancer.

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    Suh, Ja Hee; Park, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Cheol; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer is considered to be highly heterogeneous, with various morphologic features and biologic behaviors. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion is the most frequently observed genetic aberration in prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to elucidate the intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion status. ERG immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed in samples from 168 prostate cancer patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy, and 40 cases showing ERG-positive IHC staining were selected for tissue microarray (TMA) construction. Two to six representative cores were selected from each tumor focus. In the cases with heterogeneous ERG IHC staining intensity, the areas showing different intensities were separately selected. Using the TMA blocks, IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were conducted to evaluate the heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and ERG fusion gene patterns, respectively, in a single tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was defined as the simultaneous presence of negative and positive cores in the same tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG FISH was defined by the presence of cores with positive and negative FISH signals or cores with break-apart and interstitial deletion FISH signals in the same tumor focus. A total of 202 TMA cores were isolated from 40 ERG-positive cases. Of the 202 total cores, 19 were negative for ERG IHC staining, and 46 showed 1+, 52 showed 2+, and 85 showed 3+ ERG staining intensity. Eleven cores were negative for ERG FISH signal, 119 cores showed ERG break-apart FISH signals, and the remaining 72 cores revealed interstitial deletion. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was found in 20% (8/40) of cases, and intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion pattern was found in 32.5% (13/40) of cases. In summary, this study showed significantly frequent intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression, gene fusion status and fusion pattern. This heterogeneity can be caused by the development

  17. Comparative evaluation of urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2: ERG scores and serum PHI in predicting prostate cancer aggressiveness.

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    Tallon, Lucile; Luangphakdy, Devillier; Ruffion, Alain; Colombel, Marc; Devonec, Marian; Champetier, Denis; Paparel, Philippe; Decaussin-Petrucci, Myriam; Perrin, Paul; Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie

    2014-07-30

    It has been suggested that urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion tests and serum PHI correlate to cancer aggressiveness-related pathological criteria at prostatectomy. To evaluate and compare their ability in predicting prostate cancer aggressiveness, PHI and urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG (T2) scores were assessed in 154 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Univariate and multivariate analyses using logistic regression and decision curve analyses were performed. All three markers were predictors of a tumor volume≥0.5 mL. Only PHI predicted Gleason score≥7. T2 score and PHI were both independent predictors of extracapsular extension(≥pT3), while multifocality was only predicted by PCA3 score. Moreover, when compared to a base model (age, digital rectal examination, serum PSA, and Gleason sum at biopsy), the addition of both PCA3 score and PHI to the base model induced a significant increase (+12%) when predicting tumor volume>0.5 mL. PHI and urinary PCA3 and T2 scores can be considered as complementary predictors of cancer aggressiveness at prostatectomy.

  18. Comparative Evaluation of Urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2: ERG Scores and Serum PHI in Predicting Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

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    Lucile Tallon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion tests and serum PHI correlate to cancer aggressiveness-related pathological criteria at prostatectomy. To evaluate and compare their ability in predicting prostate cancer aggressiveness, PHI and urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG (T2 scores were assessed in 154 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Univariate and multivariate analyses using logistic regression and decision curve analyses were performed. All three markers were predictors of a tumor volume ≥0.5 mL. Only PHI predicted Gleason score ≥7. T2 score and PHI were both independent predictors of extracapsular extension (≥pT3, while multifocality was only predicted by PCA3 score. Moreover, when compared to a base model (age, digital rectal examination, serum PSA, and Gleason sum at biopsy, the addition of both PCA3 score and PHI to the base model induced a significant increase (+12% when predicting tumor volume >0.5 mL. PHI and urinary PCA3 and T2 scores can be considered as complementary predictors of cancer aggressiveness at prostatectomy.

  19. Expressed prostatic secretion biomarkers improve stratification of NCCN active surveillance candidates: performance of secretion capacity and TMPRSS2:ERG models.

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    Whelan, Christopher; Kawachi, Mark; Smith, David D; Linehan, Jennifer; Babilonia, Gail; Mejia, Rosa; Wilson, Timothy; Smith, Steven S

    2014-01-01

    Active surveillance is a viable patient option for prostate cancer provided that a clinical determination of low risk and presumably organ confined disease can be made. To standardize risk stratification schemes the NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network®) provides guidelines for the active surveillance option. We determined the effectiveness of expressed prostatic secretion biomarkers for detecting occult risk factors in NCCN active surveillance candidates. Expressed prostatic secretion specimens were obtained before robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Secretion capacity biomarkers, including total RNA and expressed prostatic secretion specimen volume, were measured by standard techniques. RNA expression biomarkers, including TXNRD1 mRNA, prostate specific antigen mRNA, TMPRSS2:ERG fusion mRNA and PCA3 mRNA, were measured by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Of the 528 patients from whom expressed prostatic secretions were collected 216 were eligible for active surveillance under NCCN guidelines. Variable selection on logistic regression identified 2 models, including one featuring types III and VI TMPRSS2:ERG variants, and one featuring 2 secretion capacity biomarkers. Of the 2 high performing models the secretion capacity model was most effective for detecting cases in this group that were up-staged or up-staged plus upgraded. It decreased the risk of up-staging in patients with a negative test almost eightfold and decreased the risk of up-staging plus upgrading about fivefold while doubling the prevalence of up-staging in the positive test group. Noninvasive expressed prostatic secretion testing may improve patient acceptance of active surveillance by dramatically reducing the presence of occult risk factors among those eligible for active surveillance under NCCN guidelines. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. IL-6 Overexpression in ERG-Positive Prostate Cancer Is Mediated by Prostaglandin Receptor EP2.

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    Merz, Constanze; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Queisser, Angela; Vogel, Wenzel; Andrén, Ove; Kirfel, Jutta; Duensing, Stefan; Perner, Sven; Nowak, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer in men and multiple risk factors and genetic alterations have been described. The TMPRSS2-ERG fusion event and the overexpression of the transcription factor ERG are present in approximately 50% of all prostate cancer patients, however, the clinical outcome is still controversial. Prostate tumors produce various soluble factors, including the pleiotropic cytokine IL-6, regulating cellular processes such as proliferation and metastatic segregation. Here, we used prostatectomy samples in a tissue microarray format and analyzed the co-expression and the clinicopathologic data of ERG and IL-6 using immunohistochemical double staining and correlated the read-out with clinicopathologic data. Expression of ERG and IL-6 correlated strongly in prostate tissue samples. Forced expression of ERG in prostate tumor cell lines resulted in significantly increased secretion of IL-6, whereas the down-regulation of ERG decreased IL-6 secretion. By dissecting the underlying mechanism in prostate tumor cell lines we show the ERG-mediated up-regulation of the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP3. The prostanoid receptor EP2 was overexpressed in human prostate cancer tissue. Furthermore, the proliferation rate and IL-6 secretion in DU145 cells was reduced after treatment with EP2-receptor antagonist. Collectively, our study shows that the expression of ERG in prostate cancer is linked to the expression of IL-6 mediated by the prostanoid receptor EP2. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The transcription factor ERG increases expression of neurotransmitter receptors on prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissick, Haydn T.; On, Seung T.; Dunn, Laura K.; Sanda, Martin G.; Asara, John M.; Pellegrini, Kathryn L.; Noel, Jonathan K.; Arredouani, Mohamed S.

    2015-01-01

    The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion occurs in about half of prostate cancer (PCa) cases and results in overexpression of the transcription factor ERG. Overexpression of ERG has many effects on cellular function. However, how these changes enhance cell growth and promote tumor development is unclear. To investigate the role of ERG, LNCaP and PC3 cells were transfected with ERG and gene expression and metabolic profile were analyzed. Our data show that expression of ERG induces overexpression of many nicotinicacetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In addition, metabolic profiling by LC-MS/MS revealed elevated production of several neurotransmitters in cells expressing ERG. Consistently, treatment of ERG-expressing cells with nicotine induced elevated calcium influx, GSK3β (Ser9) phosphorylation and cell proliferation. Finally, we show that PCa patientswho are smokers have larger tumors if their tumors are TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion positive. Collectively, our data suggest that ERG sensitizes prostate tumor cells to neurotransmitter receptor agonists like nicotine. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1612-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  2. ERG oncoprotein expression in prostate carcinoma patients of different ethnicities

    OpenAIRE

    KELLY, GREGORY M.; KONG, YINK HEAY; DOBI, ALBERT; SRIVASTAVA, SHIV; SESTERHENN, ISABELL A.; PATHMANATHAN, RAJADURAI; TAN, HUI MENG; TAN, SHYH-HAN; CHEONG, SOK CHING

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the erythroblast transformation-specific-related gene (ERG) oncoprotein due to transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2)-ERG fusion, the most prevalent genomic alteration in prostate cancer (CaP), is more frequently observed among Caucasian patients compared to patients of African or Asian descent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the prevalence of ERG alterations in a multiethnic cohort of CaP patients. A total of 191 formalin-fixed para...

  3. Expression of ERG Protein and TMRPSS2-ERG Fusion in Prostatic Carcinoma in Egyptian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdel-Hady

    2017-03-01

    CONCLUSION: Our findings emphasise that only malignant and pre-malignant cells and not benign cells from the prostate stain positive. ERG expression may offer a simpler, accurate and less costly alternative for evaluation of ERG fusion status in PCa.

  4. ETS-Associated Genomic Alterations including ETS2 Loss Markedly Affect Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Approximately half of all prostate cancers contain a fusion between two genes, TMPRSS2 and ERG , and a further half of these contain a deletion of...the 14 genes lying between TMPRSS2 and ERG . I have now performed a screen involving inhibition of each of these 14 genes, and am currently...validating whether one or more of these genes does indeed affect cellular proliferation in vitro and in vivo. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, TMPRSS2- ERG

  5. ERG oncoprotein expression in prostate carcinoma patients of different ethnicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Gregory M; Kong, Yink Heay; Dobi, Albert; Srivastava, Shiv; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai; Tan, Hui Meng; Tan, Shyh-Han; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the erythroblast transformation-specific-related gene (ERG) oncoprotein due to transmembrane protease, serine 2 ( TMPRSS2 ) -ERG fusion, the most prevalent genomic alteration in prostate cancer (CaP), is more frequently observed among Caucasian patients compared to patients of African or Asian descent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the prevalence of ERG alterations in a multiethnic cohort of CaP patients. A total of 191 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy specimens, collected from 120 patients treated at the Sime Darby Medical Centre, Subang Jaya, Malaysia, were analyzed for ERG protein expression by immunohistochemistry using the anti-ERG monoclonal antibody 9FY as a surrogate for the detection of ERG fusion events. The overall frequency of ERG protein expression in the population evaluated in this study was 39.2%. Although seemingly similar to rates reported in other Asian communities, the expression of ERG was distinct amongst different ethnic groups (P=0.004). Malaysian Indian (MI) patients exhibited exceedingly high expression of ERG in their tumors, almost doubling that of Malaysian Chinese (MC) patients, whereas ERG expression was very low amongst Malay patients (12.5%). When collectively analyzing data, we observed a significant correlation between younger patients and higher ERG expression (P=0.04). The prevalence of ERG expression was significantly different amongst CaP patients of different ethnicities. The higher number of ERG-expressing tumors among MI patients suggested that the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion may be particularly important in the pathogenesis of CaP amongst this group of patients. Furthermore, the more frequent expression of ERG among the younger patients analyzed suggested an involvement of ERG in the early onset of CaP. The results of this study underline the value of using ERG status to better understand the differences in the

  6. Evaluation of urinary prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG score changes when starting androgen-deprivation therapy with triptorelin 6-month formulation in patients with locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Schalken, Jack A; Cabri, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    change at 6 months, according to baseline variables. Other outcome measures included urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG scores and statuses, and serum testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 months after initiation of ADT. Safety was assessed by recording adverse......OBJECTIVE: To assess prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG scores in patients with advanced and metastatic prostate cancer at baseline and after 6 months of treatment with triptorelin 22.5 mg, and analyse these scores in patient-groups defined by different disease characteristics....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Triptocare study was a prospective, open-label, multicentre, single-arm, Phase III study of triptorelin 22.5 mg in men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, who were naïve to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). The primary objective was to model the urinary PCA3...

  7. Racial Differences in Prediction of Time to Prostate Cancer Diagnosis in a Prospective Screening Cohort of High-Risk Men: Effect of TMPRSS2 Met160Val

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Veda N.; Ruth, Karen; Hughes, Lucinda; Uzzo, Robert G.; Chen, David Y.T.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Viterbo, Rosalia; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion occurs in >50% of prostate tumors and has been associated with poor outcomes. The T-allele (Valine) of the Met160Val (rs12329760) in TMPRSS2 has been associated with this fusion. We evaluated this polymorphism with respect to self-identified race or ethnicity (SIRE), time to prostate cancer (PCA) diagnosis, and screening parameters in the Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment Program, a prospective screening program for high-risk men. Patients and Methods 631 men ages 35-69 years were studied. “High-risk” was defined as ≥ one first degree or two second degree relatives with PCA, any African American (AA) man regardless of familial PCA, and men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Men with elevated PSA or other indications for PCA underwent biopsy. Men were followed from time of study entry to PCA diagnosis. Cox models were used to evaluate time to PCA diagnosis by genotype. Results Genotype distribution differed significantly by SIRE (CT/TT vs. CC, p<0.0001). Among 183 Caucasian men with at least one follow-up visit, PCA was more than doubled in men carrying CT/TT vs CC genotypes (HR= 2.55, 95% CI=1.14-5.70) after controlling for age and PSA. No association was seen among AA men by TMPRSS2 genotype. Conclusions The T-allele of the Met160Val variant in TMPRSS2, which has been associated with the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, may be informative of time to PCA diagnosis for a subset of high-risk Caucasian men who are undergoing regular PCA screening. This variant along with other genetic markers warrant further study for personalizing PCA screening. PMID:20735386

  8. PASS Reference Set Application: Lin UW (2010) TMPRSS2-ERG-PCA-PASS — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active surveillance is used to manage low-risk prostate cancer. Both PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG are promising biomarkers that may be associated with aggressive disease. This study examines the correlation of these biomarkers with higher cancer volume and grade determined at the time of biopsy in an active surveillance cohort.

  9. A DNA methylation microarray-based study identifies ERG as a gene commonly methylated in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Jacob; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Gibbs, Angela; Gao, Lina; Corless, Christopher L; Jin, Jennifer; Zarour, Luai; Higano, Celestia; True, Lawrence D; Vessella, Robert L; Wilmot, Beth; Bottomly, Daniel; McWeeney, Shannon K; Bova, G Steven; Partin, Alan W; Mori, Motomi; Alumkal, Joshi

    2011-10-01

    DNA methylation of promoter regions is a common event in prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in men worldwide. Because prior reports demonstrating that DNA methylation is important in prostate cancer studied a limited number of genes, we systematically quantified the DNA methylation status of 1505 CpG dinucleotides for 807 genes in 78 paraffin-embedded prostate cancer samples and three normal prostate samples. The ERG gene, commonly repressed in prostate cells in the absence of an oncogenic fusion to the TMPRSS2 gene, was one of the most commonly methylated genes, occurring in 74% of prostate cancer specimens. In an independent group of patient samples, we confirmed that ERG DNA methylation was common, occurring in 57% of specimens, and cancer-specific. The ERG promoter is marked by repressive chromatin marks mediated by polycomb proteins in both normal prostate cells and prostate cancer cells, which may explain ERG's predisposition to DNA methylation and the fact that tumors with ERG DNA methylation were more methylated, in general. These results demonstrate that bead arrays offer a high-throughput method to discover novel genes with promoter DNA methylation such as ERG, whose measurement may improve our ability to more accurately detect prostate cancer.

  10. VEGFR-1 Overexpression Identifies a Small Subgroup of Aggressive Prostate Cancers in Patients Treated by Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Tsourlakis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The VEGFR-1 is suggested to promote tumor progression. In the current study we analyzed prevalence and prognostic impact of the VEGFR-1 by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing more than 3000 prostate cancer specimens. Results were compared to tumor phenotype, ETS-related gene (ERG status, and biochemical recurrence. Membranous VEGFR-1 expression was detectable in 32.6% of 2669 interpretable cancers and considered strong in 1.7%, moderate in 6.7% and weak in 24.2% of cases. Strong VEGFR-1 expression was associated with TMPRSS2:ERG fusion status as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and immunohistochemistry (p < 0.0001 each. Elevated VEGFR-1 expression was linked to high Gleason grade and advanced pT stage in TMPRSS2:ERG negative cancers (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.001, while these associations were absent in TMPRSS2:ERG positive cancers. VEGFR-1 expression was also linked to phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN deletions. A comparison with prostate specific antigen (PSA recurrence revealed that the 1.7% of prostate cancers with the highest VEGFR-1 levels had a strikingly unfavorable prognosis. This could be seen in all cancers, in the subsets of TMPRSS2:ERG positive or negative, PTEN deleted or undeleted carcinomas (p < 0.0001 each. High level VEGFR-1 expression is infrequent in prostate cancer, but identifies a subgroup of aggressive cancers, which may be candidates for anti-VEGFR-1 targeted therapy.

  11. Development of Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of the ERG Gene Fusion Product in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoju; Qiao, Yuanyuan; Asangani, Irfan A; Ateeq, Bushra; Poliakov, Anton; Cieślik, Marcin; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Chakravarthi, Balabhadrapatruni V S K; Cao, Xuhong; Jing, Xiaojun; Wang, Cynthia X; Apel, Ingrid J; Wang, Rui; Tien, Jean Ching-Yi; Juckette, Kristin M; Yan, Wei; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Shaomeng; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2017-04-10

    Transcription factors play a key role in the development of diverse cancers, and therapeutically targeting them has remained a challenge. In prostate cancer, the gene encoding the transcription factor ERG is recurrently rearranged and plays a critical role in prostate oncogenesis. Here, we identified a series of peptides that interact specifically with the DNA binding domain of ERG. ERG inhibitory peptides (EIPs) and derived peptidomimetics bound ERG with high affinity and specificity, leading to proteolytic degradation of the ERG protein. The EIPs attenuated ERG-mediated transcription, chromatin recruitment, protein-protein interactions, cell invasion and proliferation, and tumor growth. Thus, peptidomimetic targeting of transcription factor fusion products may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer as well as other malignancies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeted Radiosensitization of ETS Fusion-Positive Prostate Cancer through PARP1 Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumin Han

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ETS gene fusions, which result in overexpression of an ETS transcription factor, are considered driving mutations in approximately half of all prostate cancers. Dysregulation of ETS transcription factors is also known to exist in Ewing's sarcoma, breast cancer, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We previously discovered that ERG, the predominant ETS family member in prostate cancer, interacts with the DNA damage response protein poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 in human prostate cancer specimens. Therefore, we hypothesized that the ERG-PARP1 interaction may confer radiation resistance by increasing DNA repair efficiency and that this radio-resistance could be reversed through PARP1 inhibition. Using lentiviral approaches, we established isogenic models of ERG overexpression in PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. In both cell lines, ERG overexpression increased clonogenic survival following radiation by 1.25 (±0.07 fold (mean ± SEM and also resulted in increased PARP1 activity. PARP1 inhibition with olaparib preferentially radiosensitized ERG-positive cells by a factor of 1.52 (±0.03 relative to ERG-negative cells (P < .05. Neutral and alkaline COMET assays and immunofluorescence microscopy assessing γ-H2AX foci showed increased short- and long-term efficiencies of DNA repair, respectively, following radiation that was preferentially reversed by PARP1 inhibition. These findings were verified in an in vivo xenograft model. Our findings demonstrate that ERG overexpression confers radiation resistance through increased efficiency of DNA repair following radiation that can be reversed through inhibition of PARP1. These results motivate the use of PARP1 inhibitors as radiosensitizers in patients with localized ETS fusion-positive cancers.

  13. YK-4-279 inhibits ERG and ETV1 mediated prostate cancer cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Rahim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Genomic rearrangements involving the ETS family of transcription factors occur in 40-70% of prostate cancer cases. ERG and ETV1 are the most common ETS members observed in these genetic alterations. The high prevalence of these rearrangements and their biological significance represents a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer.We recently reported the development of YK-4-279, a small molecule inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 oncoprotein in Ewing's Sarcoma. Since ERG and ETV1 belong to the same class of ETS factors as FLI1, we tested the ability of YK-4-279 to inhibit biological functions of ERG and ETV1 proteins in prostate cancer. YK-4-279 inhibited ERG and ETV1 mediated transcriptional activity in a luciferase assay. YK-4-279 also decreased ERG and ETV1 downstream target mRNA and protein expression in ETV1-fusion positive LNCaP and ERG fusion positive VCaP cells. YK-4-279 reduced the motility of LNCaP cells in a scratch assay and the invasive phenotype of both LNCaP and VCaP cells in a HUVEC invasion assay. Fusion-negative PC3 cells were unresponsive to YK-4-279. SiRNA mediated ERG knockdown in VCaP cells resulted in a loss of drug responsiveness. Concurrently, transient ERG expression in PC-3 cells resulted in increased invasive potential, which was reduced by YK-4-279.These data demonstrate that YK-4-279 inhibits ERG and ETV1 biological activity in fusion-positive prostate cancer cells leading to decreased motility and invasion. Therefore, YK-4-279 may have an impact on metastasis in prostate cancer and it may be further evaluated for its clinical applications in prostate cancer in addition to Ewing's sarcoma.

  14. Targeting TMPRSS2 ERG in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    kinome library, using physiologic cell based assays of ERG activity. We made lentivirus expressing multiple shRNAs targeting each candidate 9...MDV3100 reverses the effect of R1881 (compare columns 2 and 3). Interestingly, PKCi inhibited a subset of androgen induced genes ( column 4...expenditures Nothing to report. Significant changes in use or care of human subjects, vertebrate animals, biohazards, and/or select agents Nothing to

  15. Early detection of clinically significant prostate cancer at diagnosis: a prospective study using a novel panel of TMPRSS2:ETS fusion gene markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Sam W.; Nguyen, Phuong-Nam; Violette, Philippe; Brimo, Fadi; Taguchi, Yosh; Aprikian, Armen; Chen, Junjian Z.

    2013-01-01

    We explore noninvasive clinical applications of multiple disease-specific fusion markers recently discovered in prostate cancer to predict the risk of cancer occurrence and aggressiveness at diagnosis. A total of 92 men who were prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screened and scheduled for diagnostic biopsy were enrolled for this study. Prospectively collected urine was blind coded for laboratory tests. RNA from urine sediments was analyzed using a panel of 6 TMPRSS2:ETS fusion markers with a sensitive quantitative PCR platform. The pathology reported 39 biopsy-positive cases from 92 patients (42.4%). In urine test, 10 unique combinations of fusion types were detected in 32 of 92 (34.8%) prebiopsy samples. A novel combination of fusion markers, termed Fx (III, IV, ETS), was identified with a sensitivity of 51.3% and an odds ratio of 10.1 in detecting cancer on biopsy. Incorporating a categorical variable of Fx (III, IV, ETS) with urine PCA3 and serum PSA, a regression model was developed to predict biopsy outcomes with an overall accuracy of 77%. Moreover, the overexpression of Fx (III, IV, or ETS) was shown to be an independent predictor to the high-grade cancer, with a predictive accuracy of 80% when coupled with PSA density. The individualized risk scores further stratified a high-risk group that is composed of 92% high-grade cancers and a low-risk group that harbors mainly clinically insignificant cancers. In conclusion, we have identified a novel combination of fusion types very specific to the clinically significant prostate cancer and developed effective regression models to predict biopsy outcomes and aggressive cancers at diagnosis

  16. Molecular assays for the detection of prostate tumor derived nucleic acids in peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinnunen Martin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in American men. Although serum PSA testing is widely used for early detection, more specific prognostic tests are needed to guide treatment decisions. Recently, the enumeration of circulating prostate epithelial cells has been shown to correlate with disease recurrence and metastasis following definitive treatment. The purpose of our study was to investigate an immunomagnetic fractionation procedure to enrich circulating prostate tumor cells (CTCs from peripheral blood specimens, and to apply amplified molecular assays for the detection of prostate-specific markers (PSA, PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion mRNAs. Results As few as five prostate cancer cells were detected per 5 mL of whole blood in model system experiments using anti-EpCAM magnetic particles alone or in combination with anti-PSMA magnetic particles. In our experiments, anti-EpCAM magnetic particles alone exhibited equivalent or better analytical performance with patient samples compared to a combination of anti-EpCAM + anti-PSMA magnetic particles. Up to 39% of men with advanced prostate cancer tested positive with one or more of the molecular assays tested, whereas control samples from men with benign prostate hyperplasia gave consistently negative results as expected. Interestingly, for the vast majority of men who tested positive for PSA mRNA following CTC enrichment, their matched plasma samples also tested positive, although CTC enrichment gave higher overall mRNA copy numbers. Conclusion CTCs were successfully enriched and detected in men with advanced prostate cancer using an immunomagnetic enrichment procedure coupled with amplified molecular assays for PSA, PCA3, and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion mRNAs. Our results indicate that men who test positive following CTC enrichment also exhibit higher detectable levels of non-cellular, circulating prostate-specific mRNAs.

  17. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer. A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    aim 2: Evaluate a panel of four-kallikrein plasma-based markers to determine the presence of or progression to clinically relevant prostate cancer...and sent to Genomic Health, Inc. for processing. Task 3: Analysis of scientific Aim 2: Evaluate a panel of four-kallikrein plasma-based markers to...site: FHCRC) PCA3 and the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion are prostate cancer-specific biomarkers that hold promise for stratifying risk in the setting of AS

  18. Frequent down-regulation of ABC transporter genes in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidenko, Rita; Razanauskas, Deividas; Daniunaite, Kristina; Lazutka, Juozas Rimantas; Jankevicius, Feliksas; Jarmalaite, Sonata

    2015-10-12

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins responsible for the efflux of a wide variety of substrates, including steroid metabolites, through the cellular membranes. For better characterization of the role of ABC transporters in prostate cancer (PCa) development, the profile of ABC transporter gene expression was analyzed in PCa and noncancerous prostate tissues (NPT). TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) human ABC transporter plates were used for the gene expression profiling in 10 PCa and 6 NPT specimens. ABCB1 transcript level was evaluated in a larger set of PCa cases (N = 78) and NPT (N = 15) by real-time PCR, the same PCa cases were assessed for the gene promoter hypermethylation by methylation-specific PCR. Expression of eight ABC transporter genes (ABCA8, ABCB1, ABCC6, ABCC9, ABCC10, ABCD2, ABCG2, and ABCG4) was significantly down-regulated in PCa as compared to NPT, and only two genes (ABCC4 and ABCG1) were up-regulated. Down-regulation of ABC transporter genes was prevalent in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative cases. A detailed analysis of ABCB1 expression confirmed TLDA results: a reduced level of the transcript was identified in PCa in comparison to NPT (p = 0.048). Moreover, the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative PCa cases showed significantly lower expression of ABCB1 in comparison to NPT (p = 0.003) or the fusion-positive tumors (p = 0.002). Promoter methylation of ABCB1 predominantly occurred in PCa and was rarely detected in NPT (p ABC transporter genes in PCa, especially in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative tumors.

  19. Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression defines a subset of locally advanced prostate cancer: Potential opportunities for synergistic targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udager, Aaron M; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Shi, Yang; Hicks, Jessica L; Cao, Xuhong; Siddiqui, Javed; Jiang, Hui; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent ERG gene fusions, the most common genetic alterations in prostate cancer, drive overexpression of the nuclear transcription factor ERG, and are early clonal events in prostate cancer progression. The nuclear transcription factor MYC is also frequently overexpressed in prostate cancer and may play a role in tumor initiation and/or progression. The relationship between nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression in prostate cancer, as well as the clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of ERG-positive/MYC high tumors, is not well understood. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ERG and MYC was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs), and nuclear staining was scored semi-quantitatively (IHC product score range = 0-300). Correlation between nuclear ERG and MYC protein expression and association with clinicopathologic parameters and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy was assessed. 29.1% of all tumor nodules showed concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression (i.e., ERG-positive/MYC high), including 35.0% of secondary nodules. Overall, there was weak positive correlation between ERG and MYC expression across all tumor nodules (rpb  = 0.149, P = 0.045), although this correlation was strongest in secondary nodules (rpb  = 0.520, P = 0.019). In radical prostatectomy specimens, ERG-positive/MYC high tumors were positively associated with the presence of extraprostatic extension (EPE), relative to all other ERG/MYC expression subgroups, however, there was no significant association between concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression and time to biochemical recurrence. Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression is common in prostate cancer and defines a subset of locally advanced tumors. Recent data indicates that BET bromodomain proteins regulate ERG gene fusion and MYC gene expression in prostate cancer, suggesting possible synergistic

  20. The prognostic value of SUMO1/Sentrin specific peptidase 1 (SENP1) in prostate cancer is limited to ERG-fusion positive tumors lacking PTEN deletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdelski, Christoph; Menan, Devi; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Kluth, Martina; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Melling, Nathaniel; Minner, Sarah; Koop, Christina; Graefen, Markus; Heinzer, Hans; Wittmer, Corinna; Sauter, Guido; Simon, Ronald; Schlomm, Thorsten; Steurer, Stefan; Krech, Till

    2015-01-01

    Posttranscriptional protein modification by SUMOylation plays an important role in tumor development and progression. In the current study we analyzed prevalence and prognostic impact of the de-SUMOylation enzyme SENP1 in prostate cancer. SENP1 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing more than 12,400 prostate cancer specimens. Results were compared to tumor phenotype, ERG status, genomic deletions of 3p, 5q, 6q and PTEN, and biochemical recurrence. SENP1 immunostaining was detectable in 34.5 % of 9,516 interpretable cancers and considered strong in 7.3 %, moderate in 14.9 % and weak in 12.3 % of cases. Strong SENP1 expression was linked to advanced pT stage (p < 0.0001), high Gleason grade (p < 0.0001), positive lymph node status (p = 0.0019), high pre-operative PSA levels (p = 0.0037), and PSA recurrence (p < 0.0001). SENP1 expression was strongly associated with positive ERG fusion status as determined by both in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry as well as with PTEN deletions. Detectable SENP1 immunostaining was found in 41 % of ERG positive and in 47 % of PTEN deleted cancers but in only 30 % of ERG negative and 30 % of PTEN non-deleted cancers (p < 0.0001 each). Deletions of 3p, 5q, and 6q were unrelated to SENP1 expression. Subset analyses revealed that the prognostic impact of SENP1 expression was solely driven by the subgroup of ERG positive, PTEN undeleted cancers. In this subgroup, the prognostic role of SENP1 expression was independent of the preoperative PSA level, tumor stage, Gleason grade, and the status of the resection margin. SENP1 expression has strong prognostic impact in a molecularly defined subset of cancers. This is per se not surprising as the biologic impact of each individual molecular event is likely to be dependent on its cellular environment. However, such findings challenge the concept of finding clinically relevant molecular signatures that are equally applicable to all

  1. Frequent down-regulation of ABC transporter genes in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidenko, Rita; Razanauskas, Deividas; Daniunaite, Kristina; Lazutka, Juozas Rimantas; Jankevicius, Feliksas; Jarmalaite, Sonata

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins responsible for the efflux of a wide variety of substrates, including steroid metabolites, through the cellular membranes. For better characterization of the role of ABC transporters in prostate cancer (PCa) development, the profile of ABC transporter gene expression was analyzed in PCa and noncancerous prostate tissues (NPT). TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) human ABC transporter plates were used for the gene expression profiling in 10 PCa and 6 NPT specimens. ABCB1 transcript level was evaluated in a larger set of PCa cases (N = 78) and NPT (N = 15) by real-time PCR, the same PCa cases were assessed for the gene promoter hypermethylation by methylation-specific PCR. Expression of eight ABC transporter genes (ABCA8, ABCB1, ABCC6, ABCC9, ABCC10, ABCD2, ABCG2, and ABCG4) was significantly down-regulated in PCa as compared to NPT, and only two genes (ABCC4 and ABCG1) were up-regulated. Down-regulation of ABC transporter genes was prevalent in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative cases. A detailed analysis of ABCB1 expression confirmed TLDA results: a reduced level of the transcript was identified in PCa in comparison to NPT (p = 0.048). Moreover, the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative PCa cases showed significantly lower expression of ABCB1 in comparison to NPT (p = 0.003) or the fusion-positive tumors (p = 0.002). Promoter methylation of ABCB1 predominantly occurred in PCa and was rarely detected in NPT (p < 0.001). The study suggests frequent down-regulation of the ABC transporter genes in PCa, especially in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative tumors. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1689-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  2. Overexpression of the A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase ADAM15 is linked to a Small but Highly Aggressive Subset of Prostate Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Burdelski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase (ADAM family of endopeptidases plays a role in many solid cancers and includes promising targets for anticancer therapies. Deregulation of ADAM15 has been linked to tumor aggressiveness and cell line studies suggest that ADAM15 overexpression may also be implicated in prostate cancer. To evaluate the impact of ADAM15 expression and its relationship with key genomic alterations, a tissue microarray containing 12,427 prostate cancers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. ADAM15 expression was compared to phenotype, prognosis and molecular features including TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and frequent deletions involving PTEN, 3p, 5q and 6q. Normal prostate epithelium did not show ADAM15 staining. In prostate cancers, negative, weak, moderate, and strong ADAM15 staining was found in 87.7%, 3.7%, 5.6%, and 3.0% of 9826 interpretable tumors. Strong ADAM15 staining was linked to high Gleason grade, advanced pathological tumor stage, positive nodal stage and resection margin. ADAM15 overexpression was also associated with TMPRSS2:ERG fusions and PTEN deletions (P < .0001 but unrelated to deletions of 3p, 5q and 6q. In univariate analysis, high ADAM15 expression was strongly linked to PSA recurrence (P < .0001. However, in multivariate analyses this association was only maintained if the analysis was limited to preoperatively available parameters in ERG-negative cancers. The results of our study demonstrate that ADAM15 is strongly up regulated in a small but highly aggressive fraction of prostate cancers. In these tumors, ADAM15 may represent a suitable drug target. In a preoperative scenario, ADAM15 expression measurement may assist prognosis assessment, either alone or in combination with other markers.

  3. Estrogen receptor signaling in prostate cancer: Implications for carcinogenesis and tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonkhoff, Helmut

    2018-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the classical target for prostate cancer prevention and treatment, but more recently estrogens and their receptors have also been implicated in prostate cancer development and tumor progression. Recent experimental and clinical data were reviewed to elucidate pathogenetic mechanisms how estrogens and their receptors may affect prostate carcinogenesis and tumor progression. The estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is the most prevalent ER in the human prostate, while the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is restricted to basal cells of the prostatic epithelium and stromal cells. In high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), the ERα is up-regulated and most likely mediates carcinogenic effects of estradiol as demonstrated in animal models. The partial loss of the ERβ in HGPIN indicates that the ERβ acts as a tumor suppressor. The tumor promoting function of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, a major driver of prostate carcinogenesis, is triggered by the ERα and repressed by the ERβ. The ERβ is generally retained in hormone naïve and metastatic prostate cancer, but is partially lost in castration resistant disease. The progressive emergence of the ERα and ERα-regulated genes (eg, progesterone receptor (PR), PS2, TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, and NEAT1) during prostate cancer progression and hormone refractory disease suggests that these tumors can bypass the AR by using estrogens and progestins for their growth. In addition, nongenomic estrogen signaling pathways mediated by orphan receptors (eg, GPR30 and ERRα) has also been implicated in prostate cancer progression. Increasing evidences demonstrate that local estrogen signaling mechanisms are required for prostate carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Despite the recent progress in this research topic, the translation of the current information into potential therapeutic applications remains highly challenging and clearly warrants further investigation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Chemical biology drug sensitivity screen identifies sunitinib as synergistic agent with disulfiram in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Ketola

    Full Text Available Current treatment options for castration- and treatment-resistant prostate cancer are limited and novel approaches are desperately needed. Our recent results from a systematic chemical biology sensitivity screen covering most known drugs and drug-like molecules indicated that aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor disulfiram is one of the most potent cancer-specific inhibitors of prostate cancer cell growth, including TMPRSS2-ERG fusion positive cancers. However, the results revealed that disulfiram alone does not block tumor growth in vivo nor induce apoptosis in vitro, indicating that combinatorial approaches may be required to enhance the anti-neoplastic effects.In this study, we utilized a chemical biology drug sensitivity screen to explore disulfiram mechanistic details and to identify compounds potentiating the effect of disulfiram in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion positive prostate cancer cells. In total, 3357 compounds including current chemotherapeutic agents as well as drug-like small molecular compounds were screened alone and in combination with disulfiram. Interestingly, the results indicated that androgenic and antioxidative compounds antagonized disulfiram effect whereas inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinase, proteasome, topoisomerase II, glucosylceramide synthase or cell cycle were among compounds sensitizing prostate cancer cells to disulfiram. The combination of disulfiram and an antiangiogenic agent sunitinib was studied in more detail, since both are already in clinical use in humans. Disulfiram-sunitinib combination induced apoptosis and reduced androgen receptor protein expression more than either of the compounds alone. Moreover, combinatorial exposure reduced metastatic characteristics such as cell migration and 3D cell invasion as well as induced epithelial differentiation shown as elevated E-cadherin expression.Taken together, our results propose novel combinatorial approaches to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth. Disulfiram

  5. PCA3 Reference Set Application: T2-Erg-Martin Sanda-Emory (2014) — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    We hypothesize that combining T2:erg (T2:erg) fusion and PCA3 detection in urine collected after digital rectal exam can improve the specificity of identifying clinically significant prostate cancer presence over the standard PSA and DRE. To address this hypothesis we propose to validate the performance of the urinary T2:erg in a multiplex model predicting the diagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancer on subsequent prostate biopsy using post-DRE pre biopsy urine specimens from a cohort of 900 men on the EDRN’s PCA3 trial.

  6. ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    phenotype  in   preclinical  models  of  prostate  cancer,  2)  to  explore  the  mechanism  of  interaction  between   ERG  (the  predominant  ETS...established  this  axis  as  a  potential  therapeutic   target.         15. SUBJECT  TERMS Prostate cancer, ETS gene fusions, ERG , radiation resistance, DNA...interaction  between   ERG   (the   predominant   ETS   gene   fusion   product)   and   the   DNA   repair   protein   DNA-­PK,   and   3)   to

  7. Prostate Cancer Detection and Prognosis: From Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) to Exosomal Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filella, Xavier; Foj, Laura

    2016-10-26

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) remains the most used biomarker in the management of early prostate cancer (PCa), in spite of the problems related to false positive results and overdiagnosis. New biomarkers have been proposed in recent years with the aim of increasing specificity and distinguishing aggressive from non-aggressive PCa. The emerging role of the prostate health index and the 4Kscore is reviewed in this article. Both are blood-based tests related to the aggressiveness of the tumor, which provide the risk of suffering PCa and avoiding negative biopsies. Furthermore, the use of urine has emerged as a non-invasive way to identify new biomarkers in recent years, including the PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene. Available results about the PCA3 score showed its usefulness to decide the repetition of biopsy in patients with a previous negative result, although its relationship with the aggressiveness of the tumor is controversial. More recently, aberrant microRNA expression in PCa has been reported by different authors. Preliminary results suggest the utility of circulating and urinary microRNAs in the detection and prognosis of PCa. Although several of these new biomarkers have been recommended by different guidelines, large prospective and comparative studies are necessary to establish their value in PCa detection and prognosis.

  8. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    biomarkers; prediction models; PCA3; TMPRSS2: ERG ; kallikreins; 4KScore; OncotypeDX; 5 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS What were the major goals and...urine, alone or in combination with TMPRSS2: ERG mRNA. (Lead site: FHCRC) Milestone 10. Urine specimens identified for analysis. Due 12/30/2014...COMPLETED Milestone 11. PCA3 and TMPRSS2: ERG validation complete in PASS cohort. Due 12/30/2015 Milestone 12. Manuscript submission of PCA3 and TMPRSS2: ERG

  9. Developing a PTEN-ERG Signature to Improve Molecular Risk Stratification in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0737 TITLE: Developing a PTEN-ERG Signature to Improve Molecular Risk Stratification in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Developing a PTEN-ERG Signature to Improve Molecular Risk Stratification in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...that there exist distinctive molecular correlates of PTEN loss in the context of ETS-negative versus ETS-positive human prostate cancers and that

  10. Developing a PTEN-ERG Signature to Improve Molecular Risk Stratification in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    performed exploratory data analysis on all clinically annotated prostate cancer datasets available from the public domain and through the collaboration...with GenomeDX. We used statistical summaries and data visualizations techniques (e.g., principal component analysis , hierarchical clustering) to...associated with PTEN loss on genetically homogeneous ERG-positive and ERG- negative backgrounds. Timeline (Months) Major Task 2: Perform CAGE analysis

  11. Androgen Metabolism in Progression to Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    described CRPC bone marrow metastases (8), we detected TMPRSS2:ERG transcripts (TMPRSS2 exon 2-ERG exon 4) in 11 of 29 cases. Affymetrix oligonucleotide...and immunoblotted. B, RT-PCR for ERG ( exon 9/10), TMPRSS2 ( exon 5/6), and PSA mRNA after DHT stimulation. C, cells in CSS medium treated with DHT and...therapeutic index CYP3A4 sub- strates were excluded. The treatment was ketoconazole 400 mg orally thrice daily, hydro- cortisone (30 mg/AM and 10 mg/PM

  12. Functional Characterization of the Protein Product of the Prostate Carcinoma Gene Fusion TMPRSS2:ERG Using the Proteomic and Microarray Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    AD_________________ ( Leave blank) Award Number: W81XWH-08-1-0048 TITLE: Functional... Guava ™ FACS analyzer with the ViaCount™ kit (Millipore). As shown in Fig. 7, VCaP cells infected with ERG or ERGa once again failed to proliferate...and the cell numbers in each series were determined using the Guava ViaCount™ kit. Average values of the triplicate samples are shown. Milestone

  13. Molecular pathology of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazares, L H; Drake, R R; Esquela-Kirscher, A; Lance, R S; Semmes, O J; Troyer, D A

    2010-01-01

    This chapter includes discussion of the molecular pathology of tissue, blood, urine, and expressed prostatic secretions. Because we are unable to reliably image the disease in vivo, a 12 core method that oversamples the peripheral zone is widely used. This generates large numbers of cores that need to be carefully processed and sampled. In spite of the large number of tissue cores, the amount of tumor available for study is often quite limited. This is a particular challenge for research, as new biomarker assays will need to preserve tissue architecture intact for histopathology. Methods of processing and reporting pathology are discussed. With the exception of ductal variants, recognized subtypes of prostate cancer are largely confined to research applications, and most prostate cancers are acinar. Biomarker discovery in urine and expressed prostatic secretions would be useful since these are readily obtained and are proximate fluids. The well-known challenges of biomarker discovery in blood and urine are referenced and discussed. Mediators of carcinogenesis can serve as biomarkers as exemplified by mutations in PTEN and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion. The use of proteomics in biomarker discovery with an emphasis on imaging mass spectroscopy of tissues is discussed. Small RNAs are of great interest, however, their usefulness as biomarkers in clinical decision making remains the subject of ongoing research. The chapter concludes with an overview of blood biomarkers such as circulating nucleic acids and tumor cells and bound/free isoforms of prostate specific antigen (PSA).

  14. TMPRSS12 Is an Activating Protease for Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bingling; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Yongzhen; Guan, Xiaolu; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-12-15

    The entry of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) into host cells initially requires the fusion of viral and cell membranes, which is exclusively mediated by fusion (F) protein. Proteolysis of aMPV F protein by endogenous proteases of host cells allows F protein to induce membrane fusion; however, these proteases have not been identified. Here, we provide the first evidence that the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS12 facilitates the cleavage of subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F protein. We found that overexpression of TMPRSS12 enhanced aMPV/B F protein cleavage, F protein fusogenicity, and viral replication. Subsequently, knockdown of TMPRSS12 with specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) reduced aMPV/B F protein cleavage, F protein fusogenicity, and viral replication. We also found a cleavage motif in the aMPV/B F protein (amino acids 100 and 101) that was recognized by TMPRSS12. The histidine, aspartic acid, and serine residue (HDS) triad of TMPRSS12 was shown to be essential for the proteolysis of aMPV/B F protein via mutation analysis. Notably, we observed TMPRSS12 mRNA expression in target organs of aMPV/B in chickens. Overall, our results indicate that TMPRSS12 is crucial for aMPV/B F protein proteolysis and aMPV/B infectivity and that TMPRSS12 may serve as a target for novel therapeutics and prophylactics for aMPV. Proteolysis of the aMPV F protein is a prerequisite for F protein-mediated membrane fusion of virus and cell and for aMPV infection; however, the proteases used in vitro and vivo are not clear. A combination of analyses, including overexpression, knockdown, and mutation methods, demonstrated that the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS12 facilitated cleavage of subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F protein. Importantly, we located the motif in the aMPV/B F protein recognized by TMPRSS12 and the catalytic triad in TMPRSS12 that facilitated proteolysis of the aMPV/B F protein. This is the first report on TMPRSS12 as a protease for proteolysis of viral envelope

  15. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Screening and New Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer (PCa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Carsten; Rittenhouse, Harry; Hu, Xinhai; Cammann, Henning; Jung, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    PSA screening reduces PCa-mortality but the disadvantages overdiagnosis and overtreatment require multivariable risk-prediction tools to select appropriate treatment or active surveillance. This review explains the differences between the two largest screening trials and discusses the drawbacks of screening and its meta-analysisxs. The current American and European screening strategies are described. Nonetheless, PSA is one of the most widely used tumor markers and strongly correlates with the risk of harboring PCa. However, while PSA has limitations for PCa detection with its low specificity there are several potential biomarkers presented in this review with utility for PCa currently being studied. There is an urgent need for new biomarkers especially to detect clinically significant and aggressive PCa. From all PSA-based markers, the FDA-approved prostate health index (phi) shows improved specificity over percent free and total PSA. Another kallikrein panel, 4K, which includes KLK2 has recently shown promise in clinical research studies but has not yet undergone formal validation studies. In urine, prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) has also been validated and approved by the FDA for its utility to detect PCa. The potential correlation of PCA3 with cancer aggressiveness requires more clinical studies. The detection of the fusion of androgen-regulated genes with genes of the regulatory transcription factors in tissue of (~)50% of all PCa-patients is a milestone in PCa research. A combination of the urinary assays for TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion and PCA3 shows an improved accuracy for PCa detection. Overall, the field of PCa biomarker discovery is very exciting and prospective.

  16. Tumor Repression of VCaP Xenografts by a Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide

    OpenAIRE

    Hargrove, Amanda E.; Martinez, Thomas F.; Hare, Alissa A.; Kurmis, Alexis A.; Phillips, John W.; Sud, Sudha; Pienta, Kenneth J; Dervan, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im) polyamides are high affinity DNA-binding small molecules that can inhibit protein-DNA interactions. In VCaP cells, a human prostate cancer cell line overexpressing both AR and the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion, an androgen response element (ARE)-targeted Py-Im polyamide significantly downregulates AR driven gene expression. Polyamide exposure to VCaP cells reduced proliferation without causing DNA damage. Py-Im polyamide treatment also reduced tumor growth in a VCaP mouse ...

  17. Clonal Evaluation of Prostate Cancer by ERG/SPINK1 Status to Improve Prognosis Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    19 NIH Exploiting drivers of androgen receptor signaling negative prostate cancer for precision medicine Goal(s): Identify novel potential drivers...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0466 TITLE: Clonal evaluation of prostate cancer by ERG/SPINK1 status to improve prognosis prediction PRINCIPAL...Sept 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Clonal Evaluation of Prostate Cancer by ERG/SPINK1 Status to Improve Prognosis Prediction 5b

  18. T2*-weighted image/T2-weighted image fusion in postimplant dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Norihisa; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Yoshio, Kotaro

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fusion is considered to be the best method for postimplant dosimetry of permanent prostate brachytherapy; however, it is inconvenient and costly. In T2 * -weighted image (T2 * -WI), seeds can be easily detected without the use of an intravenous contrast material. We present a novel method for postimplant dosimetry using T2 * -WI/T2-weighted image (T2-WI) fusion. We compared the outcomes of T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based and CT/T2-WI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry. Between April 2008 and July 2009, 50 consecutive prostate cancer patients underwent brachytherapy. All the patients were treated with 144 Gy of brachytherapy alone. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters (prostate D90, prostate V100, prostate V150, urethral D10, and rectal D2cc) were prospectively compared between T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based and CT/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry. All the DVH parameters estimated by T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry strongly correlated to those estimated by CT/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry (0.77≤ R ≤0.91). No significant difference was observed in these parameters between the two methods, except for prostate V150 (p=0.04). These results show that T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry is comparable or superior to MRI-based dosimetry as previously reported, because no intravenous contrast material is required. For some patients, rather large differences were observed in the value between the 2 methods. We thought these large differences were a result of seed miscounts in T2 * -WI and shifts in fusion. Improving the image quality of T2 * -WI and the image acquisition speed of T2 * -WI and T2-WI may decrease seed miscounts and fusion shifts. Therefore, in the future, T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion may be more useful for postimplant dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy. (author)

  19. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Screening and New Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer (PCa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Harry; Hu, Xinhai; Cammann, Henning; Jung, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Abstract PSA screening reduces PCa-mortality but the disadvantages overdiagnosis and overtreatment require multivariable risk-prediction tools to select appropriate treatment or active surveillance. This review explains the differences between the two largest screening trials and discusses the drawbacks of screening and its meta-analysisxs. The current American and European screening strategies are described. Nonetheless, PSA is one of the most widely used tumor markers and strongly correlates with the risk of harboring PCa. However, while PSA has limitations for PCa detection with its low specificity there are several potential biomarkers presented in this review with utility for PCa currently being studied. There is an urgent need for new biomarkers especially to detect clinically significant and aggressive PCa. From all PSA-based markers, the FDA-approved prostate health index (phi) shows improved specificity over percent free and total PSA. Another kallikrein panel, 4K, which includes KLK2 has recently shown promise in clinical research studies but has not yet undergone formal validation studies. In urine, prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) has also been validated and approved by the FDA for its utility to detect PCa. The potential correlation of PCA3 with cancer aggressiveness requires more clinical studies. The detection of the fusion of androgen-regulated genes with genes of the regulatory transcription factors in tissue of ~50% of all PCa-patients is a milestone in PCa research. A combination of the urinary assays for TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion and PCA3 shows an improved accuracy for PCa detection. Overall, the field of PCa biomarker discovery is very exciting and prospective. PMID:27683457

  20. Evaluation of ERG and SPINK1 by Immunohistochemical Staining and Clinicopathological Outcomes in a Multi-Institutional Radical Prostatectomy Cohort of 1067 Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Brooks

    Full Text Available Distinguishing between patients with early stage, screen detected prostate cancer who must be treated from those that can be safely watched has become a major issue in prostate cancer care. Identification of molecular subtypes of prostate cancer has opened the opportunity for testing whether biomarkers that characterize these subtypes can be used as biomarkers of prognosis. Two established molecular subtypes are identified by high expression of the ERG oncoprotein, due to structural DNA alterations that encode for fusion transcripts in approximately ½ of prostate cancers, and over-expression of SPINK1, which is purportedly found only in ERG-negative tumors. We used a multi-institutional prostate cancer tissue microarray constructed from radical prostatectomy samples with associated detailed clinical data and with rigorous selection of recurrent and non-recurrent cases to test the prognostic value of immunohistochemistry staining results for the ERG and SPINK1 proteins. In univariate analysis, ERG positive cases (419/1067; 39% were associated with lower patient age, pre-operative serum PSA levels, lower Gleason scores (≤ 3+4=7 and improved recurrence free survival (RFS. On multivariate analysis, ERG status was not correlated with RFS, disease specific survival (DSS or overall survival (OS. High-level SPINK1 protein expression (33/1067 cases; 3% was associated with improved RFS on univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Over-expression of either protein was not associated with clinical outcome. While expression of ERG and SPINK1 proteins was inversely correlated, it was not mutually exclusive since 3 (0.28% cases showed high expression of both. While ERG and SPINK1 appear to identify discrete molecular subtypes of prostate cancer, only high expression of SPINK1 was associated with improved clinical outcome. However, by themselves, neither ERG nor SPINK1 appear to be useful biomarkers for prognostication of early stage prostate

  1. Evaluation of ERG and SPINK1 by Immunohistochemical Staining and Clinicopathological Outcomes in a Multi-Institutional Radical Prostatectomy Cohort of 1067 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, James D; Wei, Wei; Hawley, Sarah; Auman, Heidi; Newcomb, Lisa; Boyer, Hilary; Fazli, Ladan; Simko, Jeff; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Troyer, Dean A; Carroll, Peter R; Gleave, Martin; Lance, Raymond; Lin, Daniel W; Nelson, Peter S; Thompson, Ian M; True, Lawrence D; Feng, Ziding; McKenney, Jesse K

    2015-01-01

    Distinguishing between patients with early stage, screen detected prostate cancer who must be treated from those that can be safely watched has become a major issue in prostate cancer care. Identification of molecular subtypes of prostate cancer has opened the opportunity for testing whether biomarkers that characterize these subtypes can be used as biomarkers of prognosis. Two established molecular subtypes are identified by high expression of the ERG oncoprotein, due to structural DNA alterations that encode for fusion transcripts in approximately ½ of prostate cancers, and over-expression of SPINK1, which is purportedly found only in ERG-negative tumors. We used a multi-institutional prostate cancer tissue microarray constructed from radical prostatectomy samples with associated detailed clinical data and with rigorous selection of recurrent and non-recurrent cases to test the prognostic value of immunohistochemistry staining results for the ERG and SPINK1 proteins. In univariate analysis, ERG positive cases (419/1067; 39%) were associated with lower patient age, pre-operative serum PSA levels, lower Gleason scores (≤ 3+4=7) and improved recurrence free survival (RFS). On multivariate analysis, ERG status was not correlated with RFS, disease specific survival (DSS) or overall survival (OS). High-level SPINK1 protein expression (33/1067 cases; 3%) was associated with improved RFS on univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Over-expression of either protein was not associated with clinical outcome. While expression of ERG and SPINK1 proteins was inversely correlated, it was not mutually exclusive since 3 (0.28%) cases showed high expression of both. While ERG and SPINK1 appear to identify discrete molecular subtypes of prostate cancer, only high expression of SPINK1 was associated with improved clinical outcome. However, by themselves, neither ERG nor SPINK1 appear to be useful biomarkers for prognostication of early stage prostate cancer.

  2. Interracial differences in prostate cancer progression among patients from the United States, China and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhau, Haiyen E; Li, Qinlong; Chung, Leland W K

    2013-11-01

    Although previous studies indicate interracial differences in prostate cancer epidemiology based on gene expression profiles among patients from the United States, China and Japan, evidence at the genetic and phenotypic levels that these differences exist and manifest along ethnic lines has been sparse. Recent studies, however, suggest that genetic differences, such as the lower incidence of Chinese prostate cancers harboring TMPRSS2-ERG translocations compared to patients from Western countries, should be carefully considered in the context of genotypic and phenotypic differences among interracial groups. New, more efficient technologies need to be developed to validate genetic, gene expression and/or phenotypic differences associated with prostate cancer tissue specimens obtained from interracial groups, to establish reliable clinical standards that take racial/ethnic data into account to improve the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of patients with prostate cancer.

  3. Analysis list: Erg [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Erg Blood,Prostate + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Erg.1.tsv http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Erg.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyus...hu-u/mm9/target/Erg.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Erg.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchiv...e.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Erg.Prostate.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Blood.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Prostate.gml ...

  4. ERG protein expression over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Brasso, Klaus; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: We evaluated the consistency in ERG protein expression from diagnostic specimens through rebiopsies to radical prostatectomies in patients with clinically localised prostate cancer to investigate the validity of ERG status in biopsies. METHODS: ERG expression was assessed by immunohistochem......AIMS: We evaluated the consistency in ERG protein expression from diagnostic specimens through rebiopsies to radical prostatectomies in patients with clinically localised prostate cancer to investigate the validity of ERG status in biopsies. METHODS: ERG expression was assessed...

  5. Diagnostic Value of ERG in Prostate Needle Biopsies Containing Minute Cancer Foci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachurska Svitlana Y.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate carcinoma (PC is the second most diagnosed cancer in men population worldwide. The small amount of the tissue in prostate needle biopsy is often sufficient for the correct interpretation. Novel antibodies, as ERG, could add to the diagnostic value of IHC study in analysing difficult core biopsies.

  6. The predictive value of ERG protein expression for development of castration-resistant prostate cancer in hormone-naïve advanced prostate cancer treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin A; Thomsen, Frederik B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomarkers predicting response to primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and risk of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is lacking. We aimed to analyse the predictive value of ERG expression for development of CRPC. METHODS: In total, 194 patients with advanced and....../or metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with first-line castration-based ADT were included. ERG protein expression was analysed in diagnostic specimens using immunohistochemistry (anti-ERG, EPR3864). Time to CRPC was compared between ERG subgroups using multiple cause-specific Cox regression stratified......-negative group, respectively. Compared to a model omitting ERG-status, the ERG-stratified model showed comparable AUC values 1 year (77.6% vs. 78.0%, P = 0.82), 2 years (71.7% vs. 71.8%, P = 0.85), 5 years (68.5% vs. 69.9%, P = 0.32), and 8 years (67.9% vs. 71.4%, P = 0.21) from ADT initiation. No differences...

  7. Immunohistochemical expression of Ets-related gene-transcriptional factor in adenocarcinoma prostate and its correlation with Gleason score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Mannan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate carcinoma is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in males worldwide. The burden is expected to grow 1.7 million new cases and 499,000 new deaths by 2030. In developing countries such as India, prostate carcinoma will show an increase by 140% in the next few years. Although the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma can usually be made on histological features, now a days many immunohistochemical (IHC markers are used to distinguish it from benign mimickers as well as in predicting prognosis and treatment. Out of these markers, Ets-related gene (ERG product is a proto-oncogene which participates in chromosomal translocations and is frequently over expressed in prostate carcinoma which harbors ERG-transmembrane protease, serine 2 fusion. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases of carcinoma prostate diagnosed in needle biopsies and prostatic chips, in the Department of Pathology of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Punjab, India, were included in the present study. The slides were observed under the light microscope, and Gleason scoring was done using the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology modified Gleason system. IHC study for ERG expression was done on all the cases, for which anti-ERG monoclonal rabbit clone antibody EP111 (Dako, Denmark was used. Lymphocytes and endothelial cells were taken as in built positive controls for staining. The intensity of ERG positivity was scored as no staining (0, weak staining (+1, moderate staining (+2 and intense staining (+3. The H score was then calculated by multiplying the intensity of the stain with the percentage (0-100 of the cells showing that staining intensity. The H-score has a range of 0-300. The relationship between IHC expression and clinico-pathological parameters was compared and analyzed using Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Majority of patients included in the study were in the age group of 61-80 (84% of the

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of Ets-related gene-transcriptional factor in adenocarcinoma prostate and its correlation with Gleason score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, Rahul; Bhasin, Tejinder Singh; Manjari, Mridu; Singh, Gagandeep; Bhatia, Puneet Kaur; Sharma, Sonam

    2016-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in males worldwide. The burden is expected to grow 1.7 million new cases and 499,000 new deaths by 2030. In developing countries such as India, prostate carcinoma will show an increase by 140% in the next few years. Although the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma can usually be made on histological features, now a days many immunohistochemical (IHC) markers are used to distinguish it from benign mimickers as well as in predicting prognosis and treatment. Out of these markers, Ets-related gene (ERG product) is a proto-oncogene which participates in chromosomal translocations and is frequently over expressed in prostate carcinoma which harbors ERG-transmembrane protease, serine 2 fusion. Fifty cases of carcinoma prostate diagnosed in needle biopsies and prostatic chips, in the Department of Pathology of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Punjab, India, were included in the present study. The slides were observed under the light microscope, and Gleason scoring was done using the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology modified Gleason system. IHC study for ERG expression was done on all the cases, for which anti-ERG monoclonal rabbit clone antibody EP111 (Dako, Denmark) was used. Lymphocytes and endothelial cells were taken as in built positive controls for staining. The intensity of ERG positivity was scored as no staining (0), weak staining (+1), moderate staining (+2) and intense staining (+3). The H score was then calculated by multiplying the intensity of the stain with the percentage (0-100) of the cells showing that staining intensity. The H-score has a range of 0-300. The relationship between IHC expression and clinico-pathological parameters was compared and analyzed using Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Majority of patients included in the study were in the age group of 61-80 (84% of the total). When ERG expression was studied with age

  9. Emerging biomarkers in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filella X

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Xavier Filella, Esther Fernández-Galan, Rosa Fernández Bonifacio, Laura Foj Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (CDB, Hospital Clínic, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain Abstract: Prostate cancer (PCa is the second most common cancer in men worldwide. A large proportion of PCa are latent, never destined to progress or affect the patients’ life. It is of utmost importance to identify which PCa are destined to progress and which would benefit from an early radical treatment. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA remains the most used test to detect PCa. Its limited specificity and an elevated rate of overdiagnosis are the main problems associated with PSA testing. New PCa biomarkers have been proposed to improve the accuracy of PSA in the management of early PCa. Commercially available biomarkers such as PCA3 score, Prostate Health Index (PHI, and the four-kallikrein panel are used with the purpose of reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies and providing information related to the aggressiveness of the tumor. The relationship with PCa aggressiveness seems to be confirmed by PHI and the four-kallikrein panel, but not by the PCA3 score. In this review, we also summarize new promising biomarkers, such as PSA glycoforms, TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene, microRNAs, circulating tumor cells, androgen receptor variants, and PTEN gene. All these emerging biomarkers could change the management of early PCa, offering more accurate results than PSA. Nonetheless, large prospective studies comparing these new biomarkers among them are required to know their real value in PCa detection and prognosis. Keywords: prostate cancer, PSA, PHI, four-kallikrein panel, PCA3, miRNAs

  10. Analysis list: ERG [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ERG Blood,Breast,Prostate + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/ta...rget/ERG.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ERG.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscienced...bc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ERG.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ERG.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ERG.Breast.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ERG.Prostate.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/B

  11. The diet as a cause of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, William G; Demarzo, Angelo M; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic prostate inflammation and prostate cancer have reached epidemic proportions among men in the developed world. Animal model studies implicate dietary carcinogens, such as the heterocyclic amines from over-cooked meats and sex steroid hormones, particularly estrogens, as candidate etiologies for prostate cancer. Each acts by causing epithelial cell damage, triggering an inflammatory response that can evolve into a chronic or recurrent condition. This milieu appears to spawn proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) lesions, a type of focal atrophy that represents the earliest of prostate cancer precursor lesions. Rare PIA lesions contain cells which exhibit high c-Myc expression, shortened telomere segments, and epigenetic silencing of genes such as GSTP1, encoding the π-class glutathione S-transferase, all characteristic of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer. Subsequent genetic changes, such as the gene translocations/deletions that generate fusion transcripts between androgen-regulated genes (such as TMPRSS2) and genes encoding ETS family transcription factors (such as ERG1), arise in PIN lesions and may promote invasiveness characteristic of prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. Lethal prostate cancers contain markedly corrupted genomes and epigenomes. Epigenetic silencing, which seems to arise in response to the inflamed microenvironment generated by dietary carcinogens and/or estrogens as part of an epigenetic "catastrophe" affecting hundreds of genes, persists to drive clonal evolution through metastatic dissemination. The cause of the initial epigenetic "catastrophe" has not been determined but likely involves defective chromatin structure maintenance by over-exuberant DNA methylation or histone modification. With dietary carcinogens and estrogens driving pro-carcinogenic inflammation in the developed world, it is tempting to speculate that dietary components associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, such as intake of

  12. Up-regulation of mismatch repair genes MSH6, PMS2 and MLH1 parallels development of genetic instability and is linked to tumor aggressiveness and early PSA recurrence in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczak, Waldemar; Rashed, Semin; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Kluth, Martina; Simon, Ronald; Büscheck, Franziska; Clauditz, Till Sebastian; Grupp, Katharina; Minner, Sarah; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Möller-Koop, Christina; Graefen, Markus; Adam, Meike; Haese, Alexander; Wittmer, Corinna; Sauter, Guido; Izbicki, Jakob Robert; Huland, Hartwig; Schlomm, Thorsten; Steurer, Stefan; Krech, Till; Lebok, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is integral to the maintenance of genetic stability. We aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of MMR gene expression in prostate cancer. The MMR genes MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing 11152 prostate cancer specimens. Results were compared with ETS-related gene status and deletions of PTEN, 3p13, 5q21 and 6q15. MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2 expression was detectable in 89.5%, 85.4% and 85.0% of cancers and was particularly strong in cancers with advanced pathological tumor stage (P < 0.0001 each), high Gleason grade (P < 0.0001 each), nodal metastasis (P ≤ 0.0083) and early biochemical recurrence (P < 0.0001). High levels of MMR gene expression paralleled features of genetic instability, such as the number of genomic deletions per cancer; strong expression of all three MMR genes was found in 24%, 29%, 30%, 33% and 42% of cancers with no, one, two, three or four to five deletions (P < 0.0001). The prognostic value of the analyzed MMR genes was largely driven by the subset of cancers lacking ERG fusion (P < 0.0001), while the prognostic impact of MMR gene overexpression was only marginal in ERG-positive cancers. Multivariate analyses suggested an independent prognostic relevance of MMR genes in ERG-negative prostate cancers when compared with prognostic parameters available at the time of initial biopsy. In conclusion, MMR overexpression is common in prostate cancer and is linked to poor outcome as well as features indicating genetic instability. ERG fusion should be analyzed along with MMR gene expression in potential clinical tests. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Changes in cortical cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix gene expression in prostate cancer are related to oncogenic ERG deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Wolfgang A; Ingenwerth, Marc; Djuidje, Carolle E; Hader, Christiane; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Engers, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The cortical cytoskeleton network connects the actin cytoskeleton to various membrane proteins, influencing cell adhesion, polarity, migration and response to extracellular signals. Previous studies have suggested changes in the expression of specific components in prostate cancer, especially of 4.1 proteins (encoded by EPB41 genes) which form nodes in this network. Expression of EPB41L1, EPB41L2, EPB41L3 (protein: 4.1B), EPB41L4B (EHM2), EPB41L5, EPB49 (dematin), VIL2 (ezrin), and DLG1 (summarized as „cortical cytoskeleton' genes) as well as ERG was measured by quantitative RT-PCR in a well-characterized set of 45 M0 prostate adenocarcinoma and 13 benign tissues. Hypermethylation of EPB41L3 and GSTP1 was compared in 93 cancer tissues by methylation-specific PCR. Expression of 4.1B was further studied by immunohistochemistry. EPB41L1 and EPB41L3 were significantly downregulated and EPB41L4B was upregulated in cancer tissues. Low EPB41L1 or high EPB41L4B expression were associated with earlier biochemical recurrence. None of the other cortical cytoskeleton genes displayed expression changes, in particular EPB49 and VIL2, despite hints from previous studies. EPB41L3 downregulation was significantly associated with hypermethylation of its promoter and strongly correlated with GSTP1 hypermethylation. Protein 4.1B was detected most strongly in the basal cells of normal prostate epithelia. Its expression in carcinoma cells was similar to the weaker one in normal luminal cells. EPB41L3 downregulation and EPB41L4B upregulation were essentially restricted to the 22 cases with ERG overexpression. Expression changes in EPB41L3 and EPB41L4B closely paralleled those previously observed for the extracellular matrix genes FBLN1 and SPOCK1, respectively. Specific changes in the cortical cytoskeleton were observed during prostate cancer progression. They parallel changes in the expression of extracellular matrix components and all together appear to be associated with

  14. Heterogeneity of PTEN and ERG expression in prostate cancer on core needle biopsies: implications for cancer risk stratification and biomarker sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rajal B; Bentley, James; Jeffery, Zach; DeMarzo, Angelo M

    2015-05-01

    ERG and PTEN biomarkers are increasingly being analyzed on prostate core biopsies (NBXs); ERG as a marker of clonality and number of separately arising tumor foci and PTEN for prognostic information. Yet, in patients with multiple biopsy cores positive for cancer (PCa), there is no standardized approach for interrogation of these biomarkers in terms of the number of positive cores to evaluate. A total of 194 NBX cases containing more than one positive core with cancer were evaluated for ERG overexpression and PTEN loss by immunostaining (immunohistochemistry) of all positive cores. ERG overexpression or PTEN loss in at least one cancer core was present in 111 (57%) and 69 (36%) cases respectively. ERG overexpression was significantly associated with PTEN loss (P < .0001), and PTEN loss was associated with a high Gleason score (P < .0001). Inter- and intra-tumor core staining heterogeneity for ERG overexpression occurred in 42% and 5% cases and for PTEN loss both intra- and inter-tumor core heterogeneity was 68%. PTEN staining was highly discordant between PCa sites regardless of laterality. When the Gleason score was non-uniform across PCa sites, the combination of cores showing the highest Gleason score and largest tumor volume provided the best representation of ERG overexpression (92%) and PTEN loss (98%). When grades were uniform across cancer sites, the highest tumor volume core was generally representative of ERG overexpression (90%) but was less representative for PTEN loss (76%). Our results suggest that knowledge of this heterogeneity is critical for developing optimal yet cost-effective strategies to identify these underlying molecular abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Concepts of epigenetics in prostate cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C S; Foster, C S

    2009-01-27

    Substantial evidence now supports the view that epigenetic changes have a role in the development of human prostate cancer. Analyses of the patterns of epigenetic alteration are providing important insights into the origin of this disease and have identified specific alterations that may serve as useful diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. Examination of cancer methylation patterns supports a stem cell origin of prostate cancer. It is well established that methylation of GSTpi is a marker of prostate cancer, and global patterns of histone marking appear to be linked to cancer prognosis with levels of acetylated histones H3K9, H3K18, and H4K12, and of dimethylated H4R3 and H3K4, dividing low-grade prostate cancer (Gleason 6 or less) into two prognostically separate groups. Elevated levels of several components of the polycomb group protein complex, EZH2, BMI1, and RING1, can also act as biomarkers of poor clinical outcome. Many components of the epigenetic machinery, including histone deacetylase (whose expression level is linked to the TMPRSS2:ERG translocation) and the histone methylase EZH2, are potential therapeutic targets. The recent discovery of the role of small RNAs in governing the epigenetic status of individual genes offers exciting new possibilities in therapeutics and chemoprevention.

  16. Tumor Repression of VCaP Xenografts by a Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E Hargrove

    Full Text Available Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im polyamides are high affinity DNA-binding small molecules that can inhibit protein-DNA interactions. In VCaP cells, a human prostate cancer cell line overexpressing both AR and the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion, an androgen response element (ARE-targeted Py-Im polyamide significantly downregulates AR driven gene expression. Polyamide exposure to VCaP cells reduced proliferation without causing DNA damage. Py-Im polyamide treatment also reduced tumor growth in a VCaP mouse xenograft model. In addition to the effects on AR regulated transcription, RNA-seq analysis revealed inhibition of topoisomerase-DNA binding as a potential mechanism that contributes to the antitumor effects of polyamides in cell culture and in xenografts. These studies support the therapeutic potential of Py-Im polyamides to target multiple aspects of transcriptional regulation in prostate cancers without genotoxic stress.

  17. Expression of TMPRSS4 in non-small cell lung cancer and its modulation by hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    NGUYEN, TRI-HUNG; WEBER, WILLIAM; HAVARI, EVIS; CONNORS, TIMOTHY; BAGLEY, REBECCA G.; McLAREN, RAJASHREE; NAMBIAR, PRASHANT R.; MADDEN, STEPHEN L.; TEICHER, BEVERLY A.; ROBERTS, BRUCE; KAPLAN, JOHANNE; SHANKARA, SRINIVAS

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of TMPRSS4, a cell surface-associated transmembrane serine protease, has been reported in pancreatic, colorectal and thyroid cancers, and has been implicated in tumor cell migration and metastasis. Few reports have investigated both TMPRSS4 gene expression levels and the protein products. In this study, quantitative RT-PCR and protein staining were used to assess TMPRSS4 expression in primary non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tissues and in lung tumor cell lines. At the transcriptional level, TMPRSS4 message was significantly elevated in the majority of human squamous cell and adenocarcinomas compared with normal lung tissues. Staining of over 100 NSCLC primary tumor and normal specimens with rabbit polyclonal anti-TMPRSS4 antibodies confirmed expression at the protein level in both squamous cell and adenocarcinomas with little or no staining in normal lung tissues. Human lung tumor cell lines expressed varying levels of TMPRSS4 mRNA in vitro. Interestingly, tumor cell lines with high levels of TMPRSS4 mRNA failed to show detectable TMPRSS4 protein by either immunoblotting or flow cytometry. However, protein levels were increased under hypoxic culture conditions suggesting that hypoxia within the tumor microenvironment may upregulate TMPRSS4 protein expression in vivo. This was supported by the observation of TMPRSS4 protein in xenograft tumors derived from the cell lines. In addition, staining of human squamous cell carcinoma samples for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), a hypoxia marker, showed TMPRSS4 positive cells adjacent to CAIX positive cells. Overall, these results indicate that the cancer-associated TMPRSS4 protein is overexpressed in NSCLC and may represent a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22692880

  18. Concurrent deletion of 16q23 and PTEN is an independent prognostic feature in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, Martina; Runte, Frederic; Barow, Philipp; Omari, Jazan; Abdelaziz, Zaid M; Paustian, Lisa; Steurer, Stefan; Christina Tsourlakis, Maria; Fisch, Margit; Graefen, Markus; Tennstedt, Pierre; Huland, Hartwig; Michl, Uwe; Minner, Sarah; Sauter, Guido; Simon, Ronald; Adam, Meike; Schlomm, Thorsten

    2015-11-15

    The deletion of 16q23-q24 belongs to the most frequent chromosomal changes in prostate cancer, but the clinical consequences of this alteration have not been studied in detail. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis using a 16q23 probe in more than 7,400 prostate cancers with clinical follow-up data assembled in a tissue microarray format. Chromosome 16q deletion was found in 21% of cancers, and was linked to advanced tumor stage, high Gleason grade, accelerated cell proliferation, the presence of lymph node metastases (p Deletion was more frequent in ERG fusion-positive (27%) as compared to ERG fusion-negative cancers (16%, p deletions including phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) (p deletion of 16q was linked to early biochemical recurrence independently from the ERG status (p deletion of 16q alone. Multivariate modeling revealed that the prognostic value of 16q/PTEN deletion patterns was independent from the established prognostic factors. In summary, the results of our study demonstrate that the deletion of 16q and PTEN cooperatively drives prostate cancer progression, and suggests that deletion analysis of 16q and PTEN could be of important clinical value particularly for preoperative risk assessment of the clinically most challenging group of low- and intermediated grade prostate cancers. © 2015 UICC.

  19. [Interest using 3D ultrasound and MRI fusion biopsy for prostate cancer detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marien, A; De Castro Abreu, A; Gill, I; Villers, A; Ukimura, O

    2017-09-01

    The strategic therapy for prostate cancer depends on histo-pronostics data, which could be upgraded by obtaining targeted biopsies (TB) with MRI (magnetic resonance imagery) fusion 3D ultrasound. To compare diagnostic yield of image fusion guided prostate biopsy using image fusion of multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) with 3D-TRUS. Between January 2010 and April 2013, 179 consecutive patients underwent outpatient TRUS biopsy using the real-time 3D TRUS tracking system (Urostation™). These patients underwent MRI-TRUS fusion targeted biopsies (TB) with 3D volume data of the MRI elastically fused with 3D TRUS at the time of biopsy. A hundred and seventy-three patients had TBs with fusion. Mean biopsy core per patient were 11.1 (6-14) for SB and 2.4 (1-6) for TB. SBs were positive in 11% compared to 56% for TB (Pperform the higher level of MR/US fusion and should be use for active surveillance. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Prostate cancer diagnosis: Efficacy of a simple electromagnetic MRI-TRUS fusion method to target biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelidi, Amina; Ohana, Mickael; Labani, Aïssam; Alemann, Guillaume; Lang, Herve; Roy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A very simple electromagnetic device for fusion with MRI examination during TRUS guided biopsies increases the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. • This device has advantages: a short time for the fusion registration, no additional cumbersome material and no intense training to be fluent with. • Low or intermediate suspicious area for prostate carcinoma on mpMRI can be due to benign histological abnormalities or high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. - Abstract: Objective: To assess that transrectal ultrasound guidance (TRUS) targeted biopsies (TB) aimed with an easy to use electronic real-time fusion registration device have a higher rate of prostate cancer (PC) detection than standard biopsies (SB). Material and methods: This prospective study included 130 patients referred for TRUS biopsies after suspicious MRI. They underwent 16-core SB and 2 to 3 cores in each MRI suspicious area, using a fusion software. We noted SB and TB positivity for PC and Gleason score (GS). We used the McNemar test to compare SB and TB, with a statistical significance p < 0.05. Results: Among 130 patients, 68.5% had PC. Additional time due to the fusion registration was 3.3 min. One hundred fifteen patients (88.4%) had pathological findings on the histological analysis (prostate cancer n = 89, others n = 26). TB diagnosed PC in 75 patients with negative SB. Positivity rate for PC was significantly higher for TB than SB (p = 0.03). Among highly suspicious MRI lesions, detection rate of histological abnormalities using SB and TB was 96% with 79.7% of PC. Most PC that TB diagnosed alone were clinically significant (86.3%). Conclusion: TRUS biopsies performed with a simple MRI and US electronic fusion is an unrestrainedly method to increase PC diagnosis.

  1. Molecular Subtyping of Primary Prostate Cancer Reveals Specific and Shared Target Genes of Different ETS Rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Paulo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate whether ETS transcription factors frequently involved in rearrangements in prostate carcinomas (PCa, namely ERG and ETV1, regulate specific or shared target genes. We performed differential expression analysis on nine normal prostate tissues and 50 PCa enriched for different ETS rearrangements using exon-level expression microarrays, followed by in vitro validation using cell line models. We found specific deregulation of 57 genes in ERG-positive PCa and 15 genes in ETV1-positive PCa, whereas deregulation of 27 genes was shared in both tumor subtypes. We further showed that the expression of seven tumor-associated ERG target genes (PLA1A, CACNA1D, ATP8A2, HLA-DMB, PDE3B, TDRD1, and TMBIM1 and two tumor-associated ETV1 target genes (FKBP10 and GLYATL2 was significantly affected by specific ETS silencing in VCaP and LNCaP cell line models, respectively, whereas the expression of three candidate ERG and ETV1 shared targets (GRPR, KCNH8, and TMEM45B was significantly affected by silencing of either ETS. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the expression of TDRD1, the topmost overexpressed gene of our list of ERG-specific candidate targets, is inversely correlated with the methylation levels of a CpG island found at -66 bp of the transcription start site in PCa and that TDRD1 expression is regulated by direct binding of ERG to the CpG island in VCaP cells. We conclude that ETS transcription factors regulate specific and shared target genes and that TDRD1, FKBP10, and GRPR are promising therapeutic targets and can serve as diagnostic markers for molecular subtypes of PCa harboring specific fusion gene rearrangements.

  2. SPINK1 Overexpression in Localized Prostate Cancer: a Rare Event Inversely Associated with ERG Expression and Exclusive of Homozygous PTEN Deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Evans, Andrew; Donnelly, Bryan; Bismar, Tarek A

    2017-04-01

    SPINK1 is proposed as potential prognostic marker in prostate cancer (PCA). However, its relation to PTEN and ERG in localized PCA remains unclear. The study population consisted of two independent cohorts of men treated by radical prostatectomy for localized PCA (discovery n = 218 and validation n = 129). Patterns of association between SPINK1 and each of ERG and PTEN were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Associations between SPINK1 expression and various pathologic parameters and clinical outcome were also investigated. SPINK1 was expressed in 15.3 % and 10.9 % of cases in the discovery and validation cohort, respectively. SPINK expression was observed in 5.56 % of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and 1.1 % of adjacent morphologically benign prostatic glands. SPINK1 and ERG expression were almost exclusive, with only 1.0 % of the cases co-expressing both in the same core sample. SPINK1 interfocal and within-core heterogeneity was noted in 29.2 % and 64.6 % of cases, respectively. SPINK1 expression was not significantly associated with PTEN deletion in the two cohorts (p = 0.871 for discovery cohort and p = 0.293 for validation cohort). While SPINK1 expression did occur with hemizygous PTEN deletion, there was a complete absence of SPINK1 expression in PCA showing homozygous PTEN deletion, which was confirmed in the validation cohort (p = 0.02). Despite SPINK1's association with higher Gleason score (>7) (p = 0.02), it was not associated with other pathological parameters or biochemical recurrence post-radical prostatectomy. We documented absolute exclusivity between SPINK1 overexpression and homozygous PTEN deletion in localized PCA. SPINK1 and ERG expressions are exclusive events in PCA. SPINK1 is not of added prognostic value in localized PCA.

  3. Expression and Function of ETS Genes in Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Gasi (Delila)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease that is very common in elderly men in developed countries. Understanding the molecular and biological processes that contribute to tumor development and progressive growth is a challenging task. The fusion of the genes ERG

  4. The A736V TMPRSS6 polymorphism influences hepcidin and iron metabolism in chronic hemodialysis patients: TMPRSS6 and hepcidin in hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelusi Serena

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of this study was to evaluate whether the A736V TMPRSS6 polymorphism, a major genetic determinant of iron metabolism in healthy subjects, influences serum levels of hepcidin, the hormone regulating iron metabolism, and erythropoiesis in chronic hemodialysis (CHD. Methods To this end, we considered 199 CHD patients from Northern Italy (157 with hepcidin evaluation, and 188 healthy controls without iron deficiency, matched for age and gender. Genetic polymorphisms were evaluated by allele specific polymerase chain reaction assays, and hepcidin quantified by mass spectrometry. Results Serum hepcidin levels were not different between the whole CHD population and controls (median 7.1, interquartile range (IQR 0.55-17.1 vs. 7.4, 4.5-17.9 nM, respectively, but were higher in the CHD subgroup after exclusion of subjects with relative iron deficiency (p = 0.04. In CHD patients, the A736V TMPRSS6 polymorphism influenced serum hepcidin levels in individuals positive for mutations in the HFE gene of hereditary hemochromatosis (p 30 ng/ml; n = 86, hepcidin was associated with lower mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.002, suggesting that it contributed to iron-restricted erythropoiesis. In line with previous results, in patients without acute inflammation and severe iron deficiency the “high hepcidin” 736 V TMPRSS6 variant was associated with higher erythropoietin maintenance dose (p = 0.016, independently of subclinical inflammation (p = 0.02. Conclusions The A736V TMPRSS6 genotype influences hepcidin levels, erythropoiesis, and anemia management in CHD patients. Evaluation of the effect of TMPRSS6 genotype on clinical outcomes in prospective studies in CHD may be useful to predict the outcomes of hepcidin manipulation, and to guide treatment personalization by optimizing anemia management.

  5. ERG Protein Expression in Diagnostic Specimens Is Associated with Increased Risk of Progression During Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Vainer, Ben; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk

    2014-01-01

    with a ready-to-use kit (anti-ERG, EPR3864). Men were characterised as ERG positive if a minimum of one tumour focus demonstrated ERG expression. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Overall AS progression was defined as clinical progression: increased clinical tumour category ≥cT2b by digital rectal...

  6. Low expression levels of hepsin and TMPRSS3 are associated with poor breast cancer survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelkonen, Mikko; Luostari, Kaisa; Tengström, Maria; Ahonen, Hermanni; Berdel, Bozena; Kataja, Vesa; Soini, Ylermi; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto

    2015-01-01

    Hepsin, (also called TMPRSS1) and TMPRSS3 are type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) that are involved in cancer progression. TTSPs can remodel extracellular matrix (ECM) and, when dysregulated, promote tumor progression and metastasis by inducing defects in basement membrane and ECM molecules. This study investigated whether the gene and protein expression levels of these TTSPs were associated with breast cancer characteristics or survival. Immunohistochemical staining was used to evaluate hepsin levels in 372 breast cancer samples and TMPRSS3 levels in 373 samples. TMPRSS1 mRNA expression was determined in 125 invasive and 16 benign breast tumor samples, and TMPRSS3 mRNA expression was determined in 167 invasive and 23 benign breast tumor samples. The gene and protein expression levels were analyzed for associations with breast cancer-specific survival and clinicopathological parameters. Low TMPRSS1 and TMPRSS3 mRNA expression levels were independent prognostic factors for poor breast cancer survival during the 20-year follow-up (TMPRSS1, P = 0.023; HR, 2.065; 95 % CI, 1.106–3.856; TMPRSS3, P = 0.013; HR, 2.106; 95 % CI, 1.167–3.800). Low expression of the two genes at the mRNA and protein levels associated with poorer survival compared to high levels (log rank P-values 0.015–0.042). Low TMPRSS1 mRNA expression was also an independent marker of poor breast cancer prognosis in patients treated with radiotherapy (P = 0.034; HR, 2.344; 95 % CI, 1.065–5.160). Grade III tumors, large tumor size, and metastasis were associated with low mRNA and protein expression levels. The results suggest that the TTSPs hepsin and TMPRSS3 may have similar biological functions in the molecular pathology of breast cancer. Low mRNA and protein expression levels of the studied TTSPs were prognostic markers of poor survival in breast cancer. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1440-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized

  7. Development and Validation of a Scalable Next-Generation Sequencing System for Assessing Relevant Somatic Variants in Solid Tumors12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovelson, Daniel H.; McDaniel, Andrew S.; Cani, Andi K.; Johnson, Bryan; Rhodes, Kate; Williams, Paul D.; Bandla, Santhoshi; Bien, Geoffrey; Choppa, Paul; Hyland, Fiona; Gottimukkala, Rajesh; Liu, Guoying; Manivannan, Manimozhi; Schageman, Jeoffrey; Ballesteros-Villagrana, Efren; Grasso, Catherine S.; Quist, Michael J.; Yadati, Venkata; Amin, Anmol; Siddiqui, Javed; Betz, Bryan L.; Knudsen, Karen E.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Feng, Felix Y.; Roh, Michael H.; Nelson, Peter S.; Liu, Chia-Jen; Beer, David G.; Wyngaard, Peter; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Sadis, Seth; Rhodes, Daniel R.; Tomlins, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled genome-wide personalized oncology efforts at centers and companies with the specialty expertise and infrastructure required to identify and prioritize actionable variants. Such approaches are not scalable, preventing widespread adoption. Likewise, most targeted NGS approaches fail to assess key relevant genomic alteration classes. To address these challenges, we predefined the catalog of relevant solid tumor somatic genome variants (gain-of-function or loss-of-function mutations, high-level copy number alterations, and gene fusions) through comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of >700,000 samples. To detect these variants, we developed the Oncomine Comprehensive Panel (OCP), an integrative NGS-based assay [compatible with 95% accuracy for KRAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and BRAF mutation detection as well as for ALK and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusions. Associating positive variants with potential targeted treatments demonstrated that 6% to 42% of profiled samples (depending on cancer type) harbored alterations beyond routine molecular testing that were associated with approved or guideline-referenced therapies. As a translational research tool, OCP identified adaptive CTNNB1 amplifications/mutations in treated prostate cancers. Through predefining somatic variants in solid tumors and compiling associated potential treatment strategies, OCP represents a simplified, broadly applicable targeted NGS system with the potential to advance precision oncology efforts. PMID:25925381

  8. A small molecule inhibitor of ETV1, YK-4-279, prevents prostate cancer growth and metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Rahim

    Full Text Available The erythroblastosis virus E26 transforming sequences (ETS family of transcription factors consists of a highly conserved group of genes that play important roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and invasion. Chromosomal translocations fusing ETS factors to promoters of androgen responsive genes have been found in prostate cancers, including the most clinically aggressive forms. ERG and ETV1 are the most commonly translocated ETS proteins. Over-expression of these proteins in prostate cancer cells results in a more invasive phenotype. Inhibition of ETS activity by small molecule inhibitors may provide a novel method for the treatment of prostate cancer.We recently demonstrated that the small molecule YK-4-279 inhibits biological activity of ETV1 in fusion-positive prostate cancer cells leading to decreased motility and invasion in-vitro. Here, we present data from an in-vivo mouse xenograft model. SCID-beige mice were subcutaneously implanted with fusion-positive LNCaP-luc-M6 and fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 tumors. Animals were treated with YK-4-279, and its effects on primary tumor growth and lung metastasis were evaluated. YK-4-279 treatment resulted in decreased growth of the primary tumor only in LNCaP-luc-M6 cohort. When primary tumors were grown to comparable sizes, YK-4-279 inhibited tumor metastasis to the lungs. Expression of ETV1 target genes MMP7, FKBP10 and GLYATL2 were reduced in YK-4-279 treated animals. ETS fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 xenografts were unresponsive to the compound. Furthermore, YK-4-279 is a chiral molecule that exists as a racemic mixture of R and S enantiomers. We established that (S-YK-4-279 is the active enantiomer in prostate cancer cells.Our results demonstrate that YK-4-279 is a potent inhibitor of ETV1 and inhibits both the primary tumor growth and metastasis of fusion positive prostate cancer xenografts. Therefore, YK-4-279 or similar compounds may be evaluated as a potential

  9. X-ray-assisted positioning of patients treated by conformal arc radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Comparison of setup accuracy using implanted markers versus bony structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soete, Guy; Cock, Mieke de; Verellen, Dirk; Michielsen, Dirk; Keuppens, Frans; Storme, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare setup accuracy of NovalisBody stereoscopic X-ray positioning using implanted markers in the prostate vs. bony structures in patients treated with dynamic conformal arc radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Random and systematic setup errors (RE and SE) of the isocenter with regard to the center of gravity of three fiducial markers were measured by means of orthogonal verification films in 120 treatment sessions in 12 patients. Positioning was performed using NovalisBody semiautomated marker fusion. The results were compared with a control group of 261 measurements in 15 patients who were positioned with NovalisBody automated bone fusion. In addition, interfraction and intrafraction prostate motion was registered in the patients with implanted markers. Results: Marker-based X-ray positioning resulted in a reduction of RE as well as SE in the anteroposterior, craniocaudal, and left-right directions compared with those in the control group. The interfraction prostate displacements with regard to the bony pelvis that could be avoided by marker positioning ranged between 1.6 and 2.8 mm for RE and between 1.3 and 4.3 mm for SE. Intrafraction random and systematic prostate movements ranged between 1.4 and 2.4 mm and between 0.8 and 1.3 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The problem of interfraction prostate motion can be solved by using implanted markers. In addition, the NovalisBody X-ray system performs more accurately with markers compared with bone fusion. Intrafraction organ motion has become the limiting factor for margin reduction around the clinical target volume

  10. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castrationresistant prostate cancer: a report from the PETRUS prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs. Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients. PMID:27391263

  11. Sequential evaluation of prostate edema after permanent seed prostate brachytherapy using CT-MRI fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taussky, Daniel; Austen, Lyn; Toi, Ants; Yeung, Ivan; Williams, Theresa; Pearson, Shannon; McLean, Michael; Pond, Gregory; Crook, Juanita

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the extent and time course of prostate edema and its effect on dosimetry after permanent seed prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients scheduled for permanent seed 125 I prostate brachytherapy agreed to a prospective study on postimplant edema. Implants were preplanned using transrectal ultrasonography. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated using computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) fusion on the day of the implant (Day 1) and Days 8 and 30. The prostate was contoured on MRI, and the seeds were located on CT. Factors investigated for an influence on edema were the number of seeds and needles, preimplant prostate volume, transitional zone index (transition zone volume divided by prostate volume), age, and prostate-specific antigen level. Prostate dosimetry was evaluated by the percentage of the prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V 100 ) and percentage of prescribed dose received by 90% of the prostate volume (D 90 ). Results: Prostate edema was maximal on Day 1, with the median prostate volume 31% greater than preimplant transrectal ultrasound volume (range, 0.93-1.72; p 100 on Day 1 was 93.6% (range, 86.0-98.2%) and was 96.3% (range, 85.7-99.5%) on Day 30 (p = 0.079). Patients with a Day 1 V 100 >93% were less affected by edema resolution, showing a median increase in V 100 of 0.67% on Day 30 compared with 2.77% for patients with a V 100 100 >93%)

  12. Diagnostic Accuracy of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Fusion Guided Targeted Biopsy Evaluated by Transperineal Template Saturation Prostate Biopsy for the Detection and Characterization of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezavi, Ashkan; Märzendorfer, Olivia; Donati, Olivio F; Rizzi, Gianluca; Rupp, Niels J; Wettstein, Marian S; Gross, Oliver; Sulser, Tullio; Hermanns, Thomas; Eberli, Daniel

    2018-02-21

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging/transrectal ultrasound fusion guided targeted biopsy against that of transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy to detect prostate cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 415 men who consecutively presented for prostate biopsy between November 2014 and September 2016 at our tertiary care center. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a 3 Tesla device without an endorectal coil, followed by transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy with the BiopSee® fusion system. Additional fusion guided targeted biopsy was done in men with a suspicious lesion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, defined as Likert score 3 to 5. Any Gleason pattern 4 was defined as clinically significant prostate cancer. The detection rates of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and fusion guided targeted biopsy were compared with the detection rate of transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy using the McNemar test. We obtained a median of 40 (range 30 to 55) and 3 (range 2 to 4) transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy and fusion guided targeted biopsy cores, respectively. Of the 124 patients (29.9%) without a suspicious lesion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging 32 (25.8%) were found to have clinically significant prostate cancer on transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy. Of the 291 patients (70.1%) with a Likert score of 3 to 5 clinically significant prostate cancer was detected in 129 (44.3%) by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging fusion guided targeted biopsy, in 176 (60.5%) by transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy and in 187 (64.3%) by the combined approach. Overall 58 cases (19.9%) of clinically significant prostate cancer would have been missed if fusion guided targeted biopsy had been performed exclusively. The sensitivity of

  13. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: A report from the PETRUS prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-08-23

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs.Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients.

  14. A strong anti-inflammatory signature revealed by liver transcription profiling of Tmprss6-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Riba

    Full Text Available Control of systemic iron homeostasis is interconnected with the inflammatory response through the key iron regulator, the antimicrobial peptide hepcidin. We have previously shown that mice with iron deficiency anemia (IDA-low hepcidin show a pro-inflammatory response that is blunted in iron deficient-high hepcidin Tmprss6 KO mice. The transcriptional response associated with chronic hepcidin overexpression due to genetic inactivation of Tmprss6 is unknown. By using whole genome transcription profiling of the liver and analysis of spleen immune-related genes we identified several functional pathways differentially expressed in Tmprss6 KO mice, compared to IDA animals and thus irrespective of the iron status. In the effort of defining genes potentially targets of Tmprss6 we analyzed liver gene expression changes according to the genotype and independently of treatment. Tmprss6 inactivation causes down-regulation of liver pathways connected to immune and inflammatory response as well as spleen genes related to macrophage activation and inflammatory cytokines production. The anti-inflammatory status of Tmprss6 KO animals was confirmed by the down-regulation of pathways related to immunity, stress response and intracellular signaling in both liver and spleen after LPS treatment. Opposite to Tmprss6 KO mice, Hfe(-/- mice are characterized by iron overload with inappropriately low hepcidin levels. Liver expression profiling of Hfe(-/- deficient versus iron loaded mice show the opposite expression of some of the genes modulated by the loss of Tmprss6. Altogether our results confirm the anti-inflammatory status of Tmprss6 KO mice and identify new potential target pathways/genes of Tmprss6.

  15. Improving Positioning in High-Dose Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Safety and Visibility of Frequently Used Gold Fiducial Markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonteyne, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.fonteyne@uzgent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Ost, Piet [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Villeirs, Geert [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Oosterlinck, Willem [Department of Urology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Impens, Aline; De Gersem, Werner; De Wagter, Carlos; De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The use of gold fiducial markers (GFMs) for prostate positioning in high-dose radiotherapy is gaining interest. The purpose of this study was to compare five GFMs regarding feasibility of ultrasound-based implantation in the prostate and intraprostatic lesion (IPL); toxicity; visibility on transabdominal ultrasound (TU) and cone-beam CT (CBCT); reliability of automatic, soft tissue, and GFM-based CBCT patient positioning by comparing manual and automatic fusion CBCT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients were included. Pain and toxicity were scored after implantation and high-dose radiotherapy. Fisher exact test was used to evaluate the correlation of patients' characteristics and prostatitis. Positioning was evaluated on TU and kilovoltage CBCT images. CBCT fusion was performed automatically (Elekta XVI technology, release 3.5.1 b27, based on grey values) and manually on soft tissue and GFMs. Pearson correlation statistics and Bland-Altman evaluation were used. Five GFMs were compared. Results: Twenty percent of the patients developed prostatitis despite antibiotic prophylaxis. Cigarette smoking was significantly correlated with prostatitis. The visualization of all GFMs on TU was disappointing. Consequently we cannot recommend the use of these GFMs for TU-based prostate positioning. For all GFMs, there was only fair to poor linear correlation between automatic and manual CBCT images, indicating that even when GFMs are used, an operator evaluation is imperative. However, when GFMs were analyzed individually, a moderate to very strong correlation between automatic and manual positioning was found for larger GFMs in all directions. Conclusion: The incidence of prostatitis in our series was high. Further research is imperative to define the ideal preparation protocol preimplantation and to select patients. Automatic fusion is more reliable with larger GFMs at the cost of more scatter. The stability of all GFMs was proven.

  16. ETS transcription factors control transcription of EZH2 and epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Kunderfranco

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available ETS transcription factors regulate important signaling pathways involved in cell differentiation and development in many tissues and have emerged as important players in prostate cancer. However, the biological impact of ETS factors in prostate tumorigenesis is still debated.We performed an analysis of the ETS gene family using microarray data and real-time PCR in normal and tumor tissues along with functional studies in normal and cancer cell lines to understand the impact in prostate tumorigenesis and identify key targets of these transcription factors. We found frequent dysregulation of ETS genes with oncogenic (i.e., ERG and ESE1 and tumor suppressor (i.e., ESE3 properties in prostate tumors compared to normal prostate. Tumor subgroups (i.e., ERG(high, ESE1(high, ESE3(low and NoETS tumors were identified on the basis of their ETS expression status and showed distinct transcriptional and biological features. ERG(high and ESE3(low tumors had the most robust gene signatures with both distinct and overlapping features. Integrating genomic data with functional studies in multiple cell lines, we demonstrated that ERG and ESE3 controlled in opposite direction transcription of the Polycomb Group protein EZH2, a key gene in development, differentiation, stem cell biology and tumorigenesis. We further demonstrated that the prostate-specific tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 was controlled by ERG and ESE3 both directly and through induction of EZH2.These findings provide new insights into the role of the ETS transcriptional network in prostate tumorigenesis and uncover previously unrecognized links between aberrant expression of ETS factors, deregulation of epigenetic effectors and silencing of tumor suppressor genes. The link between aberrant ETS activity and epigenetic gene silencing may be relevant for the clinical management of prostate cancer and design of new therapeutic strategies.

  17. Tmprss6 is a genetic modifier of the Hfe-hemochromatosis phenotype in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittlesey, Rebecca L.; Andrews, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    The hereditary hemochromatosis protein HFE promotes the expression of hepcidin, a circulating hormone produced by the liver that inhibits dietary iron absorption and macrophage iron release. HFE mutations are associated with impaired hepatic bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/SMAD signaling for hepcidin production. TMPRSS6, a transmembrane serine protease mutated in iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia, inhibits hepcidin expression by dampening BMP/SMAD signaling. In the present study, we used genetic approaches in mice to examine the relationship between Hfe and Tmprss6 in the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis. Heterozygous loss of Tmprss6 in Hfe−/− mice reduced systemic iron overload, whereas homozygous loss caused systemic iron deficiency and elevated hepatic expression of hepcidin and other Bmp/Smad target genes. In contrast, neither genetic loss of Hfe nor hepatic Hfe overexpression modulated the hepcidin elevation and systemic iron deficiency of Tmprss6−/− mice. These results indicate that genetic loss of Tmprss6 increases Bmp/Smad signaling in an Hfe-independent manner that can restore Bmp/Smad signaling in Hfe−/− mice. Furthermore, these results suggest that natural genetic variation in the human ortholog TMPRSS6 might modify the clinical penetrance of HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis, raising the possibility that pharmacologic inhibition of TMPRSS6 could attenuate iron loading in this disorder. PMID:21355094

  18. Analysis of the genetic phylogeny of multifocal prostate cancer identifies multiple independent clonal expansions in neoplastic and morphologically normal prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Colin S; Eeles, Rosalind; Wedge, David C; Van Loo, Peter; Gundem, Gunes; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Kremeyer, Barbara; Butler, Adam; Lynch, Andrew G; Camacho, Niedzica; Massie, Charlie E; Kay, Jonathan; Luxton, Hayley J; Edwards, Sandra; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Dennis, Nening; Merson, Sue; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Zamora, Jorge; Corbishley, Cathy; Thomas, Sarah; Nik-Zainal, Serena; O'Meara, Sarah; Matthews, Lucy; Clark, Jeremy; Hurst, Rachel; Mithen, Richard; Bristow, Robert G; Boutros, Paul C; Fraser, Michael; Cooke, Susanna; Raine, Keiran; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Stebbings, Lucy; Hinton, Jon; Teague, Jon; McLaren, Stuart; Mudie, Laura; Hardy, Claire; Anderson, Elizabeth; Joseph, Olivia; Goody, Victoria; Robinson, Ben; Maddison, Mark; Gamble, Stephen; Greenman, Christopher; Berney, Dan; Hazell, Steven; Livni, Naomi; Fisher, Cyril; Ogden, Christopher; Kumar, Pardeep; Thompson, Alan; Woodhouse, Christopher; Nicol, David; Mayer, Erik; Dudderidge, Tim; Shah, Nimish C; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Voet, Thierry; Campbell, Peter; Futreal, Andrew; Easton, Douglas; Warren, Anne Y; Foster, Christopher S; Stratton, Michael R; Whitaker, Hayley C; McDermott, Ultan; Brewer, Daniel S; Neal, David E

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide DNA sequencing was used to decrypt the phylogeny of multiple samples from distinct areas of cancer and morphologically normal tissue taken from the prostates of three men. Mutations were present at high levels in morphologically normal tissue distant from the cancer, reflecting clonal expansions, and the underlying mutational processes at work in morphologically normal tissue were also at work in cancer. Our observations demonstrate the existence of ongoing abnormal mutational processes, consistent with field effects, underlying carcinogenesis. This mechanism gives rise to extensive branching evolution and cancer clone mixing, as exemplified by the coexistence of multiple cancer lineages harboring distinct ERG fusions within a single cancer nodule. Subsets of mutations were shared either by morphologically normal and malignant tissues or between different ERG lineages, indicating earlier or separate clonal cell expansions. Our observations inform on the origin of multifocal disease and have implications for prostate cancer therapy in individual cases.

  19. Activation of ERG2 potassium channels by the diphenylurea NS1643

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmedyb, Pernille; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Grunnet, Morten

    2007-01-01

    Three members of the ERG potassium channel family have been described (ERG1-3 or Kv 11.1-3). ERG1 is by far the best characterized subtype and it constitutes the molecular component of the cardiac I(Kr) current. All three channel subtypes are expressed in neurons but their function remains unclear....... The lack of functional information is at least partly due to the lack of specific pharmacological tools. The compound NS1643 has earlier been reported as an ERG1 channel activator. We found that NS1643 also activates the ERG2 channel; however, the molecular mechanism of the activation differs between...... the ERG1 and ERG2 channels. This is surprising since ERG1 and ERG2 channels have very similar biophysical and structural characteristics. For ERG2, NS1643 causes a left-ward shift of the activation curve, a faster time-constant of activation and a slower time-constant of inactivation as well...

  20. Prostate cancer detection using multiparametric 3 – tesla MRI and fusion biopsy: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Caldara Mussi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of transrectal ultrasonography (US biopsy with imaging fusion using multiparametric (mp magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa, with an emphasis on clinically significant tumors according to histological criteria. Materials and Methods: A total of 189 consecutive US/MRI fusion biopsies were performed obtaining systematic and guided samples of suspicious areas on mpMRI using a 3 Tesla magnet without endorectal coil. Clinical significance for prostate cancer was established based on Epstein criteria. Results: In our casuistic, the average Gleason score was 7 and the average PSA was 5.0ng/mL. Of the 189 patients that received US/MRI biopsies, 110 (58.2% were positive for PCa. Of those cases, 88 (80% were clinically significant, accounting for 46.6% of all patients. We divided the MRI findings into 5 Likert scales of probability of having clinically significant PCa. The positivity of US/MRI biopsy for clinically significant PCa was 0%, 17.6% 23.5%, 53.4% and 84.4% for Likert scores 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in terms of biopsy results between different levels of suspicion on mpMRI and also when biopsy results were divided into groups of clinically non-significant versus clinically significant between different levels of suspicion on mpMRI (p-value <0.05 in both analyzes. Conclusion: We found that there is a significant difference in cancer detection using US/MRI fusion biopsy between low-probability and intermediate/high probability Likert scores using mpMRI.

  1. [Radiotherapy in node-positive prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, D; Bartkowiak, D; Bolenz, C; Wiegel, T

    2016-03-01

    There are numerous randomized trials to guide the management of patients with localized (and metastatic) prostate cancer, but only a few (mostly retrospective) studies have specifically addressed node-positive patients. Therefore, there is uncertainty regarding optimal treatment in this situation. Current guidelines recommend long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) alone or radiotherapy plus long-term ADT as treatment options. This overview summarizes the existing literature on the use of radiotherapy for node-positive prostate cancer as definitive treatment and as adjuvant or salvage therapy after radical prostatectomy. In this context, we also discuss several PET tracers in the imaging evaluation of patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. As for definitive treatment, retrospective studies suggest that ADT plus radiotherapy improves overall survival compared with ADT alone. These studies also consistently demonstrated that many patients with node-positive prostate cancer can achieve long-term survival - and are likely curable - with aggressive therapy. The beneficial impact of adjuvant radiotherapy on survival in patients with pN1 prostate cancer seems to be highly influenced by tumor characteristics. Men with ≤ 2 positive lymph nodes in the presence of intermediate- to high-grade disease, or positive margins, and those with 3 or 4 positive lymph nodes are the ideal candidates for adjuvant radiotherapy (plus long-term ADT) after surgery. There is a need for randomized trials to further examine the potential role of radiotherapy as either definitive or adjuvant treatment, for patients with node-positive prostate cancer.

  2. Deep sequencing reveals distinct patterns of DNA methylation in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung H; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M; Prensner, John R; Cao, Xuhong; Robinson, Daniel; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Huang, Christina; Shankar, Sunita; Jing, Xiaojun; Iyer, Matthew; Hu, Ming; Sam, Lee; Grasso, Catherine; Maher, Christopher A; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Mehra, Rohit; Kominsky, Hal D; Siddiqui, Javed; Yu, Jindan; Qin, Zhaohui S; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2011-07-01

    Beginning with precursor lesions, aberrant DNA methylation marks the entire spectrum of prostate cancer progression. We mapped the global DNA methylation patterns in select prostate tissues and cell lines using MethylPlex-next-generation sequencing (M-NGS). Hidden Markov model-based next-generation sequence analysis identified ∼68,000 methylated regions per sample. While global CpG island (CGI) methylation was not differential between benign adjacent and cancer samples, overall promoter CGI methylation significantly increased from ~12.6% in benign samples to 19.3% and 21.8% in localized and metastatic cancer tissues, respectively (P-value prostate tissues, 2481 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) are cancer-specific, including numerous novel DMRs. A novel cancer-specific DMR in the WFDC2 promoter showed frequent methylation in cancer (17/22 tissues, 6/6 cell lines), but not in the benign tissues (0/10) and normal PrEC cells. Integration of LNCaP DNA methylation and H3K4me3 data suggested an epigenetic mechanism for alternate transcription start site utilization, and these modifications segregated into distinct regions when present on the same promoter. Finally, we observed differences in repeat element methylation, particularly LINE-1, between ERG gene fusion-positive and -negative cancers, and we confirmed this observation using pyrosequencing on a tissue panel. This comprehensive methylome map will further our understanding of epigenetic regulation in prostate cancer progression.

  3. A child with severe iron-deficiency anemia and a complex TMPRSS6 genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Anna Paola; Ferro, Elisa; Cannavò, Laura; La Rosa, Maria Angela; Zirilli, Giuseppina

    2017-10-01

    We report a case of a 7-year-old girl with severe hypochromic microcytic anemia, who was unresponsive to classical iron supplements. We suspected IRIDA, iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia, a genetic iron metabolism disorder, caused by TMPRSS6 variations. TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a negative regulator of hepcidin, and its pathological variants are related to normal to high levels of hepcidin. We analyzed the TMPRSS6 gene and we improved clinical management of the patient, selecting the appropriate supplementation therapy. Intervention & Technique: The parenteral iron therapy was started, but the patient was only partially responsive and the anemia persisted. To confirm the diagnosis, the TMPRSS6 gene sequence was analyzed by DNA sequencing and other relevant biochemical parameters were evaluated. The TMPRSS6 sequence analysis showed a complex genotype with a rare heterozygous missense variant, in addition to other common polymorphisms. The serum hepcidin value was normal. We unexpectedly observed a normalization of patient's hemoglobin (Hb) levels only after liposomal iron treatment. The proband was symptomatic for IRIDA during a critical phase of growth and development, but we did not find a clearly causative genotype. A long-term result, improving stably patient's Hb levels, was obtained only after liposomal iron supplementation. Children may be at greater risk for iron deficiency and the degree of anemia as well as the response to the iron supplements varies markedly patient to patient. Here, we show the importance of comprehensive study of these patients in order to collect useful information about genotype-phenotype association of genes involved in iron metabolism.

  4. Magnetic Resonance and Ultrasound Image Fusion Supported Transperineal Prostate Biopsy Using the Ginsburg Protocol: Technique, Learning Points, and Biopsy Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Nienke; Patruno, Giulio; Wadhwa, Karan; Gaziev, Gabriele; Miano, Roberto; Barrett, Tristan; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Doble, Andrew; Warren, Anne; Bratt, Ola; Kastner, Christof

    2016-08-01

    Prostate biopsy supported by transperineal image fusion has recently been developed as a new method to the improve accuracy of prostate cancer detection. To describe the Ginsburg protocol for transperineal prostate biopsy supported by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) image fusion, provide learning points for its application, and report biopsy results. The article is supplemented by a Surgery in Motion video. This single-centre retrospective outcome study included 534 patients from March 2012 to October 2015. A total of 107 had no previous prostate biopsy, 295 had benign TRUS-guided biopsies, and 159 were on active surveillance for low-risk cancer. A Likert scale reported mpMRI for suspicion of cancer from 1 (no suspicion) to 5 (cancer highly likely). Transperineal biopsies were obtained under general anaesthesia using BiopSee fusion software (Medcom, Darmstadt, Germany). All patients had systematic biopsies, two cores from each of 12 anatomic sectors. Likert 3-5 lesions were targeted with a further two cores per lesion. Any cancer and Gleason score 7-10 cancer on biopsy were noted. Descriptive statistics and positive predictive values (PPVs) and negative predictive values (NPVs) were calculated. The detection rate of Gleason score 7-10 cancer was similar across clinical groups. Likert scale 3-5 MRI lesions were reported in 378 (71%) of the patients. Cancer was detected in 249 (66%) and Gleason score 7-10 cancer was noted in 157 (42%) of these patients. PPV for detecting 7-10 cancer was 0.15 for Likert score 3, 0.43 for score 4, and 0.63 for score 5. NPV of Likert 1-2 findings was 0.87 for Gleason score 7-10 and 0.97 for Gleason score ≥4+3=7 cancer. Limitations include lack of data on complications. Transperineal prostate biopsy supported by MRI/TRUS image fusion using the Ginsburg protocol yielded high detection rates of Gleason score 7-10 cancer. Because the NPV for excluding Gleason score 7-10 cancer was very

  5. Comparison of MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetric analysis of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Hayashi, Shinya; Matsuo, Masayuki; Sakurai, Kota; Nakano, Masahiro; Maeda, Sunaho; Kajita, Kimihiro R.T.; Deguchi, Takashi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based and computed tomography (CT)/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry methods in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and March 2006, a total of 52 consecutive patients with prostate cancer were treated by brachytherapy, and postimplant dosimetry was performed using CT/MRI fusion. The accuracy and reproducibility were prospectively compared between MRI-based dosimetry and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) related parameters as recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society. Results: The prostate volume was 15.97 ± 6.17 cc (mean ± SD) in MRI-based dosimetry, and 15.97 ± 6.02 cc in CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry without statistical difference. The prostate V100 was 94.5% and 93.0% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.002). The prostate D90 was 119.4% and 114.4% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Our current results suggested that, as with fusion images, MR images allowed accurate contouring of the organs, but they tended to overestimate the analysis of postimplant dosimetry in comparison to CT/MRI fusion images. Although this MRI-based dosimetric discrepancy was negligible, MRI-based dosimetry was acceptable and reproducible in comparison to CT-based dosimetry, because the difference between MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results was smaller than that between CT-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results as previously reported

  6. A comparison of ventilatory prostate movement in four treatment positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Laura A.; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Brock, Kristy K.; Sanda, Martin; Sullivan, Molly; Sandler, Howard M.; Balter, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure target coverage during radiotherapy, all sources of geometric uncertainty in target position must be considered. Movement of the prostate due to breathing has not traditionally been considered in prostate radiotherapy. The purpose of this study is to report the influence of patient orientation and immobilization on prostate movement due to breathing. Methods and Materials: Four patients had radiopaque markers implanted in the prostate. Fluoroscopy was performed in four different positions: prone in alpha cradle, prone with an aquaplast mold, supine on a flat table, and supine with a false table under the buttocks. Fluoroscopic movies were videotaped and digitized. Frames were analyzed using 2D-alignment software to determine the extent of movement of the prostate markers and the skeleton for each position during normal and deep breathing. Results: During normal breathing, maximal movement of the prostate markers was seen in the prone position (cranial-caudal [CC] range: 0.9-5.1 mm; anterior-posterior [AP] range: up to 3.5 mm). In the supine position, prostate movement during normal breathing was less than 1 mm in all directions. Deep breathing resulted in CC movements of 3.8-10.5 mm in the prone position (with and without an aquaplast mold). This range was reduced to 2.0-7.3 mm in the supine position and 0.5-2.1 mm with the use of the false table top. Deep breathing resulted in AP skeletal movements of 2.7-13.1 mm in the prone position, whereas AP skeletal movements in the supine position were negligible. Conclusion: Ventilatory movement of the prostate is substantial in the prone position and is reduced in the supine position. The potential for breathing to influence prostate movement, and thus the dose delivered to the prostate and normal tissues, should be considered when positioning and planning patients for conformal irradiation

  7. The value of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography (MRI/US)-fusion biopsy platforms in prostate cancer detection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayet, Maudy; van der Aa, Anouk; Beerlage, Harrie P; Schrier, Bart Ph; Mulders, Peter F A; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2016-03-01

    Despite limitations considering the presence, staging and aggressiveness of prostate cancer, ultrasonography (US)-guided systematic biopsies (SBs) are still the 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Recently, promising results have been published for targeted prostate biopsies (TBs) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (MRI/US)-fusion platforms. Different platforms are USA Food and Drug Administration registered and have, mostly subjective, strengths and weaknesses. To our knowledge, no systematic review exists that objectively compares prostate cancer detection rates between the different platforms available. To assess the value of the different MRI/US-fusion platforms in prostate cancer detection, we compared platform-guided TB with SB, and other ways of MRI TB (cognitive fusion or in-bore MR fusion). We performed a systematic review of well-designed prospective randomised and non-randomised trials in the English language published between 1 January 2004 and 17 February 2015, using PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. Search terms included: 'prostate cancer', 'MR/ultrasound(US) fusion' and 'targeted biopsies'. Extraction of articles was performed by two authors (M.G. and A.A.) and were evaluated by the other authors. Randomised and non-randomised prospective clinical trials comparing TB using MRI/US-fusion platforms and SB, or other ways of TB (cognitive fusion or MR in-bore fusion) were included. In all, 11 of 1865 studies met the inclusion criteria, involving seven different fusion platforms and 2626 patients: 1119 biopsy naïve, 1433 with prior negative biopsy, 50 not mentioned (either biopsy naïve or with prior negative biopsy) and 24 on active surveillance (who were disregarded). The Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool was used to assess the quality of included articles. No clear advantage of MRI/US fusion-guided TBs was seen for cancer detection rates (CDRs) of all prostate

  8. Potential downstream target genes of aberrant ETS transcription factors are differentially affected in Ewing's sarcoma and prostate carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J Camões

    Full Text Available FLI1 and ERG, the major ETS transcription factors involved in rearrangements in the Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT and in prostate carcinomas (PCa, respectively, belong to the same subfamily, having 98% sequence identity in the DNA binding domain. We therefore decided to investigate whether the aberrant transcription factors in both malignancies have some common downstream targets. We crossed a publicly available list of all putative EWSR1-FLI1 target genes in ESFT with our microarray expression data on 24 PCa and 6 non-malignant prostate tissues (NPT and choose four genes among the top-most differentially expressed between PCa with (PCa ERG+ and without (PCa ETS- ETS fusion genes (HIST1H4L, KCNN2, ECRG4 and LDOC1, as well as four well-validated direct targets of the EWSR1-FLI1 chimeric protein in ESFT (NR0B1, CAV1, IGFBP3 and TGFBR2. Using quantitative expression analysis in 16 ESFT and seven alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas (ARMS, we were able to validate the four genes previously described as direct targets of the EWSR1-FLI1 oncoprotein, showing overexpression of CAV1 and NR0B1 and underexpression of IGFBP3 and TGFBR2 in ESFT as compared to ARMS. Although none of these four genes showed significant expression differences between PCa ERG+ and PCa ETS-, CAV1, IGFBP3 and TGFBR2 were less expressed in PCa in an independent series of 56 PCa and 15 NPT, as also observed for ECRG4 and LDOC1, suggesting a role in prostate carcinogenesis in general. On the other hand, we demonstrate for the first time that both HIST1H4L and KCNN2 are significantly overexpressed in PCa ERG+ and that ERG binds to the promoter of these genes. Conversely, KCNN2 was found underexpressed in ESFT relative to ARMS, suggesting that the EWSR1-ETS oncoprotein may have the opposite effect of ERG rearrangements in PCa. We conclude that aberrant ETS transcription factors modulate target genes differently in ESFT and PCa.

  9. Characterization of 1577 primary prostate cancers reveals novel biological and clinicopathologic insights into molecular subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlins, Scott A; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Davicioni, Elai; Erho, Nicholas; Yousefi, Kasra; Zhao, Shuang; Haddad, Zaid; Den, Robert B; Dicker, Adam P; Trock, Bruce J; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Ross, Ashley E; Schaeffer, Edward M; Klein, Eric A; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Jenkins, Robert B; Feng, Felix Y

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) molecular subtypes have been defined by essentially mutually exclusive events, including ETS gene fusions (most commonly involving ERG) and SPINK1 overexpression. Clinical assessment may aid in disease stratification, complementing available prognostic tests. To determine the analytical validity and clinicopatholgic associations of microarray-based molecular subtyping. We analyzed Affymetrix GeneChip expression profiles for 1577 patients from eight radical prostatectomy cohorts, including 1351 cases assessed using the Decipher prognostic assay (GenomeDx Biosciences, San Diego, CA, USA) performed in a laboratory with Clinical Laboratory Improvements Amendment certification. A microarray-based (m-) random forest ERG classification model was trained and validated. Outlier expression analysis was used to predict other mutually exclusive non-ERG ETS gene rearrangements (ETS(+)) or SPINK1 overexpression (SPINK1(+)). Associations with clinical features and outcomes by multivariate logistic regression analysis and receiver operating curves. The m-ERG classifier showed 95% accuracy in an independent validation subset (155 samples). Across cohorts, 45% of PCas were classified as m-ERG(+), 9% as m-ETS(+), 8% as m-SPINK1(+), and 38% as triple negative (m-ERG(-)/m-ETS(-)/m-SPINK1(-)). Gene expression profiling supports three underlying molecularly defined groups: m-ERG(+), m-ETS(+), and m-SPINK1(+)/triple negative. On multivariate analysis, m-ERG(+) tumors were associated with lower preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen and Gleason scores, but greater extraprostatic extension (p<0.001). m-ETS(+) tumors were associated with seminal vesicle invasion (p=0.01), while m-SPINK1(+)/triple negative tumors had higher Gleason scores and were more frequent in Black/African American patients (p<0.001). Clinical outcomes were not significantly different among subtypes. A clinically available prognostic test (Decipher) can also assess PCa molecular subtypes

  10. Gene expression profiles in prostate cancer: identification of candidate non-invasive diagnostic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengual, L; Ars, E; Lozano, J J; Burset, M; Izquierdo, L; Ingelmo-Torres, M; Gaya, J M; Algaba, F; Villavicencio, H; Ribal, M J; Alcaraz, A

    2014-04-01

    To analyze gene expression profiles of prostate cancer (PCa) with the aim of determining the relevant differentially expressed genes and subsequently ascertain whether this differential expression is maintained in post-prostatic massage (PPM) urine samples. Forty-six tissue specimens (36 from PCa patients and 10 controls) and 158 urine PPM-urines (113 from PCa patients and 45 controls) were collected between December 2003 and May 2007. DNA microarrays were used to identify genes differentially expressed between tumour and control samples. Ten genes were technically validated in the same tissue samples by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Forty two selected differentially expressed genes were validated in an independent set of PPM-urines by qRT-PCR. Multidimensional scaling plot according to the expression of all the microarray genes showed a clear distinction between control and tumour samples. A total of 1047 differentially expressed genes (FDR≤.1) were indentified between both groups of samples. We found a high correlation in the comparison of microarray and RT-qPCR gene expression levels (r=.928, P<.001). Thirteen genes maintained the same fold change direction when analyzed in PPM-urine samples and in four of them (HOXC6, PCA3, PDK4 and TMPRSS2-ERG), these differences were statistically significant (P<.05). The analysis of PCa by DNA microarrays provides new putative mRNA markers for PCa diagnosis that, with caution, can be extrapolated to PPM-urines. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasound and PET-CT image fusion for prostate brachytherapy image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasford, F.

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of medical images between different cross-sectional modalities is widely used, mostly where functional images are fused with anatomical data. Ultrasound has for some time now been the standard imaging technique used for treatment planning of prostate cancer cases. While this approach is laudable and has yielded some positive results, latest developments have been the integration of images from ultrasound and other modalities such as PET-CT to compliment missing properties of ultrasound images. This study has sought to enhance diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancers by developing MATLAB algorithms to fuse ultrasound and PET-CT images. The fused ultrasound-PET-CT image has shown to contain improved quality of information than the individual input images. The fused image has the property of reduced uncertainty, increased reliability, robust system performance, and compact representation of information. The objective of co-registering the ultrasound and PET-CT images was achieved by conducting performance evaluation of the ultrasound and PET-CT imaging systems, developing image contrast enhancement algorithm, developing MATLAB image fusion algorithm, and assessing accuracy of the fusion algorithm. Performance evaluation of the ultrasound brachytherapy system produced satisfactory results in accordance with set tolerances as recommended by AAPM TG 128. Using an ultrasound brachytherapy quality assurance phantom, average axial distance measurement of 10.11 ± 0.11 mm was estimated. Average lateral distance measurements of 10.08 ± 0.07 mm, 20.01 ± 0.06 mm, 29.89 ± 0.03 mm and 39.84 ± 0.37 mm were estimated for the inter-target distances corresponding to 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm and 40 mm respectively. Volume accuracy assessment produced measurements of 3.97 cm 3 , 8.86 cm 3 and 20.11 cm 3 for known standard volumes of 4 cm 3 , 9 cm 3 and 20 cm 3 respectively. Depth of penetration assessment of the ultrasound system produced an estimate of 5.37 ± 0.02 cm

  12. Characterization of a new full length TMPRSS3 isoform and identification of mutant alleles responsible for nonsyndromic recessive deafness in Newfoundland and Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shotland Lawrence I

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutant alleles of TMPRSS3 are associated with nonsyndromic recessive deafness (DFNB8/B10. TMPRSS3 encodes a predicted secreted serine protease, although the deduced amino acid sequence has no signal peptide. In this study, we searched for mutant alleles of TMPRSS3 in families from Pakistan and Newfoundland with recessive deafness co-segregating with DFNB8/B10 linked haplotypes and also more thoroughly characterized the genomic structure of TMPRSS3. Methods We enrolled families segregating recessive hearing loss from Pakistan and Newfoundland. Microsatellite markers flanking the TMPRSS3 locus were used for linkage analysis. DNA samples from participating individuals were sequenced for TMPRSS3. The structure of TMPRSS3 was characterized bioinformatically and experimentally by sequencing novel cDNA clones of TMPRSS3. Results We identified mutations in TMPRSS3 in four Pakistani families with recessive, nonsyndromic congenital deafness. We also identified two recessive mutations, one of which is novel, of TMPRSS3 segregating in a six-generation extended family from Newfoundland. The spectrum of TMPRSS3 mutations is reviewed in the context of a genotype-phenotype correlation. Our study also revealed a longer isoform of TMPRSS3 with a hitherto unidentified exon encoding a signal peptide, which is expressed in several tissues. Conclusion Mutations of TMPRSS3 contribute to hearing loss in many communities worldwide and account for 1.8% (8 of 449 of Pakistani families segregating congenital deafness as an autosomal recessive trait. The newly identified TMPRSS3 isoform e will be helpful in the functional characterization of the full length protein.

  13. Dynamics of hERG closure allow novel insights into hERG blocking by small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, Peter; Ciantar, Marine; Theret, Isabelle; Ducrot, Pierre

    2014-08-25

    Today, drug discovery routinely uses experimental assays to determine very early if a lead compound can yield certain types of off-target activity. Among such off targets is hERG. The ion channel plays a primordial role in membrane repolarization and altering its activity can cause severe heart arrhythmia and sudden death. Despite routine tests for hERG activity, rather little information is available for helping medicinal chemists and molecular modelers to rationally circumvent hERG activity. In this article novel insights into the dynamics of hERG channel closure are described. Notably, helical pairwise closure movements have been observed. Implications and relations to hERG inactivation are presented. Based on these dynamics novel insights on hERG blocker placement are presented, compared to literature, and discussed. Last, new evidence for horizontal ligand positioning is shown in light of former studies on hERG blockers.

  14. Genomewide Search of Oncogenic Pathways Cooperating With ETS Fusions in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Arrows in T-ETV1 pictures indicate inflammation in T-ETV1 knock-in males ([left] slight inflammation in the lateral lobe of a young knock-in male...drives anabolic metabolism and tumorigenesis (Ward and Thompson 2012). We propose that TMPRSS2-ETV1 cooperates with Pten loss by further enhancing

  15. Multiparametric MRI fusion-guided biopsy for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesch, Claudia; Schütz, Viktoria; Dieffenbacher, Svenja; Bonekamp, David; Hadaschik, Boris Alexander; Hohenfellner, Markus; Radtke, Jan P

    2018-03-01

    To discuss the timing, benefits, limitations and current controversies of multiparametric magnet resonance imaging (mpMRI) combined with fusion-guided biopsy and consider how additional incorporation of multivariable risk stratification might further improve prostate cancer diagnosis. MpMRI has been proven advantageous over standard practice for biopsy-naïve men and men with previous biopsy in large prospective studies providing level 1b evidence. Upfront multivariable risk stratification followed by or combined with mpMRI further improves diagnostic accuracy. Regarding active surveillance, mpMRI in combination with fusion biopsy can support initial candidate selection and may help to monitor disease progression. mpMRI and fusion biopsy, however, do not spare failure and conflicting data exists to what extend (systematic) biopsies can be omitted. Integration of mpMRI into the diagnostic pathway for prostate cancer is beneficial; yet more prospective and randomized data is needed to establish reliable procedure standards after mpMRI acquisition.

  16. Prostate-specific antigen-positive extramammary Paget's disease--association with prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne; Hager, Henrik; Steiniche, Torben

    2008-01-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare intraepidermal adenocarcinoma that primarily affects the anogenital region. Cases of EMPD reacting with PSA (prostate-specific antigen) have previously been associated with underlying prostate cancer. However, a recent case of EMPD in our department has...... led us to question the value of PSA as an indicator of underlying prostate cancer. Clinical and pathological data were obtained for 16 cases of EMPD. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from the primary skin lesions were investigated using PSA and other immunohistochemical markers. 5...... of the 16 cases of EMPD stained positive for PSA (2 women and 3 men). However, no reactivity was seen for the prostatic marker P501S. Three of the five patients had been diagnosed with internal malignant disease-two with prostate cancer, stage 1. Immunohistochemical investigations of the tumour specimens...

  17. Clinical assessment of CT-MRI image fusion software in localization of the prostate for 3D conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Kazufumi; Lee, W. Robert; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Shaer, Andrew H.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of image fusion software and compare MRI prostate localization with CT localization in patients undergoing 3D conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: After a phantom study was performed to ensure the accuracy of image fusion procedure, 22 prostate cancer patients had CT and MRI studies before the start of radiotherapy. Immobilization casts used during radiation treatment were also used for both imaging studies. After the clinical target volume (CTV) (prostate or prostate + seminal vesicles) was defined on CT, slices from MRI study were reconstructed to match precisely the corresponding CT slices by identifying three common bony landmarks on each study. The CTV was separately defined on the matched MRI slices. Data related to the size and location of the prostate were compared between CT and MRI. The spatial relationship between the tip of urethrogram cone on CT and prostate apex seen on MRI was also scrutinized. Results: The phantom study showed the registration discrepancies between CT and MRI smaller than 1.0 mm in any pair of comparison. The patient study showed mean image registration error of 0.9 (± 0.6) mm. The average prostate volume was 63.0 (± 25.8) cm 3 and 50.9 (± 22.9) cm 3 determined by CT and MRI respectively (Fig. 1). The difference in prostate location with the two studies most commonly differed at the base and at the apex of the prostate (Fig. 2). On transverse MRI, the prostate apex was situated 7.1 (± 4.5) mm dorsal and 15.1 (± 4.0) mm cephalad to the tip of urethrogram cone (Fig. 3). Conclusions: CT-MRI image fusion study made it possible to compare the two modalities directly. MRI localization of the prostate is more accurate than CT, and indicates the distance from cone to apex is 15 mm. In view of excellent treatment results obtained with current CT localization of the prostate, still it may not be wise to reduce target volume to that demonstrated on MRI

  18. Novel RNA hybridization method for the in situ detection of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5 gene fusions in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunju, Lakshmi P; Carskadon, Shannon; Siddiqui, Javed; Tomlins, Scott A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Palanisamy, Nallasivam

    2014-09-01

    The genetic basis of 50% to 60% of prostate cancer (PCa) is attributable to rearrangements in E26 transformation-specific (ETS) (ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5), BRAF, and RAF1 genes and overexpression of SPINK1. The development and validation of reliable detection methods are warranted to classify various molecular subtypes of PCa for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. ETS gene rearrangements are typically detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction methods. Recently, monoclonal antibodies against ERG have been developed that detect the truncated ERG protein in immunohistochemical assays where staining levels are strongly correlated with ERG rearrangement status by fluorescence in situ hybridization. However, specific antibodies for ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5 are unavailable, challenging their clinical use. We developed a novel RNA in situ hybridization-based assay for the in situ detection of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from prostate needle biopsies, prostatectomy, and metastatic PCa specimens using RNA probes. Further, with combined RNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we identified a rare subset of PCa with dual ETS gene rearrangements in collisions of independent tumor foci. The high specificity and sensitivity of RNA in situ hybridization provides an alternate method enabling bright-field in situ detection of ETS gene aberrations in routine clinically available PCa specimens.

  19. A Prospective Study of Intrafraction Prostate Motion in the Prone vs. Supine Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, Richard B.; Chittenden, Lucy; Mesa, Albert V.; Bunyapanasarn, Jane; Agustin, Jeff; Lizarde, Jessica; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze prostate intrafraction motion in the prone vs. supine position and to assess patient satisfaction with these two positions. Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate cancer patients underwent implantation of five fiducial gold seeds in their prostate for localization. Patients were treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy to 2,200 cGy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 5,040 cGy. Patients underwent computed tomography simulation and IMRT in the prone position. For the first five IMRT treatments, an electronic portal imaging system was used to acquire anteroposterior (AP) and lateral images pretreatment and posttreatment. We then repositioned each patient supine and repeated the process, resulting in 600 images. Results: Mean ± standard deviation intrafraction prostate motion was 2.1 ± 1.2 mm and 1.7 ± 1.4 mm (AP, p = 0.47), 2.2 ± 2.0 mm and 1.6 ± 1.8 mm (superoinferior, p = 0.16), and 1.0 ± 1.2 mm and 0.6 ± 0.9 mm (left-right, p = 0.03) in the prone and supine positions, respectively. Eighty percent of patients stated that they were more comfortable in the supine position (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Prone and supine positions resulted in a similar magnitude of AP and superoinferior intrafraction prostate motion (2 mm). Because there was no significant difference in the magnitude of AP and superoinferior prostate motion prone vs. supine and patients were more comfortable in the supine position, patients now undergo IMRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles at our center in the supine position.

  20. Effect of Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Ultrasound Fusion-guided Biopsy on Radiation Treatment Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Aaron; Valle, Luca F.; Shankavaram, Uma; Krauze, Andra; Kaushal, Aradhana; Schott, Erica; Cooley-Zgela, Theresa [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Wood, Bradford [Center for Interventional Oncology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Pinto, Peter [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Choyke, Peter; Turkbey, Baris [Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Citrin, Deborah E., E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: Targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/ultrasound fusion prostate biopsy (MRI-Bx) has recently been compared with the standard of care extended sextant ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (SOC-Bx), with the former associated with an increased rate of detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. The present study sought to determine the influence of MRI-Bx on radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) recommendations. Methods and Materials: All patients who had received radiation treatment and had undergone SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx at our institution were included. Using the clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, and Gleason score, patients were categorized into National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk groups and radiation treatment or ADT recommendations assigned. Intensification of the recommended treatment after multiparametric MRI, SOC-Bx, and MRI-Bx was evaluated. Results: From January 2008 to January 2016, 73 patients received radiation therapy at our institution after undergoing a simultaneous SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx (n=47 with previous SOC-Bx). Repeat SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx resulted in frequent upgrading compared with previous SOC-Bx (Gleason score 7, 6.7% vs 44.6%; P<.001; Gleason score 8-10, 2.1% vs 38%; P<.001). MRI-Bx increased the proportion of patients classified as very high risk from 24.7% to 41.1% (P=.027). Compared with SOC-Bx alone, including the MRI-Bx findings resulted in a greater percentage of pathologically positive cores (mean 37% vs 44%). Incorporation of multiparametric MRI and MRI-Bx results increased the recommended use and duration of ADT (duration increased in 28 of 73 patients and ADT was added for 8 of 73 patients). Conclusions: In patients referred for radiation treatment, MRI-Bx resulted in an increase in the percentage of positive cores, Gleason score, and risk grouping. The benefit of treatment intensification in accordance with the MRI-Bx findings is unknown.

  1. ERG2 and ERG24 Are Required for Normal Vacuolar Physiology as Well as Candida albicans Pathogenicity in a Murine Model of Disseminated but Not Vaginal Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Tapia, Arturo; Peters, Brian M; Eberle, Karen E; Kerns, Morgan E; Foster, Timothy P; Marrero, Luis; Noverr, Mairi C; Fidel, Paul L; Palmer, Glen E

    2015-10-01

    Several important classes of antifungal agents, including the azoles, act by blocking ergosterol biosynthesis. It was recently reported that the azoles cause massive disruption of the fungal vacuole in the prevalent human pathogen Candida albicans. This is significant because normal vacuolar function is required to support C. albicans pathogenicity. This study examined the impact of the morpholine antifungals, which inhibit later steps of ergosterol biosynthesis, on C. albicans vacuolar integrity. It was found that overexpression of either the ERG2 or ERG24 gene, encoding C-8 sterol isomerase or C-14 sterol reductase, respectively, suppressed C. albicans sensitivity to the morpholines. In addition, both erg2Δ/Δ and erg24Δ/Δ mutants were hypersensitive to the morpholines. These data are consistent with the antifungal activity of the morpholines depending upon the simultaneous inhibition of both Erg2p and Erg24p. The vacuoles within both erg2Δ/Δ and erg24Δ/Δ C. albicans strains exhibited an aberrant morphology and accumulated large quantities of the weak base quinacrine, indicating enhanced vacuolar acidification compared with that of control strains. Both erg mutants exhibited significant defects in polarized hyphal growth and were avirulent in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Surprisingly, in a mouse model of vaginal candidiasis, both mutants colonized mice at high levels and induced a pathogenic response similar to that with the controls. Thus, while targeting Erg2p or Erg24p alone could provide a potentially efficacious therapy for disseminated candidiasis, it may not be an effective strategy to treat vaginal infections. The potential value of drugs targeting these enzymes as adjunctive therapies is discussed. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Initial clinical assessment of CT-MRI image fusion software in localization of the prostate for 3D conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Kazufumi; Lee, W. Robert; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Shaer, Andrew H.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of image fusion software and compare MRI prostate localization with CT localization in patients undergoing 3D conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: After a phantom study was performed to ensure the accuracy of image fusion procedure, 22 prostate cancer patients had CT and MRI studies before the start of radiotherapy. Immobilization casts used during radiation treatment were also used for both imaging studies. After the clinical target volume (CTV) (prostate or prostate + seminal vesicles) was defined on CT, slices from the MRI study were reconstructed to precisely match the CT slices by identifying three common bony landmarks on each study. The CTV was separately defined on the matched MRI slices. Data related to the size and location of the prostate were compared between CT and MRI. The spatial relationship between the tip of urethrogram cone on CT and prostate apex seen on MRI was also estimated. Results: The phantom study showed the registration discrepancies between CT and MRI smaller than 1.0 mm in any pair in comparison. The patient study showed a mean image registration error of 0.9 (± 0.6) mm. The average prostate volume was 63.0 (± 25.8) cm 3 and 50.9 (± 22.9) cm 3 determined by CT and MRI, respectively. The difference in prostate location with the two studies usually differed at the base and at the apex of the prostate. On the transverse MRI, the prostate apex was situated 7.1 (± 4.5) mm dorsal and 15.1 (± 4.0) mm cephalad to the tip of urethrogram cone. Conclusions: CT-MRI image fusion study made it possible to compare the two modalities directly. MRI localization of the prostate is more accurate than CT, and indicates the distance from cone to apex is 15 mm. CT-MRI image fusion technique provides valuable supplements to CT technology for more precise targeting of the prostate cancer

  3. Image Guidance Based on Prostate Position for Prostate Cancer Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Wagner, Marcus; Indelicato, Daniel; Fryer, Amber; Horne, David; Chellini, Angela; McKenzie, Craig; Lawlor, Paula; Mahajan, Chaitali; Li Zuofeng; Lin Liyong; Keole, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the target coverage for proton therapy with and without image guidance and daily prebeam reorientation. Methods and Materials: A total of 207 prostate positions were analyzed for 9 prostate cancer patients treated using our low-risk prostate proton therapy protocol (University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute 001). The planning target volume was defined as the prostate plus a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superoinferior extension. The prostate was repositioned using 5- and 10-mm shifts (anteriorly, inferiorly, posteriorly, and superiorly) and for Points A-D using a combination of 10-mm multidimensional movements (anteriorly or inferiorly; posteriorly or superiorly; and left or right). The beams were then realigned using the new prostate position. The prescription dose was 78 Gray equivalent (GE) to 95% of the planning target volume. Results: For small movements in the anterior, inferior, and posterior directions within the planning target volume (≤5 mm), treatment realignment demonstrated small, but significant, improvements in the clinical target volume (CTV) coverage to the prescribed dose (78 GE). The anterior and posterior shifts also significantly increased the minimal CTV dose (Δ +1.59 GE). For prostate 10-mm movements in the inferior, posterior, and superior directions, the beam realignment produced larger and significant improvements for both the CTV V 78 (Δ +6.4%) and the CTV minimal dose (Δ +8.22 GE). For the compounded 10-mm multidimensional shifts, realignment significantly improved the CTV V 78 (Δ +11.8%) and CTV minimal dose (Δ +23.6 GE). After realignment, the CTV minimal dose was >76.6 GE (>98%) for all points (A-D). Conclusion: Proton beam realignment after target shift will enhance CTV coverage for different prostate positions

  4. Prostate immobilization can be achieved with patient positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, David T.; Silverman, Larry N.; Tercilla, Oscar F.; Lutz, Stephen T.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: With advances in 3D conformal therapy, daily variation in the position of the prostate poses increasing problems for radiation oncologists. In this study we attempt to define the optimal treatment position for patients with prostate cancer by measuring the range of movement of the prostate. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with biopsy proven adenocarcinoma of the prostate underwent prone and supine CT scans with IV and oral contrast. Foley catheters (FC) were placed in the urinary bladder, and renograffin was used to make the balloon radiopaque. AP/PA and lateral radiographs were taken for patients in the supine and prone position with either empty bladder (EB) or partially filled bladder (PFB, containing 60 cc of contrast medium). Measurements were taken from the Foley catheter (represents prostatic urethra), to the anterior rectal wall and pubic symphysis (PS). The rectal gas pattern was analyzed to evaluate the rectum-sparing effect. The false table top was not used. Results: For radiographs taken in the supine position, the FC was located 1.4 ± 0.5 cm from the PS in the case of PFB versus EB. In the prone position the variation was significantly less, with an increase in FC to PS distance of only 0.5 ± 0.3 cm for a PFB versus EB. The rectal gas pattern was also noted to vary, with a more expanded and rounded shape in the prone position. Conclusion: Most institutions treat patients with prostate cancer in the supine position. The previous rationale for treatment in the prone position has been small bowel sparing. Here, however, we show that prone treatment also minimizes the motion of the prostate. With less posterior margin required, 3D conformal treatment could be delivered with an additional 30-50% rectal sparing

  5. Development of an immunotherapeutic adenovirus targeting hormone-independent prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim JS

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jae Sik Kim,1 Sang Don Lee,2 Sang Jin Lee,3 Moon Kee Chung21Department of Urology, The Catholic University of Korea Incheon St Mary's Hospital, Incheon, 2Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital and Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Yangsan, 3Genitourinary Cancer Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang, KoreaBackground: To develop a targeting therapy for hormone-independent prostate cancer, we constructed and characterized conditionally replicating oncolytic adenovirus (Ad equipped with mRFP(monomeric red fluorescence protein/ttk (modified herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase This construct was then further modified to express both mRFP/ttk and a soluble form of cytokine FLT3L (fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand simultaneously.Methods: To construct the recombinant oncolytic adenovirus, E1a and E4 genes, which are necessary for adenovirus replication, were controlled by the prostate-specific enhancer sequence (PSES targeting prostate cancer cells expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA. Simultaneously, it expressed the mRFP/ttk fusion protein in order to be able to elicit the cytotoxic effect.Results: The Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk chimeric recombinant adenovirus was generated successfully. When replication of Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk was evaluated in prostate cancer cell lines under fluorescence microscopy, red fluorescence intensity increased more in LNCaP cells, suggesting that the mRFP/ttk fusion protein was folded functionally. In addition, the replication assay including wild-type adenovirus as a positive control showed that PSES-positive cells (LNCaP and CWR22rv permitted virus replication but not PSES-negative cells (DU145 and PC3. Next, we evaluated the killing activity of this recombinant adenovirus. The Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk killed LNCaP and CWR22rv more effectively. Unlike PSES-positive cells, DU145 and PC3 were resistant to killing by this recombinant

  6. Prostate position late in the course of external beam therapy: patterns and predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zellars, Richard C.; Roberson, Peter L.; Strawderman, Myla; Zhang Daowen; Sandler, Howard M.; Haken, Randall K. ten; Osher, David; McLaughlin, P. William

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To examine prostate and seminal vesicles position late in the course of radiation therapy and to determine the effect and predictive value of the bladder and rectum on prostate and seminal vesicles positioning. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with localized prostate cancer underwent a computerized tomography scan (CT1) before the start of radiation therapy. After 4-5 weeks of radiation therapy, a second CT scan (CT2) was obtained. All patients were scanned in the supine treatment position with instructions to maintain a full bladder. The prostate, seminal vesicles, bladder, and rectum were contoured. CT2 was aligned via fixed bony anatomy to CT1. The geometrical center and volume of each structure were obtained and directly compared. Results: The prostate shifted along a diagonal axis extending from an anterior-superior position to a posterior-inferior position. The dominant shift was to a more posterior-inferior position. On average, bladder and rectal volumes decreased to 51% (no. +-no. 29%) and 82% (no. +-no. 45%) of their pretreatment values, respectively. Multiple regression analysis (MRA) revealed that bladder movement and volume change and upper rectum movement were independently associated with prostate motion (p = 0.016, p = 0.003, and p = 0.052 respectively). Conclusion: Patients are often instructed to maintain a full bladder during a course of external beam radiation therapy, in the hopes of decreasing bladder and small bowel toxicity. However, our study shows that large bladder volumes late in therapy are strongly associated with posterior prostate displacement. This prostate displacement may result in marginal miss

  7. Spacer stability and prostate position variability during radiotherapy for prostate cancer applying a hydrogel to protect the rectal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Escobar-Corral, Nuria; Caffaro, Mariana; Djukic, Victoria; Klotz, Jens; Eble, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim was to evaluate the spacer dimensions and prostate position variability during the course of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: CT scans were performed in a group of 15 patients (G1) after the 10 ml injection of a hydrogel spacer (SpaceOAR™) and 30 patients without a spacer (G2) before the beginning of treatment (CT1) and in the last treatment week, 10–12 weeks following spacer implantation (CT2). Spacer dimensions and displacements were determined and prostate displacements compared. Results: Mean volume of the hydrogel increased slightly (17%; p 2 cm 3 . The average displacement of the hydrogel center of mass was 0.6 mm (87% ⩽ 2.2 mm), −0.6 mm (100% ⩽ 2.2 mm) and 1.4 mm (87% ⩽ 4.3 mm) in the x-, y- and z-axes (not significant). The average distance between prostate and anterior rectal wall before/at the end of radiotherapy was 1.6 cm/1.5 cm, 1.2 cm/1.3 cm and 1.0 cm/1.1 cm at the level of the base, middle and apex (G1). Prostate position variations were similar comparing G1 and G2, but significant systematic posterior displacements were only found in G2. Conclusions: A stable distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall results during the radiotherapy course after injection of the spacer before treatment planning. Larger posterior prostate displacements could be reduced

  8. Optimal preprocessing of serum and urine metabolomic data fusion for staging prostate cancer through design of experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Hong; Cai, Aimin; Zhou, Qi; Xu, Pengtao; Zhao, Liangcai; Li, Chen; Dong, Baijun; Gao, Hongchang

    2017-01-01

    Accurate classification of cancer stages will achieve precision treatment for cancer. Metabolomics presents biological phenotypes at the metabolite level and holds a great potential for cancer classification. Since metabolomic data can be obtained from different samples or analytical techniques, data fusion has been applied to improve classification accuracy. Data preprocessing is an essential step during metabolomic data analysis. Therefore, we developed an innovative optimization method to select a proper data preprocessing strategy for metabolomic data fusion using a design of experiment approach for improving the classification of prostate cancer (PCa) stages. In this study, urine and serum samples were collected from participants at five phases of PCa and analyzed using a 1 H NMR-based metabolomic approach. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used as a classification model and its performance was assessed by goodness of fit (R 2 ) and predictive ability (Q 2 ). Results show that data preprocessing significantly affect classification performance and depends on data properties. Using the fused metabolomic data from urine and serum, PLS-DA model with the optimal data preprocessing (R 2  = 0.729, Q 2  = 0.504, P < 0.0001) can effectively improve model performance and achieve a better classification result for PCa stages as compared with that without data preprocessing (R 2  = 0.139, Q 2  = 0.006, P = 0.450). Therefore, we propose that metabolomic data fusion integrated with an optimal data preprocessing strategy can significantly improve the classification of cancer stages for precision treatment. - Highlights: • NMR metabolomic analysis of body fluids can be used for staging prostate cancer. • Data preprocessing is an essential step for metabolomic analysis. • Data fusion improves information recovery for cancer classification. • Design of experiment achieves optimal preprocessing of metabolomic data fusion.

  9. MicroRNA-224 targets ERG2 and contributes to malignant progressions of meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Maomao; Deng, Xiaodong; Ying, Qi; Jin, Tingyan; Li, Ming; Liang, Chong

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-224 is overexpressed in various malignant tumors with poor prognosis, which plays a critical role in biological processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis and several developmental and physiological progressions. However, the potential association between miR-224 and clinical outcome in patients with meningiomas remains unknown. Here, we investigate miR-224 expression and biological functions in meningiomas. MiR-224 expression was measured by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in meningioma and normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to exam its correlation with clinicopathological features and prognostic value. The biological effects of miR-224 on the cell proliferation and apoptosis in meningioma cells were examined by MTT assay and apoptosis assay. We found the expression levels of miR-224 were significantly higher in meningioma tissues than that in normal brain, positively correlated with advanced pathological grade. Kaplan–Meier analysis indicated that meningioma patients with low miR-224 expression exhibited significantly prolonged overall and recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ERG2 was an identical candidate target gene of MiR-224 in vitro. Our results indicated that downregulation of miR-224 suppressed cell growth and resulted in the enhancement of cell apoptosis through activation of the ERG2-BAK-induced apoptosis pathway. Our findings imply the miR-224 expression could predict the overall survival and recurrence-free survival of patients with meningioma and it might be a promising therapeutic target for treating malignant meningiomas. - Highlights: • MiR-224 expression is correlates with prognosis in meningioma patients. • ERG2 is a novel downstream target of miR-224. • MiR-224 suppressed cell growth and enhanced apoptosis in IOMM-Lee and CH157 cells. • MiR-224 is an upstream regulator of the ERG2

  10. Androgens as therapy for androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hui-Ping

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed non-cutaneous tumor of men in Western countries. While surgery is often successful for organ-confined prostate cancer, androgen ablation therapy is the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. However, this therapy is associated with several undesired side-effects, including increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Shortening the period of androgen ablation therapy may benefit prostate cancer patients. Intermittent Androgen Deprivation therapy improves quality of life, reduces toxicity and medical costs, and delays disease progression in some patients. Cell culture and xenograft studies using androgen receptor (AR-positive castration-resistant human prostate cancers cells (LNCaP, ARCaP, and PC-3 cells over-expressing AR suggest that androgens may suppress the growth of AR-rich prostate cancer cells. Androgens cause growth inhibition and G1 cell cycle arrest in these cells by regulating c-Myc, Skp2, and p27Kip via AR. Higher dosages of testosterone cause greater growth inhibition of relapsed tumors. Manipulating androgen/AR signaling may therefore be a potential therapy for AR-positive advanced prostate cancer.

  11. MR imaging of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbach, P.; Haas, M.; Hamm, B.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in Germany; however, there is a distinct difference between incidence and mortality. The detection of prostate cancer is based on clinical and laboratory testing using serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and transrectal ultrasound with randomized biopsy. Multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate can provide valuable diagnostic information for detection of prostate cancer, especially after negative results of a biopsy prior to repeat biopsy. In addition the use of MR ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy has gained in diagnostic importance and has increased the prostate cancer detection rate. The prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS) classification has standardized the reporting of prostate MRI which has positively influenced the acceptance by urologists. (orig.) [de

  12. CT and MR image fusion using two different methods after prostate brachytherapy: impact on post-implant dosimetric assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servois, V.; El Khoury, C.; Lantoine, A.; Ollivier, L.; Neuenschwander, S.; Chauveinc, L.; Cosset, J.M.; Flam, T.; Rosenwald, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    To study different methods of CT and MR images fusion in patient treated by brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. To compare the results of the dosimetric study realized on CT slices and images fusion. Fourteen cases of patients treated by 1125 were retrospectively studied. The CT examinations were realized with continuous section of 5 mm thickness, and MR images were obtained with a surface coil with contiguous section of 3 mm thickness. For the images fusion process, only the T2 weighted MR sequence was used. Two processes of images fusion were realized for each patient, using as reference marks the bones of the pelvis and the implanted seeds. A quantitative and qualitative appreciation was made by the operators, for each patient and both methods of images fusion. The dosimetric study obtained by a dedicated software was realized on CT images and all types of images fusion. The usual dosimetric indexes (D90, V 100 and V 150) were compared for each type of image. The quantitative results given by the software of images fusion showed a superior accuracy to the one obtained by the pelvic bony reference marks. Conversely, qualitative and quantitative results obtained by the operators showed a better accuracy of the images fusion based on iodine seeds. For two patients out of three presenting a D90 inferior to 145 Gy on CT examination, the D90 was superior to this norm when the dosimetry was based on images fusion, whatever the method used. The images fusion method based on implanted seed matching seems to be more precise than the one using bony reference marks. The dosimetric study realized on images fusion could allow to rectify possible errors, mainly due to difficulties in surrounding prostate contour delimitation on CT images. (authors)

  13. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-12-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities.

  14. Incremental diagnostic value of targeted biopsy using mpMRI-TRUS fusion versus 14-fragments prostatic biopsy. A prospective controlled study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariotti, Guilherme C.; Falsarella, Priscila M.; Garcia, Rodrigo G.; Queiroz, Marcos R.G.; Lemos, Gustavo C.; Baroni, Ronaldo H.

    2018-01-01

    To compare the incremental diagnostic value of targeted biopsy using real-time multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasound (mpMRI-TRUS) fusion to conventional 14-cores biopsy. Uni-institutional, institutional review board (IRB) approved prospective blinded study comparing TRUS-guided random and targeted biopsy using mpMRI-TRUS fusion, in 100 consecutive men. We included men with clinical-laboratorial suspicious for prostate cancer and Likert score ≥ 3 mp-MRI. Patients previously diagnosed with prostate cancer were excluded. All patients were submitted to 14-cores TRUS-guided biopsy (mpMRI data operator-blinded), followed by targeted biopsy using mpMRI-TRUS fusion. There was an overall increase in cancer detection rate, from 56% with random technique to 62% combining targeted biopsy using mpMRI-TRUS fusion; incremental diagnosis was even more relevant for clinically significant lesions (Gleason ≥ 7), diagnosing 10% more clinically significant lesions with fusion biopsy technique. Diagnosis upgrade occurred in 5 patients that would have negative results in random biopsies and had clinically significant tumours with the combined technique, and in 5 patients who had the diagnosis of significant tumours after fusion biopsy and clinically insignificant tumours in random biopsies(p=0.0010). Targeted biopsy using mpMRI-TRUS fusion has incremental diagnostic value in comparison to conventional random biopsy, better detecting clinically significant prostate cancers. (orig.)

  15. Incremental diagnostic value of targeted biopsy using mpMRI-TRUS fusion versus 14-fragments prostatic biopsy. A prospective controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, Guilherme C.; Falsarella, Priscila M.; Garcia, Rodrigo G.; Queiroz, Marcos R.G. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Department of Interventional Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lemos, Gustavo C. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Department of Urology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Baroni, Ronaldo H. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2018-01-15

    To compare the incremental diagnostic value of targeted biopsy using real-time multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasound (mpMRI-TRUS) fusion to conventional 14-cores biopsy. Uni-institutional, institutional review board (IRB) approved prospective blinded study comparing TRUS-guided random and targeted biopsy using mpMRI-TRUS fusion, in 100 consecutive men. We included men with clinical-laboratorial suspicious for prostate cancer and Likert score ≥ 3 mp-MRI. Patients previously diagnosed with prostate cancer were excluded. All patients were submitted to 14-cores TRUS-guided biopsy (mpMRI data operator-blinded), followed by targeted biopsy using mpMRI-TRUS fusion. There was an overall increase in cancer detection rate, from 56% with random technique to 62% combining targeted biopsy using mpMRI-TRUS fusion; incremental diagnosis was even more relevant for clinically significant lesions (Gleason ≥ 7), diagnosing 10% more clinically significant lesions with fusion biopsy technique. Diagnosis upgrade occurred in 5 patients that would have negative results in random biopsies and had clinically significant tumours with the combined technique, and in 5 patients who had the diagnosis of significant tumours after fusion biopsy and clinically insignificant tumours in random biopsies(p=0.0010). Targeted biopsy using mpMRI-TRUS fusion has incremental diagnostic value in comparison to conventional random biopsy, better detecting clinically significant prostate cancers. (orig.)

  16. Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin; Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 ± 1.5% error, 4.4 ± 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 ± 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

  17. Sedimentary record of erg migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, M. L.

    1986-06-01

    The sedimentary record of erg (eolian sand sea) migration consists of an idealized threefold division of sand-sea facies sequences. The basal division, here termed the fore-erg, is composed of a hierarchy of eolian sand bodies contained within sediments of the flanking depositional environment. These sand bodies consist of eolian strata deposited by small dune complexes, zibars, and sand sheets. The fore-erg represents the downwind, leading edge of the erg and records the onset of eolian sedimentation. Basin subsidence coupled with erg migration places the medial division, termed the central erg, over the fore-erg strata. The central erg, represented by a thick accumulation of large-scale, cross-stratified sandstone, is the product of large draa complexes. Eolian influence on regional sedimentation patterns is greatest in the central erg, and most of the sand transported and deposited in the erg is contained within this region. Reduction in sand supply and continued erg migration will cover the central-erg deposits with a veneer of back-erg deposits. This upper division of the erg facies sequence resembles closely the fore-erg region. Similar types of eolian strata are present and organized in sand bodies encased in sediments of the upwind flanking depositional environment(s). Back-erg deposits may be thin due to limited eolian influence on sedimentation or incomplete erg migration, or they may be completely absent because of great susceptibility to postdepositional erosion. Tectonic, climatic, and eustatic influences on sand-sea deposition will produce distinctive variations or modifications of the idealized erg facies sequence. The resulting variants in the sedimentary record of erg migration are illustrated with ancient examples from western North America, Europe, southern Africa, and South America.

  18. Characterization of KRAS Rearrangements in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Song; Shankar, Sunita; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Ateeq, Bushra; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Jing, Xiaojun; Robinson, Daniel; Cao, Qi; Prensner, John R.; Yocum, Anastasia K.; Wang, Rui; Fries, Daniel F.; Han, Bo; Asangani, Irfan A.; Cao, Xuhong; Li, Yong; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Pflueger, Dorothee; Gopalan, Anuradha; Reuter, Victor E.; Kahoud, Emily Rose; Cantley, Lewis C.; Rubin, Mark A.; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2011-01-01

    Using an integrative genomics approach called Amplification Breakpoint Ranking and Assembly (ABRA) analysis, we nominated KRAS as a gene fusion with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2L3 in the DU145 cell line, originally derived from prostate cancer metastasis to the brain. Interestingly, analysis of tissues revealed that 2 of 62 metastatic prostate cancers harbored aberrations at the KRAS locus. In DU145 cells, UBE2L3-KRAS produces a fusion protein, specific knock-down of which, attenuates cell invasion and xenograft growth. Ectopic expression of the UBE2L3-KRAS fusion protein exhibits transforming activity in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and RWPE prostate epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In NIH 3T3 cells, UBE2L3-KRAS attenuates MEK/ERK signaling, commonly engaged by oncogenic mutant KRAS, and instead signals via AKT and p38 MAPK pathways. This is the first report of a gene fusion involving Ras family suggesting that this aberration may drive metastatic progression in a rare subset of prostate cancers. PMID:22140652

  19. Polymorphisms and mutations of human TMPRSS6 in iron deficiency anemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beutler, E.; Geet, C. Van; Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Gelbart, T.; Crain, K.; Truksa, J.; Lee, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    Male subjects with iron deficiency from the general population were examined for polymorphisms or sporadic mutations in TMPRSS6 to identify genetic risk factors for iron deficiency anemia. Three uncommon non-synonymous polymorphisms were identified, G228D, R446W, and V795I (allele frequencies

  20. Identification of threshold prostate specific antigen levels to optimize the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer by magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound fusion guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Nabeel A; George, Arvin K; Siddiqui, M Minhaj; Rothwax, Jason T; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Stamatakis, Lambros; Su, Daniel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Simon, Richard; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Prostate specific antigen sensitivity increases with lower threshold values but with a corresponding decrease in specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy detects prostate cancer more efficiently and of higher grade than standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy but the optimal population for its use is not well defined. We evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy vs 12-core biopsy across a prostate specific antigen continuum. We reviewed the records of all patients enrolled in a prospective trial who underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsies from August 2007 through February 2014. Patients were stratified by each of 4 prostate specific antigen cutoffs. The greatest Gleason score using either biopsy method was compared in and across groups as well as across the population prostate specific antigen range. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason 7 (4 + 3) or greater. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. A total of 1,003 targeted and 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsies were performed, of which 564 diagnosed prostate cancer for a 56.2% detection rate. Targeted biopsy led to significantly more upgrading to clinically significant disease compared to 12-core biopsy. This trend increased more with increasing prostate specific antigen, specifically in patients with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml. Prostate specific antigen 5.2 ng/ml or greater captured 90% of upgrading by targeted biopsy, corresponding to 64% of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent fusion biopsy. Conversely a greater proportion of clinically insignificant disease was detected by 12-core vs targeted biopsy overall. These differences persisted when controlling for potential confounders on multivariate analysis. Prostate cancer upgrading with targeted biopsy increases

  1. An evaluation of intrafraction motion of the prostate in the prone and supine positions using electromagnetic tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Amish P.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Langen, Katja M.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate differences in target motion during prostate irradiation in the prone versus supine position using electromagnetic tracking to measure prostate mobility. Materials/methods: Twenty patients received prostate radiotherapy in the supine position utilizing the Calypso Localization System (registered) for prostate positioning and monitoring. For each patient, 10 treatment fractions were followed by a session in which the patient was repositioned prone, and prostate mobility was tracked. The fraction of time that the prostate was displaced by >3, 5, 7, and 10 mm was calculated for each patient, for both positions (400 tracking sessions). Results: Clear patterns of respiratory motion were seen in the prone tracks due to the influence of increased abdominal motion. Averaged over all patients, the prostate was displaced >3 and 5 mm for 37.8% and 10.1% of the total tracking time in the prone position, respectively. In the supine position, the prostate was displaced >3 and 5 mm for 12.6% and 2.9%, respectively. With both patient setups, inferior and posterior drifts of the prostate position were observed. Averaged over all prone tracking sessions, the prostate was displaced >3 mm in the posterior and inferior directions for 11.7% and 9.5% of the total time, respectively. Conclusions: With real-time tracking of the prostate, it is possible to study the effects of different setup positions on the prostate mobility. The percentage of time the prostate moved >3 and 5 mm was increased by a factor of three in the prone versus supine position. For larger displacements (>7 mm) no difference in prostate mobility was observed between prone and supine positions. To reduce rectal toxicity, radiotherapy in the prone position may be a suitable alternative provided respiratory motion is accounted for during treatment. Acute and late toxicity results remain to be evaluated for both patient positions.

  2. Elastic Versus Rigid Image Registration in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Prostate Biopsy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venderink, Wulphert; de Rooij, Maarten; Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Huisman, Henkjan J; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2016-07-29

    The main difference between the available magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound (MRI-TRUS) fusion platforms for prostate biopsy is the method of image registration being either rigid or elastic. As elastic registration compensates for possible deformation caused by the introduction of an ultrasound probe for example, it is expected that it would perform better than rigid registration. The aim of this meta-analysis is to compare rigid with elastic registration by calculating the detection odds ratio (OR) for both subgroups. The detection OR is defined as the ratio of the odds of detecting clinically significant prostate cancer (csPCa) by MRI-TRUS fusion biopsy compared with systematic TRUS biopsy. Secondary objectives were the OR for any PCa and the OR after pooling both registration techniques. The electronic databases PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were systematically searched for relevant studies according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Statement. Studies comparing MRI-TRUS fusion and systematic TRUS-guided biopsies in the same patient were included. The quality assessment of included studies was performed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies version 2. Eleven papers describing elastic and 10 describing rigid registration were included. Meta-analysis showed an OR of csPCa for elastic and rigid registration of 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-1.73, pimaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion systems which vary in their method of compensating for prostate deformation. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. SU-F-T-42: MRI and TRUS Image Fusion as a Mode of Generating More Accurate Prostate Contours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petronek, M; Purysko, A; Balik, S; Ciezki, J; Klein, E; Wilkinson, D [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is utilized intra-operatively for LDR permanent prostate seed implant treatment planning. Prostate contouring with TRUS can be challenging at the apex and base. This study attempts to improve accuracy of prostate contouring with MRI-TRUS fusion to prevent over- or under-estimation of the prostate volume. Methods: 14 patients with previous MRI guided prostate biopsy and undergone an LDR permanent prostate seed implant have been selected. The prostate was contoured on the MRI images (1 mm slice thickness) by a radiologist. The prostate was also contoured on TRUS images (5 mm slice thickness) during LDR procedure by a urologist. MRI and TRUS images were rigidly fused manually and the prostate contours from MRI and TRUS were compared using Dice similarity coefficient, percentage volume difference and length, height and width differences. Results: The prostate volume was overestimated by 8 ± 18% (range: 34% to −25%) in TRUS images compared to MRI. The mean Dice was 0.77 ± 0.09 (range: 0.53 to 0.88). The mean difference (TRUS-MRI) in the prostate width was 0 ± 4 mm (range: −11 to 5 mm), height was −3 ± 6 mm (range: −13 to 6 mm) and length was 6 ± 6 (range: −10 to 16 mm). Prostate was overestimated with TRUS imaging at the base for 6 cases (mean: 8 ± 4 mm and range: 5 to 14 mm), at the apex for 6 cases (mean: 11 ± 3 mm and range: 5 to 15 mm) and 1 case was underestimated at both base and apex by 4 mm. Conclusion: Use of intra-operative TRUS and MRI image fusion can help to improve the accuracy of prostate contouring by accurately accounting for prostate over- or under-estimations, especially at the base and apex. The mean amount of discrepancy is within a range that is significant for LDR sources.

  4. SU-F-T-42: MRI and TRUS Image Fusion as a Mode of Generating More Accurate Prostate Contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petronek, M; Purysko, A; Balik, S; Ciezki, J; Klein, E; Wilkinson, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is utilized intra-operatively for LDR permanent prostate seed implant treatment planning. Prostate contouring with TRUS can be challenging at the apex and base. This study attempts to improve accuracy of prostate contouring with MRI-TRUS fusion to prevent over- or under-estimation of the prostate volume. Methods: 14 patients with previous MRI guided prostate biopsy and undergone an LDR permanent prostate seed implant have been selected. The prostate was contoured on the MRI images (1 mm slice thickness) by a radiologist. The prostate was also contoured on TRUS images (5 mm slice thickness) during LDR procedure by a urologist. MRI and TRUS images were rigidly fused manually and the prostate contours from MRI and TRUS were compared using Dice similarity coefficient, percentage volume difference and length, height and width differences. Results: The prostate volume was overestimated by 8 ± 18% (range: 34% to −25%) in TRUS images compared to MRI. The mean Dice was 0.77 ± 0.09 (range: 0.53 to 0.88). The mean difference (TRUS-MRI) in the prostate width was 0 ± 4 mm (range: −11 to 5 mm), height was −3 ± 6 mm (range: −13 to 6 mm) and length was 6 ± 6 (range: −10 to 16 mm). Prostate was overestimated with TRUS imaging at the base for 6 cases (mean: 8 ± 4 mm and range: 5 to 14 mm), at the apex for 6 cases (mean: 11 ± 3 mm and range: 5 to 15 mm) and 1 case was underestimated at both base and apex by 4 mm. Conclusion: Use of intra-operative TRUS and MRI image fusion can help to improve the accuracy of prostate contouring by accurately accounting for prostate over- or under-estimations, especially at the base and apex. The mean amount of discrepancy is within a range that is significant for LDR sources.

  5. Mechanisms underlying probucol-induced hERG-channel deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi YQ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuan-Qi Shi,1,* Cai-Chuan Yan,1,* Xiao Zhang,1 Meng Yan,1 Li-Rong Liu,1 Huai-Ze Geng,1 Lin Lv,1 Bao-Xin Li1,21Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, 2State-Province Key Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Engineering, Harbin, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The hERG gene encodes the pore-forming α-subunit of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium channel (IKr, which is important for cardiac repolarization. Reduction of IhERG due to genetic mutations or drug interferences causes long QT syndrome, leading to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias (torsades de pointes or sudden death. Probucol is a cholesterol-lowering drug that could reduce hERG current by decreasing plasma membrane hERG protein expression and eventually cause long QT syndrome. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of probucol effects on IhERG and hERG-channel expression. Our data demonstrated that probucol reduces SGK1 expression, known as SGK isoform, in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in downregulation of phosphorylated E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 expression, but not the total level of Nedd4-2. As a result, the hERG protein reduces, due to the enhanced ubiquitination level. On the contrary, carbachol could enhance the phosphorylation level of Nedd4-2 as an alternative to SGK1, and thus rescue the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of hERG channels caused by probucol. These discoveries provide a novel mechanism of probucol-induced hERG-channel deficiency, and imply that carbachol or its analog may serve as potential therapeutic compounds for the handling of probucol cardiotoxicity.Keywords: long QT, hERG potassium channels, probucol, SGK1, Nedd4-2

  6. Impact of knee support and shape of tabletop on rectum and prostate position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbakkers, Roel; Duppen, Joop C.; Betgen, Anja; Lotz, Heidi; Remeijer, Peter; Fitton, Isabelle; Nowak, Peter; Herk, Marcel van; Rasch, Coen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of different tabletops with or without a knee support on the position of the rectum, prostate, and bulb of the penis; and to evaluate the effect of these patient-positioning devices on treatment planning. Methods and materials: For 10 male volunteers, five MRI scans were made in four different positions: on a flat tabletop with knee support, on a flat tabletop without knee support, on a rounded tabletop with knee support, and on a rounded tabletop without knee support. The fifth scan was in the same position as the first. With image registration, the position differences of the rectum, prostate, and bulb of the penis were measured at several points in a sagittal plane through the central axis of the prostate. A planning target volume was generated from the delineated prostates with a margin of 10 mm in three dimensions. A three-field treatment plan with a prescribed dose of 78 Gy to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements point was automatically generated from each planning target volume. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for all rectal walls. Results: The shape of the tabletop did not affect the rectum and prostate position. Addition of a knee support shifted the anterior and posterior rectal walls dorsally. For the anterior rectal wall, the maximum dorsal shift was 9.9 mm (standard error of the mean [SEM] 1.7 mm) at the top of the prostate. For the posterior rectal wall, the maximum dorsal shift was 10.2 mm (SEM 1.5 mm) at the middle of the prostate. Therefore, the rectal filling was pushed caudally when a knee support was added. The knee support caused a rotation of the prostate around the left-right axis at the apex (i.e., a dorsal rotation) by 5.6 deg (SEM 0.8 deg ) and shifts in the caudal and dorsal directions of 2.6 mm (SEM 0.4 cm) and 1.4 mm (SEM 0.6 mm), respectively. The position of the bulb of the penis was not influenced by the use of a knee support or rounded tabletop. The volume of the

  7. Characterization of hERG1a and hERG1b potassium channels-a possible role for hERG1b in the I (Kr) current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Peter; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Grunnet, Morten

    2008-01-01

    I (Kr) is the fast component of the delayed rectifier potassium currents responsible for the repolarization of the cardiac muscle. The molecular correlate underlying the I (Kr) current has been identified as the hERG1 channel. Recently, two splice variants of the hERG1 alpha-subunit, hERG1a and hERG......1b, have been shown to be co-expressed in human cardiomyocytes. In this paper, we present the electrophysiological characterization of hERG1a, hERG1b, and co-expressed hERG1a/b channels in a mammalian expression system using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. We also quantified the messenger RNA...... (mRNA) levels of hERG1a and hERG1b in human cardiac tissue, and based on the expressed ratios, we evaluated the resulting currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Compared to hERG1a channels, activation was faster for both hERG1b and hERG1a/b channels. The deactivation kinetics was greatly accelerated...

  8. Targeting Splicing in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Effrosyni Antonopoulou; Michael Ladomery

    2018-01-01

    Over 95% of human genes are alternatively spliced, expressing splice isoforms that often exhibit antagonistic functions. We describe genes whose alternative splicing has been linked to prostate cancer; namely VEGFA, KLF6, BCL2L2, ERG, and AR. We discuss opportunities to develop novel therapies that target specific splice isoforms, or that target the machinery of splicing. Therapeutic approaches include the development of small molecule inhibitors of splice factor kinases, splice isoform speci...

  9. Identification of a novel homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, in a Tibetan family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Fan

    Full Text Available Different ethnic groups have distinct mutation spectrums associated with inheritable deafness. In order to identify the mutations responsible for congenital hearing loss in the Tibetan population, mutation screening for 98 deafness-related genes by microarray and massively parallel sequencing of captured target exons was conducted in one Tibetan family with familiar hearing loss. A homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, was identified in two affected brothers. Both parents are heterozygotes and an unaffected sister carries wild type alleles. The same mutation was not detected in 101 control Tibetan individuals. This missense mutation results in an amino acid change (p.Ala179Thr at a highly conserved site in the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR domain of the TMPRSS3 protein, which is essential for protein-protein interactions. Thus, this mutation likely affects the interactions of this transmembrane protein with extracellular molecules. According to our bioinformatic analyses, the TMPRSS3: c.535G>A mutation might damage protein function and lead to hearing loss. These data suggest that the homozygous mutation TMPRSS3: c.535G>A causes prelingual hearing loss in this Tibetan family. This is the first TMPRSS3 mutation found in the Chinese Tibetan population.

  10. Deletion of the Candida glabrata ERG3 and ERG11 genes: effect on cell viability, cell growth, sterol composition, and antifungal susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, A; Hitchcock, C A; Swartz, J E; Pullen, F S; Marsden, K E; Kwon-Chung, K J; Bennett, J E

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the structural genes encoding the delta 5,6 sterol desaturase (ERG3 gene) and the 14 alpha-methyl sterol demethylase (ERG11 gene) from Candida glabrata L5 (leu2). Single and double mutants of these genes were created by gene deletion. The phenotypes of these mutants, including sterol profiles, aerobic viabilities, antifungal susceptibilities, and generation times, were studied. Strain L5D (erg3 delta::LEU2) accumulated mainly ergosta-7,22-dien-3 beta-ol, was aerobically viable, and remained susceptible to antifungal agents but had a slower generation time than its parent strain. L5LUD (LEU2 erg11 delta::URA3) strains required medium supplemented with ergosterol and an anaerobic environment for growth. A spontaneous aerobically viable mutant, L5LUD40R (LEU erg11 delta::URA3), obtained from L5LUD (LEU2 erg11 delta::URA3), was found to accumulate lanosterol and obtusifoliol, was resistant to azole antifungal agents, demonstrated some increase in resistance to amphotericin B, and exhibited a 1.86-fold increase in generation time in comparison with L5 (leu2). The double-deletion mutant L5DUD61 (erg3 delta::LEU2 erg11 delta::URA3) was aerobically viable, produced mainly 14 alpha-methyl fecosterol, and had the same antifungal susceptibility pattern as L5LUD40R (LEU2 erg11 delta::URA3), and its generation time was threefold greater than that of L5 (leu2). Northern (RNA) analysis revealed that the single-deletion mutants had a marked increase in message for the undeleted ERG3 and ERG11 genes. These results indicate that differences in antifungal susceptibilities and the restoration of aerobic viability exist between the C. glabrata ergosterol mutants created in this study and those sterol mutants with similar genetic lesions previously reported for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:8593007

  11. Vacancy-ordering effects in AlB2-type ErGe2 - x(0.4 < x < or = 0.5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jeppe; Lidin, Sven; Malaman, Bernard; Venturini, Gerard

    2008-06-01

    In the Er-Ge system, the compostion range ErGe(2) to Er(2)Ge(3) has been investigated. Eight samples were produced by arc melting of the elements, and analyzed using X-ray powder diffraction. Nine crystal structures were found to be present in the samples. The structures are described as a homologous series and presented within the superspace formalism using the superspace group X2/m(alpha0gamma)0s, X representing the centring vector ((1/2), (1/2), 0, (1/2)). In this description the modulation vector q = (alphaa* + gammac*) is shown to be a direct measure of the Ge content as ErGe(2 - alpha) (alpha falls in the range 1\\over 3 to (1/2)). The large composition range is achieved by extended vacancy ordering in the planar 6(3) net of Ge with subsequent relaxation.

  12. Modulation of ERG channels by XE991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmedyb, Pernille; Calloe, Kirstine; Schmitt, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    In neuronal tissue, KCNQ2-5 channels conduct the physiologically important M-current. In some neurones, the M-current may in addition be conducted partly by ERG potassium channels, which have widely overlapping expression with the KCNQ channel subunits. XE991 and linopiridine are known to be stan......In neuronal tissue, KCNQ2-5 channels conduct the physiologically important M-current. In some neurones, the M-current may in addition be conducted partly by ERG potassium channels, which have widely overlapping expression with the KCNQ channel subunits. XE991 and linopiridine are known...... to be standard KCNQ potassium channel blockers. These compounds have been used in many different tissues as specific pharmacological tools to discern native currents conducted by KCNQ channels from other potassium currents. In this article, we demonstrate that ERG1-2 channels are also reversibly inhibited by XE......991 in the micromolar range (EC(50) 107 microM for ERG1). The effect has been characterized in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing ERG1-2 and in the mammalian HEK293 cell line stably expressing ERG1 channels. The IC(50) values for block of KCNQ channels by XE991 range 1-65 microM. In conclusion, great...

  13. Electromagnetic Tracking of Intrafraction Prostate Displacement in Patients Externally Immobilized in the Prone Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, Nathan; Butler, Wayne M.; Reed, Joshua L.; Murray, Brian C.; Kurko, Brian S.; Wallner, Kent E.; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intrafraction prostate displacement among patients immobilized in the prone position using real-time monitoring of implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso localization system was used to track prostate motion in patients receiving external beam radiation therapy (XRT) for prostate cancer. All patients were treated in the prone position and immobilized with a thermoplastic immobilization device. Real-time measurement of prostate displacement was recorded for each treatment fraction. These measurements were used to determine the duration and magnitude of displacement along the three directional axes. Results: The calculated centroid of the implanted transponders was offset from the treatment isocenter by ≥2 mm, ≥3 mm, and ≥4 mm for 38.0%, 13.9%, and 4.5% of the time. In the lateral dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by ≥2 mm, ≥3 mm, and ≥4 mm for 2.7%, 0.4%, and 0.06% of the time. In the superior-inferior dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by ≥2 mm, ≥3 mm, and ≥4 mm for 16.1%, 4.7%, and 1.5% of the time, respectively. In the anterior-posterior dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by ≥2 mm, ≥3 mm, and ≥4 mm for 13.4%, 3.0%, and 0.5% of the time. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate displacement in the prone position is comparable to that in the supine position. For patients with large girth, in whom the supine position may preclude accurate detection of implanted radiofrequency transponders, treatment in the prone position is a suitable alternative.

  14. Genomic rearrangements of PTEN in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopheap ePhin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The phosphatase and tensin homolog gene on chromosome 10q23.3 (PTEN is a negative regulator of the PIK3/Akt survival pathway and is the most frequently deleted tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer. Monoallelic loss of PTEN is present in up to 60% of localized prostate cancers and complete loss of PTEN in prostate cancer is linked to metastasis and androgen independent progression. Studies on the genomic status of PTEN in prostate cancer initially used a two-color fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH assay for PTEN copy number detection in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue preparations. More recently, a four-color FISH assay containing two additional control probes flanking the PTEN locus with a lower false-positive rate was reported. Combined with the detection of other critical genomic biomarkers for prostate cancer such as ERG, AR, and MYC, the evaluation of PTEN genomic status has proven to be invaluable for patient stratification and management. Although less frequent than allelic deletions, point mutations in the gene and epigenetic silencing are also known to contribute to loss of PTEN function, and ultimately to prostate cancer initiation. Overall, it is clear that PTEN is a powerful biomarker for prostate cancer. Used as a companion diagnostic for emerging therapeutic drugs, FISH analysis of PTEN is promisingly moving human prostate cancer closer to more effective cancer management and therapies.

  15. Analysis of histological findings obtained combining US/mp-MRI fusion-guided biopsies with systematic US biopsies: mp-MRI role in prostate cancer detection and false negative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiella, Eliodoro; Santucci, Domiziana; Greco, Federico; Frauenfelder, Giulia; Giacobbe, Viola; Muto, Giovanni; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Grasso, Rosario Francesco

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of mp-MRI correlating US/mp-MRI fusion-guided biopsy with systematic random US-guided biopsy in prostate cancer diagnosis. 137 suspected prostatic abnormalities were identified on mp-MRI (1.5T) in 96 patients and classified according to PI-RADS score v2. All target lesions underwent US/mp-MRI fusion biopsy and prostatic sampling was completed by US-guided systematic random 12-core biopsies. Histological analysis and Gleason score were established for all the samples, both target lesions defined by mp-MRI, and random biopsies. PI-RADS score was correlated with the histological results, divided in three groups (benign tissue, atypia and carcinoma) and with Gleason groups, divided in four categories considering the new Grading system of the ISUP 2014, using t test. Multivariate analysis was used to correlate PI-RADS and Gleason categories to PSA level and abnormalities axial diameter. When the random core biopsies showed carcinoma (mp-MRI false-negatives), PSA value and lesions Gleason median value were compared with those of carcinomas identified by mp-MRI (true-positives), using t test. There was statistically significant difference between PI-RADS score in carcinoma, atypia and benign lesions groups (4.41, 3.61 and 3.24, respectively) and between PI-RADS score in Gleason  7 group (4.14 and 4.79, respectively). mp-MRI performance was more accurate for lesions > 15 mm and in patients with PSA > 6 ng/ml. In systematic sampling, 130 (11.25%) mp-MRI false-negative were identified. There was no statistic difference in Gleason median value (7.0 vs 7.06) between this group and the mp-MRI true-positives, but a significant lower PSA median value was demonstrated (7.08 vs 7.53 ng/ml). mp-MRI remains the imaging modality of choice to identify PCa lesions. Integrating US-guided random sampling with US/mp-MRI fusion target lesions sampling, 3.49% of false-negative were identified.

  16. Escitalopram block of hERG potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Yun Ju; Jeon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hong Joon; Kim, In-Beom; Choi, Jin-Sung; Sung, Ki-Wug; Hahn, Sang June

    2014-01-01

    Escitalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is the pharmacologically active S-enantiomer of the racemic mixture of RS-citalopram and is widely used in the treatment of depression. The effects of escitalopram and citalopram on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels expressed in human embryonic kidney cells were investigated using voltage-clamp and Western blot analyses. Both drugs blocked hERG currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 2.6 μM for escitalopram and an IC50 value of 3.2 μM for citalopram. The blocking of hERG by escitalopram was voltage-dependent, with a steep increase across the voltage range of channel activation. However, voltage independence was observed over the full range of activation. The blocking by escitalopram was frequency dependent. A rapid application of escitalopram induced a rapid and reversible blocking of the tail current of hERG. The extent of the blocking by escitalopram during the depolarizing pulse was less than that during the repolarizing pulse, suggesting that escitalopram has a high affinity for the open state of the hERG channel, with a relatively lower affinity for the inactivated state. Both escitalopram and citalopram produced a reduction of hERG channel protein trafficking to the plasma membrane but did not affect the short-term internalization of the hERG channel. These results suggest that escitalopram blocked hERG currents at a supratherapeutic concentration and that it did so by preferentially binding to both the open and the inactivated states of the channels and by inhibiting the trafficking of hERG channel protein to the plasma membrane.

  17. Indexing molecules for their hERG liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Anwar; Falah, Mizied; Raiyn, Jamal; Da'adoosh, Beny; Kadan, Sleman; Zaid, Hilal; Goldblum, Amiram

    2013-07-01

    The human Ether-a-go-go-Related-Gene (hERG) potassium (K(+)) channel is liable to drug-inducing blockage that prolongs the QT interval of the cardiac action potential, triggers arrhythmia and possibly causes sudden cardiac death. Early prediction of drug liability to hERG K(+) channel is therefore highly important and preferably obligatory at earlier stages of any drug discovery process. In vitro assessment of drug binding affinity to hERG K(+) channel involves substantial expenses, time, and labor; and therefore computational models for predicting liabilities of drug candidates for hERG toxicity is of much importance. In the present study, we apply the Iterative Stochastic Elimination (ISE) algorithm to construct a large number of rule-based models (filters) and exploit their combination for developing the concept of hERG Toxicity Index (ETI). ETI estimates the molecular risk to be a blocker of hERG potassium channel. The area under the curve (AUC) of the attained model is 0.94. The averaged ETI of hERG binders, drugs from CMC, clinical-MDDR, endogenous molecules, ACD and ZINC, were found to be 9.17, 2.53, 3.3, -1.98, -2.49 and -3.86 respectively. Applying the proposed hERG Toxicity Index Model on external test set composed of more than 1300 hERG blockers picked from chEMBL shows excellent performance (Matthews Correlation Coefficient of 0.89). The proposed strategy could be implemented for the evaluation of chemicals in the hit/lead optimization stages of the drug discovery process, improve the selection of drug candidates as well as the development of safe pharmaceutical products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Driver Fusions and Their Implications in the Development and Treatment of Human Cancers

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    Qingsong Gao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Gene fusions represent an important class of somatic alterations in cancer. We systematically investigated fusions in 9,624 tumors across 33 cancer types using multiple fusion calling tools. We identified a total of 25,664 fusions, with a 63% validation rate. Integration of gene expression, copy number, and fusion annotation data revealed that fusions involving oncogenes tend to exhibit increased expression, whereas fusions involving tumor suppressors have the opposite effect. For fusions involving kinases, we found 1,275 with an intact kinase domain, the proportion of which varied significantly across cancer types. Our study suggests that fusions drive the development of 16.5% of cancer cases and function as the sole driver in more than 1% of them. Finally, we identified druggable fusions involving genes such as TMPRSS2, RET, FGFR3, ALK, and ESR1 in 6.0% of cases, and we predicted immunogenic peptides, suggesting that fusions may provide leads for targeted drug and immune therapy. : Gao et al. analyze a 9,624 sample TCGA cohort with 33 cancer types to detect gene fusion events. They provide a landscape of fusion events detected, relate fusions to gene expression, focus on kinase fusion structures, examine mutually exclusive mutation and fusion patterns, and highlight fusion druggability. Keywords: fusion, cancer, RNA, translocation, gene fusions

  19. Clinical utility of the percentage of positive prostate biopsies in predicting prostate cancer-specific and overall survival after radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Keshaviah, Aparna; Manola, Judith; Cote, Kerri; Loffredo, Marian; Iskrzytzky, Olga; Renshaw, Andrew A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the percentage of positive prostate biopsies provides clinically relevant information to a previously established risk stratification system with respect to the end points of prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) and overall survival after radiotherapy for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A Cox regression multivariable analysis was used to evaluate the ability of the percentage of positive prostate biopsies to predict PCSS and overall survival for 381 men who underwent radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer during the prostate-specific antigen era. Results: At a median follow-up of 4.3 years (range 0.8-13.3), the presence of ≤50% positive biopsies vs. >50% positive biopsies provided a clinically relevant stratification of the 7-year estimates of PCSS (100% vs. 57%, p=0.004) in intermediate-risk patients. Moreover, all patients could be stratified into a minimal or high-risk cohort on the basis of the 10-year estimates of PCSS (100% vs. 55%, p 50%] intermediate-risk + high-risk) cohort for prostate cancer-specific death after conventional dose radiotherapy. Additional follow-up and independent validation are needed to confirm these findings

  20. Characterization of 1,577 Primary Prostate Cancers Reveals Novel Biological and Clinicopathological Insights into Molecular Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlins, Scott A.; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Davicioni, Elai; Erho, Nicholas; Yousefi, Kasra; Zhao, Shuang; Haddad, Zaid; Den, Robert B.; Dicker, Adam P.; Trock, Bruce; DeMarzo, Angelo; Ross, Ashley; Schaeffer, Edward M.; Klein, Eric A.; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Karnes, Jeffery R.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Feng, Felix Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PCa) molecular subtypes have been defined by essentially mutually exclusive events, including ETS gene fusions (most commonly involving ERG) and SPINK1 over-expression. Clinical assessment may aid in disease stratification, complementing available prognostic tests. Objective To determine the analytical validity and clinicopatholgical associations of microarray-based molecular subtyping. Design, Setting and Participants We analyzed Affymetrix GeneChip expression profiles for 1,577 patients from eight radical prostatectomy (RP) cohorts, including 1,351 cases assessed using the Decipher prognostic assay (performed in a CLIA-certified laboratory). A microarray-based (m-) random forest ERG classification model was trained and validated. Outlier expression analysis was used to predict other mutually exclusive non-ERG ETS gene rearrangements (ETS+) or SPINK1 over-expression (SPINK1+). Outcome Measurements Associations with clinical features and outcomes by multivariable logistic regression analysis and receiver operating curves. Results and Limitations The m-ERG classifier showed 95% accuracy in an independent validation subset (n=155 samples). Across cohorts, 45%, 9%, 8% and 38% of PCa were classified as m-ERG+, m-ETS+, m-SPINK1+, and triple negative (m-ERG−/m-ETS−/m-SPINK1−), respectively. Gene expression profiling supports three underlying molecularly defined groups (m-ERG+, m-ETS+ and m-SPINK1+/triple negative). On multivariable analysis, m-ERG+ tumors were associated with lower preoperative serum PSA and Gleason scores, but enriched for extraprostatic extension (p<0.001). m-ETS+ tumors were associated with seminal vesicle invasion (p=0.01), while m-SPINK1+/triple negative tumors had higher Gleason scores and were more frequent in Black/African American patients (p<0.001). Clinical outcomes were not significantly different between subtypes. Conclusions A clinically available prognostic test (Decipher) can also assess PCa molecular

  1. Peptide Immunization Against ERG and Immunogenic Mutations to Treat Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Scientific (Maynard, Ma). Peptide purity was tested by HPlC and was greater than 95 % in all instances. Peptides were dissolved in either water or...dependent regulation of autoimmunity. Science 339(6123):1084-1088. 8. Drake CG , et al. (2005) Androgen ablation mitigates tolerance to a prostate/prostate

  2. Overall Survival Benefit From Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Organ-Confined, Margin-Positive Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, Robert O.; Hafer, Russell; Cox, Craig; McClure, Stephanie E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radical prostatectomy for invasive prostate cancer is associated with positive margin rates in 10% to 50% of resected specimens. Postoperative radiation therapy may benefit patients who have organ-confined prostate cancer with positive margins. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis to examine whether adjunctive radiation therapy enhanced long-term survival for prostate cancer patients who underwent prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer but with positive margins. We used the Hoag Cancer Center database to identify patients diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer. Relative and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Among 1,474 patients diagnosed with localized invasive prostate cancer during the years 1990 to 2006 and undergoing prostatectomy, 113 (7.7%) were identified who had positive margins and did not have local extension of disease, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases. A total of 17 patients received adjunctive radiation therapy (Group A), whereas 96 did not (Group B; 3 received hormonal therapy). Both groups had a median age of 64 years and median follow-up of 7.5 years. In Group A, no patients have died as of last follow-up, but in Group B, 18 have died. Estimated 10-year and 15-year overall survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 85% and 57% respectively for Group B (p 2 = 0.050, log rank). Relative 10- and 15 year survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 100% and 79% respectively for Group B. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis suggests that prostate cancer patients with localized disease but positive margins do derive a survival benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy.

  3. IGF1 is a common target gene of Ewing's sarcoma fusion proteins in mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Cironi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The EWS-FLI-1 fusion protein is associated with 85-90% of Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFT, the remaining 10-15% of cases expressing chimeric genes encoding EWS or FUS fused to one of several ets transcription factor family members, including ERG-1, FEV, ETV1 and ETV6. ESFT are dependent on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 for growth and survival and recent evidence suggests that mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells constitute a candidate ESFT origin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the functional relatedness between ESFT-associated fusion proteins, we compared mouse progenitor cell (MPC permissiveness for EWS-FLI-1, EWS-ERG and FUS-ERG expression and assessed the corresponding expression profile changes. Whereas all MPC isolates tested could stably express EWS-FLI-1, only some sustained stable EWS-ERG expression and none could express FUS-ERG for more than 3-5 days. Only 14% and 4% of the total number of genes that were respectively induced and repressed in MPCs by the three fusion proteins were shared. However, all three fusion proteins, but neither FLI-1 nor ERG-1 alone, activated the IGF1 promoter and induced IGF1 expression. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Whereas expression of different ESFT-associated fusion proteins may require distinct cellular microenvironments and induce transcriptome changes of limited similarity, IGF1 induction may provide one common mechanism for their implication in ESFT pathogenesis.

  4. Prostate position relative to pelvic bony anatomy based on intraprostatic gold markers and electronic portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schallenkamp, John M.; Herman, Michael G.; Kruse, Jon J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the relative positions and motions of the prostate, pelvic bony anatomy, and intraprostatic gold fiducial markers during daily electronic portal localization of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Twenty prostate cancer patients were treated supine with definitive external radiotherapy according to an on-line target localization protocol using three or four intraprostatic gold fiducial markers and an electronic portal imaging device. Daily pretherapy and through-treatment electronic portal images (EPIs) were obtained for each of four treatment fields. The patients' pelvic bony anatomy, intraprostatic gold markers, and a best visual match to the target (i.e., prostate) were identified on simulation digitally reconstructed radiographs and during daily treatment setup and delivery. These data provided quantitative inter- and intrafractional analysis of prostate motion, its position relative to the bony anatomy, and the individual intraprostatic fiducial markers. Treatment planning margins, with and without on-line localization, were subsequently compared. Results: A total of 22,266 data points were obtained from daily pretherapy and through-treatment EPIs. The pretherapy three-dimensional (3D) average displacement of the fiducial markers, as a surrogate for the prostate, was 5.6 mm, which improved to 2.8 mm after use of the localization protocol. The bony anatomy 3D average displacement was 4.4 mm both before and after localization to the prostate (p = 0.46). Along the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and right-left (RL) axes, the average prostate displacement improved from 2.5, 3.7, and 1.9 mm, respectively, before localization to 1.4, 1.6, and 1.1 mm after (all p < 0.001). The pretherapy to through-treatment position of the bony landmarks worsened from 1.7 to 2.5 mm (p < 0.001) in the SI axis, remained statistically unchanged at 2.8 mm (p = 0.39) in the AP axis, and improved from 2.0 to 1.2 mm in the RL axis (p < 0.001). There

  5. Diagnostic Accuracy of Robot-Guided, Software Based Transperineal MRI/TRUS Fusion Biopsy of the Prostate in a High Risk Population of Previously Biopsy Negative Men

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    Malte Kroenig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In this study, we compared prostate cancer detection rates between MRI-TRUS fusion targeted and systematic biopsies using a robot-guided, software based transperineal approach. Methods and Patients. 52 patients received a MRIT/TRUS fusion followed by a systematic volume adapted biopsy using the same robot-guided transperineal approach. The primary outcome was the detection rate of clinically significant disease (Gleason grade ≥ 4. Secondary outcomes were detection rate of all cancers, sampling efficiency and utility, and serious adverse event rate. Patients received no antibiotic prophylaxis. Results. From 52 patients, 519 targeted biopsies from 135 lesions and 1561 random biopsies were generated (total n=2080. Overall detection rate of clinically significant PCa was 44.2% (23/52 and 50.0% (26/52 for target and random biopsy, respectively. Sampling efficiency as the median number of cores needed to detect clinically significant prostate cancer was 9 for target (IQR: 6–14.0 and 32 (IQR: 24–32 for random biopsy. The utility as the number of additionally detected clinically significant PCa cases by either strategy was 0% (0/52 for target and 3.9% (2/52 for random biopsy. Conclusions. MRI/TRUS fusion based target biopsy did not show an advantage in the overall detection rate of clinically significant prostate cancer.

  6. On- and off-response ERGs elicited by sawtooth stimuli in normal subjects and glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangeni, Gobinda; Lämmer, Robert; Tornow, Ralf P; Horn, Folkert K; Kremers, Jan

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the on- and off-responses and their response asymmetries elicited by sawtooth stimuli in normal subjects and glaucoma patients. Furthermore, the correlation between the ERGs and other functional and structural parameters are investigated. Full-field stimuli were produced using a Ganzfeld bowl with Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) as light sources. On- and off-response ERGs were recorded from 17 healthy subjects, 12 pre-perimetric and 15 perimetric glaucoma patients using 4-Hz luminance rapid-on and rapid-off sawtooth stimuli (white light; mean luminance 55 cd/m(2)) at 100% contrast. The on- and off-responses were added to study response asymmetries. In addition, flash ERGs were elicited by red stimuli (200 cd/m(2)) on a blue background (10 cd/m(2)). The mean deviations (MD) of the visual field defects were obtained by standard automated perimetry. The retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFLT) was measured with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT). We studied the correlation between ERG response amplitudes, visual field mean deviation (MDs) and RNFLT values. The on-responses showed an initial negative (N-on) followed by a positive (P-on), a late positive (LP-on) and a late negative responses (LN-on). The off-responses showed an initial positive (P-off) a late positive (LP-off) and a late negative response (LN-off). The addition of on- and off-responses revealed an initial positive (P-add) and a late negative response (LN-add). The on-response components (N-on, P-on and LN-on) in the glaucoma patients were relatively similar to those of the control subjects. However, the LP-on was significantly elevated (p = 0.03) in perimetric patients. The LP-off was significantly elevated (p < 0.001), and the amplitude of LN-off was significantly reduced in perimetric patients (p = 0.02). The LN-add amplitude was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) and delayed (p = 0.03) in perimetric patients. The amplitudes of the LN-off and LN

  7. Prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in radiotherapy for prostate cancer with full and empty bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Eble, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in prostate radiotherapy with full bladder (FB) and empty bladder (EB). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients underwent planning computed tomography scans in a supine position with FB and EB before and after 4 and 8 weeks of radiation therapy. The scans were matched by alignment of pelvic bones. Displacements of the prostate/seminal vesicle organ borders and center of mass were determined. Treatment plans (FB vs. EB) were compared. Results: Compared with the primary scan, FB volume varied more than EB volume (standard deviation, 106 cm 3 vs. 47 cm 3 ), but the prostate/seminal vesicle center of mass position variability was the same (>3 mm deviation in right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions in 0, 41%, and 33%, respectively, with FB vs. 0, 44%, and 33% with EB). The bladder volume treated with 90% of the prescription dose was significantly larger with EB (39% ± 14% vs. 22% ± 10%; p < 0.01). Bowel loops received ≥90% of prescription dose in 37% (3% with FB; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite the larger variability of bladder filling, prostate position stability was the same with FB compared with EB. An increased amount of bladder volume in the high-dose region and a higher dose to bowel loops result from treatment plans with EB

  8. Risk of biochemical recurrence and positive surgical margins in patients with pT2 prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To investigate risk factors associated with positive surgical margins (PSM) and biochemical recurrence (BR) in organ confined tumors (pT2) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: Between 1995 and 2011, 1,649 patients underwent RP...

  9. Positive HER-2 protein expression in circulating prostate cells and micro-metastasis, resistant to androgen blockage but not diethylstilbestrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel P Murray

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : HER-2 expression in prostate cancer is associated with a worse prognosis and is suggested to play a role in androgen resistance. We present a study of HER-2 expression in circulating tumor cells and micrometastasis in bone marrow and the effect of androgen blockage or DES in the presence of HER-2 expressing cells. Patients and Methods : A multicenter study of men with prostate cancer, treated with surgery, radiotherapy, or observation, and with or without hormone therapy. Mononuclear cells were separated from blood and bone marrow aspirate by differential centrifugation, touch preps were made from bone marrow biopsy samples. Prostate cells were detected using anti-PSA monoclonal antibody and standard immunocytochemistry. Positive samples were processed using Herceptest® to determine HER-2 expression. After 1 year, patients were re-evaluated and the findings of HER-2 expression and PSA change compared with treatment. Results : Total 199 men participated, and 97 had a second evaluation 1 year later, frequency of HER-2 expression in circulating tumor cells and micrometastasis was 18% and 21%, respectively. There was no significant difference in HER-2 expression in the pretreatment group, after radical surgery or radiotherapy or with biochemical failure. Men with androgen blockade had a significantly higher expression of HER-2 (58% (P =0.001. Of the 97 men with a second evaluation, 56 were in the observation arm, 27 androgen blockade, and 14 DES. Use of androgen blockade or DES significantly reduced serum PSA levels in comparison with observation (P =0.001. However, there was a significant increase in HER-2 expression in patients with androgen blockade (P =0.05 en comparison with observation or DES treatment. No patient with observation or DES became HER-2 positive, en comparison 4/22 patients initially HER-2 negative became HER-2 positive with androgen blockade. Conclusions : The results suggest that HER-2 positive cells are

  10. Reduced Erg Dosage Impairs Survival of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ying; Koch, Mia Lee; Zhang, Xin; Hamblen, Melanie J; Godinho, Frank J; Fujiwara, Yuko; Xie, Huafeng; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Orkin, Stuart H; Li, Zhe

    2017-07-01

    ERG, an ETS family transcription factor frequently overexpressed in human leukemia, has been implicated as a key regulator of hematopoietic stem cells. However, how ERG controls normal hematopoiesis, particularly at the stem and progenitor cell level, and how it contributes to leukemogenesis remain incompletely understood. Using homologous recombination, we generated an Erg knockdown allele (Erg kd ) in which Erg expression can be conditionally restored by Cre recombinase. Erg kd/kd animals die at E10.5-E11.5 due to defects in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, but can be completely rescued by Tie2-Cre-mediated restoration of Erg in these cells. In Erg kd/+ mice, ∼40% reduction in Erg dosage perturbs both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoiesis by reducing the numbers of Lin - Sca-1 + c-Kit + (LSK) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and megakaryocytic progenitors. By genetic mosaic analysis, we find that Erg-restored HSPCs outcompete Erg kd/+ HSPCs for contribution to adult hematopoiesis in vivo. This defect is in part due to increased apoptosis of HSPCs with reduced Erg dosage, a phenotype that becomes more drastic during 5-FU-induced stress hematopoiesis. Expression analysis reveals that reduced Erg expression leads to changes in expression of a subset of ERG target genes involved in regulating survival of HSPCs, including increased expression of a pro-apoptotic regulator Bcl2l11 (Bim) and reduced expression of Jun. Collectively, our data demonstrate that ERG controls survival of HSPCs, a property that may be used by leukemic cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:1773-1785. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  11. SPOP Mutations in Prostate Cancer across Demographically Diverse Patient Cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Blattner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recurrent mutations in the Speckle-Type POZ Protein (SPOP gene occur in up to 15% of prostate cancers. However, the frequency and features of cancers with these mutations across different populations is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate SPOP mutations across diverse cohorts and validate a series of assays employing high-resolution melting (HRM analysis and Sanger sequencing for mutational analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: 720 prostate cancer samples from six international cohorts spanning Caucasian, African American, and Asian patients, including both prostate-specific antigen-screened and unscreened populations, were screened for their SPOP mutation status. Status of SPOP was correlated to molecular features (ERG rearrangement, PTEN deletion, and CHD1 deletion as well as clinical and pathologic features. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Overall frequency of SPOP mutations was 8.1% (4.6% to 14.4%, SPOP mutation was inversely associated with ERG rearrangement (P < .01, and SPOP mutant (SPOPmut cancers had higher rates of CHD1 deletions (P < .01. There were no significant differences in biochemical recurrence in SPOPmut cancers. Limitations of this study include missing mutational data due to sample quality and lack of power to identify a difference in clinical outcomes. CONCLUSION: SPOP is mutated in 4.6% to 14.4% of patients with prostate cancer across different ethnic and demographic backgrounds. There was no significant association between SPOP mutations with ethnicity, clinical, or pathologic parameters. Mutual exclusivity of SPOP mutation with ERG rearrangement as well as a high association with CHD1 deletion reinforces SPOP mutation as defining a distinct molecular subclass of prostate cancer.

  12. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    MD Anderson. Fusion analysis of the first 19 cases demonstrates 10 cases are ETS fusion positive, while 9 cases are ETS fusion negative. Notably...Foundation Grants Officer: Jane Zuber, Director, Contracts & Grants, Texas A&M Univ. System 400 Harvey Mitchell Pkwy South, Suite 300 College Station, TX...prostate cancer PDXs for expression of targets of interest to company. 18 ARAUJO, John None BROOM, Bradley ACTIVE Bioinformatics Gift ( Weinstein

  13. Genetic and Molecular Differences in Prostate Carcinogenesis between African American and Caucasian American Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv Srivastava

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men in the United States. Prostate cancer incidence and associated mortality are highest in African American men in comparison to other races. The observed differences in incidence and disease aggressiveness at presentation support a potential role for different pathways of prostate carcinogenesis between African American and Caucasian men. This review focuses on some of the recent molecular biology discoveries, which have been investigated in prostate carcinogenesis and their likely contribution to the known discrepancies across race and ethnicity. Key discussion points include the androgen receptor gene structure and function, genome-wide association studies and epigenetics. The new observations of the ethnic differences of the ERG oncogene, the most common prostate cancer gene, are providing new insights into ERG based stratification of prostate cancers in the context of ethnically diverse patient populations. This rapidly advancing knowledge has the likely potential to benefit clinical practice. Current and future work will improve the ability to sub-type prostate cancers by molecular alterations and lead to targeted therapy against this common malignancy.

  14. EDRN Pre-Validation of Multiplex Biomarker in Urine — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this proposal is to begin to establish an EDRN “pre-validation” trial of a multiplex set of transcripts, including the ETS gene fusions, in post-DRE urine sediments. As can be evidenced by our preliminary data, we have established the utility of this multiplex urine test (which includes TMPRSS-ERG, SPINK1, PCA3 and GOLPH2) in a cohort of prospectively collected urine sediments from the University of Michigan EDRN CEVC site (collected by co-I, Dr. John Wei). In this proposal, we will run this multiplex assay on prospectively collected post-DRE urines collected from other EDRN sites. The idea is to couple this “pre-validation” study with an EDRN validation trial under consideration for the Gen-Probe PCA3 urine test (directed by Drs. John Wei and Harry Rittenhouse).

  15. Positive Response to Thermobalancing Therapy Enabled by Therapeutic Device in Men with Non-Malignant Prostate Diseases: BPH and Chronic Prostatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gerasimovich Aghajanyan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common types of non-malignant prostate diseases are benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and chronic prostatitis (CP. The aim of this study was to find out whether thermobalancing therapy with a physiotherapeutic device is effective for BPH and CP. Methods: During a 2.5-year period, 124 men with BPH over the age of 55 were investigated. Clinical parameters were tested twice: via the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS and via ultrasound measurement of prostate volume (PV and uroflowmetry maximum flow rate (Qmax, before and after six months of therapy. In 45 men with CP under the age of 55, the dynamics of the National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI were studied. Results: The results of the investigated index tests in men with BPH confirmed a decrease in IPSS (p < 0.001, a reduction in PV (p < 0.001, an increase in Qmax (p < 0.001, and an improvement of quality of life (QoL (p < 0.001. NIH-CPSI scores in men with CP indicated positive dynamics. Conclusions: The observed positive changes in IPSS, PV, and Qmax in men with BPH and the improvement in NIH-CPSI-QoL in patients with CP after using a physiotherapeutic device for six months as mono-therapy, support the view that thermobalancing therapy with the device can be recommended for these patients. Furthermore, the therapeutic device is free of side effects.

  16. Inhibition of RM-1 prostate carcinoma and eliciting robust immune responses in the mouse model by using VEGF-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqin; Alahdal, Murad; Ye, Jia; Jing, Liangliang; Liu, Xiaoxin; Chen, Huan; Jin, Liang; Cao, Rongyue

    2018-01-23

    GnRH and VEGF have been investigated as prostate carcinoma enhancers that support tumor spread and progression. Although both have documented roles in prostate carcinoma and many cancer types, the weak immunogenicity of these peptides has remained a major challenge for use in immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel strategy to inhibit GnRH and VEGF production and assess the effect on the immune responses against these hormones using the RM-1 prostate cancer model. We designed a novel recombinant fusion protein which combined GnRH and VEGF as a vaccine against this tumor. The newly constructed fusion protein hVEGF121-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP contains the human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF121) and three copies of GnRH in sequential linear alignment and T helper epitope MVP as an immunogenic vaccine. The effectiveness of the vaccine in eliciting an immune response and attenuating the prostate tumor growth was evaluated. Results showed that administration of a new vaccine effectively elicited humoral and cellular immune responses. We found that, a novel fusion protein, hVEGF121-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP, effectively inhibited growth of RM-1 prostate model and effectively promoted immune response. In conclusion, hVEGF121-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP is an effective dual mechanism tumor vaccine that limits RM-1 prostate growth. This vaccine may be a promising strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory prostate malignancies.

  17. Detection of Gene Rearrangements in Circulating Tumor Cells: Examples of ALK-, ROS1-, RET-Rearrangements in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and ERG-Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelain, Cyril; Pailler, Emma; Oulhen, Marianne; Faugeroux, Vincent; Pommier, Anne-Laure; Farace, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) hold promise as biomarkers to aid in patient treatment stratification and disease monitoring. Because the number of cells is a critical parameter for exploiting CTCs for predictive biomarker's detection, we developed a FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) method for CTCs enriched on filters (filter-adapted FISH [FA-FISH]) that was optimized for high cell recovery. To increase the feasibility and reliability of the analyses, we combined fluorescent staining and FA-FISH and developed a semi-automated microscopy method for optimal FISH signal identification in filtration-enriched CTCs . Here we present these methods and their use for the detection and characterization of ALK-, ROS1-, RET-rearrangement in CTCs from non-small-cell lung cancer and ERG-rearrangements in CTCs from prostate cancer patients.

  18. Daily Prostate Volume and Position Monitoring Using Implanted Gold Markers and On-Board Imaging during Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kašaová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate prostate volume changes and prostate motions during radiotherapy. Methods: In 2010, twenty-five patients were treated for prostate cancer by external beam radiotherapy with implanted fiducial markers. Coordinates of three gold markers on kilovoltage images were calculated daily. Volume changes in target structure were observed through changes in intermarker distances. Differences in patient position between laser-tattoo alignment and gold marker localization were evaluated. Intrafraction motion was assessed by measuring marker displacement on kilovoltage images acquired before and after fraction delivery. Results: Prostate shrinkage was observed in 60% of patients. The average shrinkage was 7% of the prostate’s initial volume. Corrections after laser-tattoo alignment remained mostly below 1 cm. The difference between marker centroid position on the actual images and the planning images was 2 ± 1 mm on average. The extension of intrafraction movements was 7.6 ± 0.2 mm on average. Conclusions: In our retrospective study, the possibility for prostate volume changes during radiotherapy was revealed. Intrafraction movements turned out to be the limiting factor in safety margin reduction.

  19. Toxicity and outcome of pelvic IMRT for node-positive prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.C.; Luetjens, J.; Eckert, F.; Bamberg, M.; Alber, M.; Schilling, D.; Belka, C.; Gaswindt, U.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study reports on the treatment techniques, toxicity, and outcome of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lymph node-positive prostate cancer (LNPPC, T1-4, c/pN1 cM0). Patients and methods: Pelvic IMRT to 45-50.4 Gy was applied in 39 cases either after previous surgery of involved lymph nodes (n = 18) or with a radiation boost to suspicious nodes (n = 21) with doses of 60-70 Gy, usually combined with androgen deprivation (n = 37). The prostate and seminal vesicles received 70-74 Gy. In cases of previous prostatectomy, prostatic fossa and remnants of seminal vesicles were given 66-70 Gy. Treatment-related acute and late toxicity was graded according to the RTOG criteria. Results: Acute radiation-related toxicity higher than grade 2 occurred in 2 patients (with the need for urinary catheter/subileus related to adhesions after surgery). Late toxicity was mild (grade 1-2) after a median follow-up of 70 months. Over 50% of the patients reported no late morbidity (grade 0). PSA control and cancer-specific survival reached 67% and 97% at over 5 years. Conclusion: Pelvic IMRT after the removal of affected nodes or with a radiation boost to clinically positive nodes led to an acceptable late toxicity (no grade 3/4 events), thus justifying further evaluation of this approach in a larger cohort. (orig.)

  20. Angular momentum effects in the fusion of "2"8Si+"2"8Si system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Atul; Verma, Dalip Singh

    2016-01-01

    In the heavy ion fusion reactions the interaction potential plays an important role as it provides the characteristics like barrier height, barrier position and barrier width in the calculations of fusion cross section. This means different types of interaction potential gives different fusion cross sections or potential parameters are predicted w.r.t the experimental data. In the literature, number of formalism for the calculation of fusion cross sections assumes that the potential barrier position and width is independent of angular momentum (ℓ). However, all the three potential characteristics are ℓ-dependent and are used in the calculation the fusion cross section for a positive Q-value system, "2"8Si+"2"8Si (Q = 10.9 MeV) and is compared with the recently measured fusion cross section

  1. Hypoxic Prostate/Muscle PO2 Ratio Predicts for Outcome in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turaka, Aruna; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate tumor oxygenation status with long-term biochemical outcome after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Custom-made Eppendorf PO 2 microelectrodes were used to obtain PO 2 measurements from the prostate (P), focused on positive biopsy locations, and normal muscle tissue (M), as a control. A total of 11,516 measurements were obtained in 57 men with localized prostate cancer immediately before prostate brachytherapy was given. The Eppendorf histograms provided the median PO 2 , mean PO 2 , and % 2 ratio on BF. Results: With a median follow-up time of 8 years, 12 men had ASTRO BF and 8 had Phoenix BF. On multivariate analysis, P/M PO 2 ratio 2 ratio 2 ratio) significantly predicts for poor long-term biochemical outcome, suggesting that novel hypoxic strategies should be investigated.

  2. Effects of Tannic Acid, Green Tea and Red Wine on hERG Channels Expressed in HEK293 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chu

    Full Text Available Tannic acid presents in varying concentrations in plant foods, and in relatively high concentrations in green teas and red wines. Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG channels expressed in multiple tissues (e.g. heart, neurons, smooth muscle and cancer cells, and play important roles in modulating cardiac action potential repolarization and tumor cell biology. The present study investigated the effects of tannic acid, green teas and red wines on hERG currents. The effects of tannic acid, teas and red wines on hERG currents stably transfected in HEK293 cells were studied with a perforated patch clamp technique. In this study, we demonstrated that tannic acid inhibited hERG currents with an IC50 of 3.4 μM and ~100% inhibition at higher concentrations, and significantly shifted the voltage dependent activation to more positive potentials (Δ23.2 mV. Remarkably, a 100-fold dilution of multiple types of tea (green tea, oolong tea and black tea or red wine inhibited hERG currents by ~90%, and significantly shifted the voltage dependent activation to more positive potentials (Δ30.8 mV and Δ26.0 mV, respectively. Green tea Lung Ching and red wine inhibited hERG currents, with IC50 of 0.04% and 0.19%, respectively. The effects of tannic acid, teas and red wine on hERG currents were irreversible. These results suggest tannic acid is a novel hERG channel blocker and consequently provide a new mechanistic evidence for understanding the effects of tannic acid. They also revealed the potential pharmacological basis of tea- and red wine-induced biology activities.

  3. Effects of Tannic Acid, Green Tea and Red Wine on hERG Channels Expressed in HEK293 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingyuan; Li, Wenya; Lin, Yue; Sun, Xiaorun; Ding, Chunhua; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Tannic acid presents in varying concentrations in plant foods, and in relatively high concentrations in green teas and red wines. Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels expressed in multiple tissues (e.g. heart, neurons, smooth muscle and cancer cells), and play important roles in modulating cardiac action potential repolarization and tumor cell biology. The present study investigated the effects of tannic acid, green teas and red wines on hERG currents. The effects of tannic acid, teas and red wines on hERG currents stably transfected in HEK293 cells were studied with a perforated patch clamp technique. In this study, we demonstrated that tannic acid inhibited hERG currents with an IC50 of 3.4 μM and ~100% inhibition at higher concentrations, and significantly shifted the voltage dependent activation to more positive potentials (Δ23.2 mV). Remarkably, a 100-fold dilution of multiple types of tea (green tea, oolong tea and black tea) or red wine inhibited hERG currents by ~90%, and significantly shifted the voltage dependent activation to more positive potentials (Δ30.8 mV and Δ26.0 mV, respectively). Green tea Lung Ching and red wine inhibited hERG currents, with IC50 of 0.04% and 0.19%, respectively. The effects of tannic acid, teas and red wine on hERG currents were irreversible. These results suggest tannic acid is a novel hERG channel blocker and consequently provide a new mechanistic evidence for understanding the effects of tannic acid. They also revealed the potential pharmacological basis of tea- and red wine-induced biology activities. PMID:26625122

  4. Evaluation of the ESUR PI-RADS scoring system for multiparametric MRI of the prostate with targeted MR/TRUS fusion-guided biopsy at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roethke, M C; Kuru, T H; Schultze, S; Tichy, D; Kopp-Schneider, A; Fenchel, M; Schlemmer, H-P; Hadaschik, B A

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) proposed by the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) for detection of prostate cancer (PCa) by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in a consecutive cohort of patients with magnetic resonance/transrectal ultrasound (MR/TRUS) fusion-guided biopsy. Suspicious lesions on mpMRI at 3.0 T were scored according to the PI-RADS system before MR/TRUS fusion-guided biopsy and correlated to histopathology results. Statistical correlation was obtained by a Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and optimal thresholds were calculated. In 64 patients, 128/445 positive biopsy cores were obtained out of 95 suspicious regions of interest (ROIs). PCa was present in 27/64 (42%) of the patients. ROC results for the aggregated PI-RADS scores exhibited higher areas under the curve compared to those of the Likert score. Sensitivity/Specificity for the following thresholds were calculated: 85 %/73 % and 67 %/92 % for PI-RADS scores of 9 and 10, respectively; 85 %/60 % and 56 %/97 % for Likert scores of 3 and 4, respectively [corrected. The standardised ESUR PI-RADS system is beneficial to indicate the likelihood of PCa of suspicious lesions on mpMRI. It is also valuable to identify locations to be targeted with biopsy. The aggregated PI-RADS score achieved better results compared to the single five-point Likert score. • The ESUR PI-RADS scoring system was evaluated using multiparametric 3.0-T MRI. • To investigate suspicious findings, transperineal MR/TRUS fusion-guided biopsy was used. • PI-RADS can guide biopsy locations and improve detection of clinically significant cancer. • Biopsy procedures can be optimised, reducing unnecessary negative biopsies for patients. • The PI-RADS scoring system may contribute to more effective prostate MRI.

  5. The Role of ERG and CXCR4 in Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    NI, Koh -Paige AJ, Shim H, et al. (2005). Skeletal localization and neutralization of the SDF-1(CXCL12)/CXCR4 axis blocks prostate cancer metastasis...cancer metastasis and growth in osseous sites in vivo. J Bone Miner Res. 2005;20(2):318-29. 34. Ao M, Franco OE, Park D, Raman D, Williams K...Schneider A, Jung Y, Wang J, Dai J, Wang J, Cook K, Osman NI, Koh -Paige AJ, Shim H, et al: Skeletal localization and neutralization of the SDF- 1(CXCL12

  6. Baicalein suppresses the androgen receptor (AR)-mediated prostate cancer progression via inhibiting the AR N-C dimerization and AR-coactivators interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Defeng; Chen, Qiulu; Liu, Yalin; Wen, Xingqiao

    2017-12-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Androgen deprivation therapy with antiandrogens to reduce androgen biosynthesis or prevent androgens from binding to AR are widely used to suppress AR-mediated PCa growth. However, most of ADT may eventually fail with development of the castration resistance after 12-24 months. Here we found that a natural product baicalein can effectively suppress the PCa progression via targeting the androgen-induced AR transactivation with little effect to AR protein expression. PCa cells including LNCaP, CWR22Rv1, C4-2, PC-3, and DU145, were treated with baicalein and luciferase assay was used to evaluate their effect on the AR transactivation. Cell growth and IC 50 were determined by MTT assay after 48 hrs treatment. RT-PCR was used to evaluate the mRNA levels of AR target genes including PSA, TMPRSS2, and TMEPA1. Western blot was used to determine AR and PSA protein expression. The natural product of baicalein can selectively inhibit AR transactivation with little effect on the other nuclear receptors, including ERα, and GR. At a low concentration, 2.5 μM of baicalein effectively suppresses the growth of AR-positive PCa cells, and has little effect on AR-negative PCa cells. Mechanism dissection suggest that baicalein can suppress AR target genes (PSA, TMPRSS2, and TMEPA1) expression in both androgen responsive LNCaP cells and castration resistant CWR22Rv1 cells, that may involve the inhibiting the AR N/C dimerization and AR-coactivators interaction. Baicalein may be developed as an effective anti-AR therapy via its ability to inhibit AR transactivation and AR-mediated PCa cell growth.

  7. Clinical feasibility study for the use of implanted gold seeds in the prostate as reliable positioning markers during megavoltage irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnad, Homan; Nederveen, Aart J.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A. van; Hofman, Pieter; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using gold seed implants in the prostate for position verification, using an a-Si flat panel imager as a detector during megavoltage irradiation of prostate carcinoma. This is a study to guarantee positioning accuracy in intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Ten patients with localized prostate carcinoma (T2-3) received between one and three fiducial gold markers in the prostate. All patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy with an anterior-posterior (AP) and two lateral wedge fields. The acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were scored using common toxicity criteria scales (CTC). Using three consecutive CT scans and portal images obtained during the treatment we have studied the occurrence of any change in prostate shape (deformation), seed migration and the magnitude of translations and rotations of the prostate. Results: We observed no acute major complications for prostate irradiation regarding the seed implantation. The maximum acute GU toxicity grade 2 (dysuria and frequency) was observed in seven patients during the treatment. The maximum grade 2 (diarrhoea) was scored in two patients regarding the acute GI toxicities. No significant prostate deformation could be detected in the consecutive CT scans. It appeared that the distances between the markers only slightly changed during treatment (S.D. 0.5 mm). Random prostate translations were (1 S.D.) 2.1, 3.2 and 2.2 mm in the lateral (LR), AP and cranial-caudal (CC) directions, respectively, whereas systematic translations were 3.3, 4.8 and 3.5 mm in the LR, AP and CC directions, respectively. Random prostate rotations were (1 S.D.) 3.6, 1.7 and 1.9 deg. around the LR, AP and CC axis, respectively, whereas systematic rotations were 4.7, 2.0 and 2.7 deg. around the LR, AP and CC axis, respectively. Conclusions: We found that the fiducial gold seeds are a safe and appropriate

  8. ERG review of waste package corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geisert, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Engineering Review Group (ERG) was established by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) to help evaluate engineering-related issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The ERG reviewed the waste package corrosion mechanisms. This report documents the ERG's comments and recommendations on these subjects and the ONWI response to the specific points raised by the ERG. 1 ref

  9. Multifocal ERG wavelet packet decomposition applied to glaucoma diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Ascariz José M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glaucoma is the second-leading cause of blindness worldwide and early diagnosis is essential to its treatment. Current clinical methods based on multifocal electroretinography (mfERG essentially involve measurement of amplitudes and latencies and assume standard signal morphology. This paper presents a new method based on wavelet packet analysis of global-flash multifocal electroretinogram signals. Methods This study comprised twenty-five patients diagnosed with OAG and twenty-five control subjects. Their mfERG recordings data were used to develop the algorithm method based on wavelet packet analysis. By reconstructing the third wavelet packet contained in the fourth decomposition level (ADAA4 of the mfERG recording, it is possible to obtain a signal from which to extract a marker in the 60-80 ms time interval. Results The marker found comprises oscillatory potentials with a negative-slope basal line in the case of glaucomatous recordings and a positive-slope basal line in the case of normal signals. Application of the optimal threshold calculated in the validation cases showed that the technique proposed achieved a sensitivity of 0.81 and validation specificity of 0.73. Conclusions This new method based on mfERG analysis may be reliable enough to detect functional deficits that are not apparent using current automated perimetry tests. As new stimulation and analysis protocols develop, mfERG has the potential to become a useful tool in early detection of glaucoma-related functional deficits.

  10. Asymptomatic prostatic inflammation in men with clinical BPH and erectile dysfunction affects the positive predictive value of prostate-specific antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Shalini; Mittal, Rama Devi; Kapoor, Rakesh; Mandhani, Anil

    2014-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that sexual dysfunction in elderly men with benign prostatic hyperplasia leads to prostatic inflammation, diagnosed by prostatic fluid interleukin-8 (IL-8), which lowers the positive predictive value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Overall, 160 men with lower urinary tract symptoms between 50 and 75 years of age with an elevated PSA level of more than 4 ng/ml with normal digital rectal examination and 50 age-matched controls with normal PSA level were prospectively evaluated for prostatic fluid IL-8 levels. Erectile dysfunction was measured by self-administered questionnaire of the Sexual Health Inventory for Men. Total and free serum PSA levels and IL-8 in prostatic fluid were measured 6 to 8 weeks after a course of 400mg of ofloxacin and 20mg of piroxicam given daily for 2 weeks. Transrectal ultrasonography-guided biopsy was done only when PSA level did not decrease less than 4 ng/ml. Mean ages of patients and controls were 63.18 (standard deviation [SD]±7.10) and 60.18 (SD+6.02) years, respectively. Mean concentration of IL-8 in prostatic fluid of the patients was significantly higher, i.e., 6678 pg/ml (SD±1985.7) than in control, i.e., 1543 pg/ml (SD±375.7) (Pprostatic hyperplasia and erectile dysfunction had significant inflammation of the prostate to cause spurious rise in PSA level resulting in an unnecessary biopsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacologic Approach to Defective Protein Trafficking in the E637K-hERG Mutant with PD-118057 and Thapsigargin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Mao

    Full Text Available Treatment of LQT2 is inadequate. Many drugs which can pharmacologically rescue defective protein trafficking in LQT2 also result in potent blockade of HERG current, negating their therapeutic benefit. It is reported that PD-118057 and thapsigargin can rescue LQT2 without hERG channel blockade, but the precise mechanism of action is unknown. Furthermore, the effect of PD-118057 and thapsigargin on the dominant negative E637K-hERG mutant has not been previously investigated.IN THIS STUDY, WE INVESTIGATED: (a the effect of PD-118057 and thapsigargin on the current amplitudes of WT-hERG and WT/E637K-hERG channels; (b the effect of PD-118057 and thapsigargin on the biophysical properties of WT-hERG and WT/E637K-hERG channels; (c whether drug treatment can rescue channel processing and trafficking defects of the WT/E637K-hERG mutant.The whole-cell Patch-clamp technique was used to assess the effect of PD-118057 and thapsigargin on the electrophysiological characteristics of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+ current (Ikr of the hERG protein channel. Western blot was done to investigate pharmacological rescue on hERG protein channel function.In our study, PD-118057 was shown to significantly enhance both the maximum current amplitude and tail current amplitude, but did not alter the gating and kinetic properties of the WT-hERG channel, with the exception of accelerating steady-state inactivation. Additionally, thapsigargin shows a similar result as PD-118057 for the WT-hERG channel, but with the exception of attenuating steady-state inactivation. However, for the WT/E637K-hERG channel, PD-118057 had no effect on either the current or on the gating and kinetic properties. Furthermore, thapsigargin treatment did not alter the current or the gating and kinetic properties of the WT/E637K-hERG channel, with the exception of opening at more positive voltages.Our findings illustrate that neither PD-118057 nor thapsigargin play a role in correcting

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Imaging-Guided Prostate Biopsy Techniques: Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound, Direct In-Bore MRI, and Image Fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venderink, W.; Govers, T.M.; Rooij, M. de; Futterer, J.J.; Sedelaar, J.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Three commonly used prostate biopsy approaches are systematic transrectal ultrasound guided, direct in-bore MRI guided, and image fusion guided. The aim of this study was to calculate which strategy is most cost-effective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A decision tree and Markov model were

  13. Mechanisms of IhERG/IKr Modulation by α1-Adrenoceptors in HEK293 Cells and Cardiac Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janire Urrutia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The rapid delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr, carried by the hERG protein, is one of the main repolarising currents in the human heart and a reduction of this current increases the risk of ventricular fibrillation. α1-adrenoceptors (α1-AR activation reduces IKr but, despite the clear relationship between an increase in the sympathetic tone and arrhythmias, the mechanisms underlying the α1-AR regulation of the hERG channel are controversial. Thus, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which α1-AR stimulation regulates IKr. Methods: α1-adrenoceptors, hERG channels, auxiliary subunits minK and MIRP1, the non PIP2-interacting mutant D-hERG (with a deletion of the 883-894 amino acids in the C-terminal and the non PKC-phosphorylable mutant N-terminal truncated-hERG (NTK-hERG were transfected in HEK293 cells. Cell membranes were extracted by centrifugation and the different proteins were visualized by Western blot. Potassium currents were recorded by the patch-clamp technique. IKr was recorded in isolated feline cardiac myocytes. Results: Activation of the α1-AR reduces the amplitude of IhERG and IKr through a positive shift in the activation half voltage, which reduces the channel availability at physiological membrane potentials. The intracellular pathway connecting the α1-AR to the hERG channel in HEK293 cells includes activation of the Gαq protein, PLC activation and PIP2 hydrolysis, activation of PKC and direct phosphorylation of the hERG channel N-terminal. The PKC-mediated IKr channel phosphorylation and subsequent IKr reduction after α1-AR stimulation was corroborated in feline cardiac myocytes. Conclusions: These findings clarify the link between sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity and IKr reduction, one of the best characterized causes of torsades de pointes and ventricular fibrillation.

  14. Association between HIV status and Positive Prostate Biopsy in a Study of U.S. Veterans

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    Wayland Hsiao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV infection is associated with increased incidence of malignancies, such as lymphomas and testicular cancers. We reviewed the relationship between HIV infection and prostate cancer in a contemporary series of prostate biopsy patients. The study is a retrospective analysis of consecutive prostate biopsies performed at a VA Medical Center. The indications for performing a prostate biopsy included an abnormal digital rectal examination and/or an elevated PSA. Patients were categorized according to their HIV status, biopsy results, and various demographic and clinical characteristics. Univariate and multivariate analyses compared distributions of HIV status, and various clinical and demographic characteristics. The adjusted measures of association between HIV status and positive biopsy were expressed as odds ratios (ORs and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI. The likelihood of positive biopsy was significantly higher among 18 HIV-positive patients compared to patients with negative HIV tests (adjusted OR = 3.9; 95% CI: 1.3–11.5. In analyses restricted to prostate cancer patients, HIV-positive patients were not different from the remaining group with respect to their prostate cancer stage, PSA level, PSA velocity, PSA density, or Gleason grade. There is an association between HIV infection and prostate biopsy positive for carcinoma in a population referred for urologic workup. Further confirmation of this association by prospective studies may impact the current screening practices in HIV patients.

  15. Association between HIV status and Positive Prostate Biopsy in a Study of U.S. Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Wayland; Anastasia, Katrina; Hall, John; Goodman, Michael; Rimland, David; Ritenour, Chad W. M.; Issa, Muta M.

    2009-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with increased incidence of malignancies, such as lymphomas and testicular cancers. We reviewed the relationship between HIV infection and prostate cancer in a contemporary series of prostate biopsy patients. The study is a retrospective analysis of consecutive prostate biopsies performed at a VA Medical Center. The indications for performing a prostate biopsy included an abnormal digital rectal examination and/or an elevated PSA. Patients were categorized according to their HIV status, biopsy results, and various demographic and clinical characteristics. Univariate and multivariate analyses compared distributions of HIV status, and various clinical and demographic characteristics. The adjusted measures of association between HIV status and positive biopsy were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). The likelihood of positive biopsy was significantly higher among 18 HIV-positive patients compared to patients with negative HIV tests (adjusted OR = 3.9; 95% CI: 1.3–11.5). In analyses restricted to prostate cancer patients, HIV-positive patients were not different from the remaining group with respect to their prostate cancer stage, PSA level, PSA velocity, PSA density, or Gleason grade. There is an association between HIV infection and prostate biopsy positive for carcinoma in a population referred for urologic workup. Further confirmation of this association by prospective studies may impact the current screening practices in HIV patients. PMID:19219374

  16. Lateral decubitus position vs. lithotomy position: which is the best way to minimize patient’s pain perception during transrectal prostate biopsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Hyun Song

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Considering the distinctive nature in terms of psychological stress and anal tone of position which is generally selected between lithotomy and left lateral decubitus (LLD, we postulated its effect on pain perception during biopsy, and investigated their association. Materials and Methods A prospective study for comparison of two biopsy positions which were perform in a different working day was conducted for 208 men (lithotomy position=86, LLD=122. The decision on the position was made solely based on the patient’s preference for the biopsy day, and all procedures were performed according to the identical protocol (12-core biopsy with intrarectal lidocaine gel, probe, and needle. The maximal degree of pain during the entire process was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS, immediately after biopsy. After propensity matching, a total of 152 patients were finally selected (lithotomy group=76, LLD=76, then peri-biopsy parameters were compared. Results Between groups, no differences were observed across all variables including age, obesity, prostate volume, serum PSA, international prostate symptom score, and cancer detection rate, except mean (±standard deviation VAS score (3.89±2.01 vs. 4.58±2.22, p=0.049. VAS score showed significant association solely with patient’s position (Pearson’s coefficient=-0.165, p=0.042. In multiple linear regression models regarding the effect of clinical variables on VAS score, patient position was a single independent predictor favoring lithotomy position to decrease perceived pain (B=-0.928, p=0.024. Conclusions These data suggest lithotomy position as a proper way to perform transrectal prostate biopsy with routine use of topical lidocaine gel in comparison with conventional LLD position.

  17. Three-dimensional intrafractional movement of prostate measured during real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy in supine and prone treatment positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kei; Shirato, Hiroki; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Onimaru, Rikiya; Oda, Makoto; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Shinichi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Harabayashi, Toru; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify three-dimensional (3D) movement of the prostate gland with the patient in the supine and prone positions and to analyze the movement frequency for each treatment position. Methods and Materials: The real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy (RTRT) system was developed to identify the 3D position of a 2-mm gold marker implanted in the prostate 30 times/s using two sets of fluoroscopic images. The linear accelerator was triggered to irradiate the tumor only when the gold marker was located within the region of the planned coordinates relative to the isocenter. Ten patients with prostate cancer treated with RTRT were the subjects of this study. The coordinates of the gold marker were recorded every 0.033 s during RTRT in the supine treatment position for 2 min. The patient was then moved to the prone position, and the marker was tracked for 2 min to acquire data regarding movement in this position. Measurements were taken 5 times for each patient (once a week); a total of 50 sets for the 10 patients was analyzed. The raw data from the RTRT system were filtered to reduce system noise, and the amplitude of movement was then calculated. The discrete Fourier transform of the unfiltered data was performed for the frequency analysis of prostate movement. Results: No apparent difference in movement was found among individuals. The amplitude of 3D movement was 0.1-2.7 mm in the supine and 0.4-24 mm in the prone positions. The amplitude in the supine position was statistically smaller in all directions than that in the prone position (p < 0.0001). The amplitude in the craniocaudal and AP directions was larger than in the left-right direction in the prone position (p < 0.0001). No characteristic movement frequency was detected in the supine position. The respiratory frequency was detected for all patients regarding movement in the craniocaudal and AP directions in the prone position. The results of the frequency analysis suggest that prostate movement is

  18. Regulation of protein kinase C-related kinase (PRK) signalling by the TPα and TPβ isoforms of the human thromboxane A2 receptor: Implications for thromboxane- and androgen- dependent neoplastic and epigenetic responses in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Aine G; Mulvaney, Eamon P; Kinsella, B Therese

    2017-04-01

    The prostanoid thromboxane (TX) A 2 and its T Prostanoid receptor (the TP) are increasingly implicated in prostate cancer (PCa). Mechanistically, we recently discovered that both TPα and TPβ form functional signalling complexes with members of the protein kinase C-related kinase (PRK) family, AGC- kinases essential for the epigenetic regulation of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcription and promising therapeutic targets for treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Critically, similar to androgens, activation of the PRKs through the TXA 2 /TP signalling axis induces phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr11 (H3Thr11), a marker of androgen-induced chromatin remodelling and transcriptional activation, raising the possibility that TXA 2 -TP signalling can mimic and/or enhance AR-induced cellular changes even in the absence of circulating androgens such as in CRPC. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate whether TXA 2 /TP-induced PRK activation can mimic and/or enhance AR-mediated cellular responses in the model androgen-responsive prostate adenocarcinoma LNCaP cell line. We reveal that TXA 2 /TP signalling can act as a neoplastic- and epigenetic-regulator, promoting and enhancing both AR-associated chromatin remodelling (H3Thr11 phosphorylation, WDR5 recruitment and acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16) and AR-mediated transcriptional activation (e.g of the KLK3/prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2 genes) through mechanisms involving TPα/TPβ mediated-PRK1 and PRK2, but not PRK3, signalling complexes. Overall, these data demonstrate that TPα/TPβ can act as neoplastic and epigenetic regulators by mimicking and/or enhancing the actions of androgens within the prostate and provides further mechanistic insights into the role of the TXA 2 /TP signalling axis in PCa, including potentially in CRPC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. ERG review of containment failure probability and repository functional design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, S.

    1986-06-01

    The Engineering Review Group (ERG) was established by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) to help evaluate engineering-related issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The June 1984 meeting of the ERG considered two topics: (1) statistical probability for containment of nuclides within the waste package and (2) repository design criteria. This report documents the ERG's comments and recommendations on these two subjects and the ONWI response to the specific points raised by ERG

  20. A shape-based statistical method to retrieve 2D TRUS-MR slice correspondence for prostate biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Jhimli; Srikantha, Abhilash; Sidibé, Désiré; Martí, Robert; Oliver, Arnau; Lladó, Xavier; Ghose, Soumya; Vilanova, Joan C.; Comet, Josep; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a method based on shape-context and statistical measures to match interventional 2D Trans Rectal Ultrasound (TRUS) slice during prostate biopsy to a 2D Magnetic Resonance (MR) slice of a pre-acquired prostate volume. Accurate biopsy tissue sampling requires translation of the MR slice information on the TRUS guided biopsy slice. However, this translation or fusion requires the knowledge of the spatial position of the TRUS slice and this is only possible with the use of an electro-magnetic (EM) tracker attached to the TRUS probe. Since, the use of EM tracker is not common in clinical practice and 3D TRUS is not used during biopsy, we propose to perform an analysis based on shape and information theory to reach close enough to the actual MR slice as validated by experts. The Bhattacharyya distance is used to find point correspondences between shape-context representations of the prostate contours. Thereafter, Chi-square distance is used to find out those MR slices where the prostates closely match with that of the TRUS slice. Normalized Mutual Information (NMI) values of the TRUS slice with each of the axial MR slices are computed after rigid alignment and consecutively a strategic elimination based on a set of rules between the Chi-square distances and the NMI leads to the required MR slice. We validated our method for TRUS axial slices of 15 patients, of which 11 results matched at least one experts validation and the remaining 4 are at most one slice away from the expert validations.

  1. Documenting the location of systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies: correlation with multi-parametric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Xu, Sheng; Kruecker, Jochen; Locklin, Julia; Pang, Yuxi; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Baccala, Angelo; Rastinehad, Ardeshir; Benjamin, Compton; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2011-03-29

    During transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsies, the actual location of the biopsy site is rarely documented. Here, we demonstrate the capability of TRUS-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image fusion to document the biopsy site and correlate biopsy results with multi-parametric MRI findings. Fifty consecutive patients (median age 61 years) with a median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 5.8 ng/ml underwent 12-core TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate. Pre-procedural T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were fused to TRUS. A disposable needle guide with miniature tracking sensors was attached to the TRUS probe to enable fusion with MRI. Real-time TRUS images during biopsy and the corresponding tracking information were recorded. Each biopsy site was superimposed onto the MRI. Each biopsy site was classified as positive or negative for cancer based on the results of each MRI sequence. Sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) values were calculated for multi-parametric MRI. Gleason scores for each multi-parametric MRI pattern were also evaluated. Six hundred and 5 systemic biopsy cores were analyzed in 50 patients, of whom 20 patients had 56 positive cores. MRI identified 34 of 56 positive cores. Overall, sensitivity, specificity, and ROC area values for multi-parametric MRI were 0.607, 0.727, 0.667, respectively. TRUS-MRI fusion after biopsy can be used to document the location of each biopsy site, which can then be correlated with MRI findings. Based on correlation with tracked biopsies, T2-weighted MRI and apparent diffusion coefficient maps derived from diffusion-weighted MRI are the most sensitive sequences, whereas the addition of delayed contrast enhancement MRI and three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated higher specificity consistent with results obtained using radical prostatectomy specimens.

  2. Mechanism and pharmacological rescue of berberine-induced hERG channel deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Meng Yan,1 Kaiping Zhang,1 Yanhui Shi,1 Lifang Feng,1 Lin Lv,1 Baoxin Li1,2 1Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, 2State-Province Key Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Engineering, Harbin, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Berberine (BBR, an isoquinoline alkaloid mainly isolated from plants of Berberidaceae family, is extensively used to treat gastrointestinal infections in clinics. It has been reported that BBR can block human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG potassium channel and inhibit its membrane expression. The hERG channel plays crucial role in cardiac repolarization and is the target of diverse proarrhythmic drugs. Dysfunction of hERG channel can cause long QT syndrome. However, the regulatory mechanisms of BBR effects on hERG at cell membrane level remain unknown. This study was designed to investigate in detail how BBR decreased hERG expression on cell surface and further explore its pharmacological rescue strategies. In this study, BBR decreases caveolin-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells stably expressing hERG channel. Knocking down the basal expression of caveolin-1 alleviates BBR-induced hERG reduction. In addition, we found that aromatic tyrosine (Tyr652 and phenylalanine (Phe656 in S6 domain mediate the long-term effect of BBR on hERG by using mutation techniques. Considering both our previous and present work, we propose that BBR reduces hERG membrane stability with multiple mechanisms. Furthermore, we found that fexofenadine and resveratrol shorten action potential duration prolongated by BBR, thus having the potential effects of alleviating the cardiotoxicity of BBR. Keywords: berberine, hERG, cavoline-1, cardiotoxicity, LQTS, pharmacological rescue

  3. An analysis of intraoperative versus post-operative dosimetry with CT, CT-MRI fusion and XMR for the evaluation of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acher, Peter; Puttagunta, Srikanth; Rhode, Kawal; Morris, Stephen; Kinsella, Janette; Gaya, Andrew; Dasgupta, Prokar; Deehan, Charles; Beaney, Ronald; Popert, Rick; Keevil, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the agreement between intraoperative and post-operative dosimetry and to identify factors that influence dose calculations of prostate brachytherapy implants. Materials and methods: Patients treated with prostate brachytherapy implants underwent post-operative CT and XMR (combined X-ray and MR) imaging. Dose-volume histograms were calculated from CT, XMR and CT-MR fusion data and compared with intraoperative values for two observers. Multiple linear regression models assessed the influences of intraoperative D90, gland oedema, gland volume, source loss and migration, and implanted activity/volume prostate on post-operative D90. Results: Forty-nine patients were studied. The mean D90 differences (95% confidence limits) between intraoperative and post-operative CT, XMR and CT-MR fusion assessments were: 11 Gy (-22, 45), 18 Gy (-13, 49) and 20 Gy (-17, 58) for Observer 1; and 15 Gy (-34, 63), 13 Gy (-29, 55) and 14 Gy (-27, 54) for Observer 2. Multiple linear regression modelling showed that the observed oedema and intraoperative D90 were significant independent variables for the prediction of post-operative D90 values for both observers using all modalities. Conclusion: This is the first study to report Bland-Altman agreement analysis between intraoperative and post-operative dosimetry. Agreement is poor. Post-operative dosimetry is dependent on the intraoperative D90 and the subjectively outlined gland volume.

  4. Matched Cohort Analysis of Outcomes of Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, Shannon; Jani, Ashesh; Edelman, Scott; Rossi, Peter; Godette, Karen; Landry, Jerome; Anderson, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the biochemical outcome and toxicity scores of men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and prostate cancer with a matched control population with negative or unknown HIV status when treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A single-institution database of men with prostate cancer treated with EBRT from 1999 to 2009 was reviewed. Thirteen men with HIV were identified and matched to 2 control patients according to age, race, T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, RT dose, intensity-modulated RT vs. three-dimensional conformal RT, and whole-pelvis vs. prostate-only RT, for a total of 39 cases. The median follow-up time was 39 months (range, 3–110 months). Results: The 4-year biochemical failure (BF)-free survival rate was 87% in the HIV-positive group vs. 89% in the controls (p = 0.94). Pre- and post-RT viral loads were found to be predictive of BF (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). No men with HIV died, whereas 2 in the control group died of causes unrelated to prostate cancer. Acute and chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity were less in the HIV-positive patients than in controls (p 3 . Conclusions: Our findings suggest that men with HIV treated with EBRT have a similar risk of BF; however, high viral loads may contribute to an increased risk. This analysis supports that HIV-positive men with prostate cancer can be treated with definitive EBRT with similar disease control and toxicity outcomes as in the general population.

  5. [Follow-up on MEWDS by fundus perimetry and multifocal ERG with the SLO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bültmann, S; Martin, M; Rohrschneider, K

    2002-09-01

    Most conventional techniques for examination such as perimetry or ERG may not be sensitive enough to detect functional alterations due to MEWDS precisely. We report on a follow-up performed by fundus perimetry and the new technique of multifocal ERG using the scanning laser ophthalmoscope. A 24-year-old female patient (VA 0.2/0.8) was followed up for 7 weeks with these techniques as well as Octopus perimetry, fluorescence angiography, Ganzfeld ERG and biomicroscopy. Multifocal ERG stimulation (mfERG, Retiscan) was performed with the SLO. Visual acuity improved from 0.2 to 0.8 and the central relative scotoma disappeared while a relevant increase of P1-wave amplitudes in mfERG could be observed. Combining objective measurements from the fundus controlled SLO-mfERG and results from fundus perimetry enable good correlation of morphology and results, even for minor alterations of the macula only accessible by few established clinical examinations.

  6. Matched Cohort Analysis of Outcomes of Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Shannon, E-mail: shannonkahn@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, Ashesh; Edelman, Scott; Rossi, Peter; Godette, Karen; Landry, Jerome; Anderson, Cynthia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the biochemical outcome and toxicity scores of men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and prostate cancer with a matched control population with negative or unknown HIV status when treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A single-institution database of men with prostate cancer treated with EBRT from 1999 to 2009 was reviewed. Thirteen men with HIV were identified and matched to 2 control patients according to age, race, T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, RT dose, intensity-modulated RT vs. three-dimensional conformal RT, and whole-pelvis vs. prostate-only RT, for a total of 39 cases. The median follow-up time was 39 months (range, 3-110 months). Results: The 4-year biochemical failure (BF)-free survival rate was 87% in the HIV-positive group vs. 89% in the controls (p = 0.94). Pre- and post-RT viral loads were found to be predictive of BF (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). No men with HIV died, whereas 2 in the control group died of causes unrelated to prostate cancer. Acute and chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity were less in the HIV-positive patients than in controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.003, and p < 0.001, respectively). The HIV-positive men experienced an average decline in CD4 count of 193 cells/mm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that men with HIV treated with EBRT have a similar risk of BF; however, high viral loads may contribute to an increased risk. This analysis supports that HIV-positive men with prostate cancer can be treated with definitive EBRT with similar disease control and toxicity outcomes as in the general population.

  7. Does the urethral angle change with leg position? Implications for urethral-based CT-planned transperineal prostate implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednarz, Greg; Ning, Yue; Waterman, Frank M.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Dicker, Adam P.

    1997-01-01

    accurately define the target and surrounding normal structures. 2) Leg position significantly affects the prostatic urethral angle. 3) We have constructed a device that can be attached to the CT table and holds the legs in a position comparable to that in the operating room. 4) Current work is underway to evaluate whether planning in the lithotomy position results in better reproducibility in setup at the time of implant in the operating room

  8. Sox2 Is an Androgen Receptor-Repressed Gene That Promotes Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregel, Steven; Kiriluk, Kyle J.; Rosen, Alex M.; Cai, Yi; Reyes, Edwin E.; Otto, Kristen B.; Tom, Westin; Paner, Gladell P.; Szmulewitz, Russell Z.; Vander Griend, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in detection and therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer continues to be a major clinical problem. The aberrant activity of stem cell pathways, and their regulation by the Androgen Receptor (AR), has the potential to provide insight into novel mechanisms and pathways to prevent and treat advanced, castrate-resistant prostate cancers. To this end, we investigated the role of the embryonic stem cell regulator Sox2 [SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2] in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. In the normal prostate, Sox2 is expressed in a portion of basal epithelial cells. Prostate tumors were either Sox2-positive or Sox2-negative, with the percentage of Sox2-positive tumors increasing with Gleason Score and metastases. In the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line CWR-R1, endogenous expression of Sox2 was repressed by AR signaling, and AR chromatin-IP shows that AR binds the enhancer element within the Sox2 promoter. Likewise, in normal prostate epithelial cells and human embryonic stem cells, increased AR signaling also decreases Sox2 expression. Resistance to the anti-androgen MDV3100 results in a marked increase in Sox2 expression within three prostate cancer cell lines, and in the castration-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell line ectopic expression of Sox2 was sufficient to promote castration-resistant tumor formation. Loss of Sox2 expression in the castration-resistant CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line inhibited cell growth. Up-regulation of Sox2 was not associated with increased CD133 expression but was associated with increased FGF5 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 5) expression. These data propose a model of elevated Sox2 expression due to loss of AR-mediated repression during castration, and consequent castration-resistance via mechanisms not involving induction of canonical embryonic stem cell pathways. PMID:23326489

  9. Investigations on uncertainties in patient positioning for prostate treatment with EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakai, A.; Nuesslin, F.; Paulsen, F.; Plasswilm, L.; Bamberg, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Conformal radiotherapy techniques as used in prostate treatment allow to spare normal tissue by conforming the radiation fields to the shape of the planning target volume (PTV). To be able to fully utilize the advantages of these techniques correct patient positioning is an important prerequisite. This study employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) investigated the positioning uncertainties that occur in the pelvic region for different patient positioning devices. Patients and Methods: 15 patients with prostate cancer were irradiated with or without rectal balloon/pelvic mask at a linear accelerator with multileaf collimator (MLC). For each patient multiple portal images were taken from different directions and compared to the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the treatment planning system and to simulation films (Table 1, Figure 1). Results: In spite of different positioning devices, all patients showed comparable total positioning uncertainties of 4.0 mm (lateral), 4.5 mm (cranio-caudal) and 1.7 mm (dorso-ventral). The lateral positioning error was reduced for the pelvic mask patients while the cranio-caudal error increased (Table 2, Figure 2). A systematic and a random component sum up to the total positioning error, and a good estimate of the magnitudes of the two is possible from six to eight portal images (Figure 3). Conclusions: With a small number of portal images it is possible to find out the systematic and random positioning error of a patient. Knowledge of the random error can be used to resize the treatment margin which is clinically relevant since this error differs greatly for different patients (Figure 4). Image analysis with EPID is convenient, yet has some problems. For example, one only gets indirect information on the movement of the ventral rectum wall. The successful operation of positioning devices, although, needs further improvement - especially if one focuses on IMRT. (orig.) [de

  10. Effects of organ motion on proton prostate treatments, as determined from analysis of daily CT imaging for patient positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yoshitaka; Shibata, Satoshi; Bou, Sayuri; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Tamamura, Hiroyasu; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Takamatsu, Shigeyuki; Sasaki, Makoto; Tameshige, Yuji; Kume, Kyo; Minami, Hiroki; Saga, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto

    2018-05-01

    We quantified interfractional movements of the prostate, seminal vesicles (SVs), and rectum during computed tomography (CT) image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer and studied the range variation in opposed lateral proton beams. We analyzed 375 sets of daily CT images acquired throughout the proton therapy treatment of ten patients. We analyzed daily movements of the prostate, SVs, and rectum by simulating three image-matching strategies: bone matching, prostate center (PC) matching, and prostate-rectum boundary (PRB) matching. In the PC matching, translational movements of the prostate center were corrected after bone matching. In the PRB matching, we performed PC matching and correction along the anterior-posterior direction to match the boundary between the prostate and the rectum's anterior region. In each strategy, we evaluated systematic errors (Σ) and random errors (σ) by measuring the daily movements of certain points on each anatomic structure. The average positional deviations in millimeter of each point were determined by the Van Herk formula of 2.5Σ + 0.7σ. Using these positional deviations, we created planning target volumes of the prostate and SVs and analyzed the daily variation in the water equivalent length (WEL) from the skin surface to the target along the lateral beam directions using the density converted from the daily CT number. Based on this analysis, we designed prostate cancer treatment planning and evaluated the dose volume histograms (DVHs) for these strategies. The SVs' daily movements showed large variations over the superior-inferior direction, as did the rectum's anterior region. The average positional deviations of the prostate in the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior, and lateral sides (mm) in bone matching, PC matching, and PRB matching were (8.9, 9.8, 7.5, 3.6, 1.6), (5.6, 6.1, 3.5, 4.5, 1.9), and (8.6, 3.2, 3.5, 4.5, 1.9) (mm), respectively. Moreover, the ones of the SV tip were similarly (22.5, 15.5, 11

  11. Multiparametric MRI of the prostate. Important radiological findings for urologists; Multiparametrische MRT der Prostata. Wichtige radiologische Befunde fuer den Urologen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    High prevalence of prostate cancer with multifocality and biological heterogeneity. Insufficient conventional urological diagnostics. Discrimination between significant and insignificant cancer needed. Digital rectal examination, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) serum level, systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) including T2-weighted (T2w), diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI according to the prostate imaging reporting and data system (PIRADS), MR-targeted biopsy, most frequently MR/TRUS image fusion biopsy. Prostate cancer is characterized by low signal intensity on T2w MRI, restricted water diffusion and pronounced and early uptake of contrast enhancement. Sensitivity and specificity according to the current literature are ca. 80% and 90%, respectively. In cases of suspected prostate cancer, most accurate are mpMRI according to PIRADS and in cases of positive findings, MRI-targeted biopsy, most frequently as MRI/TRUS image fusion biopsy. (orig.) [German] Hohe Praevalenz des Prostatakarzinoms mit Multifokalitaet und biologischer Heterogenitaet. Unzureichende konventionelle urologische Diagnostik. Unterscheidung klinisch signifikanter von klinisch nicht signifikanten Karzinomen erforderlich. Digitale rektale Untersuchung, Serum-PSA (prostataspezifisches Antigen), transrektale Sonographie (TRUS), systematische transrektale TRUS-Biopsie. Multiparametrische Magnetresonanztomographie (mpMRT) mit T2w- und diffusionsgewichteten sowie dynamischen kontrastmittelverstaerkten T1w-Sequenzen, dem Standard nach dem Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PIRADS) entsprechend. MR-unterstuetzte Biopsie, meist MR-/TRUS-Fusionsbiopsie. Prostatakarzinome sind typischerweise T2-hypointens mit eingeschraenkter Diffusion und zeigen eine rasche Kontrastmittelanflutung. Nach der Literatur betragen Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet der mpMRT ca. 80 bzw. 90 %. Fuer die Abklaerung bei Verdacht auf

  12. Daily variations in the position of the prostate bed in patients with prostate cancer receiving postoperative external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Langen, Katja M.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of the variation in the position of the prostate bed with respect to the bony anatomy. Methods and Materials: Four patients were treated to 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Before each fraction, a megavoltage computed tomography (CT) of the prostate bed was obtained, resulting in a total of 140 CT studies. Retrospectively, each CT scan was aligned to the simulation kilovoltage scan based on bony anatomy and the prostate bed. The difference between the 2 alignments was calculated for each scan. Results: The average differences (±1 SD) between the two alignments were 0.06 ± 0.37, 0.10 ± 0.86, and 0.39 ± 1.27 mm in the lateral, longitudinal (SI), and vertical (AP) directions, respectively. Laterally, there was no difference ≥3 mm. The cumulative frequency of SI differences were as follows; ≥3 mm: 3%, ≥4 mm: 1%, and ≥5 mm: 1% (maximum: 5 mm). The cumulative frequency of AP differences were as follows; ≥3 mm: 7%, and ≥4 mm: 3% (maximum: 4 mm). Conclusion: In patients with prostate cancer receiving postoperative radiotherapy, the prostate bed motion relative to the pelvic bony anatomy is of a relatively small magnitude. Significant motion (≥3 mm) is infrequent. However, small differences between the prostate bed and the bony anatomy still exist. This might have implications on treatment margins when daily alignment on bony anatomy is performed

  13. Erythropoietin administration increases splenic erythroferrone protein content and liver TMPRSS6 protein content in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gurieva, I.; Frýdlová, J.; Rychtarčíková, Zuzana; Vokurka, M.; Truksa, Jaroslav; Krijt, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 64, MAY 2017 (2017), s. 1-7 ISSN 1079-9796 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28830S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Hepcidin * Hemojuvelin * TMPRSS6 * Fam132b * Fam132a Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 1.882, year: 2016

  14. Prospective comparison of PI-RADS version 2 and qualitative in-house categorization system in detection of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Sonia; Harmon, Stephanie; Mehralivand, Sherif; Bednarova, Sandra; Calio, Brian P; Sugano, Dordaneh; Sidana, Abhinav; Merino, Maria J; Pinto, Peter A; Wood, Bradford J; Shih, Joanna H; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2018-03-31

    Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System v. 2 (PI-RADSv2) provides standardized nomenclature for interpretation of prostate multiparametric MRI (mpMRI). Inclusion of additional features for categorization may provide benefit to stratification of disease. To prospectively compare PI-RADSv2 to a qualitative in-house system for detecting prostate cancer on mpMRI. Prospective. In all, 338 patients who underwent mpMRI May 2015-May 2016, with subsequent MRI/transrectal ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy. 3T mpMRI (T 2 W, diffusion-weighted [DW], apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC] map, b-2000 DWI acquisition, and dynamic contrast-enhanced [DCE] MRI). One genitourinary radiologist prospectively read mpMRIs using both in-house and PI-RADSv2 5-category systems. In lesion-based analysis, overall and clinically significant (CS) tumor detection rates (TDR) were calculated for all PI-RADSv2 and in-house categories. The ability of each scoring system to detect cancer was assessed by area under receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC). Within each PI-RADSv2 category, lesions were further stratified by their in-house categories to determine if TDRs can be increased by combining features of both systems. In 338 patients (median prostate-specific antigen [PSA] 6.5 [0.6-113.6] ng/mL; age 64 [44-84] years), 733 lesions were identified (47% tumor-positive). Predictive abilities of both systems were comparable for all (AUC 76-78%) and CS cancers (AUCs 79%). The in-house system had higher overall and CS TDRs than PI-RADSv2 for categories 3 and 4 (P house 65%, PI-RADSv2 22.1%). For lesions categorized as PI-RADSv2 = 4, characterization of suspicious/indeterminate extraprostatic extension (EPE) and equivocal findings across all mpMRI sequences contributed to significantly different TDRs for both systems (TDR range 19-75%, P < 0.05). PI-RADSv2 behaves similarly to an existing validated system that relies on the number of sequences on which a lesion is seen. This prospective

  15. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like ductal prostatic adenocarcinoma: A case suitable for active surveillance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Rais-Bahrami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to typical prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN-like ductal adenocarcinoma is a rare variant of prostate cancer with low-grade clinical behavior. We report a case of a 66-year-old African-American male with an elevated serum prostate-specific antigen who underwent multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MRI/ultrasound fusion-guided biopsies. Pathology demonstrated low-volume Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6 (Grade Group 1, acinar adenocarcinoma involving one core and PIN-like ductal adenocarcinoma on a separate core. Herein, we discuss the potential role of active surveillance for patients with this rare variant of prostate cancer found in the era of advanced imaging with multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer.

  16. Dosimetric effects of the prone and supine positions on image guided localized prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bei; Lerma, Fritz A.; Patel, Shilpen; Amin, Pradip; Feng Yuanming; Yi, B.-Y.; Yu, Cedric

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare target coverage and doses to rectum and bladder in IMRT of localized prostate cancer in the supine versus prone position, with the inclusion of image guidance. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with early stage localized prostate carcinoma who received external beam radiotherapy in the supine and prone positions underwent approximately 10 serial CT examinations in their respective treatment position in non-consecutive days, except for one patient who was treated prone but serially imaged supine. The prostate, bladder and rectum were contoured on all CT scans. A PTV was generated on the first scan of each patient's CT series by expanding the prostate with a 5 mm margin and an IMRT plan was created. The resultant IMRT plan was then applied to that patient's remaining serial CT scans by aligning the initial CT image set with the subsequent serial CT image sets using (1) skin marks, (2) bony anatomy and (3) center of mass of the prostate. The dosimetric results from these three alignments were compared between the supine and prone groups. To account for the uncertainties associated with prostate delineation and intra-fractional geometric changes, a fictional 'daily PTV' was generated by expanding the prostate with a 3 mm margin on each serial CT scan. Thus, a more realistic target coverage index, V95, was quantified as the fraction of the daily PTV receiving at least 95% of the prescription dose. Dose-volume measures of the organs at risk were also compared. The fraction of the daily PTV contained by the initial PTV after each alignment method was quantified on each patient's serial CT scan, and is defined as PTV overlap index. Results: As expected, alignment based on skin marks yielded unacceptable dose coverage for both groups of patients. Under bony alignment, the target coverage index, V95, was 97.3% and 93.6% for prone and supine patients (p < 0.0001), respectively. The mean PTV overlap indices were 90.7% and 84.7% for prone and supine

  17. Lesion volume predicts prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness: validation of its value alone and matched with prostate imaging reporting and data system score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorana, Eugenio; Pirola, Giacomo Maria; Scialpi, Michele; Micali, Salvatore; Iseppi, Andrea; Bonetti, Luca Reggiani; Kaleci, Shaniko; Torricelli, Pietro; Bianchi, Giampaolo

    2017-07-01

    To demonstrate the association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) estimated lesion volume (LV), prostate cancer detection and tumour clinical significance, evaluating this variable alone and matched with Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System version 2 (PI-RADS v2) score. We retrospectively analysed 157 consecutive patients, with at least one prior negative systematic prostatic biopsy, who underwent transperineal prostate MRI/ultrasonography fusion-targeted biopsy between January 2014 and February 2016. Suspicious lesions were delineated using a 'region of interest' and the system calculated prostate volume and LV. Patients were divided in groups considering LV (≤0.5, 0.5-1, ≥1 mL) and PI-RADS score (1-5). We considered clinically significant prostate cancer as all cancers with a Gleason score of ≥3 + 4 as suggested by PI-RADS v2. A direct comparison between MRI estimated LV (MRI LV) and histological tumour volume (HTV) was done in 23 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy during the study period. Differences between MRI LV and HTV were assessed using the paired sample t-test. MRI LV and HTV concordance was verified using a Bland-Altman plot. The chi-squared test and logistic and ordinal regression models were used to evaluate difference in frequencies. The MRI LV and PI-RADS score were associated both with prostate cancer detection (both P prostate cancer detection (P Prostate cancer detection was 1.4-times higher for LVs of 0.5-1 mL and 1.8-times higher for LVs of ≥1 mL; significant prostate cancer detection was 2.6-times for LVs of 0.5-1 mL and 4-times for LVs of ≥1 mL. There was a positive correlation between MRI LV and HTV (r = 0.9876, P prostate cancer detection and with tumour clinical significance. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Channel sialic acids limit hERG channel activity during the ventricular action potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norring, Sarah A; Ednie, Andrew R; Schwetz, Tara A; Du, Dongping; Yang, Hui; Bennett, Eric S

    2013-02-01

    Activity of human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) 1 voltage-gated K(+) channels is responsible for portions of phase 2 and phase 3 repolarization of the human ventricular action potential. Here, we questioned whether and how physiologically and pathophysiologically relevant changes in surface N-glycosylation modified hERG channel function. Voltage-dependent hERG channel gating and activity were evaluated as expressed in a set of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines under conditions of full glycosylation, no sialylation, no complex N-glycans, and following enzymatic deglycosylation of surface N-glycans. For each condition of reduced glycosylation, hERG channel steady-state activation and inactivation relationships were shifted linearly by significant depolarizing ∼9 and ∼18 mV, respectively. The hERG window current increased significantly by 50-150%, and the peak shifted by a depolarizing ∼10 mV. There was no significant change in maximum hERG current density. Deglycosylated channels were significantly more active (20-80%) than glycosylated controls during phases 2 and 3 of action potential clamp protocols. Simulations of hERG current and ventricular action potentials corroborated experimental data and predicted reduced sialylation leads to a 50-70-ms decrease in action potential duration. The data describe a novel mechanism by which hERG channel gating is modulated through physiologically and pathophysiologically relevant changes in N-glycosylation; reduced channel sialylation increases hERG channel activity during the action potential, thereby increasing the rate of action potential repolarization.

  19. A vaccine strategy with multiple prostatic acid phosphatase-fused cytokines for prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujio, Kei; Watanabe, Masami; Ueki, Hideo; Li, Shun-Ai; Kinoshita, Rie; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Futami, Junichiro; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi

    2015-04-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the attractive treatment strategies for advanced prostate cancer. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) previously approved the therapeutic vaccine, sipuleucel-T, which is composed of autologous antigen-presenting cells cultured with a fusion protein [prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF)]. Although sipuleucel-T has been shown to prolong the median survival of patients for 4.1 months, more robust therapeutic effects may be expected by modifying the vaccination protocol. In the present study, we aimed to develop and validate a novel vaccination strategy using multiple PAP-fused cytokines for prostate cancer treatment. Using a super gene expression (SGE) system that we previously established to amplify the production of a recombinant protein, significant amounts of PAP-fused cytokines [human GMCSF, interleukin-2 (IL2), IL4, IL7 and mouse GMCSF and IL4] were obtained. We examined the activity of the fusion proteins in vitro to validate their cytokine functions. A significant upregulation of dendritic cell differentiation from monocytes was achieved by PAP-GMCSF when used with the other PAP-fused cytokines. The PAP-fused human IL2 significantly increased the proliferation of lymphocytes, as determined by flow cytometry. We also investigated the in vivo therapeutic effects of multiple PAP-fused cytokines in a mouse prostate cancer model bearing prostate-specific antigen (PSA)- and PAP-expressing tumors. The simultaneous intraperitoneal administration of PAP-GMCSF, -IL2, -IL4 and -IL7 significantly prevented tumor induction and inhibited the tumor growth in the PAP-expressing tumors, yet not in the PSA-expressing tumors. The in vivo therapeutic effects with the multiple PAP-fused cytokines were superior to the effects of PAP-GMCSF alone. We thus demonstrated the advantages of the combined use of multiple PAP-fused cytokines including PAP-GMCSF, and propose a promising prostatic

  20. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xyang43@emory.edu; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Mao, Hui [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  1. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  2. Functional recovery after experimental RPE debridement, mfERG studies in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nina Buus; Lassota, Nathan; Kyhn, Maria Voss

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The correlation between histologically identified regeneration of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and functional outcome measured by multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) following surgical debridement is examined in a porcine model. In humans, visual acuity is reduced in diseases......, and by brushing the Bruch's membrane with a silicone catheter. Immediately following surgery (baseline) and after 2 and 6 weeks respectively, the animals were examined by mfERG, fundus photographs (FPs), fluorescein angiograms (FAs), and histopathology. RESULTS: The mfERG P1 amplitude was decreased 2 weeks (T2....... CONCLUSION: This is the first study to show that the histological regeneration of hypopigmented RPE correlates to a return of the retinal function, measured by mfERG....

  3. WE-AB-BRA-12: Post-Implant Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy by X-Ray and MRI Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S; Song, D; Lee, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Le, Y [Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For post-implant dosimetric assessment after prostate brachytherapy, CT-MR fusion approach has been advocated due to the superior accuracy on both seeds localization and soft tissue delineation. However, CT deposits additional radiation to the patient, and seed identification in CT requires manual review and correction. In this study, we propose an accurate, low-dose, and cost-effective post-implant dosimetry approach based on X-ray and MRI. Methods: Implanted seeds are reconstructed using only three X-ray fluoroscopy images by solving a combinatorial optimization problem. The reconstructed seeds are then registered to MR images using an intensity-based points-to-volume registration. MR images are first pre-processed by geometric and Gaussian filtering, yielding smooth candidate seed-only images. To accommodate potential soft tissue deformation, our registration is performed in two steps, an initial affine followed by local deformable registrations. An evolutionary optimizer in conjunction with a points-to-volume similarity metric is used for the affine registration. Local prostate deformation and seed migration are then adjusted by the deformable registration step with external and internal force constraints. Results: We tested our algorithm on twenty patient data sets. For quantitative evaluation, we obtained ground truth seed positions by fusing the post-implant CT-MR images. Seeds were semi-automatically extracted from CT and manually corrected and then registered to the MR images. Target registration error (TRE) was computed by measuring the Euclidean distances from the ground truth to the closest registered X-ray seeds. The overall TREs (mean±standard deviation in mm) are 1.6±1.1 (affine) and 1.3±0.8 (affine+deformable). The overall computation takes less than 1 minute. Conclusion: It has been reported that the CT-based seed localization error is ∼1.6mm and the seed localization uncertainty of 2mm results in less than 5% deviation of prostate D

  4. WE-AB-BRA-12: Post-Implant Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy by X-Ray and MRI Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S; Song, D; Lee, J; Le, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For post-implant dosimetric assessment after prostate brachytherapy, CT-MR fusion approach has been advocated due to the superior accuracy on both seeds localization and soft tissue delineation. However, CT deposits additional radiation to the patient, and seed identification in CT requires manual review and correction. In this study, we propose an accurate, low-dose, and cost-effective post-implant dosimetry approach based on X-ray and MRI. Methods: Implanted seeds are reconstructed using only three X-ray fluoroscopy images by solving a combinatorial optimization problem. The reconstructed seeds are then registered to MR images using an intensity-based points-to-volume registration. MR images are first pre-processed by geometric and Gaussian filtering, yielding smooth candidate seed-only images. To accommodate potential soft tissue deformation, our registration is performed in two steps, an initial affine followed by local deformable registrations. An evolutionary optimizer in conjunction with a points-to-volume similarity metric is used for the affine registration. Local prostate deformation and seed migration are then adjusted by the deformable registration step with external and internal force constraints. Results: We tested our algorithm on twenty patient data sets. For quantitative evaluation, we obtained ground truth seed positions by fusing the post-implant CT-MR images. Seeds were semi-automatically extracted from CT and manually corrected and then registered to the MR images. Target registration error (TRE) was computed by measuring the Euclidean distances from the ground truth to the closest registered X-ray seeds. The overall TREs (mean±standard deviation in mm) are 1.6±1.1 (affine) and 1.3±0.8 (affine+deformable). The overall computation takes less than 1 minute. Conclusion: It has been reported that the CT-based seed localization error is ∼1.6mm and the seed localization uncertainty of 2mm results in less than 5% deviation of prostate D

  5. Imaging Characteristics in ALK Fusion-Positive Lung Adenocarcinomas by Using HRCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Sakae; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Uehara, Hirofumi; Mun, Mingyon; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nakagawa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to identify high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) features useful to distinguish the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) fusion-positive and negative lung adenocarcinomas. Methods: We included 236 surgically resected adenocarcinoma lesions, which included 27 consecutive ALK fusion-positive (AP) lesions, 115 epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive lesions, and 94 double-negative lesions. HRCT parameters including size, air bronchograms, pleural indentation, spiculation, and tumor disappearance rate (TDR) were compared. In addition, prevalence of small lesions (≤20 mm) and solid lesions (TDR ≤20%) were compared. Results: AP lesions were significantly smaller and had lower TDR (%) than ALK fusion-negative (AN) lesions (tumor diameter: 20.7 mm ± 14.1 mm vs. 27.4 mm ± 13.8 mm, respectively, p 20 mm (n = 7, 25.9%) showed a solid pattern. Among all small lesions, AP lesions had lower TDR and more frequent spiculation than AN lesions (p 20 mm lesions may be ALK fusion-negative. PMID:24899136

  6. Web 2.0 Dienste als Ergänzung zu algorithmischen Suchmaschinen

    CERN Document Server

    Deutschland. Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Technologie; Maas, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Dokumentiert die Ergebnisse des Fachprojekts "Einbingung von Frage-Antwort-Diensten in die Web-Suche", Wintersemester 2007/2008, Dept. Information, Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaften Hamburg. Mit sozialen Suchdiensten - wie z.B. Yahoo Clever, Lycos iQ oder Mister Wong - ist eine Ergänzung zu den bisherigen Ansätzen in der Web-Suche entstanden. Während Google und Co. automatisch generierte Trefferlisten bieten, binden soziale Suchdienste die Anwender zur Generierung der Suchergebnisse in den Suchprozess ein. Vor diesem Hintergrund wird in diesem Buch der Frage nachgegangen, inwieweit soziale Suchdienste mit traditionellen Suchmaschinen konkurrieren oder diese qualitativ ergänzen können. Der vorliegende Band beleuchtet die hier aufgeworfene Fragestellung aus verschiedenen Perspektiven, um auf die Bedeutung von sozialen Suchdiensten zu schließen.

  7. Application of electroretinography (ERG) in early drug development for assessing retinal toxicity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wenhu, E-mail: wenhu.huang@pfizer.com; Collette, Walter; Twamley, Michelle; Aguirre, Shirley A.; Sacaan, Aida

    2015-12-15

    Retinal ocular toxicity is among the leading causes of drug development attrition in the pharmaceutical industry. Electroretinography (ERG) is a non-invasive functional assay used to assess neuro-retinal physiological integrity by measuring the electrical responses. To directly assess the utility of ERG, a series of studies was conducted following intravitreal and/or iv administration of pan-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors: AG-012,986 and AG-024,322 in rats. Both compounds have previously shown to induce retinal toxicity. Retinal injury was evaluated by ERG, histopathology and TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-012,986 at ≥ 10 μg/eye resulted in decreases (60%) in ERG b-wave and microscopic changes of mild to moderate retinal degeneration, and at 30 μg/eye led to additional ophthalmic findings. Intravenous administration of AG-012,986 daily at ≥ 5 mg/kg resulted in dose-related decreases (25 to 40%) in b-wave and sporadic to intense positive TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-024,322 at 30 μg/eye also resulted in decreases (50 to 60%) in b-wave, mild to marked retinal degeneration and mild vitreous debris. These experiments demonstrate that ERG can be used as a sensitive and reliable functional tool to evaluate retinal toxicity induced by test compounds in rats complementing other classical ocular safety measurements. - Highlights: • There were strong correlations of ERG readouts to in vivo ophthalmic exams, TUNEL assay, and histopathology. • ERG appears to be more sensitive and can detect retinal functional changes at a very early stage of pathogenesis. • ERG can be incorporated into routine exploratory toxicity study to identify compound ocular safety issues. • In drug discovery, ERG is a quick, non-invasive, sensitive and reliable tool in retinal toxicity de-risking.

  8. Application of electroretinography (ERG) in early drug development for assessing retinal toxicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Wenhu; Collette, Walter; Twamley, Michelle; Aguirre, Shirley A.; Sacaan, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ocular toxicity is among the leading causes of drug development attrition in the pharmaceutical industry. Electroretinography (ERG) is a non-invasive functional assay used to assess neuro-retinal physiological integrity by measuring the electrical responses. To directly assess the utility of ERG, a series of studies was conducted following intravitreal and/or iv administration of pan-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors: AG-012,986 and AG-024,322 in rats. Both compounds have previously shown to induce retinal toxicity. Retinal injury was evaluated by ERG, histopathology and TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-012,986 at ≥ 10 μg/eye resulted in decreases (60%) in ERG b-wave and microscopic changes of mild to moderate retinal degeneration, and at 30 μg/eye led to additional ophthalmic findings. Intravenous administration of AG-012,986 daily at ≥ 5 mg/kg resulted in dose-related decreases (25 to 40%) in b-wave and sporadic to intense positive TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-024,322 at 30 μg/eye also resulted in decreases (50 to 60%) in b-wave, mild to marked retinal degeneration and mild vitreous debris. These experiments demonstrate that ERG can be used as a sensitive and reliable functional tool to evaluate retinal toxicity induced by test compounds in rats complementing other classical ocular safety measurements. - Highlights: • There were strong correlations of ERG readouts to in vivo ophthalmic exams, TUNEL assay, and histopathology. • ERG appears to be more sensitive and can detect retinal functional changes at a very early stage of pathogenesis. • ERG can be incorporated into routine exploratory toxicity study to identify compound ocular safety issues. • In drug discovery, ERG is a quick, non-invasive, sensitive and reliable tool in retinal toxicity de-risking.

  9. Presence of PSA auto-antibodies in men with prostate abnormalities (prostate cancer/benign prostatic hyperplasia/prostatitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokant, M T; Naz, R K

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by the prostate, liquefies post-ejaculate semen. PSA is detected in semen and blood. Increased circulating PSA levels indicate prostate abnormality [prostate cancer (PC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis (PTIS)], with variance among individuals. As the prostate has been proposed as an immune organ, we hypothesise that variation in PSA levels among men may be due to presence of auto-antibodies against PSA. Sera from healthy men (n = 28) and men having prostatitis (n = 25), BPH (n = 30) or PC (n = 29) were tested for PSA antibody presence using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) values converted to standard deviation (SD) units, and Western blotting. Taking ≥2 SD units as cut-off for positive immunoreactivity, 0% of normal men, 0% with prostatitis, 33% with BPH and 3.45% with PC demonstrated PSA antibodies. One-way analysis of variance (anova) performed on the mean absorbance values and SD units of each group showed BPH as significantly different (P prostatitis. All others were nonsignificant (P prostate abnormalities, especially differentiating BPH from prostate cancer and prostatitis. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Continuous monitoring of prostate position using stereoscopic and monoscopic kV image guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, M. Tynan R.; Parsons, Dave D.; Robar, James L. [Department of Medical Physics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2, Canada and Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, QEII Health Science Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2Y9 (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate continuous kV x-ray monitoring of prostate motion using both stereoscopic and monoscopic localizations, assess the spatial accuracy of these techniques, and evaluate the dose delivered from the added image guidance. Methods: The authors implemented both stereoscopic and monoscopic fiducial localizations using a room-mounted dual oblique x-ray system. Recently developed monoscopic 3D position estimation techniques potentially overcome the issue of treatment head interference with stereoscopic imaging at certain gantry angles. To demonstrate continuous position monitoring, a gold fiducial marker was placed in an anthropomorphic phantom and placed on the Linac couch. The couch was used as a programmable translation stage. The couch was programmed with a series of patient prostate motion trajectories exemplifying five distinct categories: stable prostate, slow drift, persistent excursion, transient excursion, and high frequency excursions. The phantom and fiducial were imaged using 140 kVp, 0.63 mAs per image at 1 Hz for a 60 s monitoring period. Both stereoscopic and monoscopic 3D localization accuracies were assessed by comparison to the ground-truth obtained from the Linac log file. Imaging dose was also assessed, using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter inserts in the phantom. Results: Stereoscopic localization accuracy varied between 0.13 ± 0.05 and 0.33 ± 0.30 mm, depending on the motion trajectory. Monoscopic localization accuracy varied from 0.2 ± 0.1 to 1.1 ± 0.7 mm. The largest localization errors were typically observed in the left–right direction. There were significant differences in accuracy between the two monoscopic views, but which view was better varied from trajectory to trajectory. The imaging dose was measured to be between 2 and 15 μGy/mAs, depending on location in the phantom. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the first use of monoscopic localization for a room-mounted dual x-ray system. Three

  11. Comparing Three Different Techniques for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-targeted Prostate Biopsies : A Systematic Review of In-bore versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging-transrectal Ultrasound fusion versus Cognitive Registration. Is There a Preferred Technique?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegelin, Olivier; Melick, H.H.E.; Hooft, Lotty; Bosch, J L H Ruud; Reitsma, Hans B; Barentsz, Jelle O; Somford, Diederik M

    CONTEXT: The introduction of magnetic resonance imaging-guided biopsies (MRI-GB) has changed the paradigm concerning prostate biopsies. Three techniques of MRI-GB are available: (1) in-bore MRI target biopsy (MRI-TB), (2) MRI-transrectal ultrasound fusion (FUS-TB), and (3) cognitive registration

  12. Detección precoz de cáncer de próstata: Controversias y recomendaciones actuales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Christian, Dr.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El cáncer a la próstata es un serio problema de salud en el mundo occidental. Es el cáncer más común en hombres luego del cáncer a la piel, estimándose que uno de cada seis hombres desarrollará la enfermedad en el transcurso de su vida. Corresponde a la segunda causa de muerte en hombres mayores de 50 años después del cáncer de pulmón. En Chile, la mortalidad por cáncer de próstata ha ido en aumento durante los últimos años, alcanzando una tasa de 20.9 por 100000 en el año 2009 y ocupa el segundo lugar en las causas de muerte por cáncer en el hombre.Las herramientas con que se dispone para detectar precozmente la enfermedad son el tacto rectal (TR y el antígeno prostático específico (APE, pero en el último tiempo se han estudiado una serie de nuevos marcadores como el PCA3, el pro-APE, TMPRSS2-ERG, 4K Score, SelectMDx®, ConfirmMDx® y ExoDx®. Algunos ya se encuentran en una fase inicial de uso clínico y pretenden aumentar la especificidad, especialmente en el diagnóstico de tumores más agresivos.Existe suficiente evidencia que la detección precoz de cáncer de próstata disminuye la mortalidad, ya que se cuenta con tratamiento efectivos para la enfermedad diagnosticada en etapas tempranas. El desafío está en encontrar nuevos marcadores que permitan identificar aquellos hombres que se encuentren en mayor riesgo, evitando así procedimientos innecesarios. Summary: Prostate Cancer is a serious health problem in the western world. It is the most common cancer in men after cancer of the skin, estimated that one in six men will develop the disease in the course of his life. Corresponds to the second cause of death in men older than 50 years after lung cancer. In Chile, mortality from prostate cancer has been increasing in recent years reaching a rate of 20.9 per 100,000 in 2009 and ranks second in the causes of cancer death in men.The tools available to detect the early disease early are the digital rectal

  13. An online x-ray based position validation system for prostate hypofractionated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arumugam, Sankar, E-mail: Sankar.Arumugam@sswahs.nsw.gov.au; Xing, Aitang [Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Sidhom, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate positioning of the target volume during treatment is paramount for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In this work, the authors present the development of an in-house software tool to verify target position with an Elekta-Synergy linear accelerator using kV planar images acquired during treatment delivery. Methods: In-house software, SeedTracker, was developed in MATLAB to perform the following three functions: 1. predict intended seed positions in a planar view perpendicular to any gantry angle, simulating a portal imaging device, from the 3D seed co-ordinates derived from the treatment planning system; 2. autosegment seed positions in kV planar images; and 3. report the position shift based on the seed positions in the projection images. The performance of SeedTracker was verified using a CIRS humanoid phantom (CIRS, VA, USA) implanted with three Civco gold seed markers (Civco, IA, USA) in the prostate. The true positive rate of autosegmentation (TPR{sub seg}) and the accuracy of the software in alerting the user when the isocenter position was outside the tolerance (TPR{sub trig}) were studied. Two-dimensional and 3D static position offsets introduced to the humanoid phantom and 3D dynamic offsets introduced to a gel phantom containing gold seeds were used for evaluation of the system. Results: SeedTracker showed a TPR{sub seg} of 100% in the humanoid phantom for projection images acquired at all angles except in the ranges of 80°–100° and 260°–280° where seeds are obscured by anatomy. This resulted in a TPR{sub trig} of 88% over the entire treatment range for considered 3D static offsets introduced to the phantom. For 2D static offsets where the position offsets were only introduced in the anterior–posterior and lateral directions, the TPR{sub trig} of SeedTracker was limited by both seed detectability and positional offset. SeedTracker showed a false positive trigger in the projection angle range between 130°–170° and

  14. BrachyView: Combining LDR seed positions with transrectal ultrasound imaging in a prostate gel phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaghy, S; Cutajar, D L; Bucci, J A; Enari, K; Safavi-Naeini, M; Favoino, M; Tartaglia, M; Carriero, F; Jakubek, J; Pospisil, S; Lerch, M; Rosenfeld, A B; Petasecca, M

    2017-02-01

    BrachyView is a novel in-body imaging system which aims to provide LDR brachytherapy seeds position reconstruction within the prostate in real-time. The first prototype is presented in this study: the probe consists of a gamma camera featuring three single cone pinhole collimators embedded in a tungsten tube, above three, high resolution pixelated detectors (Timepix). The prostate was imaged with a TRUS system using a sagittal crystal with a 2.5mm slice thickness. Eleven needles containing a total of thirty 0.508U 125 I seeds were implanted under ultrasound guidance. A CT scan was used to localise the seed positions, as well as provide a reference when performing the image co-registration between the BrachyView coordinate system and the TRUS coordinate system. An in-house visualisation software interface was developed to provide a quantitative 3D reconstructed prostate based on the TRUS images and co-registered with the LDR seeds in situ. A rigid body image registration was performed between the BrachyView and TRUS systems, with the BrachyView and CT-derived source locations compared. The reconstructed seed positions determined by the BrachyView probe showed a maximum discrepancy of 1.78mm, with 75% of the seeds reconstructed within 1mm of their nominal location. An accurate co-registration between the BrachyView and TRUS coordinate system was established. The BrachyView system has shown its ability to reconstruct all implanted LDR seeds within a tissue equivalent prostate gel phantom, providing both anatomical and seed position information in a single interface. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. High Glucose Represses hERG K+ Channel Expression through Trafficking Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Qi Shi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Abnormal QT prolongation is the most prominent cardiac electrical disturbance in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. It is well known that the human ether-ago-go-related gene (hERG controls the rapid delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr in cardiac cells. The expression of the hERG channel is severely down-regulated in diabetic hearts, and this down-regulation is a critical contributor to the slowing of repolarization and QT prolongation. However, the intracellular mechanisms underlying the diabetes-induced hERG deficiency remain unknown. Methods: The expression of the hERG channel was assessed via western blot analysis, and the hERG current was detected with a patch-clamp technique. Results: The results of our study revealed that the expression of the hERG protein and the hERG current were substantially decreased in high-glucose-treated hERG-HEK cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that the high-glucose-mediated damage to the hERG channel depended on the down-regulation of protein levels but not the alteration of channel kinetics. These discoveries indicated that high glucose likely disrupted hERG channel trafficking. From the western blot and immunoprecipitation analyses, we found that high glucose induced trafficking inhibition through an effect on the expression of Hsp90 and its interaction with hERG. Furthermore, the high-glucose-induced inhibition of hERG channel trafficking could activate the unfolded protein response (UPR by up-regulating the expression levels of activating transcription factor-6 (ATF-6 and the ER chaperone protein calnexin. In addition, we demonstrated that 100 nM insulin up-regulated the expression of the hERG channel and rescued the hERG channel repression caused by high glucose. Conclusion: The results of our study provide the first evidence of a high-glucose-induced hERG channel deficiency resulting from the inhibition of channel trafficking. Furthermore, insulin promotes the expression of the hERG channel

  17. The influence of prostate-specific antigen density on positive and negative predictive values of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging to detect Gleason score 7-10 prostate cancer in a repeat biopsy setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Nienke L; Barrett, Tristan; Koo, Brendan; Doble, Andrew; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Warren, Anne; Kastner, Christof; Bratt, Ola

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of prostate-specific antigen density (PSAD) on positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to detect Gleason score ≥7 cancer in a repeat biopsy setting. Retrospective study of 514 men with previous prostate biopsy showing no or Gleason score 6 cancer. All had mpMRI, graded 1-5 on a Likert scale for cancer suspicion, and subsequent targeted and 24-core systematic image-fusion guided transperineal biopsy in 2013-2015. The NPVs and PPVs of mpMRIs for detecting Gleason score ≥7 cancer were calculated (±95% confidence intervals) for PSAD ≤0.1, 0.1-0.2, ≤0.2 and >0.2 ng/mL/mL, and compared by chi-square test for linear trend. Gleason score ≥7 cancer was detected in 31% of the men. The NPV of Likert 1-2 mpMRI was 0.91 (±0.04) with a PSAD of ≤0.2 ng/mL/mL and 0.71 (±0.16) with a PSAD of >0.2 ng/mL/mL (P = 0.003). For Likert 3 mpMRI, PPV was 0.09 (±0.06) with a PSAD of ≤0.2 ng/mL/mL and 0.44 (±0.19) with a PSAD of >0.2 ng/mL/mL (P = 0.002). PSAD also significantly affected the PPV of Likert 4-5 mpMRI lesions: the PPV was 0.47 (±0.08) with a PSAD of ≤0.2 ng/mL/mL and 0.66 (±0.10) with a PSAD of >0.2 ng/mL/mL (P prostate cancer, not only in men with negative mpMRI, but also in men with equivocal imaging. Surveillance, rather than repeat biopsy, may be appropriate for these men. Conversely, biopsies are indicated in men with a high PSAD, even if an mpMRI shows no suspicious lesion, and in men with an mpMRI suspicious for cancer, even if the PSAD is low. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Early prostate cancer antigen expression in predicting presence of prostate cancer in men with histologically negative biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, D E; DeMarzo, A M; Platz, E A; Jadallah, S; Hicks, J; Epstein, J I; Partin, A W; Netto, G J

    2007-05-01

    Early prostate cancer antigen is a nuclear matrix protein that was recently shown to be expressed in prostate adenocarcinoma and adjacent benign tissue. Previous studies have demonstrated early prostate cancer antigen expression in benign prostate tissue up to 5 years before a diagnosis of prostate carcinoma, suggesting that early prostate cancer antigen could be used as a potential predictive marker. We evaluated early prostate cancer antigen expression by immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal antibody (Onconome Inc., Seattle, Washington) on benign biopsies from 98 patients. Biopsies were obtained from 4 groups that included 39 patients with first time negative biopsy (group 1), 24 patients with persistently negative biopsies (group 2), 8 patients with initially negative biopsies who were subsequently diagnosed with prostate carcinoma (group 3) and negative biopsies obtained from 27 cases where other concurrent biopsies contained prostate carcinoma (group 4). Early prostate cancer antigen staining was assessed by 2 of the authors who were blind to the group of the examined sections. Staining intensity (range 0 to 3) and extent (range 1 to 3) scores were assigned. The presence of intensity 3 staining in any of the blocks of a biopsy specimen was considered as positive for early prostate cancer antigen for the primary outcome in the statistical analysis. In addition, as secondary outcomes we evaluated the data using the proportion of blocks with intensity 3 early prostate cancer antigen staining, the mean of the product of staining intensity and staining extent of all blocks within a biopsy, and the mean of the product of intensity 3 staining and extent. Primary outcome analysis revealed the proportion of early prostate cancer antigen positivity to be highest in group 3 (6 of 8, 75%) and lowest in group 2 (7 of 24, 29%, p=0.04 for differences among groups). A relatively higher than expected proportion of early prostate cancer antigen positivity was present in

  19. An Interaction with Ewing's Sarcoma Breakpoint Protein EWS Defines a Specific Oncogenic Mechanism of ETS Factors Rearranged in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedage, Vivekananda; Selvaraj, Nagarathinam; Nicholas, Taylor R; Budka, Justin A; Plotnik, Joshua P; Jerde, Travis J; Hollenhorst, Peter C

    2016-10-25

    More than 50% of prostate tumors have a chromosomal rearrangement resulting in aberrant expression of an oncogenic ETS family transcription factor. However, mechanisms that differentiate the function of oncogenic ETS factors expressed in prostate tumors from non-oncogenic ETS factors expressed in normal prostate are unknown. Here, we find that four oncogenic ETS (ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5), and no other ETS, interact with the Ewing's sarcoma breakpoint protein, EWS. This EWS interaction was necessary and sufficient for oncogenic ETS functions including gene activation, cell migration, clonogenic survival, and transformation. Significantly, the EWS interacting region of ERG has no homology with that of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5. Therefore, this finding may explain how divergent ETS factors have a common oncogenic function. Strikingly, EWS is fused to various ETS factors by the chromosome translocations that cause Ewing's sarcoma. Therefore, these findings link oncogenic ETS function in both prostate cancer and Ewing's sarcoma. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss Kyhn, Maria; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Lopez, Ana Garcia

    2007-01-01

    To establish a method allowing multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) recording with simultaneous fundus monitoring on anaesthetized pigs. In addition we characterize the peaks of the porcine mfERG trace, and compare the visual streak area with the optic nerve head, a known non-response area....... Finally we illustrate the feasibility of the method by performing mfERG after an induced laser burn in the visual streak....

  1. Urinary engrailed-2 (EN2) levels predict tumour volume in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandha, Hardev; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2012-01-01

    ELISA test and is not dependent on other parameters, even PSA, unlike all the other current biomarkers under evaluation. To date, no marker correlates with the amount of cancer present - the present study shows this positive correlation with EN2 in men undergoing prostatectomy. The potential utility...... in men who had undergone radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer. To date, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels have not reliably predicted prostate cancer volume. Reliable volume indicator biomarker(s) may aid management decisions, e.g. active treatment vs active surveillance. PATIENTS......: In all, 88 of the whole cohort of 125 men (70%) were positive for EN2 in their urine (>42.5 µg/L); 38/58 (65%) men where cancer volume data was available. There was no statistical relationship between urinary EN2 levels and serum PSA levels. PSA levels did not correlate with tumour stage, combined...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter R; Cool, Derek W; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided "fusion" prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm(3) or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each tumor was consistently greater when using

  3. Fused-data transrectal EIT for prostate cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ethan K; Wu, Xiaotian; Halter, Ryan J

    2018-05-25

    Prostate cancer is a significant problem affecting 1 in 7 men. Unfortunately, the diagnostic gold-standard of ultrasound-guided biopsy misses 10%-30% of all cancers. The objective of this study was to develop an electrical impedance tomography (EIT) approach that has the potential to image the entire prostate using multiple impedance measurements recorded between electrodes integrated onto an end-fired transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) device and a biopsy probe (BP). Simulations and sensitivity analyses were used to investigate the best combination of electrodes, and measured tank experiments were used to evaluate a fused-data transrectal EIT (fd-TREIT) and BP approach. Simulations and sensitivity analysis revealed that (1) TREIT measurements are not sufficiently sensitive to image the whole prostate, (2) the combination of TREIT  +  BP measurements increases the sensitive region of TREIT-only measurements by 12×, and (3) the fusion of multiple TREIT  +  BP measurements collected during a routine or customized 12-core biopsy procedure can cover up to 76.1% or 94.1% of a nominal 50 cm 3 prostate, respectively. Three measured tank experiments of the fd-TREIT  +  BP approach successfully and accurately recovered the positions of 2-3 metal or plastic inclusions. The measured tank experiments represent important steps in the development of an algorithm that can combine EIT from multiple locations and from multiple probes-data that could be collected during a routine TRUS-guided 12-core biopsy. Overall, this result is a step towards a clinically deployable impedance imaging approach to scanning the entire prostate, which could significantly help to improve prostate cancer diagnosis.

  4. Effective molecular targeting of CDK4/6 and IGF-1R in a rare FUS-ERG fusion CDKN2A-deletion doxorubicin-resistant Ewing's sarcoma patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude-mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Singh, Arun S; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; James, Aaron W; Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; DeLong, Jonathan C; Zhang, Yong; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Russell, Tara; Eckardt, Mark A; Yanagawa, Jane; Federman, Noah; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-07-26

    Ewing's sarcoma is a rare and aggressive malignancy. In the present study, tumor from a patient with a Ewing's sarcoma with cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/B (CDKN2A/B) loss and FUS-ERG fusion was implanted in the right chest wall of nude mice to establish a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. The aim of the present study was to determine efficacy of cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitors on the Ewing's sarcoma PDOX. The PDOX models were randomized into the following groups when tumor volume reached 50 mm3: G1, untreated control; G2, doxorubicin (DOX) (intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, weekly, for 2 weeks); G3, CDK4/6 inhibitor (palbociclib, PD0332991, per oral (p.o.), daily, for 14 days); G4, IGF-1R inhibitor (linsitinib, OSI-906, p.o., daily, for 14 days). Tumor growth was significantly suppressed both in G3 (palbociclib) and in G4 (linsitinib) compared to G1 (untreated control) at all measured time points. In contrast, DOX did not inhibit tumor growth at any time point, which is consistent with the failure of DOX to control tumor growth in the patient. The results of the present study demonstrate the power of the PDOX model to identify effective targeted molecular therapy of a recalcitrant DOX-resistant Ewing's sarcoma with specific genetic alterations. The results of this study suggest the potential of PDOX models for individually-tailored, effective targeted therapy for recalcitrant cancer.

  5. Fusion Based on Visible Light Positioning and Inertial Navigation Using Extended Kalman Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhitian; Feng, Lihui; Yang, Aiying

    2017-05-11

    With the rapid development of smart technology, the need for location-based services (LBS) increases every day. Since classical positioning technology such as GPS cannot satisfy the needs of indoor positioning, new indoor positioning technologies, such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and Visible light communication (VLC), have already cut a figure. VLC positioning has been proposed because it has higher accuracy, costs less, and is easier to accomplish in comparison to the other indoor positioning technologies. However, the practicality of VLC positioning is limited since it is easily affected by multipath effects and the layout of LEDs. Thus, we propose a fusion positioning system based on extended Kalman filters, which can fuse the VLC position and the inertial navigation data. The accuracy of the fusion positioning system is in centimeters, which is better compared to the VLC-based positioning or inertial navigation alone. Furthermore, the fusion positioning system has high accuracy, saves energy, costs little, and is easy to install, making it a promising candidate for future indoor positioning applications.

  6. MAGE-C2/CT10 protein expression is an independent predictor of recurrence in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta von Boehmer

    Full Text Available The cancer-testis (CT family of antigens is expressed in a variety of malignant neoplasms. In most cases, no CT antigen is found in normal tissues, except in testis, making them ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy. A comprehensive analysis of CT antigen expression has not yet been reported in prostate cancer. MAGE-C2/CT-10 is a novel CT antigen. The objective of this study was to analyze extent and prognostic significance of MAGE-C2/CT10 protein expression in prostate cancer. 348 prostate carcinomas from consecutive radical prostatectomies, 29 castration-refractory prostate cancer, 46 metastases, and 45 benign hyperplasias were immunohistochemically analyzed for MAGE-C2/CT10 expression using tissue microarrays. Nuclear MAGE-C2/CT10 expression was identified in only 3.3% primary prostate carcinomas. MAGE-C2/CT10 protein expression was significantly more frequent in metastatic (16.3% positivity and castration-resistant prostate cancer (17% positivity; p<0.001. Nuclear MAGE-C2/CT10 expression was identified as predictor of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (p = 0.015, which was independent of preoperative PSA, Gleason score, tumor stage, and surgical margin status in multivariate analysis (p<0.05. MAGE-C2/CT10 expression in prostate cancer correlates with the degree of malignancy and indicates a higher risk for biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Further, the results suggest MAGE-C2/CT10 as a potential target for adjuvant and palliative immunotherapy in patients with prostate cancer.

  7. Dosimetric impact of systematic MLC positional errors on step and shoot IMRT for prostate cancer: a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ung, N.M.; Harper, C.S.; Wee, L.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The positional accuracy of multileaf collimators (MLC) is crucial in ensuring precise delivery of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this planning study was to investigate the dosimetric impact of systematic MLC positional errors on step and shoot IMRT of prostate cancer. A total of 12 perturbations of MLC leaf banks were introduced to six prostate IMRT treatment plans to simulate MLC systematic positional errors. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) were generated for the extraction of dose endpoint parameters. Plans were evaluated in terms of changes to the defined endpoint dose parameters, conformity index (CI) and healthy tissue avoidance (HTA) to planning target volume (PTV), rectum and bladder. Negative perturbations of MLC had been found to produce greater changes to endpoint dose parameters than positive perturbations of MLC (p 9 5 of -1.2 and 0.9% respectively. Negative and positive synchronised MLC perturbations of I mm in one direction resulted in median changes in D 9 5 of -2.3 and 1.8% respectively. Doses to rectum were generally more sensitive to systematic MLC en-ors compared to bladder (p < 0.01). Negative and positive synchronised MLC perturbations of I mm in one direction resulted in median changes in endpoint dose parameters of rectum and bladder from 1.0 to 2.5%. Maximum reduction of -4.4 and -7.3% were recorded for conformity index (CI) and healthy tissue avoidance (HT A) respectively due to synchronised MLC perturbation of 1 mm. MLC errors resulted in dosimetric changes in IMRT plans for prostate. (author)

  8. Dynamic regulation of canonical TGFβ signalling by endothelial transcription factor ERG protects from liver fibrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufton, Neil P; Peghaire, Claire R; Osuna-Almagro, Lourdes; Raimondi, Claudio; Kalna, Viktoria; Chuahan, Abhishek; Webb, Gwilym; Yang, Youwen; Birdsey, Graeme M; Lalor, Patricia; Mason, Justin C; Adams, David H; Randi, Anna M

    2017-10-12

    The role of the endothelium in protecting from chronic liver disease and TGFβ-mediated fibrosis remains unclear. Here we describe how the endothelial transcription factor ETS-related gene (ERG) promotes liver homoeostasis by controlling canonical TGFβ-SMAD signalling, driving the SMAD1 pathway while repressing SMAD3 activity. Molecular analysis shows that ERG binds to SMAD3, restricting its access to DNA. Ablation of ERG expression results in endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) and spontaneous liver fibrogenesis in EC-specific constitutive hemi-deficient (Erg cEC-Het ) and inducible homozygous deficient mice (Erg iEC-KO ), in a SMAD3-dependent manner. Acute administration of the TNF-α inhibitor etanercept inhibits carbon tetrachloride (CCL 4 )-induced fibrogenesis in an ERG-dependent manner in mice. Decreased ERG expression also correlates with EndMT in tissues from patients with end-stage liver fibrosis. These studies identify a pathogenic mechanism where loss of ERG causes endothelial-dependent liver fibrogenesis via regulation of SMAD2/3. Moreover, ERG represents a promising candidate biomarker for assessing EndMT in liver disease.The transcription factor ERG is key to endothelial lineage specification and vascular homeostasis. Here the authors show that ERG balances TGFβ signalling through the SMAD1 and SMAD3 pathways, protecting the endothelium from endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and consequent liver fibrosis in mice via a SMAD3-dependent mechanism.

  9. BTG2 Antiproliferative Gene and Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walden, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    .... During this study we showed that BTG2 protein expression is lost as an early event in prostate carcinogenesis and that prostate cancer cells degrade BTG2 at a greater rate than noncancerous prostate cells...

  10. Peptide-Mediated Liposome Fusion: The Effect of Anchor Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niek S. A. Crone

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A minimal model system for membrane fusion, comprising two complementary peptides dubbed “E” and “K” joined to a cholesterol anchor via a polyethyleneglycol spacer, has previously been developed in our group. This system promotes the fusion of large unilamellar vesicles and facilitates liposome-cell fusion both in vitro and in vivo. Whilst several aspects of the system have previously been investigated to provide an insight as to how fusion is facilitated, anchor positioning has not yet been considered. In this study, the effects of placing the anchor at either the N-terminus or in the center of the peptide are investigated using a combination of circular dichroism spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and fluorescence assays. It was discovered that anchoring the “K” peptide in the center of the sequence had no effect on its structure, its ability to interact with membranes, or its ability to promote fusion, whereas anchoring the ‘E’ peptide in the middle of the sequence dramatically decreases fusion efficiency. We postulate that anchoring the ‘E’ peptide in the middle of the sequence disrupts its ability to form homodimers with peptides on the same membrane, leading to aggregation and content leakage.

  11. The effect of an endorectal balloon and off-line correction on the interfraction systematic and random prostate position variations: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Emile van; Vight, Lisette van der; Witjes, J. Alfred; Huisman, HenkJan J.; Leer, Jan Willem; Visser, Andries G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of an endorectal balloon (ERB) and an off-line correction protocol on the day-to-day, interfraction prostate gland motion, in patients receiving external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and materials: In 22 patients, irradiated with an ERB in situ (ERB group) and in 30 patients without an ERB (No-ERB group), prostate displacements were measured daily in three orthogonal directions with portal images. Implanted gold markers and an off-line electronic portal imaging correction protocol were used for prostate position verification and correction. Movie loops were analyzed to evaluate prostate motion and rectal filling variations. Results: The off-line correction protocol reduced the systematic prostate displacements, equally for the ERB and No-ERB group, to 1.3-1.8 mm (1 SD). The mean 3D displacement was reduced to 2.8 mm and 2.4 mm for the ERB and No-ERB group, respectively. The random interfraction displacements, relative to the treatment isocenter, were not reduced by the ERB and remained nearly unchanged in all three directions: 3.1 mm (1 SD) left-right, 2.6 mm (1 SD) superior-inferior, and 4.7 mm (1 SD) for the anterior-posterior direction. These day-to-day prostate position variations can be explained by the presence of gas and stool beside the ERB. Conclusions: The off-line corrections on the fiducial markers are effective in reducing the systematic prostate displacements. The investigated ERB does not reduce the interfraction prostate motion. Although the overall mean displacement is low, the day-to-day interfraction motion, especially in anterior-posterior direction, remains high compared with the systematic displacements

  12. ERG review of waste package container materials selection and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moak, D.P.; Perrin, J.S.

    1986-07-01

    The Engineering Review Group (ERG) was established by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) to help evaluate engineering-related issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The October 1984 meeting of the ERG reviewed the waste package container materials selection and corrosion. This report documents the ERG's comments and recommendations on these subjects and the ONWI response to the specific points raised by the ERG

  13. MR imaging of the prostate; MRT der Prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asbach, P.; Haas, M.; Hamm, B. [Charite Campus Benjamin Franklin, Klinik fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in Germany; however, there is a distinct difference between incidence and mortality. The detection of prostate cancer is based on clinical and laboratory testing using serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and transrectal ultrasound with randomized biopsy. Multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate can provide valuable diagnostic information for detection of prostate cancer, especially after negative results of a biopsy prior to repeat biopsy. In addition the use of MR ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy has gained in diagnostic importance and has increased the prostate cancer detection rate. The prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS) classification has standardized the reporting of prostate MRI which has positively influenced the acceptance by urologists. (orig.) [German] Das Prostatakarzinom ist in Deutschland die haeufigste Krebserkrankung des Mannes, wobei ein deutlicher Unterschied zwischen Inzidenz und Mortalitaet besteht. Die Detektion des Prostatakarzinoms basiert auf klinischer und laborchemischer Untersuchung (prostataspezifisches-Antigen[PSA]-Wert) sowie der transrektalen Ultraschalluntersuchung mit randomisierter Biopsie. Die multiparametrische MR-Tomographie kann zur Detektion des Prostatakarzinoms, insbesondere bei negativer Biopsie vor einer erneuten Biopsie wertvolle diagnostische Informationen liefern. Zudem wird zunehmend die MRT-Ultraschall-Fusionsbiopsie in der Diagnostik eingesetzt, wodurch die Detektionsrate des Prostatakarzinoms deutlich gesteigert werden kann. Mit Einfuehrung der PI-RADS-Klassifikation (Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System) konnte zudem eine Standardisierung der Befundung erreicht werden, was die Akzeptanz der MRT der Prostata in der Urologie erhoeht hat. (orig.)

  14. Prostate ultrasound: back in business!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Nicolae; Andras, Iulia; Radu, Corina; Andras, David; Coman, Radu-Tudor; Tucan, Paul; Pisla, Doina; Crisan, Dana; Coman, Ioan

    2017-11-29

    The use of grey scale prostate ultrasound decreased after the implementation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis and evaluation of prostate cancer. The new developments, such as multiparametric ultrasound and MRI-ultrasound fusion technology, renewed the interest for this imaging method in the assessment of prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper was to review the current role of prostate ultrasound in the setting of these new applications. A thorough reevaluation of the selection criteria of the patients is required to assess which patients would benefit from multiparametric ultrasound, who wouldbenefit from multiparametric MRI or the combination of both to assist prostate biopsy in order to ensure the balance between overdiagnosis and underdiagnosis of prostate cancer.

  15. hERG trafficking inhibition in drug-induced lethal cardiac arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Hisashi; Kawai, Tomoyuki

    2014-10-15

    Acquired long QT syndrome induced by non-cardiovascular drugs can cause lethal cardiac arrhythmia called torsades de points and is a significant problem in drug development. The prolongation of QT interval and cardiac action potential duration are mainly due to reduced physiological function of the rapidly activating voltage-dependent potassium channels encoded by human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG). Structurally diverse groups of drugs are known to directly inhibit hERG channel conductance. Therefore, the ability of acute hERG inhibition is routinely assessed at the preclinical stages in pharmaceutical testing. Recent findings indicated that chronic treatment with various drugs not only inhibits hERG channels but also decreases hERG channel expression in the plasma membrane of cardiomyocytes, which has become another concern in safety pharmacology. The mechanisms involve the disruption of hERG trafficking to the surface membrane or the acceleration of hERG protein degradation. From this perspective, we present a brief overview of mechanisms of drug-induced trafficking inhibition and pathological regulation. Understanding of drug-induced hERG trafficking inhibition may provide new strategies for predicting drug-induced QT prolongation and lethal cardiac arrhythmia in pharmaceutical drug development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A systems genetics approach identifies CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 as novel aggressive prostate cancer susceptibility genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra A Williams

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although prostate cancer typically runs an indolent course, a subset of men develop aggressive, fatal forms of this disease. We hypothesize that germline variation modulates susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer. The goal of this work is to identify susceptibility genes using the C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP8247Ng/J (TRAMP mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping was performed in transgene-positive (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ F2 intercross males (n = 228, which facilitated identification of 11 loci associated with aggressive disease development. Microarray data derived from 126 (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ F2 primary tumors were used to prioritize candidate genes within QTLs, with candidate genes deemed as being high priority when possessing both high levels of expression-trait correlation and a proximal expression QTL. This process enabled the identification of 35 aggressive prostate tumorigenesis candidate genes. The role of these genes in aggressive forms of human prostate cancer was investigated using two concurrent approaches. First, logistic regression analysis in two human prostate gene expression datasets revealed that expression levels of five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, LPCAT2, RNASEH2A, and ZNF322 were positively correlated with aggressive prostate cancer and two genes (CCL19 and HIST1H1A were protective for aggressive prostate cancer. Higher than average levels of expression of the five genes that were positively correlated with aggressive disease were consistently associated with patient outcome in both human prostate cancer tumor gene expression datasets. Second, three of these five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 harbored polymorphisms associated with aggressive disease development in a human GWAS cohort consisting of 1,172 prostate cancer patients. This study is the first example of using a systems genetics approach to successfully identify novel susceptibility genes for aggressive prostate cancer. Such

  17. SU-F-J-131: Reproducibility of Positioning Error Due to Temporarily Indwelled Urethral Catheter for Urethra-Sparing Prostate IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, K; Takai, Y; Sato, M; Hatayama, Y; Kawaguchi, H; Aoki, M; Akimoto, H; Komai, F; Souma, M; Obara, H; Suzuki, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the reproducibility of positioning errors due to temporarily indwelled catheter in urethra-sparing image-guided (IG) IMRT. Methods: Ten patients received urethra-sparing prostate IG-IMRT with implanted fiducials. After the first CT scan was performed in supine position, 6-Fr catheter was indwelled into urethra, and the second CT images were taken for planning. While the PTV received 80 Gy, 5% dose reduction was applied for the urethral PRV along the catheter. Additional CT scans were also performed at 5th and 30th fraction. Positions of interests (POIs) were set on posterior edge of prostate at beam isocenter level (POI1) and cranial and caudal edge of prostatic urethra on the post-indwelled CT images. POIs were copied into the pre-indwelled, 5th and 30th fraction’s CT images after fiducial matching on these CT images. The deviation of each POI between pre- and post-indwelled CT and the reproducibility of prostate displacement due to catheter were evaluated. Results: The deviation of POI1 caused by the indwelled catheter to the directions of RL/AP/SI (mm) was 0.20±0.27/−0.64±2.43/1.02±2.31, respectively, and the absolute distances (mm) were 3.15±1.41. The deviation tends to be larger if closer to the caudal edge of prostate. Compared with the pre-indwelled CT scan, a median displacement of all POIs (mm) were 0.3±0.2/2.2±1.1/2.0±2.6 in the post-indwelled, 0.4±0.4/3.4±2.1/2.3±2.6 in 5th, and 0.5±0.5/1.7±2.2/1.9±3.1 in 30th fraction’s CT scan with a similar data distribution. There were 6 patients with 5-mm-over displacement in AP and/or CC directions. Conclusion: Reproducibility of positioning errors due to temporarily indwelling catheter was observed. Especially in case of patients with unusually large shifts by indwelling catheter at the planning process, treatment planning should be performed by using the pre-indwelled CT images with transferred contour of the urethra identified by

  18. SU-F-J-131: Reproducibility of Positioning Error Due to Temporarily Indwelled Urethral Catheter for Urethra-Sparing Prostate IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, K; Takai, Y [Hirosaki University, Hirosaki (Japan); Southern Tohoku BNCT Research Center, Koriyama (Japan); Sato, M; Hatayama, Y; Kawaguchi, H; Aoki, M; Akimoto, H [Hirosaki University, Hirosaki (Japan); Komai, F; Souma, M; Obara, H; Suzuki, M [Hirosaki University Hospital, Hirosaki (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the reproducibility of positioning errors due to temporarily indwelled catheter in urethra-sparing image-guided (IG) IMRT. Methods: Ten patients received urethra-sparing prostate IG-IMRT with implanted fiducials. After the first CT scan was performed in supine position, 6-Fr catheter was indwelled into urethra, and the second CT images were taken for planning. While the PTV received 80 Gy, 5% dose reduction was applied for the urethral PRV along the catheter. Additional CT scans were also performed at 5th and 30th fraction. Positions of interests (POIs) were set on posterior edge of prostate at beam isocenter level (POI1) and cranial and caudal edge of prostatic urethra on the post-indwelled CT images. POIs were copied into the pre-indwelled, 5th and 30th fraction’s CT images after fiducial matching on these CT images. The deviation of each POI between pre- and post-indwelled CT and the reproducibility of prostate displacement due to catheter were evaluated. Results: The deviation of POI1 caused by the indwelled catheter to the directions of RL/AP/SI (mm) was 0.20±0.27/−0.64±2.43/1.02±2.31, respectively, and the absolute distances (mm) were 3.15±1.41. The deviation tends to be larger if closer to the caudal edge of prostate. Compared with the pre-indwelled CT scan, a median displacement of all POIs (mm) were 0.3±0.2/2.2±1.1/2.0±2.6 in the post-indwelled, 0.4±0.4/3.4±2.1/2.3±2.6 in 5th, and 0.5±0.5/1.7±2.2/1.9±3.1 in 30th fraction’s CT scan with a similar data distribution. There were 6 patients with 5-mm-over displacement in AP and/or CC directions. Conclusion: Reproducibility of positioning errors due to temporarily indwelling catheter was observed. Especially in case of patients with unusually large shifts by indwelling catheter at the planning process, treatment planning should be performed by using the pre-indwelled CT images with transferred contour of the urethra identified by

  19. PSA levels as a predictor of 68Ga PSMA PET/CT positivity in patients with prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydal, Cigdem; Urun, Yuksel; Suer, Evren; Nak, Demet; Ozkan, Elgin; Kucuk, Ozlem N

    2018-05-10

    The aim of this study is to evaluate predictive factors of 68Gallium (68Ga) Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography (CT) positivity. Relationships between serum Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, Gleason Score (GS) and positivity of 68Ga PSMA PET in patients who underwent 68Ga PSMA PET/CT for restaging for PCa were evaluated retrospectively. One hundred and four (median age: 67; range: 51-88) patients were included in this study. Of these patients, PSMA PET was positive in 75 (72%) patients. Mean serum PSA levels for PET negative and positive groups were 0.76±1.00 and 180.85±324.93 ng/ml (pPSA cut-off and 92% and 90%, respectively, for the 2 ng/ml PSA cut-off values. The positivity rates for patients with PSA levels PSA recurrence. Patients with higher GS and early PSA recurrence could benefit from 68Ga PSMA PET/CT.

  20. An ERG channel inhibitor from the scorpion Buthus eupeus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korolkova, Y.V.; Kozlov, S.A.; Lipkin, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    and the three mutants partly inhibited the native M-like current in NG108-15 at 100 nm. The effect of the recombinant BeKm-1 on different K(+) channels was also studied. BeKm-1 inhibited hERG1 channels with an IC(50) of 3.3 nm, but had no effect at 100 nm on hEAG, hSK1, rSK2, hIK, hBK, KCNQ1/KCNE1, KCNQ2/KCNQ3......, KCNQ4 channels, and minimal effect on rELK1. Thus, BeKm-1 was shown to be a novel specific blocker of hERG1 potassium channels....

  1. Comparison of megavoltage position verification for prostate irradiation based on bony anatomy and implanted fiducials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nederveen, Aart J.; Dehnad, Homan; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A. van; Hofman, Pieter; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The patient position during radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer can be verified with the help of portal images acquired during treatment. In this study we quantify the clinical consequences of the use of image-based verification based on the bony anatomy and the prostate target itself. Patients and methods: We analysed 2025 portal images and 23 computed tomography (CT) scans from 23 patients with prostate cancer. In all patients gold markers were implanted prior to CT scanning. Statistical data for both random and systematic errors were calculated for displacements of bones and markers and we investigated the effectiveness of an off-line correction protocol. Results: Standard deviations for systematic marker displacement are 2.4 mm in the lateral (LR) direction, 4.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction and 3.7 mm in the caudal-cranial direction (CC). Application of off-line position verification based on the marker positions results in a shrinkage of the systematic error to well below 1 mm. Position verification based on the bony anatomy reduces the systematic target uncertainty to 50% in the AP direction and in the LR direction. No reduction was observed in the CC direction. For six out of 23 patients we found an increase of the systematic error after application of bony anatomy-based position verification. Conclusions: We show that even if correction based on the bony anatomy is applied, considerable margins have to be set to account for organ motion. Our study highlights that for individual patients the systematic error can increase after application of bony anatomy-based position verification, whereas the population standard deviation will decrease. Off-line target-based position verification effectively reduces the systematic error to well below 1 mm, thus enabling significant margin reduction

  2. Non-syndromic hearing impairment in India: high allelic heterogeneity among mutations in TMPRSS3, TMC1, USHIC, CDH23 and TMIE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Ganapathy

    Full Text Available Mutations in the autosomal genes TMPRSS3, TMC1, USHIC, CDH23 and TMIE are known to cause hereditary hearing loss. To study the contribution of these genes to autosomal recessive, non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL in India, we examined 374 families with the disorder to identify potential mutations. We found four mutations in TMPRSS3, eight in TMC1, ten in USHIC, eight in CDH23 and three in TMIE. Of the 33 potentially pathogenic variants identified in these genes, 23 were new and the remaining have been previously reported. Collectively, mutations in these five genes contribute to about one-tenth of ARNSHL among the families examined. New mutations detected in this study extend the allelic heterogeneity of the genes and provide several additional variants for structure-function correlation studies. These findings have implications for early DNA-based detection of deafness and genetic counseling of affected families in the Indian subcontinent.

  3. Positioning errors assessed with kV cone-beam CT for image-guided prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiongyan; Guo Xiaomao; Yao Weiqiang; Wang Yanyang; Ma Jinli; Chen Jiayi; Zhang Zhen; Feng Yan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess set-up errors measured with kilovoltage cone-beam CT (KV-CBCT), and the impact of online corrections on margins required to account for set-up variability during IMRT for patients with prostate cancer. Methods: Seven patients with prostate cancer undergoing IMRT were enrolled onto the study. The KV-CBCT scans were acquired at least twice weekly. After initial set-up using the skin marks, a CBCT scan was acquired and registered with the planning CT to determine the setup errors using an auto grey-scale registration software. Corrections would be made by moving the table if the setup errors were considered clinically significant (i. e. , > 2 mm). A second CBCT scan was acquired immediately after the corrections to evaluate the residual error. PTV margins were derived to account for the measured set-up errors and residual errors determined for this group of patients. Results: 197 KV-CBCT images in total were acquired. The random and systematic positioning errors and calculated PTV margins without correction in mm were : a) Lateral 3.1, 2.1, 9.3; b) Longitudinal 1.5, 1.8, 5.1;c) Vertical 4.2, 3.7, 13.0. The random and systematic positioning errors and calculated PTV margin with correction in mm were : a) Lateral 1.1, 0.9, 3.4; b) Longitudinal 0.7, 1.1, 2.5; c) Vertical 1.1, 1.3, 3.7. Conclusions: With the guidance of online KV-CBCT, set-up errors could be reduced significantly for patients with prostate cancer receiving IMRT. The margin required after online CBCT correction for the patients enrolled in the study would be appoximatively 3-4 mm. (authors)

  4. The future perspectives in transrectal prostate ultrasound guided biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Il Hwang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most common neoplasms in men. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided systematic biopsy has a crucial role in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, it shows limited value with gray-scale ultrasound alone because only a small number of malignancies are visible on TRUS. Recently, new emerging technologies in TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were introduced and showed high potential in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. High echogenicity of ultrasound contrast agent reflect the increased status of angiogenesis in tumor. Molecular imaging for targeting specific biomarker can be also used using ultrasound contrast agent for detecting angiogenesis or surface biomarker of prostate cancer. The combination of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and ultrasound contrast agents can increase the accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis. Elastography is an emerging ultrasound technique that can provide the information regarding tissue elasticity and stiffness. Tumors are usually stiffer than the surrounding soft tissue. In two types of elastography techniques, shearwave elastography has many potential in that it can provide quantitative information on tissue elasticity. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI from high resolution morphologic and functional magnetic resonance (MR technique enables to detect more prostate cancers. The combination of functional techniques including apparent diffusion coefficient map from diffusion weighted imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MR and MR spectroscopy are helpful in the localization of the prostate cancer. MR-ultrasound (US fusion image can enhance the advantages of both two modalities. With MR-US fusion image, targeted biopsy of suspicious areas on MRI is possible and fusion image guided biopsy can provide improved detection rate. In conclusion, with recent advances in multiparametric-MRI, and introduction of new US techniques such as contrast-enhanced US and elastography, TRUS-guided biopsy

  5. Hypoxic Prostate/Muscle PO{sub 2} Ratio Predicts for Outcome in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turaka, Aruna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K., E-mail: mark.buyyounouski@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Greenberg, Richard E. [Department of Surgery, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To correlate tumor oxygenation status with long-term biochemical outcome after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Custom-made Eppendorf PO{sub 2} microelectrodes were used to obtain PO{sub 2} measurements from the prostate (P), focused on positive biopsy locations, and normal muscle tissue (M), as a control. A total of 11,516 measurements were obtained in 57 men with localized prostate cancer immediately before prostate brachytherapy was given. The Eppendorf histograms provided the median PO{sub 2}, mean PO{sub 2}, and % <5 mm Hg or <10 mm Hg. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined using both the former American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) (three consecutive raises) and the current Phoenix (prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL) definitions. A Cox proportional hazards regression model evaluated the influence of hypoxia using the P/M mean PO{sub 2} ratio on BF. Results: With a median follow-up time of 8 years, 12 men had ASTRO BF and 8 had Phoenix BF. On multivariate analysis, P/M PO{sub 2} ratio <0.10 emerged as the only significant predictor of ASTRO BF (p = 0.043). Hormonal therapy (p = 0.015) and P/M PO{sub 2} ratio <0.10 (p = 0.046) emerged as the only independent predictors of the Phoenix BF. Kaplan-Meier freedom from BF for P/M ratio <0.10 vs. {>=}0.10 at 8 years for ASTRO BF was 46% vs. 78% (p = 0.03) and for the Phoenix BF was 66% vs. 83% (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Hypoxia in prostate cancer (low mean P/M PO{sub 2} ratio) significantly predicts for poor long-term biochemical outcome, suggesting that novel hypoxic strategies should be investigated.

  6. Where Do Transrectal Ultrasound- and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-guided Biopsies Miss Significant Prostate Cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Nørgaard, Nis; Løgager, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    -guided biopsy (reTRUSbx) and targeted mpMRIbx (image fusion) of any suspicious lesion. Biopsy results were compared and the locations of missed sPCa lesions were registered. Cancer significance was defined as (1) any core with a Gleason score of >6, (2) cancer core involvement of ≥50% and for re......TRUSbx on patient level, and (3) the presence of ≥3 positive cores. RESULTS: Of the 289 patients, prostate cancer was detected in 128 (44%) with 88 (30%) having sPCa. Overall, 165 separate prostate cancer lesions were detected with 100 being sPCa. Of these, mpMRIbx and reTRUSbx detected 90% (90/100) and 68% (68...... TRUSbx and mpMRIbx missed sPCa lesions in specific segments of the prostate. Missed sPCa lesions at repeat biopsy were primarily located anteriorly for TRUSbx and posterolateral midprostatic for mpMRIbx. Localization of these segments may improve biopsy techniques in men undergoing repeat biopsies....

  7. CO2-laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, E.E. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The basic concept of laser fusion is described, with a set of requirements on the laser system. Systems and applications concepts are presented and discussed. The CO 2 laser's characteristics and advantages for laser fusion are described. Finally, technological issues in the development of CO 2 laser systems for fusion applications are discussed

  8. Prostate screening uptake in Australian BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKinley Joanne M

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Men who carry mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are at increased risk for prostate cancer. However the efficacy of prostate screening in this setting is uncertain and limited data exists on the uptake of prostate screening by mutation carriers. This study prospectively evaluated uptake of prostate cancer screening in a multi-institutional cohort of mutation carriers. Subjects were unaffected male BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, aged 40–69 years, enrolled in the Kathleen Cuningham Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer (kConFab and who had completed a mailed, self-report follow-up questionnaire 3 yearly after study entry. Of the 75 male carriers in this study, only 26 (35% had elected to receive their mutation result. Overall, 51 (68% did not recall having received a recommendation to have prostate screening because of their family history, but 41 (55% had undergone a prostate specific antigen (PSA test and 32 (43% a digital rectal examination (DRE in the previous 3 years. Those who were aware of their mutation result were more likely to have received a recommendation for prostate screening (43 vs. 6%, p = 0.0001, and to have had a PSA test (77 vs. 43%, p = 0.005 and a DRE (69 vs. 29%, p = 0.001 in the previous 3 years. The majority of unaffected males enrolled in kConFab with a BRCA1/2 mutation have not sought out their mutation result. However, of those aware of their positive mutation status, most have undergone at least one round of prostate screening in the previous 3 years.

  9. Evaluating the effect of rectal distension and rectal movement on prostate gland position using cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhani, Anwar R.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Suckling, John; Husband, Janet E.; Leach, Martin O.; Dearnaley, David P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dynamic interrelationship between rectal distension and rectal movements, and to determine the effect of rectal movement on the position of the prostatic gland using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with biopsy-proven or suspected prostate cancer were examined in the axial plane using repeated spoiled gradient-echo sequences every 10 seconds for 7 minutes. Twenty-four patients received bowel relaxants before imaging. Images were analyzed for the degree of rectal distension, for the incidence, magnitude, and number of rectal and prostate movements. Results: Rectal movements were seen in 28 (51%) patients overall, in 10 (42%) of those receiving bowel relaxants and in 18 (58%) not receiving bowel relaxants. The incidence of rectal movements correlated with the degree of rectal distension (p = 0.0005), but the magnitude of rectal movements did not correlate with the degree of rectal distension. Eighty-six rectal movements resulting in 33 anterior-posterior (AP) prostate movements were seen. The magnitude of rectal movements correlated well with degree of prostate movements (p < 0.001). Prostate movements in the AP direction were seen in 16 (29%) patients, and in 9 (16%) patients the movement was greater than 5 mm. The median prostate AP displacement was anterior by 4.2 (-5 to +14 mm). Conclusions: Cine MRI is able to demonstrate near real time rectal and associated prostate movements. Rectal movements are related to rectal distension and result in significant displacements of the prostate gland over a time period similar to that used for daily fractionated radiotherapy treatments. Delivery of radiotherapy needs to take into account these organ movements

  10. Potential predictive factors of positive prostate biopsy in the Chinese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-16

    Jan 16, 2012 ... Therefore, it might be inappropriate that we apply these western models to the. Chinese population that has a lower incidence of PCa. Therefore, this retrospective study aimed to determine predictive factors for a positive prostate biopsy in Chinese men. Our ultimate goal is to develop a simple model for ...

  11. Combination of prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS) score and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density predicts biopsy outcome in prostate biopsy naïve patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washino, Satoshi; Okochi, Tomohisa; Saito, Kimitoshi; Konishi, Tsuzumi; Hirai, Masaru; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Miyagawa, Tomoaki

    2017-02-01

    To assess the value of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) scoring system, for prostate multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to detect prostate cancer, and classical parameters, such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, prostate volume and PSA density, for predicting biopsy outcome in biopsy naïve patients who have suspected prostate cancer. Patients who underwent mpMRI at our hospital, and who had their first prostate biopsy between July 2010 and April 2014, were analysed retrospectively. The prostate biopsies were taken transperineally under transrectal ultrasonography guidance. In all, 14 cores were biopsied as a systematic biopsy in all patients. Two cognitive fusion-targeted biopsy cores were added for each lesion in patients who had suspicious or equivocal lesions on mpMRI. The PI-RADS scoring system version 2.0 (PI-RADS v2) was used to describe the MRI findings. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine significant predictors of prostate cancer and clinically significant prostate cancer. In all, 288 patients were analysed. The median patient age, PSA level, prostate volume and PSA density were 69 years, 7.5 ng/mL, 28.7 mL, and 0.26 ng/mL/mL, respectively. The biopsy results were benign, clinically insignificant, and clinically significant prostate cancer in 129 (45%), 18 (6%) and 141 (49%) patients, respectively. The multivariate analysis revealed that PI-RADS v2 score and PSA density were independent predictors for prostate cancer and clinically significant prostate cancer. When PI-RADS v2 score and PSA density were combined, a PI-RADS v2 score of ≥4 and PSA density ≥0.15 ng/mL/mL, or PI-RADS v2 score of 3 and PSA density of ≥0.30 ng/mL/mL, was associated with the highest clinically significant prostate cancer detection rates (76-97%) on the first biopsy. Of the patients in this group with negative biopsy results, 22% were subsequently diagnosed as prostate cancer. In contrast, a PI

  12. Risk score predicts high-grade prostate cancer in DNA-methylation positive, histopathologically negative biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Leander; Partin, Alan W; Stewart, Grant D; Epstein, Jonathan I; Harrison, David J; Van Criekinge, Wim

    2016-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis is challenging because efforts for effective, timely treatment of men with significant cancer typically result in over-diagnosis and repeat biopsies. The presence or absence of epigenetic aberrations, more specifically DNA-methylation of GSTP1, RASSF1, and APC in histopathologically negative prostate core biopsies has resulted in an increased negative predictive value (NPV) of ∼90% and thus could lead to a reduction of unnecessary repeat biopsies. Here, it is investigated whether, in methylation-positive men, DNA-methylation intensities could help to identify those men harboring high-grade (Gleason score ≥7) PCa, resulting in an improved positive predictive value. Two cohorts, consisting of men with histopathologically negative index biopsies, followed by a positive or negative repeat biopsy, were combined. EpiScore, a methylation intensity algorithm was developed in methylation-positive men, using area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic as metric for performance. Next, a risk score was developed combining EpiScore with traditional clinical risk factors to further improve the identification of high-grade (Gleason Score ≥7) cancer. Compared to other risk factors, detection of DNA-methylation in histopathologically negative biopsies was the most significant and important predictor of high-grade cancer, resulting in a NPV of 96%. In methylation-positive men, EpiScore was significantly higher for those with high-grade cancer detected upon repeat biopsy, compared to those with either no or low-grade cancer. The risk score resulted in further improvement of patient risk stratification and was a significantly better predictor compared to currently used metrics as PSA and the prostate cancer prevention trial (PCPT) risk calculator (RC). A decision curve analysis indicated strong clinical utility for the risk score as decision-making tool for repeat biopsy. Low DNA-methylation levels in PCa-negative biopsies led

  13. Racial differences in prostate cancer risk in young HIV-positive and HIV-negative men: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anupriya; Uno, Hajime; Holman, Alex; Lorenz, David R; Gabuzda, Dana

    2017-07-01

    African American men have the highest incidence of prostate cancer among ethnic groups, and racial disparity is highest in younger men. Prostate cancer prevalence is rising in HIV-infected men due to improved survival on antiretroviral therapies, yet little is known about racial differences in prostate cancer risk by HIV-infection status and age. This is a prospective cohort study of prostate cancer risk in 2,800 HIV-infected and -uninfected men who have sex with men (MSM) aged 40-70 years (22% African American) who were enrolled in the multicenter AIDS cohort study from 1996 to 2010. Poisson regression models were used to examine associations between race and HIV-infection status and prostate cancer risk among men aged 40-70, 40-55, and 56-70 years. Among men aged 40-70 years, incidence rates (IR) per 100,000 person-years were 169 among all men and 276 among African American HIV-infected men. Prostate cancer risk was similar by HIV-infection status (IRR 1.0, 95% CI 0.55-1.82), but nearly threefold higher in African Americans compared to non-African Americans in adjusted models (IRRs 2.66 and 3.22, 95% CIs 1.36-5.18 and 1.27-8.16 for all or HIV-infected men, respectively). Racial disparity in prostate cancer risk was greatest in African American men aged 40-55 years (adjusted IRR 3.31, 95% CI 1.19-9.22). Prostate cancer risk showed associations with family history of prostate cancer (p = 0.001), but not heavy smoking, androgen supplement use, or HIV-related factors. Among MSM, African American HIV-positive and HIV-negative men aged 40-55 years have threefold increased risk of young-onset prostate cancer compared to non-African American men, highlighting the need to make informed decisions about screening in this population.

  14. Mechanism and pharmacological rescue of berberine-induced hERG channel deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Meng; Zhang, Kaiping; Shi, Yanhui; Feng, Lifang; Lv, Lin; Li, Baoxin

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (BBR), an isoquinoline alkaloid mainly isolated from plants of Berberidaceae family, is extensively used to treat gastrointestinal infections in clinics. It has been reported that BBR can block human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel and inhibit its membrane expression. The hERG channel plays crucial role in cardiac repolarization and is the target of diverse proarrhythmic drugs. Dysfunction of hERG channel can cause long QT syndrome. However, the regulatory mechanisms of BBR effects on hERG at cell membrane level remain unknown. This study was designed to investigate in detail how BBR decreased hERG expression on cell surface and further explore its pharmacological rescue strategies. In this study, BBR decreases caveolin-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells stably expressing hERG channel. Knocking down the basal expression of caveolin-1 alleviates BBR-induced hERG reduction. In addition, we found that aromatic tyrosine (Tyr652) and phenylalanine (Phe656) in S6 domain mediate the long-term effect of BBR on hERG by using mutation techniques. Considering both our previous and present work, we propose that BBR reduces hERG membrane stability with multiple mechanisms. Furthermore, we found that fexofenadine and resveratrol shorten action potential duration prolongated by BBR, thus having the potential effects of alleviating the cardiotoxicity of BBR. PMID:26543354

  15. Can Single Positive Core Prostate Cancer at biopsy be Considered a Low-Risk Disease after Radical Prostatectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Kupka da Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Single positive core in a prostate biopsy is usually associated with indolent prostate cancer (PCa and is one of the active surveillance (AS inclusion criteria. We investigated whether single positive core PCa at biopsy could define an archetype of low-risk disease. Materials and Methods A total of 1320 consecutive patients were enrolled. Among them, 249 patients with single positive core PCa were followed up, and the clinical and pathological parameters influencing prognosis were analyzed. Results Out of the 249 patients, 172 (69.0% had pathological findings ≥ pT2c and 87 (34.9% had an undergraded Gleason Score (GS based on the biopsy. Positive surgical margins (PSMs, extraprostatic extension (EPE and seminal vesicle invasion (SVI were found in 20.8%, 10.0% and 6.0% of patients, respectively. In a comparative analysis, we found that the PSA level, prostate weight and number of cores at biopsy are essential to correctly predict an indolent PCa. A total of 125 patients (67.3% with nonpalpable tumors became high-risk tumors (pT2c-T3. Analyzing only nonpalpable tumors with a GS of 6 at biopsy (156 patients, we noted that 106 (67.9% of cT1 progressed from cT1c to pT2c-pT3. Conclusions Single core PCa have clinically significant disease in the Radical Prostatectomy specimens, with considerable rates of overgrading for the GS, pT2c-pT3, PSMs, EPE and SVI. The treatment plan must be evaluated individually for patients with single core PCa and must take into account other prognostic factors when determining whether a patient should be managed with AS.

  16. Structural implications of hERG K+ channel block by a high-affinity minimally structured blocker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, Matthew V.; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Du, Chunyun; Hancox, Jules C.; Dempsey, Christopher E.

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac potassium channels encoded by human ether-à-go-go–related gene (hERG) are major targets for structurally diverse drugs associated with acquired long QT syndrome. This study characterized hERG channel inhibition by a minimally structured high-affinity hERG inhibitor, Cavalli-2, composed of three phenyl groups linked by polymethylene spacers around a central amino group, chosen to probe the spatial arrangement of side chain groups in the high-affinity drug-binding site of the hERG pore. hERG current (IhERG) recorded at physiological temperature from HEK293 cells was inhibited with an IC50 of 35.6 nm with time and voltage dependence characteristic of blockade contingent upon channel gating. Potency of Cavalli-2 action was markedly reduced for attenuated inactivation mutants located near (S620T; 54-fold) and remote from (N588K; 15-fold) the channel pore. The S6 Y652A and F656A mutations decreased inhibitory potency 17- and 75-fold, respectively, whereas T623A and S624A at the base of the selectivity filter also decreased potency (16- and 7-fold, respectively). The S5 helix F557L mutation decreased potency 10-fold, and both F557L and Y652A mutations eliminated voltage dependence of inhibition. Computational docking using the recent cryo-EM structure of an open channel hERG construct could only partially recapitulate experimental data, and the high dependence of Cavalli-2 block on Phe-656 is not readily explainable in that structure. A small clockwise rotation of the inner (S6) helix of the hERG pore from its configuration in the cryo-EM structure may be required to optimize Phe-656 side chain orientations compatible with high-affinity block. PMID:29545312

  17. Is the Ellipsoid Formula the New Standard for 3-Tesla MRI Prostate Volume Calculation without Endorectal Coil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Matthias; Günzel, Karsten; Miller, Kurt; Hamm, Bernd; Cash, Hannes; Asbach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Prostate volume in multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) is of clinical importance. For 3-Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil, there is no distinctive standard for volume calculation. We tested the accuracy of the ellipsoid formula with planimetric volume measurements as reference and investigated the correlation of gland volume and cancer detection rate on MRI/ultrasound (MRI/US) fusion-guided biopsy. One hundred forty-three patients with findings on 3-Tesla mpMRI suspicious of cancer and subsequent MRI/US fusion-guided targeted biopsy and additional systematic biopsy were analyzed. T2-weighted images were used for measuring the prostate diameters and for planimetric volume measurement by a segmentation software. Planimetric and calculated prostate volumes were compared with clinical data. The median prostate volume was 48.1 ml (interquartile range (IQR) 36.9-62.1 ml). Volume calculated by the ellipsoid formula showed a strong concordance with planimetric volume, with a tendency to underestimate prostate volume (median volume 43.1 ml (IQR 31.2-58.8 ml); r = 0.903, p Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil. It allows a fast, valid volume calculation in prostate MRI datasets. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The eternal enigma in prostatic biopsy access route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fabiani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editors,We read with interest the article by Di Franco and co-workers (1. The introduction of prostatic magnetic resonance and the relative fusion-biopsy have not yet allowed the expected improvements in prostate biopsy. To our knowledge, there are no works that demonstrate the superiority of fusion techniques on the remaining ultrasound guided prostate biopsies that are still the widely used in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Furthemore, these technologies are expensive exams and they are not yet available in all centers, especially in those minors. We work at a “minor” center and we always keep in mind that the goal of  prostatic biopsy is the diagnosis and the staging of prostatic neoplasms.. However, it remains uncertain which of the two techniques, transperineal (TP or transrectal (TR, is superior in terms of detection rate during first biopsy setting. Several studies have compared the prostate cancer detection rate but TR and TP access route in prostatic gland sampling seems to be equivalent in terms of efficiency and complications, as reported by Shen PF et al. (2, despite several methodological limitations recognized in their work. The results reported by Di Franco CA et al. represent the real life experience of most urologists that perform the PB based on their own training experience and available technical devices. From an historical viewpoint, the TP route has been the first one to be used to reach the prostate, both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. To date, because it seems to be more invasive and difficult, the TP route is less used worldwide than the TR one (2. Theoretically, the TP approach should detect more prostate cancer than the TR way  because the cores of the TP approach are directed longitudinally to the peripheral zone and the anterior part of the prostate (4. The results reported by Di Franco et al. seems to confirm these considerations. However, our real life experience differ from the conclusions

  19. The eternal enigma in prostatic biopsy access route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, Andrea; Principi, Emanuele; Filosa, Alessandra; Servi, Lucilla

    2017-10-03

    Dear Editors,We read with interest the article by Di Franco and co-workers (1). The introduction of prostatic magnetic resonance and the relative fusion-biopsy have not yet allowed the expected improvements in prostate biopsy. To our knowledge, there are no works that demonstrate the superiority of fusion techniques on the remaining ultrasound guided prostate biopsies that are still the widely used in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Furthemore, these technologies are expensive exams and they are not yet available in all centers, especially in those minors. We work at a "minor" center and we always keep in mind that the goal of  prostatic biopsy is the diagnosis and the staging of prostatic neoplasms.. However, it remains uncertain which of the two techniques, transperineal (TP) or transrectal (TR), is superior in terms of detection rate during first biopsy setting. Several studies have compared the prostate cancer detection rate but TR and TP access route in prostatic gland sampling seems to be equivalent in terms of efficiency and complications, as reported by Shen PF et al. (2), despite several methodological limitations recognized in their work. The results reported by Di Franco CA et al. represent the real life experience of most urologists that perform the PB based on their own training experience and available technical devices. From an historical viewpoint, the TP route has been the first one to be used to reach the prostate, both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. To date, because it seems to be more invasive and difficult, the TP route is less used worldwide than the TR one (2). Theoretically, the TP approach should detect more prostate cancer than the TR way  because the cores of the TP approach are directed longitudinally to the peripheral zone and the anterior part of the prostate (4). The results reported by Di Franco et al. seems to confirm these considerations. However, our real life experience differ from the conclusions reached in their

  20. Impact of knee support and shape of tabletop on rectum and prostate position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; Duppen, Joop C.; Betgen, Anja; Lotz, Heidi Th; Remeijer, Peter; Fitton, Isabelle; Nowak, Peter J. C. M.; van Herk, Marcel; Rasch, Coen R. N.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the impact of different tabletops with or without a knee support on the position of the rectum, prostate, and bulb of the penis; and to evaluate the effect of these patient-positioning devices on treatment planning. METHODS AND MATERIALS: For 10 male volunteers, five MRI scans

  1. SU-G-JeP4-10: Measurement of Prostate Motion Trajectories During Prostate SBRT Boost Treatments with a Rectafix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legge, K; O’Connor, D J [University of Newcastle (Australia); Nguyen, D; Ng, J; Keall, P [University of Sydney (Australia); Wilton, L; Martin, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle (Australia); Booth, J [Royal North Shore Hospital (Australia); Greer, P [University of Newcastle (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine prostate motion during SBRT boost treatments with a Rectafix rectal sparing device in place using kV imaging during treatment. Methods: Patients each had three gold fiducial markers inserted into the prostate and received two VMAT boost fractions of 9.5–10 Gy under the PROMETHEUS clinical trial protocol with a Rectafix rectal retractor in place. Two-dimensional kilovoltage images of fiducial markers were acquired continuously during delivery. Three patients were treated on a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator (6X, 600 MU/min), where kV images were acquired at 5 Hz during treatment. Seven patients were treated on a Varian Truebeam linear accelerator (10XFFF, 2400 MU/min) where kV images were acquired every 3 seconds. Images were processed off-line using the Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring (KIM) software after treatment. KIM determines prostate position in three dimensions from 2D kV projections using a probability density model and a pre-treatment kV arc. The 3D displacement of the prostate was quantified as a function of time throughout each fraction. Results: From all fractions analyzed, it was found that the prostate had moved less than 1 mm in any direction from its initial position 84.6% of the time. The prostate was between 1 and 2 mm from its initial position 14.2% of the time, between 2 and 3 mm of its initial position 0.8% of the time and was greater than 3 mm from its initial position only 0.4% of the time. Conclusion: The amount of prostate motion observed during prostate SBRT boost treatments with a Rectafix device in place was minimal and lower than that observed in non-Rectafix studies. The Rectafix device reduces rectal dose as well as immobilizing the prostate. Kimberley Legge is the recipient of an Australian Postgraduate Award.

  2. Immunohistochemical expression of interleukin-2 receptor and interleukin-6 in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia: association with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Paul Friedrich; Seklehner, Stephan; Brustmann, Hermann; Lusuardi, Lukas; Riedl, Claus R

    2015-04-01

    This study prospectively investigated the immunohistochemical expression of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and a possible association of these conditions with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis National Institutes of Health (NIH) category IV. The study included 139 consecutive patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate and transvesical enucleation of the prostate (n = 82) or radical prostatectomy (n = 57). To characterize inflammatory changes the criteria proposed by Irani et al. [J Urol 1997;157:1301-3] were used. IL-2R and IL-6 expression was studied by a standard immunohistochemical method. Results were correlated with tumour, node, metastasis stage, Gleason scores, total prostate-specific antigen, International Prostate Symptom Score and body mass index. IL-2R and IL-6 expression was significantly higher in neoplastic prostate cancer tissue than in normal tissue of prostate cancer patients (p Prostate cancer patients with prostatitis showed significantly higher IL-2R expression than those without inflammation (p prostatitis than in those without (p prostate cancer tissue than in normal tissue. Patients with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV showed significantly greater activity.

  3. ERG voltage-gated K+ channels regulate excitability and discharge dynamics of the medial vestibular nucleus neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessia, Mauro; Servettini, Ilenio; Panichi, Roberto; Guasti, Leonardo; Grassi, Silvarosa; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Wanke, Enzo; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2008-10-15

    The discharge properties of the medial vestibular nucleus neurones (MVNn) critically depend on the activity of several ion channel types. In this study we show, immunohistochemically, that the voltage-gated K(+) channels ERG1A, ERG1B, ERG2 and ERG3 are highly expressed within the vestibular nuclei of P10 and P60 mice. The role played by these channels in the spike-generating mechanisms of the MVNn and in temporal information processing was investigated electrophysiologically from mouse brain slices, in vitro, by analysing the spontaneous discharge and the response to square-, ramp- and sinusoid-like intracellular DC current injections in extracellular and whole-cell patch-clamp studies. We show that more than half of the recorded MVNn were responsive to ERG channel block (WAY-123,398, E4031), displaying an increase in spontaneous activity and discharge irregularity. The response to step and ramp current injection was also modified by ERG block showing a reduction of first spike latency, enhancement of discharge rate and reduction of the slow spike-frequency adaptation process. ERG channels influence the interspike slope without affecting the spike shape. Moreover, in response to sinusoid-like current, ERG channel block caused frequency-dependent gain enhancement and phase-lead shift. Taken together, the data demonstrate that ERG channels control the excitability of MVNn, their discharge regularity and probably their resonance properties.

  4. Voltage-Dependent Gating of hERG Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yen May; Claydon, Tom W.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which voltage-gated channels sense changes in membrane voltage and energetically couple this with opening of the ion conducting pore has been the source of significant interest. In voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, much of our knowledge in this area comes from Shaker-type channels, for which voltage-dependent gating is quite rapid. In these channels, activation and deactivation are associated with rapid reconfiguration of the voltage-sensing domain unit that is electromechanically coupled, via the S4–S5 linker helix, to the rate-limiting opening of an intracellular pore gate. However, fast voltage-dependent gating kinetics are not typical of all Kv channels, such as Kv11.1 (human ether-à-go-go related gene, hERG), which activates and deactivates very slowly. Compared to Shaker channels, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying slow hERG gating is much poorer. Here, we present a comparative review of the structure–function relationships underlying activation and deactivation gating in Shaker and hERG channels, with a focus on the roles of the voltage-sensing domain and the S4–S5 linker that couples voltage sensor movements to the pore. Measurements of gating current kinetics and fluorimetric analysis of voltage sensor movement are consistent with models suggesting that the hERG activation pathway contains a voltage independent step, which limits voltage sensor transitions. Constraints upon hERG voltage sensor movement may result from loose packing of the S4 helices and additional intra-voltage sensor counter-charge interactions. More recent data suggest that key amino acid differences in the hERG voltage-sensing unit and S4–S5 linker, relative to fast activating Shaker-type Kv channels, may also contribute to the increased stability of the resting state of the voltage sensor. PMID:22586397

  5. Voltage-dependent gating of hERG potassium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen May eCheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which voltage-gated channels sense changes in membrane voltage and energetically couple this with opening of the ion conducting pore has been the source of significant interest. In voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels, much of our knowledge in this area comes from Shaker-type channels, for which voltage-dependent gating is quite rapid. In these channels, activation and deactivation are associated with rapid reconfiguration of the voltage-sensing domain unit that is electromechanically coupled, via the S4-S5 linker helix, to the rate-limiting opening of an intracellular pore gate. However, fast voltage-dependent gating kinetics are not typical of all Kv channels, such as Kv11.1 (human ether-a-go-go related gene, hERG, which activates and deactivates very slowly. Compared to Shaker channels, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying slow hERG gating is much poorer. Here, we present a comparative review of the structure-function relationships underlying voltage-dependent gating in Shaker and hERG channels, with a focus on the roles of the voltage sensing domain and the S4-S5 linker that couples voltage sensor movements to the pore. Measurements of gating current kinetics and fluorimetric analysis of voltage sensor movement are consistent with models suggesting that the hERG activation pathway contains a voltage independent step, which limits voltage sensor transitions. Constraints upon hERG voltage sensor movement may result from loose packing of the S4 helices and additional intra-voltage sensor counter charge interactions. More recent data suggest that key amino acid differences in the hERG voltage sensing unit and S4-S5 linker, relative to fast activating Shaker-type Kv channels, may also contribute to the increased stability of the resting state of the voltage sensor.

  6. Fenofibrate down-regulates the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes and induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hu; Zhu, Chen; Qin, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tao, Tao [Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Li, Jie; Cheng, Gong; Li, Pu; Cao, Qiang; Meng, Xiaoxin; Ju, Xiaobing; Shao, Pengfei; Hua, Lixin [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Gu, Min, E-mail: medzhao1980@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Yin, Changjun, E-mail: drcjyin@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate reduces the expressions of androgen receptor in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. -- Abstract: Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha agonist, is widely used in treating different forms of hyperlipidemia and hypercholesterolemia. Recent reports have indicated that fenofibrate exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. This study aims to investigate the effects of fenofibrate on the prostate cancer (PCa) cell line LNCaP. The effects of fenofibrate on LNCaP cells were evaluated by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blot analysis, and dual-luciferase reporter assay. Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells, reduces the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes (prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2), and inhibits Akt phosphorylation. Fenofibrate can induce the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and decrease the activities of total anti-oxidant and superoxide dismutase in LNCaP cells. Fenofibrate exerts an anti-proliferative property by inhibiting the expression of AR and induces apoptosis by causing oxidative stress. Therefore, our data suggest fenofibrate may have beneficial effects in fenofibrate users by preventing prostate cancer growth through inhibition of androgen activation and expression.

  7. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freytag, Svend O., E-mail: sfreyta1@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Stricker, Hans [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Lu, Mei [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Peabody, James [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli [Pathology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Rodriguez, Ron [Urology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); DeWeese, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  8. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, Svend O.; Stricker, Hans; Lu, Mei; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho; Peabody, James; Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee; Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli; Rodriguez, Ron; DeWeese, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer

  9. MRI Fusion-Targeted Transrectal Prostate Biopsy and the Role of Prostate-Specific Antigen Density and Prostate Health Index for the Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer in Southeast Asian Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Teck Wei; Png, Keng Siang; Lee, Chau Hung; Yuwono, Arianto; Yeow, Yuyi; Chong, Kian Tai; Lee, Yee Mun; Tan, Cher Heng; Tan, Yung Khan

    2017-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that targeted biopsy has a higher detection rate for clinically significant prostate cancer (csPCa) than systematic biopsy. We defined csPCa as any Gleason sum ≥7 cancer. In patients with Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) 3 lesions, to determine if factors, such as prostate-specific antigen density (PSAD) and prostate health index (PHI), can predict csPCa and help select patients for biopsy. We report the first series of targeted biopsies in Southeast Asian men, with comparison against systematic biopsy. Consecutive patients were registered into a prospective institutional review board-approved database in our institution. We reviewed patients who underwent biopsy from May 2016 to June 2017. Inclusion criteria for our study were patients with at least one PI-RADS ≥3, and who underwent both targeted and systematic biopsies in the same sitting. There were 115 patients in the study, of whom 74 (64.3%) had a previous negative systematic biopsy. Targeted biopsies detected significantly less Gleason 6 cancers than systematic biopsies (p < 0.01), and demonstrated significantly higher sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value (NPV) for the detection of csPCa. For patients with PI-RADS 3 lesions, PHI and PSAD were found to be the best predictors for csPCa. PSAD <0.10 ng/mL/mL had an NPV of 93% and sensitivity of 92%, while allowing 20% of patients to avoid biopsy. PHI cutoff of <27 would allow 34% of patients to avoid biopsy, with both sensitivity and NPV of 100%. Targeted prostate biopsies were found to be significantly superior to systematic biopsies for the detection of csPCa, while detecting less Gleason 6 cancer. Usage of PSAD and PHI cutoff levels in patients with PI-RADS 3 lesions may enable a number of patients to avoid unnecessary biopsy.

  10. Cone dystrophy with "supernormal" rod ERG: psychophysical testing shows comparable rod and cone temporal sensitivity losses with no gain in rod function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, Andrew; Henning, G Bruce; Michaelides, Michel; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R; Cammack, Jocelyn; Ripamonti, Caterina

    2014-02-10

    We report a psychophysical investigation of 5 observers with the retinal disorder "cone dystrophy with supernormal rod ERG," caused by mutations in the gene KCNV2 that encodes a voltage-gated potassium channel found in rod and cone photoreceptors. We compared losses for rod- and for cone-mediated vision to further investigate the disorder and to assess whether the supernormal ERG is associated with any visual benefit. L-cone, S-cone, and rod temporal acuity (critical flicker fusion frequency) were measured as a function of target irradiance; L-cone temporal contrast sensitivity was measured as a function of temporal frequency. Temporal acuity measures revealed that losses for vision mediated by rods, S-cones, and L-cones are roughly equivalent. Further, the gain in rod function implied by the supernormal ERG provides no apparent benefit to near-threshold rod-mediated visual performance. The L-cone temporal contrast sensitivity function in affected observers was similar in shape to the mean normal function but only after the mean function was compressed by halving the logarithmic sensitivities. The name of this disorder is potentially misleading because the comparable losses found across rod and cone vision suggest that the disorder is a generalized cone-rod dystrophy. Temporal acuity and temporal contrast sensitivity measures are broadly consistent with the defect in the voltage-gated potassium channel producing a nonlinear distortion of the photoreceptor response but after otherwise normal transduction processes.

  11. CNPY2 inhibits MYLIP-mediated AR protein degradation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Saya; Ueno, Akihisa; Ueda, Takashi; Nakagawa, Hideo; Taniguchi, Hidefumi; Kayukawa, Naruhiro; Fujihara-Iwata, Atsuko; Hongo, Fumiya; Okihara, Koji; Ukimura, Osamu

    2018-04-03

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that promotes prostate cancer (PC) cell growth through control of target gene expression. This report suggests that Canopy FGF signaling regulator 2 (CNPY2) controls AR protein levels in PC cells. We found that AR was ubiquitinated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase, myosin regulatory light chain interacting protein (MYLIP) and then degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. CNPY2 decreased the ubiquitination activity of MYLIP by inhibition of interaction between MYLIP and UBE2D1, an E2 ubiquitin ligase. CNPY2 up-regulated gene expression of AR target genes such as KLK3 gene which encodes the prostate specific antigen (PSA) and promoted cell growth of PC cells. The cell growth inhibition by CNPY2 knockdown was rescued by AR overexpression. Furthermore, positive correlation of expression levels between CNPY2 and AR/AR target genes was observed in tissue samples from human prostate cancer patients. Together, these results suggested that CNPY2 promoted cell growth of PC cells by inhibition of AR protein degradation through MYLIP-mediated AR ubiquitination.

  12. Concurrent AURKA and MYCN Gene Amplifications Are Harbingers of Lethal TreatmentRelated Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Miguel Mosquera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC, also referred to as anaplastic prostate cancer, is a lethal tumor that most commonly arises in late stages of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCA with predilection to metastasize to visceral organs. In the current study, we explore for evidence that Aurora kinase A (AURKA and N-myc (MYCN gene abnormalities are harbingers of treatment-related NEPC (t-NEPC. We studied primary prostate tissue from 15 hormone naïve PCAs, 51 castration-resistant prostate cancers, and 15 metastatic tumors from 72 patients at different stages of disease progression to t-NEPC, some with multiple specimens. Histologic evaluation, immunohistochemistry, and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed and correlated with clinical variables. AURKA amplification was identified in overall 65% of PCAs (hormone naïve and treated from patients that developed t-NEPC and in 86% of metastases. Concurrent amplification of MYCN was present in 70% of primary PCAs, 69% of treated PCAs, and 83% of metastases. In contrast, in an unselected PCA cohort, AURKA and MYCN amplifications were identified in only 5% of 169 cases. When metastatic t-NEPC was compared to primary PCA from the same patients, there was 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement, 100% concordance of AURKA amplification, and 60% concordance of MYCN amplification. In tumors with mixed features, there was also 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement and 94% concordance of AURKA and MYCN co-amplification between areas of NEPC and adenocarcinoma. AURKA and MYCN amplifications may be prognostic and predictive biomarkers, as they are harbingers of tumors at risk of progressing to t-NEPC after hormonal therapy.

  13. Prostate stromal cell telomere shortening is associated with risk of prostate cancer in the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Christopher M; Gaonkar, Gaurav; Peskoe, Sarah B; Joshu, Corinne E; De Marzo, Angelo M; Lucia, M Scott; Goodman, Phyllis J; Lippman, Scott M; Thompson, Ian M; Platz, Elizabeth A; Meeker, Alan K

    2015-08-01

    Telomeres are repetitive nucleoproteins that help maintain chromosomal stability by inhibiting exonucleolytic degradation, prohibiting inappropriate homologous recombination, and preventing chromosomal fusions by suppressing double-strand break signals. We recently observed that men treated for clinically localized prostate cancer with shorter telomeres in their cancer-associated stromal cells, in combination with greater variation in cancer cell telomere lengths, were significantly more likely to progress to distant metastases, and die from their disease. Here, we hypothesized that shorter stromal cell telomere length would be associated with prostate cancer risk at time of biopsy. Telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was performed in normal-appearing stromal, basal epithelial, and luminal epithelial cells in biopsies from men randomized to the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Prostate cancer cases (N = 32) were either detected on a biopsy performed for cause or at the end of the study per trial protocol, and controls (N = 50), defined as negative for cancer on an end-of-study biopsy performed per trial protocol (e.g., irrespective of indication), were sampled. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between mean telomere length of the particular cell populations, cell-to-cell telomere length variability, and risk of prostate cancer. Men with short stromal cell telomere lengths (below median) had 2.66 (95% CI 1.04-3.06; P = 0.04) times the odds of prostate cancer compared with men who had longer lengths (at or above median). Conversely, we did not observe statistically significant associations for short telomere lengths in normal-appearing basal (OR = 2.15, 95% CI 0.86-5.39; P= 0 .10) or luminal (OR = 1.15, 95% CI 0.47-2.80; P = 0.77) cells. These findings suggest that telomere shortening in normal stromal cells is associated with prostate cancer risk. It is essential

  14. Importance of Local Control in Early-Stage Prostate Cancer: Outcomes of Patients With Positive Post-Radiation Therapy Biopsy Results Treated in RTOG 9408

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, Daniel J.; Hu, Chen; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Souhami, Luis; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Chafe, Susan Maria Jacinta; Leibenhaut, Mark H.; Narayan, Samir; Torres-Roca, Javier; Michalski, Jeff; Zeitzer, Kenneth L.; Donavanik, Viroon; Sandler, Howard; McGowan, David G.; Jones, Christopher U.; Shipley, William U.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the association between positive post-radiation therapy (RT) biopsy results and subsequent clinical outcomes in males with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group study 94-08 analyzed 1979 males with prostate cancer, stage T1b-T2b and prostate-specific antigen concentrations of ≤20 ng/dL, to investigate whether 4 months of total androgen suppression (TAS) added to RT improved survival compared to RT alone. Patients randomized to receive TAS received flutamide with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist. According to protocol, patients without evidence of clinical recurrence or initiation of additional endocrine therapy underwent repeat prostate biopsy 2 years after RT completion. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of positive post-RT biopsy results on clinical outcomes. Results: A total of 831 patients underwent post-RT biopsy, 398 were treated with RT alone and 433 with RT plus TAS. Patients with positive post-RT biopsy results had higher rates of biochemical failure (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-2.1) and distant metastasis (HR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.3-4.4) and inferior disease-specific survival (HR = 3.8; 95% CI = 1.9-7.5). Positive biopsy results remained predictive of such outcomes after correction for potential confounders such as Gleason score, tumor stage, and TAS administration. Prior TAS therapy did not prevent elevated risk of adverse outcome in the setting of post-RT positive biopsy results. Patients with Gleason score ≥7 with a positive biopsy result additionally had inferior overall survival compared to those with a negative biopsy result (HR = 1.56; 95% CI = 1.04-2.35). Conclusions: Positive post-RT biopsy is associated with increased rates of distant metastases and inferior disease-specific survival in patients treated with definitive RT and was associated with inferior overall

  15. Electronic portal imaging device detection of radioopaque markers for the evaluation of prostate position during megavoltage irradiation: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneault, Eric; Pouliot, Jean; Laverdiere, Jacques; Roy, Jean; Dorion, Marc

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess daily prostatic apex motion relative to pelvic bone structures during megavoltage irradiation. Methods and Materials: Radioopaque markers were implanted under ultrasound guidance near the prostatic apex of 11 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma. Patients were subsequently treated with a four field-box technique at a beam energy of 23 MV. During treatment, on-line images were obtained with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The marker was easily identified, even on unprocessed images, and the distance between the marker and a bony landmark was measured. Timelapse movies were also reviewed. After the completion of treatment, a transcrectal ultrasound examination was performed in 8 of 11 patients, to verify the position of the marker. Results: We acquired over 900 digital portal images and analyzed posterioanterior and right lateral views. The quality of portal images obtained with megavoltage irradiation was good. It was possible to evaluate pelvic bone structures even without image histogram equalization. Moreover, the radioopaque marker was easily visible on every online portal image. The review of timelapse movies showed important interfraction motion of the marker while bone structures remained stable. We measured the position of the marker for each fraction. Marker displacements up to 1.6 cm were measured between 2 consecutive days of treatment. Important marker motions were predominantly in the posteroanterior and cephalocaudal directions. In eight patients, we verified the position of the marker relative to the prostatic apex with ultrasound at the end of the treatments. The marker remained in the trapezoid zone. Intratreatment images reviewed in two cases showed no change in marker position. Our results, obtained during the treatment courses, indicate similar or larger prostate motions than previously observed in studies that used intertreatment x-ray films and CT images. Marker implantation under

  16. Assessing the Contribution of the Oscillatory Potentials to the Genesis of the Photopic ERG with the Discrete Wavelet Transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin, Mathieu; Dorfman, Allison L; Trang, Nataly; Gauthier, Mercedes; Little, John M; Lina, Jean-Marc; Lachapelle, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The electroretinogram (ERG) is composed of slow (i.e., a-, b-waves) and fast (i.e., oscillatory potentials: OPs) components. OPs have been shown to be preferably affected in some diseases (such as diabetic retinopathy), while the a- and b-waves remain relatively intact. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of OPs to the building of the ERG and to examine whether a signal mostly composed of OPs could also exist. DWT analyses were performed on photopic ERGs (flash intensities: -2.23 to 2.64 log cd·s·m -2 in 21 steps) obtained from normal subjects ( n = 40) and patients ( n = 21) affected with a retinopathy. In controls, the %OP value (i.e., OPs energy/ERG energy) is stimulus- and amplitude-independent (range: 56.6-61.6%; CV = 6.3%). In contrast, the %OPs measured from the ERGs of our patients varied significantly more (range: 35.4%-89.2%; p pathology, some presenting with ERGs that are almost solely composed of OPs. In conclusion, patients may present with a wide range of %OP values. Findings herein also support the hypothesis that, in certain conditions, the photopic ERG can be mostly composed of high-frequency components.

  17. Assessing the Contribution of the Oscillatory Potentials to the Genesis of the Photopic ERG with the Discrete Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gauvin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The electroretinogram (ERG is composed of slow (i.e., a-, b-waves and fast (i.e., oscillatory potentials: OPs components. OPs have been shown to be preferably affected in some diseases (such as diabetic retinopathy, while the a- and b-waves remain relatively intact. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of OPs to the building of the ERG and to examine whether a signal mostly composed of OPs could also exist. DWT analyses were performed on photopic ERGs (flash intensities: −2.23 to 2.64 log cd·s·m−2 in 21 steps obtained from normal subjects (n=40 and patients (n=21 affected with a retinopathy. In controls, the %OP value (i.e., OPs energy/ERG energy is stimulus- and amplitude-independent (range: 56.6–61.6%; CV = 6.3%. In contrast, the %OPs measured from the ERGs of our patients varied significantly more (range: 35.4%–89.2%; p<0.05 depending on the pathology, some presenting with ERGs that are almost solely composed of OPs. In conclusion, patients may present with a wide range of %OP values. Findings herein also support the hypothesis that, in certain conditions, the photopic ERG can be mostly composed of high-frequency components.

  18. In vitro chronic effects on hERG channel caused by the marine biotoxin Yessotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Fernández Ferreiro

    2014-06-01

    Currently, published evidence indicates that hERG channel dysfunction can be due to more than one mechanism for many drugs (Guth, 2007. Alterations of hERG channel trafficking are considered an important factor in hERG-related cardiotoxicity. Actually, a screening study revealed that almost 40% of the drugs that block Ikr have also trafficking effects (Wible et al., 2005. Although YTX does not block hERG channels, it has been historically described as cardiotoxic due to in vivo damage to cardiomyocytes. Our results show that YTX induces a significant increase of hERG channel levels on the extracellular side of the plasma membrane in vitro. YTX causes cell death in many cell lines (Korsnes and Espenes, 2011 and the alterations of surface hERG levels might be related to the apoptotic process. However, annexin-V, a relatively early marker of apoptosis (Vermes et al., 1995, occurs later than the increase of surface hERG. Additionally, staurosporine triggered apoptosis without a simultaneous increase of surface hERG, so events are not necessarily related. Therefore YTX-induced elevated hERG in the plasma membrane seem to be independent of apoptosis. Functional implications of hERG currents have been described after alterations of cell surface hERG density (Guth, 2007. YTX did not cause significant alterations of hERG currents. Furthermore the hERG levels after YTX treatment were duplicated, so the effect on currents should be clearly evidenced if these channels were functional. The hERG channels on the cell surface are regulated by its production, translocation to the plasma membrane and degradation. The increase of extracellular channel could be a consequence of a higher production and externalization or a slower degradation. Higher synthesis in our cell model would not be physiologically relevant but our results demonstrated that the amount of immature hERG is reduced instead of increased. Fully glycosylated hERG seems slightly increased in these conditions but it is

  19. Expression of KLK2 gene in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Shafai

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The expression of KLK2 gene in people with prostate cancer is the higher than the healthy person; finally, according to the results, it could be mentioned that the KLK2 gene considered as a useful factor in prostate cancer, whose expression is associated with progression and development of the prostate cancer.

  20. Does Small Prostate Predict High Grade Prostate Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliskan, S.; Kaba, S.; Koca, O.; Ozturk, M. I.

    2017-01-01

    groups 1 and 2, respectively at final pathology (p=0.373). Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that smaller prostates are more likely to compose higher percentage of the high grade prostate cancer, local advanced disease, and the Gleason upgrading. The positive surgical margin rate is higher in patients with small prostates when it is compared with the other patients. (author)

  1. Predictive value of bcl-2 immunoreactivity in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bylund, A.; Widmark, A.; Stattin, P.; Bergh, A.

    1998-01-01

    Background and purpose: Recent experimental evidence suggests that overexpression of bcl-2, a protein functioning by blocking apoptosis, may influence the treatment outcome in human tumours, including prostate cancer. To test the clinical implications of this hypothesis, tumours from patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were investigated for bcl-2 immunoreactivity (IR) and correlated with prognosis and treatment outcome. Materials and methods: Bcl-2 IR was evaluated in archival tumour specimens obtained through transurethral resection from 42 patients with localized prostate cancer (T0-T4, N0 and M0). Bcl-2 IR expression was related to stage, grade and cancer-specific survival. Specimens were obtained prior to administrating routine radiotherapy for all patients. Results: Bcl-2 IR was present in 19/42 (45%) tumours. The bcl-2-positive patients had a significantly longer cancer-specific survival than the bcl-2-negative patients (10.3 versus 3.4 years, P<0.04). At follow-up (7-19 years), nine patients were still alive, 26 patients had died of prostate cancer and seven patients had died of other causes. Conclusions: This study indicates that pre-treatment bcl-2 overexpression is related to a favourable outcome in prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy. Low bcl-2 along with a high stage may be a predictor of poor prognosis and these patients might benefit from additional treatment. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. Clinical Usefulness of Implanted Fiducial Markers for Hypofractionated Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Min; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Lee, Hyung Hwan; Lee, Hyung Sik; Hur, Woo Joo; Yoon, Jin Han; Kim, Tae Hyo; Kim, Soo Dong; Yun, Seong Guk

    2011-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of implanted fiducial markers in the setup of hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients by comparing a fiducial marker matched setup with a pelvic bone match. Four prostate cancer patients treated with definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy between September 2009 and August 2010 were enrolled in this study. Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate and through the rectum under ultrasound guidance around a week before radiotherapy. Glycerin enemas were given prior to each radiotherapy planning CT and every radiotherapy session. Hypofractionated radiotherapy was planned for a total dose of 59.5 Gy in daily 3.5 Gy with using the Novalis system. Orthogonal kV X-rays were taken before radiotherapy. Treatment positions were adjusted according to the results from the fusion of the fiducial markers on digitally reconstructed radiographs of a radiotherapy plan with those on orthogonal kV X-rays. When the difference in the coordinates from the fiducial marker fusion was less than 1 mm, the patient position was approved for radiotherapy. A virtual bone matching was carried out at the fiducial marker matched position, and then a setup difference between the fiducial marker matching and bone matching was evaluated. Three patients received a planned 17-fractionated radiotherapy and the rest underwent 16 fractionations. The setup error of the fiducial marker matching was 0.94±0.62 mm (range, 0.09 to 3.01 mm; median, 0.81 mm), and the means of the lateral, craniocaudal, and anteroposterior errors were 0.39±0.34 mm, 0.46±0.34 mm, and 0.57±0.59 mm, respectively. The setup error of the pelvic bony matching was 3.15±2.03 mm (range, 0.25 to 8.23 mm; median, 2.95 mm), and the error of craniocaudal direction (2.29±1.95 mm) was significantly larger than those of anteroposterior (1.73±1.31 mm) and lateral directions (0.45±0.37 mm), respectively (p< 0.05). Incidences of over 3 mm and 5 mm in setup difference among the

  3. Daily Setup Uncertainties and Organ Motion Based on the Tomoimages in Prostatic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jeong Hee; Lee, Sang Kyu; Kim, Sei Joon; Na, Soo Kyung

    2007-01-01

    The patient's position and anatomy during the treatment course little bit varies to some extend due to setup uncertainties and organ motions. These factors could affected to not only the dose coverage of the gross tumor but over dosage of normal tissue. Setup uncertainties and organ motions can be minimized by precise patient positioning and rigid immobilization device but some anatomical site such as prostate, the internal organ motion due to physiological processes are challenge. In planning procedure, the clinical target volume is a little bit enlarged to create a planning target volume that accounts for setup uncertainties and organ motion as well. These uncertainties lead to differences between the calculated dose by treatment planning system and the actually delivered dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences of interfractional displacement of organ and GTV based on the tomoimages. Over the course of 3 months, 3 patients, those who has applied rectal balloon, treated for prostatic cancer patient's tomoimage were studied. During the treatment sessions 26 tomoimages per patient, Total 76 tomoimages were collected. Tomoimage had been taken everyday after initial setup with lead marker attached on the patient's skin center to comparing with C-T simulation images. Tomoimage was taken after rectal balloon inflated with 60 cc of air for prostate gland immobilization for daily treatment just before treatment and it was used routinely in each case. The intrarectal balloon was inserted to a depth of 6 cm from the anal verge. MVCT image was taken with 5 mm slice thickness after the intrarectal balloon in place and inflated. For this study, lead balls are used to guide the registration between the MVCT and CT simulation images. There are three image fusion methods in the tomotherapy, bone technique, bone/tissue technique, and full image technique. We used all this 3 methods to analysis the setup errors. Initially, image fusions were based on the

  4. Daily Setup Uncertainties and Organ Motion Based on the Tomoimages in Prostatic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jeong Hee; Lee, Sang Kyu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yensei Univesity Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sei Joon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology,Yongdong Severance Hospital , Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Soo Kyung [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gimcheon College, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    The patient's position and anatomy during the treatment course little bit varies to some extend due to setup uncertainties and organ motions. These factors could affected to not only the dose coverage of the gross tumor but over dosage of normal tissue. Setup uncertainties and organ motions can be minimized by precise patient positioning and rigid immobilization device but some anatomical site such as prostate, the internal organ motion due to physiological processes are challenge. In planning procedure, the clinical target volume is a little bit enlarged to create a planning target volume that accounts for setup uncertainties and organ motion as well. These uncertainties lead to differences between the calculated dose by treatment planning system and the actually delivered dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences of interfractional displacement of organ and GTV based on the tomoimages. Over the course of 3 months, 3 patients, those who has applied rectal balloon, treated for prostatic cancer patient's tomoimage were studied. During the treatment sessions 26 tomoimages per patient, Total 76 tomoimages were collected. Tomoimage had been taken everyday after initial setup with lead marker attached on the patient's skin center to comparing with C-T simulation images. Tomoimage was taken after rectal balloon inflated with 60 cc of air for prostate gland immobilization for daily treatment just before treatment and it was used routinely in each case. The intrarectal balloon was inserted to a depth of 6 cm from the anal verge. MVCT image was taken with 5 mm slice thickness after the intrarectal balloon in place and inflated. For this study, lead balls are used to guide the registration between the MVCT and CT simulation images. There are three image fusion methods in the tomotherapy, bone technique, bone/tissue technique, and full image technique. We used all this 3 methods to analysis the setup errors. Initially, image fusions were

  5. EPID detection of radio-opaque markers for the evaluation of prostate position during megavoltage irradiation: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneault, E.; Pouliot, J.; Laverdiere, J.; Roy, J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess daily prostatic apex motion relative to pelvic bone structures during megavoltage irradiation. Materials and Methods: Radio-opaque markers were implanted under ultrasound guidance near the prostatic apex of ten patients with localized prostatic carcinoma. Patients were subsequently treated with four field box technique at a beam energy of 23 MV. During treatment, on-line images were obtained with an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for each field and fraction. The marker was easily identified, even on unprocessed images and the distance between the marker and a bony landmark was measured. Timelapse movie for the complete treatment of each patient were also reviewed. After the completion of treatment, a transrectal ultrasound examination was performed to verify the position of the marker relative to the apex. Results: Over 1000 digital portal images were acquired. Antero-posterior and lateral views of each fraction were analysed. The quality of portal images obtained with megavoltage irradiation was good. Even without image histogram equalization it was possible to evaluate pelvic bone structures. Moreover, the radio-opaque marker was easily visible on every on-line portal image. Qualitatively, the review of timelapse movies showed important interfraction motions of the marker while bone structures remained stable. Quantitatively, the position of the marker were measured for each fraction. Marker displacements of up to 1,4 cm were measured between two consecutive days of treatment. Important marker motions were predominately in the antero-posterior and cephalo-caudal directions. Position of the markers relative to the prostatic apex were verified with ultrasound at the end of the treatments and were found to remain globaly at their original position. Intratreatment images were reviewed in two cases and no change in marker positions was observed. Our results, obtained during the treatment courses, indicate similar or larger prostate motions

  6. Genetic Alterations in Prostate Cancers among African American Men and Comparisons with Cancers from European and Asian Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    ERG (T_E) that creates the fusion of these two genes. Preliminary result analysis suggests that the tumor genome of African American PCa may harbor a...Table 1) that creates the fusion of these two genes, as this fusion is one of the most common somatically acquired changes of genomic structure in...based molecular markers for predication of cancer progression. To evaluate the feasibility of using DNA from FFPE samples, we performed exploratory

  7. The internal and external responsiveness of Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) and Short Form-12 Health Survey version 2 (SF-12 v2) in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Edmond P H; Wong, Carlos K H; Wan, Eric Y F; Tsu, James H L; Chin, W Y; Kung, Kenny; Yiu, M K

    2016-09-01

    To examine the responsiveness of Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) and Short Form-12 Health Survey version 2 (SF-12 v2) in prostate cancer patients because there is a lack of evidence to support their responsiveness in this patient population. One hundred sixty-eight subjects with prostate cancer were surveyed at baseline and at 6 months using the SF-12 v2 and FACT-P version 4. Internal responsiveness was assessed using paired t test and generalized estimating equation. External responsiveness was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The internal responsiveness of the FACT-P and SF-12 v2 to detect positive change was satisfactory. The FACT-P and SF-12 v2 could not detect negative change. The FACT-P and the SF-12 v2 performed the best in distinguishing between improved general health and worsened general health. The FACT-P performed better in distinguishing between unchanged general health and worsened general health. The SF-12 v2 performed better in distinguishing between unchanged general health and improved general health. Positive change detected by these measures should be interpreted with caution as they might be too responsive to detect "noise," which is not clinically significant. The ability of the FACT-P and the SF-12 v2 to detect negative change was disappointing. The internal and external responsiveness of the social well-being of the FACT-P cannot be supported, suggesting that it is not suitable to longitudinally monitor the social component of HRQOL in prostate cancer patients. The study suggested that generic and disease-specific measures should be used together to complement each other.

  8. Development of a Nomogram Model Predicting Current Bone Scan Positivity in Patients Treated with Androgen-Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotto, Geoffrey T.; Yu, Changhong; Bernstein, Melanie; Eastham, James A.; Kattan, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a nomogram predictive of current bone scan positivity in patients receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for advanced prostate cancer; to augment clinical judgment and highlight patients in need of additional imaging investigations. Materials and methods: A retrospective chart review of bone scan records (conventional 99mTc-scintigraphy) of 1,293 patients who received ADT at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 2000 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables suitable for inclusion in the nomogram. The probability of current bone scan positivity was determined using these variables and the predictive accuracy of the nomogram was quantified by concordance index. Results: In total, 2,681 bone scan records were analyzed and 636 patients had a positive result. Overall, the median pre-scan prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 2.4 ng/ml; median PSA doubling time (PSADT) was 5.8 months. At the time of a positive scan, median PSA level was 8.2 ng/ml; 53% of patients had PSA <10 ng/ml; median PSADT was 4.0 months. Five variables were included in the nomogram: number of previous negative bone scans after initiating ADT, PSA level, Gleason grade sum, and history of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy. A concordance index value of 0.721 was calculated for the nomogram. This was a retrospective study based on limited data in patients treated in a large cancer center who underwent conventional 99mTc bone scans, which themselves have inherent limitations. Conclusion: This is the first nomogram to predict current bone scan positivity in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients, providing high predictive accuracy. PMID:25386410

  9. Development of a nomogram model predicting current bone scan positivity in patients treated with androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eKattan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop a nomogram predictive of current bone scan positivity in patients receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT for advanced prostate cancer; to augment clinical judgment and highlight patients in need of additional imaging investigations.Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review of bone scan records (conventional 99mTc-scintigraphy of 1,293 patients who received ADT at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 2000 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables suitable for inclusion in the nomogram. The probability of current bone scan positivity was determined using these variables and the predictive accuracy of the nomogram was quantified by concordance index.Results: In total, 2,681 bone scan records were analyzed and 636 patients had a positive result. Overall, the median pre-scan prostate-specific antigen (PSA level was 2.4 ng/ml; median PSA doubling time (PSADT was 5.8 months. At the time of a positive scan, median PSA level was 8.2 ng/ml; 53% of patients had PSA <10 ng/ml; median PSADT was 4.0 months. Five variables were included in the nomogram: number of previous negative bone scans after initiating ADT, PSA level, Gleason grade sum, and history of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy. A concordance index value of 0.721 was calculated for the nomogram. This was a retrospective study based on limited data in patients treated in a large cancer centre who underwent conventional 99mTc bone scans, which themselves have inherent limitations. Conclusions: This is the first nomogram to predict current bone scan positivity in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients, providing high predictive accuracy.

  10. Inhibitory effects and mechanism of dihydroberberine on hERG channels expressed in HEK293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahai Yu

    Full Text Available The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG potassium channel conducts rapid delayed rectifier potassium currents (IKr and contributes to phase III cardiac action potential repolarization. Drugs inhibit hERG channels by binding to aromatic residues in hERG helixes. Berberine (BBR has multiple actions, and its hydrogenated derivative dihydroberberine (DHB is a potential candidate for developing new drugs. Previous studies have demonstrated that BBR blocks hERG channels and prolongs action potential duration (APD. Our present study aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of DHB on hERG channels. Protein expression and the hERG current were analyzed using western blotting and patch-clamp, respectively. DHB inhibited the hERG current concentration-dependently after instantaneous perfusion, accelerated channel inactivation by directly binding tyrosine (Tyr652 and phenylalanine (Phe656, and decreased mature (155-kDa and simultaneously increased immature (135-kDa hERG expression, respectively. This suggests disruption of forward trafficking of hERG channels. Besides, DHB remarkably reduced heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 expression and its interaction with hERG, indicating that DHB disrupted hERG trafficking by impairing channel folding. Meanwhie, DHB enhanced the expression of cleaved activating transcription factor-6 (ATF-6, a biomarker of unfolded protein response (UPR. Expression of calnexin and calreticulin, chaperones activated by ATF-6 to facilitate channel folding, were also increased, which indicating UPR activation. Additionally, the degradation rate of mature 155-kDa hERG increased following DHB exposure. In conclusion, we demonstrated that DHB acutely blocked hERG channels by binding the aromatic Tyr652 and Phe656. DHB may decrease hERG plasma membrane expression through two pathways involving disruption of forward trafficking of immature hERG channels and enhanced degradation of mature hERG channels. Furthermore, forward trafficking was

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Peter R., E-mail: pmarti46@uwo.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Cool, Derek W. [Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada and Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Romagnoli, Cesare [Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Fenster, Aaron [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Ward, Aaron D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm 3 or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each tumor was

  13. Clinical significance of determination of serum IGF-I and SIL-2R levels in patients with prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zaigao; Lv Yuliang; Li Jiacheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the significance of changes of serum IGF-I and SIL-2R levels in patients with prostatic cancer. Methods: Serum IGF-I levels (with RIA) and SIL-2R levels (with ELISA) were measured in 31 patients with prostatic cancer and 30 controls. Results: Serum levels of IGF-I and SIL-2R in the 31 patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.01), serum IGF-I and SIL-2R levels were mutually positively correlated (r=0.6182, P<0.01). Conclusion: Serum IGF-I and SIL-2R were useful markers for prostatic cancer. (authors)

  14. The combination of temozolomide-irinotecan regresses a doxorubicin-resistant patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude-mouse model of recurrent Ewing's sarcoma with a FUS-ERG fusion and CDKN2A deletion: Direction for third-line patient therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kentaro; Murakami, Takashi; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Miyake, Masuyo; Li, Yunfeng; Nelson, Scott D; Dry, Sarah M; Bouvet, Michael; Elliott, Irmina A; Russell, Tara A; Singh, Arun S; Eckardt, Mark A; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Momiyama, Masashi; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Endo, Itaru; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-11-28

    The aim of the present study was to determine the usefulness of a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude-mouse model of a doxorubicin-resistant metastatic Ewing's sarcoma, with a unique combination of a FUS-ERG fusion and CDKN2A deletion, to identify effective drugs for third-line chemotherapy of the patient. Our previous study showed that cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitors were effective on the Ewing's sarcoma PDOX, but not doxorubicin, similar to the patient's resistance to doxorubicin. The results of the previous PDOX study were successfully used for second-line therapy of the patiend. In the present study, the PDOX mice established with the Ewing's sarcoma in the right chest wall were randomized into 5 groups when the tumor volume reached 60 mm 3 : untreated control; gemcitabine combined with docetaxel (intraperitoneal [i.p.] injection, weekly, for 2 weeks); irinotecan combined with temozolomide (irinotecan: i.p. injection; temozolomide: oral administration, daily, for 2 weeks); pazopanib (oral administration, daily, for 2 weeks); yondelis (intravenous injection, weekly, for 2 weeks). All mice were sacrificed on day 15. Body weight and tumor volume were assessed 2 times per week. Tumor weight was measured after sacrifice. Irinotecan combined with temozolomide was the most effective regimen compared to the untreated control group (p=0.022). Gemcitabine combined with docetaxel was also effective (p=0.026). Pazopanib and yondelis did not have significant efficacy compared to the untreated control (p=0.130, p=0.818). These results could be obtained within two months after the physician's request and were used for third-line therapy of the patient.

  15. Intratumoral conversion of adrenal androgen precursors drives androgen receptor-activated cell growth in prostate cancer more potently than de novo steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Jinpei; Hofland, Johannes; Erkens-Schulze, Sigrun; Dits, Natasja F J; Steenbergen, Jacobie; Jenster, Guido; Homma, Yukio; de Jong, Frank H; van Weerden, Wytske M

    2013-11-01

    Despite an initial response to hormonal therapy, patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC) almost always progress to castration-resistant disease (CRPC). Although serum testosterone (T) is reduced by androgen deprivation therapy, intratumoral T levels in CRPC are comparable to those in prostate tissue of eugonadal men. These levels could originate from intratumoral conversion of adrenal androgens and/or from de novo steroid synthesis. However, the relative contribution of de novo steroidogenesis to AR-driven cell growth is unknown. The relative contribution of androgen biosynthetic pathways to activate androgen receptor (AR)-regulated cell growth and expression of PSA, FKBP5, and TMPRSS2 was studied at physiologically relevant levels of adrenal androgen precursors and intermediates of de novo androgen biosynthesis in human prostate cancer cell lines, PC346C, VCaP, and LNCaP. In PC346C and VCaP, responses to pregnenolone and progesterone were absent or minimal, while large effects of adrenal androgen precursors were found. VCaP CRPC clones overexpressing CYP17A1 did not acquire an increased ability to use pregnenolone or progesterone to activate AR. In contrast, all precursors stimulated growth and gene expression in LNCaP cells, presumably resulting from the mutated AR in these cells. Our data indicate that at physiological levels of T precursors PC cells can generally convert adrenal androgens, while de novo steroidogenesis is not generally possible in PC cells and is not able to support AR transactivation and PC growth. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Stereographic Targeting in Prostate Radiotherapy: Speed and Precision by Daily Automatic Positioning Corrections Using Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Image Pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutanga, Theodore F.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Wentzler, Davy; Barnhoorn, Jaco; Incrocci, Luca; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: A fully automated, fast, on-line prostate repositioning scheme using implanted markers, kilovoltage/megavoltage imaging, and remote couch movements has been developed and clinically applied. The initial clinical results of this stereographic targeting (SGT) method, as well as phantom evaluations, are presented. Methods and Materials: Using the SGT method, portal megavoltage images are acquired with the first two to six monitor units of a treatment beam, immediately followed by acquisition of an orthogonal kilovoltage image without gantry motion. The image pair is automatically analyzed to obtain the marker positions and three-dimensional prostate displacement and rotation. Remote control couch shifts are applied to correct for the displacement. The SGT performance was measured using both phantom images and images from 10 prostate cancer patients treated using SGT. Results: With phantom measurements, the accuracy of SGT was 0.5, 0.2, and 0.3 mm (standard deviation [SD]) for the left-right, craniocaudal, and anteroposterior directions, respectively, for translations and 0.5 o (SD) for the rotations around all axes. Clinically, the success rate for automatic marker detection was 99.5%, and the accuracy was 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 mm (SD) in the left-right, craniocaudal, and anteroposterior axes. The SDs of the systematic center-of-mass positioning errors (Σ) were reduced from 4.0 mm to <0.5 mm for all axes. The corresponding SD of the random (σ) errors was reduced from 3.0 to <0.8 mm. These small residual errors were achieved with a treatment time extension of <1 min. Conclusion: Stereographic targeting yields systematic and random prostate positioning errors of <1 mm with <1 min of added treatment time

  17. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of spontaneous acute prostatitis and transrectal prostate biopsy-related acute prostatitis: Is transrectal prostate biopsy-related acute prostatitis a distinct acute prostatitis category?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Wook; Oh, Mi Mi; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kang, Seok Ho; Park, Hong Seok; Moon, Du Geon

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to compare the clinical and microbiological characteristics between acute bacterial prostatitis and transrectal biopsy-related acute prostatitis. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 135 patients hospitalized for acute prostatitis in three urological centers between 2004 and 2013. Acute bacterial prostatitis was diagnosed according to typical symptoms, findings of physical examination, and laboratory test results. Clinical variables, laboratory test results, and anti-microbial susceptibility results were reviewed. Patients were classified into the spontaneous acute prostatitis group (S-ABP) or biopsy-related acute prostatitis (Bx-ABP) for comparison of their clinical, laboratory, and microbiological findings. The mean age of all patients was 61.7 ± 12.9 years. Compared with S-ABP patients, Bx-ABP patients were significantly older, had larger prostate volumes, higher PSA values, higher peak fever temperatures, and higher incidence of septicemia and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Overall, of the 135 patients, 57.8% had positive bacterial urine and/or blood cultures. Bx-ABP patients had a higher incidence of bacterial (urine and/or blood) positive cultures compared to S-ABP patients (66.7% versus 55.6%). Escherichia coli was the predominant organism in both groups, but it was more common in Bx-ABP (88.9%) than in S-ABP (66.7%). Extended spectrum beta-lactamase -producing bacteria accounted for 64.7% of culture-positive patients in the Bx-ABP group compared to 13.3% in the S-ABP group. Bx-ABP patients showed a higher incidence of septicemia and antibiotic-resistant bacteria than S-ABP patients. These results have important implications for the management and antimicrobial treatment of Bx-ABP, which may well deserve to be considered a distinct prostatitis category. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel genomic alteration of LSAMP associates with aggressive prostate cancer in African American men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrovics, Gyorgy; Li, Hua; Stümpel, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    a systematic whole genome analyses, revealing alterations that differentiate African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) CaP genomes. We discovered a recurrent deletion on chromosome 3q13.31 centering on the LSAMP locus that was prevalent in tumors from AA men (cumulative analyses of 435 patients: whole...... genome sequence, 14; FISH evaluations, 101; and SNP array, 320 patients). Notably, carriers of this deletion experienced more rapid disease progression. In contrast, PTEN and ERG common driver alterations in CaP were significantly lower in AA prostate tumors compared to prostate tumors from CA. Moreover...

  19. Comparison of prostate positioning guided by three-dimensional transperineal ultrasound and cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minglun; Ballhausen, Hendrik; Hegemann, Nina-Sophie; Reiner, Michael; Manapov, Farkhad; Corradini, Stefanie; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus [University Hospital Munich, LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Tritschler, Stefan; Gratzke, Christian [University Hospital Munich, LMU Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The accuracy of a transperineal three-dimensional ultrasound system (3DUS) was assessed for prostate positioning and compared to fiducial- and bone-based positioning in kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) during definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Each of the 7 patients had three fiducial markers implanted into the prostate before treatment. Prostate positioning was simultaneously measured by 3DUS and CBCT before each fraction. In total, 177 pairs of 3DUS and CBCT scans were collected. Bone-match and seed-match were performed for each CBCT. Using seed-match as a reference, the accuracy of 3DUS and bone-match was evaluated. Systematic and random errors as well as optimal setup margins were calculated for 3DUS and bone-match. The discrepancy between 3DUS and seed-match in CBCT (average ± standard deviation) was 0.0 ± 1.7 mm laterally, 0.2 ± 2.0 mm longitudinally, and 0.3 ± 1.7 mm vertically. Using seed-match as a reference, systematic errors for 3DUS were 1.2 mm, 1.1 mm, and 0.9 mm; and random errors were 1.4 mm, 1.8 mm, and 1.6 mm, on lateral, longitudinal, and vertical axes, respectively. By analogy, the difference of bone-match to seed-match was 0.1 ± 1.1 mm laterally, 1.3 ± 3.8 mm longitudinally, and 1.3 ± 4.5 mm vertically. Systematic errors were 0.5 mm, 2.2 mm, and 2.6 mm; and random errors were 1.0 mm, 3.1 mm, and 3.9 mm on lateral, longitudinal, and vertical axes, respectively. The accuracy of 3DUS was significantly higher than that of bone-match on longitudinal and vertical axes, but not on the lateral axis. Image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer based on transperineal 3DUS was feasible, with overall small discrepancy to seed-match in CBCT in this retrospective study. Compared to bone-match, transperineal 3DUS achieved higher accuracy on longitudinal and vertical axes. (orig.) [German] Bewertung der Genauigkeit eines transperinealen dreidimensionalen Ultraschallsystems (3DUS) fuer die Prostatapositionierung und Vergleich mit

  20. Value of Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Prostate Cancer: Comparison with Systemic Prostate Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Seong Kuk; Kim, Dong Won; Ha, Dong Ho; Kwon, Hee Jin; Kang, Myong Jin; Choi, Sun Seob; Nam, Kyung Jin; Kim, Jung Il [Dong-A University, Medical Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and to correlate systemic twelve biopsy in prostate cancer. Thirty-one patients with suspected prostate cancer underwent MR imaging. DTI was performed prior to a prostate biopsy. We prospectively calculated the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) value in each corresponding biopsy site. Twenty-three of 31 patients had histopathologically proven adenocarcinoma. Among the 276 biopsy cores of 23 patients with prostate cancer, 109 cores showed positive results (39%). The ADC and FA value of positive cores were 1.31 {+-} 0.34x10-3 mm2/s and 0.68 {+-} 0.07, and those of the negative cores were 1.74 {+-} 0.45x10-3 mm2/s and 0.54 {+-} 0.09, respectively. Eight patients without carcinoma showed an ADC value of 1.83 {+-} 0.26x10-3 mm2/s and an FA value of 0.47 {+-} 0.07. The ADC and FA value of positive cores were significantly lower and higher than those of negative cores and cancer-free patients, respectively (p < 0.05). The ADC and FA values using DTI may provide useful diagnostic information in the differentiation of cancerous tissues, although there is overlap in some cases

  1. Reciprocal positive regulation between TRPV6 and NUMB in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Young; Hong, Chansik; Wie, Jinhong [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Euiyong [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Joo [Division of Longevity and Biofunctional Medicine, Pusan National University School of Korean Medicine, Yangsan 626-870 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Kotdaji [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Kim, In-Gyu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Ju-Hong [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); So, Insuk, E-mail: insuk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • TRPV6 interacts with tumor suppressor proteins. • Numb has a selective effect on TRPV6, depending on the prostate cancer cell line. • PTEN is a novel regulator of TRPV6–Numb complex. - Abstract: Calcium acts as a second messenger and plays a crucial role in signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation. Recently, calcium channels related to calcium influx into the cytosol of epithelial cells have attracted attention as a cancer therapy target. Of these calcium channels, TRPV6 is overexpressed in prostate cancer and is considered an important molecule in the process of metastasis. However, its exact role and mechanism is unclear. NUMB, well-known tumor suppressor gene, is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6. We show that NUMB and TRPV6 have a reciprocal positive regulatory relationship in PC-3 cells. We repeated this experiment in two other prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and LNCaP. Interestingly, there were no significant changes in TRPV6 expression following NUMB knockdown in DU145. We revealed that the presence or absence of PTEN was the cause of NUMB–TRPV6 function. Loss of PTEN caused a positive correlation of TRPV6–NUMB expression. Collectively, we determined that PTEN is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6 and NUMB. These results demonstrated a novel relationship of NUMB–TRPV6 in prostate cancer cells, and show that PTEN is a novel regulator of this complex.

  2. Positive Response to Thermobalancing Therapy Enabled by Therapeutic Device in Men with Non-Malignant Prostate Diseases: BPH and Chronic Prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajanyan, Ivan Gerasimovich; Allen, Simon

    2016-04-18

    The most common types of non-malignant prostate diseases are benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis (CP). The aim of this study was to find out whether thermobalancing therapy with a physiotherapeutic device is effective for BPH and CP. During a 2.5-year period, 124 men with BPH over the age of 55 were investigated. Clinical parameters were tested twice: via the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and via ultrasound measurement of prostate volume (PV) and uroflowmetry maximum flow rate (Q max ), before and after six months of therapy. In 45 men with CP under the age of 55, the dynamics of the National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) were studied. The results of the investigated index tests in men with BPH confirmed a decrease in IPSS ( p BPH and the improvement in NIH-CPSI-QoL in patients with CP after using a physiotherapeutic device for six months as mono-therapy, support the view that thermobalancing therapy with the device can be recommended for these patients. Furthermore, the therapeutic device is free of side effects.

  3. ERG and other discriminators between advanced hydroxychloroquine retinopathy and retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Archana A; Marmor, Michael F

    2017-06-01

    To study whether the ERG and other clinical findings help to distinguish between advanced hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) retinopathy and pericentral or diffuse retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with similar fundus appearance. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with advanced HCQ retinopathy (n = 11), pericentral RP (n = 8) and diffuse RP (n = 8). Pericentral RP was defined as having limited fundus damage and relatively normal flicker ERG time-to-peak. Diffuse RP had typical loss of the rod ERG and flicker timing delay. All patients showed reduced amplitude of the ISCEV responses in the full-field electroretinogram (ERG). Aspects of history, visual field results, fundus appearance, fundus autofluorescence and ocular coherence tomography were also compared. Relative to pericentral RP, patients with HCQ toxicity showed delayed flicker ERG time-to-peak and lower ERG amplitudes, particularly combined rod-cone responses. Relative to diffuse RP, most HCQ toxicity patients had some preserved rod ERG response, and there was no obvious predilection for rod over cone damage. In addition, patients with HCQ toxicity usually lacked markers of long-standing degeneration such as bone spicule figures or severe loss of peripheral field. History of familial disease and long-standing night blindness were specific to RP. While the early signs of HCQ damage are typically regional in the posterior pole, advanced disease is characteristically diffuse (unlike pericentral RP). This is appropriate for a systemic toxin, as is the finding that rods and cones were both affected in the ERG to a similar degree (unlike genetic rod-cone dystrophies). For patients with severe HCQ exposure and some of our discriminatory findings, and no family history or prior night blindness, HCQ toxicity is a sufficient diagnosis without invoking a second rare disease (Occam's razor).

  4. Positive resection margin and/or pathologic T3 adenocarcinoma of prostate with undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy: to irradiate or not?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Richard; Hruby, George; Hong, Julie; Hong, Eugene; DeBoer, Gerrit; Danjoux, Cyril; Morton, Gerard; Klotz, Laurence; Bhak, Edward; Flavin, Aileen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for positive resection margin and/or pathologic T3 (pT3) adenocarcinoma of the prostate with undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Methods and materials: We retrospectively analyzed 125 patients with a positive resection margin and/or pT3 adenocarcinoma of the prostate who had undetectable postoperative serum PSA levels after radical prostatectomy. Seventy-three patients received postoperative adjuvant RT and 52 did not. Follow-up ranged from 1.5 to 12.0 years (median 4.2 for the irradiated group and 4.9 for the nonirradiated group). PSA outcome was available for all patients. Freedom from failure was defined as the maintenance of a serum PSA level of ≤0.2 ng/mL, as well as the absence of clinical local recurrence and distant metastasis. Results: No difference was found in the 5-year actuarial overall survival between the irradiated and nonirradiated group (94% vs. 95%). However, patients receiving adjuvant RT had a statistically superior 5-year actuarial relapse-free rate, including freedom from PSA failure, compared with those treated with surgery alone (88% vs. 65%, p=0.0013). In the irradiated group, 8 patients had relapse with PSA failure alone. None had local or distant recurrence. In the nonirradiated group, 15, 1, and 2 had PSA failure, local recurrence, and distant metastasis, respectively. On Cox regression analysis, pre-radical prostatectomy PSA level and adjuvant RT were statistically significant predictive factors for relapse, and Gleason score, extracapsular invasion, and resection margin status were not. There was a suggestion that seminal vesicle invasion was associated with an increased risk of relapse. The morbidity of postoperative adjuvant RT was acceptable, with only 2 patients developing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 genitourinary complications. Adjuvant RT had a minimal adverse effect on urinary continence and did not cause

  5. Transcription factor ERG and joint and articular cartilage formation during mouse limb and spine skeletogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Koyama, Eiki; Komori, Toshihisa; Takeshita, Nobuo; Williams, Julie A; Nakamura, Takashi; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2007-05-01

    Articular cartilage and synovial joints are critical for skeletal function, but the mechanisms regulating their development are largely unknown. In previous studies we found that the ets transcription factor ERG and its alternatively-spliced variant C-1-1 have roles in joint formation in chick. Here, we extended our studies to mouse. We found that ERG is also expressed in developing mouse limb joints. To test regulation of ERG expression, beads coated with the joint master regulator protein GDF-5 were implanted close to incipient joints in mouse limb explants; this led to rapid and strong ectopic ERG expression. We cloned and characterized several mammalian ERG variants and expressed a human C-1-1 counterpart (hERG3Delta81) throughout the cartilaginous skeleton of transgenic mice, using Col2a1 gene promoter/enhancer sequences. The skeletal phenotype was severe and neonatal lethal, and the transgenic mice were smaller than wild type littermates and their skeletons were largely cartilaginous. Limb long bone anlagen were entirely composed of chondrocytes actively expressing collagen IX and aggrecan as well as articular markers such as tenascin-C. Typical growth plates were absent and there was very low expression of maturation and hypertrophy markers, including Indian hedgehog, collagen X and MMP-13. The results suggest that ERG is part of molecular mechanisms leading chondrocytes into a permanent developmental path and become joint forming cells, and may do so by acting downstream of GDF-5.

  6. Influence of radiotherapy on node-positive prostate cancer treated with androgen ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sands, M Elizabeth; Pollack, Alan; Zagars, Gunar K

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with node-positive prostate cancer that is regionally localized (T1-4, N1-3, M0) have a relatively poor prognosis when a single-treatment modality such as radical surgery, definitive radiotherapy, or androgen ablation is used. While promising results using radical surgery and androgen ablation have been reported, there are no data to support an analogous approach using local radiotherapy and androgen ablation. In this retrospective review, the outcome after local radiotherapy and early androgen ablation (XRT/HORM) was compared to early androgen ablation alone (HORM). Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 1992 there were 181 patients treated with HORM and 27 patients treated with XRT/HORM at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The nodal status of all patients was established pathologically by lymph node dissection, which was terminated after frozen section confirmation of involvement. In the majority of cases androgen ablation was by orchiectomy. The median dose to the prostate in XRT/HORM group was 66 Gy. The median follow-up was 45 months; 49 months for the HORM group and 25 months for the XRT/HORM group. Results: The distribution of prognostic factors between the HORM and XRT/HORM groups was similar, with the exception of tumor grade. There was a significantly larger proportion of high grade tumors in the HORM group. In terms of actuarial disease outcome, at 4 years the results of patients in the HORM group were significantly worse, including a rising prostate specific antigen (PSA) of 53%, any disease progression of 32%, a rising PSA or disease progression of 55%, and local progression of 22%. None of the patients in the XRT/HORM group failed biochemically or clinically. To determine the impact of grade on these findings, the analyses were repeated, using only those with grade 2 tumors. A similar pattern was evidenced with significantly worse actuarial outcome at 4 years for the HORM group using the endpoints of a rising PSA

  7. Immunohistochemical staining of precursor forms of prostate-specific antigen (proPSA) in metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwani, Anil V; Marlow, Cameron; Demarzo, Angelo M; Mikolajczyk, Stephen D; Rittenhouse, Harry G; Veltri, Robert W; Chan, Theresa Y

    2006-10-01

    Precursors of prostate-specific antigen (proPSA) have been previously shown to be more concentrated in prostate cancer tissue. This study characterizes the immunohistochemical staining (IHS) of proPSA forms in metastatic prostate cancer compared with prostate specific antigen (PSA) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP). A tissue microarray, consisting of 74 cases of metastatic prostate carcinoma and control tissues, was used. IHS, using monoclonal antibodies against proPSA with a truncated proleader peptide containing 2 amino acids ([-2]pPSA), native ([-5/-7]pPSA), PSA, and PAP, was analyzed. The monoclonal antibodies were specific for both benign and malignant prostatic glandular tissue. IHS with [-5/-7]pPSA showed the least number of cases with negative staining (3%), and the most number of cases with moderate or strong staining (76%). In the 60 cases where all 4 stains could be evaluated, none of them were negative for proPSA and positive for PSA or PAP, and all 7 cases that were negative for both PSA and PAP showed IHS to proPSA. [-5/-7]pPSA (native proPSA) may be a better marker than PSA and PAP in characterizing metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma, with most of the cases showing positivity for the marker. Even cases that were negative for PSA and PAP, were reactive for proPSA. Such enhanced detection is particularly important in poorly differentiated carcinomas involving metastatic sites where prostate carcinoma is a consideration. A panel of markers, including proPSA, should be performed when metastatic prostate carcinoma is in the differential diagnosis.

  8. Daily CT localization for correcting portal errors in the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattanzi, Joseph; McNeely, Shawn; Hanlon, Alexandra; Das, Indra; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction: Improved prostate localization techniques should allow the reduction of margins around the target to facilitate dose escalation in high-risk patients while minimizing the risk of normal tissue morbidity. A daily CT simulation technique is presented to assess setup variations in portal placement and organ motion for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Six patients who consented to this study underwent supine position CT simulation with an alpha cradle cast, intravenous contrast, and urethrogram. Patients received 46 Gy to the initial Planning Treatment Volume (PTV 1 ) in a four-field conformal technique that included the prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes as the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV 1 ). The prostate or prostate and seminal vesicles (GTV 2 ) then received 56 Gy to PTV 2 . All doses were delivered in 2-Gy fractions. After 5 weeks of treatment (50 Gy), a second CT simulation was performed. The alpha cradle was secured to a specially designed rigid sliding board. The prostate was contoured and a new isocenter was generated with appropriate surface markers. Prostate-only treatment portals for the final conedown (GTV 3 ) were created with a 0.25-cm margin from the GTV to PTV. On each subsequent treatment day, the patient was placed in his cast on the sliding board for a repeat CT simulation. The daily isocenter was recalculated in the anterior/posterior (A/P) and lateral dimension and compared to the 50-Gy CT simulation isocenter. Couch and surface marker shifts were calculated to produce portal alignment. To maintain proper positioning, the patients were transferred to a stretcher while on the sliding board in the cast and transported to the treatment room where they were then transferred to the treatment couch. The patients were then treated to the corrected isocenter. Portal films and electronic portal images were obtained for each field. Results: Utilizing CT-CT image registration (fusion) of the daily and 50

  9. Androgen signaling promotes translation of TMEFF2 in prostate cancer cells via phosphorylation of the α subunit of the translation initiation factor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan F Overcash

    Full Text Available The type I transmembrane protein with epidermal growth factor and two follistatin motifs 2 (TMEFF2, is expressed mainly in brain and prostate. Expression of TMEFF2 is deregulated in prostate cancer, suggesting a role in this disease, but the molecular mechanism(s involved in this effect are not clear. Although androgens promote tmeff2 transcription, androgen delivery to castrated animals carrying CWR22 xenografts increases TMEFF2 protein levels in the absence of mRNA changes, suggesting that TMEFF2 may also be post-transcriptionally regulated. Here we show that translation of TMEFF2 is regulated by androgens. Addition of physiological concentrations of dihydrotestosterone (DHT to prostate cancer cell lines increases translation of endogenous TMEFF2 or transfected TMEFF2-Luciferase fusions, and this effect requires the presence of upstream open reading frames (uORFs in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR of TMEFF2. Using chemical and siRNA inhibition of the androgen receptor (AR, we show that the androgen effect on TMEFF2 translation is mediated by the AR. Importantly, DHT also promotes phosphorylation of the α subunit of the translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α in an AR-dependent manner, paralleling the effect on TMEFF2 translation. Moreover, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress conditions, which promote eIF2α phosphorylation, also stimulate TMEFF2 translation. These results indicate that androgen signaling promotes eIF2α phosphorylation and subsequent translation of TMEFF2 via a mechanism that requires uORFs in the 5'-UTR of TMEFF2.

  10. Intra-fractional uncertainties in image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polat, Buelent; Guenther, Iris; Wilbert, Juergen; Goebel, Joachim; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate intra-fractional uncertainties during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer. During IMRT of 21 consecutive patients, kilovolt (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were acquired prior to and immediately after treatment: a total of 252 treatment fractions with 504 CBCT studies were basis of this analysis. The prostate position in anterior-posterior (AP) direction was determined using contour matching; patient set-up based on the pelvic bony anatomy was evaluated using automatic image registration. Internal variability of the prostate position was the difference between absolute prostate and patient position errors. Intra-fractional changes of prostate position, patient position, rectal distension in AP direction and bladder volume were analyzed. With a median treatment time of 16 min, intra-fractional drifts of the prostate were > 5 mm in 12% of all fractions and a margin of 6 mm was calculated for compensation of this uncertainty. Mobility of the prostate was independent from the bony anatomy with poor correlation between absolute prostate motion and motion of the bony anatomy (R 2 = 0.24). A systematic increase of bladder filling by 41 ccm on average was observed; however, these changes did not influence the prostate position. Small variations of the prostate position occurred independently from intra-fractional changes of the rectal distension; a weak correlation between large internal prostate motion and changes of the rectal volume was observed (R 2 = 0.55). Clinically significant intra-fractional changes of the prostate position were observed and margins of 6 mm were calculated for this intra-fractional uncertainty. Repeated or continuous verification of the prostate position may allow further margin reduction. (orig.)

  11. Intra-fractional uncertainties in image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polat, Buelent; Guenther, Iris; Wilbert, Juergen; Goebel, Joachim; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate intra-fractional uncertainties during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer. During IMRT of 21 consecutive patients, kilovolt (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were acquired prior to and immediately after treatment: a total of 252 treatment fractions with 504 CBCT studies were basis of this analysis. The prostate position in anterior-posterior (AP) direction was determined using contour matching; patient set-up based on the pelvic bony anatomy was evaluated using automatic image registration. Internal variability of the prostate position was the difference between absolute prostate and patient position errors. Intra-fractional changes of prostate position, patient position, rectal distension in AP direction and bladder volume were analyzed. With a median treatment time of 16 min, intra-fractional drifts of the prostate were > 5 mm in 12% of all fractions and a margin of 6 mm was calculated for compensation of this uncertainty. Mobility of the prostate was independent from the bony anatomy with poor correlation between absolute prostate motion and motion of the bony anatomy (R{sup 2} = 0.24). A systematic increase of bladder filling by 41 ccm on average was observed; however, these changes did not influence the prostate position. Small variations of the prostate position occurred independently from intra-fractional changes of the rectal distension; a weak correlation between large internal prostate motion and changes of the rectal volume was observed (R{sup 2} = 0.55). Clinically significant intra-fractional changes of the prostate position were observed and margins of 6 mm were calculated for this intra-fractional uncertainty. Repeated or continuous verification of the prostate position may allow further margin reduction. (orig.)

  12. CRTC1-MAML2 gene fusion in mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lacrimal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Holstein, Sarah Linea; Fehr, André; Heegaard, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    -grade MEC of the lacrimal gland. There were no signs of recurrence or metastases during a five-year follow-up. Using RT-PCR and FISH we demonstrated that the tumor was positive for the CRTC1-MAML2 gene fusion previously shown to be associated with in particular low-grade salivary MECs with favorable...... prognosis. By immunohistochemistry we showed that the majority of tumor cells, including epidermoid, intermediate and mucous producing cells, expressed the CRTC1-MAML2 fusion protein. In contrast, 15 non-MEC lacrimal neoplasm were fusion-negative. Our findings show that lacrimal MEC is not only clinically...... anatomical sites and organs. Moreover, our findings indicate that the CRTC1-MAML2 fusion may be a useful diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for lacrimal MEC....

  13. Investigating the role of caveolin-2 in prostate cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yih Low

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a worldwide problem. While the role of caveolin-1 has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of caveolin-2 (CAV2 in prostate cancer. Up-regulation of CAV2 in androgen independent PC3 cells compared to normal prostate cell line and androgen dependent prostate cancer cell lines has been observed. Recent studies suggest that up-regulation of CAV2 plays an important role in androgen independent prostate cancer. This study investigates whether CAV2 is important in mediating the aggressive phenotypes seen in androgen independent prostate cancer cells. The androgen independent prostate cancer cell line, PC3 was used that has been shown to express CAV2, and CAV2 knock down was performed using siRNA system. Changes to cell number, migration and invasion were assessed after knocking down CAV2. Our results showed that down-regulating CAV2 resulted in reduced cell numbers, migration and invasion in PC3 cells. This preliminary study suggests that CAV2 may act to promote malignant behavior in an androgen independent prostate cancer cell line. Further studies are required to fully elucidate the role of CAV2 in androgen independent prostate cancer.

  14. Comparison of daily megavoltage electronic portal imaging or kilovoltage imaging with marker seeds to ultrasound imaging or skin marks for prostate localization and treatment positioning in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serago, Christopher F.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Igel, Todd C.; Gale, Ashley A.; Serago, Nicole E.; Earle, John D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of imaging modalities, immobilization, localization, and positioning techniques in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer had gold marker seeds implanted transrectally and were treated with fractionated radiotherapy. Twenty of the 35 patients had limited immobilization; the remaining had a vacuum-based immobilization. Patient positioning consisted of alignment with lasers to skin marks, ultrasound or kilovoltage X-ray imaging, optical guidance using infrared reflectors, and megavoltage electronic portal imaging (EPI). The variance of each positioning technique was compared to the patient position determined from the pretreatment EPI. Results: With limited immobilization, the average difference between the skin marks' laser position and EPI pretreatment position is 9.1 ± 5.3 mm, the average difference between the skin marks' infrared position and EPI pretreatment position is 11.8 ± 7.2 mm, the average difference between the ultrasound position and EPI pretreatment position is 7.0 ± 4.6 mm, the average difference between kV imaging and EPI pretreatment position is 3.5 ± 3.1 mm, and the average intrafraction movement during treatment is 3.4 ± 2.7 mm. For the patients with the vacuum-style immobilization, the average difference between the skin marks' laser position and EPI pretreatment position is 10.7 ± 4.6 mm, the average difference between kV imaging and EPI pretreatment position is 1.9 ± 1.5 mm, and the average intrafraction movement during treatment is 2.1 ± 1.5 mm. Conclusions: Compared with use of skin marks, ultrasound imaging for positioning provides an increased degree of agreement to EPI-based positioning, though not as favorable as kV imaging fiducial seeds. Intrafraction movement during treatment decreases with improved immobilization

  15. Influence of volumes of prostate, rectum, and bladder on treatment planning CT on interfraction prostate shifts during ultrasound image-guided IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Nandanuri M. S.; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Sartin, William; Maiorano, Samuel; Modena, Jennifer; Mazur, Andrej; Osian, Adrian; Sood, Brijmohan; Ravi, Akkamma; Sampath, Seshadri; Lange, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between prostate, bladder, and rectum volumes on treatment planning CT day and prostate shifts in the XYZ directions on treatment days. Methods: Prostate, seminal vesicles, bladder, and rectum were contoured on CT images obtained in supine position. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans was prepared. Contours were exported to BAT-ultrasound imaging system. Patients were positioned on the couch using skin marks. An ultrasound probe was used to obtain ultrasound images of prostate, bladder, and rectum, which were aligned with CT images. Couch shifts in the XYZ directions as recommended by BAT system were made and recorded. 4698 couch shifts for 42 patients were analyzed to study the correlations between interfraction prostate shifts vs bladder, rectum, and prostate volumes on planning CT. Results: Mean and range of volumes (cc): Bladder: 179 (42-582), rectum: 108 (28-223), and prostate: 55 (21-154). Mean systematic prostate shifts were (cm, ±SD) right and left lateral: -0.047±0.16 (-0.361-0.251), anterior and posterior: 0.14±0.3 (-0.466-0.669), and superior and inferior: 0.19±0.26 (-0.342-0.633). Bladder volume was not correlated with lateral, anterior/posterior, and superior/inferior prostate shifts (P>0.2). Rectal volume was correlated with anterior/posterior (P 0.2). The smaller the rectal volume or cross sectional area, the larger was the prostate shift anteriorly and vice versa (P 0.2). The smaller the prostate volume, the larger was prostate shift superiorly and vice versa (P<0.05). Conclusions: Prostate and rectal volumes, but not bladder volumes, on treatment planning CT influenced prostate position on treatment fractions. Daily image-guided adoptive radiotherapy would be required for patients with distended or empty rectum on planning CT to reduce rectal toxicity in the case of empty rectum and to minimize geometric miss of prostate.

  16. A novel mouse model of human prostate cancer to study intraprostatic tumor growth and the development of lymph node metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linxweiler, Johannes; Körbel, Christina; Müller, Andreas; Hammer, Markus; Veith, Christian; Bohle, Rainer M; Stöckle, Michael; Junker, Kerstin; Menger, Michael D; Saar, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    In this study, we aimed to establish a versatile in vivo model of prostate cancer, which adequately mimics intraprostatic tumor growth, and the natural routes of metastatic spread. In addition, we analyzed the capability of high-resolution ultrasonography (hrUS), in vivo micro-CT (μCT), and 9.4T MRI to monitor tumor growth and the development of lymph node metastases. A total of 5 × 10 5 VCaP cells or 5 × 10 5 cells of LuCaP136- or LuCaP147 spheroids were injected into the prostate of male CB17-SCID mice (n = 8 for each cell type). During 12 weeks of follow-up, orthotopic tumor growth, and metastatic spread were monitored by repetitive serum-PSA measurements and imaging studies including hrUS, μCT, and 9.4T MRI. At autopsy, primary tumors and metastases were harvested and examined by histology and immunohistochemistry (CK5, CK8, AMACR, AR, Ki67, ERG, and PSA). From imaging results and PSA-measurements, tumor volume doubling time, tumor-specific growth rate, and PSA-density were calculated. All 24 mice developed orthotopic tumors. The tumor growth could be reliably monitored by a combination of hrUS, μCT, MRI, and serum-PSA measurements. In most animals, lymph node metastases could be detected after 12 weeks, which could also be well visualized by hrUS, and MRI. Immunohistochemistry showed positive signals for CK8, AMACR, and AR in all xenograft types. CK5 was negative in VCaP- and focally positive in LuCaP136- and LuCaP147-xenografts. ERG was positive in VCaP- and negative in LuCaP136- and LuCaP147-xenografts. Tumor volume doubling times and tumor-specific growth rates were 21.2 days and 3.9 %/day for VCaP-, 27.6 days and 3.1 %/day for LuCaP136- and 16.2 days and 4.5 %/day for LuCaP147-xenografts, respectively. PSA-densities were 433.9 ng/mL per milliliter tumor for VCaP-, 6.5 ng/mL per milliliter tumor for LuCaP136-, and 11.2 ng/mL per milliliter tumor for LuCaP147-xenografts. By using different monolayer and 3D spheroid cell cultures in an

  17. Chronic inflammation of the prostate type IV with respect to risk of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio B. Porcaro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic inflammatory infiltrate (CII might be involved in prostate cancer (PCA and benign hyperplasia (BPH; however, its significance is controversial. Chronic inflammatory prostatitis type IV is the most common non cancer diagnosis in men undergoing biopsy because of suspected PCA. Objective: To evaluate potential associations of coexistent CII and PCA in biopsy specimens after prostate assessment. Design, setting, and participants: Between January 2007 and December 2008, 415 consecutive patients who underwent prostate biopsy were retrospectively evaluated. The investigated variables included Age (years and PSA (ug/l; moreover, CII+, glandular atrophy (GA+, glandular hyperplasia (GH+, prostate Intraepithelial neoplasm (PIN+, atypical small acinar cell proliferation (ASAP+ and PCA positive cores (P+ were evaluated as categorical and continuous (proportion of positive cores. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Associations of CII+ and PCA risk were assessed by statistical methods. Results and limitations: In the patient population, a biopsy core positive for PCA was detected in 34.2% of cases and the rate of high grade PCA (HGPCA: bGS ! 8 resulted 4.82%. CII+ significantly and inversely associated with a positive biopsy core P+ (P < 0.0001; OR = 0.26 and HGPCA (P = 0.0005; OR = 0.05. Moreover, the associations indicated that patients with coexistent CII+ on needle biopsy were 74% less likely to have coexistent PCA than men without CII+ as well as 95% less likely to have HGPCA in the biopsy core than men without coexistent CII+. There were limits in our study which was single centre and included only one dedicated pathologist. Conclusions: There was an inverse association of chronic inflammation of the prostate type IV and risk of PCA; moreover, HGPCA was less likely to be detected in cancers associated with coexistent CII. In prostate microenvironment, prostate chronic inflammation may be protective; however, its role in

  18. Transcriptome sequencing in prostate cancer identifies inter-tumor heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Mendonca

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the dearth of gene mutations in prostate cancer, [1] ,[2] it is likely that genomic rearrangements play a significant role in the evolution of prostate cancer. However, in the search for recurrent genomic alterations, "private alterations" have received less attention. Such alterations may provide insights into the evolution, behavior, and clinical outcome of an individual tumor. In a recent report in "Genome Biology" Wyatt et al. [3] defines unique alterations in a cohort of high-risk prostate cancer patient with a lethal phenotype. Utilizing a transcriptome sequencing approach they observe high inter-tumor heterogeneity; however, the genes altered distill into three distinct cancer-relevant pathways. Their analysis reveals the presence of several non-ETS fusions, which may contribute to the phenotype of individual tumors, and have significance for disease progression.

  19. Prostatic MR imaging. Accuracy in differentiating cancer from other prostatic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, S.; Kivisaari, L.; Tervahartiala, P. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept of Radiology; Vehmas, T. [Finnish Inst. of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland); Taari, K.; Rannikko, S. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept of Urology

    2001-03-01

    Purpose: We assessed the accuracy of MR imaging in differentiating between cancer and other prostatic disorders, and evaluated the diagnostic criteria for various prostatic diseases. Material and Methods: A total of 74 endorectal coil MR studies were performed on 72 patients. Twenty patients had prostatic cancer, 20 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), 4 acute bacterial prostatitis, 5 chronic bacterial prostatitis (2 also belonging to the previous category), 19 chronic non-bacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and 6 were symptomless voluntary controls. All studies were interpreted by two experienced radiologists in random order. Radiologists were blinded to all clinical data including the age of the patients. Based on MR findings, both radiologists filled in a form covering diagnostic criteria and diagnosis. Results: Accuracy in diagnosing prostate cancer was 74%. Sensitivity was 50% and specificity 83%, and positive and negative predictive values were 53 and 82%, respectively. Bacterial prostatitis showed some features similar to carcinoma. Abundant BPH rendered cancer detection more difficult. No diagnostic criterion was clearly better than the others. Interobserver agreement on the MR diagnosis ranged from moderate to good. Conclusion: Without knowledge of accurate clinical data, MR seems to be too insensitive in detecting prostate cancer to be used as a primary diagnostic tool.

  20. Cancer-related identity and positive affect in survivors of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellizzi, Keith M; Blank, Thomas O

    2007-03-01

    Despite a shift in the cancer culture and language used to describe individuals diagnosed with this disease, the extent to which individuals with cancer adopt a particular cancer-related identity and the impact of these identities in relation to their well-being is virtually unknown. Using a cross-sectional study design and a metropolitan tumor registry, a mail questionnaire to examine post-treatment quality of life was sent to prostate cancer (PCa) survivors. The sample consisted of 490 PCa survivors, ranging in age from 49-88 (M = 69.7; SD = 7.8), one to eight years after diagnosis. The outcome measure used in these analyses was the PANAS to assess positive and negative affect. The most frequently reported cancer-related identity was "someone who has had PCa" (57%). The least reported self view was "victim" (1%). Twenty-six percent of men self-identified as "survivors" while 6% thought of themselves as "cancer conquerors." Only 9% self-identified as a "patient." Multivariate analyses, adjusted for potential confounders, show respondents who identified themselves as "survivors" or "cancer conquerors" reported significantly higher scores on positive affect than men who self-identified as "patients" (p < .001). Although the majority of respondents identified themselves as "someone who has had cancer," identifying as a "survivor" or "someone who has conquered cancer" appears to have adaptive value for positive mood. Those who perceive themselves as survivors of prostate cancer may derive some benefit in well-being associated with this self assessment.

  1. The Influence of Brightness on Functional Assessment by mfERG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, A T; Kiilgaard, J F; Smith, M

    2012-01-01

    To determine the effect of membrane brightness on multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs), we implanted poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) membranes in the subretinal space of 11 porcine eyes. We compared membranes with their native shiny white color with membranes that were stained with a blue dye...... (Brilliant Blue). Histological and electrophysiological evaluation of the overlying retina was carried out 6 weeks after implantation. Histologically, both white and blue membranes degraded in a spongiform manner leaving a disrupted outer retina with no preserved photoreceptor segments. Multifocal ERG...... when the adjacent photoreceptors are missing. Functional assessment with mfERG in scaffold implant studies should therefore be evaluated with care....

  2. Predictive value of different prostate-specific antigen-based markers in men with baseline total prostate-specific antigen <2.0 ng/mL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujizuka, Yuji; Ito, Kazuto; Oki, Ryo; Suzuki, Rie; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Koike, Hidekazu; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the predictive value of various molecular forms of prostate-specific antigen in men with baseline prostate-specific antigen baseline prostate-specific antigen level baseline prostate-specific antigen- and age-adjusted men who did not develop prostate cancer. Serum prostate-specific antigen, free prostate-specific antigen, and [-2] proenzyme prostate-specific antigen were measured at baseline and last screening visit. The predictive impact of baseline prostate-specific antigen- and [-2] proenzyme prostate-specific antigen-related indices on developing prostate cancer was investigated. The predictive impact of those indices at last screening visit and velocities from baseline to final screening on tumor aggressiveness were also investigated. The baseline free to total prostate-specific antigen ratio was a significant predictor of prostate cancer development. The odds ratio was 6.08 in the lowest quintile baseline free to total prostate-specific antigen ratio subgroup. No serum indices at diagnosis were associated with tumor aggressiveness. The Prostate Health Index velocity and [-2] proenzyme prostate-specific antigen/free prostate-specific antigen velocity significantly increased in patients with higher risk D'Amico risk groups and higher Gleason scores. Free to total prostate-specific antigen ratio in men with low baseline prostate-specific antigen levels seems to predict the risk of developing prostate cancer, and it could be useful for a more effective individualized screening system. Longitudinal changes in [-2] proenzyme prostate-specific antigen-related indices seem to correlate with tumor aggressiveness, and they could be used as prognostic tool before treatment and during active surveillance. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  3. A comparison of two patient friendly ERG electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidajat, R.; McLay, J.; Elder, M.; Burley, C.; Goode, D.; Morton, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The ideal electroretinography (ERG) electrode should provide reproducible waveforms, maximal amplitudes and minimal irritation of the patient's eyes. Contact lens electrodes (e.g. Burian-Allen, ERG jet) generate large amplitudes but are very uncomfortable and quite intimidating for the patient. Two other types, the gold foil and the H-K loop, provide a much more patient friendly alternative at the cost of somewhat reduced amplitudes. With the purchase of a new Nicolet Bravo electrodiagnostic system we had to select a suitable type of ERG electrode and establish the normal range for each ERG test with that electrode. It was decided to trial two electrodes, the gold foil (CH Electronics, UK) and the H-K loop (Avanta, Slovenia) before making the final choice. Seventeen normal volunteers, ranging in age from 14 to 56 years, were subjected to three standard measurements namely the flash photopic, white flash scotopic and transient pattern (PERG) ERG. Each test followed the guidelines set by the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV). Before starting the measurements both eyes were anaesthetised with Ophthetic and for the flash ERG's the pupils were dilated with 1% Tropicamide. Immediately after the measurements each subject was asked which electrode was most comfortable. As specified by ISCEV the amplitudes were measured between adjacent troughs and peaks. The mean and standard deviation of the flash ERG b wave and the PERG P 50 amplitudes for each electrode are shown m the accompanying table together with the mean and standard deviation of the ratios of the amplitudes (gold foil/H-K loop) from each subject. It can be seen that the amplitudes measured with the gold foil electrodes are approximately twice those from the H-K loop and that the fractional variation (standard deviation/mean) of the gold foil amplitudes is also lower. In addition nearly all the subjects (13/17) felt less discomfort with the gold foil electrodes, only

  4. Prostate specific antigen enhances the innate defence of prostatic epithelium against Escherichia coli infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, Claire L; Ali, Ased; Gross, Naomi; Pal, Deepali; Williamson, Stuart; Heer, Rakesh; Robson, Craig N; Pickard, Robert S; Hall, Judith

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated whether the increase in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) typically seen during male urinary tract infection (UTI) is incidental or reflects an innate defence mechanism of the prostate. The protective roles of the whey-acid-motif-4-disulphide core (WFDC) proteins, secretory leukoproteinase inhibitor (SLPI) and WFDC2, in the prostate were also examined. UTI recurrence was assessed retrospectively in men following initial UTI by patient interview. PSA, SLPI, and WFDC2 gene expression were assessed using biopsy samples. LNCaP and DU145 in vitro prostate cell models were utilized to assess the effects of an Escherichia coli challenge on PSA and WFDC gene expression, and bacterial invasion of the prostate epithelium. The effects of PSA on WFDC antimicrobial properties were studied using recombinant peptides and time-kill assays. Men presenting with PSA >4 ng/ml at initial UTI were less likely to have recurrent (r) UTI than those with PSA prostatic epithelium, and the PSA and SLPI proteins co-localized in vivo. Challenging LNCaP (PSA-positive) cells with E. coli increased PSA, SLPI, and WFDC2 gene expression (P prostate innate defences. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Theory, modeling, and integrated studies in the Arase (ERG) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Kanako; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Ebihara, Yusuke; Katoh, Yuto; Amano, Takanobu; Saito, Shinji; Shoji, Masafumi; Nakamizo, Aoi; Keika, Kunihiro; Hori, Tomoaki; Nakano, Shin'ya; Watanabe, Shigeto; Kamiya, Kei; Takahashi, Naoko; Omura, Yoshiharu; Nose, Masahito; Fok, Mei-Ching; Tanaka, Takashi; Ieda, Akimasa; Yoshikawa, Akimasa

    2018-02-01

    Understanding of underlying mechanisms of drastic variations of the near-Earth space (geospace) is one of the current focuses of the magnetospheric physics. The science target of the geospace research project Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) is to understand the geospace variations with a focus on the relativistic electron acceleration and loss processes. In order to achieve the goal, the ERG project consists of the three parts: the Arase (ERG) satellite, ground-based observations, and theory/modeling/integrated studies. The role of theory/modeling/integrated studies part is to promote relevant theoretical and simulation studies as well as integrated data analysis to combine different kinds of observations and modeling. Here we provide technical reports on simulation and empirical models related to the ERG project together with their roles in the integrated studies of dynamic geospace variations. The simulation and empirical models covered include the radial diffusion model of the radiation belt electrons, GEMSIS-RB and RBW models, CIMI model with global MHD simulation REPPU, GEMSIS-RC model, plasmasphere thermosphere model, self-consistent wave-particle interaction simulations (electron hybrid code and ion hybrid code), the ionospheric electric potential (GEMSIS-POT) model, and SuperDARN electric field models with data assimilation. ERG (Arase) science center tools to support integrated studies with various kinds of data are also briefly introduced.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Intrafractional prostate motion during online image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budiharto, Tom; Slagmolen, Pieter; Haustermans, Karin; Maes, Frederik; Junius, Sara; Verstraete, Jan; Oyen, Raymond; Hermans, Jeroen; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Intrafractional motion consists of two components: (1) the movement between the on-line repositioning procedure and the treatment start and (2) the movement during the treatment delivery. The goal of this study is to estimate this intrafractional movement of the prostate during prostate cancer radiotherapy. Material and methods: Twenty-seven patients with prostate cancer and implanted fiducials underwent a marker match procedure before a five-field IMRT treatment. For all fields, in-treatment images were obtained and then processed to enable automatic marker detection. Combining the subsequent projection images, five positions of each marker were determined using the shortest path approach. The residual set-up error (RSE) after kV-MV based prostate localization, the prostate position as a function of time during a radiotherapy session and the required margins to account for intrafractional motion were determined. Results: The mean RSE and standard deviation in the antero-posterior, cranio-caudal and left-right direction were 2.3 ± 1.5 mm, 0.2 ± 1.1 mm and -0.1 ± 1.1 mm, respectively. Almost all motions occurred in the posterior direction before the first treatment beam as the percentage of excursions >5 mm was reduced significantly when the RSE was not accounted for. The required margins for intrafractional motion increased with prolongation of the treatment. Application of a repositioning protocol after every beam could decrease the 1 cm margin from CTV to PTV by 2 mm. Conclusions: The RSE is the main contributor to intrafractional motion. This RSE after on-line prostate localization and patient repositioning in the posterior direction emphasizes the need to speed up the marker match procedure. Also, a prostate IMRT treatment should be administered as fast as possible, to ensure that the pre-treatment repositioning efforts are not erased by intrafractional prostate motion. This warrants an optimized workflow with the use of faster treatment

  7. An automatic CT-guided adaptive radiation therapy technique by online modification of multileaf collimator leaf positions for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, Laurence E.; Dong Lei; Lee, Andrew K.; Cheung, Rex; Bonnen, Mark D.; O'Daniel, Jennifer; Wang He; Mohan, Radhe; Kuban, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To propose and evaluate online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) using in-room computed tomography (CT) imaging that detects changes in the target position and shape of the prostate and seminal vesicles (SVs) and then automatically modifies the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf pairs in a slice-by-slice fashion. Methods and materials: For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using a coplanar beam arrangement, each MLC leaf pair projects onto a specific anatomic slice. The proposed strategy assumes that shape deformation is a function of only the superior-inferior (SI) position. That is, there is no shape change within a CT slice, but each slice can be displaced in the anteroposterior (AP) or right-left (RL) direction relative to adjacent slices. First, global shifts (in SI, AP, and RL directions) were calculated by three-dimensional (3D) registration of the bulk of the prostate in the treatment planning CT images with the daily CT images taken immediately before treatment. Local shifts in the AP direction were then found using slice-by-slice registration, in which the CT slices were individually registered. The translational shift within a slice could then be projected to a translational shift in the position of the corresponding MLC leaf pair for each treatment segment for each gantry angle. Global shifts in the SI direction were accounted for by moving the open portal superiorly or inferiorly by an integral number of leaf pairs. The proposed slice-by-slice registration technique was tested by using daily CT images from 46 CT image sets (23 each from 2 patients) taken before the standard delivery of IMRT for prostate cancer. A dosimetric evaluation was carried out by using an 8-field IMRT plan. Results: The shifts and shape change of the prostate and SVs could be separated into 3D global shifts in the RL, AP, and SI directions, plus local shifts in the AP direction, which were different for each CT slice. The MLC leaf positions were successfully

  8. Transmembrane prostatic acid phosphatase (TMPAP interacts with snapin and deficient mice develop prostate adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana B Quintero

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying prostate carcinogenesis are poorly understood. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, a prostatic epithelial secretion marker, has been linked to prostate cancer since the 1930's. However, the contribution of PAP to the disease remains controversial. We have previously cloned and described two isoforms of this protein, a secretory (sPAP and a transmembrane type-I (TMPAP. The goal in this work was to understand the physiological function of TMPAP in the prostate. We conducted histological, ultra-structural and genome-wide analyses of the prostate of our PAP-deficient mouse model (PAP(-/- with C57BL/6J background. The PAP(-/- mouse prostate showed the development of slow-growing non-metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. In order to find out the mechanism behind, we identified PAP-interacting proteins byyeast two-hybrid assays and a clear result was obtained for the interaction of PAP with snapin, a SNARE-associated protein which binds Snap25 facilitating the vesicular membrane fusion process. We confirmed this interaction by co-localization studies in TMPAP-transfected LNCaP cells (TMPAP/LNCaP cells and in vivo FRET analyses in transient transfected LNCaP cells. The differential gene expression analyses revealed the dysregulation of the same genes known to be related to synaptic vesicular traffic. Both TMPAP and snapin were detected in isolated exosomes. Our results suggest that TMPAP is involved in endo-/exocytosis and disturbed vesicular traffic is a hallmark of prostate adenocarcinoma.

  9. Transmembrane Prostatic Acid Phosphatase (TMPAP) Interacts with Snapin and Deficient Mice Develop Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Ileana B.; Herrala, Annakaisa M.; Araujo, César L.; Pulkka, Anitta E.; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Ovaska, Kristian; Pryazhnikov, Evgeny; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Ruuth, Maija K.; Soini, Ylermi; Sormunen, Raija T.; Khirug, Leonard; Vihko, Pirkko T.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying prostate carcinogenesis are poorly understood. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), a prostatic epithelial secretion marker, has been linked to prostate cancer since the 1930's. However, the contribution of PAP to the disease remains controversial. We have previously cloned and described two isoforms of this protein, a secretory (sPAP) and a transmembrane type-I (TMPAP). The goal in this work was to understand the physiological function of TMPAP in the prostate. We conducted histological, ultra-structural and genome-wide analyses of the prostate of our PAP-deficient mouse model (PAP−/−) with C57BL/6J background. The PAP−/− mouse prostate showed the development of slow-growing non-metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. In order to find out the mechanism behind, we identified PAP-interacting proteins byyeast two-hybrid assays and a clear result was obtained for the interaction of PAP with snapin, a SNARE-associated protein which binds Snap25 facilitating the vesicular membrane fusion process. We confirmed this interaction by co-localization studies in TMPAP-transfected LNCaP cells (TMPAP/LNCaP cells) and in vivo FRET analyses in transient transfected LNCaP cells. The differential gene expression analyses revealed the dysregulation of the same genes known to be related to synaptic vesicular traffic. Both TMPAP and snapin were detected in isolated exosomes. Our results suggest that TMPAP is involved in endo-/exocytosis and disturbed vesicular traffic is a hallmark of prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:24039861

  10. Interactions between charged residues in the transmembrane segments of the voltage-sensing domain in the hERG channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Liu, J; Jiang, M; Wu, D-M; Sonawane, K; Guy, H R; Tseng, G-N

    2005-10-01

    Studies on voltage-gated K channels such as Shaker have shown that positive charges in the voltage-sensor (S4) can form salt bridges with negative charges in the surrounding transmembrane segments in a state-dependent manner, and different charge pairings can stabilize the channels in closed or open states. The goal of this study is to identify such charge interactions in the hERG channel. This knowledge can provide constraints on the spatial relationship among transmembrane segments in the channel's voltage-sensing domain, which are necessary for modeling its structure. We first study the effects of reversing S4's positive charges on channel activation. Reversing positive charges at the outer (K525D) and inner (K538D) ends of S4 markedly accelerates hERG activation, whereas reversing the 4 positive charges in between either has no effect or slows activation. We then use the 'mutant cycle analysis' to test whether D456 (outer end of S2) and D411 (inner end of S1) can pair with K525 and K538, respectively. Other positive charges predicted to be able, or unable, to interact with D456 or D411 are also included in the analysis. The results are consistent with predictions based on the distribution of these charged residues, and confirm that there is functional coupling between D456 and K525 and between D411 and K538.

  11. Transperineal in vivo fluence-rate dosimetry in the canine prostate during SnET2-mediated PDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilge, Lothar; Pomerleau-Dalcourt, Natalie; Douplik, Alexander; Selman, Steven H; Keck, Rick W; Szkudlarek, Maria; Pestka, Maciej; Jankun, Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    Advances in photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment for prostate cancer can be achieved either by improving selectivity of the photosensitizer towards prostate gland tissue or improving the dosimetry by means of individualized treatment planning using currently available photosensitizers. The latter approach requires the ability to measure, among other parameters, the fluence rate at different positions within the prostate and the ability to derive the tissue optical properties. Here fibre optic probes are presented capable of measuring the fluence rate throughout large tissue volumes and a method to derive the tissue optical properties for different volumes of the prostate. The responsivity of the sensors is sufficient to detect a fluence rate of 0.1 mW cm -2 . The effective attenuation coefficient in the canine prostate at 660 nm is higher at the capsule (2.15 ± 0.19 cm -1 ) than in proximity of the urethra (1.84 ± 0.36 cm -1 ). Significant spatial and temporal intra- and inter-canine variability in the tissue optical properties was noted, highlighting the need for individualized monitoring of the fluence rate for improved dosimetry

  12. Abhydrolase domain containing 2, an androgen target gene, promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obinata, Daisuke; Takada, Shogo; Takayama, Ken-ichi; Urano, Tomohiko; Ito, Akiko; Ashikari, Daisaku; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Yamada, Yuta; Murata, Taro; Kumagai, Jinpei; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Homma, Yukio; Takahashi, Satoru; Inoue, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a key role in the development of prostate cancer. AR signalling mediates the expression of androgen-responsive genes, which are involved in prostate cancer development and progression. Our previous chromatin immunoprecipitation study showed that the region of abhydrolase domain containing 2 (ABHD2) includes a functional androgen receptor binding site. In this study, we demonstrated that ABHD2 is a novel androgen-responsive gene that is overexpressed in human prostate cancer tissues. The expression levels of ABHD2 in androgen-sensitive cells were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western-blot analyses. LNCaP and VCaP cells with ABHD2 overexpression or short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown were used for functional analyses. ABHD2 expression was examined in clinical samples of prostate cancer by immunohistochemistry. We showed that ABHD2 expression is increased by androgen in LNCaP and VCaP cells. This androgen-induced ABHD2 expression was diminished by bicalutamide. While stable expression of ABHD2 affected the enhancement of LNCaP cell proliferation and migration, siRNA-mediated ABHD2 knockdown suppressed cell proliferation and migration. In addition, the siRNA treatment significantly repressed the tumour growth derived from LNCaP cells in athymic mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of ABHD2 expression in tumour specimens showed a positive correlation of ABHD2 immunoreactivity with high Gleason score and pathological N stage. Moreover, patients with high immunoreactivity of ABHD2 showed low cancer-specific survival rates and a resistance to docetaxel-based chemotherapy. ABHD2 is a novel androgen-regulated gene that can promote prostate cancer growth and resistance to chemotherapy, and is a novel target for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. First postoperative PSA is associated with outcomes in patients with node positive prostate cancer: Results from the SEARCH database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michelle L; Howard, Lauren E; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Amling, Christopher L; Freedland, Stephen J; Kane, Christopher J

    2018-05-01

    To analyze factors associated with metastases, prostate cancer-specific mortality, and all-cause mortality in pN1 patients. We analyzed 3,642 radical prostatectomy patients within the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database. Pathologic Gleason grade, number of lymph nodes (LN) removed, and first postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (PSA. Of 3,642 patients, 124 (3.4%) had pN1. There were 71 (60%) patients with 1 positive LN, 32 (27%) with 2 positive LNs, and 15 (13%) with ≥3. Among men with pN1, first postoperative PSA wasPSA ≥0.2 ng/ml (P = 0.005) were associated with metastases. First postoperative PSA ≥0.2ng/ml was associated with metastasis on multivariable analysis (P = 0.046). Log-rank analysis revealed a more favorable metastases-free survival in patients with a first postoperative PSAPSAPSA ≥0.2ng/ml were more likely to develop metastases. First postoperative PSA may be useful in identifying pN1 patients who harbor distant disease and aid in secondary treatment decisions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The results of transrectal prostate biopsy in patients with low levels of prostate specific antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ali Sancaktutar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the resultsof prostate biopsy of patients who had the prostatespecificantigen (PSA levels below 4 ng/ml.Material and methods: The medical records of 63 patientswho underwent transrectal prostate biopsy, betweenJanuary 2005 and December 2011, due to suspicionof prostate cancer with the PSA levels under 4 ng/mlwere retrospectively reviewed.Results: Transrectal Prostate biopsy was performed to63 patients. Prostate cancer was detected in 12 (19%patients. The mean value of PSA was 2.5 ng/ml. TheGleason score of Prostate cancer patients was 6,8 (5-7and the number of positive cores were 3.Conclusions: The rate of prostate cancer was found as19% in patients with levels of PSA under 4 ng/ml and thisratio is compatible with the results of previous reports.

  15. Bag1 Co-chaperone Promotes TRC8 E3 Ligase-dependent Degradation of Misfolded Human Ether a Go-Go-related Gene (hERG) Potassium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantouche, Christine; Williamson, Brittany; Valinsky, William C; Solomon, Joshua; Shrier, Alvin; Young, Jason C

    2017-02-10

    Cardiac long QT syndrome type 2 is caused by mutations in the human ether a go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel, many of which cause misfolding and degradation at the endoplasmic reticulum instead of normal trafficking to the cell surface. The Hsc70/Hsp70 chaperones assist the folding of the hERG cytosolic domains. Here, we demonstrate that the Hsp70 nucleotide exchange factor Bag1 promotes hERG degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system at the endoplasmic reticulum to regulate hERG levels and channel activity. Dissociation of hERG complexes containing Hsp70 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP requires the interaction of Bag1 with Hsp70, but this does not involve the Bag1 ubiquitin-like domain. The interaction with Bag1 then shifts hERG degradation to the membrane-anchored E3 ligase TRC8 and its E2-conjugating enzyme Ube2g2, as determined by siRNA screening. TRC8 interacts through the transmembrane region with hERG and decreases hERG functional expression. TRC8 also mediates degradation of the misfolded hERG-G601S disease mutant, but pharmacological stabilization of the mutant structure prevents degradation. Our results identify TRC8 as a previously unknown Hsp70-independent quality control E3 ligase for hERG. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Magnetic resonance assessment of prostate localization variability in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeirs, Geert M.; Meerleer, Gert O. de; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Neve, Wilfried J. de

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To measure prostate motion with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Seven patients with prostate carcinoma were scanned supine on a 1.5-Tesla MRI system with weekly pretreatment and on-treatment HASTE T2-weighted images in 3 orthogonal planes. The bladder and rectal volumes and position of the prostatic midpoint (PMP) and margins relative to the bony pelvis were measured. Results: All pretreatment positions were at the mean position as computed from the on-treatment scans in each patient. The PMP variability (given as 1 SD) in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and right-left (RL) directions was 2.6, 2.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The largest variabilities occurred at the posterior (3.2 mm), superior (2.6 mm), and inferior (2.6 mm) margins. A strong correlation was found between large rectal volume (>95th percentile) and anterior PMP displacement. A weak correlation was found between bladder volume and superior PMP displacement. Conclusions: All pretreatment positions were representative of the subsequent on-treatment positions. A clinical target volume (CTV) expansion of 5.3 mm in any direction was sufficient to ascertain a 95% coverage of the CTV within the planning target volume (PTV), provided that a rectal suppository is administered to avoid rectal overdistension and that the patient has a comfortably filled bladder (<300 mL)

  17. Rab11-dependent Recycling of the Human Ether-a-go-go-related Gene (hERG) Channel*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jeffery; Guo, Jun; Yang, Tonghua; Li, Wentao; Lamothe, Shawn M.; Kang, Yudi; Szendrey, John A.; Zhang, Shetuan

    2015-01-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) encodes the pore-forming subunit of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium channel (IKr). A reduction in the hERG current causes long QT syndrome, which predisposes affected individuals to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. We reported previously that hERG channels in the plasma membrane undergo vigorous internalization under low K+ conditions. In the present study, we addressed whether hERG internalization occurs under normal K+ conditions and whether/how internalized channels are recycled back to the plasma membrane. Using patch clamp, Western blot, and confocal imaging analyses, we demonstrated that internalized hERG channels can effectively recycle back to the plasma membrane. Low K+-enhanced hERG internalization is accompanied by an increased rate of hERG recovery in the plasma membrane upon reculture following proteinase K-mediated clearance of cell-surface proteins. The increased recovery rate is not due to enhanced protein synthesis, as hERG mRNA expression was not altered by low K+ exposure, and the increased recovery was observed in the presence of the protein biosynthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. GTPase Rab11, but not Rab4, is involved in the recycling of hERG channels. Interfering with Rab11 function not only delayed hERG recovery in cells after exposure to low K+ medium but also decreased hERG expression and function in cells under normal culture conditions. We concluded that the recycling pathway plays an important role in the homeostasis of plasma membrane-bound hERG channels. PMID:26152716

  18. Prostate positioning using cone-beam computer tomography based on manual soft-tissue registration. Interobserver agreement between radiation oncologists and therapists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Pobbiati, C.; Fanti, P. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Santoro, L. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milan (Italy); Fodor, C.; Zerini, D. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Milan (Italy); Vigorito, S. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Baroni, G. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Electronics Information and Bioengineering, Milan (Italy); De Cobelli, O. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Urology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Orecchia, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Milan (Italy); National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) Foundation, Pavia (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    To check the interobserver agreement between radiation oncologists and therapists (RTT) using an on- and off-line cone-beam computer tomography (CBCT) protocol for setup verification in the radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The CBCT data from six prostate cancer patients treated with hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were independently reviewed off-line by four observers (one radiation oncologist, one junior and two senior RTTs) and benchmarked with on-line CBCT positioning performed by a radiation oncologist immediately prior to treatment. CBCT positioning was based on manual soft-tissue registration. Agreement between observers was evaluated using weighted Cohen's kappa statistics. In total, 152 CBCT-based prostate positioning procedures were reviewed by each observer. The mean (± standard deviation) of the differences between off- and on-line CBCT-simCT registration translations along the three directions (antero-posterior, latero-lateral and cranio-caudal) and rotation around the antero-posterior axis were - 0.7 (3.6) mm, 1.9 (2.7) mm, 0.9 (3.6) mm and - 1.8 (5.0) degrees, respectively. Satisfactory interobserver agreement was found, being substantial (weighted kappa > 0.6) in 10 of 16 comparisons and moderate (0.41-0.60) in the remaining six comparisons. CBCT interpretation performed by RTTs is comparable to that of radiation oncologists. Our study might be helpful in the quality assurance of radiotherapy and the optimization of competencies. Further investigation should include larger sample sizes, a greater number of observers and validated methodology in order to assess interobserver variability and its impact on high-precision prostate cancer IGRT. In the future, it should enable the wider implementation of complex and evolving radiotherapy technologies. (orig.)

  19. MiR-17-5p impairs trafficking of H-ERG K+ channel protein by targeting multiple er stress-related chaperones during chronic oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate if microRNAs (miRNAs play a role in regulating h-ERG trafficking in the setting of chronic oxidative stress as a common deleterious factor for many cardiac disorders. METHODS: We treated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and HEK293 cells with stable expression of h-ERG with H2O2 for 12 h and 48 h. Expression of miR-17-5p seed miRNAs was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Protein levels of chaperones and h-ERG trafficking were measured by Western blot analysis. Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to study miRNA and target interactions. Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were employed to record h-ERG K(+ current. RESULTS: H-ERG trafficking was impaired by H2O2 after 48 h treatment, accompanied by reciprocal changes of expression between miR-17-5p seed miRNAs and several chaperones (Hsp70, Hsc70, CANX, and Golga2, with the former upregulated and the latter downregulated. We established these chaperones as targets for miR-17-5p. Application miR-17-5p inhibitor rescued H2O2-induced impairment of h-ERG trafficking. Upregulation of endogenous by H2O2 or forced miR-17-5p expression either reduced h-ERG current. Sequestration of AP1 by its decoy molecule eliminated the upregulation of miR-17-5p, and ameliorated impairment of h-ERG trafficking. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, deregulation of the miR-17-5p seed family miRNAs can cause severe impairment of h-ERG trafficking through targeting multiple ER stress-related chaperones, and activation of AP1 likely accounts for the deleterious upregulation of these miRNAs, in the setting of prolonged duration of oxidative stress. These findings revealed the role of miRNAs in h-ERG trafficking, which may contribute to the cardiac electrical disturbances associated with oxidative stress.

  20. MiR-17-5p impairs trafficking of H-ERG K+ channel protein by targeting multiple er stress-related chaperones during chronic oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Hu, Weina; Lei, Mingming; Wang, Yong; Yan, Bing; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ren; Jin, Yuanzhe

    2013-01-01

    To investigate if microRNAs (miRNAs) play a role in regulating h-ERG trafficking in the setting of chronic oxidative stress as a common deleterious factor for many cardiac disorders. We treated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and HEK293 cells with stable expression of h-ERG with H2O2 for 12 h and 48 h. Expression of miR-17-5p seed miRNAs was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Protein levels of chaperones and h-ERG trafficking were measured by Western blot analysis. Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to study miRNA and target interactions. Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were employed to record h-ERG K(+) current. H-ERG trafficking was impaired by H2O2 after 48 h treatment, accompanied by reciprocal changes of expression between miR-17-5p seed miRNAs and several chaperones (Hsp70, Hsc70, CANX, and Golga2), with the former upregulated and the latter downregulated. We established these chaperones as targets for miR-17-5p. Application miR-17-5p inhibitor rescued H2O2-induced impairment of h-ERG trafficking. Upregulation of endogenous by H2O2 or forced miR-17-5p expression either reduced h-ERG current. Sequestration of AP1 by its decoy molecule eliminated the upregulation of miR-17-5p, and ameliorated impairment of h-ERG trafficking. Collectively, deregulation of the miR-17-5p seed family miRNAs can cause severe impairment of h-ERG trafficking through targeting multiple ER stress-related chaperones, and activation of AP1 likely accounts for the deleterious upregulation of these miRNAs, in the setting of prolonged duration of oxidative stress. These findings revealed the role of miRNAs in h-ERG trafficking, which may contribute to the cardiac electrical disturbances associated with oxidative stress.

  1. The study of mucin histochemistry in benign and malignant lesions of prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durgaprasad N Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of mucin stains in differentiating benign and malignant lesions of prostate. Materials and Methods: Sections were obtained from archival paraffin blocks which included randomly selected 70 cases of benign hyperplasia and 30 cases of carcinoma prostate. After confirming the diagnosis, sections were stained for Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS to study neutral mucins, Alcian blue (2.5 pH to study acidic mucins and combined Alcian blue - PAS to study the mucin character. Results: Benign hyperplasia of prostate showed positivity for neutral mucins (98.57% but not for acidic mucins, whereas prostatic carcinomas showed positivity for acidic mucins (46.66% in addition to the positivity for neutral mucins (56.66%. All the cases of low grade prostatic carcinomas showed positivity for acidic mucins but none of the high grade carcinomas showed positivity for the same. Conclusion: Positivity for acidic mucins with Alcian Blue (2.5 pH technique can be used to differentiate well differentiated adenocarcinomas of prostate from benign hyperplasia especially in those cases where prostatic lesion is a questionable malignancy either because it is so well differentiated histologically or have altered architecture so as to make it cytologically un diagnosable (P = 0.001.

  2. Dosimetric impact of systematic MLC positional errors on step and shoot IMRT for prostate cancer: a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ung, N.M.; Wee, L.; Harper, C.S.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The positional accuracy of multi leaf collimators (MLC) is crucial in ensuring precise delivery of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this planning study was to investigate the dosimetric impact of systematic MLC errors on step and shoot IMRT of prostate cancer. Twelve MLC leaf banks perturbations were introduced to six prostate IMRT treatment plans to simulate MLC systematic errors. Dose volume histograms (OYHs) were generated for the extraction of dose endpoint parameters. Plans were evaluated in terms of changes to the defined endpoint dose parameters, conformity index (CI) and healthy tissue avoidance (HTA) to planning target volume (PTY), rectum and bladder. Negative perturbations of MLC had been found to produce greater changes to endpoint dose parameters than positive perturbations of MLC (p < 0.05). Negative and positive synchronized MLC perturbations of I mm resulted in median changes of -2.32 and 1.78%, respectively to 095% of PTY whereas asynchronized MLC perturbations of the same direction and magnitude resulted in median changes of 1.18 and 0.90%, respectively. Doses to rectum were generally more sensitive to systematic MLC errors compared to bladder. Synchronized MLC perturbations of I mm resulted in median changes of endpoint dose parameters to both rectum and bladder from about I to 3%. Maximum reduction of -4.44 and -7.29% were recorded for CI and HTA, respectively, due to synchronized MLC perturbation of I mm. In summary, MLC errors resulted in measurable amount of dose changes to PTY and surrounding critical structures in prostate LMRT. (author)

  3. Evaluation of electrode position in deep brain stimulation by image fusion (MRI and CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnaure, I.; Lovblad, K.O.; Vargas, M.I. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Pollak, P.; Horvath, J.; Boex, C.; Burkhard, P. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Geneva (Switzerland); Momjian, S. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Geneva (Switzerland); Remuinan, J. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    Imaging has an essential role in the evaluation of correct positioning of electrodes implanted for deep brain stimulation (DBS). Although MRI offers superior anatomic visualization of target sites, there are safety concerns in patients with implanted material; imaging guidelines are inconsistent and vary. The fusion of postoperative CT with preoperative MRI images can be an alternative for the assessment of electrode positioning. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of measurements realized on fused images (acquired without a stereotactic frame) using a manufacturer-provided software. Data from 23 Parkinson's disease patients who underwent bilateral electrode placement for subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS were acquired. Preoperative high-resolution T2-weighted sequences at 3 T, and postoperative CT series were fused using a commercially available software. Electrode tip position was measured on the obtained images in three directions (in relation to the midline, the AC-PC line and an AC-PC line orthogonal, respectively) and assessed in relation to measures realized on postoperative 3D T1 images acquired at 1.5 T. Mean differences between measures carried out on fused images and on postoperative MRI lay between 0.17 and 0.97 mm. Fusion of CT and MRI images provides a safe and fast technique for postoperative assessment of electrode position in DBS. (orig.)

  4. Light Reflectance Spectroscopy to Detect Positive Surgical Margins on Prostate Cancer Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Monica S C; Lay, Aaron H; Wang, Xinlong; Kapur, Payal; Ozayar, Asim; Sayah, Maryam; Zeng, Li; Liu, Hanli; Roehrborn, Claus G; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-01

    Intraoperative frozen section analysis is not routinely performed to determine positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy due to time requirements and unproven clinical usefulness. Light reflectance spectroscopy, which measures light intensity reflected or backscattered from tissues, can be applied to differentiate malignant from benign tissue. We used a novel light reflectance spectroscopy probe to evaluate positive surgical margins on ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens and correlate its findings with pathological examination. Patients with intermediate to high risk disease undergoing radical prostatectomy were enrolled. Light reflectance spectroscopy was performed on suspected malignant and benign prostate capsule immediately following organ extraction. Each light reflectance spectroscopy at 530 to 830 nm was analyzed and correlated with pathological results. A regression model and forward sequential selection algorithm were developed for optimal feature selection. Eighty percent of light reflectance spectroscopy data were selected to train a logistic regression model, which was evaluated by the remaining 20% data. This was repeated 5 times to calculate averaged sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Light reflectance spectroscopy analysis was performed on 17 ex vivo prostate specimens, on which a total of 11 histologically positive and 22 negative surgical margins were measured. Two select features from 700 to 830 nm were identified as unique to malignant tissue. Cross-validation when performing the predictive model showed that the optical probe predicted positive surgical margins with 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 86% accuracy and an AUC of 0.95. Light reflectance spectroscopy can identify positive surgical margins accurately in fresh ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens. Further study is required to determine whether such analysis may be used in real time to improve surgical decision making and decrease positive surgical margin rates

  5. The value of prostate specific antigen and prostate specific antigen density in the diagnosis ad treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Guoying; Yu Mingqi; Feng Xinli

    2001-01-01

    To study the clinical value of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and prostate specific antigen density (PSAD), the PSA levels of pre-and post-treatment were measured in 28 cases with prostate cancer (Pca) and 80 patients with being Prostate hyperplasia (BPH). PASD was measured in 18 cases Pca and 50 cases BPH of them. The results suggest that the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of diagnosis for Pca were 85.7%, 80.0% and 81.4%, respectively. The false positive rate was 20%. PSAD is superior to PSA in distinguishing prostate cancer from benign prostate hyperplasia. The false positive rate was only 6%. But in the clinical application, the authors should combine PASD with other materials. The regular observation of post therapeutic PSA is of great value to the earlier discovery of local recurrence and metastasis as well as the judgement of curative effect and prognosis

  6. A meta-analysis of use of Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System Version 2 (PI-RADS V2) with multiparametric MR imaging for the detection of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Sipan [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, Department of MRI, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Tang, Min; Lei, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoling [Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, Department of MRI, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Huan, Yi [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2017-12-15

    This meta-analysis was undertaken to review the diagnostic accuracy of PI-RADS V2 for prostate cancer (PCa) detection with multiparametric MR (mp-MR). A comprehensive literature search of electronic databases was performed by two observers independently. Inclusion criteria were original research using the PI-RADS V2 system in reporting prostate MRI. The methodological quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool. Data necessary to complete 2 x 2 contingency tables were obtained from the included studies. Thirteen studies (2,049 patients) were analysed. This is an initial meta-analysis of PI-RADs V2 and the overall diagnostic accuracy in diagnosing PCa was as follows: pooled sensitivity, 0.85 (0.78-0.91); pooled specificity, 0.71 (0.60-0.80); pooled positive likelihood ratio (LR+), 2.92 (2.09-4.09); pooled negative likelihood ratio (LR-), 0.21 (0.14-0.31); pooled diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), 14.08 (7.93-25.01), respectively. Positive predictive values ranged from 0.54 to 0.97 and negative predictive values ranged from 0.26 to 0.92. Currently available evidence indicates that PI-RADS V2 appears to have good diagnostic accuracy in patients with PCa lesions with high sensitivity and moderate specificity. However, no recommendation regarding the best threshold can be provided because of heterogeneity. (orig.)

  7. The role of serum prostate specific antigen assayed by TRFIA in diagnosis of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Yongmei; Zhang Jinshan; Li Min

    2002-01-01

    The authors evaluate the diagnostic value of serum free prostate specific antigen (F-PSA), total-PSA(T-PSA) and free/total (F/T) PSA ratio in differentiation between benign and malignant prostatic diseases. Serum samples were measured by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TRFIA), there were 86 patients whose T-PSA levels were limited within 2-20 ng/mL, from the results of prostate biopsies after operation, the patients were classified into two groups: the group with prostate hyperplasia (68 patients) and the group with prostate cancer (18 patients). The serum F-PSA and T-PSA of the two groups were analysed and compared, and the F/T PSA ratio was calculated. Results were: 1) the means of F-PSA and T-PSA were not significantly different between patients with prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and with prostate cancer (P>0.05), but the mean of F/T PSA ratio for prostate cancer was significantly lower than that for BPH (P<0.001); 2) sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value for prostate cancer detection at a cutoff value of 0.18 for the F/T PSA ratio were 85%, 72.5% and 43.6%, respectively. Conclusion is the F/T PSA ratio may be used in differentiation prostate cancer from BPH, and when T-PSA level is within the range of 2-20 ng/mL, selecting 0.18 as the cutoff value has great clinical value

  8. Prostate biopsy with image fusion: system validation and clinical results (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruecker, J.; Kadoury, S.; Xu, S.; Turkbey, B.; Choyke, P.; Pinto, P.; Wood, B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Prostate cancer (PCA) is the second most frequent cause of cancer-related death in men in the United States and Europe. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided systematic prostate biopsy is the standard of care for detection and diagnosis of PCA. However, due to inadequate visualization of PCA

  9. Multi-sensor fusion with interacting multiple model filter for improved aircraft position accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Taehwan; Lee, Changho; Choi, Sangbang

    2013-03-27

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has decided to adopt Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) as the 21st century standard for navigation. Accordingly, ICAO members have provided an impetus to develop related technology and build sufficient infrastructure. For aviation surveillance with CNS/ATM, Ground-Based Augmentation System (GBAS), Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), multilateration (MLAT) and wide-area multilateration (WAM) systems are being established. These sensors can track aircraft positions more accurately than existing radar and can compensate for the blind spots in aircraft surveillance. In this paper, we applied a novel sensor fusion method with Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) filter to GBAS, ADS-B, MLAT, and WAM data in order to improve the reliability of the aircraft position. Results of performance analysis show that the position accuracy is improved by the proposed sensor fusion method with the IMM filter.

  10. Prostate specific antigen velocity does not aid prostate cancer detection in men with prior negative biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J; Wolters, Tineke; Savage, Caroline J; Cronin, Angel M; O'Brien, M Frank; Roobol, Monique J; Aus, Gunnar; Scardino, Peter T; Hugosson, Jonas; Schröder, Fritz H; Lilja, Hans

    2010-09-01

    Prostate specific antigen velocity has been proposed as a marker to aid in prostate cancer detection. We determined whether prostate specific antigen velocity could predict repeat biopsy results in men with persistently increased prostate specific antigen after initial negative biopsy. We identified 1,837 men who participated in the Göteborg or Rotterdam section of the European Randomized Screening study of Prostate Cancer and who underwent 1 or more subsequent prostate biopsies after an initial negative finding. We evaluated whether prostate specific antigen velocity improved predictive accuracy beyond that of prostate specific antigen alone. Of the 2,579 repeat biopsies 363 (14%) were positive for prostate cancer, of which 44 (1.7%) were high grade (Gleason score 7 or greater). Prostate specific antigen velocity was statistically associated with cancer risk but had low predictive accuracy (AUC 0.55, p <0.001). There was some evidence that prostate specific antigen velocity improved AUC compared to prostate specific antigen for high grade cancer. However, the small increase in risk associated with high prostate specific antigen velocity (from 1.7% to 2.8% as velocity increased from 0 to 1 ng/ml per year) had questionable clinical relevance. Men with prior negative biopsy are at lower risk for prostate cancer at subsequent biopsies with high grade disease particularly rare. We found little evidence to support prostate specific antigen velocity to aid in decisions about repeat biopsy for prostate cancer. 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of intrafractional prostate motion using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mah, Dennis; Freedman, Gary; Milestone, Bart; Hanlon, Alexandra; Palacio, Elizabeth; Richardson, Theresa; Movsas, Benjamin; Mitra, Raj; Horwitz, Eric; Hanks, Gerald E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the three-dimensional intrafractional prostate motion over typical treatment time intervals with cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine MRI) studies. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients with prostate cancer were scanned supine in an alpha cradle cast using cine MRI. Twenty sequential slices were acquired in the sagittal and axial planes through the center of the prostate. Each scan took ∼9 min. The posterior, lateral, and superior edges of the prostate were tracked on each frame relative to the initial prostate position, and the size and duration of each displacement was recorded. Results: The prostate displacements were (mean ± SD): 0.2 ± 2.9 mm, 0.0 ± 3.4 mm, and 0.0 ± 1.5 mm in the anterior-posterior, superior-inferior, and medial-lateral dimensions respectively. The prostate motion appeared to have been driven by peristalsis in the rectum. Large displacements of the prostate (up to 1.2 cm) moved the prostate both anteriorly and superiorly and in some cases compressed the organ. For such motions, the prostate did not stay displaced, but moved back to its original position. To account for the dosimetric consequences of the motion, we also calculated the time-averaged displacement to be ∼1 mm. Conclusions: Cine MRI can be used to measure intrafractional prostate motion. Although intrafractional prostate motions occur, their effects are negligible compared to interfractional motion and setup error. No adjustment in margin is necessary for three-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy

  12. The Analysis of A Frequent TMPRSS3 Allele Containing P.V116M and P.V291L in A Cis Configuration among Deaf Koreans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah Reum Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We performed targeted re-sequencing to identify the genetic etiology of early-onset postlingual deafness and encountered a frequent TMPRSS3 allele harboring two variants in a cis configuration. We aimed to evaluate the pathogenicity of the allele. Among 88 cochlear implantees with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss, subjects with GJB2 and SLC26A4 mutations were excluded. Thirty-one probands manifesting early-onset postlingual deafness were sorted. Through targeted re-sequencing, we detected two families with a TMPRSS3 mutant allele containing p.V116M and p.V291L in a cis configuration, p.[p.V116M; p.V291L]. A minor allele frequency was calculated and proteolytic activity was measured. A p.[p.V116M; p.V291L] allele demonstrated a significantly higher frequency compared to normal controls and merited attention due to its high frequency (4.84%, 3/62. The first family showed a novel deleterious splice site variant—c.783-1G>A—in a trans allele, while the other showed homozygosity. The progression to deafness was noted within the first decade, suggesting DFNB10. The proteolytic activity was significantly reduced, confirming the severe pathogenicity. This frequent mutant allele significantly contributes to early-onset postlingual deafness in Koreans. For clinical implication and proper auditory rehabilitation, it is important to pay attention to this allele with a severe pathogenic potential.

  13. Molecular mechanisms underlying the pilsicainide-induced stabilization of hERG proteins in transfected mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Onohara, MD

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Pilsicainide penetrates the plasma membrane, stabilizes WT-hERG proteins by acting as a chemical chaperone, and enhances WT-hERG channel currents. This mechanism could also be applicable to modulations of certain mutant-hERG proteins.

  14. Endocytosis of hERG Is Clathrin-Independent and Involves Arf6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuarab, Nada; Smith, Andrew J.; Hardy, Matthew E. L.; Elliott, David J. S.; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2013-01-01

    The hERG potassium channel is critical for repolarisation of the cardiac action potential. Reduced expression of hERG at the plasma membrane, whether caused by hereditary mutations or drugs, results in long QT syndrome and increases the risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Thus, it is of fundamental importance to understand how the density of this channel at the plasma membrane is regulated. We used antibodies to an extracellular native or engineered epitope, in conjunction with immunofluorescence and ELISA, to investigate the mechanism of hERG endocytosis in recombinant cells and validated the findings in rat neonatal cardiac myocytes. The data reveal that this channel undergoes rapid internalisation, which is inhibited by neither dynasore, an inhibitor of dynamin, nor a dominant negative construct of Rab5a, into endosomes that are largely devoid of the transferrin receptor. These results support a clathrin-independent mechanism of endocytosis and exclude involvement of dynamin-dependent caveolin and RhoA mechanisms. In agreement, internalised hERG displayed marked overlap with glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored GFP, a clathrin-independent cargo. Endocytosis was significantly affected by cholesterol extraction with methyl-β-cyclodextrin and inhibition of Arf6 function with dominant negative Arf6-T27N-eGFP. Taken together, we conclude that hERG undergoes clathrin-independent endocytosis via a mechanism involving Arf6. PMID:24392021

  15. The value of endorectal MR imaging to predict positive biopsies in clinically intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilanova, J.C.; Barcelo, J.; Comet, J.; Capdevila, A.; Dolz, J.L.; Huguet, M.; Aldoma, J.; Delgado, E.; Barcelo, C.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of endorectal MR imaging in predicting the positive biopsy results in patients with clinically intermediate risk for prostate cancer. We performed a prospective endorectal MR imaging study with 81 patients at intermediate risk to detect prostate cancer between January 1997 and December 1998. Intermediate risk was defined as: prostatic specific antigen (PSA) levels between 4 and 10 ng/ml or PSA levels in the range of 10-20 ng/ml but negative digital rectal examination (DRE) or PSA levels progressively higher (0.75 ng/ml year -1 ). A transrectal sextant biopsy was performed after the endorectal MR exam, and also of the area of suspicion detected by MR imaging. The accuracies were measured, both singly for MR imaging and combined for PSA level and DRE, by calculating the area index of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. Cancer was detected in 23 patients (28 %). Overall sensitivity and specificity of endorectal MRI was 70 and 76 %, respectively. Accuracy was 71 % estimated from the area under the ROC curve for the total patient group and 84 % for the group of patients with PSA level between 10-20 ng/ml. Positive biopsy rate (PBR) was 63 % for the group with PSA 10-20 ng/ml and a positive MR imaging, and 15 % with a negative MR exam. The PBR was 43 % for the group with PSA 4-10 ng/ml and a positive MR study, and 13 % with a negative MR imaging examination. We would have avoided 63 % of negative biopsies, while missing 30 % of cancers for the total group of patients. Endorectal MR imaging was not a sufficient predictor of positive biopsies for patients clinically at intermediate risk for prostate cancer. Although we should not avoid performing systematic biopsies in patients with endorectal MR imaging negative results, as it will miss a significant number of cancers, selected patients with a PSA levels between 10-20 ng/ml or clinical-biopsy disagreement might benefit from endorectal MR imaging. (orig.)

  16. The value of endorectal MR imaging to predict positive biopsies in clinically intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilanova, J.C.; Barcelo, J. [Ressonancia Girona, Clinica Girona, Girona (Spain); Comet, J. [Dept. of Urology, Univ. Hospital of Girona (Spain); Capdevila, A.; Dolz, J.L.; Huguet, M.; Aldoma, J.; Delgado, E. [Centre Diagnostic Pedralbes, Cetir Grup Medic, Barcelona (Spain); Barcelo, C. [Dept. of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, University of Girona (Spain)

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of endorectal MR imaging in predicting the positive biopsy results in patients with clinically intermediate risk for prostate cancer. We performed a prospective endorectal MR imaging study with 81 patients at intermediate risk to detect prostate cancer between January 1997 and December 1998. Intermediate risk was defined as: prostatic specific antigen (PSA) levels between 4 and 10 ng/ml or PSA levels in the range of 10-20 ng/ml but negative digital rectal examination (DRE) or PSA levels progressively higher (0.75 ng/ml year{sup -1}). A transrectal sextant biopsy was performed after the endorectal MR exam, and also of the area of suspicion detected by MR imaging. The accuracies were measured, both singly for MR imaging and combined for PSA level and DRE, by calculating the area index of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. Cancer was detected in 23 patients (28 %). Overall sensitivity and specificity of endorectal MRI was 70 and 76 %, respectively. Accuracy was 71 % estimated from the area under the ROC curve for the total patient group and 84 % for the group of patients with PSA level between 10-20 ng/ml. Positive biopsy rate (PBR) was 63 % for the group with PSA 10-20 ng/ml and a positive MR imaging, and 15 % with a negative MR exam. The PBR was 43 % for the group with PSA 4-10 ng/ml and a positive MR study, and 13 % with a negative MR imaging examination. We would have avoided 63 % of negative biopsies, while missing 30 % of cancers for the total group of patients. Endorectal MR imaging was not a sufficient predictor of positive biopsies for patients clinically at intermediate risk for prostate cancer. Although we should not avoid performing systematic biopsies in patients with endorectal MR imaging negative results, as it will miss a significant number of cancers, selected patients with a PSA levels between 10-20 ng/ml or clinical-biopsy disagreement might benefit from endorectal MR imaging

  17. Towards a Structural View of Drug Binding to hERG K+ Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Jamie I; Perozo, Eduardo; Allen, Toby W

    2017-10-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K + channel is of great medical and pharmaceutical relevance. Inherited mutations in hERG result in congenital long-QT syndrome which is associated with a markedly increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. hERG K + channels are also remarkably susceptible to block by a wide range of drugs, which in turn can cause drug-induced long-QT syndrome and an increased risk of sudden death. The recent determination of the near-atomic resolution structure of the hERG K + channel, using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), provides tremendous insights into how these channels work. It also suggests a way forward in our quest to understand why these channels are so promiscuous with respect to drug binding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of prostate specific antigen and immediate confirmatory biopsy in predicting progression during active surveillance for low risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamy, Ari; Yee, David S; Matsushita, Kazuhito; Maschino, Alexandra; Cronin, Angel; Vickers, Andrew; Guillonneau, Bertrand; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2011-02-01

    We evaluated predictors of progression after starting active surveillance, especially the role of prostate specific antigen and immediate confirmatory prostate biopsy. A total of 238 men with prostate cancer met active surveillance eligibility criteria and were analyzed for progression with time. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to evaluate predictors of progression. Progression was evaluated using 2 definitions, including no longer meeting 1) full and 2) modified criteria, excluding prostate specific antigen greater than 10 ng/ml as a criterion. Using full criteria 61 patients progressed during followup. The 2 and 5-year progression-free probability was 80% and 60%, respectively. With prostate specific antigen included in progression criteria prostate specific antigen at confirmatory biopsy (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.14-1.46, p <0.0005) and positive confirmatory biopsy (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.01-3.04, p = 0.047) were independent predictors of progression. Of the 61 cases 34 failed due to increased prostate specific antigen, including only 5 with subsequent progression by biopsy criteria. When prostate specific antigen was excluded from progression criteria, only 32 cases progressed, and 2 and 5-year progression-free probability was 91% and 76%, respectively. Using modified criteria as an end point positive confirmatory biopsy was the only independent predictor of progression (HR 3.16, 95% CI 1.41-7.09, p = 0.005). Active surveillance is feasible in patients with low risk prostate cancer and most patients show little evidence of progression within 5 years. There is no clear justification for treating patients in whom prostate specific antigen increases above 10 ng/ml in the absence of other indications of tumor progression. Patients considering active surveillance should undergo confirmatory biopsy to better assess the risk of progression. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Muon nuclear fusion and low temperature nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, Kanetada

    1990-01-01

    Low temperature (or normal temperature) nuclear fusion is one of the phenomena causing nuclear fusion without requiring high temperature. In thermal nuclear fusion, the Coulomb barrier is overcome with the help of thermal energy, but in the low temperature nuclear fusion, the Coulomb barrier is neutralized by the introduction of the particles having larger mass than electrons and negative charges, at this time, if two nuclei can approach to the distance of 10 -13 cm in the neutral state, the occurrence of nuclear fusion reaction is expected. As the mass of the particles is heavier, the neutral region is smaller, and nuclear fusion is easy to occur. The particles to meet this purpose are the electrons within substances and muons. The research on muon nuclear fusion became suddenly active in the latter half of 1970s, the cause of which was the discovery of the fact that the formation of muons occurs resonantly rapidly in D-T and D-D systems. Muons are the unstable elementary particles having the life of 2.2 μs, and they can have positive and negative charges. In the muon catalyzed fusion, the muons with negative charge take part. The principle of the muon catalyzed fusion, its present status and future perspective, and the present status of low temperature nuclear fusion are reported. (K.I.)

  20. Effectiveness of the combined evaluation of KLK3 genetics and free-to-total prostate specific antigen ratio for prostate cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, Carlo-Federico; Prayer-Galetti, Tommaso; Basso, Daniela; Padoan, Andrea; Rossi, Elisa; Secco, Silvia; Pelloso, Michela; Fogar, Paola; Navaglia, Filippo; Moz, Stefania; Zattoni, Filiberto; Plebani, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Of serum prostate specific antigen variability 40% depends on inherited factors. We ascertained whether the knowledge of KLK3 genetics would enhance prostate specific antigen diagnostic performance in patients with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer. We studied 1,058 men who consecutively underwent prostate biopsy for clinical suspicion of prostate cancer. At histology prostate cancer was present in 401 cases and absent in 657. Serum total prostate specific antigen and the free-to-total prostate specific antigen ratio were determined. Four polymorphisms of the KLK3 gene (rs2569733, rs2739448, rs925013 and rs2735839) and 1 polymorphism of the SRD5A2 gene (rs523349) were studied. The influence of genetics on prostate specific antigen variability was evaluated by multivariate linear regression analysis. The performance of total prostate specific antigen and the free-to-total prostate specific antigen ratio alone or combined with a genetically based patient classification were defined by ROC curve analyses. For prostate cancer diagnosis the free-to-total prostate specific antigen ratio index alone (cutoff 11%) was superior to total prostate specific antigen (cutoff 4 ng/ml) and to free-to-total prostate specific antigen ratio reflex testing (positive predictive value 61%, 43% and 54%, respectively). Prostate specific antigen correlated with KLK3 genetics (rs2735839 polymorphism p = 0.001, and rs2569733, rs2739448 and rs925013 haplotype combination p = 0.003). In patients with different KLK3 genetics 2 optimal free-to-total prostate specific antigen ratio cutoffs (11% and 14.5%) were found. For free-to-total prostate specific antigen ratio values between 11% and 14.5% the prostate cancer probability ranged from 30.0% to 47.4% according to patient genetics. The free-to-total prostate specific antigen ratio is superior to total prostate specific antigen for prostate cancer diagnosis, independent of total prostate specific antigen results. Free-to-total prostate

  1. [Changes in prostatic circulation in response to laser therapy and magnetic therapy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The results of preoperative preparation were analysed in 59 patients with prostatic benign hyperplasia (PBH) subjected to TUR. Treatment outcomes were assessed by transrectal ultrasound (color Doppler mapping) in two groups of patients. Group 1 received combined therapy including transrectal laser radiation of the prostate, group 2--transrectal magnetotherapy. The analysis showed that laser radiation reduced insignificantly the size of the prostate and adenomatous node, improved microcirculation and circulation in the prostate. This resulted in relief of inflammation and reduction of the number of postoperative inflammatory complications. Transrectal magnetotherapy has a positive effect on vascularization and hemodynamics of the prostate, local immunity, contamination of the tissues with pathogenic flora.

  2. InFusion: Advancing Discovery of Fusion Genes and Chimeric Transcripts from Deep RNA-Sequencing Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Okonechnikov

    Full Text Available Analysis of fusion transcripts has become increasingly important due to their link with cancer development. Since high-throughput sequencing approaches survey fusion events exhaustively, several computational methods for the detection of gene fusions from RNA-seq data have been developed. This kind of analysis, however, is complicated by native trans-splicing events, the splicing-induced complexity of the transcriptome and biases and artefacts introduced in experiments and data analysis. There are a number of tools available for the detection of fusions from RNA-seq data; however, certain differences in specificity and sensitivity between commonly used approaches have been found. The ability to detect gene fusions of different types, including isoform fusions and fusions involving non-coding regions, has not been thoroughly studied yet. Here, we propose a novel computational toolkit called InFusion for fusion gene detection from RNA-seq data. InFusion introduces several unique features, such as discovery of fusions involving intergenic regions, and detection of anti-sense transcription in chimeric RNAs based on strand-specificity. Our approach demonstrates superior detection accuracy on simulated data and several public RNA-seq datasets. This improved performance was also evident when evaluating data from RNA deep-sequencing of two well-established prostate cancer cell lines. InFusion identified 26 novel fusion events that were validated in vitro, including alternatively spliced gene fusion isoforms and chimeric transcripts that include intergenic regions. The toolkit is freely available to download from http:/bitbucket.org/kokonech/infusion.

  3. [ERG diagnosis and differential diagnosis: results of examination over 6 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemeyer, G; Stähli, P

    1996-05-01

    This study reviews the patient material first from the point of view of referral diagnosis. Secondly, we focus on difficulties in selective differential diagnoses. 1501 patients underwent electroretinographic (ERG) testing from 1989 to 1994, amounting to 1815 ERG recordings, including follow-up examinations. The technique applied is full-field, single flash ERG with selective stimulation of the rod- and of the cone-systems. In 3.8% (57 cases) the ERG was performed under general anesthesia in outpatients. Tapetoretinal degenerations, toxic retinal side effects, inflammatory disease and ocular trauma represented, in this order, the major groups of referral diagnoses aside from unclear visual loss. The documentation or the exclusion of tapetoretinal degeneration represented the largest share (57%) of the application of the diagnostic procedure. 171 cases of isolated retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and 33 cases of syndromic RP were identified. Frequent and rare diagnostic entities and their differential diagnoses within this group are discussed. Inevitably, a number of diagnostic decisions remain problematic, in particular at the first examination. These diagnostic difficulties are addressed also and include the differentiation between RP sine pigmento and congenital amaurosis Leber in infants, RP with macular involvement vs. cone-rod degeneration, unilateral RP vs. postinflammatory conditions, and progressive cone dystrophy vs. achromatopsia, cone-rod degeneration or Stargardt's disease. Frequent and meaningful indications for ERG recording and difficult diagnostic decisions arise from this review of a relatively large group of patients. A number of diagnoses can hardly, if not at all be established without ERG testing. These include retinal cause of visual loss in infants, congenital amaurosis Leber, RP sine pigmento, early stages of RP, carrier status in XL RP and in choroideremia, progressive cone dystrophy, toxic retinopathy without fundus changes, retinal involvement

  4. High yield purification of full-length functional hERG K+ channels produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molbaek, Karen; Scharff-Poulsen, Peter; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    knowledge this is the first reported high-yield production and purification of full length, tetrameric and functional hERG. This significant breakthrough will be paramount in obtaining hERG crystal structures, and in establishment of new high-throughput hERG drug safety screening assays....

  5. Relationship of chronic histologic prostatic inflammation in biopsy specimens with serum isoform [-2]proPSA (p2PSA), %p2PSA, and prostate health index in men with a total prostate-specific antigen of 4-10 ng/ml and normal digital rectal examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeri, Massimo; Abrate, Alberto; Lughezzani, Giovanni; Gadda, Giulio Maria; Freschi, Massimo; Mistretta, Francesco; Lista, Giuliana; Fossati, Nicola; Larcher, Alessandro; Kinzikeeva, Ella; Buffi, Nicolòmaria; Dell'Acqua, Vincenzo; Bini, Vittorio; Montorsi, Francesco; Guazzoni, Giorgio

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between serum [-2]proPSA (p2PSA) and derivatives with chronic histologic prostatic inflammation (CHPI) in men undergoing prostate biopsy for suspected prostate cancer (PCa). This nested case-control study resulted from an observational prospective trial for the definition of sensibility, specificity, and accuracy of p2PSA, %p2PSA, and Beckman Coulter Prostate Health Index (PHI), in men undergoing prostate biopsy, with a total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 4-10 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination. CHPI was the outcome of interest and defined as the presence of moderate to large infiltration of lymphomononuclear cells with interstitial and/or glandular disruption in absence of PCa. p2PSA, %p2PSA, and PHI were considered the index tests and compared with the established biomarker reference standard tests: tPSA, fPSA, %fPSA. Of 267 patients subjected to prostate biopsy, 73 (27.3%) patients were diagnosed with CHPI. Comparing CHPI with PCa patients, %p2PSA and PHI were found to be significantly lower, whereas fPSA and %fPSA were significantly higher. %p2PSA and PHI were the most accurate predictors of CHPI at biopsy, significantly outperforming tPSA, fPSA, and %fPSA. On the contrary, no significant differences were found in PSA, p2PSA, and derivatives between CHPI and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients. Our findings showed that p2PSA, %p2PSA, and PHI values might discriminate PCa from CHPI or BPH, but not CHPI from BPH, in men with a total PSA 4-10 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination. p2PSA isoform and its derivatives could be useful in clinical decision making to avoid unnecessary biopsies in patients with CHPI and elevated tPSA value. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of Six Transmembrane Protein of Prostate 2 Gene Expression and Intracellular Localization in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora İrer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to determine the relationship between the RNA and protein expression profile of six transmembrane protein of prostate 2 (STAMP2 gene and androgen and the intracellular localization of STAMP2. Materials and Methods: RNA and protein were obtained from androgen treated lymph node carcinoma of the prostate (LNCaP cells, untreated LNCaP cells, DU145 cells with no androgen receptor, and STAMP2 transfected COS-7 cells. The expression profile of STAMP2 gene and the effect of androgenes on the expression was shown in RNA and protein levels by using Northern and Western blotting methods. In addition, intracellular localization of the naturally synthesized STAMP2 protein and the transfected STAMP2 protein in COS-7 cells after androgen administration in both LNCaP cells was determined by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: We found that the RNA and protein expression of STAMP2 gene in LNCaP cells are regulated by androgenes, the power of expression is increased with the duration of androgen treatment and there is no STAMP2 expression in DU145 cells which has no androgen receptor. As a result of the immunofluorescence microscopy study we observed that STAMP2 protein was localized at golgi complex and cell membrane. Conclusion: In conclusion, we have demonstrated that STAMP2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the prostate cancer and in the androgen-dependent androgen-independent staging of prostate cancer. In addition, STAMP2 protein, which is localized in the intracellular golgi complex and cell membrane, may be a new target molecule for prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  7. The Positioning Accuracy of BAUV Using Fusion of Data from USBL System and Movement Parameters Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naus Krzysztof

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a study of the accuracy of estimating the position coordinates of BAUV (Biomimetic Autonomous Underwater Vehicle by the extended Kalman filter (EKF method. The fusion of movement parameters measurements and position coordinates fixes was applied. The movement parameters measurements are carried out by on-board navigation devices, while the position coordinates fixes are done by the USBL (Ultra Short Base Line system. The problem of underwater positioning and the conceptual design of the BAUV navigation system constructed at the Naval Academy (Polish Naval Academy—PNA are presented in the first part of the paper. The second part consists of description of the evaluation results of positioning accuracy, the genesis of the problem of selecting method for underwater positioning, and the mathematical description of the method of estimating the position coordinates using the EKF method by the fusion of measurements with on-board navigation and measurements obtained with the USBL system. The main part contains a description of experimental research. It consists of a simulation program of navigational parameter measurements carried out during the BAUV passage along the test section. Next, the article covers the determination of position coordinates on the basis of simulated parameters, using EKF and DR methods and the USBL system, which are then subjected to a comparative analysis of accuracy. The final part contains systemic conclusions justifying the desirability of applying the proposed fusion method of navigation parameters for the BAUV positioning.

  8. The Positioning Accuracy of BAUV Using Fusion of Data from USBL System and Movement Parameters Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzysztof, Naus; Aleksander, Nowak

    2016-08-15

    The article presents a study of the accuracy of estimating the position coordinates of BAUV (Biomimetic Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) by the extended Kalman filter (EKF) method. The fusion of movement parameters measurements and position coordinates fixes was applied. The movement parameters measurements are carried out by on-board navigation devices, while the position coordinates fixes are done by the USBL (Ultra Short Base Line) system. The problem of underwater positioning and the conceptual design of the BAUV navigation system constructed at the Naval Academy (Polish Naval Academy-PNA) are presented in the first part of the paper. The second part consists of description of the evaluation results of positioning accuracy, the genesis of the problem of selecting method for underwater positioning, and the mathematical description of the method of estimating the position coordinates using the EKF method by the fusion of measurements with on-board navigation and measurements obtained with the USBL system. The main part contains a description of experimental research. It consists of a simulation program of navigational parameter measurements carried out during the BAUV passage along the test section. Next, the article covers the determination of position coordinates on the basis of simulated parameters, using EKF and DR methods and the USBL system, which are then subjected to a comparative analysis of accuracy. The final part contains systemic conclusions justifying the desirability of applying the proposed fusion method of navigation parameters for the BAUV positioning.

  9. Quantification of prostate movements during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artignana, X.; Rastkhah, M.; Balosso, J.; Bolla, M.; Fourneret, P.; Gilliot, O.

    2006-01-01

    Decrease treatment uncertainties is one of the most important challenge in radiation oncology. Numerous techniques are available to quantify prostate motion and visualize prostate location day after day before each irradiation: CT-scan, cone-beam-CT-Scan, ultrasound, prostatic markers... The knowledge of prostate motion is necessary to define the minimal margin around the target volume needed to avoid mis-positioning during treatment session. Different kind of prostate movement have been studied and are reported in the present work: namely, those having a large amplitude extending through out the whole treatment period on one hand; and those with a shorter amplitude happening during treatment session one the other hand. The long lasting movement are mostly anterior posterior (3 mm standard deviation), secondary in cranial-caudal (1-2 mm standard deviation) and lateral directions (0.5-1 mm standard deviation). They are mostly due to the rectal state of filling and mildly due to bladder filling or inferior limbs position. On the other hand the shorter movement that occurs during the treatment session is mostly variation of position around a steady point represented by the apex. Ones again, the rectal filling state is the principle cause. This way, during the 20 minutes of a treatment session, including the positioning of the patient, a movement of less than 3 mm could be expected when the rectum is empty. Ideally, real time imaging tools should allow an accurate localisation of the prostate and the adaptation of the dosimetry before each treatment session in a time envelope not exceeding 20 minutes. (author)

  10. Initial Results of Using Daily CT Localization to Correct Portal Error in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattanzi, Joseph; McNeely, Shawn; Barnes, Scott; Das, Indra; Schultheiss, Timothy E; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of daily CT simulation in prostate cancer to correct errors in portal placement and organ motion. Improved localization with this technique should allow the reduction of target margins and facilitate dose escalation in high risk patients while minimizing the risk of normal tissue morbidity. Methods and Materials : Five patients underwent standard CT simulation with the alpha cradle cast, IV contrast, and urethrogram. All were initially treated to 46 Gy in a four field conformal technique which included the prostate, seminal vesicles and pelvic lymph nodes (GTV 1 ). The prostate or prostate and seminal vesicles (GTV 2 ) then received 56 Gy with a 1.0 cm margin to the PTV. At 50 Gy a second CT simulation was performed with IV contrast, urethrogram and the alpha cradle secured to a rigid sliding board. The prostate was contoured, a new isocenter generated, and surface markers placed. Prostate only treatment portals for the final conedown (GTV 3 ) were created with 0.25 cm isodose margins to the PTV. The final six fractions in 2 patients with favorable disease and eight fractions in 3 patients with unfavorable disease were delivered using the daily CT technique. On each treatment day the patient was placed in his cast on the sliding board and a CT scan performed. The daily isocenter was calculated in the A/P and lateral dimension and compared to the 50 Gy CT simulation isocenter. Couch and surface marker shifts were calculated to produce perfect portal alignment. To maintain positioning, the patient was transferred to a gurney while on the sliding board in his cast, transported to the treatment room and then transferred to the treatment couch. The patient was then treated to the corrected isocenter. Portal films and real time images were obtained for each portal. Results: Utilizing CT-CT image registration (fusion) of the daily and 50 Gy baseline CT scans the isocenter changes were quantified to reflect the contribution of positional

  11. Detection of prostate cancer-specific transcripts in extracellular vesicles isolated from post-DRE urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Kathryn L; Patil, Dattatraya; Douglas, Kristen J S; Lee, Grace; Wehrmeyer, Kathryn; Torlak, Mersiha; Clark, Jeremy; Cooper, Colin S; Moreno, Carlos S; Sanda, Martin G

    2017-06-01

    The measurement of gene expression in post-digital rectal examination (DRE) urine specimens provides a non-invasive method to determine a patient's risk of prostate cancer. Many currently available assays use whole urine or cell pellets for the analysis of prostate cancer-associated genes, although the use of extracellular vesicles (EVs) has also recently been of interest. We investigated the expression of prostate-, kidney-, and bladder-specific transcripts and known prostate cancer biomarkers in urine EVs. Cell pellets and EVs were recovered from post-DRE urine specimens, with the total RNA yield and quality determined by Bioanalyzer. The levels of prostate, kidney, and bladder-associated transcripts in EVs were assessed by TaqMan qPCR and targeted sequencing. RNA was more consistently recovered from the urine EV specimens, with over 80% of the patients demonstrating higher RNA yields in the EV fraction as compared to urine cell pellets. The median EV RNA yield of 36.4 ng was significantly higher than the median urine cell pellet RNA yield of 4.8 ng. Analysis of the post-DRE urine EVs indicated that prostate-specific transcripts were more abundant than kidney- or bladder-specific transcripts. Additionally, patients with prostate cancer had significantly higher levels of the prostate cancer-associated genes PCA3 and ERG. Post-DRE urine EVs are a viable source of prostate-derived RNAs for biomarker discovery and prostate cancer status can be distinguished from analysis of these specimens. Continued analysis of urine EVs offers the potential discovery of novel biomarkers for pre-biopsy prostate cancer detection. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Common variants in the hERG (KCNH2) voltage-gated potassium channel are associated with altered fasting and glucose-stimulated plasma incretin and glucagon responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrechtsen, Line; Mahendran, Yuvaraj; Jonsson, Anna

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with long QT syndrome due to rare loss-of-function mutations in the human ether-á-go-go-related gene (hERG) have prolonged QT interval, risk of arrhythmias, increased secretion of insulin and incretins and impaired glucagon response to hypoglycemia. This is caused by a dysfun......BACKGROUND: Patients with long QT syndrome due to rare loss-of-function mutations in the human ether-á-go-go-related gene (hERG) have prolonged QT interval, risk of arrhythmias, increased secretion of insulin and incretins and impaired glucagon response to hypoglycemia. This is caused...... by a dysfunctional Kv11.1 voltage-gated potassium channel. Based on these findings in patients with rare variants in hERG, we hypothesized that common variants in hERG may also lead to alterations in glucose homeostasis. Subsequently, we aimed to evaluate the effect of two common gain-of-function variants in hERG...... in hERG on QT-interval and circulation levels of incretins, insulin and glucagon. The Danish population-based Inter99 cohort (n = 5895) was used to assess the effect of common variants on QT-interval. The Danish ADDITION-PRO cohort was used (n = 1329) to study genetic associations with levels of GLP-1...

  13. Determinants of Isoform-Specific Gating Kinetics of hERG1 Channel: Combined Experimental and Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura L. Pe