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  1. What Difference Does a Title Make

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Søren Hattesen

    out by Gerard Genette, by naming and “designat[ing] it as precisely as possible and without too much risk of confusion” (Genette, 1997). In accordance with its title the poem thus represents the discourse of a newsreader neutrally reporting the events of war scenario. However, each section of the poem...

  2. Separation of compounds differing in isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, R.E.; Brooks, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Compounds differing in isotopic composition are separated by introducing a mixture of the compounds into a chromatographic column containing a lanthanide chelate as a stationary phase and eluting from the column a fraction which is at least enriched with one of the compounds of the mixture. 17 claims, no drawings

  3. Separation of compounds differing in isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, R.E.; Brooks, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    Compounds differing in isotopic composition are separated by introducing a mixture of the compounds into a chromatographic column containing a lanthanide chelate as a stationary phase and eluting from the column a fraction that is at least enriched with one of the compounds of the mixture. (U.S.)

  4. Compositional differences in the phenolics compounds of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates phenolic composition of commercial and experimental wines derived from bunch (Vitis vinifera) and muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia) grapes to determine compositional differences in phenolics. HPLC analysis of wines showed that majority of phenolic compounds eluted during the first 30 min. Of the red ...

  5. [Corrected Title: Solid-Phase Extraction of Polar Compounds from Water] Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Richard; Rutz, Jeffrey; Schultz, John

    2005-01-01

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) process has been developed for removing alcohols, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, amines, and other polar organic compounds from water. This process can be either a subprocess of a water-reclamation process or a means of extracting organic compounds from water samples for gas-chromatographic analysis. This SPE process is an attractive alternative to an Environmental Protection Administration liquid-liquid extraction process that generates some pollution and does not work in a microgravitational environment. In this SPE process, one forces a water sample through a resin bed by use of positive pressure on the upstream side and/or suction on the downstream side, thereby causing organic compounds from the water to be adsorbed onto the resin. If gas-chromatographic analysis is to be done, the resin is dried by use of a suitable gas, then the adsorbed compounds are extracted from the resin by use of a solvent. Unlike the liquid-liquid process, the SPE process works in both microgravity and Earth gravity. In comparison with the liquid-liquid process, the SPE process is more efficient, extracts a wider range of organic compounds, generates less pollution, and costs less.

  6. What's in a Name? Impact of marketing different course titles on enrollment for online classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Woods, Charles; McBride, Allison

    2008-12-01

    Little is known about the impact of different marketing strategies on enrollment of online courses for health professionals. The authors compared one aspect of marketing, course titles, for online classes about herbs and dietary supplements (HDS). The authors marketed two titles-one knowledge-oriented, the other behavior-oriented-for each of seven online HDS classes. The two titles were (1) "Introduction to topic" (Knowledge) and (2) "Talking with patients about topic" (Behavior). The seven classes were two general (introduction and safety) and five specialty (women, children, the elderly, depression, and gastrointestinal) topics. The Area Health Education Center in northwest North Carolina marketed the classes. Altogether, 195 clinicians enrolled in an average of 7.6 classes per enrollee (1,487 total). For every class, enrollment was higher for knowledge-oriented than behavior-oriented titled classes (average of 124 versus 89 enrollees per class, P online classes on an unfamiliar topic. Additional marketing research is needed to inform efforts to enroll clinicians into courses on more familiar topics.

  7. Bioactive compounds in different acerola fruit cultivares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Aparecida de Carvalho Mariano-Nasser

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The increased consumption of acerola in Brazil was triggered because it is considered as a functional food mainly for its high ascorbic acid content, but the fruit also has high nutritional value, high levels of phenolic compounds, total antioxidant activity, anthocyanins and carotenoids in its composition. The objective was to evaluate the chemical, physical-chemical and antioxidant activity of eight varieties of acerola tree. The acerolas used in the research were the harvest 2015, 8 varieties: BRS 235 - Apodi, Mirandópolis, Waldy - CATI 30, BRS 238 - Frutacor, Okinawa, BRS 236 - Cereja, Olivier and BRS 237 - Roxinha, from the Active Bank Germplasm APTA Regional Alta Paulista in Adamantina - SP. Avaluated the following attributes: pH, titratable acidity, soluble solids, reducing sugar, instrumental color, ascorbic acid, total phenolics, flavonoids and antioxidant activity. The design was completely randomized, 8 varieties and 3 replications of 20 fruits each. Acerola fruit of the analyzed varieties prove to be good sources of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity, ensuring its excellent nutritional quality relative to combat free radicals. The variety BRS 236 - Cereja presents higher ascorbic acid content, antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds, and the lowest value for flavonoid, which was higher than the other cultivars, especially Olivier and Waldy CATI-30.

  8. Compounds in different aphasia categories: a study on picture naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Carlo; De Pellegrin, Serena; Battel, Irene; Garzon, Martina; Meneghello, Francesca; Chiarelli, Valentina

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the production of compounds in Italian-speaking patients affected by different aphasia categories (i.e., Broca's, Wernicke's, and anomic aphasia) in a confrontation naming task. Questions of theoretical interest concerning the processing of compounds within the framework of the "lemma theory" as well as the role of morphological productivity in compound processing are addressed. Results indicate that all persons with aphasia retain knowledge of the morphological status of words, even when they fail to retrieve the corresponding phonological form (the "compound effect"). A difference was found among aphasia categories in the type of errors produced (omission vs. substitution) and in the position (first or second) of these errors within the compound words. In Broca's aphasia, the first component is omitted more frequently than the second one, but only in verb-noun compounds. Anomic and Wernicke's aphasia, unlike in Broca's aphasia, seem to retain sensitivity to morphological productivity.

  9. Biodegradation of creosote compounds: Comparison of experiments at different scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, K.; Arvin, Erik

    2001-01-01

    of the pyrroles on the biodegradation of benzene, and the biodegradation of benzothiophene occurs only in the presence of a primary substrate. The experiments show that some biodegradation processes of organic compounds may be common to different microorganisms.......This paper compares the results of biodegradation experiments with creosote compounds performed at different scales. The experiments include field observations, field experiments, large-scale intact laboratory column experiments, model fracture experiments, and batch experiments. Most...... of the experiments were conducted with till or ground water from the field site at Ringe on the island of Funen. Although the experiments were conducted on different scales, they revealed that some phenomena-e.g., an extensive biodegradation potential of several of the creosote compounds, the inhibitory influence...

  10. Characterization of volatile aroma compounds in different brewing barley cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Hou, Yingmin; Li, Feng; Piao, Yongzhe; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Li, Cheng; Zhao, Changxin

    2015-03-30

    Beer is a popular alcoholic malt beverage resulting from fermentation of the aqueous extract of malted barley with hops. The aroma of brewing barley impacts the flavor of beer indirectly, because some flavor compounds or their precursors in beer come from the barley. The objectives of this research were to study volatile profiles and to characterize odor-active compounds of brewing barley in order to determine the variability of the aroma composition among different brewing barley cultivars. Forty-one volatiles comprising aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, organic acids, aromatic compounds and furans were identified using solid phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, among which aldehydes, alcohols and ketones were quantitatively in greatest abundance. Quantitative measurements performed by means of solvent extraction and calculation of odor activity values revealed that acetaldehyde, 2-methylpropanal, 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylbutanal, hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, 3-methyl-1-butanol, cyclopentanol, 2,3-butanedione, 2,3-pentanedione, 2-heptanone, acetic acid, ethyl acetate, 2-pentylfuran and benzeneacetaldehyde, whose concentrations exceeded their odor thresholds, could be considered as odor-active compounds of brewing barley. Principal component analysis was employed to evaluate the differences among cultivars. The results demonstrated that the volatile profile based on the concentrations of aroma compounds enabled good differentiation of most barley cultivars. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Biofunctional Compounds Content from Different Herbal Infusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca C. Fărcaş

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tea is the most important non-alcoholic beverage in the world being appreciated for its stimulant properties and health benefits. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the content in caffeine, phenolic compounds, flavonoids, as well as the antioxidant activity of five different herbal infusion samples in oder to compare the amount of these bioactive compounds from traditional Romanian medicinal plants and Chinese tea plants. Green tea, black tea, linden (lime tea, mint, and St. John's wort were chosen as materials for the preparation of infusion and laboratory analyses. The caffeine was extracted with dichloromethane and then was quantified by measuring the absorbance of the extract at 260 nm. The quantification of total phenolic compounds was achieved by Folin-Ciocalteu method, while the flavonoid content was determined using a chromogenic system of NaNO2-(Al(NO33-NaOH based on spectrophotometric method. The antioxidant capacity of each tea sample was assessed by evaluating their radical scavenging  activity on DPPH radical. The largest content in antioxidant compounds was found in green, but also in the mint infusion sample, while black tea has registered the highest caffeine content. Following the results obtained it can be stated that all the analysed samples contain remarkable amounts of biologically active compounds essential for the human body healt.

  12. Datasets used in the manuscript titled "Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms and organic aerosol"

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset documents that all of the data used in the manuscript "Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic...

  13. [Comparison of the English titles of articles in Chinese and foreign academic journals: influences of difference between China and the foreign in thinking and psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie-hua

    2006-11-01

    By analyzing the East-West difference in psychology and thinking patterns, the author compared the frequency of conventional words applied and the usage of subtitle, as well as the selection of sentence structure in title of articles, and thus advocated that the differences of attention psychology and thinking patterns, linear in the West and spiral in China, were the primary causes for different expressions of articles' title.

  14. Biodegradation of NSO-compounds under different redox-conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyreborg, S.; Arvin, E.; Broholm, K.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the potential of groundwater microorganisms to degrade selected heterocyclic aromatic compounds containing nitrogen, sulphur, or oxygen (NSO-compounds) under four redox-conditions over a period of 846 days. Eight compounds (pyrrole, 1...... anaerobic conditions, even though the microorganisms present in the anaerobic microcosms were active throughout the incubation period. A high variability in the lag period among the NSO-compounds was observed under aerobic conditions. While quinoline, indole, and carbazole were degraded with a lag period...

  15. Characterization of volatile organic compounds from different cooking emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shuiyuan; Wang, Gang; Lang, Jianlei; Wen, Wei; Wang, Xiaoqi; Yao, Sen

    2016-11-01

    Cooking fume is regarded as one of the main sources of urban atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its chemical characteristics would be different among various cooking styles. In this study, VOCs emitted from four different Chinese cooking styles were collected. VOCs concentrations and emission characteristics were analyzed. The results demonstrated that Barbecue gave the highest VOCs concentrations (3494 ± 1042 μg/m3), followed by Hunan cuisine (494.3 ± 288.8 μg/m3), Home cooking (487.2 ± 139.5 μg/m3), and Shandong cuisine (257.5 ± 98.0 μg/m3). The volume of air drawn through the collection hood over the stove would have a large impact on VOCs concentration in the exhaust. Therefore, VOCs emission rates (ER) and emission factors (EF) were also estimated. Home cooking had the highest ER levels (12.2 kg/a) and Barbecue had the highest EF levels (0.041 g/kg). The abundance of alkanes was higher in Home cooking, Shandong cuisine and Hunan cuisine with the value of 59.4%-63.8%, while Barbecue was mainly composed of alkanes (34.7%) and alkenes (39.9%). The sensitivity species of Home cooking and Hunan cuisine were alkanes, and that of Shandong cuisine and Barbecue were alkenes. The degree of stench pollution from cooking fume was lighter.

  16. Effect of different drying techniques on the volatile compounds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the volatile compounds, thermal stability and morphological characteristics of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni) leaves after sun, oven and microwave drying. Methods: Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with a spectral analysis manager was used to separate the volatile compounds. Dried stevia ...

  17. Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Skrovankova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Berries, especially members of several families, such as Rosaceae (strawberry, raspberry, blackberry, and Ericaceae (blueberry, cranberry, belong to the best dietary sources of bioactive compounds (BAC. They have delicious taste and flavor, have economic importance, and because of the antioxidant properties of BAC, they are of great interest also for nutritionists and food technologists due to the opportunity to use BAC as functional foods ingredients. The bioactive compounds in berries contain mainly phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, such as anthocyanins and flavonols, and tannins and ascorbic acid. These compounds, either individually or combined, are responsible for various health benefits of berries, such as prevention of inflammation disorders, cardiovascular diseases, or protective effects to lower the risk of various cancers. In this review bioactive compounds of commonly consumed berries are described, as well as the factors influencing their antioxidant capacity and their health benefits.

  18. Therapeutic Properties of Bioactive Compounds from Different Honeybee Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornara, Laura; Biagi, Marco; Xiao, Jianbo; Burlando, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Honeybees produce honey, royal jelly, propolis, bee venom, bee pollen, and beeswax, which potentially benefit to humans due to the bioactives in them. Clinical standardization of these products is hindered by chemical variability depending on honeybee and botanical sources, but different molecules have been isolated and pharmacologically characterized. Major honey bioactives include phenolics, methylglyoxal, royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), and oligosaccharides. In royal jelly there are antimicrobial jelleins and royalisin peptides, MRJPs, and hydroxy-decenoic acid derivatives, notably 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10-HDA), with antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, neuromodulatory, metabolic syndrome preventing, and anti-aging activities. Propolis contains caffeic acid phenethyl ester and artepillin C, specific of Brazilian propolis, with antiviral, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects. Bee venom consists of toxic peptides like pain-inducing melittin, SK channel blocking apamin, and allergenic phospholipase A2. Bee pollen is vitaminic, contains antioxidant and anti-inflammatory plant phenolics, as well as antiatherosclerotic, antidiabetic, and hypoglycemic flavonoids, unsaturated fatty acids, and sterols. Beeswax is widely used in cosmetics and makeup. Given the importance of drug discovery from natural sources, this review is aimed at providing an exhaustive screening of the bioactive compounds detected in honeybee products and of their curative or adverse biological effects.

  19. Therapeutic Properties of Bioactive Compounds from Different Honeybee Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cornara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Honeybees produce honey, royal jelly, propolis, bee venom, bee pollen, and beeswax, which potentially benefit to humans due to the bioactives in them. Clinical standardization of these products is hindered by chemical variability depending on honeybee and botanical sources, but different molecules have been isolated and pharmacologically characterized. Major honey bioactives include phenolics, methylglyoxal, royal jelly proteins (MRJPs, and oligosaccharides. In royal jelly there are antimicrobial jelleins and royalisin peptides, MRJPs, and hydroxy-decenoic acid derivatives, notably 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10-HDA, with antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, neuromodulatory, metabolic syndrome preventing, and anti-aging activities. Propolis contains caffeic acid phenethyl ester and artepillin C, specific of Brazilian propolis, with antiviral, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects. Bee venom consists of toxic peptides like pain-inducing melittin, SK channel blocking apamin, and allergenic phospholipase A2. Bee pollen is vitaminic, contains antioxidant and anti-inflammatory plant phenolics, as well as antiatherosclerotic, antidiabetic, and hypoglycemic flavonoids, unsaturated fatty acids, and sterols. Beeswax is widely used in cosmetics and makeup. Given the importance of drug discovery from natural sources, this review is aimed at providing an exhaustive screening of the bioactive compounds detected in honeybee products and of their curative or adverse biological effects.

  20. Exposure to volatile organic compounds: Comparison among different transportation modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Duc Hoai; Van Langenhove, Herman; Chigbo, Stephen Izuchukwu; Amare, Abebech Nuguse; Demeestere, Kristof; Walgraeve, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    The increasing trend of promoting public transportation (bus tram, metro, train) and more environmental friendly and sustainable non fossil-fuel alternatives (walking, cycling etc) as substitutes for auto vehicles brings forward new questions with regard to pollutant levels to which commuters are exposed. In this study, three transportation modes (tram, auto vehicle and bicycle) are studied and concentration levels of 84 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, oxygen containing hydrocarbons, terpenes and halogenated compounds) are measured along a route in the city of Ghent, Belgium. The concentration levels are obtained by active sampling on Tenax TA sorbent tubes followed by thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) using deuterated toluene as an internal standard. The median total VOC concentrations for the tram mode (33 μg/m³) is 1.7 times higher than that of the bicycle mode (20 μg/m³) and 1.5 times higher than for the car mode (22 μg/m³). It is found that aromatic hydrocarbons account for a significant proportion in the total VOCs concentration (TVOCs) being as high as 41-57%, 59-72% and 58-72% for the tram, car and bicycle respectively. In all transportation modes, there was a high (r > 0.6) degree of correlation between BTEX compounds, isopropylbenzene, n-propylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. When comparing time weighed average concentrations along a fixed route in Ghent, it is found that commuters using the tram mode experience the highest TVOCs concentration levels. However, next to the concentration level to which commuters are exposed, the physical activity level involving the mode of transportation is important to assess the exposure to toxic VOCs. It is proven that the commuter using a bicycle (4.3 ± 1.5 μg) inhales seven and nine times more benzene compared to the commuter using the car and tram respectively, when the same route is followed.

  1. Volatile organic compounds adsorption using different types of adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimanmes Chanayotha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adsorbents were synthesized from coconut shell, coal and coke by pyrolysis followed by chemical activation process. These synthesized materials were used as adsorbents in adsorption test to determine the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs namely, 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA, Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and Alkanes standard solution (C8-C20. The adsorption capacities of both synthesized adsorbents and commercial grade adsorbents (Carbotrap™ B and Carbotrap™ C were also compared. It was found that adsorbent A402, which was produced from coconut shell, activated with 40% (wt. potassium hydroxide and at activating temperature of 800°C for 1 hr, could adsorb higher amount of both HEMA and Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane than other synthesized adsorbents. The maximum adsorption capacity of adsorbent A402 in adsorbing HEMA and Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane were 77.87% and 50.82% respectively. These adsorption capabilities were 79.73% and 70.07% of the adsorption capacity of the commercial adsorbent Carbotrap™ B respectively. All three types of the synthesized adsorbent (A402, C302, C402 showed the capability to adsorb alkanes standard solution through the range of C8-C20 . However, their adsorption capacities were high in a specific range of C10-C11. The result from the isotherm plot was indicated that surface adsorption of synthesized adsorbent was isotherm type I while the surface adsorption of commercial adsorbent was isotherm type III.

  2. The different aspects of magnetism in cerium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sereni, J. G.

    1999-01-01

    Different factors related to the formation of the Cerium magnetic ground state are analyzed from its electronic structure, following a decreasing scale of energy. The studied behaviours include from nonmagnetic states, like those with valence instability, to different magnetic phase diagrams. The competition between the Kondo effect, which screens the magnetic moments and the magnetic interactions, that tends to order them is also described. In the ordered phase boundary the phenomena related to the incipient magnetisms are analyzed and related to deviations from the Fermi liquid behaviour and divergences of the thermodynamic parameters when the temperature tend to zero. Some experimental techniques are described and the difference between thermodynamical and control parameters analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the effect of pressure and ligand substitution. (Author) 22 refs

  3. Evaluation of the combination effect of different antiviral compounds against HIV in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1993-01-01

    3'-azido-3'deoxythymidine (AZT), a clinically used anti-HIV compound, was evaluated for antiviral effect on HIV infection in combination with other antiviral compounds in vitro. Interactions were evaluated by the median-effect principle and the isobologram technique. Synergistic effect was obtained...... by combining many evaluated antiviral agents with AZT. We observed a difference in the degree of synergism depending on the evaluated compound; the results indicate that compounds with the same target in the viral replicative cycle (ddI: 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, didanosine; d4T: 2',3'-dideoxy-2...

  4. Bioactive compounds in different cocoa (Theobroma cacao, L cultivars during fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Fontes Moreau Cruz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One component that contribute to the flavor and aroma of chocolate are the polyphenols, which have received much attention due to their beneficial implications to human health. Besides bioactive action, polyphenols and methylxantines are responsible for astringency and bitterness in cocoa beans. Another important point is its drastic reduction during cocoa processing for chocolate production and the difference between cultivars. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the modifications in monomeric phenolic compounds and methylxanthines during fermentation of three cocoa cultivars grown in southern Bahia. Cocoa beans from three cultivars were fermented and sun dried and monomeric phenolic compounds and methylxantines were determinated. The results showed that each cultivar have different amounts of phenolic compounds and the behaviour of them is different during fermentation. The amount of methylxantines varied but there was not a pattern for methylxantines behavior during process. In addition a huge reduction in phenolic compounds could be observed after drying. Differently of phenolic compounds, methylxantines did not have great modification after sun drying. So, the differences observed in this study between cultivars, take to the conclusion that the compounds studied in those cocoa cultivars have different behavior during fermentation and drying, which consequently, give to these cultivars differences in sensory characteristics.

  5. Evaluation of the combination effect of different antiviral compounds against HIV in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1993-01-01

    by combining many evaluated antiviral agents with AZT. We observed a difference in the degree of synergism depending on the evaluated compound; the results indicate that compounds with the same target in the viral replicative cycle (ddI: 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, didanosine; d4T: 2',3'-dideoxy-2......3'-azido-3'deoxythymidine (AZT), a clinically used anti-HIV compound, was evaluated for antiviral effect on HIV infection in combination with other antiviral compounds in vitro. Interactions were evaluated by the median-effect principle and the isobologram technique. Synergistic effect was obtained...... with the adhesion/penetration process of virus (ConA: Concanavalin A; DS: dextran sulfate) were most potent with AZT when used in rather high concentrations. At this moment in the HIV epidemic, these observations suggest that combinations of antiviral compounds should be evaluated in clinical trials, with the major...

  6. Analysis of volatile organic compound from Elaeis guineensis inflorescences planted on different soil types in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad Fahmi, M. H.; Ahmad Bukhary, A. K.; Norma, H.; Idris, A. B.

    2016-11-01

    The main attractant compound for Eleidobius kamerunicus to male spikelet Elaeis guineensis (oil palm) were determined by analyzing volatile organic compound extracted from E. guineenses inflorescences planted on different soil types namely peat soil, clay soil and sandy soil. Anthesizing male oil palm inflorescences were randomly choosen from palm aged between 4-5 years old age. Extraction of the volatiles from the oil palm inflorescences were performed by Accelerated Solvent Extraction method (ASE). The extracted volatile compound were determined by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Out of ten identified compound, estragole was found to be a major compound in sandy soil (37.49%), clay soil (30.71%) and peat soil (27.79%). Other compound such as 9,12-octadecadieonic acid and n-hexadecanoic acid were found as major compound in peat soil (27.18%) and (7.45%); sandy soil (14.15 %) and (9.31%); and clay soil (30.23%) and (4.99%). This study shows that estragole was the predominant volatile compound detected in oil palm inflorescences with highly concentrated in palm planted in sandy soil type.

  7. Life cycle responses of the midge Chironomus riparius to compounds with different modes of action.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinkovic, M.; Verweij, R.A.; Nummerdor, G.A.; Jonker, M.J.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    Compounds with different modes of action may affect life cycles of biota differently. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the impact of four chemicals with different modes of action, including the essential metal copper, the nonessential metal cadmium, the organometal

  8. Life cycle responses of the midge Chironomus riparius to compounds with different modes of action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinkovic, M.; Verweij, R.A.; Nummerdor, G.A.; Jonker, M.J.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    Compounds with different modes of action may affect life cycles of biota differently. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the impact of four chemicals with different modes of action, including the essential metal copper, the nonessential metal cadmium, the organometal

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 985 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 17 (2010), Alternating Direction Implicit Finite Difference Time Domain Acoustic Wave Algorithm, Abstract. E Ikata .... Vol 17 (2010), Analytic derivation of the wave profile and phase speed of sixth order Stokes waves in deep water, Abstract.

  10. Volatile compounds of Aspergillus strains with different abilities to produce ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeleń, Henryk H; Grabarkiewicz-Szczesna, Jadwiga

    2005-03-09

    Volatile compounds emitted by Aspergillus strains having different abilities to produce ochratoxin A were investigated. Thirteen strains of Aspergillus ochraceus, three belonging to the A. ochraceus group, and eight other species of Aspergillus were examined for their abilities to produce volatile compounds and ochratoxin A on a wheat grain medium. The profiles of volatile compounds, analyzed using SPME, in all A. ochraceus strains, regardless of their toxeginicity, were similar and comprised mainly of 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, 3-octanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-octene, and limonene. The prevailing compound was always 1-octen-3-ol. Mellein, which forms part of the ochratoxin A molecule, was found in both toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains. Volatile compounds produced by other Aspergillus strains were similar to those of A. ochraceus. Incubation temperatures (20, 24, and 27 degrees C) and water content in the medium (20, 30, and 40%) influenced both volatile compounds formation and ochratoxin A biosynthesis efficiency, although conditions providing the maximum amount of volatiles were different from those providing the maximum amount of ochratoxin A. The pattern of volatiles produced by toxigenic A. ochraceus strains does not facilitate their differentiation from nontoxigenic strains.

  11. Assessment of locomotion behavior in adult Zebrafish after acute exposure to different pharmacological reference compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the present study was to assess locomotor behavior of adult zebrafish after acute exposure to different pharmacological reference compounds. Materials and Methods: Adult zebrafish of 4-5-months-old were exposed to different concentrations of known reference compounds for 15 min. The test was conducted separately for each drug concentration as well as control. Locomotor activity parameters viz. distance travelled, speed, total mobile time, and total immobile time were recorded for each animal during the exposure period. Results: Out of 11 compounds tested, nine compounds showed decrease in locomotor behavior with significant changes in distance travelled, speed, total mobile time, and total immobile time. Caffeine exhibited biphasic response in locomotion behavior, while scopolamine failed to induce any significant changes. Conclusion: In view of the above findings, these results suggested that exposure of adult zebrafish with different known compounds produce the expected changes in the locomotion behavior; therefore, adult zebrafish can be used an alternative approach for the assessment of new chemical entities for their effect on locomotor behavior.

  12. Production and Recovery of Aroma Compounds Produced by Solid-State Fermentation Using Different Adsorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane B. P. Medeiros

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile compounds with fruity characteristics were produced by Ceratocystis fimbriata in two different bioreactors: columns (laboratory scale and horizontal drum (semi-pilot scale. Coffee husk was used as substrate for the production of volatile compounds by solid-state fermentation. The production of volatile compounds was significantly higher when horizontal drum bioreactor was used than when column bioreactors were used. These results showed that this model of bioreactor presents good perspectives for scale-up and application in an industrial production. Headspace analysis of the solid-state culture detected twelve compounds, among them: ethanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, ethyl propionate, and isoamyl acetate. Ethyl acetate was the predominant product in the headspace (28.55 µmol/L/g of initial dry matter. Activated carbon, Tenax-TA, and Amberlite XAD-2 were tested to perform the recovery of the compounds. The adsorbent columns were connected to the column-type bioreactor. All compounds present in the headspace of the columns were adsorbed in Amberlite XAD-2. With Tenax-TA, acetaldehyde was adsorbed in higher concentrations. However, the recovery found by using the activated carbon was very low.

  13. Aluminium and Aroma Compound Concentration in Beer During Storage at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Soldo Gjeldum

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem of aluminium in beer has been elaborated in several papers over the last decade. However, the effect of aluminium on organoleptic properties of beer has been observed in few papers where it has been stated that aluminium gives beer a »metallic« and bitter flavour without any observations on particular aroma compound changes. Also, the number of reports on precise changes of aroma components throughout different storage conditions is surprisingly scarce. In order to investigate the changes of aluminium concentration along with aroma compound changes, graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GF-AAS with Zeeman background correction and gas chromatography with static headspace sampler (GC-HSS were used in this work. Analyses were conducted periodically throughout seven months of storage on three different brands of beer from name breweries. Samples were taken before and after filling in aluminium cans. One part of samples was stored in a refrigerator (4 °C and the other in a thermostatic chamber (22 °C. The effects of beer brand and storage conditions on aluminium concentration and level of aroma compounds were measured. To prove the effect of aluminium concentration on the changes of aroma compounds, the adequate level of aluminium sulphate was added to bottled beer samples stored at 28 °C. Although different beer types showed significantly different aluminium concentration, it could be the result of other factors (different batches of identical beer type showed significantly different aluminium concentration as well. Samples that were stored in the refrigerator were protected from aluminium migration from the can to the beer and showed increased aroma stability. Level of aroma constituents of analyzed beer brands was significantly different. Elevated aluminium concentration did not have any noticeable effect on the level of aroma compounds in beer samples stored at 28 °C.

  14. GC–MS analysis of bioactive compounds present in different extracts of an endemic plant Broussonetia luzonica (Blanco (Moraceae leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franelyne Pataueg Casuga

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The three extracts possess major bioactive compounds that were identified and characterized spectroscopically. Thus, identification of different biologically active compounds in the extracts of B. luzonica leaves warrants further biological and pharmacological studies.

  15. Analysis of aroma compounds of Roselle by Dynamic Headspace Sampling using different preparation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhari, Nurul Hanisah Binti; Varming, Camilla; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin

    2015-01-01

    The influence of different methods of sample preparation on the aroma profiles of dried Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) was studied. Least amounts of aroma compounds were recovered by analysis of whole dry calyxes (WD) followed by ground dry (GD), blended together with water (BTW), and ground...

  16. [Corrosion resistance of casted titanium by compound treatments in the artificial saliva with different fluoride concentrations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-li; Guo, Tian-wen

    2012-09-01

    To study the corrosion resistance of casted titanium by plasma nitriding and TiN-coated compound treatments in the artificial saliva with different fluoride concentrations and to investigate whether compound treatments can increase the corrosion resistance of casted titanium. Potentiodynamic polarization technique was used to depict polarization curve and to measured the current density of corrosion (Icorr) and the electric potential of corrosion (Ecorr) of casted titanium (Group A) and casted titanium by compound treatments (Group B) in the artificial saliva with different fluoride concentrations. After electrochemical experiment, the microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The Icorrs of Group A and B in the artificial saliva of different fluoride concentrations were (1530.23 ± 340.12), (2290.36 ± 320.10), (4130.52 ± 230.17) nA and (2.62 ± 0.64), (7.37 ± 3.59), (10.76 ± 6.05) nA, respectively. The Ecorrs were (-0.93 ± 0.10), (-0.89 ± 0.21), (-0.57 ± 0.09) V and (-0.21 ± 0.04), (-0.17 ± 0.03), (-0.22 ± 0.03) V, respectively.The Icorrs of Group B were significantly lower (P compound treatments can significantly increase the corrosion resistance of casted titanium.

  17. Article Title:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Garima

    ). The significance level was set at different levels as P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.001. Results. General. When animals were exposed to a dose of 3 Gy gamma irradiation, no toxic effects in terms of sickness were observed in animals of any of ...

  18. Surface induces different crystal structures in a room temperature switchable spin crossover compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Denis; Liscio, Fabiola; Demitri, Nicola; Schäfer, Bernhard; Borgatti, Francesco; Torelli, Piero; Gobaut, Benoit; Panaccione, Giancarlo; Rossi, Giorgio; Degli Esposti, Alessandra; Gazzano, Massimo; Milita, Silvia; Bergenti, Ilaria; Ruani, Giampiero; Šalitroš, Ivan; Ruben, Mario; Cavallini, Massimiliano

    2016-01-07

    We investigated the influence of surfaces in the formation of different crystal structures of a spin crossover compound, namely [Fe(L)2] (LH: (2-(pyrazol-1-yl)-6-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine), which is a neutral compound thermally switchable around room temperature. We observed that the surface induces the formation of two different crystal structures, which exhibit opposite spin transitions, i.e. on heating them up to the transition temperature, one polymorph switches from high spin to low spin and the second polymorph switches irreversibly from low spin to high spin. We attributed this inversion to the presence of water molecules H-bonded to the complex tetrazolyl moieties in the crystals. Thin deposits were investigated by means of polarized optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro Raman spectroscopy; moreover the analysis of the Raman spectra and the interpretation of spin inversion were supported by DFT calculations.

  19. Volatile compound profile of sous-vide cooked lamb loins at different temperature-time combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Mar; Ruiz, Jorge; Del Pulgar, José Sánchez; Pérez-Palacios, Trinidad; Antequera, Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Lamb loins were subjected to sous-vide cooking at different combinations of temperature (60 and 80°C) and time (6 and 24h) to assess the effect on the volatile compound profile. Major chemical families in cooked samples were aliphatic hydrocarbons and aldehydes. The volatile compound profile in sous-vide cooked lamb loin was affected by the cooking temperature and time. Volatile compounds arising from lipid oxidation presented a high abundance in samples cooked at low or moderate cooking conditions (60°C for 6 and 24h, 80°C for 6h), while a more intense time and temperature combination (80°C for 24h) resulted on a higher concentration of volatile compounds arising from Strecker degradations of amino acids, as 2-methylpropanal and 3-methylbutanal. Therefore, sous-vide cooking at moderately high temperatures for long times would result in the formation of a stronger meaty flavor and roast notes in lamb meat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of different cooking methods on lipid oxidation and formation of volatile compounds in foal meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Rubén; Gómez, María; Fonseca, Sonia; Lorenzo, José M

    2014-06-01

    The influence of four different cooking methods (roasting, grilling, microwaving and frying) on cooking loss, lipid oxidation and volatile profile of foal meat was studied. Cooking loss were significantly (Pcooking methods increased TBARs content, since high temperature during cooking causes increased oxidation in foal steaks, this increase was significantly (Pcooking methods led to increased total volatile compounds (between 366.7 and 633.1AU×10(6)/g dry matter) compared to raw steaks (216.4AU×10(6)/g dry matter). The roasted steaks showed the highest volatile content, indicating that increased cooking temperature increases the formation of volatile compounds. Aldehydes were the most abundant compounds in cooked samples, with amounts of 217.2, 364.5, 283.5 and 409.1AU×10(6)/g dry matter in grilled, microwaved, fried and roasted samples, respectively, whereas esters were the most abundant compounds in raw samples, with mean amounts of 98.8AU×10(6)/g dry matter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. English title

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisel E. Meléndez Ramos

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The economic and social history tends to relate the power and the exercise of power of the leader with the men’s figure. However, within the context of business, more and more women show they can perform as effective leaders. This paper aims to provide an overview on the evolution of leadership theories and to present a different vision about effective leadership looked through the prism of genre. The central argument of the paper is that the polarization implicit within the constructs male leadership and female lead as separate entities is a futile exercise and is based on a stereotype. The important conclusion is that transformational leadership, as the center of worldwide accepted theories about leadership, not particular to a genre, but can be exercised both by men as by women.

  2. english title

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, Adolfo; Eppis, Maria Rosa

    1996-01-01

    One important parameter to specify in nuclear fuels is the oxygen-metal ratio, many tests were described in literature to determine it. Gravimetric methods are possibly the most used and usually a good precision was obtained analyzing sintered materials. However this method is affected by the humidity and impurities sorbed in the samples, especially in powders. The spectrophotometric methods determine oxygen-uranium ratio by measuring the absorbance of different ionic species in phosphoric acid. This technique is simply and is not affected by humidity and impurities. Owing to discrepancy in the results between both methods, it was carried out in our laboratory, a study on various gravimetric and spectrophotometric methods. Several assays and analysis were performed comparing test procedures, trying to obtain better precision and accuracy. This work presents the results obtained and the recommended procedure to use with sintered and unsintered materials. (author)

  3. Occurrence and removal of pharmaceutically active compounds in sewage treatment plants with different technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Guang-Guo; Kookana, Rai S.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2009-01-01

    Occurrence of eight selected pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs; caffeine, carbamazepine, triclosan, gemfibrozil, diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen and naproxen) were investigated in effluents from fifteen sewage treatment plants (STPs) across South Australia. In addition, a detailed investigation into the removal of these compounds was also carried out in four STPs with different technologies (Plant A: conventional activated sludge; plant B: two oxidation ditches; plant C: three bioreactors; and plant D: ten lagoons in series). The concentrations of these compounds in the effluents from the fifteen STPs showed substantial variations among the STPs, with their median concentrations ranging from 26 ng/L for caffeine to 710 ng/L for carbamazepine. Risk assessment based on the "worst case scenario" of the monitoring data from the present study suggested potential toxic risks to aquatic organisms posed by carbamazepine, triclosan and diclofenac associated with such effluent discharge. With the exception of carbamazepine and gemfibrozil, significant concentration decreases between influent and effluent were observed in the four STPs studied in more detail. Biodegradation was found to be the main mechanism for removing concentrations from the liquid waste stream for the PhACs within the four STPs, while adsorption onto sludge appeared to be a minor process for all target PhACs except for triclosan. Some compounds (e.g. gemfibrozil) exhibited variable removal efficiencies within the four STPs. Plant D (10 lagoons in series) was least efficient in the removal of the target PhACs; significant biodegradation of these compounds only occurred from the sixth or seventh lagoon.

  4. Effect of different GRAS compounds in the control of apples blue mould.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, T; Cubaiu, L; Ladu, G; D'Hallewin, G

    2013-01-01

    The most important pathogen for apples is Penicillium expansum that is the causal organism of blue mould. Postharvest losses are controlled with chemical fungicides such as TBZ but a growing concern for human health and a greater awareness for environmental conservation have multiplied the studies on new ecological technologies. In the search of new environment and consumer friendly technologies that can reduce toxic residues, the use of GRAS compounds represent a valid alternative to the use of synthetic postharvest fungicides. The aims of the present work were: (1) To evaluate the effectiveness of different GRAS compounds in the control of P. expansum in artificially inoculated fruit; (2) To assess the capability of injured and treated fruit with GRAS compounds, used alone or combined, to heal the wounds in order to resist to infection. Fruit was injured with a steel rod and after 1 hour was (1) Inoculated with the pathogen and after 24 hours treated or (2) Treated and after 24 hours inoculated. Treatments were performed with the following compounds: sodium bicarbonate (SBC), boric acid (BA) and calcium chloride (CC) by using a 1% solution for all of them. After 9 or 14 days fruit lesion diameters were assessed. In the trial (1) the combined treatment with BA and SBC was the most effective reducing the lesion diameter by 86.5% with respect to untreated fruit, after 9 days from infection. A good pathogen control was also obtained with BA used alone or combined with CC. When the treatment was performed before infection the best results were achieved with the combination of SBC and CC, with 87% of reduction of the lesion diameter. The addition of CC also reduced the lesion if combined with BA (66.8%). These preliminary results showed that GRAS compounds can be effective in reducing blue mold by a direct effect on the pathogen, and by modulating fruit responses enhancing host resistance.

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of different agave plants and the compound cantalasaponin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosas-Brisson, Nayeli; Ocampo, Martha L Arenas; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique; Jiménez-Aparicio, Antonio R; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Cortazar, Manases; Tortoriello, Jaime; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel

    2013-07-10

    Species of the agave genus, such as Agave tequilana, Agave angustifolia and Agave americana are used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat inflammation-associated conditions. These plants' leaves contain saponin compounds which show anti-inflammatory properties in different models. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory capacity of these plants, identify which is the most active, and isolate the active compound by a bio-directed fractionation using the ear edema induced in mice with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) technique. A dose of 6 mg/ear of acetone extract from the three agave species induced anti-inflammatory effects, however, the one from A. americana proved to be the most active. Different fractions of this species showed biological activity. Finally the F5 fraction at 2.0 mg/ear induced an inhibition of 85.6%. We identified one compound in this fraction as (25R)-5α-spirostan-3β,6α,23α-triol-3,6-di-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (cantalasaponin-1) through 1H- and 13C-NMR spectral analysis and two dimensional experiments like DEPT NMR, COSY, HSQC and HMBC. This steroidal glycoside showed a dose dependent effect of up to 90% of ear edema inhibition at the highest dose of 1.5 mg/ear.

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Different Agave Plants and the Compound Cantalasaponin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Tortoriello

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Species of the agave genus, such as Agave tequilana, Agave angustifolia and Agave americana are used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat inflammation-associated conditions. These plants’ leaves contain saponin compounds which show anti-inflammatory properties in different models. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory capacity of these plants, identify which is the most active, and isolate the active compound by a bio-directed fractionation using the ear edema induced in mice with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA technique. A dose of 6 mg/ear of acetone extract from the three agave species induced anti-inflammatory effects, however, the one from A. americana proved to be the most active. Different fractions of this species showed biological activity. Finally the F5 fraction at 2.0 mg/ear induced an inhibition of 85.6%. We identified one compound in this fraction as (25R-5α-spirostan-3β,6α,23α-triol-3,6-di-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (cantalasaponin-1 through 1H- and 13C-NMR spectral analysis and two dimensional experiments like DEPT NMR, COSY, HSQC and HMBC. This steroidal glycoside showed a dose dependent effect of up to 90% of ear edema inhibition at the highest dose of 1.5 mg/ear.

  7. Assessing two different peroxidases´ potential for application in recalcitrant organic compound bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Caicedo

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the promising future presented by the following enzymes: Chloroperoxidase (CPO from Caldariomyces fumago and royal palm peroxidase (Roystonea regia, PPR. These peroxidases were obtained from different sources (microbial and vegetable and used as biocatalysts for applicating them in bioremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds. Each one of the enzymes' peroxidase catalytic activity was evaluated in organic phase systems, using different model compounds such as: PAHs (pyrene and anthracene, organic-nitrogenated compounds (diphenylamine, monoaromatic phenolic molecules (guayacol and dyes (methyl orange and ABTS. The reaction systems were composed of mono-phase water mixtures and organic miscible solvent (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran, dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl formamide, on which both peroxidases' catalytic activity was evaluated. The two enzymes' catalytic activity was observed on the evaluated substrates in most of these assays. However, PPR did not show biocatalytic oxidation for methyl orange dye and some PAHs. This enzyme did show the best tolerance to the evaluated solvents. Its catalytic activity was appreciably enhanced when low hydrophobic solvents were used. The kcat was calculated from this experimental data (as kinetic parameter leading to each enzyme's biocatalytic performance on substrates being compared.

  8. Comparing the characteristics of highly cited titles and highly alted titles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didegah, F.; Bowman, T.D.; Bowman, S.; Hartley, J.

    2016-07-01

    This study examines differences in the types of titles for articles that show high altmetric activity (highly alted articles) versus highly cited articles. This work expands on previous research on document titles in combination with a grounded theory approach to develop a codebook in which articles were manually coded based on 11 characteristics. The results show that there are differences and similarities in titles across many of the examined characteristics; highly cited titles and highly mentioned titles on Wikipedia have some similar characteristics such as they have the the highest percentage of substantive words; in addition, there are no or very few titles referencing outside or with humor/lightness on both platforms. Twitter and Facebook also showed some similarities having the highest percentage of humorous/light titles and lowest percentage of substantive words in their titles. (Author)

  9. Some triterpenic compounds in extracts of Cecropia and Bauhinia species for different sampling years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Emilia Pietra Schmidt

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this paper is to provide an overview on the chemical composition of triterpenes in widespread used folk medicine species, through the development and validation of eleven compounds using HPLC-UV detection. The compounds were separated using isocratic elution, on a reverse phase column (Kinetex C18, 250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 µm with mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile:tetrahydrofuran (90:10, v/v, flow-rate of 0.5 ml/min and detection in 210 nm. Diverse validation parameters were successfully evaluated. The samples of Bauhinia variegata L., B. variegata var. candida Voigt, Fabaceae, Cecropia palmata Willd. and C. obtusa Trécul, Urticaceae, collected in 2012, 2013 and 2014 from Amazon were treated with two different solvents (ethyl acetate and chloroform and analyzed by the proposed method. Stigmasterol, lupeol, β-sitosterol, β-amirin and α-amirin were found in all the studied plants. Highlighting the presence of oleanolic acid, maslinic acid in C. obtusa and C. palmata extracts, erythrodiol only in C. palmata, stigmasteol in B. variegata and α-amirin in B. variegata var. candida. Overall, ethyl acetate showed better performance as the extractor solvent than chloroform. Moreover, it could be used for the quality control of medicinal plants and to assess potential marker compounds.

  10. Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Grafted Varieties of Bell Pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Chávez-Mendoza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Grafting favors the presence of bioactive compounds in the bell pepper, but many species and varieties have not yet been analyzed in this sense, including commonly grafted varieties. The aim of the present study is to characterize the content in β-carotenes, vitamin C, lycopene, total phenols, and the antioxidant activity of bell pepper (Capsicum annum L. using the cultivar/rootstock combinations: Jeanette/Terrano (yellow, Sweet/Robusto (green, Fascinato/Robusto (red, Orangela/Terrano (orange, and Fascinato/Terrano (red. The plants were grown in a net-shading system and harvested on three sampling dates of the same crop cycle. The results show statistical differences (p ≤ 0.05 between cultivar/rootstock combinations and sampling dates for the content in bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. Fascinato/Robusto presented the highest concentration of lycopene and total phenols as well as the greatest antioxidant activity of all cultivar/rootstock combinations evaluated. In addition, it was found that the best sampling time for the peppers to have the highest concentrations of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity was September.

  11. Effect of edible coatings on bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity of tomatoes at different maturity stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-Aviña, Jorge E; Villa-Rodríguez, José A; Villegas-Ochoa, Mónica A; Tortoledo-Ortiz, Orlando; Olivas, Guadalupe I; Ayala-Zavala, J Fernando; González-Aguilar, Gustavo A

    2014-10-01

    This work evaluated the effect of carnauba and mineral oil coatings on the bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity of tomato fruits (cv. "Grandela"). Carnauba and mineral oil coatings were applied on fresh tomatoes at two maturity stages (breaker and pink) over 28 day of storage at 10 °C was evaluated. Bioactive compound and antioxidant activity assays included total phenols, total flavonoids, ascorbic acid (ASA), lycopene, DPPH radical scavenging activity (%RSA), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay (ORAC). The total phenolic, flavonoid and lycopene contents were significantly lower for coated fruit than control fruits. However, ascorbic acid content was highest in fruits treated with carnauba, followed by mineral oil coating and control fruits. The ORAC values were highest in breaker tomatoes coated with carnauba wax, followed by mineral oil-coated fruits and controls. No significant differences in ORAC values were observed in pink tomatoes. % RSA and TEAC values were higher for controls than for coated fruit. Edible coatings preserve the overall quality of tomatoes during storage without affecting the nutritional quality of fruit. We found that the physiological response to the coatings is in function of the maturity stage of tomatoes. The information obtained in this study support to use of edible coating as a safe and good alternative to preserve tomato quality, and that the changes of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of tomato fruits, was not negatively affected. This approach can be used by producers to preserve tomato quality.

  12. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004): Special Issue 2004, Differential production of immune parameters by mouse strains ... agglutination and complement fixation tests in the field diagnosis ... List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

  13. Characterization of Active Compounds of Different Garlic (Allium sativum L. Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szychowski Konrad A.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum L. has a reputation as a therapeutic agent for many different diseases such as microbial infections, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes, atherosclerosis and cancer. Health benefits of garlic depend on its content of biologically-active compounds, which differs between cultivars and geographical regions. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the biological activity of aqueous extracts from nine garlic varieties from different countries (Poland, Spain, China, Portugal, Burma, Thailand and Uzbekistan. Antioxidant properties were evaluated through free radical scavenging (DPPH•, ABTS•+ and ion chelation (Fe2+, Cu2+ activities. The cytotoxicity of garlic extracts was evaluated in vitro using Neutral Red Uptake assay in normal human skin fibroblasts. The obtained results revealed that garlic extracts contained the highest amount of syringic and p-hydroxybenzoic acids derivatives. The lowest IC50 values for DPPH•, ABTS•+ scavenging and Cu2+ chelating ability were determined in Chinese garlic extracts (4.63, 0.43 and 14.90 μg/mL, respectively. Extracts from Spanish cultivar Morado and Chinese garlic were highly cytotoxic to human skin fibroblasts as they reduced cellular proliferation by 70–90%. We showed diverse contents of proteins and phenolic components in garlic bulbs from different varieties. The obtained results could help to choose the cultivars of garlic which contain significant amounts of active compounds, have important antioxidant properties and display low antiproliferative effect and/or low cytotoxicity against normal human skin fibroblast BJ.

  14. Phenolic compounds and sterol contents of olive (olea europaea l.) oils obtained from different

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhaimi, F.; Ghafoor, K.; Adiamo, O.Q.; Babiker, E.E.

    2017-01-01

    Oil obtained from 5 different olive cultivars was analyzed for phenolic and sterol composition. Total phenolic contents of oils were determined between 94.99 mg GAE/kg oil (Al-Joif) to 405.71 mg GAE/ kg oil (Sariulak) (p<0.05). Phenolic compounds of oils obtained from different olive verities (Ayvalik, Sariulak, Savrani, Al-Joif and Gemlik) when fully ripened were evaluated using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol were identified to have higher concentrations than other compounds. Tyrosol contents were between 3.65 mg/kg to 21.47 mg/kg oil (p<0.05) in different verities. The contents of hydroxytyrosol of oils for Ayvalik and Gemlik were 1.23 and 14.42 mg/kg, respectively. Cinnamic acid was detected only in Al-Joif olive oil sample. Low amounts of syringic, vanillin, p-cumaric, quercetin and luteolin were observed in different varieties' oils. (author)

  15. Differences in serum concentrations of organochlorine compounds by occupational social class in pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porta, Miquel; Bosch de Basea, Magda; Benavides, Fernando G.; Lopez, Tomas; Fernandez, Esteve; Marco, Esther; Alguacil, Juan; Grimalt, Joan O.; Puigdomenech, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    Background: The relationships between social factors and body concentrations of environmental chemical agents are unknown in many human populations. Some chemical compounds may play an etiopathogenic role in pancreatic cancer. Objective: To analyze the relationships between occupational social class and serum concentrations of seven selected organochlorine compounds (OCs) in exocrine pancreatic cancer: dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), 3 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene, and β-hexachlorocyclohexane. Methods: Incident cases of exocrine pancreatic cancer were prospectively identified, and interviewed face-to-face during hospital admission (n=135). Serum concentrations of OCs were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. Social class was classified according to occupation. Results: Multivariate-adjusted concentrations of all seven compounds were higher in occupational social classes IV-V (the less affluent) than in classes I-II; they were higher as well in class III than in classes I-II for four compounds. Concentrations of six OCs were higher in manual workers than in non-manual workers (p<0.05 for PCBs). Social class explained statistically between 3.7% and 5.7% of the variability in concentrations of PCBs, and 2% or less variability in the other OCs. Conclusions: Concentrations of most OCs were higher in the less affluent occupational social classes. In pancreatic cancer the putative causal role of these persistent organic pollutants may not be independent of social class. There is a need to integrate evidence on the contribution of different social processes and environmental chemical exposures to the etiology of pancreatic and other cancers

  16. Title IX Resource Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office for Civil Rights, US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) prohibits discrimination based on sex in education programs and activities in federally funded schools at all levels. If any part of a school district or college receives any Federal funds for any purpose, all of the operations of the district or college are covered by Title IX. The essence…

  17. Development of volatile compounds during storage of different skin care products at various conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, A. F.; Thomsen, Birgitte Raagaard; Hyldig, Grethe

    a storage experiment on three cleansing milks stored between 14 and 84 days, under different conditions. The samples were exposed to heat (20°C, 40°C and 50°C), light (samples at 20°C) and iron (samples at 40°C). Samples were analysed for their development of volatile compounds by dynamic headspace gas...... chromatography-mass spectrometry and peroxide value, and compared to samples stored at 2°C in the dark. In addition, sensory analyses were carried out to assess the off-odours developed in the samples....

  18. Natural characteristics analysis of two teeth difference external compound planet transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youdong YE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An analytical translational-rotational-coupling dynamic model is developed to evaluate the natural characteristics of two teeth difference external compound planet transmission by adopting centralized parameters method. The governing differential equations are established by deriving relative displacement relationships between all motional components, and Matlab is used to calculate and obtain the natural frequencies and free vibration modes of the transmission system. The analysis results show that the vibration modes are classified into rotational mode of the central members, translational mode of the central members and complicate vibration mode of the planetary gears. The vibration modes are different from the NGW planetary transmission, and especially the planetary gears vibration mode are quite complex with several different vibration modes. The research can provide useful reference for preventing resonance, vibration and noise reduction, and structure optimization of the planet transmission mode used in polishing grinding.

  19. Concentration of Umami Compounds in Pork Meat and Cooking Juice with Different Cooking Times and Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotola-Pukkila, Minna K; Pihlajaviita, Seija T; Kaimainen, Mika T; Hopia, Anu I

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the concentrations of umami compounds in pork loins cooked at 3 different temperatures and 3 different lengths of cooking times. The pork loins were cooked with the sous vide technique. The free amino acids (FAAs), glutamic acid and aspartic acid; the 5'-nucleotides, inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP); and corresponding nucleoside inosine of the cooked meat and its released juice were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under the experimental conditions used, the cooking temperature played a more important role than the cooking time in the concentration of the analyzed compounds. The amino acid concentrations in the meat did not remain constant under these experimental conditions. The most notable effect observed was that of the cooking temperature and the higher amino acid concentrations in the released juice of meat cooked at 80 °C compared with 60 and 70 °C. This is most likely due to the heat induced hydrolysis of proteins and peptides releasing water soluble FAAs from the meat into the cooking juice. In this experiment, the cooking time and temperature had no influence on the IMP concentrations observed. However, the AMP concentrations increased with the increasing temperature and time. This suggests that the choice of time and temperature in sous vide cooking affects the nucleotide concentration of pork meat. The Sous vide technique proved to be a good technique to preserve the cooking juice and the results presented here show that cooking juice is rich in umami compounds, which can be used to provide a savory or brothy taste. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Age differences in visual search for compound patterns: long- versus short-range grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burack, J A; Enns, J T; Iarocci, G; Randolph, B

    2000-11-01

    Visual search for compound patterns was examined in observers aged 6, 8, 10, and 22 years. The main question was whether age-related improvement in search rate (response time slope over number of items) was different for patterns defined by short- versus long-range spatial relations. Perceptual access to each type of relation was varied by using elements of same contrast (easy to access) or mixed contrast (hard to access). The results showed large improvements with age in search rate for long-range targets; search rate for short-range targets was fairly constant across age. This pattern held regardless of whether perceptual access to a target was easy or hard, supporting the hypothesis that different processes are involved in perceptual grouping at these two levels. The results also point to important links between ontogenic and microgenic change in perception (H. Werner, 1948, 1957).

  1. Driver exposure to volatile organic compounds, CO, ozone, and NO2 under different driving conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changchuan Chan; Oezkaynak, H.; Spengler, J.D.; Sheldon, L.

    1991-01-01

    The in-vehicle concentrations of 24 gasoline-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and three criteria air pollutants, ozone, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide, were measured in the summer of 1988, in Raleigh, NC. Two four-door sedan of different ages were used to evaluate in-vehicle concentrations of these compounds under different driving conditions. Factors that could influence driver exposure, such as different traffic patterns, car model, vehicle ventilation conditions, and driving periods, were evaluated. Isopentane was the most abundant aliphatic hydrocarbon and toluene was the most abundant aromatic VOC measured inside the vehicles. In-vehicle VOC and CO concentrations were highest for the urban roadway, second highest for the interstate highway, and lowest for the rural road. The median concentration ratio of urban/interstate/rural for each VOC was about 10/6/1. No differences in in-vehicle VOC concentrations were found between morning and afternoon rush hour driving, but higher in-vehicle ozone and NO 2 concentrations were found during afternoon driving. In-vehicle VOC levels were lowest with the air conditioner on and highest when the vent was open with the fan on. The in-vehicle/car exterior concentration ratio for VOCs, CO, and NO 2 was slightly higher than 1. The VOC concentration measured by a pedestrian on the urban sidewalk was lower than the in-vehicle measurements but higher than the fixed-site measurements but higher than the fixed-site measurements on urban roadways 50 m from streets. The VOC measurements were positively correlated with the CO measurement and negatively correlated with the ozone measurement

  2. Electrochemical studies, in-situ and ex-situ characterizations of different manganese compounds electrodeposited in aerated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peulon, S.; Lacroix, A.; Chausse, A.; Larabi-Gruet, N.

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the electrodeposition of manganese compounds. A systematic study of the synthesis experimental conditions has been carried out, and the obtained depositions have been characterized by different ex-situ analyses methods (XRD, FTIR, SEM). The in-situ measurements of mass increase with a quartz microbalance during the syntheses have allowed to estimate the growth mechanisms which are in agreement with the ex-situ characterizations. The cation has an important role in the nature of the electrodeposited compounds. In presence of sodium, a mixed lamellar compound Mn(III)/Mn(IV), the birnessite, is deposited, whereas in presence of potassium, bixbyite is formed (Mn 2 O 3 ), these two compounds having a main role in the environment. The substrate can also influence the nature of the formed intermediary compounds. Little studied compounds such as feitkneichtite (β-MnOOH) and groutite (α-MnOOH) have been revealed. (O.M.)

  3. Spectral determination of individual rare earths in different classes of inorganic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, L.I.; Fadeeva, L.A.; Shevchenko, L.D.

    1979-01-01

    The conditions are found allowing to analyze various inorganic compounds for rare-earth elements without separation from non-rare-earth components. The influence of the plasma composition on the intensity of spectral lines of rare-earth elements is studied. The relative intensity of homologous spectral lines of various rare-earth elements remains constant regardless of the plasma composition. The conditions are found for the determination of individual rare-earth elements acting as both alloying additives (Csub(n) -- n x 10 -1 -n x 10 -3 %), and basic components (up to tens of per cent) in different classes of inorganic compounds of 1-7 elements. The general method is developed for the determination of individual rare-earth elements in mixtures of oxides of rare-earth elements, complex fluorides of rare-earth elements and elements of group 2, gallates, borates, germanates, vanadates of rare-earth elements and aluminium; zirconates-titanates of lead and barium, containing modifying additives of rare-earth elements, complex chalcogenides of rare-earth elements and elements of group 5

  4. Fingerprint profiles of flavonoid compounds from different Psidium guajava leaves and their antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wu, Yanan; Bei, Qi; Shi, Kan; Wu, Zhenqiang

    2017-10-01

    Flavonoids are the main active components in Psidium guajava leaves and have many multi-physiological functions. In this study, the flavonoid compositions were identified in the Psidium guajava leaves samples using a high-performance liquid chromatography with time-of-flight electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method. A high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint method, combined with chemometrics, was used to perform a quality assessment of the Psidium guajava leaves samples. The eight identified flavonoid compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, quercetin-3-O-β-d-xylopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-α-l-arabinopyranoside, avicularin, quercitrin, quercetin, and kaempferol were used as the chemical markers. The antioxidant activity of 15 batches of samples was examined using three different methods, and the results revealed the Psidium guajava leaves samples that had higher contents of the flavonoid compounds, glycoside and aglycone, possessed the highest antioxidant capacities. Consequently, a combination of chromatographic fingerprints and chemometric analyses was used for a quality assessment of Psidium guajava leaf tea and its derived products, which can lay the foundation for the development of plant tea resources or other herbs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Content and Phrasing in Titles of Original Research and Review Articles in 2015: Range of Practice in Four Clinical Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ellen Kerans

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Reporting guidelines for clinical research designs emerged in the mid-1990s and have influenced various aspects of research articles, including titles, which have also been subject to changing uses with the growth of electronic database searching and efforts to reduce bias in literature searches. We aimed (1 to learn more about titles in clinical medicine today and (2 to develop an efficient, reliable way to study titles over time and on the fly—for quick application by authors, manuscript editors, translators and instructors. We compared content and form in titles from two general medical journals—the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM and the British Medical Journal—and two anesthesiology journals (the European Journal of Anaesthesiology and Anesthesiology; we also analyzed the inter-rater reliability of our coding. Significant content differences were found in the frequencies of mentions of methods, results (between general and subspecialty titles, and geographic setting; phrasing differences were found in the prevalence of full-sentence and compound titles (and their punctuation. NEJM titles were significantly shorter, and this journal differed consistently on several features. We conclude that authors must learn to efficiently survey titles for form and content patterns when preparing manuscripts to submit to unfamiliar journals or on resubmitting to a new journal after rejection.

  6. Data on changes in red wine phenolic compounds, headspace aroma compounds and sensory profile after treatment of red wines with activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Filipe-Ribeiro, Lu?s; Milheiro, Juliana; Matos, Carlos C.; Cosme, Fernanda; Nunes, Fernando M.

    2017-01-01

    Data in this article presents the changes on phenolic compounds, headspace aroma composition and sensory profile of a red wine spiked with 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol and treated with seven activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics, namely surface area, micropore volume and mesopore volume (“Reduction of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol in red wine by activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics: impact on wine quality” Filipe-Ribeiro et al. (...

  7. The Influence of Different Air-Drying Conditions on Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Mariela C; Rocha-Parra, Diego; Sampedro, Ines; de Pascual-Teresa, Sonia; León, Alberto E

    2018-03-21

    The aim of the present research was to study the effect of convective drying on color, bioactive compounds, and antioxidant activity of berry fruits and to chemically characterize the polyphenolic composition of raspberry, boysenberry, redcurrants, and blackcurrants fruit. Drying berries at 65 °C provoked the best conservations of color, particularly for boysenberry and blackcurrant. Drying at 65 °C was also the condition that showed higher level of polyphenols, while drying at 50 or 130 °C showed above % degradation of them due to the long time or high temperature drying. Radical scavenging activity was the predominant antioxidant mechanism in all samples, with 65 °C dried berries being the most active ones possibly because of polyphenol depolymerization. The anthocyanin profile showed that delphinidin and cyanidin derivatives were the most abundant anthocyanidins with different predominance between berry genera. Degradation of anthocyanins was increased with drying temperature been Cy 3-glucoside and Cy 3-rutinoside the most abundant.

  8. Compound quarks and gluons and parton confinement (proposal of a different approach)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolikowski, W.

    1978-01-01

    The author develops further the compound model proposed in 1971, where coloured quarks are factorized into elementary constituents carrying separately the flavour and colour quantum numbers and obeying the 'compensating' wrong statistics. An 'effective quantum chromodynamics' is conjectured, where both coloured quarks and vector gluons (which obey good statistics) are factorized into elementary constituents obeying wrong statistics. Then the Pauli connection of spin and statistics confines these elementary constituents within bound states obeying good statistics. In the parton model approximation with these elementary constituents as partons it prevents also coloured quarks and vector gluons from appearing as free particles. The expected confinement violation for coloured quarks and vector gluons and the observed scaling violation have here a common origin, namely the clustering of elementary constituents inside hadrons. The basic difference between leptons and quarks is related in this model to wrong statistics of elementary constituents involved in the quark structure. (Auth.)

  9. Effects of different drying methods on the product quality and volatile compounds of whole shiitake mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuting; Zhao, Yingting; Huang, Jijun; Zeng, Hongliang; Zheng, Baodong

    2016-04-15

    Various drying methods play important roles in the preservation of foods. However, how the different drying methods affect the quality of some foods is not clear. This paper evaluates the effects of hot air, vacuum, microwave, and microwave vacuum drying techniques on important qualities and volatile compounds of whole shiitake (Lentinus edodes) mushrooms. These four drying methods resulted in a significantly (pdried products. Microwave vacuum drying helped to maintain larger amounts of taste-active amino acids, and improved nutrient retention and color attributes. Furthermore, the uniform honeycomb network created by microwave vacuum drying along with a less collapsed structure of dried samples can be used to explain the observed high rehydration ratio. Therefore, microwave vacuum drying should be a potential method for obtaining high-quality dried mushrooms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of Binary Organogels Based on Some Azobenzene Compounds and Alkyloxybenzoic Acids with Different Chain Lengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmei Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the gelation behaviors of binary organogels composed of azobenzene amino derivatives and alkyloxybenzoic acids with different lengths of alkyl chains in various organic solvents were investigated and characterized. The corresponding gelation behaviors in 20 solvents were characterized and shown as new binary organic systems. It showed that the lengths of substituent alkyl chains in compounds have played an important role in the gelation formation of gelator mixtures in present tested organic solvents. Longer methylene chains in molecular skeletons in these gelators seem more suitable for the gelation of present solvents. Morphological characterization showed that these gelator molecules have the tendency to self-assemble into various aggregates from lamella, wrinkle, and belt to dot with change of solvents and gelator mixtures. Spectral characterization demonstrated different H-bond formation and hydrophobic force existing in gels, depending on different substituent chains in molecular skeletons. Meanwhile, these organogels can self-assemble to form monomolecular or multilayer nanostructures owing to the different lengths of due to alkyl substituent chains. Possible assembly modes for present xerogels were proposed. The present investigation is perspective to provide new clues for the design of new nanomaterials and functional textile materials with special microstructures.

  11. PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS, ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY AND PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS OF TOMATOES FERTIGATED WITH DIFFERENT NITROGEN RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCOS FILGUEIRAS JORGE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the physicochemical and microbiological characteristics, antioxidant capacity and phenolic compounds of organic cherry tomatoes grown under fertigation with organic dairy cattle wastewater (DCW with different nitrogen rates. Tomato plants, grown in an agroecological farm in Seropédica, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were subjected to four different nitrogen rates (T1=0, T2=50, T3=100 and T4=150% of N. The moisture, lipids, ashes, protein and total fiber contents, soluble solids (ºBrix, reducing and total sugars (%, pH and total titratable acidity (mg NaOH per 100 g were evaluated. The total phenolic content (TPC and the antioxidant capacity was determined by the DPPH and FRAP methods. The different nitrogen rates (%N affected the pH, protein and soluble solids contents. The increase in %N increased the antioxidant capacities, according to the DPPH assay, and TPC. On the other hand, the tomatoes under fertigation with the highest %N presented lower antioxidant capacities according to the FRAP assay. The fertigation did not affect the microbiological characteristics of the tomatoes, which presented fecal coliforms count <3 NMP g-1 and absence of Salmonella in 25 g.

  12. Laboratory evaluation of a gasifier particle sampling system using model compounds of different particle morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Patrik T.; Malik, Azhar; Pagels, Joakim; Lindskog, Magnus; Rissler, Jenny; Gudmundsson, Anders; Bohgard, Mats; Sanati, Mehri [Lund University, Division of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology, P.O. Box 118, Lund (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    The objective of this work was to design and evaluate an experimental setup to be used for field studies of particle formation in biomass gasification processes. The setup includes a high-temperature dilution probe and a denuder to separate solid particles from condensable volatile material. The efficiency of the setup to remove volatile material from the sampled stream and the influence from condensation on particles with different morphologies is presented. In order to study the sampling setup model, aerosols were created with a nebulizer to produce compact and solid KCl particles and a diffusion flame burner to produce agglomerated and irregular soot particles. The nebulizer and soot generator was followed by an evaporation-condensation section where volatile material, dioctylsebacete (DOS), was added to the system as a tar model compound. The model aerosol particles were heated to 200 C to create a system containing both solid particles and volatile organic material in gas phase. The heated aerosol particles were sampled and diluted at the same temperature with the dilution probe. Downstream the probe, the DOS was adsorbed in the denuder. This was achieved by slowly decreasing the temperature of the diluted sample towards ambient level in the denuder. Thereby the supersaturation of organic vapors was reduced which decreased the probability for tar condensation and nucleation of new particles. Both the generation system and the sampling technique gave reproducible results. A DOS collection efficiency of >99% was achieved if the denuder inlet concentration was diluted to less than 1-6 mg/m{sup 3} depending on the denuder flow rate. Concentrations higher than that lead to significant impact on the resulting KCl size distribution. The choice of model compounds was done to study the effect from the particle morphology on the achieved particle characteristics after the sampling setup. When similar amounts of volatile material condensed on soot agglomerates and

  13. Sensory analysis and volatile compounds of olive oil (cv. Cobrancosa) from different irrigation regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes-Silva, A. A.; Falco, V.; Correia, C. M.; Villalobos, F. J.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different irrigation strategies on the sensory quality of virgin olive oil VOO) from the cv. cobrancosa- integrated into a protected denomination of origin of Azeite de Tras-os-Montes in the Northeast of Portugal. Three irrigation treatments were applied: (T2)-full irrigation, which received a seasonal water equivalent of 100% of the estimated crop evapotranspiration (ET{sub c}), (T1)-continuous deficit irrigation (30% ETc) and (T0)- rainfed treatment. Data were collected from two consecutive crop years (2005-2006). Olive oil samples were analyzed for volatiles by GC-MS and the results compared with sensory evaluation data. Total volatile compounds tended to decrease with the amount of water applied. The characteristics pungent and bitter were more pronounced in olive oils from T0 and T1, which had higher polyphenolic concentrations, with a strong positive relationship with this variable and the bitter attribute. The Principal Components Analysis clearly separates the three olive oils from 2005, the driest year, and aggregates into a single group the three samples from 2006, suggesting no effect of irrigation on volatile compounds in years with a rainy spring and a marked effect in years with severe drought, suggesting that the effect of the trees’ water status on these variables occurs throughout the crop season and not just during the oil accumulation phase. In general, olive oil from the cv. Cobrançosa is more bitter than pungent and has a typical nutty sensory attribute shown by a strong positive relationship between benzaldehyde and the sensory notes of almonds and nuts. (Author) 34 refs.

  14. Steam reforming of different biomass tar model compounds over Ni/Al_2O_3 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artetxe, Maite; Alvarez, Jon; Nahil, Mohamad A.; Olazar, Martin; Williams, Paul T.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Order of reactivity: anisole > furfural > indene > phenol > toluene > methyl naphthalene. • Higher coke deposition for oxygenates (1.5–2.8%) than for aromatics (0.5–0.8%). • Amorphous coke is deposited for oxygenates and filamentous carbon for aromatics. • Ni content of 20 wt.% shows the higher conversion (90%) and H_2 potential (63%). - Abstract: This work focuses on the removal of the tar derived from biomass gasification by catalytic steam reforming on Ni/Al_2O_3 catalysts. Different tar model compounds (phenol, toluene, methyl naphthalene, indene, anisole and furfural) were individually steam reformed (after dissolving each one in methanol), as well as a mixture of all of them, at 700 °C under a steam/carbon (S/C) ratio of 3 and 60 min on stream. The highest conversions and H_2 potential were attained for anisole and furfural, while methyl naphthalene presented the lowest reactivity. Nevertheless, the higher reactivity of oxygenates compared to aromatic hydrocarbons promoted carbon deposition on the catalyst (in the 1.5–2.8 wt.% range). When the concentration of methanol is decreased in the feedstock and that of toluene or anisole is increased, the selectivity to CO is favoured in the gaseous products, thus increasing coke deposition on the catalyst and decreasing catalyst activity for the steam reforming reaction. Moreover, an increase in Ni loading in the catalyst from 5 to 20% enhances carbon conversion and H_2 formation in the steam reforming of a mixture of all the model compounds studied, but these values decrease for a Ni content of 40%. Coke formation also increased by increasing Ni loading, attaining its maximum value for 40% Ni (6.5 wt.%).

  15. Data on changes in red wine phenolic compounds and headspace aroma compounds after treatment of red wines with chitosans with different structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Filipe-Ribeiro

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Data in this article presents the changes on phenolic compounds and headspace aroma abundance of a red wine spiked with 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol and treated with a commercial crustacean chitin (CHTN, two commercial crustacean chitosans (CHTB, CHTD, one fungal chitosan (CHTF, one additional chitin (CHTNA and one additional chitosan (CHTC produced by alkaline deacetylation of CHTN and CHTB, respectively. Chitin and chitosans presented different structural features, namely deacetylation degree (DD, average molecular weight (MW, sugar and mineral composition (“Reducing the negative sensory impact of volatile phenols in red wine with different chitosan: effect of structure on efficiency” (Filipe-Ribeiro et al., 2018 [1]. Statistical data is also shown, which correlates the changes in headspace aroma abundance of red wines with the chitosans structural features at 10 g/h L application dose. Keywords: Red wine, 4-Ethylphenol, 4-Ethylguaiacol, Chitosan, Chitin, Chromatic characteristics, Phenolic compounds, Headspace aroma abundance

  16. Accumulation of mercury in selected plant species grown in soils contaminated with different mercury compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Yi; Han, Fengxiang; Shiyab, Safwan; Chen, Jian; Monts, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of our research is to screen and search for suitable plant species for phyto-remediation of mercury-contaminated soil. Currently our effort is specifically focused on mercury removal from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, where mercury contamination is a major concern. In order to cost effectively implement mercury remediation efforts, it is necessary now to obtain an improved understanding of biological means of removing mercury and mercury compounds.. Phyto-remediation is a technology that uses various plants to degrade, extract, contain, or immobilize contaminants from soil and water. In particular, phyto-extraction is the uptake of contaminants by plant roots and translocation within the plants to shoots or leaves. Contaminants are generally removed by harvesting the plants. We have investigated phyto-extraction of mercury from contaminated soil by using some of the known metal-accumulating plants since no natural plant species with mercury hyper-accumulating properties has yet been identified. Different natural plant species have been studied for mercury uptake, accumulation, toxicity and overall mercury removal efficiency. Various mercury compounds, such as HgS, HgCl 2 , and Hg(NO 3 ) 2 , were used as contaminant sources. Different types of soil were examined and chosen for phyto-remediation experiments. We have applied microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectrometry as well as conventional analytical chemistry to monitor the phyto-remediation processes of mercury uptake, translocation and accumulation, and the physiological impact of mercury contaminants on selected plant species. Our results indicate that certain plant species, such as beard grass (Polypogon monospeliensis), accumulated a very limited amount of mercury in the shoots ( 2 powder, respectively; no visual stress symptoms were observed. We also studied mercury phyto-remediation using aged soils that contained HgS, HgCl 2 , or Hg(NO 3 ) 2 . We have found that up to hundreds

  17. Effect of different iron compounds on wheat and gluten-free breads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiskini, Alexandra; Kapsokefalou, Maria; Yanniotis, Stavros; Mandala, Ioanna

    2010-05-01

    Iron fortification of bread often results in sub-optimal quality of the final product due to undesirable changes in the physical characteristics and sensory properties of the bread. In this study both the form of iron (soluble, insoluble or encapsulated) and the type of bread (wheat or gluten-free) were varied in order to investigate the effect of iron and gluten on the product characteristics. The effect of iron on the quality characteristics of the breads investigated depended on iron type, but not on iron solubility. Colour, crust firmness, specific volume, cell number and uniformity as well as aroma were the attributes that were mainly affected in iron-enriched wheat bread. In some cases, specific volume was 30% lower than that of the control sample, while cell uniformity was significantly lower, as low as 50% of the control sample in some fortified samples. In gluten-free breads, differences between unfortified and fortified samples included colour, crust firmness, cell number, 'moisture' odour, metallic taste and stickiness. In some cases, the sensory scores were better for fortified samples. Differences due to iron fortification were less pronounced in gluten-free compared to wheat breads. The choice of the appropriate iron compound which will not cause adverse quality changes is still a challenge.

  18. Microbial production of volatile sulphur compounds in the large intestine of pigs fed two different diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, H V; Jensen, B B; Finster, K; Spence, C; Whitehead, T R; Cotta, M A; Canibe, N

    2012-07-01

      To investigate the production of volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) in the segments of the large intestine of pigs and to assess the impact of diet on this production.   Pigs were fed two diets based on either wheat and barley (STD) or wheat and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS). Net production of VSC and potential sulphate reduction rate (SRR) (sulphate saturated) along the large intestine were determined by means of in vitro incubations. The net production rate of hydrogen sulphide and potential SRR increased from caecum towards distal colon and were significantly higher in the STD group. Conversely, the net methanethiol production rate was significantly higher in the DDGS group, while no difference was observed for dimethyl sulphide. The number of sulphate-reducing bacteria and total bacteria were determined by quantitative PCR and showed a significant increase along the large intestine, whereas no diet-related differences were observed.   VSC net production varies widely throughout the large intestine of pigs and the microbial processes involved in this production can be affected by diet.   This first report on intestinal production of all VSC shows both spatial and dietary effects, which are relevant to both bowel disease- and odour mitigation research. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 229 ... Browse Title Index ... Issue, Title. Vol 14, No 2 ... Vol 15, No 1 (2017), Qualitative and quantitative methods of suicide research in old age, Abstract PDF ... Vol 11, No 2 (2013), Simple Algorithm in the Management of Fetal ...

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 488 ... African Journal of Paediatric Surgery. ... Ileocecal valve atresia: Introduction of a new surgical approach ... Vol 4, No 1 (2007), Isolated Bilateral Macrostomia: Case Series and ... Vol 9, No 2 (2012), Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in ... List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 601 - 650 of 788 ... Browse Title Index ... Issue, Title ... Vol 14, No 1 (2006), Social science research: a critique of quantitative and qualitative methods ... Vol 18, No 1 (2010), Stress among part-time business students: a study in a Ghanaian ...

  2. Title to mining properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouch, K.M.

    1976-01-01

    The requirements of the law which must be met in order to create title to an unpatented mining claim and the procedures which should be followed when an attempt is made to determine the title to the claim is acceptable are reviewed

  3. Evaluation of different compound fertilizers for use in oil palm nursery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The standard NPKMg 12:12:17:2 compound fertilizer (SF) for oil palm nurseries is not always available when needed. Evaluation of other compound fertilizers – NKP 15:15:15 and NPK 20:10:10 – compared with the SF were carried out in the main nursery at NIFOR to ascertain their suitability and rates of application.

  4. Sexual Differences in Chemical Composition and Aroma-active Compounds of Essential Oil from Flower Buds of Eurya japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Usami, Atsushi; Tanaka, Takio; Tsuji, Kaoru; Takehara, Manami; Hori, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the composition of essential oil from buds of male and female Eurya japonica flowers and to determine the aroma-active compounds of this plant by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), sensory evaluation, and odor activity values (OAV). The oils contained eighty-five compounds. We identified for the first time forty-four compounds in E. japonica. Through sensory evaluation, nineteen aroma-active compounds were identified by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O). Because the chemical composition can affect the interaction between plants and herbivorous insects, our results suggest that essential oils from male and female flower buds of E. japonica differently affect herbivores. Sexual differences in essential oils deserve further investigations in this plant-insect system.

  5. Phenolic compounds and saponins in quinoa samples (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) grown under different saline and nonsaline irrigation regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Iafelice, Giovanna; Lavini, Antonella; Pulvento, Cataldo; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Marconi, Emanuele

    2012-05-09

    Quinoa is a pseudocereal from South America that has received increased interest around the world because it is a good source of different nutrients and rich in antioxidant compounds. Thus, this study has focused on the effects of different agronomic variables, such as irrigation and salinity, on the phenolic and saponin profiles of quinoa. It was observed that irrigation with 25% of full water restitution, with and without the addition of salt, was associated with increases in free phenolic compounds of 23.16 and 26.27%, respectively. In contrast, bound phenolic compounds were not affected by environmental stresses. Saponins decreased if samples were exposed to drought and saline regimens. In situations of severe water deficit, the saponins content decreased 45%, and 50% when a salt stress was added. The results suggest that irrigation and salinity may regulate the production of bioactive compounds in quinoa, influencing its nutritional and industrial values.

  6. Comparative study of thyroid fixation of different iodine compounds; Etude comparative de la fixation thyroidienne de differents composes iodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, R; Coeur, A; Raynfeld, Ch [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the thyroid fixation of various iodine compounds in mineral or organic form. The animals (rats) are given therapeutic doses of the derivative orally with the object of saturating the thyroid, and then receive a determined dose of radio-iodine 131 by intra-peritoneal injection; any fixation of this latter is then measured under anaesthetic by means of a scintillation counter. Whatever form of iodine derivative was used whether in ionic (potassium iodide type) or organic form (iodo-tannic syrup) or in the form of elementary iodine (iodinated water), thyroid saturation was always obtained, as shown by practically zero fixation of the 4 {mu}curies of iodine 131 administered by intra-peritoneal injection. (author) [French] Notre travail a pour but l'etude de la fixation thyroidienne de differents composes iodes sous forme minerale ou organique. Les animaux (rats), apres absorption orale de doses therapeutiques de derives destines a saturer leur thyroide recoivent par voie intra-peritoneale une dose determinee de radio-iode {sup 131}I, la fixation eventuelle de ce dernier est ensuite mesuree sous anesthesie en utilisant un compteur a scintillation. Quelle que soit la forme utilisee, c'est-a-dire derive iode sous forme ionique (type iodure de potassium) ou sous forme organique (sirop iodotanique) ou encore sous forme d'iode metalloidique (eau iodee), nous avons obtenu chaque fois une saturation thyroidienne mise en evidence par une fixation pratiquement nulle des 4 {mu}curies de l'iode 131 injectes par voie intraperitoneale. (auteur)

  7. Phase relation of LaFe11· 6Si1· 4 compounds annealed at different ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 35; Issue 2. Phase relation of LaFe11.6Si1.4 compounds annealed at different high-temperature and the magnetic property of LaFe11.6−CoSi1.4 compounds. Xiang Chen Yungui Chen Yongbai Tang. Volume 35 Issue 2 April 2012 pp 175-182 ...

  8. Volatile compounds profiles in unroasted Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora beans from different countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel KNYSAK

    Full Text Available Abstract Aroma is the most important factor in assessing the quality of coffee. The volatile compounds profile could be very important to confirm the authenticity of Coffea arabica. The study was carried out on two species of unroasted coffee beans: Coffea arabica from Colombia and Nepal and Coffea robusta from Uganda and Vietnam. Both Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora were imported to the country of analysis approximately 5 months prior to the research. Before the analysis, the coffee beans were kept in a sealed, dark container, at 21 °C. The tests were performed using an electronic nose. Its functioning is based on gas chromatography with two columns of different polarities in parallel and with 2 ultra sensitive Flame Ionization Detectors (FID. With multivariate statistics – Principal Components Analysis – it was possible to reduce the number of links and present them in two dimensions, which allowed for the unambiguous identification and assignment of samples to a particular species of coffee. By using an electronic nose, one can distinguish and group unroasted coffee beans’ flavours depending on the country of origin and species.

  9. Bioactive compounds and quality parameters of avocado oil obtained by different processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumreich, Fernanda D; Borges, Caroline D; Mendonça, Carla Rosane B; Jansen-Alves, Cristina; Zambiazi, Rui C

    2018-08-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of avocado oil whose pulp was processed through different drying and oil extraction methods. The physicochemical characteristics of avocados cv. Breda were determined after drying the pulp in an oven under ventilation (40 °C and 60 °C) and vacuum oven (60 °C), followed by the oil extracted by mechanical pressing or the Soxhlet method. From the approximately 72% pulp found in the avocado fruit, the 16% fraction is lipids. The quality indices evaluated in avocado oil showed better results when the pulp was dried at 60 °C under vacuum and oil extraction was done by the Soxhlet method with petroleum ether, whereas the bioactive compounds were better preserved when the avocado pulp was dried at 60 °C under ventilation and mechanical pressing was used for the oil extraction. Among the fatty acids found, oleic acid was the main. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evolutions of volatile sulfur compounds of Cabernet Sauvignon wines during aging in different oak barrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dong-Qing; Zheng, Xiao-Tian; Xu, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Yun-He; Duan, Chang-Qing; Liu, Yan-Lin

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in Cabernet Sauvignon wines from seven regions of China during maturation in oak barrels was investigated. The barrels were made of different wood grains (fine and medium) and toasting levels (light and medium). Twelve VSCs were quantified by GC/FPD, with dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and methionol exceeding their sensory thresholds. Most VSCs tended to decline during the aging, while DMS was found to increase. After one year aging, the levels of DMS, 2-methyltetrahy-drothiophen-3-one and sulfur-containing esters were lower in the wines aged in oak barrels than in stainless steel tanks. The wood grain and toasting level of oak barrels significantly influenced the concentration of S-methyl thioacetate and 2-methyltetrahy-drothiophen-3-one. This study reported the evolution of VSCs in wines during oak barrel aging for the first time and evaluated the influence of barrel types, which would provide wine-makers with references in making proposals about wine aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nutritional composition, bioactive compounds and volatile profile of cocoa beans from different regions of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioli, Giovanni; Fiorini, Dennis; Maggi, Filippo; Nicoletti, Marcello; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Toniolo, Chiara; Prosper, Biapa; Vittori, Sauro; Sagratini, Gianni

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of the complex composition of cocoa beans provides fundamental information for evaluating the quality and nutritional aspects of cocoa-based food products, nutraceuticals and supplements. Cameroon, the world's fourth largest producer of cocoa, has been defined as "Africa in miniature" because of the variety it habitats. In order to evaluate the nutritional characteristics of cocoa beans from five different regions of Cameroon, we studied their polyphenolic content, volatile compounds and fatty acids composition. The High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) analysis showed that the Mbalmayo sample had the highest content of theobromine (11.6 mg/g) and caffeic acid (2.1 mg/g), while the Sanchou sample had the highest level of (-)-epicatechin (142.9 mg/g). Concerning fatty acids, the lowest level of stearic acid was found in the Mbalmayo sample while the Bertoua sample showed the highest content of oleic acid. Thus, we confirmed that geographical origin influences the quality and nutritional characteristics of cocoa from these regions of Cameroon.

  12. Isotope Investigations of Nitrogen Compounds in Different Aquatic Ecosystems in Cyprus, Russia and Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voropaev, A.; Voerkelius, S.; Eichinger, L. [Hydroisotop GmbH, Schweitenkirchen (Germany); Grinenko, V. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    The isotope analyses of nitrogen compounds is a powerful tool for the investigation of anrthropogenic influence on the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The isotopic composition of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrates from different groundwater aquifers in Cyprus reflects anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen mainly from industrial fertilizer application in agriculture. Significant denitrification as identified at many sampling sites is an important process, which reduces nitrate concentrations in groundwater. In surface water ecosystems anthropogenic influences and natural environmental changes are detected by the isotopic composition of nitrogen in suspended organic material and in bottom sediments. In the oligotrophic fresh water of Lake Galich in Russia the waste water outflow is a reason for the local increase of {delta}{sup 15}N values in bottom sediments, where the nitrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of unpolluted sediments are very homogeneous. In the Neva estuary in russia the lateral destribution of {delta}{sup 15}N values in upper layers of bottom sediments reflects changes in the mixing pattern of marine and continental organic matter caused by a flood protection dam building in the Dneprovsko-Bugsky estuary in Ukraine - probably the increasing influence of anthropogenic {sup 15}N enriched nutrient load. (author)

  13. High pressure study of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound in two different phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Electronic and structural properties of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound are calculated at hydrostatic pressure using the full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method in both cubic and tetragonal phases. The exchange-correlation potential is treated by the generalized gradient approximation within the scheme of Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof, GGA96 (1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 3865). Also, the Engel and Vosko GGA formalism, EV-GGA (Engel and Vosko 1993 Phys. Rev. B 47 13164), is used to improve the band-gap results. Internal parameters are optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The lattice constants, internal parameters, bulk modulus, cohesive energy and band structures have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. The structural calculations predict that the stable phase is tetragonal. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band-gap, valence bandwidths and internal gaps (the energy gap between different parts of the valence bands) are studied using both GGA96 and EV-GGA.

  14. High pressure study of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound in two different phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Ali [Simulation Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Shahrekord University, PB 115, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mokhtari@sci.sku.ac.ir

    2009-07-08

    Electronic and structural properties of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound are calculated at hydrostatic pressure using the full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method in both cubic and tetragonal phases. The exchange-correlation potential is treated by the generalized gradient approximation within the scheme of Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof, GGA96 (1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 3865). Also, the Engel and Vosko GGA formalism, EV-GGA (Engel and Vosko 1993 Phys. Rev. B 47 13164), is used to improve the band-gap results. Internal parameters are optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The lattice constants, internal parameters, bulk modulus, cohesive energy and band structures have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. The structural calculations predict that the stable phase is tetragonal. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band-gap, valence bandwidths and internal gaps (the energy gap between different parts of the valence bands) are studied using both GGA96 and EV-GGA.

  15. High-Pressure Chemistry of a Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework Compound in the Presence of Different Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Junhyuck; Yim, Narae; Kim, Jaheon; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2016-09-14

    Pressure-dependent structural and chemical changes of the zeolitic imidazolate framework compound ZIF-8 have been investigated using different pressure transmitting media (PTM) up to 4 GPa. The unit cell of ZIF-8 expands and contracts under hydrostatic pressure depending on the solvent molecules used as PTM. When pressurized in water up to 2.2(1) GPa, the unit cell of ZIF-8 reveals a gradual contraction. In contrast, when alcohols are used as PTM, the ZIF-8 unit cell volume initially expands by 1.2% up to 0.3(1) GPa in methanol, and by 1.7% up to 0.6(1) GPa in ethanol. Further pressure increase then leads to a discontinuous second volume expansion by 1.9% at 1.4(1) GPa in methanol and by 0.3% at 2.3(1) GPa in ethanol. The continuous uptake of molecules under pressure, modeled by the residual electron density derived from Rietveld refinements of X-ray powder diffraction, reveals a saturation pressure near 2 GPa. In non-penetrating PTM (silicone oil), ZIF-8 becomes amorphous at 0.9(1) GPa. The structural changes observed in the ZIF-8-PTM system under pressure point to distinct molecular interactions within the pores.

  16. Absorption Profile of (PolyPhenolic Compounds after Consumption of Three Food Supplements Containing 36 Different Fruits, Vegetables, and Berries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Bresciani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The market of plant-based nutraceuticals and food supplements is continuously growing due to the increased consumer demand. The introduction of new products with relevant nutritional characteristics represents a new way of providing bioactive compounds and (polyphenols to consumers, becoming a strategy to ideally guarantee the health benefits attributed to plant foodstuffs and allowing the increase of daily bioactive compound intake. A paramount step in the study of nutraceuticals is the evaluation of the bioavailability and metabolism of their putatively active components. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the absorption profile of the (polyphenolic compounds contained in three different plant-based food supplements, made of 36 different plant matrices, which were consumed by 20 subjects in an open one-arm study design. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 1, 2, 5, and 10 h after capsule intake. Twenty quantifiable metabolites deriving from different (polyphenolic compounds were identified. Results showed that the consumption of the three capsules allowed the effective absorption of several (polyphenolic compounds and metabolites appearing at different times in plasma, thereby indicating different absorption profiles. The capsules thus ensured potential health-promoting molecules to be potentially available to target tissues and organs.

  17. Absorption Profile of (Poly)Phenolic Compounds after Consumption of Three Food Supplements Containing 36 Different Fruits, Vegetables, and Berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Letizia; Martini, Daniela; Mena, Pedro; Tassotti, Michele; Calani, Luca; Brigati, Giacomo; Brighenti, Furio; Holasek, Sandra; Malliga, Daniela-Eugenia; Lamprecht, Manfred; Del Rio, Daniele

    2017-02-26

    The market of plant-based nutraceuticals and food supplements is continuously growing due to the increased consumer demand. The introduction of new products with relevant nutritional characteristics represents a new way of providing bioactive compounds and (poly)phenols to consumers, becoming a strategy to ideally guarantee the health benefits attributed to plant foodstuffs and allowing the increase of daily bioactive compound intake. A paramount step in the study of nutraceuticals is the evaluation of the bioavailability and metabolism of their putatively active components. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the absorption profile of the (poly)phenolic compounds contained in three different plant-based food supplements, made of 36 different plant matrices, which were consumed by 20 subjects in an open one-arm study design. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 1, 2, 5, and 10 h after capsule intake. Twenty quantifiable metabolites deriving from different (poly)phenolic compounds were identified. Results showed that the consumption of the three capsules allowed the effective absorption of several (poly)phenolic compounds and metabolites appearing at different times in plasma, thereby indicating different absorption profiles. The capsules thus ensured potential health-promoting molecules to be potentially available to target tissues and organs.

  18. Different fecal microbiotas and volatile organic compounds in treated and untreated children with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; Rizzello, Carlo G; Gagliardi, Francesca; Ricciuti, Patrizia; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Guerzoni, M Elisabetta; Crecchio, Carmine; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria

    2009-06-01

    This study aimed at investigating the fecal microbiotas of children with celiac disease (CD) before (U-CD) and after (T-CD) they were fed a gluten-free diet and of healthy children (HC). Brothers or sisters of T-CD were enrolled as HC. Each group consisted of seven children. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis with V3 universal primers revealed a unique profile for each fecal sample. PCR-DGGE analysis with group- or genus-specific 16S rRNA gene primers showed that the Lactobacillus community of U-CD changed significantly, while the diversity of the Lactobacillus community of T-CD was quite comparable to that of HC. Compared to HC, the ratio of cultivable lactic acid bacteria and Bifidobacterium to Bacteroides and enterobacteria was lower in T-CD and even lower in U-CD. The percentages of strains identified as lactobacilli differed as follows: HC (ca. 38%) > T-CD (ca. 17%) > U-CD (ca. 10%). Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus rossiae, and Lactobacillus pentosus were identified only in fecal samples from T-CD and HC. Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactobacillus gasseri were identified only in several fecal samples from HC. Compared to HC, the composition of Bifidobacterium species of T-CD varied, and it varied even more for U-CD. Forty-seven volatile organic compounds (VOCs) belonging to different chemical classes were identified using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry-solid-phase microextraction analysis. The median concentrations varied markedly for HC, T-CD, and U-CD. Overall, the r(2) values for VOC data for brothers and sisters were equal to or lower than those for unrelated HC and T-CD. This study shows the effect of CD pathology on the fecal microbiotas of children.

  19. The efficiency of child formula dentifrices containing different calcium and phosphate compounds on artificial enamel caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Saengsirinavin, Chavengkiat; Khumsub, Ploychompoo

    2016-01-01

    Fluoride toothpaste has been extensively used to prevent dental caries. However, the risk of fluorosis is concerning, especially in young children. Calcium phosphate has been an effective remineralizing agent and is present in commercial dental products, with no risk of fluorosis to users. This in vitro study aimed to compare the effects of different calcium phosphate compounds and fluoride-containing dentifrices on artificial caries in primary teeth. Fifty sound primary incisors were coated with nail varnish, leaving two 1 mm 2 windows on the labial surface before immersion in demineralizing solution for 96 hours to produce artificial enamel lesions. Subsequently, one window from each tooth was coated with nail varnish, and all 50 teeth were divided into five groups ( n = 10); group A - deionized water; group B - casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste (Tooth Mousse); group C - 500 ppm F (Colgate Spiderman ® ); group D - nonfluoridated toothpaste with triple calcium phosphate (Pureen ® ); and group E - tricalcium phosphate (TCP). Polarized light microscopy and Image-Pro ® Plus software were used to evaluate lesions. After a 7-day pH-cycle, mean lesion depths in groups A, B, C, D, and E had increased by 57.52 ± 10.66%, 33.28 ± 10.16%, 17.04 ± 4.76%, 32.51 ± 8.99%, and 21.76 ± 8.15%, respectively. All data were processed by the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (version 16.0) software package. Comparison of percentage changes using one-way analysis of variance and Fisher's least squares difference tests at a 95% level of confidence demonstrated that group A was significantly different from the other groups ( P < 0.001). Lesions in groups B and D had a significant lesion progression when compared with groups C and E. All toothpastes in this study had the potential to delay the demineralization progression of artificial enamel caries in primary teeth. The fluoride 500 ppm and TCP toothpastes were equal in the deceleration of

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  11. Effect of Different Germination Conditions on Antioxidative Properties and Bioactive Compounds of Germinated Brown Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Tung Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates antioxidative activity and bioactive compounds of ungerminated brown rice (UBR and germinated brown rice (GBR. We used two rice cultivars (Oryza sativa L., Taiwan Japonica 9 (TJ-9 and Taichung Indica 10 (TCI-10, as the materials in our experiments. The conditions for inducing germination are soaking time in water 24, 48, or 72 h; temperature 26 or 36°C; incubation in light or darkness; and open or closed vessels, in which the antioxidative activities and bioactive compounds of GBR were determined. We found that, in order to maximize antioxidative activity and bioactive compounds, germination should be under higher temperature (36°C, long soaking time (72 h, darkness, and closed vessel. GBR contains much higher levels of antioxidative activity and bioactive compounds than ungerminated brown rice (UBR. We found a strong correlation between antioxidative activities (DPPH radical scavenging ability, reducing power, and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity and bioactive compounds (γ-oryzanols, tocopherol, and tocotrienol. Higher temperature (36°C is also conducive to the production of GABA in GBR. These results are considered very useful research references for the development of future functional foods and additives.

  12. Analysis of Organic Volatile Flavor Compounds in Fermented Stinky Tofu Using SPME with Different Fiber Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The organic volatile flavor compounds in fermented stinky tofu (FST were studied using SPME-GC/MS. A total of 39 volatile compounds were identified, including nine esters, seven alcohols, five alkenes, four sulfides, three heterocycles, three carboxylic acids, three ketones, two aldehydes, one phenol, one amine and one ether. These compounds were determined by MS, and conformed by comparison of the retention times of the separated constituents with those of authentic samples and by comparison of retention indexes (RIs of separated constituents with the RIs reported in the literature. The predominant volatile compound in FST was indole, followed by dimethyl trisulfide, phenol, dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl tetrasulfide. In order to find a better extraction time, the extraction times was optimized for each type of SPME fiber; the results show that the best extraction time for Carboxen/PDMS is 60 min, for PDMS/DVB 30 min, for DVB/CAR/PDMS 60 min and for PDMS 75 min. Of the four fibers used in this work, Carboxen/PDMS is found to be the most suitable to extract the organic volatile flavor compounds in fermented stinky tofu.

  13. Volatile compounds and some physico-chemical properties of pastırma produced with different nitrate levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Akköse

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of different nitrate levels (150, 300, 450, and 600 ppm KNO3 on the volatile compounds and some other properties of pastırma. Methods Pastırma samples were produced under the controlled condition and analyses of volatile compounds, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS as an indicator of lipid oxidation, non-protein nitrogenous matter content as an indicator of proteolysis, color and residual nitrite were carried out on the final product. The profile of volatile compounds of pastırma samples was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using a solid phase microextraction. Results Nitrate level had a significant effect on pH value (p<0.05 and a very significant effect on TBARS value (p<0.01. No significant differences were determined in terms of aw value, non-protein nitrogenous substance content, color and residual nitrite between pastırma groups produced by using different nitrate levels. Nitrate level had a significant (p<0.05 or a very significant (p<0.01 effect on some volatile compounds. It was determined that the amounts and counts of volatile compounds were lower in the 450 and especially 600 ppm nitrate levels than 150 and 300 ppm nitrate levels (p<0.05. While the use of 600 ppm nitrate did not cause an increase in residual nitrite levels, the use of 150 ppm nitrate did not negatively affect the color of pastırma. However, the levels of volatile compounds decreased with an increasing level of nitrate. Conclusion The use of 600 ppm nitrate is not a risk in terms of residual nitrite in pastırma produced under controlled condition, however, this level is not suitable due to decrease in the amount of volatile compounds.

  14. From Olive Fruits to Olive Oil: Phenolic Compound Transfer in Six Different Olive Cultivars Grown under the Same Agronomical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talhaoui, Nassima; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; León, Lorenzo; De la Rosa, Raúl; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-03-04

    Phenolic compounds are responsible of the nutritional and sensory quality of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO). The composition of phenolic compounds in EVOO is related to the initial content of phenolic compounds in the olive-fruit tissues and the activity of enzymes acting on these compounds during the industrial process to produce the oil. In this work, the phenolic composition was studied in six major cultivars grown in the same orchard under the same agronomical and environmental conditions in an effort to test the effects of cultivars on phenolic composition in fruits and oils as well as on transfer between matrices. The phenolic fractions were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. A total of 33 phenolic compounds were determined in the fruit samples and a total of 20 compounds in their corresponding oils. Qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic composition were found among cultivars in both matrices, as well as regarding the transfer rate of phenolic compounds from fruits to oil. The results also varied according to the different phenolic groups evaluated, with secoiridoids registering the highest transfer rates from fruits to oils. Moreover, wide-ranging differences have been noticed between cultivars for the transfer rates of secoiridoids (4.36%-65.63% of total transfer rate) and for flavonoids (0.18%-0.67% of total transfer rate). 'Picual' was the cultivar that transferred secoiridoids to oil at the highest rate, whereas 'Changlot Real' was the cultivar that transferred flavonoids at the highest rates instead. Principal-component analysis confirmed a strong genetic effect on the basis of the phenolic profile both in the olive fruits and in the oils.

  15. From Olive Fruits to Olive Oil: Phenolic Compound Transfer in Six Different Olive Cultivars Grown under the Same Agronomical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassima Talhaoui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are responsible of the nutritional and sensory quality of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO. The composition of phenolic compounds in EVOO is related to the initial content of phenolic compounds in the olive-fruit tissues and the activity of enzymes acting on these compounds during the industrial process to produce the oil. In this work, the phenolic composition was studied in six major cultivars grown in the same orchard under the same agronomical and environmental conditions in an effort to test the effects of cultivars on phenolic composition in fruits and oils as well as on transfer between matrices. The phenolic fractions were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. A total of 33 phenolic compounds were determined in the fruit samples and a total of 20 compounds in their corresponding oils. Qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic composition were found among cultivars in both matrices, as well as regarding the transfer rate of phenolic compounds from fruits to oil. The results also varied according to the different phenolic groups evaluated, with secoiridoids registering the highest transfer rates from fruits to oils. Moreover, wide-ranging differences have been noticed between cultivars for the transfer rates of secoiridoids (4.36%–65.63% of total transfer rate and for flavonoids (0.18%–0.67% of total transfer rate. ‘Picual’ was the cultivar that transferred secoiridoids to oil at the highest rate, whereas ‘Changlot Real’ was the cultivar that transferred flavonoids at the highest rates instead. Principal-component analysis confirmed a strong genetic effect on the basis of the phenolic profile both in the olive fruits and in the oils.

  16. Different magnetic behaviour of the Kondo compounds Al3Ce and Al11Ce3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, A.; Flouquet, J.; Palleau, J.; Buevoz, J.L.

    1979-08-01

    Neutron diffraction experiments on the Al 3 Ce and Al 11 Ce 3 compounds have been performed on the multidetector of the I.L.L. high flux reactor. No magnetic structure has been detected on the Al 3 Ce compound down to 20 mK. This confirms the non magnetic ground state of Al 3 Ce. For Al 11 Ce 3 , two magnetic structures have been observed: a ferromagnetic one at 4.2 K and an antiferromagnetic one at 2 K. The antiferromagnetic structure, which corresponds to a propagation vector (0,0,1/3), implies a strong reduction of the magnetic moment of determined sites; this reflects the Kondo character of the compounds

  17. Decoction, infusion and hydroalcoholic extract of Origanum vulgare L.: different performances regarding bioactivity and phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Natália; Barros, Lillian; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Henriques, Mariana; Silva, Sónia; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2014-09-01

    Bioactivity of oregano methanolic extracts and essential oils is well known. Nonetheless, reports using aqueous extracts are scarce, mainly decoction or infusion preparations used for therapeutic applications. Herein, the antioxidant and antibacterial activities, and phenolic compounds of the infusion, decoction and hydroalcoholic extract of oregano were evaluated and compared. The antioxidant activity is related with phenolic compounds, mostly flavonoids, since decoction presented the highest concentration of flavonoids and total phenolic compounds, followed by infusion and hydroalcoholic extract. The samples were effective against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. It is important to address that the hydroalcoholic extract showed the highest efficacy against Escherichia coli. This study demonstrates that the decoction could be used for antioxidant purposes, while the hydroalcoholic extract could be incorporated in formulations for antimicrobial features. Moreover, the use of infusion/decoction can avoid the toxic effects showed by oregano essential oil, widely reported for its antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An investigation on the chemotactic responses of different entomopathogenic nematode strains to mechanically damaged maize root volatile compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laznik, Z; Trdan, S

    2013-07-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) respond to a variety of stimuli when foraging. In a laboratory investigation, we tested the chemotactic responses of 8 EPN strains (Steinernema and Heterorhabditis) to three mechanically damaged maize root compounds (linalool, α-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene). We hypothesized that the EPN directional response to the tested volatile compounds would vary among the species and volatile compound and may be related to foraging strategies. The nematodes with an intermediate foraging strategy (Steinernema feltiae) proved to be less active in their movement toward volatile compounds in a comparison with the ambushers (Steinernema carpocapsae) and cruisers (Steinernema kraussei and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora); β-caryophyllene was found to be the most attractive substance in our experiment. The results of our investigation showed that the cruisers were more attracted to β-caryophyllene than the ambushers and intermediates. The foraging strategy did not affect the movement of the IJs toward the other tested volatile compounds or the control. Our results suggest that the response to different volatile cues is more a strain-specific characteristic than a different host-searching strategy. Only S. carpocapsae strain B49 displayed an attraction to linalool, whereas S. kraussei showed a retarded reaction to β-caryophyllene and α-caryophyllene in our experiment. The EPN strains showed only a weak attraction to α-caryophyllene, suggesting that this volatile compound could not have an important role in the orientation of IJs to the damaged roots of maize plants. These results expand our knowledge of volatile compounds as the cues that may be used by EPNs for finding hosts or other aspects of navigation in the soil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and Quantification of Volatile Compounds Found in Vinasses from Two Different Processes of Tequila Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Rodríguez-Félix

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Vinasses are the main byproducts of ethanol distillation and distilled beverages worldwide and are generated in substantial volumes. Tequila vinasses (TVs could be used as a feedstock for biohydrogen production through a dark fermentative (DF process due to their high content of organic matter. However, TV components have not been previously assayed in order to evaluate if they may dark ferment. This work aimed to identify and quantify volatile compounds (VC in TV and determine if the VC profile depends upon the type of production process (whether the stems were initially cooked or not. TVs were sampled from 3 agave stems with a not-cooking (NC process, and 3 agave stems with a cooking (C process, and volatile compounds were determined by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC–MS. A total of 111 volatile compounds were identified, the TV from the cooking process (C showed the higher presence of furanic compounds (furfural and 5-(hydroxymethyl furfural and organic acids (acetic acid and butyric acid, which have been reported as potential inhibitors for DF. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the VC composition from TVs. This study could serve as a base for further investigations related to vinasses from diverse sources.

  20. Impact of different drying trajectories on degradation of nutritional compounds in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, X.; Oliviero, T.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Verkerk, R.; Dekker, M.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns the degradation of the nutritional compounds glucoraphanin (GR) and vitamin C (Vc), and the inactivation of the enzyme myrosinase (MYR) in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) during drying with air temperatures in the range of 30e60 C. Dynamic optimization is applied to find

  1. Extraction and characterization of candidate bioactive compounds in different tissues from salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Mikalsen, S. O.; Joensen, H.

    2014-01-01

    There is an interest in bioprospecting organisms from the aquatic environment to find novel bioactive compounds with health promoting or other functional properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate extracts from untreated and heat-treated salmon tissues for their radical scavenging activiti...

  2. Development of volatile compounds during storage at various conditions of different lipid containing lip balm products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Birgitte Raagaard; Horn, A. F.; Hyldig, Grethe

    for their development of volatile compounds by dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and peroxide value, and compared to samples stored at 2°C in the dark. In addition, sensory analyses were carried out to assess the off-odours developed in the samples. The result showed that addition of iron increased...

  3. Distribution of major polyphenolic compounds in vine of different cultivars growing in South Moravian vineyards

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikeš, O.; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Tříska, Jan; Kyseláková, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2008), s. 182-189 ISSN 1212-1800 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA525/06/1757 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Vitis vinifera * polyphenolic compounds * berries * stems * cultivars * HPLC Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 0.472, year: 2008

  4. Data on changes in red wine phenolic compounds, headspace aroma compounds and sensory profile after treatment of red wines with activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Filipe-Ribeiro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Data in this article presents the changes on phenolic compounds, headspace aroma composition and sensory profile of a red wine spiked with 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol and treated with seven activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics, namely surface area, micropore volume and mesopore volume (“Reduction of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol in red wine by activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics: impact on wine quality” Filipe-Ribeiro et al. (2017 [1]. Data on the physicochemical characteristics of the activated carbons are shown. Statistical data on the sensory expert panel consistency by General Procrustes Analysis is shown. Statistical data is also shown, which correlates the changes in chemical composition of red wines with the physicochemical characteristics of activated carbons used.

  5. Data on changes in red wine phenolic compounds, headspace aroma compounds and sensory profile after treatment of red wines with activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipe-Ribeiro, Luís; Milheiro, Juliana; Matos, Carlos C; Cosme, Fernanda; Nunes, Fernando M

    2017-06-01

    Data in this article presents the changes on phenolic compounds, headspace aroma composition and sensory profile of a red wine spiked with 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol and treated with seven activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics, namely surface area, micropore volume and mesopore volume ("Reduction of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol in red wine by activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics: impact on wine quality" Filipe-Ribeiro et al. (2017) [1]). Data on the physicochemical characteristics of the activated carbons are shown. Statistical data on the sensory expert panel consistency by General Procrustes Analysis is shown. Statistical data is also shown, which correlates the changes in chemical composition of red wines with the physicochemical characteristics of activated carbons used.

  6. Volatile compounds of Domiati cheese made from buffaloe's milk with different fat content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Mageed, Magda A. Abd

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Buffaloe's milk was manufactured to Domiati cheese with different fat content in the cheese milk (1%, 3.5% and 7%. Results obtained during the ripening period revealed that the low fat cheese (Karish is not able to long period storage, while half cream cheese had a good quality and flavour along the ripening period. The full cream cheese did not exceed the first month of ripening, then it deteriorated. The main components found were acrolein (propenal, heptanal, acetone, butan-2 one, ethanol, butan-2 ol, 2-methylpropan- 1-ol, 3-methyl butan-1-ol, ethyl propionate, propyl propionate, pentane and octane. Methyl mercaptan, methyl thiopropionate, and dimethyl trisulfide together with propyl butyrate, were existed in the samples which are characterized as bad cheese samples. Most of the previous compounds were developed after 1 month of ripening period.

    La leche de búfalo fue procesada para obtener queso Domiati con diferente contenido graso en la cuajada (1%, 3.5% y 7%. Los resultados obtenidos durante el período de maduración revelaron que el queso con bajo contenido en grasa (Karish no permite un largo período de almacenamiento, mientras que el queso con un contenido medio en grasa tuvo una buena calidad y flavor durante el período de maduración. El queso con alto contenido graso no duró más que el primer mes de maduración, deteriorándose posteriormente. Los principales componentes encontrados fueron acroleína (propenal, heptanal, acetona, butan-2-ona, etanol, butan-2-ol, 2- metil-propan-1-ol, 3 metil butan-1-ol, propionato de etilo, propionate de propilo, pentano y octano. Metil mercaptol, tiopropionato de metilo y trisulfuro de dimetilo Junto con butirato de propilo se encontraron en muestras que fueron caracterizadas como muestras de quesos malos. La mayoría de los compuestos anteriores se produjeron después de un mes de período de maduración.

  7. Comparative analysis of four active compounds of Baikal skullcap and its classical TCM prescriptions according to different clinical curative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Wei Zhu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A sensitive HPLC-DAD detection method was established for the comparative analysis of the four active compounds (including baicalin, baicalein, wogonoside and wogonin of Baikal Skullcap and its classical TCM prescriptions according to different clinical curative effects. And analyze the relationship between compatibility of medicines, content and clinical curative effect.

  8. Identification of chemical compounds present in different fractions of Annona reticulata L. leaf by using GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Soumya P; Kar, Durga M

    2014-01-01

    GC-MS analysis of fractions prepared from hydro-alcoholic extract of Annona reticulata Linn (Family Annonaceae) leaf revealed the presence of 9,10-dimethyltricyclo[4.2.1.1(2,5)]decane-9,10-diol; 4-(1,5-dihydroxy-2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-2-enyl)but-3-en-2-one; 3,7-dimethyl-6-nonen-1-ol acetate; 9-octadecenamide,(Z)-; glycerine; D-glucose,6-O-α-D-galactopyranosyl-; desulphosinigrin and α-methyl-D-mannopyranoside as few of the major compounds in different fractions. The presence of these compounds in the plant has been identified for the first time.

  9. Tissue-Specific Accumulation of Sulfur Compounds and Saponins in Different Parts of Garlic Cloves from Purple and White Ecotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diretto, Gianfranco; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Argandoña, Javier; Castillo, Purificación; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes; Ahrazem, Oussama

    2017-08-20

    This study set out to determine the distribution of sulfur compounds and saponin metabolites in different parts of garlic cloves. Three fractions from purple and white garlic ecotypes were obtained: the tunic (SS), internal (IS) and external (ES) parts of the clove. Liquid Chromatography coupled to High Resolution Mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS), together with bioinformatics including Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Hierarchical Clustering (HCL) and correlation network analyses were carried out. Results showed that the distribution of these metabolites in the different parts of garlic bulbs was different for the purple and the white ecotypes, with the main difference being a slightly higher number of sulfur compounds in purple garlic. The SS fraction in purple garlic had a higher content of sulfur metabolites, while the ES in white garlic was more enriched by these compounds. The correlation network indicated that diallyl disulfide was the most relevant metabolite with regards to sulfur compound metabolism in garlic. The total number of saponins was almost 40-fold higher in purple garlic than in the white variety, with ES having the highest content. Interestingly, five saponins including desgalactotigonin-rhamnose, proto-desgalactotigonin, proto-desgalactotigonin-rhamnose, voghieroside D1, sativoside B1-rhamnose and sativoside R1 were exclusive to the purple variety. Data obtained from saponin analyses revealed a very different network between white and purple garlic, thus suggesting a very robust and tight coregulation of saponin metabolism in garlic. Findings in this study point to the possibility of using tunics from purple garlic in the food and medical industries, since it contains many functional compounds which can be exploited as ingredients.

  10. Lipid and cholesterol oxidation, color changes, and volatile compounds production in irradiated raw pork batters with different fat content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Cheo Run; Byun, Myung Woo

    2000-01-01

    An emulsion-type product was prepared to determine the effect of irradiation on lipid and cholesterol oxidation, color change, and volatile production in raw pork with different fat content. Lipid oxidation increased with an increase in fat content or irradiation dose. Irradiated batters had higher cholesterol oxides than did non-irradiated batters, and the major cholesterol oxides formed in irradiated pork batters were 7α- and 7β- hydroxycholesterol. Hunter color a- and b-values of raw pork batters were decreased by irradiation regardless of fat content. Irradiation significantly increased the amount of volatile compounds. Although lipid oxidation of high fat products (10 and 15% fat) was higher than that of low fat products (4%), high fat products did not always produce greater amount of volatile compounds in raw pork batters. In summary, irradiation increased lipid and cholesterol oxidation, and volatile compounds production, and had detrimental effects on the color of raw pork batter under aerobic conditions

  11. Effect of perfluorooctane sulfonate on toxicity and cell uptake of other compounds with different hydrophobicity in green alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yao-Bin; Quan, Xie; Jin, Yi-He; Chen, Shuo

    2009-04-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was evaluated alone and in binary mixtures with pentachlorophenol, atrazine and diuron, respectively to investigate the effects of interactions between PFOS and other compounds on the growth rate in Scenedesmus obliquus. Single application of PFOS showed no inhibition on the growth of S. obliquus below 40 mg L(-1), whereas PFOS acting with pentachlorophenol resulted in higher algal growth inhibition in comparison with pentachlorophenol alone. A maximum increase of 45% in the growth inhibition was observed at a pentachlorophenol concentration of 2.56 mg L(-1) together with a PFOS concentration of 40 mg L(-1). On the contrary, the algal growth inhibition of atrazine and diuron was depressed by PFOS. Furthermore, cell uptake was examined to gain some insights into the mechanisms of the effects of PFOS on the toxicity of the other compounds. Cell uptake of pentachlorophenol increased while that of atrazine and diuron was reduced in cells that have been exposed to PFOS. The effects of PFOS on the toxicity of pentachlorophenol, atrazine and diuron were possibly related to the influence of PFOS on the cell uptake of these hydrophobic compounds. Results suggested that PFOS influenced the cell uptake and toxicity of structurally different compounds in dissimilar manners and potentially increased the accessibility and toxicity of more hydrophobic compounds to algal cells.

  12. Effect of Nitrooxy Compounds with Different Molecular Structures on the Rumen Methanogenesis, Metabolic Profile, and Methanogenic Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wei; Meng, Zhenxiang; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Yanfen; Zhu, Weiyun

    2017-08-01

    Rumen in vitro fermentation was used to evaluate the capacity of nitrooxy compounds to mitigate rumen methane production. The following three nitrooxy compounds, each with different molecular structures, were evaluated: 2,2-dimethyl-3-(nitrooxy) propanoic (DNP), N-[2-(Nitrooxy)ethyl]-3-pyridinecarboxamide (NPD), and nitroglycerin (NG). All three compounds substantially decreased the total gas production, methane production, and the acetate:propionate ratio, while increasing hydrogen production. The growth of methanogens was specifically inhibited by all three compounds, without affecting the abundance of bacteria, anaerobic fungi, or protozoa. However, inhibition of methanogenesis required a much higher dose of DNP when compared to NPD or NG. Further investigations were conducted on NG to determine its effects on the methanogenic community. NG reduced the relative abundance of Methanomassiliicoccales, while increasing the relative abundance of Methanobrevibacter and Methanosphaera. Overall, the results suggested that all three of these nitrooxy compounds could specifically inhibit rumen methanogenesis, but NPD and NG were much more efficient than DNP at rumen methane mitigation.

  13. Physicochemical characterization of different trademarks of compound Yerba Maté and their herbs

    OpenAIRE

    Scipioni,Griselda Patricia; Ferreyra,Darío Jorge; Schmalko,Miguel Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the physicochemical characteristics of the main herbs used in the mixture of yerba maté with other aromatic herbs and the characterization of the trademarks of compound yerba maté. Moisture, water extract, total ash, acid-insoluble ash and caffeine concentration were determined. Results showed higher values of moisture content, total and aci-insoluble ash and lower water extracts in the herbs. Determinations were carried out in nine trademarks of ...

  14. Changes in endogenous bioactive compounds of Korean native chicken meat at different ages and during cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Dinesh D; Jung, Samooel; Bae, Young Sik; Kim, Sun Hyo; Lee, Soo Kee; Lee, Jun Heon; Jo, Cheorun

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of bird age on the contents of endogenous bioactive compounds, including carnosine, anserine, creatine, betaine, and carnitine, in meat from a certified meat-type commercial Korean native chicken strain (KNC; Woorimatdag). Additionally, the effects of the meat type (breast or leg meat) and the state of the meat (raw or cooked) were examined. Cocks of KNC were raised under similar standard commercial conditions at a commercial chicken farm. At various ages (10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 wk), breast and leg meats from a total of 10 birds from each age group were obtained. Raw and cooked meat samples were then prepared separately and analyzed for bioactive compounds. The age of the KNC had a significant effect only on the betaine content. The breast meat of KNC had higher amounts of carnosine and anserine but had lower amounts of betaine and carnitine than the leg meat (P cooking (P cooking, whereas breast meat showed almost complete retention of betaine and carnitine. The results of this study provide useful and rare information regarding the presence, amounts, and determinants of endogenous bioactive compounds in KNC meat, which can be useful for selection and breeding programs, and also for popularizing indigenous chicken meat. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  15. Determination of drugs and drug-like compounds in different samples with direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernetsova, Elena S; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2011-01-01

    Direct analysis in real time (DART), a relatively new ionization source for mass spectrometry, ionizes small-molecule components from different kinds of samples without any sample preparation and chromatographic separation. The current paper reviews the published data available on the determination of drugs and drug-like compounds in different matrices with DART-MS, including identification and quantitation issues. Parameters that affect ionization efficiency and mass spectra composition are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions from Luculia pinceana Flower and Its Changes at Different Stages of Flower Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuying Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Luculia plants are famed ornamental plants with sweetly fragrant flowers, of which L. pinceana Hooker, found primarily in Yunnan Province, China, has the widest distribution. Solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS was employed to identify the volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted from different flower development stages of L. pinceana for the evaluation of floral volatile polymorphism. Peak areas were normalized as percentages and used to determine the relative amounts of the volatiles. The results showed that a total of 39 compounds were identified at four different stages of L. pinceana flower development, including 26 at the bud stage, 26 at the initial-flowering stage, 32 at the full-flowering stage, and 32 at the end-flowering stage. The most abundant compound was paeonol (51%–83% followed by (E,E-α-farnesene, cyclosativene, and δ-cadinene. All these volatile compounds create the unique fragrance of L. pinceana flower. Floral scent emission offered tendency of ascending first and descending in succession, meeting its peak level at the initial-flowering stage. The richest diversity of floral volatile was detected at the third and later periods of flower development. Principal component analysis (PCA indicated that the composition and its relative content of floral scent differed throughout the whole flower development. The result has important implications for future floral fragrance breeding of Luculia. L. pinceana would be adequate for a beneficial houseplant and has a promising prospect for development as essential oil besides for a fragrant ornamental owing to the main compounds of floral scent with many medicinal properties.

  17. OrgTrace – No difference found in bioactive compounds of organic and conventional crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knuthsen, Pia; Søltoft, Malene; Laursen, Kristian Holst

    years as well as soil types. The results showed that contents of neither polyacetylenes and carotenoids in carrots, flavonoids in onions, nor phenolic acids in carrots and potatoes were significantly influenced by growth system. Thus it could not be concluded that the organically grown crops had higher...... contents of bioactive compounds than the conventionally grown. This indicates that giving preference to organic products because they contain more bioactive components is doubtfull. However, there are many other reasons for the consumer to choose organic food products, including: no pesticide residues...

  18. MgO-templated nitrogen-containing carbons derived from different organic compounds for capacitor electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konno, Hidetaka; Onishi, Hiroaki; Azumi, Kazuhisa [Laboratory of Advanced Materials Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Yoshizawa, Noriko [Energy Technology Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba 305-8569 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    Carbons containing nitrogen (C-N composites) were derived from three commercial organic compounds, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), polyacrylamide (PAA), and trimethylolmelamine (TMM) using the MgO template method. The C-N composites formed in nitrogen at 700-1000 C had nitrogen content, W{sub N}, of 3-23 mass% and the specific surface area by N{sub 2} adsorption, S{sub BET}, of 60-2000 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} without activation. Generally high nitrogen content of the starting compound led to larger W{sub N}, but W{sub N} was not proportional to the N/C mole ratio in the compounds. The value of S{sub BET} strongly depended on the compound: S{sub BET} (PVP) > S{sub BET} (PAA) >> S{sub BET} (TMM). There was a tendency for W{sub N} to decrease with increasing S{sub BET}. The capacitance measured in 1 mol dm{sup -3} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by cyclic voltammetry, C{sub M} in F g{sup -1}, suggested that both W{sub N} and S{sub BET} are influential in gaining large C{sub M}. For the composites with W{sub N} > 5 mass%, the capacitance normalized by S{sub BET}, C{sub A} = C{sub M}/S{sub BET}, was 0.17-0.65 F m{sup -2}, which was larger than the electric double layer capacitance (0.05-0.15 F m{sup -2}), indicating that the pseudo-capacitance contributes significantly to C{sub M}. The value of C{sub A} increased with increasing W{sub N}, but a correlation between C{sub A} and particular nitrogen species on the surface measured by XPS was obscure. It was suggested that the large C{sub A} is not simply explained by redox reactions of the surface functional groups. The composite derived from PAA at 900 C showed 234 F g{sup -1} at 2 mV s{sup -1} and 181 F g{sup -1} at 100 mV s{sup -1} with acceptable yield of the composite. (author)

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issue, Title. Vol 25, No 2 (2005), Yam-based farm practices and nematode problems in stored yams (Dioscorea spp.) in Ghana, Abstract PDF. CK Kwoseh, RA Plowright, J Bridge, R Asiedu. Vol 27, No 2 (2007), Yield, irrigation production efficiency and economic returns of broccoli under variable drip irrigation and lateral ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 68 of 68 ... Issue, Title. Vol 12, No 1-2 (2009), Sécurité et ordre politique au Cameroun : entre dynamiques internes et connexions internationales, Abstract PDF. BEP Chantal. Vol 6, No 1-2 (2003), Self-Determination, Nationalism, Development and Pan-Africanism Stuck on the Runway: Are Intellectuals to be Blamed ...

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    Items 551 - 600 of 1463 ... Issue, Title. Vol 15, No 2 (2015), Evaluation of the diagnostic performance and operational characteristics of four rapid immunochromatographic syphilis tests in Burkina Faso, Abstract PDF. FY Bocoum, H Ouedraogo, G Tarnagda, A Kiba, S Tiendrebeogo, F Bationo, B Liestman, S Diagbouga, ...

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    Items 351 - 400 of 400 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 1 (2010), Soft tissue sarcoma of the thigh: Need for angiography in the developing, Abstract PDF. IA Adigun, GA Rahman, KO Ogundipe. Vol 3, No 1 (2004), Spectrum of rheumatic heart disease in Zaria, Northern Nigeria, Abstract. SS Danbauchi, MA Alhassan, SO David, ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 183 ... Issue, Title. Vol 62 (2017), #SchoolsOnFire: Criminal justice responses to protests that impede the right to basic education, Abstract PDF. Ann Skelton, Martin Nsibirwa. Vol 45 (2013), 'Pale Face'/'Pointy Face: SA Criminology in Denial, Abstract PDF. S Henkeman. Vol 59 (2017), Aluta continua: Police ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 14 of 14 ... Issue, Title. Vol 2, No 1 (2009), Auditory and Respiratory Health Disorders Among Workers in an Iron and Steel Factory, Abstract. GM Abdel – Rasoul, OAE Mahrous, ME Abou Salem, MA Al-Batanony, HK Allam. Vol 2, No 1 (2009), Effect of An Educational Program About Medical Waste Management on ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 391 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Efficacy of four Rodenticides on the Ghanaian Market, Abstract ... Vol 2, No 1 (2000):, Determination of some wear elements in used car engine oil and oil filter ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 490 ... Issue, Title. Vol 6, No 2 (2010), Knowledge and patterns of use of highly active antiretroviral therapies in HIV management at Abuja, Nigeria, Abstract. Jill I Okpalugo, US Inyang, K Ibrahim, F Anita, Chinwe V Ukwe, NC Aguwa. Vol 5, No 4 (2009), Knowledge and utilization of the acts in two major ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 9951 - 10000 of 11090 ... Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 36 (2011), Study of heavy metals bioaccumulation in the process of vermicomposting, Abstract PDF. MM Aleagha, G Ebadi. Vol 10, No 45 (2011), Study of malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in ...

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 412 ... Issue, Title. Vol 32, No 2 (2013), Seinsverständnis and meaning in Heidegger, Abstract. Rafael Winkler. Vol 21, No 3 (2002), A defense of peace as a human right, Abstract. Patrick Hayden. Vol 26, No 2 (2007), A Kantian stance on teleology in biology, Abstract. AA Cohen. Vol 30, No 1 (2011), A Likely ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 328 ... Issue, Title. Vol 7, No 1 (2003), Sexual Harassment in Academia in Nigeria: How Real? Details PDF. Olugbenga Jelil Ladebo. Vol 8, No 2 (2004), Shaping the internet for match-making/dating: a challenge for the contemporary Nigerian family institution, Abstract PDF. Wale Adesina. Vol 6, No 1 (2002) ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 73 of 73 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 13 (2006), The ageing eye” functional changes from cradle to gray: A ... Vol 12 (2005), The evaluation of vision in children using monocular vision acuity and ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 22, No 2 (2008), Voltammetric determination of heparin based on its interaction with malachite green, Abstract PDF. Xueliang Niu, Weili Zhang, Na Zhao, Wei Sun. Vol 22, No 2 (2008), Voltammetric determination of l-cysteic acid on a 1-[4-(ferrocenyl-ethynyl)phenyl]-1-ethanone modified carbon paste ...

  12. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 577 ... Issue, Title. Vol 20, No 2 (2003), Emergency Contraception: A Global Overview of Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Among Providers, Abstract PDF. Deborah Haggai. Vol 23 (2006):, Emergency laparotomy for peripartum haemorrhage in Bida North Central Nigeria, Abstract PDF. Sunny Abiodun O ...

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 11090 ... Issue, Title. Vol 12, No 49 (2013), In vitro regeneration of selected Kenyan papaya (Carica papaya L.) lines through shoot tip culture, Abstract PDF. Naomi Nzilani Mumo, Fredah Karambu Rimberia, George Edward Mamati, Agnes Wanjiru Kihurani. Vol 7, No 12 (2008), In vitro regeneration of Turkish ...

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    Items 151 - 200 of 221 ... Issue, Title ... Vol 38 (2010), Soft drink consumption of Grade 4 and Grade 7 learners in the Wynberg area, City of Cape Town, South .... Vol 42 (2014), The meaning of food for obese men: a qualitative study, Abstract PDF.

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    Items 101 - 150 of 1215 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index. Log in or ... Vol 12, No 1 (2018), Analysis of the effects of frequent strikes on academic performance of students in universities in Nigeria: Edo State as a focal point, Abstract PDF ... Vol 6, No 1 (2012), Appraisal as a Determinant for Adequate ...

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    Items 1 - 20 of 20 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 2 (2000), Age dependent changes in the hypothalamic amino acid neurotransmitters in response to nicotine, Abstract. NM Radwan, NA Ahmed, YAM Aly. Vol 9, No 2 (2000), Autoantibodies, ocular and auditory changes in patients with vitiligo, Abstract. AE Fathia, EA Nagwa, ...

  17. Browse Title Index

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    Items 51 - 76 of 76 ... Issue, Title. Vol 6, No 1 (2013), Integrating Sustainability into the Real Estate Valuation Process: A Nigerian Perspective, Abstract PDF. G K Babawale, B A Oyalowo. Vol 5, No 1 (2012), Internalising internationa valuation standards: Relevance and applicability issues in the Nigerian context, Abstract PDF.

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    Items 51 - 100 of 201 ... Issue, Title. Vol 12, No 1 (2006), Conservative management of cervical ectopic pregnancy: case report, Abstract PDF. TD Naidoo, MR Ramogale, J Moodley. Vol 18, No 2 (2012), Contraceptive use and associated factors among South African youth (18 - 24 years): A population-based survey, Abstract ...

  19. Browse Title Index

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    Items 151 - 183 of 183 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 1 (2004), Socio-economic constraints affecting youths involvement in national economic development, Abstract. Josephine U Nwagwu. Vol 12, No 2 (2007), Stabilizing Potential Of Cement-Fly Ash Mixture On Expansive Clay Soil, Abstract. OO Amu, AB Fajobi, SO Afekhuai. Vol 11 ...

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 76 ... Issue, Title. Vol 16, No 2 (2006), A profile of the theatre procedures in paediatrict ophthalmic practice, Abstract. E O Onwasigwe. Vol 15, No 2 (2005), Abdominal cocoon, Abstract. Abdulrasheed K Adesunkanmi, Tajudeen A Badmus, Olukayode Ogundoyin, Akinwumi B Ogunrombi. Vol 18, No 1 (2008) ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 647 ... Issue, Title. Vol 13, No 2 (2010), 'N toekomstige perspektief op grondwetlike stabiliteit, Abstract PDF. F.W de Klerk. Vol 18, No 5 (2015), Cloete murray and Another v Firstrand bank ltd t/a Wesbank [2015] ZASCA 39A, Abstract PDF. M Laubscher. Vol 15, No 5 (2012), Cave Pecuniam: Lawyers as ...

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    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 1 (2008), Assessment Of Ophthalmic Patients' Satisfaction In Owo, Abstract. CO Omolase, CO Fadamiro, BO Omolase, AS Aina, EO Omolade. Vol 3, No 1 (2010), Case Report: Strongyloides stercoralis coinfection in a Nigerian with HIV. Abstract. A.A Oyekunle, R.A.A Bolarinwa, O.A ...

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    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 1 (2007), An Action Five Strategy For Bridging The Gender Gap In Academic Research Activities In African Universities. The Case of Nigeria, Abstract PDF. DN Okorie, OG Agabi, CM Uche. Vol 1, No 1 (2007), Book Review: Confronting sexual harassment in Ghanaian Universities ...

  4. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 93 ... Issue, Title. Vol 5 (2013), A cost-effective Geographic Information Systems for Transportation (GIS-T) application for traffic congestion analyses in the Developing World, Abstract PDF. E Agyemang. Vol 3 (2011), A Historical and Gendered Perspective on HIV / AIDS in Botswana, Abstract PDF. J Hesselberg ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 327 ... Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 4 (2016), Omphalocoeles: A decade in review, Abstract PDF. S Singh, A Madaree. Vol 2, No 4 (2008), Ortner syndrome, Abstract PDF. E Meyer, NE Jones, LJ Zühlke. Vol 10, No 3 (2016), Outcome of children admitted to a general highcare unit in a regional hospital in the ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 814 ... Issue, Title. Vol 21, No 2 (2016), A 10 years trend of peptic ulcer disease and other gastrointestinal disorders in northern Uganda, Abstract PDF. T.R. Okello, D.M. Ogwang, I Pecorella. Vol 21, No 2 (2016), A 2-years description of traumatic brain injury admissions in Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital ...

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    Items 301 - 350 of 577 ... Issue, Title. Vol 32, No 2 (2015), Late arrival in hospital during labour: any correlation with materno-foetal outcome? The state specialist hospital, Asubiaro, Osogbo Experience. Abstract PDF. OO Awolola. Vol 30, No 2 (2013), Late Reproductive Effects of Cancer Treatment in Young People, Abstract ...

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 319 ... Issue, Title. Vol 23, No 2 (2016), Carica papaya juice enhanced in-vitro cell proliferation better than freeze-dried PBS extract using scratch assay, Abstract. A.B. Nafiu, E Abdulaziz, M.T. Rahman. Vol 23, No 2 (2016), A comparative study of the ownership and utilization of insecticide treated nets in ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 52 ... Issue, Title. Vol 15 (2000), Ammi analysis of maize yield trials in South-Western Nigeria, Abstract. SR Ajibade, BA Ogunbodede. Vol 20 (2006), Association of yield with some agronomic characters in potatoes in a cool mid-altitude location, Abstract. CO Amadi, EE Ene Obong. Vol 20 (2006), Casein (CSN3) ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 240 of 240 ... Issue, Title. Vol 8, No 4 (2005), Status equipment in primary health centres of Tafa Lga, North Central Nigeria, Abstract. MN Sambo, I Lewis, K Sabitu. Vol 10, No 1 (2007), Stroke at a tertiary medical institution in Northern Nigeria: Patients\\' profile and predictors of outcome, Abstract. KW Wahab, MU ...

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 249 ... Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 1 (2010), Ye Shakoch Chilot (the court of the sheikhs): A traditional institution of conflict resolution in Oromiya zone of Amhara regional state, Ethiopia, Abstract PDF. M Zeleke. Vol 15, No 3 (2015), A comparative analysis of the Post- Arab Spring National Dialogues in Tunisia and ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 670 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 2 (2012), Business Planning and the Economic Growth of Small and Medium Scale Enterprises in Nigeria, Abstract. Egbe Aneozeng A, Ejoh Ndifon Ojong, Obo Ekpenyong Bassey. Vol 11, No 2 (2014), Calabar Humaphors: An Analysis of Selected Jokes in Nigerian Stand Up ...

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 107 of 107 ... Issue, Title. Vol 6, No 1 (2017), The Ophthalmic status manifestations of nutritional and lifestyle disorders of men in a peri urban community in Ghana, Abstract PDF. F. Vuvor, M. Steiner-Asiedu, F.K. Saalia. Vol 2, No 1 (2013), Thyroid Disorders in Accra, Ghana: A Retrospective Histopathological Study ...

  14. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 165 ... Issue, Title. Vol 30 (2005), Digitisation projects at the University of Cape Town Libraries, Abstract. Janine Dunlop, Lesley Hart. Vol 24 (2002), DISA: an African Perspective on Digital Technology, Abstract. Michele Pickover, Dale Peters. Vol 30 (2005), Doing it right – or are we? Basic principles in the ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 251 ... Issue, Title. Vol 55 (2014), 20 Years of democracy: Transforming the public service, Abstract. A Ruiters. Vol 63 (2016), Zemk' iinkomo magwala ndini! Wake up! The cows are being stolen! Abstract. Sipho Pityana. Vol 56 (2014), A layperson's guide to Nene's budget statement, Abstract. B Turok.

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    Items 1 - 50 of 1007 ... Issue, Title. Vol 11, No 1 (1997), (+)-Floribundone 3 from the pods of Senna septemtrionalis, Details PDF. Gizachew Alemayehu, Bekuretsion Woldeyesus, Berhanu M Abegaz. Vol 14, No 1 (2000), 11α-Hydroxy muzigadiolide, a novel drimane sesquiterpene from the stem bark of warburgia ugandensis ...

  17. Browse Title Index

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    Items 1 - 50 of 356 ... Issue, Title. Vol 27, No 3 (2014), A desire for weight loss in season increases disordered eating behaviour risk and energy deficiency in athletes, Abstract PDF. HH Wright, R Ford, CR Botha. Vol 29, No 3 (2016), A review of infant and young child feeding practice in hospital and the home in KwaZulu-Natal ...

  18. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 66 ... Issue, Title. Vol 48, No 1-2 (2015), A hierarchical modeling of information seeking behavior of school teachers in rural areas of Nigeria, Abstract. Manir Abdullahi Kamba. Vol 49, No 1-2 (2016), Access to electronic information resources by students of federal college of education in south east Nigeria ...

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 683 ... Issue, Title. Vol 54, No 1 (2006), Bovine tuberculosis survey in urban and peri urban dairy farms in coastal humid region of Tanga, Tanzania, Abstract. ES Swai, G Shirima, S Bwanga, W Moshy. Vol 60, No 3 (2012), Browsing capacity and nutritive value of indigenous browses in a tropical Coastal ...

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 387 ... Issue, Title. Vol 15, No 2 (2015), Introduction to Christian philosophy, Abstract. Charles Ogundu Nnaji. Vol 8, No 2 (2006), Is Quantum Mechanics a Complete Theory?: A Philosophical Defense of Einstein's Position, Abstract. U O Egbai. Vol 10, No 1 (2007), Jesus in Africa, Abstract. FF Edet. Vol 10, No ...

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    Items 51 - 98 of 98 ... Issue, Title. Vol 4, No 1 (2016), First-year seminar intervention: Enhancing firstyear mathematics performance at the University of Johannesburg, Abstract PDF. Melanie Jacobs, Estherna Pretorius. Vol 5, No 2 (2017), From Inky Pinky Ponky to Improving Student Understanding in Assessment: Exploring the ...

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    Items 151 - 167 of 167 ... Issue, Title ... Vol 2, No 2 (2013), Women and the Leadership Paradigm: Bridging the Workplace Gender-Gap in Nigeria, Abstract PDF ... Vol 5, No 2 (2016), Women's participation and gender issues in local governance ...

  3. Browse Title Index

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    Items 51 - 100 of 110 ... Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 1 (2003), Incidence and Determinants of Child Labour in Nigeria: Implications for Poverty Alleviation, Abstract. Benjamin Chiedozie Okpukpara, Ngozi Odurukwu. Vol 20, No 1 (2013), Inflation and capacity utilisation in Nigeria's manufacturing sector, Abstract. OA Ishola. Vol 19, No ...

  4. Browse Title Index

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    Items 251 - 300 of 367 ... Issue, Title. Vol 43 (2014), Some interlingual communicative challenges for foreign African interpreters in South African courtrooms, Abstract PDF. SE Usadolo, E Kotze. Vol 29 (1996), South Africa's new language policy in the context of the organisation for African unity's language plan of action for ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 89 ... Issue, Title ... of two-phased approaches to load balancing in cloud computing, Abstract ... Vol 19, No 1 (2012), Assessing Network Services and Security in ... Vol 23, No 1 (2016), Cloud model construct for transaction-based ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 198 ... Issue, Title ... Vol 13, No 1 (2015), Biometric Enhancement of Home and Office Security to Reduce Assassinations in Nigeria, Abstract PDF ... Vol 9, No 1 (2013), Cloud Computing: Key to IT Development in West Africa ...

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    Items 151 - 198 of 198 ... Issue, Title ... scheme for QoS and energy conservation in cloud computing, Abstract PDF ... Vol 9, No 1 (2013), Performance and Security Evaluation of ... Vol 18, No 1 (2017), Reducing capital flight through local cloud ...

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    Items 251 - 300 of 652 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 18, No 7 (2015), Introduction to virtual property: Lex virtualis ipsa ... Vol 17, No 1 (2014), Legal challenges relating to the commercial use of outer space, with ...

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    Items 151 - 170 of 170 ... Issue, Title. Vol 20, No 2 (2004), The Impact of Mine Closures on Rural Population Dynamics: The Case of Zhombe in Kwekwe District, Midlands Province, Zimbabwe, Abstract. Crescentia Madebwe. Vol 29, No 1 (2013), The Influence of Organisational Culture and Job Satisfaction on Intentions to ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 263 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 2 (2002), Effect of Light and Darkness on Packed Cell Volume in the Rat, Abstract. A. A. OSINUBI, F. I. DURU, C. C. NORONHA, A. O. OKANLAWON. Vol 4, No 1 (2005), Effect of Marijuana Smoking on Blood Chemistry and Serum Biogenic Amines Concentrations in Humans ...

  11. Browse Title Index

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    Items 751 - 800 of 846 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 9, No 3S (2017): Special Issue, The effect of torrefaction on oil palm ... core competency skills of IRBM tax auditors towards their performance, Abstract PDF ... of exchange rates behavior in Malaysia by using NATREX model, Abstract PDF.

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    Issue, Title. Vol 38, No 1 (2004), Book Review: Unexpected Voices – Theory, Practice and Identity in the Writing Classroom. Abstract. Charly Dyers. Vol 38, No 1 (2004), Book Review: Shelley Angelil-Carter: Stolen Language? Plagiarism in Writing. Abstract. Elizabeth de Kadt. Vol 37, No 1 (2003), Book Review: The Green ...

  13. Browse Title Index - AJOL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 501 - 508 of 508 ... Issue, Title. Vol 33, No 2 (2011), Visuele stereotipering van sportvroue in die sportmedia, Abstract. M Brandt, A Carstens. Vol 30, No 1 (2008), Volunteers\\' perceptions of benefits derived from volunteering: an empirical study, Abstract. J Surujlal, M Dhurup. Vol 33, No 1 (2011), Was the Conconi test ...

  14. Browse Title Index

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    Items 101 - 108 of 108 ... Issue, Title. Vol 8, No 2 (2016), The status and challenges of clinical informatics development in South Africa, Abstract PDF. Abayomi Kehinde Owolabi, Thokozani Patrick Mhlongo, Neil Evans. Vol 4, No 1 (2012), The stuttering implementation of language policies in the South African education system ...

  15. Browse Title Index

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    Items 51 - 100 of 100 ... Issue, Title. Vol 28 (2013): Special Issue, Occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in domestic animals in peri-urban communities of Kafue district, Zambia, Abstract. J Siwila, IGK Phiri, HI Enemark, M Nchito, A Olsen. Vol 26, No 1 (2009), Occurrence of foot and mouth disease serotypes in Tanzania: A ...

  16. Browse Title Index

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    Items 801 - 850 of 11090 ... Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 61 (2011), Analysis of chemical constituents in medicinal plants of selected districts of Pakhtoonkhwa, Pakistan, Abstract PDF. I Hussain, R Ullah, J Khan, N Khan, M Zahoor, N Ullah, MuR Khattak, FA Khan, A Baseer, M Khurram. Vol 10, No 77 (2011), Analysis of chloroplast ...

  17. Browse Title Index

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    Items 501 - 550 of 670 ... Issue, Title. Vol 11, No 4 (2014), Strategies for Fostering Creativity Among Business Education Graduates in Nigeria, Abstract. BO Nwosu, KE Ojo. Vol 13, No 1 (2015) ... Vol 10, No 1 (2013), The Challenges Facing Accounting Education: The Nigerian Experience, Abstract. OR Okolie. Vol 5 (2008), The ...

  18. Browse Title Index

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    Items 101 - 150 of 198 ... Issue, Title ... Vol 7, No 1 (2013), Enterprise Cloud Adoption: Leveraging on the Business ... Load Balancing And Job Scheduling In Cloud Computing ... Vol 13, No 1 (2015), ICT-Based Framework for Improved Food Security in Nigeria ... Vol 5, No 1 (2012), IT-Based Solutions to the Electoral System in ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 1117 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 13, No 3 (2007):, an edu-ethical perspecitve on the nature of truth: case studies in elite ... 2009: September: Supplement, An empirical study of university ...

  20. Browse Title Index

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    Issue, Title. Vol 20, No 1 (2015), Assessment of iron status among preschool children (6 to 59 months) with and without malaria in Western Province, Kenya, Abstract. I Kisiangani, C Mbakaya, A Makokha, D Magu. Vol 20, No 1 (2015), Assessment of iron status among preschool children (6 to 59 months) with and without ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 232 ... Issue, Title. Vol 5 (2003), Pre-School Education for a Democratic Society: Identifying Views of Stakeholders in Tanzania, Abstract. Willy LM Komba, Satoki T Mahenge, Gadi Koda. Vol 13, No 2 (2012), Process of Assuring Quality in Counselling at the National Open University of Nigeria: A Critique ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 1732 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 10, No 3 (2007), An Audit Of Perioperative Cardiac Arrest At ... Vol 11, No 4 (2008), An Audit Of Rejected Repeated X-ray Films As A Quality Assurance ...

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 1038 ... Issue, Title. Vol 31, No 2 (2009), Assessing the utility of a continuous, underway fish egg sampler (CUFES) for sampling zooplankton, Abstract. S Sono, CL Moloney, CD van der Lingen. Vol 38, No 4 (2016), Assessing trophic adaptability is critical for understanding the response of predatory fishes to ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 101 ... Issue, Title. Vol 3, No 4 (2014), Chlamydia trachomatis IgG antibodies seroprevalence among students in two tertiary institutions in Anambra state, Nigeria: a comparative study, Abstract PDF. CB Duru, FE Emele, ED Adinma, CO Ifeadike, KA Uwakwe, AO Oluboyo, BO Oluboyo, C Abejegah. Vol 2, No 1 ...

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    Items 201 - 250 of 367 ... Issue, Title. Vol 42 (2013), Nursing the Cure: A Phonetic Analysis of /ʊə/ in South African English, Abstract PDF. I Bekker. Vol 1 (1980), Nuwe ontwikkelings binne chomsky se teorle van kerngrammatika, Abstract PDF. J Maartens. Vol 42 (2013), Obligatory Reflexivity in a Minimalist Grammar of ...

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    Items 651 - 700 of 1007 ... Issue, Title. Vol 4, No 1 (1990), Kinetics of oxidation of β-diimihe macrocyclic complexes and accessibility of six-coordinate copper(III) complexes generated by electrochemical oxidation of copper(II) complexes, Abstract PDF. Mohamed A. Khalifa. Vol 14, No 2 (2000), Kinetics of periodate oxidation of ...

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    Items 151 - 200 of 1020 ... Issue, Title ... Vol 48, No 2 (2006), Barriers to HIV Care and Treatment by Doctors: A review of the literature. ... Vol 48, No 5 (2006), Breast cancer – early detection and screening in South African women from the ...

  8. Browse Title Index

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    Issue, Title. Vol 23, No 2 (2011), Dynamique foliaire et croissance du maïs: Application du modèle «STICS» en conditions tropicales en RD-Congo, Abstract PDF. MM Lufuluabo, RV Kizungu, KK Nkongolo. Vol 18, No 1 (2006), Dynamique spatio-temporelle des populations d\\'Altises Podagrica spp. (Coleoptera ...

  9. Browse Title Index

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    Items 251 - 300 of 2005 ... Issue, Title. Vol 92, No 4 (2015), Blood Pressure and Obesity Index Assessment in a Typical Urban Slum in Enugu, Nigeria, Abstract. GI Ahaneku, CU Osuji, OC Oguejiofor, BC Anisiuba, VO Ikeh, JE Ahaneku. Vol 80, No 10 (2003):, Blood pressure control in a population where antihypertensives are ...

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    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 661 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. .... A El-Mahdy, B Bolduc, J Upadhyay, R Shoukr, A Khoury. Vol 19, No 1 (2013), Factors affecting lower calyceal stone clearance after Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, Abstract PDF.

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    Items 151 - 200 of 286 ... Issue, Title. Vol 2, No 3-4 (2008), Impact of fire wood collection on trees species diversity in Bauchi state, Nigeria, Abstract. A Nura, A Ibrahim, I Mohammed, U Haruna. Vol 5, No 3 (2011), Impact of national special program for food security in Abia State, nigeria, Abstract. CO Emerole. Vol 5, No 1 (2011) ...

  12. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 351 - 400 of 979 ... Issue, Title. Vol 45, No 9 (2003), Erectile dysfunction: A GP's guide to clinical assessment, Abstract PDF. PJ Harden. Vol 47, No 4 (2005), Ethical Issues in Family Practice: My Culture – Right or Wrong? Abstract PDF. GA Ogunbanjo, D Knapp van Bogaert. Vol 59, No 3 (2017), Ethical issues with ...

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    Items 301 - 350 of 745 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 3 (1999), Frequency And Outcome In AIDS Patients In A University Teaching Hospital – A Five Year Review, Abstract. SA Ogun, OO Adelowo, AEA ... Vol 18, No 2 (2008), Good cllinical practice in clinical drug trials - What you need to know, Abstract. K Soyebi, Y Abosede, HAB ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 217 ... Browse Title Index. Journal Home > Advanced ... Vol 13, No 1 (2016), Access to specialized surgical care, Abstract PDF. H Saidi ... Vol 9, No 2 (2012), Clinical Assessment of the Palmaris Longus – Accuracy of common tests, Abstract PDF ... Vol 11, No 2 (2014), Clinical trials in Surgery, Abstract PDF.

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    Items 151 - 200 of 633 ... Issue, Title. Vol 19, No 1 (2009), Delays in Tuberculosis Treatment and Associated Factors in Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia, Abstract PDF. Ayalew Tegegn, Meseret Yazachew. Vol 26, No 1 (2016), Delivery Site Preferences and Associated Factors among Married Women of Child Bearing Age in ...

  16. Browse Title Index

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    Items 151 - 200 of 4119 ... Issue, Title. Vol 86, No 2 (1996), A re-evaluation of isotope screening for skeletal metastases in nodenegative breast cancer, Abstract PDF. C.A. Gudgeon, I.D. Werner, D.M. Dent. Vol 104, No 6 (2014), A reflection on the South African Medical Association – past, present and future, Abstract PDF.

  17. Browse Title Index

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    Items 201 - 250 of 1006 ... Issue, Title. Vol 49, No 8 (2007), Clinical approach to a patient with abnormal uterine bleeding, Abstract PDF. B G Lindeque. Vol 57, No 5 (2015), Clinical evidence in the management of swimmer's ear, Abstract PDF. Andre Marais. Vol 50, No 1 (2008), Clinical features of Systemic Lupus ...

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    Items 701 - 750 of 1010 ... Issue, Title. Vol 6, No 2 (1998), Performance et stabilité de rendement des génotypes de patate douce dans divers environnements à l'est du Congo, Abstract. P Phemba, T Mutombo, N B Lutaladio, E E Carey. Vol 22 (2014): Supplement, Performance of Artemia shell-free embryos, Moina micrura and ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 17 (2005), A. C. conduction behaviour in amorphous WO3/CEO2 thin film, Abstract. B Yagoubi, C A Hogarth, A Boukorrt. Vol 16 (2003), A lossless image compression algorithm using variable block size segmentation, Abstract. Z Brahimi, K A Saadi, N Baraka. Vol 15 (2003), Analysis method of wavelet ...

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    Items 51 - 97 of 97 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 20, No 2 (2008), Research Note: Anthropometric data of the foot of ... Vol 26, No 1 (2014), Validation of the Automation Attitude Questionnaire for Airline Pilots ...

  1. Titles of Midas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Huxley

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The Phrygian inscription on the tomb at Yazılıkaya (8th century gives Midas the titles wanax and lawagtas, paralled in Mycenaean, and there were strong connections between his dynasty and Greek Aeolis.

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 333 ... Issue, Title. Vol 15, No 1 (2016), Irrigation potential of Inuakpa in Odukpani local government of Cross river using Kostiakov model, Abstract PDF. B.O. Unuigbe, K.I. Ofem, N.R.B. Antigha. Vol 2, No 2 (2003), LABOUR USE IN SMALL-SCALE YAM PRODUCTION IN QUA'AN PAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 644 ... Issue, Title. Vol 19, No 2 (2007), A qualitative study of medical student socialization in Malawi\\'s College of Medicine: Clincal crisis and beyond, Abstract PDF. C Wendland, C Bandawe. Vol 19, No 2 (2007), A qualitative study of medical student socialization in Malawi\\'s College of Medicine: Preclinical ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 13, No 2 (2013), Using Mindfulness as a Teaching Aid for Phenomenology, Abstract PDF. IR Owen. Vol 8, No 1 (2008), Were Nietzsche's Cardinal Ideas – Delusions? Abstract PDF. Eva M Cybulska. Vol 12, No 1 (2012), What did you learn in school today? Abstract PDF. Carina Henriksson. Vol 5, No 1 (2005) ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 265 ... Issue, Title. Vol 35, No 2 (2008), Choice of place for childbirth: prevalence and correlates of utilization of health facilities in Chongwe district, Zambia, Abstract PDF. AN Hazemba, S Siziya. Vol 43, No 1 (2016), Clinical and Radiological Features of Multiple Myeloma Patients at the University Teaching ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 88, No 8 (1998), New birth and death registration forms - a foundation for the future, a challenge for health workers? Abstract PDF. Debbie Bradshaw, Danuta Kielkowski, Freddy Sitas. Vol 83, No 3 (1993), New estimates of infant and child mortality for blacks in South Africa, 1968-1979, Abstract PDF.

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    Items 151 - 200 of 643 ... Issue, Title. Vol 18, No 2 (2015), Contraceptive Knowledge and Compliance with Guidelines for Providing Contraceptive Services by Patent Medicine Vendors In Ibadan North Local Government Area, Nigeria, Abstract PDF. OO Ajayi, AJ Ajuwon. Vol 16, No 2 (2013), Coping Strategy for Food Security ...

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    Items 851 - 900 of 1006 ... Issue, Title. Vol 54, No 2 (2012), The effect of the introduction of a standard monitoring protocol on the investigations performed on the metabolic control of type 2 diabetes at Addington Hospital Medical Outpatients Department, Durban, South Africa, Abstract PDF. JM Gill, A Ross, F Pirie, ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 8, No 2 (2016): Supplement, Using operative models (ICF and CBR) within an interprofessional context to address community needs, Abstract PDF. A Rhoda, F Waggie, G.C. Filies, J.M. Frantz. Vol 2, No 1 (2010), Using portfolios to assess professional competence and development in medical laboratory ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 412 ... Issue, Title. Vol 30, No 3 (2011) ... Transferring the principle of double effect from war to business, Abstract. G. J. Rossouw ... Vol 22, No 2 (2003), Can more business ethics teaching halt corruption in companies? Abstract.

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    Items 101 - 150 of 155 ... Issue, Title. Vol 12 (2012), Political Dissent and Autonomy in Wum Local Government, Southern (West) Cameroons, 1957 – 1968, Abstract. TP Mbeum. Vol 9 (2009), Post-Emancipation Slave Commerce: Increasing Child Slave Trafficking and Women's Agency in Late Nineteenth-century Ghana ...

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    Items 451 - 500 of 581 ... Issue, Title. Vol 30, No 1 (2016), Risky sexual behaviour and associated factors among students of Debre Tabor University, Northwest Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study, Abstract PDF. Awoke Derbie, Mekonnen Assefa, Daniel Mekonnen, Fantahun Biadglegne. Vol 28, No 1 (2014), Road traffic accident: ...

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    Items 451 - 500 of 1346 ... Issue, Title. Vol 32, No 1 (2015), Fire and the dynamics of two unpalatable grass species (Cymbopogon pospischilii and Elionurus muticus) in a semi-arid climate, Abstract. Hennie A Snyman. Vol 8, No 1 (1973), Fire as a method of controlling macchia (Fynos) vegetation on the Amathole Mountains of ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 43, No 2 (2006), Review: "'n Wonderlike geweld. Jeugherinneringe", By Elsa Joubert (2005), Abstract PDF. Henriette Roos. Vol 53, No 1 (2016), Review: Breyten Breytenbach, A Monologue in Two Voices, Abstract PDF. Andy Carolin. Vol 53, No 1 (2016), Review: The Shadow of the Hummingbird, Abstract ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 103 ... Issue, Title ... SE Edusah, E Osei-Tutu ... Vol 6, No 2 (2016), Interrelationships among unemployment, inflation and economic growth in Nigeria, Abstract .... Vol 4, No 3 (2014): Special Edition, Socio-cultural Issues for ...

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    Items 4351 - 4386 of 4386 ... Issue, Title. Vol 107, No 6 (2017), When students become patients: TB disease among medical undergraduates in Cape Town, South Africa, Abstract PDF. H van der Westhuizen, A Dramowski. Vol 106, No 4 (2016), Where do children die and what are the causes? Under-5 deaths in the Metro West ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 2 (2014), Sorindeia warneckei Engl. (Anacardiaceae), une espèce multi-usagère de la dépression de la Lama au Togo, Abstract PDF. A Akodewou, S Akpavi, M Dourma, K Batawila, KB Amegnaglo, W Atakpama, K Akpagama. Vol 10, No 1 (2014), Sterculia setigera Del.: influence de quelques ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 126 ... Issue, Title. Vol 8, No 2 (2016), 2010 FIFA World Cup stadium investment: Does the post-event usage justify the expenditure? Abstract PDF. Luke Humphrey, Gavin Fraser. Vol 6, No 1 (2014), 7Implication of mergers and acquisitions on stock returns before and during the 2007–2009 credit crunch: An ...

  19. Molecular and compound-specific hydrogen isotope analyses of insoluble organic matter from different carbonaceous chondrite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Huang, Yongsong; Alexander, Conel M. O.'D.; Fogel, Marilyn; Cody, George

    2005-07-01

    We have conducted the first systematic analyses of molecular distribution and δD values of individual compounds in pyrolysates of insoluble organic matter (IOM) from different carbonaceous chondrite groups, using flash pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compound-specific D/H analysis. IOM samples from six meteorites of different classifications, Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042 (CR2), Orgueil (CI1), Allan Hills (ALH) 83100 (CM1/2), Murchison (CM2), ALH 85013 (CM2), and Tagish Lake (C2) were isolated and studied. Except for the pyrolysate of Tagish Lake IOM, pyrolysates of all five meteorite IOM samples were dominated by an extensive series of aromatic (C 1 to C 7 alkyl-substituted benzenes, C 0 to C 2 alkyl-substituted naphthalenes), with aliphatic (straight chain and branched C 10 to C 15 alkanes) hydrocarbons and several S- and O- containing compounds (C 1 to C 2 alkylthiophenes, benzothiophene, benzaldehyde) being also present. The strong similarity in the pyrolysates of different carbonaceous chondrites suggests certain common characteristics in the formation mechanisms of IOM from different meteorites. The Tagish Lake IOM sample is unique in that its pyrolysate lacks most of the alkyl-substituted aromatic hydrocarbons detected in other meteorite IOM samples, suggesting distinctively different formation processes. Both bulk δD values of meteorite IOMs and weighted-average δD values of individual compounds in pyrolysates show a decreasing trend: CR2 > CI1 > CM2 > C2 (Tagish Lake), with the EET 92042 (CR2) IOM having the highest δD values (˜2000‰ higher than other samples). We attribute the high D contents in the IOM to primitive interstellar organic sources.

  20. Effect of different extracting solvents on antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds of a fruit and vegetable residue flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica C. P. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to quantify antioxidant capacity in food products, several methods have been proposed over the years. Among them, DPPH radical is widely used to determine the antioxidant capacity of different substrates. However, it is known that different types of extractants, providing different responses, can extract a variety of bioactive compounds. Besides, storage time seems to interfere in the stability of these substances. Integral use of fruits and vegetables has been proposed along the years as a means of reducing environmental pollution and give a better destination to by-products from food industries. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant potential of a fruit and vegetables residue flour (FVR with sequential and non-sequential extraction, in order to evaluate its antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds. And these compounds stability during storage of 180 days. It was observed that in non-sequential extraction, water was able to reduce by 74% the radical; however, at sequential extraction process, using six different extractors, each one was able to reduce at least 40% of DPPH. The total soluble phenolic contents in sequential extraction were 22.49 ± 1.59 mg GAE/g FVR on the first day and 5.35 ± 0.32 mg GAE/g FVR after 180 days.

  1. Review of the prevalence and causes of antimony compounds resistance in different societies review article

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    Fariba Jaffary

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is an endemic parasitic disease of major health impact in many parts of the world and is caused by several species of the protozoan parasite Leishmania. Antimonial compounds (i.e glucantime and pentostam are the first-line treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis with emerging drug resistance as a problem. The control of Leishmania is further complicated by the emergence of drug-resistant parasites. In the clinical settings, resistance to SbV containing drugs is now well established and it was found to occur in South America, Europe, the Middle East and most notably in India. Clinical resistance to organic pentavalent antimonials, in the form of sodium stibogluconate (pentostam or N-methylglucamine antimoniate (glucantime, has long been recognized. However, it is unknown whether the clinical failure of chemotherapy is attributable to the development of drug resistance mechanisms in the parasite or to a variety of host factors that might also contribute to low drug response. Reported rate of drug-resistance to antimonial compounds in Iran varies from 9.4% to 94.2% and there is not any comprehensive study on this issue. Indeed, in the endemic region treatment with SbV fails in more cases; thus, in general patients infected with resistant parasites are unresponsive although exceptions have been reported. This article aims to review the mechanisms of drug resistance to these compounds. The main resistance factors include genetical, enzymatic, intracellular (such as apoptosis and cytoskeleton changes and resistance proteins. Also, mechanisms related to drug transport and intracellular activation are discussed. Various methods of drug resistance detection such as culture and molecular methods (i.e polymerase chain reaction are reviewed. Although the exact mechanism of action glucantime is not clear, it seems that protein and gene factors involved in cellular drug entry are the main causes of drug resistance. Cross

  2. Variation of theanine, phenolic, and methylxanthine compounds in 21 cultivars of Camellia sinensis harvested in different seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Rui; Redfern, Sally P; Kirkup, Don; Porter, Elaine A; Kite, Geoffrey C; Terry, Leon A; Berry, Mark J; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2017-04-01

    This is the first study to use chemometric methods to differentiate among 21 cultivars of Camellia sinensis from China and between leaves harvested at different times of the year using 30 compounds implicated in the taste and quality of tea. Unique patterns of catechin derivatives were observed among cultivars and across harvest seasons. C. sinensis var. pubilimba (You 510) differed from the cultivars of C. sinensis var. sinensis, with higher levels of theobromine, (+)-catechin, gallocatechin, gallocatechin gallate and theasinensin B, and lower levels of (-)-epicatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC) and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), respectively. Three cultivars of C. sinensis var. sinensis, Fuyun 7, Qiancha 7 and Zijuan contained significantly more caffeoylquinic acids than others cultivars. A Linear Discriminant Analysis model based on the abundance of 12 compounds was able to discriminate amongst all 21 tea cultivars. Harvest time impacted the abundance of EGC, theanine and afzelechin gallate. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elixabet Díaz-de-Cerio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds present in Andalusian guava leaves at different oxidation states (low, medium, and high. The phenolic compounds in guava leaves were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-QTOF-MS. The results obtained by chromatographic analysis reported that guava leaves with low degree of oxidation had a higher content of flavonols, gallic, and ellagic derivatives compared to the other two guava leaf samples. Contrary, high oxidation state guava leaves reported the highest content of cyanidin-glucoside that was 2.6 and 15 times higher than guava leaves with medium and low oxidation state, respectively. The QTOF platform permitted the determination of several phenolic compounds with anti-diabetic properties and provided new information about guava leaf phenolic composition that could be useful for nutraceutical production.

  4. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Verardo, Vito; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-05-11

    Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds present in Andalusian guava leaves at different oxidation states (low, medium, and high). The phenolic compounds in guava leaves were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-QTOF-MS. The results obtained by chromatographic analysis reported that guava leaves with low degree of oxidation had a higher content of flavonols, gallic, and ellagic derivatives compared to the other two guava leaf samples. Contrary, high oxidation state guava leaves reported the highest content of cyanidin-glucoside that was 2.6 and 15 times higher than guava leaves with medium and low oxidation state, respectively. The QTOF platform permitted the determination of several phenolic compounds with anti-diabetic properties and provided new information about guava leaf phenolic composition that could be useful for nutraceutical production.

  5. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Verardo, Vito; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds present in Andalusian guava leaves at different oxidation states (low, medium, and high). The phenolic compounds in guava leaves were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-QTOF-MS. The results obtained by chromatographic analysis reported that guava leaves with low degree of oxidation had a higher content of flavonols, gallic, and ellagic derivatives compared to the other two guava leaf samples. Contrary, high oxidation state guava leaves reported the highest content of cyanidin-glucoside that was 2.6 and 15 times higher than guava leaves with medium and low oxidation state, respectively. The QTOF platform permitted the determination of several phenolic compounds with anti-diabetic properties and provided new information about guava leaf phenolic composition that could be useful for nutraceutical production. PMID:27187352

  6. Quantitative analysis of different volatile organic compounds using an improved electronic nose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Daqi; Ji, Jiuming; Gong, Jiayu; Cai, Chaoqian

    2012-01-01

    This paper sets up an improved electronic nose with an automatic sampling mode, large volumetric vapors and constant temperature for headspace vapors and gas sensor array. In order to facilitate the fast recovery and good repeatability of gas sensors, the steps taken include (A) short-time contact with odors measured; (B) long-time purification using environmental air; (C) exact calibration using clean air before sampling. We employ multiple single-output perceptrons to discriminate and quantify multiple kinds of odors. This task is first regarded as multiple two-class discrimination problems and then multiple quantification problems, and accomplished by multiple single-output perceptrons followed by multiple single-output perceptrons. The experimental results for measuring and quantifying 12 kinds of volatile organic compounds with changing concentrations show that the type of electronic nose with a hierarchical perceptron model has a simple structure, easy operation, good repeatability and good discrimination and quantification performance. (paper)

  7. Quantitative analysis of different volatile organic compounds using an improved electronic nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daqi; Ji, Jiuming; Gong, Jiayu; Cai, Chaoqian

    2012-10-01

    This paper sets up an improved electronic nose with an automatic sampling mode, large volumetric vapors and constant temperature for headspace vapors and gas sensor array. In order to facilitate the fast recovery and good repeatability of gas sensors, the steps taken include (A) short-time contact with odors measured; (B) long-time purification using environmental air; (C) exact calibration using clean air before sampling. We employ multiple single-output perceptrons to discriminate and quantify multiple kinds of odors. This task is first regarded as multiple two-class discrimination problems and then multiple quantification problems, and accomplished by multiple single-output perceptrons followed by multiple single-output perceptrons. The experimental results for measuring and quantifying 12 kinds of volatile organic compounds with changing concentrations show that the type of electronic nose with a hierarchical perceptron model has a simple structure, easy operation, good repeatability and good discrimination and quantification performance.

  8. Comparison of Different Solvents and Extraction Methods for Isolation of Phenolic Compounds from Horseradish Roots (Armoracia rusticana)

    OpenAIRE

    Lolita Tomsone; Zanda Kruma; Ruta Galoburda

    2012-01-01

    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a perennial herb belonging to the Brassicaceae family and contains biologically active substances. The aim of the current research was to determine best method for extraction of phenolic compounds from horseradish roots showing high antiradical activity. Three genotypes (No. 105; No. 106 and variety ‘Turku’) of horseradish roots were extracted with eight different solvents: n-hexane, ethyl acetate, diethyl ether, 2-propanol, acetone, ethanol (95%), ethanol...

  9. Characterization of bioactive compounds from monascus purpureus fermented different cereal substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ivanišová

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state fermenting of cereals by Monascus is interesting strategy to produce cereals with more beneficial components.  The objective of this study was to determine selected primary and secondary metabolites in cereals (rice, wheat, barley, sorghum, corn, buckwheat fermented by Monascus purpreus and subsequently compare amount of these compounds with control sample (cereals without Monascus. In fermented cereals was determined higher protein, fat, reducing sugars, crude fiber and ash content with compare to non-fermented cereals. The antioxidant activity measured by DPPH assay, ABTS assay as well as reducing power assay was also higher in fermented Monascus cereals with the best results in rice (3.09 ±0.02; 62.9 ±2.24; 43.19 ±2.07 mg TEAC per g of dry weight. Sample of fermented rice contained the highest level of total polyphenols (15.31 ±3.62 mg GAE per g of dry weight, total flavonoids (1.65 mg QE per g of dry weight and total phenolic acids (9.47 ±0.56 mg CAE per g of dry weight. In fermented cereals was also determined higher contact of reducing sugars (highest value in rice 246.97 ±7.96 mg GE per g, proteins (highest value in buckwheat 28.47 ±1.24%, ash (highest value in sorghum 2.74 ±0.08% and fat (highest value in corn 4.89 ±0.03% with compare to non-fermented samples. Results of crude fiber content of both - fermented and non-fermented cereals were balanced with similar values. Results of this study shown that Monascus purpureus fermented cereal substrates might be a potential sources of several bioactive compounds in food products.

  10. Physicochemical characterization of different trademarks of compound Yerba Maté and their herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griselda Patricia Scipioni

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the physicochemical characteristics of the main herbs used in the mixture of yerba maté with other aromatic herbs and the characterization of the trademarks of compound yerba maté. Moisture, water extract, total ash, acid-insoluble ash and caffeine concentration were determined. Results showed higher values of moisture content, total and aci-insoluble ash and lower water extracts in the herbs. Determinations were carried out in nine trademarks of compound yerba maté. In most cases they complied with the standards of the country with the exception of one trademark from Argentina.A erva-mate composta é um produto que se consome amplamente na região do MERCOSUL. Obtém-se misturando erva-mate com outras ervas aromáticas. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi o estudo das características físico-químicas das principais ervas usadas na mistura e a caracterização das marcas de erva-mate composta. Determinou-se a umidade, extração de água, cinzas totais, cinzas insolúveis ácidas e a concentração de cafeína. Encontraram-se nas ervas, valores padrões diferentes aos da erva-mate tais como valores maiores de conteúdo de umidade, cinzas totais, cinzas insolúveis ácidas e menores extratos de água. Fizeram-se determinações em nove marcas de erva-mate composta. Na maioria dos casos, cumpriam com as normas do país, exceto uma marca da Argentina

  11. Effect of Different Flours on the Formation of Hydroxymethylfurfural, Furfural, and Dicarbonyl Compounds in Heated Glucose/Flour Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Mesías

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditional cereal-based foods usually include wheat flour in their formulations; however, the search for new products with new ingredients providing different properties to foods is widely pursued by food companies. Replacement of wheat by other flours can modify both nutritional properties and organoleptic characteristics of the final baked food, but can also impact the formation of potentially harmful compounds. The effect of the type of flour on the formation of furfurals and dicarbonyl compounds was studied in a dough model system during baking that contains water or glucose in order to promote the Maillard reaction and caramelization. The formation of methylglyoxal and glyoxal was significantly reduced in spelt and teff formulations compared to wheat flour formulations, respectively. In contrast, samples formulated with oat, teff, and rye showed a significant increase in the levels of 3-deoxyglucosone. Similarly, spelt and teff formulations presented significantly higher concentrations of hydroxymethylfurfural, and spelt, teff, and rye presented higher concentrations of furfural. Therefore, the formation of process contaminants and undesirable compounds in new food products formulated with different flours replacing the traditional wheat flour should be considered carefully in terms of food safety.

  12. Effect of Different Flours on the Formation of Hydroxymethylfurfural, Furfural, and Dicarbonyl Compounds in Heated Glucose/Flour Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesías, Marta; Morales, Francisco J

    2017-02-16

    Traditional cereal-based foods usually include wheat flour in their formulations; however, the search for new products with new ingredients providing different properties to foods is widely pursued by food companies. Replacement of wheat by other flours can modify both nutritional properties and organoleptic characteristics of the final baked food, but can also impact the formation of potentially harmful compounds. The effect of the type of flour on the formation of furfurals and dicarbonyl compounds was studied in a dough model system during baking that contains water or glucose in order to promote the Maillard reaction and caramelization. The formation of methylglyoxal and glyoxal was significantly reduced in spelt and teff formulations compared to wheat flour formulations, respectively. In contrast, samples formulated with oat, teff, and rye showed a significant increase in the levels of 3-deoxyglucosone. Similarly, spelt and teff formulations presented significantly higher concentrations of hydroxymethylfurfural, and spelt, teff, and rye presented higher concentrations of furfural. Therefore, the formation of process contaminants and undesirable compounds in new food products formulated with different flours replacing the traditional wheat flour should be considered carefully in terms of food safety.

  13. Vitamin C, Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity of Broccoli Florets Grown under Different Nitrogen Treatments Combined with Selenium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peñas Elena

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Broccoli consumption is rising worldwide and fertilization is a tool to increase its production. However, little is known about the effect of mineral supplementation to the soil on the bioactive compounds. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to analyze the content of vitamin C, total phenolic compounds and the antioxidant capacity of broccoli florets cultivated under different nitrogen (N conditions in combination with selenium (IV and VI. Greenhouse experiments were conducted in broccoli grown in commercial soil treated with different N sources [(NH42SO4, NaNO3, NH4NO3 or CO(NH22 at 160 kg N/ha]. In addition, selenium (Se salts [Na2SeO3 (Se IV or Na2SeO4 (Se VI at 10 and 20 kg Se/ha] were applied. There were no evidences of the influence of N treatment on vitamin C content whilst Se (IV or VI uptake led to a significant reduction of this vitamin in broccoli florets, irrespective of the N source. In contrast, total phenolics content and antioxidant capacity underwent a significant increment under N application. However, their combination with Se salts modified total phenolic content and antioxidant capacities in broccoli florets depending on N source and Se doses. Among all the experimental trials, application of NH4NO3 combined with 10 g Se (IV/ha was the elective treatment strategy to produce broccoli florets with higher content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity and, therefore, enhanced functionality.

  14. Evaluation of different iron compounds in chlorotic Italian lemon trees (Citrus lemon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Patricio Rivera; Castro Meza, Blanca I; de la Garza Requena, Francisco R; Flores, Guillermo Mendoza; Etchevers Barra, Jorge D

    2007-05-01

    The severe deficiency of iron or ferric chlorosis is a serious problem of most citrus trees established in calcareous soils, as a result of the low availability of iron in these soils and the poor uptake and limited transport of this nutrient in trees. The objective of this study was to evaluate the response of chlorotic Italian lemon trees (Citrus lemon) to the application of iron compounds to roots and stems. On comparing the effects of aqueous solutions of ferric citrate, ferrous sulphate and FeEDDHA chelate, applied to 20% of the roots grown in soil and sand, of trees that were planted in pots containing calcareous soil, it was observed that the chelate fully corrected ferric chlorosis, while citrate and sulphate did not solve the problem. EDDHA induced the root uptake of iron as well as the movement of the nutrient up to the leaves. With the use of injections of ferric solutions into the secondary stem of adult trees, ferric citrate corrected chlorosis but ferrous sulphate did not. The citrate ion expanded the mobility of iron within the plant, from the injection points up to the leaves, whereas the sulphate ion did not sufficiently improve the movement of iron towards the leaf mesophyll.

  15. Seasonal Difference in Antioxidant Capacity and Active Compounds Contents of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingfang Zhang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Leaf of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver (EU is a Traditional Chinese Medicine and a functional food in China. Antioxidant contents of EU leaves, which were collected monthly during the period of May–October in three years, were determined. Samples’ antioxidant capacity was characterized by DPPH radical scavenging activity, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, ferrous chelating ability, and antioxidant capacity in linoleic acid emulsion and in rapeseed oil assays. The results showed that contents of some active compounds and antioxidant activity were related to a certain time of the year. Samples collected in August showed high content of phenolics, and the samples collected in May contained higher amount of flavonoids than other samples. Leaves collected in May or June exhibited high contents of rutin, quercetin, geniposidic acid and aucubin. The August leaves showed stable and high DPPH radical scavenging activity, and ferrous chelating ability. May samples showed strong inhibitory effects on oxidation of rapeseed oil and linoleic acid. The DPPH radical scavenging activity was related to the total phenolics content. Flavonoids played an important role in the inhibitory effects on rapeseed oil and linoleic acid oxidation. Therefore, August and May were indicated as the best months to harvest EU leaves for industry.

  16. Conformational differences in dioxouraniun(VI) coordination compounds. Crystal structure of the chloroform adduct of n,n'-bis-salicylidene-1,5-diamino-3-oxapentane-dioxouranium(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombieri, G; Forsellini, E; Benetollo, F [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Padua (Italy). Lab. di Chimica e Tecnologia dei Radioelementi; Fenton, D E

    1979-01-01

    The title compound (UO/sub 2/-saloden-CHCl/sub 3/) crystallizes in an orthorhombic system. Lattice parameters are given. The coordination geometry of the uranium atom is bipyramidal pentagonal with the ligand pentadentate in the equatorial plane of the uranyl ion. The chloroform molecule does not interact directly with the ligand. The IR spectral data are also discussed.

  17. Use of solid phase microextraction to identify volatile organic compounds in brazilian wines from different grape varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Cristina Morais Fernandes

    Full Text Available Abstract The Brazilian wine industry has shown significant growth in recent years and the insertion of new concepts, such as geographical indications as signs of quality, has placed Brazil in tune with the tendencies of world wine production. The aim of this work was to apply the Solid Phase Microextraction technique in combination with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry to study Brazilian wines made from different grape varieties, in order to separate and identify their volatile organic compounds. These substances were identified by comparisons between the spectra obtained with those presented in the NIST library database, and by comparisons with linear retention indices and literature data. The amounts of the compounds were calculated based on the total peak areas of the chromatograms. Forty-seven volatile compounds were identified and grouped into alcohols, aldehydes, fatty acids, esters, hydrocarbons, ketones and terpenes. Most of them belonged to the ester function, conferring a fruity aroma on the wines. The alcohols may have originated from the yeast metabolism, contributing to the alcoholic and floral aromas. Ethyl lactate, 1-hexanol and diethyl maleate were identified in all the varieties, except Merlot. Decanal, methyl citronellate, (E-2-hexenyl-3-methylbutyrate were only found in Merlot, while 2,3-butanediol was only present in the Tannat wines. 2-Phenylethanol was present in all varieties and is recognized as giving pleasant rose and honey attributes to wines. This study showed that the volatile profile of red wines is mainly characterized by esters and higher alcohols. The statistical analysis of the comparison of averages showed a greater amount of averages significantly different in the relative areas of Merlot wine. The Principal Component Analysis showed one grouping composed only of the Merlot wine samples, and this was probably related to the existence of the volatile organic compounds that were specifically identified in

  18. Review of different methods for developing nanoelectrocatalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutanceau, C.; Brimaud, S.; Lamy, C.; Leger, J.-M.; Dubau, L.; Rousseau, S.; Vigier, F. [Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique, Equipe Electrocatalyse, UMR 6503 CNRS, 40 avenue du recteur Pineau, F-86022 Poitiers Cedex (France)

    2008-10-01

    Most of the electrochemical reactions involved in fuel cell are structure sensitive. Moreover, for the electrooxidation of small organic molecules catalysts have to be multifunctional. For these reasons, the development of various synthesis methods of multimetallic electrocatalysts allowing to control the atomic composition and the microstructure is needed in order to improve the electrocatalytic activity. For this purpose, several methods for the preparation of nanostructured catalysts have been developed in our laboratory (impregnation-reduction method, colloidal route, carbonyl route, microemulsion and electrochemical methods), which allow to prepare multimetallic particles. These catalysts were characterized using physical and physico-chemical methods (XRD, TEM, EDX, electrochemical methods, etc.) in order to check their composition, structure, dispersion, active surface area, etc. Amongst the developed methods, some of them can lead to the formation of alloyed or non-alloyed multimetallic compounds depending on the synthesis procedure. XRD analysis allows us to discriminate the catalyst structures. The influence of the atomic composition and of the nature of foreign metals added to platinum is discussed in terms of electrochemical activity towards oxidation of small organic molecules of interest in energy storage and production. In particular, it appears that non-alloyed Pt-Ru catalysts display higher electroactivity towards methanol oxidation. Electrochemical and DEMS measurements were used to study and to evaluate the influence of the electrocatalyst structure on its electroactivity. The effect of the composition in terms of foreign metal atoms and atomic content of platinum based and platinum-tin based catalysts towards the electrooxidation of ethanol is also discussed from electrochemical experiments and fuel cell test results. (author)

  19. What is the title of a Web page? A study of Webography practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy C. Craven

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Few style guides recommend a specific source for citing the title of a Web page that is not a duplicate of a printed format. Sixteen Web bibliographies were analyzed for uses of two different recommended sources: (1 the tagged title; (2 the title as it would appear to be from viewing the beginning of the page in the browser (apparent title. In all sixteen, the proportion of tagged titles was much less than that of apparent titles, and only rarely did the bibliography title match the tagged title and not the apparent title. Convenience of copying may partly explain the preference for the apparent title. Contrary to expectation, correlation between proportion of valid links in a bibliography and proportion of accurately reproduced apparent titles was slightly negative.

  20. The contribution of radioisotopes in secular equilibrium in the transport index of fissile uranium compounds in different enrichments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Teresinha de Moraes da; Sordi, Gian M.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This work shows the contribution of radioisotopes in secular equilibrium in the transport index (TI) of some fissile uranium compounds: uranium oxides UO 2 , U 3 O 8 and uranium silicide U 3 Si 2 , taking into account the different enrichment grades.The range of enrichment (E%) studied was 3,4,5,7,10,20,30,40,50,93 and 100. Initially, the cell of optimum moderation ratio was built, since it represents the most reactive of the system (consisting of uranium), with maximum infinitive multiplication factor k∞, in certain concentration of uranium for each enrichment. This was made using the computer program Gamtec II. The critical radius of a sphere was calculated for a cell of optimum moderation ratio, in order to calculate the critical mass of the uranium compound or of the uranium element for each specific enrichment. For this the program Citation was used. In this study it was calculated the smallest critical mass of the uranium compound or the smallest critical mass of the uranium element. The objective was to match the largest mass of the uranium with each specific enrichment. The largest safety mass corresponds to 45% the critical mass the compound uranium or uranium element. Then, we calculated the uranium element safety mass, which it related to a fifth of this mass to the value 50, which corresponds to criticality safety index (CSI). That is, 20% of the safety mass is the value where the transport is carried out with subcritical mass, going in favor of the security. From the uranium element safety mass (USM) was determined for each enrichment , and it was calculated the mass of 235 U, activity 235 U and dose rate of 235 U, the same items were calculated for the isotope 238 U. The total dose rate was calculated for two isotopes, and applying the transport index definition as the gamma dose rate for the distance of 1 m from the packed, it was determined the TI for 20% of the safety mass for each enrichment of the compound studied. The study of

  1. Photosynthetic capacity is negatively correlated with the concentration of leaf phenolic compounds across a range of different species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbele, Sally; Fotelli, Mariangela N; Nikolopoulos, Dimosthenis; Tooulakou, Georgia; Liakoura, Vally; Liakopoulos, Georgios; Bresta, Panagiota; Dotsika, Elissavet; Adams, Mark A; Karabourniotis, George

    2012-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are the most commonly studied of all secondary metabolites because of their significant protective-defensive roles and their significant concentration in plant tissues. However, there has been little study on relationships between gas exchange parameters and the concentration of leaf phenolic compounds (total phenolics (TP) and condensed tannins (CT)) across a range of species. Therefore, we addressed the question: is there any correlation between photosynthetic capacity (A(max)) and TP and CT across species from different ecosystems in different continents? A plethora of functional and structural parameters were measured in 49 plant species following different growth strategies from five sampling sites located in Greece and Australia. The relationships between several leaf traits were analysed by means of regression and principal component analysis. The results revealed a negative relationship between TP and CT and A(max) among the different plant species, growth strategies and sampling sites, irrespective of expression (with respect to mass, area or nitrogen content). Principal component analysis showed that high concentrations of TP and CT are associated with thick, dense leaves with low nitrogen. This leaf type is characterized by low growth, A(max) and transpiration rates, and is common in environments with low water and nutrient availability, high temperatures and high light intensities. Therefore, the high TP and CT in such leaves are compatible with the protective and defensive functions ascribed to them. Our results indicate a functional integration between carbon gain and the concentration of leaf phenolic compounds that reflects the trade-off between growth and defence/protection demands, depending on the growth strategy adopted by each species.

  2. Effect of different coatings on post-harvest quality and bioactive compounds of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meighani, Hossein; Ghasemnezhad, Mahmood; Bakhshi, Davood

    2015-07-01

    The effect of three different coatings; resin wax (Britex Ti), carnauba wax (Xedasol M14), and chitosan (1 and 2 % w/v) on postharvest quality of pomegranate fruits were investigated. Fruits quality characteristics and bioactive compounds were evaluated during 40, 80 and 120 days storage at 4.5 °C and 3 additional days at 20 °C. The results showed that uncoated fruits showed higher respiration rate, weight loss, L* and b* values of arils, total soluble solids (TSS)/titratable acidity (TA), and pH than coated fruits during storage. Coating treatments could delay declining TSS and TA percent, a* value of arils, as well as bioactive compounds such as total phenolics, flavonoids and anthocyanins content and antioxidant activity. The coated fruits with commercial resin and carnauba waxes showed significantly lower respiration rate and weight loss than other treatments, however carnauba wax could maintain considerably higher fruits quality and bioactive compounds than other coating treatments. The results suggested that postharvest application of carnauba wax have a potential to extend storage life of pomegranate fruits by reducing respiration rate, water loss and maintaining fruit quality.

  3. Effect of different iron compounds on rheological and technological parameters as well as bioaccessibility of minerals in whole wheat bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebellato, Ana Paula; Bussi, Jéssica; Silva, Joyce Grazielle Siqueira; Greiner, Ralf; Steel, Caroline Joy; Pallone, Juliana Azevedo Lima

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of iron compounds used in whole wheat flour (WWF) fortification, both on rheological properties of the dough and on bread technological quality. Furthermore, bioaccessibility of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn) and calcium (Ca) in the final breads was determined. Rheological properties (mainly dough development time, stability, mixing tolerance index, resistance to extension and ratio number) of the dough and the technological quality of bread (mainly oven spring and cut opening) were altered. However, producing roll breads fortified with different iron compounds was still possible. NaFeEDTA (ferric sodium ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid) proved to be the most effective iron compound in the fortification of WWF, since it presented the highest levels of solubility (44.80%) and dialysability (46.14%), followed by microencapsulated ferrous fumarate (FFm). On the other hand, the microencapsulated ferrous sulfate (FSm) and reduced iron presented the lowest solubility (5.40 and 18.30%, respectively) and dialysability (33.12 and 31.79%, respectively). Zn dialysis was positively influenced by NaFeEDTA, FSm, and ferrous fumarate. As for Ca, dialysis was positively influenced by FSm and negatively influenced by FFm. The data indicated that there is a competitive interaction for the absorption of these minerals in whole wheat roll breads, but all studied minerals can be considered bioaccessible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluating climate change mitigation potential of hydrochars: compounding insights from three different indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Brooks, Jennifer; Renz, Michael

    2017-01-01

    beet, fava bean, onion and lucerne) and two different countries (Spain and Germany), and used three different indicators of climate change: global warming potential (GWP), global temperature change potential (GTP), and climate tipping potential (CTP). We found that although climate change benefits (GWP......) from just sequestration and temporary storage of carbon are sufficient to outweigh impacts stemming from hydrochar production and transportation to the field, even greater benefits stem from replacing climate-inefficient biowaste management treatment options, like composting in Spain. By contrast...

  5. The efficacy of compounds with different polarities as antioxidant in emulsions with omega-3 lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Decker, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    According to the so-called polar paradox hypothesis, the efficacy of an antioxidant in emulsions is highly affected by its polarity and thereby location in the different phases. However, other factors also affect the efficacy of antioxidants in multiphase systems. The aim of this study was to eva...

  6. Influence of zinc oxide during different stages of sulfur vulcanization. Elucidated by model compound studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heideman, G.; Datta, Rabin; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.; van Baarle, B.

    2005-01-01

    The addition of zinc oxide (ZnO) as an activator for the sulfur vulcanization of rubbers enhances the vulcanization efficiency and vulcanizate properties and reduces the vulcanization time. The first part of this article deals with the reduction and optimization of the amount of ZnO. Two different

  7. Fate and Prediction of Phenolic Secoiridoid Compounds throughout the Different Stages of the Virgin Olive Oil Making Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregapane, Giuseppe; Salvador, M Desamparados

    2017-08-03

    The evolution of the main phenolic secoiridoid compounds throughout the different stages of the virgin olive oil making process-crushing, malaxation and liquid-solid separation-is studied here, with the goal of making possible the prediction of the partition and transformation that take place in the different steps of the process. The concentration of hydroxytyrosol secoiridoids produced under the different crushing conditions studied are reasonably proportional to the intensity of the milling stage, and strongly depend on the olive variety processed. During malaxation, the content of the main phenolic secoiridoids is reduced, especially in the case of the hydroxytyrosol derivatives, in which a variety-dependent behaviour is observed. The prediction of the concentration of phenolic secoiridoids finally transferred from the kneaded paste to the virgin olive oil is also feasible, and depends on the phenolic content and amount of water in the olive paste. The determination of the phenolic compounds in the olive fruit, olive paste and olive oil has been carried out by LC-MS (Liquid-Chromatography Mass-Spectrometry). This improved knowledge could help in the use of more adequate processing conditions for the production of virgin olive oil with desired properties; for example, higher or lower phenolic content, as the amount of these minor components is directly related to its sensory, antioxidant and healthy properties.

  8. Distributions of chemical reactive compounds: Effects of different emissions on the formation of ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Fiedler, F.; Vogel, B.

    1993-01-01

    By using the model system the concentration distributions are simulated in accordance to the conditions of the beginning of August 1990. For this situation the influence of the emissions outside of the modelling region and the influence of biogenic emissions of hydrocarbons on the ozone formation in the modeling region was investigated. Comparing the results of the different simulations one can find differences concerning the netto production of the oxidants. For the first simulation day the emissions outside of the modeling region show a strong influence on the ozone production. Integrated over the whole boundary layer the ozone mass increases by 24%. If additionally the biogenic emissions are taken into account one can find only an increase of 7% for the 1. day. In contrast at the 2. simulation day the ozone production increases by 81%. For this case the ozone concentration near the ground is up to 20 ppb higher than for the model rund without biogenic emissions. (orig./BBR) [de

  9. Sex-related differences in behavioral and amygdalar responses to compound facial threat cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hee Yeon; Adams, Reginald B; Cushing, Cody A; Boshyan, Jasmine; Ward, Noreen; Kveraga, Kestutis

    2018-03-08

    During face perception, we integrate facial expression and eye gaze to take advantage of their shared signals. For example, fear with averted gaze provides a congruent avoidance cue, signaling both threat presence and its location, whereas fear with direct gaze sends an incongruent cue, leaving threat location ambiguous. It has been proposed that the processing of different combinations of threat cues is mediated by dual processing routes: reflexive processing via magnocellular (M) pathway and reflective processing via parvocellular (P) pathway. Because growing evidence has identified a variety of sex differences in emotional perception, here we also investigated how M and P processing of fear and eye gaze might be modulated by observer's sex, focusing on the amygdala, a structure important to threat perception and affective appraisal. We adjusted luminance and color of face stimuli to selectively engage M or P processing and asked observers to identify emotion of the face. Female observers showed more accurate behavioral responses to faces with averted gaze and greater left amygdala reactivity both to fearful and neutral faces. Conversely, males showed greater right amygdala activation only for M-biased averted-gaze fear faces. In addition to functional reactivity differences, females had proportionately greater bilateral amygdala volumes, which positively correlated with behavioral accuracy for M-biased fear. Conversely, in males only the right amygdala volume was positively correlated with accuracy for M-biased fear faces. Our findings suggest that M and P processing of facial threat cues is modulated by functional and structural differences in the amygdalae associated with observer's sex. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Characterisation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by the composting of different waste matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Marco; Martini, Luca Matteo; Corrà, Cesare; Scapinello, Marco; Coller, Graziano; Tosi, Paolo; Ragazzi, Marco

    2017-12-01

    The complaints arising from the problem of odorants released by composting plants may impede the construction of new composting facilities, preclude the proper activity of existing facilities or even lead to their closure, with negative implications for waste management and local economy. Improving the knowledge on VOC emissions from composting processes is of particular importance since different VOCs imply different odour impacts. To this purpose, three different organic matrices were studied in this work: dewatered sewage sludge (M1), digested organic fraction of municipal solid waste (M2) and untreated food waste (M3). The three matrices were aerobically biodegraded in a bench-scale bioreactor simulating composting conditions. A homemade device sampled the process air from each treatment at defined time intervals. The samples were analysed for VOC detection. The information on the concentrations of the detected VOCs was combined with the VOC-specific odour thresholds to estimate the relative weight of each biodegraded matrix in terms of odour impact. When the odour formation was at its maximum, the waste gas from the composting of M3 showed a total odour concentration about 60 and 15,000 times higher than those resulting from the composting of M1 and M2, respectively. Ethyl isovalerate showed the highest contribution to the total odour concentration (>99%). Terpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, p-cymene and limonene) were abundantly present in M2 and M3, while sulphides (dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide) were the dominant components of M1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Different-ligand coordination europium compounds with dibenzoylmethane, nitrate-group, and hexamethylphosphotriamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasev, V.E.; Botova, I.N.

    1988-01-01

    Some different-ligand europium complexes with dibenzoylmethane (DBM), hexamethylphosphotriamide (HMPA) and NO 3 -group of composition: Eu(NO 3 ) 3 x3HMPAx2H 2 O, Eu(NO 3 ) 2 xDBMx2HMPA, EuNO 3 x(DBM) 2 x2HMPA and Eu(DBM) 3 xHMPA are synthesized. Individuality of each complex is confirmed by methods of chemical, IR spectroscopic, luminescent, thermogravimetric analyses. Integral intensities of luminescence of synthesized complexes are measured, their excitation spectra in the crystal state at 77 K in the 200-600 nm range are studied

  12. Evaluation of Fertilizer Potential of Different K Compounds Prepared Utilizing Sea Bittern as Feed Stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanjan Trivedi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Many countries import potassic fertilizers due to dearth of K-mineral deposits. Therefore processes to obtain K-nutrient sources from sea bittern were developed by our Institute. The present investigation evaluated the fertilizer potential of three different sea bittern-derived (SBD potassium forms developed viz., potassium schoenite, potassium nitrate and potassium ammonium sulfate on maize productivity in two cropping seasons.Methods: The pot and field experiments consisted of four treatments, wherein the three K forms were applied at the recommended rate of 40 kg K2O ha−1 and were compared with commercially used sulfate of potash. The effect of these fertilizers on different parameters of plant and soil were evaluated.Results: The application of SBD-potassic fertilizers led to enhancement in growth, productivity and quality of maize which related well with higher photosynthesis, nutrient uptake and soil quality parameters. On an average all the three forms of sea bittern-derived potash enhanced yield of maize over control by 22.3 and 23.8%, respectively, in pot and field trials. The best performance was under SBD-KNO3, which also recorded the highest benefit: cost ratio of 1.76.Conclusion: The K-fertilizers derived from sea-bittern—a waste product of salt industry—can thus be economically used to improve crop production sustainably.

  13. Physical properties of compressive knits compound with different matters impregnated by microcapsules moisturizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadhel Jaâfar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The compressive knits include a very varied group of different device functions, from the more merely (protection to the more developed (scars improvement, skin hydration…. We combined two therapy forms the pressure and the hydration of burned skin. We essayed to reunite the advantages of two techniques pressure and hydration in only one and the same instrument in the form of compressive knit with microencapsulated surface. The compressive knits are elaborated with different textile matters such us Cotton/Spandex, Polyester/Spandex, Polyamide/Spandex, Viscose/Spandex and Cotton/Polyester/Spandex. The hydration product chosen in this application is the Jojoba Oil. The microcapsules were prepared according to the Phase Separation Method. The physical properties such us the Pressure, the Mass per Area, the Thickness, the Air Permeability and the Adiathermic Power are tested. According to the results, we conclude that the knits are compressive, comfort, smooth, no allergen, thinness and washable. The raw materials selected for the samples studied are biocompatible with human skin.

  14. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 751 - 800 of 1007 ... ... chromium from aqueous solution using activated carbon derived .... Vol 26, No 1 (2012), Solid phase extraction of trace amounts of ... of ecstasy compounds and amphetamines in biological samples, Abstract PDF.

  15. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017), Mechanisms of Coix seed compositions in the treatment of spleen ... with Compound Kushen Injection in Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Abstract PDF ... Vol 13, No 6 (2016), Molecular identification of original plants of ...

  16. Effects of trans-stilbene and terphenyl compounds on different strains of Leishmania and on cytokines production from infected macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Federica; Castelli, Germano; Vitale, Fabrizio; Giacomini, Elisa; Roberti, Marinella; Colomba, Claudia; Cascio, Antonio; Tolomeo, Manlio

    2018-01-01

    Most of the antileishmanial modern therapies are not satisfactory due to high toxicity or emergence of resistance and high cost of treatment. Previously, we observed that two compounds of a small library of trans-stilbene and terphenyl derivatives, ST18 and TR4, presented the best activity and safety profiles against Leishmania infantum promastigotes and amastigotes. In the present study we evaluated the effects of ST18 and the TR4 in 6 different species of Leishmania and the modifications induced by these two compounds in the production of 8 different cytokines from infected macrophages. We observed that TR4 was potently active in all Leishmania species tested in the study showing a leishmanicidal activity higher than that of ST18 and meglumine antimoniate in the most of the species. Moreover, TR4 was able to decrease the levels of IL-10, a cytokine able to render the host macrophage inactive allowing the persistence of parasites inside its phagolysosome, and increase the levels of IL-1β, a cytokine important for host resistance to Leishmania infection by inducible iNOS-mediated production of NO, and IL-18, a cytokine implicated in the development of Th1-type immune response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Iron Requirement and Iron Uptake from Various Iron Compounds by Different Plant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Rudolf A.

    1974-01-01

    The Fe requirements of four monocotyledonous plant species (Avena sativa L., Triticum aestivum L., Oryza sativa L., Zea mays L.) and of three dicotyledonous species (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill., Cucumis sativus L., Glycine maxima (L.) Merr.) in hydroponic cultures were ascertained. Fe was given as NaFe-EDDHA chelate (Fe ethylenediamine di (O-hydroxyphenylacetate). I found that the monocotyledonous species required a substantially higher Fe concentration in the nutrient solution in order to attain optimum growth than did the dicotyledonous species. Analyses showed that the process of iron uptake was less efficient with the monocotyledonous species. When the results obtained by using chelated Fe were compared with those using ionic Fe, it was shown that the inefficient species were equally inefficient in utilizing Fe3+ ions. However, the differences between the efficient and the inefficient species disappeared when Fe2+ was used. This confirms the work of others who postulated that Fe3+ is reduced before uptake of chelated iron by the root. In addition, it was shown that reduction also takes place when Fe is used in ionic form. The efficiency of Fe uptake seems to depend on the efficiency of the root system of the particular plant species in reducing Fe3+. The removal of Fe from the chelate complex after reduction to Fe2+ seems to present no difficulties to the various plant species. PMID:16658933

  18. PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF PARTICLEBOARDS OF Acrocarpus fraxinifolius COMPOUNDS WITH DIFFERENT PERCENTAGES OF BARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosilani Trianoski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509812360The particleboard industries have used a large volume of wood mainly from planted forest of Pinus, beingnecessary to diversify the wood species and optimize the use of raw material. One of the ways to optimizethe use of this resource is the utilization of the bark in the particleboard manufacturing process. In thisway, this research was developed to evaluate the physical and mechanical properties of the particleboardmanufactured with the wood of Acrocarpus fraxinifolius and different proportions of the bark. The boardswere manufactured with 100% of wood particles of Acrocarpus fraxinifolius and replacing the woodparticles with 30%, 20% and 10% of bark, board density of 0.75 g/cm³ and 8% of urea-formaldehyde resin.The properties of board density, water absorption and thickness swelling, static bending, internal bond andscrew pullout strength, were determined according to EN and NBR standards, and then compared with thestandard treatment (100% Pinus taeda and with the minimum requirements of these standards. The resultsindicated that Acrocarpus fraxinifolius species showed technical feasibility for particleboard production and the addition of the bark until 30% did not negatively affect the physical and mechanical properties ofthe boards.

  19. Degradation of anthracene by laccase of Trametes versicolor in the presence of different mediator compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, C; Majcherczyk, A; Hüttermann, A

    1996-10-01

    Laccase of Trametes versicolor was generally able to oxidize anthracene in vitro. After 72 h incubation about 35% of the anthracene was transformed stoichiometrically to 9,10-anthraquinone. Transformation of anthracene increased rapidly in the presence of different mediators that readily generate stable radicals: 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 1-hydroxybenzotriazole. For the reaction, the presence of both the laccase and the mediator was necessary. In the presence of 0.005 mM 1-hydroxybenzotriazole this conversion had removed 47% of the anthracene after 72 h; 75% of the substrate was oxidized during this period when ABTS (1 mM) was used as mediator. In contrast to reactions without or with only low concentrations of a mediator, there was a discrepancy between the disappearance of anthracene and the formation of 9,10-anthraquinone in mediator-forced reactions. Coupling-products of mediators with anthracene degradation products were found. Anthracene disappeared nearly completely after incubation for 72 h with laccase in a 0.1 mM solution of 1-hydroxybenzotriazole and was transformed to 9,10-anthraquinone in about 80% yield; 90% of the substrate was transformed in the presence of ABTS (2.0 mM) resulting again in 80% quinone. Phenothiazine was not effective in this system.

  20. Formation of non-extractable pesticide residues: observations on compound differences, measurement and regulatory issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mordaunt, Catriona J.; Gevao, Bondi; Jones, Kevin C.; Semple, Kirk T

    2005-01-01

    Six major use pesticides (Atrazine, Dicamba, Isoproturon, Lindane, Paraquat and Trifluralin) with differing physico-chemical properties were evaluated for the significance of 'bound' or non extractable residue formation. Investigations were carried out in purpose-built microcosms where mineralization, volatilisation, 'soil water' extractable and organic solvent extractable residues could be quantified. Extractable residues were defined as those accessible by sequential extraction where the solvent used became increasingly non-polar. Dichloromethane was the 'harshest' solvent used at the end of the sequential extraction procedure. {sup 14}C-labelled volatilised and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fractions were trapped on exit from the microcosm. The pesticides were categorised into 3 classes based on their behaviour. (i) Type A (Atrazine, Lindane and Trifluralin) in which ring degradation was limited as was the formation of non-extractable residues; the remainder of the {sup 14}C-activity was found in the extractable fraction. (ii) Type B (Dicamba and Isoproturon) in which approximately 25% of the {sup 14}C-activity was mineralised and a large portion was found in the non-extractable fraction after 91 days. Finally, Type C (Paraquat) in which almost all of the {sup 14}C-activity was quickly incorporated into the non-extractable fraction. The implications of the data are discussed, with respect to the variability and significance of regulatory aspects of non-extractable residues.

  1. Formation of non-extractable pesticide residues: observations on compound differences, measurement and regulatory issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mordaunt, Catriona J.; Gevao, Bondi; Jones, Kevin C.; Semple, Kirk T.

    2005-01-01

    Six major use pesticides (Atrazine, Dicamba, Isoproturon, Lindane, Paraquat and Trifluralin) with differing physico-chemical properties were evaluated for the significance of 'bound' or non extractable residue formation. Investigations were carried out in purpose-built microcosms where mineralization, volatilisation, 'soil water' extractable and organic solvent extractable residues could be quantified. Extractable residues were defined as those accessible by sequential extraction where the solvent used became increasingly non-polar. Dichloromethane was the 'harshest' solvent used at the end of the sequential extraction procedure. 14 C-labelled volatilised and 14 CO 2 fractions were trapped on exit from the microcosm. The pesticides were categorised into 3 classes based on their behaviour. (i) Type A (Atrazine, Lindane and Trifluralin) in which ring degradation was limited as was the formation of non-extractable residues; the remainder of the 14 C-activity was found in the extractable fraction. (ii) Type B (Dicamba and Isoproturon) in which approximately 25% of the 14 C-activity was mineralised and a large portion was found in the non-extractable fraction after 91 days. Finally, Type C (Paraquat) in which almost all of the 14 C-activity was quickly incorporated into the non-extractable fraction. The implications of the data are discussed, with respect to the variability and significance of regulatory aspects of non-extractable residues

  2. Different radiosensitization effects of the halogenated compounds on the human chromosome in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.S.

    1976-01-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis and chromosome aberrations were compared following X- or UV-irradiation or methyl methanesulfonate treatment in cultures of HeLa S 3 or KB cells or human and rabbit lymphocytes. The sensitization by incorporation of the halouridines BUdR and IUdR was also investigated. Unscheduled DNA synthesis occurred in two established cell lines after irradiation with 0 to 10 kR of X-rays. The rate of unscheduled synthesis was dose dependent and differed for the two cell lines. The unscheduled synthesis was not correlated with the modal chromosome number nor with the number of aberrations produced. UV-irradiated rabbit lymphocytes exhibited unscheduled DNA synthesis which saturated after a dose of 250 ergs/mm 2 . In contrast the incorporation of BUdR or IUdR eliminated this saturation and caused an increasing effect with increasing dose up to 1000 ergs/mm 2 . The degree of sensitization varied between the two halo-uridines, BUdR being more effective at high doses while IUdR was a more potent sensitizer at low doses. Chromosome aberrations were not directly related to unscheduled DNA synthesis but were sensitized by halo-uridine incorporation. In this case IUdR was more potent than BUdR at all doses studied. Methyl methanesulfonate was an effective producer of chromosome aberration in human lymphocytes of both the chromosome and chromatid type. Prior incorporation of BUdR or IUdR did not increase the total aberration produced but did increase the number of chromosome type aberration at the expense of the chromatid type

  3. Comparison of the Chemical Composition of “Cystoseira sedoides (Desfontaines C. Agardh” Volatile Compounds Obtained by Different Extraction Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima Bouzidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The volatile fraction of the brown alga Cystoseira sedoides (Desfontaines C.Agardh is prepared from the crude extract through the following three extraction methods: Hydrodistillation (HD, focused microwave assisted hydrodistillation (FMAHD and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE. The volatile fractions are analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector-mass spectrometry (GC-FID-MS, the chemical components are identified on the basis of the comparison of their retention indices with literature and their mass spectra with those reported in commercial databases. The chemical composition of the volatile fractions obtained by different extraction techniques fall into three major chemical classes: fatty acids and derivatives, sesquiterpenes, and hydrocarbons and derivatives. Others Compounds belonging to different chemical classes are found in that chemical composition.

  4. Chemical shift of U L3 edges in different uranium compounds obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, D.; Jha, S.N.; Nayak, C.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Babu, P. Venu

    2014-01-01

    Uranium L 3 X-ray absorption edge was measured in various compounds containing uranium in U 4+ , U 5+ and U 5+ oxidation states. The measurements have been carried out at the Energy Dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore. Energy shifts of ∼ 2-3 eV were observed for U L 3 edge in the U-compounds compared to their value in elemental U. The different chemical shifts observed for the compounds having the same oxidation state of the cation but different anions or ligands show the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cations in determining their X-ray absorption edges in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on U cation in the above compounds. (author)

  5. Ecologically Different Fungi Affect Arabidopsis Development: Contribution of Soluble and Volatile Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarrubia, Salvatore; Sapienza, Sara; Fritz, Héma; Daghino, Stefania; Rosenkranz, Maaria; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Martin, Francis; Perotto, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and development can be influenced by mutualistic and non-mutualistic microorganisms. We investigated the ability of the ericoid endomycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius to influence growth and development of the non-host plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Different experimental setups (non-compartmented and compartmented co-culture plates) were used to investigate the influence of both soluble and volatile fungal molecules on the plant phenotype. O. maius promoted growth of A. thaliana in all experimental setups. In addition, a peculiar clumped root phenotype, characterized by shortening of the primary root and by an increase of lateral root length and number, was observed in A. thaliana only in the non-compartmented plates, suggesting that soluble diffusible molecules are responsible for this root morphology. Fungal auxin does not seem to be involved in plant growth promotion and in the clumped root phenotype because co-cultivation with O. maius did not change auxin accumulation in plant tissues, as assessed in plants carrying the DR5::GUS reporter construct. In addition, no correlation between the amount of fungal auxin produced and the plant root phenotype was observed in an O. maius mutant unable to induce the clumped root phenotype in A. thaliana. Addition of active charcoal, a VOC absorbant, in the compartmented plates did not modify plant growth promotion, suggesting that VOCs are not involved in this phenomenon. The low VOCs emission measured for O. maius further corroborated this hypothesis. By contrast, the addition of CO2 traps in the compartmented plates drastically reduced plant growth, suggesting involvement of fungal CO2 in plant growth promotion. Other mycorrhizal fungi, as well as a saprotrophic and a pathogenic fungus, were also tested with the same experimental setups. In the non-compartmented plates, most fungi promoted A. thaliana growth and some could induce the clumped root phenotype. In the compartmented plate experiments, a general

  6. Arsenic mobility and bioavailability in paddy soil under iron compound amendments at different growth stages of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan-Yun; Wang, Xiangqin; Li, Fangbai; Li, Bin; Liu, Chuanping; Wang, Qi; Lei, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Iron (Fe)-based solids can reduce arsenic (As) mobility and bioavailability in soils, which has been well recognized. However, to our knowledge, there are few studies on As uptake at different growth stages of rice under Fe compound amendments. In addition, the formation of Fe plaques at different growth stages of rice has also been rarely reported. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate As mobility and bioavailability in paddy soil under Fe compound amendments throughout the whole growth stage of rice plants. Amendments of poorly crystalline Fe oxides (PC-Fe), FeCl 2 +NaNO 3 and FeCl 2 reduced grain As by 54% ± 3.0%, 52% ± 3.0% and 46% ± 17%, respectively, compared with that of the non-amended control. The filling stage was suggested to be the key stage to take measures to reduce As uptake. At this stage, all soil amendments significantly reduced As accumulation in rice plants. At the maturation stage, PC-Fe amendment significantly reduced mobile pools and increased immobile pools of soil As. Besides, PC-Fe treatment promoted the transformation of Fe fractions from dissolved Fe to adsorbed, poorly crystalline and free Fe oxides. Moreover, significant positive correlations between soil Fe fractions and As fractions were found. Accordingly, we hypothesized that Fe compound amendments might affect the concentration distribution of Fe fractions first and then affect As fractionation in soil and its bioavailability to rice plants indirectly. The formation of Fe plaques varied with growth stages and different treatments. Significantly negative correlations between mobile pools of As and Fe or As in Fe plaques indicated that Fe plaques could immobilize mobile As in soils and thus affect As bioavailability. Overall, the effect of the soil amendments on reduction of As uptake varied with growth stages and different treatments, and further research on the key stage for reducing As uptake is still required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  7. Comparison of Bioactive Compound Content in Egg Yolk Oil Extracted from Eggs Obtained from Different Laying Hen Housing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandrs Kovalcuks

    2015-01-01

    Egg yolk oil is a natural source of bioactive compounds such as unsaturated fatty acids, oil soluble vitamins, pigments and others. Bioactive compound content in egg yolk oil depends from its content in eggs, from which oil was extracted. Many studies show that bioactive compound content in egg is correlated to the content of these compounds in hen feed, but there is also an opinion that hen housing systems also have influence on egg chemical content. The aim of this stud...

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Sulfur Compounds Contents and Antiobesity Properties of Allium hookeri Prepared by Different Drying Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hye Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the nutritional and medicinal values of Allium hookeri, its unique flavor (onion or garlic taste and smell coming from sulfur containing compounds limits its usage as functional food. For comparative study, A. hookeri roots were prepared under two different drying conditions, namely, low-temperature drying that minimizes the volatilization of sulfur components and hot-air drying that minimizes the garlic odor and spicy taste of A. hookeri. In GC/MS olfactory system, the odorous chemicals and organosulfur compounds such as diallyl trisulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, and dipropyl trisulfide were significantly decreased in hot-air drying compared to low-temperature drying. The spiciness and saltiness taste were noticeably reduced, while sourness, sweetness, and umami taste were significantly increased in hot-air dried A. hookeri according to electronic tongue. Although the content of volatile sulfur components was present at lower level, the administration of hot-air dried A. hookeri extract (100 mg/kg p.o. apparently prevented the body weight gain and improved insulin resistance in C57BL/6J obese mice receiving high fat diet. Results suggested that the hot-air dried A. hookeri possessing better taste and odor might be available as functional crop and bioactive diet supplement for the prevention and/or treatment of obesity.

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 901 - 913 of 913 ... Z Idrus, H Zainuddin, A.D.M. Ja'afar. Vol 8, No 2 (2016): Special Issue: Part 4, Visual structure analysis of compound reliefs of milli hats used by men in Makriyan region, Abstract PDF. AA Yousofkand. Vol 9, No 3S (2017): Special Issue, Voice over IP using sip server: Wide area network performance ...

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Berry, Taryn-Lee Manasse, Yee-Joo Tan, Burtram C. Fielding. Vol 5, No 19 (2006), Characterisation of palm wine yeast isolates for industrial utilisation, Abstract PDF. IN Nwachukwu, VI Ibekwe, RN Nwabueze, BN Anyanwu. Vol 12, No 20 (2013), Characterisation of selected volatile organic compounds in Rwandan ...

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 8051 - 8100 of 11090 ... Vol 10, No 72 (2011), Phenolic composition and antioxidant capacity of Cherry laurel (Laurocerasus officinalis Roem.) sampled from Trabzon region, Turkey, Abstract PDF. FY Karahalil, H Şahin. Vol 10, No 62 (2011), Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities in some fruits and vegetables ...

  12. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 157 ... ... (Agapornis taranta) in Entoto Natural Park and Bole Sub-city site Addis Ababa, Abstract .... of bioactive compounds by Streptomyces parvullus SS23/2 isolated from marine algae in the Bay of Bengal, India, Abstract.

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 1215 ... Vol 17, No 3 (2011), Air quality status of volatile organic compounds in health and financial institution microenvironments in Benin City, Nigeria, Abstract. JM Okuo, DE Ogbeifun, AP ... Vol 9, No 4 (2003), Ampere hour method of sizing a stand alone photovoltaic system, Abstract. P. E Ugwuoke, O. U. ...

  14. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 301 - 350 of 390 ... Vol 54, No 3 (2013), Relationship between the concentration of volatile sulphur compound and periodontal disease severity in Nigerian young adults .... Vol 55, No 1 (2014), Successful pregnancy outcome after in vitro fertilisation following Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis/Polymerase Chain ...

  15. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 1010 ... Vol 26, No 1 (2018), Characterisation of Phaseolus coccineus interspecific germplasm accessions for disease resistance, grain market class and ... Vol 20, No 2 (2012), Comparative activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and tyrosine ammonia-lyase and phenolic compounds accumulated in ...

  16. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 130 of 130 ... Vol 6, No 2 (2016), Uses of systemic approach and chemist's triangle in teaching and learning chemistry: Systemic Chemistry Triangle [SCT] as a teaching & learning strategy, Abstract PDF. A.F.M. Fahmy. Vol 3, No 2 (2013), Using stereochemistry models in teaching organic compounds nomenclature: ...

  17. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 651 - 700 of 846 ... Vol 9, No 4S (2017): Special Issue, Spectrum aware fuzzy ... Vol 9, No 6S (2017), Stability properties of asphalt mixture incorporating coconut shell, Abstract PDF ... Statistical analysis of agarwood oil compounds in discriminating the ... oil extraction system using Fuzzy-Fopi controller, Abstract PDF.

  18. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 160 ... Vol 1, No 1 (2010), Solid state syntheses and interconversion of new metal salts and their coordination compounds, Abstract PDF ... Vol 6, No 1 (2015), Synthesis and Single Crystal X-Ray Crystallographic Analysis of 2-oxo-2,3- dihydropyrimidin-1-ium{trichloridopyrimidin-2(1H)-one} Cobaltate (II) ...

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 260 ... Vol 23, No 1 (1978), A preliminary study of pre-harvest insect ... Vol 49 (2009), Bacteriological Quality and Possible Health Effects of ... and in compound fertilizers on maize on a coastal savanna ultisol ... yield and yield components of two cultivars of cabbage (Brassica ... EK Hayford, F Lisker, L Apaalse.

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 1250 ... J Zhou, F Qu. Vol 10, No 2 (2013), Analysis of volatile compounds of Malaysian Tualang (Koompassia excelsa) honey using gas chromatography mass spectrometry, Abstract PDF. SMS Nurul, SH Gan, AS Halim, NSM Shah, SH Gan, HA Sukari. Vol 10, No 4 (2013), Analysis on 113 cases of adverse ...

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 194 ... Vol 22 (2007), Acute Effect of Caffeine on Amplitude of Accommodation and Near Point of Convergence, Abstract ... Vol 24 (2008), Analysis of Molecular Marker Compounds from Vitexagnus cactus Using the High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Evaporative Light Scattering Detector Techniques ...

  2. Title: Sex differences in stress-induced social withdrawal: role of brain derived neurotrophic factor in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian David Greenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression and anxiety disorders are more common in women than men, and little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to this disparity. Recent data suggest that stress-induced changes in neurotrophins have opposing effects on behavior by acting in different brain networks. Social defeat has been an important approach for understanding neurotrophin action, but low female aggression levels in rats and mice have limited the application of these methods primarily to males. We examined the effects of social defeat in monogamous California mice (Peromyscus californicus, a species in which both males and females defend territories. We demonstrate that defeat stress increases mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF protein but not mRNA in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST in females but not males. Changes in BDNF protein were limited to anterior subregions of the BNST, and there were no changes in the adjacent nucleus accumbens (NAc. The effects of defeat on social withdrawal behavior and BDNF were reversed by chronic, low doses of the antidepressant sertraline. However, higher doses of sertraline restored social withdrawal and elevated BDNF levels. Acute treatment with a low dose of sertraline failed to reverse the effects of defeat. Infusions of the selective tyrosine-related kinase B receptor (TrkB antagonist ANA-12 into the anterior BNST specifically increased social interaction in stressed females but had no effect on behavior in females naïve to defeat. These results suggest that stress-induced increases in BDNF in the anterior BNST contribute to the exaggerated social withdrawal phenotype observed in females.

  3. Enhancement of water soluble wheat bran polyphenolic compounds using different steviol glucosides prepared by thermostable β-galactosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-jung Lim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Production of wheat bran (WB for human consumption is estimated to be about 90 million tons per year. WB contains an abundant source of dietary fiber, minerals, vitamins, and bioactive compounds. WB is a by-product of milling and contains an abundant source of carbohydrate (60%, protein (12%, fat (0.5%, minerals (2%, and bioactive compounds such as phenolic acids, arabinoxylans, flavonoids, caroteinoids alkylresorcinol and phytosterols. These are known for health promoting properties such as controlling glycemic index, reducing plasma cholesterol level, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic activities. Several terpene glycosides such as mogroside V, paenoiflorin, geniposide, rubusoside (Ru, stevioside (Ste, rebaudioside A (RebA, steviol monoside, and stevioside glucoside have been discovered to enhance the solubility of a number of pharmaceutically and medically important compounds that normally show poor solubility in water. Context and purpose of this study: In this study, in order to increase soluble extraction of polyphenol compounds of WB using Ru, the expression of β-galactosidase from Thermus thermophilus (T. thermophilus was optimized using different E. coli hosts and a different concentration of lactose inducer rather than of isopropyl-1- thio-β-D-galactopyranoside (IPTG for industrial production. Additionally, the effect of different steviol glucosides (Ru, Ste, RebA, and SG on the enhancement of polyphenol compounds extraction from wheat bran was studied. Results: β-galactosidase from T. thermophilus was used for the specific conversion of stevioside (Ste to rubusoside (Ru with 92% productivity. The enzyme was optimized to be expressed in E. coli. With 7 mM lactose, the β-galactosidase activity expressed was 34.3, 14.2, or 34.4 ± 0.5 U/mL in E. coli BL21(DE3pLysS, Rosetta(DE3pLysS, or BL21(DE3 at 37°C, and 9.8 ± 0.2, 7.0 ± 0.5, or 7.4 ± 0.2 U/mL at 28°C respectively. The expression of

  4. Rubber compounding and processing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, MJ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This chapter presents an overview on the compounding and processing techniques of natural rubber compounds. The introductory portion deals with different types of rubbers and principles of rubber compounding. The primary and secondary fillers used...

  5. Effect of micro-oxygenation on color and anthocyanin-related compounds of wines with different phenolic contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-López, Marta; Pardo-Mínguez, Francisco; Schmauch, Gregory; Saucier, Cedric; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; López-Roca, Jose María; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2008-07-23

    Several factors may affect the results obtained when micro-oxygenation is applied to red wines, the most important being the moment of application, the doses of oxygen, and the wine phenolic characteristics. In this study, three red wines, made from Vitis vinifera var. Monastrell (2005 vintage) and with different phenolic characteristics, were micro-oxygenated to determine as to how this technique affected the formation of new pigments in the wines and their chromatic characteristics. The results indicated that the different wines were differently affected by micro-oxygenation. In general, the micro-oxygenated wines had a higher percentage of new anthocyanin-derived pigments, being that this formation is more favored in the wines with the highest total phenol content. These compounds, in turn, significantly increased the wine color intensity. The wine with the lowest phenolic content was less influenced by micro-oxygenation, and the observed evolution in the degree of polymerization of tannins suggested that it might have suffered overoxygenation.

  6. Chemical Compounds Of Granulated Palm Sugar Made From Sap Of Nipa Palm (Nypa Fruticans Wurmb Growing In Three Different Places

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosidah R Radam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Production of granulated sugar from sap of nipa palms in South Kalimantan Province is a new innovation. The purpose of this study was to find out the chemical compounds contained in granulated sugar made from sap of nipa palms growing in 3 different places, which was expected to benefit wider community as a source of alternative sweetener. The chemical compound test of granulated nipa palm sugar was conducted at the Laboratory of Institute for Research and Standardization of Industry, Banjarbaru. Chemical parameters tested were water, sucrose, reducing sugar, fat, protein, phosphorus, and potassium content. The test results showed that the water content of granulated nipa palm sugar in treatment A1, A2, and A3 was 3.69%, 4.04%, and 2.31%, respectively; the protein content 0.65%, 2.19%, and 1.10%; the fat content 0.27 %, 0.34 %, and 0.20 %; the reducing sugar content 2.39%, 0.51%, and 0.52%; the sucrose content 75.14%, 68.15%, and 88.46%; the phosphorus content 1.1342%, 1.1196%, and 1.138%; and the potassium content 1.60%, 1.40%, and 1.58%, respectively. The test parameters of granulated nipa palm sugar that met the Mandatory Indonesia National Standard (SNI 01-3743-1995 were the water content of granulated sugar from sap of nipa palms growing in dry place (land, the reducing sugar content and sucrose content in all treatments. It can be concluded from the three required parameters that granulated nipa palm sugar is able to become the source of new sweetener in addition to block arenga palm sugar and crystal cane sugar for the community in South Kalimantan.

  7. Bioavailability and Brain-Targeting of Geniposide in Gardenia-Borneol Co-Compound by Different Administration Routes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejiao Zhao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Both geniposide (Ge and borneol (Bo are bioactive substances derived from traditional Chinese medicine. Injections containing co-compound of Gardenia-Borneol are widely used for stroke treatment in China, such as “Xingnaojing” multi-component injection. As more and more adverse reactions (especially drug allergy were reported, it is urgent to find more effective and safer routes of administration for such kinds of medicines. In this paper, bioavailabilities and brain-target effects of geniposide in Gardenia-Borneol co-compound through different administration routes in mice were investigated. Geniposide concentrations in plasma and in brain of mice were determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The pharmacokinetics parameters of intranasal (i.n. and intragastric (i.g. administration were compared with intravenous (i.v. administration. The bioavailabilities of Ge were 85.38% and 28.76% for i.n. and i.g. while Tmax were 1 min and 30 min. Cmax were 21.881 ± 5.398, 1.914 ± 0.327 and 42.410 ± 6.268 μg/mL for i.n., i.g. and i.v., respectively. The AUC of Ge in brain were 32413.6 ± 4573.9, 6440.1 ± 863.7 and 37270.5 ± 4160.6 ng/g·min for i.n., i.g. and i.v., respectively. The drug target indexes (DTI were 1.02 and 0.60 for i.n. and i.g. The results demonstrated that geniposide could be absorbed promptly and thoroughly by i.n. administration in mice and basically transported into the brain though blood vessel passways.

  8. Efficacy of 2-hydroxy-3-phenylsulfanylmethyl-[1,4]-naphthoquinone derivatives against different Trypanosoma cruzi discrete type units: Identification of a promising hit compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, L S; Moreira, C S; Calvet, C M; Lechuga, G C; Souza, R S; Bourguignon, S C; Ferreira, V F; Rocha, D; Pereira, M C S

    2018-01-20

    The limited efficacy of benznidazole (Bz) indicated by failures of current Phase II clinical trials emphasizes the urgent need to identify new drugs with improved safety and efficacy for treatment of Chagas disease (CD). Herein, we analyzed the efficacy of a series of 2-hydroxy-3-phenylsulfanylmethyl-[1,4]-naphthoquinones against different Trypanosoma cruzi discrete type units (DTUs) of relevant clinical forms of CD. Cytotoxic and trypanocidal effect of naphthoquinone derivatives were assessed in mammalian cells, trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes using, luminescent assays (CellTiter-Glo and T. cruzi Dm28c-luciferase) and/or counting with a light microscope. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and intracellular targets of promising compounds were assessed with 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H 2 DCFDA) probe and ultrastructural analysis, respectively. ADMET properties were analyzed by in silico modeling. Most of the compounds showed low cytotoxic effect. Only two compounds (Compounds 2 and 11) had IC 50 values lower than Bz, showing higher susceptibility of bloodstream trypomastigotes. Compound 2 exhibited greater efficacy against trypomastigotes from different T. cruzi DTUs, even better than Bz against Brazil and CL strains. Ultrastructural analysis revealed changes in intracellular compartments, suggesting autophagy as one possible mechanism of action. Oxidative stress, induced by Compound 2, resulted in elevated level of ROS, leading to parasite death. Compound 2 was also effective against intracellular amastigotes, showing high selectivity index. ADMET analysis predicted good oral bioavailability, reduced drug metabolism and no carcinogenic potential for Compound 2. The data highlight Compound 2 as a hit compound and stimulate further structural and pharmacological optimization to potentiate its trypanocidal activity and selectivity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Exergy Analyses of Fabricated Compound Parabolic Solar Collector with Evacuated Tubes at Different Operating Conditions: Indore (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geete, Ankur; Dubey, Akash; Sharma, Ankush; Dubey, Anshul

    2018-05-01

    In this research work, compound parabolic solar collector (CPC) with evacuated tubes is fabricated. Main benefit of CPC is that there is no requirement of solar tracking system. With fabricated CPC; outlet temperatures of flowing fluid, instantaneous efficiencies, useful heat gain rates and inlet exergies (with and without considering Sun's cone angle) are experimentally found. Observations are taken at different time intervals (1200, 1230, 1300, 1330 and 1400 h), mass flow rates (1.15, 0.78, 0.76, 0.86 and 0.89 g/s), ambient temperatures and with various dimensions of solar collector. This research work is concluded as; maximum instantaneous efficiency is 69.87% which was obtained with 0.76 g/s flow rate of water at 1300 h and 42°C is the maximum temperature difference which was also found at same time. Maximum inlet exergies are 139.733 and 139.532 kW with and without considering Sun's cone angle at 1300 h, respectively. Best thermal performance from the fabricated CPC with evacuated tubes is found at 1300 h. Maximum inlet exergy is 141.365 kW which was found at 1300 h with 0.31 m aperture width and 1.72 m absorber pipe length.

  10. Pollution characteristics and health risk assessment of volatile organic compounds emitted from different plastic solid waste recycling workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhigui; Li, Guiying; Chen, Jiangyao; Huang, Yong; An, Taicheng; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2015-04-01

    The pollution profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from different recycling workshops processing different types of plastic solid waste (PSW) and their health risks were investigated. A total of 64 VOCs including alkanes, alkenes, monoaromatics, oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), chlorinated VOCs (ClVOCs) and acrylonitrile during the melting extrusion procedure were identified and quantified. The highest concentration of total VOCs (TVOC) occurred in the poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene) (ABS) recycling workshop, followed by the polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyamide (PA), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE) and polycarbonate (PC) workshops. Monoaromatics were found as the major component emitted from the ABS and PS recycling workshops, while alkanes were mainly emitted from the PE and PP recycling processes, and OVOCs from the PVC and PA recycling workshops. According to the occupational exposure limits' (OEL) assessment, the workers suffered acute and chronic health risks in the ABS and PS recycling workshops. Meanwhile, it was found that most VOCs in the indoor microenvironments were originated from the melting extrusion process, while the highest TVOC concentration was observed in the PS rather than in the ABS recycling workshop. Non-cancer hazard indices (HIs) of all individual VOCs were <1.0, whereas the total HI in the PS recycling workshop was 1.9, posing an adverse chronic health threat. Lifetime cancer risk assessment suggested that the residents also suffered from definite cancer risk in the PS, PA, ABS and PVC recycling workshops. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Agronomical Parameters, Sugar Profile and Antioxidant Compounds of “Catherine” Peach Cultivar Influenced by Different Plum Rootstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Font i Forcada

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of seven plum rootstocks (Adesoto, Monpol, Montizo, Puebla de Soto 67 AD, PM 105 AD, St. Julien GF 655/2 and Constantí 1 on individual and total sugars, as well as on antioxidant content in fruit flesh of “Catherine” peaches, was evaluated for three years. Agronomical and basic fruit quality parameters were also determined. At twelve years after budding, significant differences were found between rootstocks for the different agronomic and fruit quality traits evaluated. The Pollizo plum rootstocks Adesoto and PM 105 AD seem to induce higher sweetness to peach fruits, based on soluble solids content, individual (sucrose, fructose and sorbitol and total sugars. A clear tendency was also observed with the rootstock Adesoto, inducing the highest content of phenolics, flavonoids, vitamin C and relative antioxidant capacity (RAC. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate the significant effect of rootstock on the sugar profile and phytochemical characteristics of peach fruits. In addition, this work shows the importance of the sugar profile, because specific sugars play an important role in peach flavour quality, as well as the studied phytochemical compounds when looking for high quality peaches with enhanced health properties.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Chemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity and Quantitative Characterization of Some Phenolic Compounds in Selected Herbs and Spices in Different Solvent Extraction Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepahpour, Shabnam; Selamat, Jinap; Abdul Manap, Mohd Yazid; Khatib, Alfi; Abdull Razis, Ahmad Faizal

    2018-02-13

    This study evaluated the efficacy of various organic solvents (80% acetone, 80% ethanol, 80% methanol) and distilled water for extracting antioxidant phenolic compounds from turmeric, curry leaf, torch ginger and lemon grass extracts. They were analyzed regarding the total phenol and flavonoid contents, antioxidant activity and concentration of some phenolic compounds. Antioxidant activity was determined by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay and the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Quantification of phenolic compounds was carried out using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). All the extracts possessed antioxidant activity, however, the different solvents showed different efficiencies in the extraction of phenolic compounds. Turmeric showed the highest DPPH values (67.83-13.78%) and FRAP (84.9-2.3 mg quercetin/g freeze-dried crude extract), followed by curry leaf, torch ginger and lemon grass. While 80% acetone was shown to be the most efficient solvent for the extraction of total phenolic compounds from turmeric, torch ginger and lemon grass (221.68, 98.10 and 28.19 mg GA/g freeze dried crude extract, respectively), for the recovery of phenolic compounds from curry leaf (92.23 mg GA/g freeze-dried crude extract), 80% ethanol was the most appropriate solvent. Results of HPLC revealed that the amount of phenolic compounds varied depending on the types of solvents used.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Chemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity and Quantitative Characterization of Some Phenolic Compounds in Selected Herbs and Spices in Different Solvent Extraction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Sepahpour

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the efficacy of various organic solvents (80% acetone, 80% ethanol, 80% methanol and distilled water for extracting antioxidant phenolic compounds from turmeric, curry leaf, torch ginger and lemon grass extracts. They were analyzed regarding the total phenol and flavonoid contents, antioxidant activity and concentration of some phenolic compounds. Antioxidant activity was determined by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging assay and the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assay. Quantification of phenolic compounds was carried out using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. All the extracts possessed antioxidant activity, however, the different solvents showed different efficiencies in the extraction of phenolic compounds. Turmeric showed the highest DPPH values (67.83–13.78% and FRAP (84.9–2.3 mg quercetin/g freeze-dried crude extract, followed by curry leaf, torch ginger and lemon grass. While 80% acetone was shown to be the most efficient solvent for the extraction of total phenolic compounds from turmeric, torch ginger and lemon grass (221.68, 98.10 and 28.19 mg GA/g freeze dried crude extract, respectively, for the recovery of phenolic compounds from curry leaf (92.23 mg GA/g freeze-dried crude extract, 80% ethanol was the most appropriate solvent. Results of HPLC revealed that the amount of phenolic compounds varied depending on the types of solvents used.

  14. Influence of different water-ethanol solvent systems on the spectroscopic and physico-chemical properties of the macrocyclic compounds pheophytin and chlorophyll a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Leonardo M.; Rodrigues, Maira R.; Oliveira, Hueder P. M. de; Lima, Adriana; Soares, Rafael R. S.; Batistela, Vagner R.; Gerola, Adriana P.; Hioka, Noboru; Severino, Divinomar; Baptista, Mauricio S.; Machado, Antonio Eduardo da Hora

    2010-01-01

    This work focus on the influence of solvent on the photophysical properties of chlorophyll a and pheophytin. Both compounds are related to the photosynthesis process and are considered prototypes of photosensitizers in Photodynamic Therapy. Fluorescence measurements were developed using water/ethanol mixtures at different compositions, since both solvents could be employed in biological applications. The spectroscopic properties of these compounds undergo profound changes depending on water content in the ethanol due to auto-aggregation processes. The major hydrophobicity and the lower dielectric constant of ethanol when compared with water precluded significantly the auto-aggregation process of these compounds. (author)

  15. Analysis of phenolic compounds in different parts of pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit by HPLC-PDA-ESI/MS and evaluation of their antioxidant activity: application to different Italian varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Marina; Fanali, Chiara; Tripodo, Giusy; Dugo, Paola; Muleo, Rosario; Dugo, Laura; De Gara, Laura; Mondello, Luigi

    2018-06-01

    The analysis of pomegranate phenolic compounds belonging to different classes in different fruit parts was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array and mass spectrometry detection. Two different separation methods were optimized for the analysis of anthocyanins and hydrolyzable tannins along with phenolic acids and flavonoids. Two C 18 columns, core-shell and fully porous particle stationary phases, were used. The parameters for separation of phenolic compounds were optimized considering chromatographic resolution and analysis time. Thirty-five phenolic compounds were found, and 28 of them were tentatively identified as belonging to four different phenolic compound classes; namely, anthocyanins, phenolic acids, hydrolyzable tannins, and flavonoids. Quantitative analysis was performed with a mixture of nine phenolic compounds belonging to phenolic compound classes representative of pomegranate. The method was then fully validated in terms of retention time precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation, limit of detection, limit of quantification, and linearity range. Phenolic compounds were analyzed directly in pomegranate juice, and after solvent extraction with a mixture of water and methanol with a small percentage of acid in peel and pulp samples. The accuracy of the extraction method was also assessed, and satisfactory values were obtained. Finally, the method was used to study identified analytes in pomegranate juice, peel, and pulp of six different Italian varieties and one international variety. Differences in phenolic compound profiles among the different pomegranate parts were observed. Pomegranate peel samples showed a high concentration of phenolic compounds, ellagitannins being the most abundant ones, with respect to pulp and juice samples for each variety. With the same samples, total phenols and antioxidant activity were evaluated through colorimetric assays, and the results were correlated among them.

  16. 32 CFR 644.62 - Title evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HANDBOOK Acquisition Procurement of Title Evidence, Title Clearance, and Closings § 644.62 Title evidence... and their charter to issue the same. They must also be financially sound and be willing and able to...

  17. Study of the removal difference in indoor particulate matter and volatile organic compounds through the application of plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Han Hong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of plants to purify indoor air by observing the effective reduction rate among pollutant types of particulate matter (PM and volatile organic compounds (VOCs. PM and four types of VOCs were measured in a new building that is less than three years old and under three different conditions: before applying the plant, after applying the plant, and a room without a plant. The removal rate of each pollutant type due to the plant was also compared and analyzed. In the case of indoor PM, the removal effect was negligible because of outdoor influence. However, 9% of benzene, 75% of ethylbenzene, 72% of xylene, 75% of styrene, 50% of formaldehyde, 36% of acetaldehyde, 35% of acrolein with acetone, and 85% of toluene were reduced. The purification of indoor air by natural ventilation is meaningless because the ambient PM concentration has recently been high. However, contamination by gaseous materials such as VOCs can effectively be removed through the application of plants.

  18. Influence of the iron source on the solar photo-Fenton degradation of different classes of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, R.F.P.; Silva, M.R.A.; Trovo, A.G. [UNESP, Sao Paulo State University, Institute of Chemistry of Araraquara, P.O. Box 355, 14800-970, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2005-10-01

    In this work the influence of two different iron sources, Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and complexed ferrioxalate (FeOx), on the degradation efficiency of 4-chlorophenol (4CP), malachite green, formaldehyde, dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and the commercial products of the herbicides diuron and tebuthiuron was studied. The oxidation of 4CP, DCA, diuron and tebuthiuron shows a strong dependence on the iron source. While the 4CP degradation is favored by the use of Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, the degradation of DCA and the herbicides diuron and tebuthiuron is most efficient when ferrioxalate is used. On the other hand, the degradation of malachite green and formaldehyde is not very influenced by the iron source showing only a slight improvement when ferrioxalate is used. In the case of formaldehyde, DCA, diuron and tebuthiuron, despite of the additional carbon introduced by the use of ferrioxalate, higher mineralization percentages were observed, confirming the beneficial effect of ferrioxalate on the degradation of these compounds. The degradation of tebuthiuron was studied in detail using a shallow pond type solar flow reactor of 4.5L capacity and 4.5cm solution depth. Solar irradiation of tebuthiuron at a flow rate of 9Lh{sup -1}, in the presence of 10.0mmolL{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 1.0mmolL{sup -1} ferrioxalate resulted in complete conversion of this herbicide and 70% total organic carbon removal. (author)

  19. Emission characteristics of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing odorous compounds during different sewage sludge chemical conditioning processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huan [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Luo, Guang-Qian; Hu, Hong-Yun [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Jia-Kuan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yao, Hong, E-mail: hyao@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and COS are emitted during different sludge conditioning processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} generation increase in the acidic environment created by H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fenton peroxidation facilitates the formation of COS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaO can reduce sulfur-containing gases emission via generation of calcium sulfate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaO leads to the conversion of free ammonia or protonated amine to volatile NH{sub 3}. - Abstract: Chemical conditioners are often used to enhance sewage sludge dewaterability through altering sludge properties and flocs structure, both affect odorous compounds emissions not only during sludge conditioning but also in subsequent sludge disposal. This study was to investigate emission characteristics of ammonia (NH{sub 3}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and carbonyl sulfide (COS) generated from sewage sludge conditioned by three representative conditioners, i.e., organic polymers, iron salts and skeleton builders, F-S (Fenton's reagent and skeleton builders) composite conditioner. The results demonstrate that polyacrylamide (PAM) has an insignificant effect on emission characteristics of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing odorous compounds, because the properties, sulfur and nitrogen speciations are similar in PAM-conditioned sludge and raw sludge (RS). Significant increases of SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S emissions in the H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} conditioning process were observed due to the accelerated decomposition of sulfur-containing amino acids in acidic environment. Fenton peroxidation facilitates the formation of COS. CaO can reduce sulfur-containing gases emission via generation of calcium sulfate. However, under strong alkaline conditions, free ammonia or protonated amine in sludge can be easily converted to volatile ammonia, resulting in a significant

  20. Region 7 Title V facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web map shows the Region 7 Title V facilities (Clean Air Act major sources), any Class I areas within 300 km of R7 States, and any Tribal areas within 50 miles...

  1. Title V Permitting Statistics Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Title V Permitting Statistics Inventory contains measured and estimated nationwide statistical data, consisting of counts of permitted sources, types of permits...

  2. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States

    OpenAIRE

    D?az-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Verardo, Vito; G?mez-Caravaca, Ana Mar?a; Fern?ndez-Guti?rrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds ...

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 31, No 2 (2009), Differences in body composition and prevalence for postural .... activity: differences in body height, body mass, BMI and motor abilities, Abstract ... body image satisfaction and self-efficacy of middle-aged women, Abstract.

  4. Comparative analysis of different cell systems for Zika virus (ZIKV) propagation and evaluation of anti-ZIKV compounds in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicenti, Ilaria; Boccuto, Adele; Giannini, Alessia; Dragoni, Filippo; Saladini, Francesco; Zazzi, Maurizio

    2018-01-15

    A strong correlation between Zika virus (ZIKV) infection and severe neurological disease in newborns and occasionally adults has emerged in the Brazilian outbreak. Efficient human cell-based assays are required to test candidate inhibitors of ZIKV replication. The aim of this work was to investigate ZIKV propagation and quantification in different cell lines. The human (U87, A549, Huh7), mosquito (C6/36) and monkey (VERO E6) cell lines tested were all permissive to ZIKV infection. When assessed by plaque forming units (PFU) in three different target cell lines, the maximal production of ZIKV was achieved in Huh7 at day 3 post-infection (6.38±0.44 log 10 PFU/ml). The C6/36 cell line showed a low and slow production of virus when compared with other cell lines. A549 readout cells generated a larger number of plaques compared to Huh7 but not to VERO E6 cells. ZIKV PFU and RNA titers showed the highest correlation when Huh7 and A549 were used as the producer and readout cells, respectively. Also, U87 cells produced ZIKV RNA titers which were highly correlated with PFU independently from the readout cell line. Using the best virus-cell system, sofosbuvir and ribavirin EC 50 were 1.2μM and 1.1μM when measured through plaque assay, and 4.2μM and 5.2μM when measured by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR), respectively. In summary, ZIKV can efficiently infect different human cell lines and rapidly reach peak viral titers. Overall, A549 cells appear to be as efficient as the VERO E6 gold standard for plaque assay allowing the use of human, rather than simian, cells for evaluating candidate anti-ZIKV compounds by the reference assay. The possibility to replace the labor-intensive plaque assay with the more rapid and easy-to-perform qRT-PCR is appealing and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Solubility and thermodynamic function of a bioactive compound bergenin in various pharmaceutically acceptable neat solvents at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakeel, Faiyaz; AlAjmi, Mohamed F.; Haq, Nazrul; Siddiqui, Nasir A.; Alam, Perwez; Al-Rehaily, Adnan J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of bergenin in eleven different neat solvents was measured. • The mole fraction solubilities of bergenin were observed highest in PEG-400. • Measured solubilities were correlated well with Apelblat and van’t Hoff models. • Bergenin’s dissolution was recorded as endothermic. - Abstract: Bergenin is neither a highly lipophilic nor a highly hydrophilic bioactive compound due to which its dissolution and permeation are poor which results in poor oral bioavailability. The solubility data of bergenin are scarce in literature. Therefore, in this study, the solubility of bergenin was determined in eleven different pharmaceutically acceptable neat solvents namely water, ethanol, isopropanol (IPA), ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG), 1-butanol, 2-butanol, ethyl acetate (EA), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400) and Transcutol at five different temperatures (T = 298.15 K–318.15 K) and atmospheric pressure (p = 0.1 MPa). Experimental solubility expressed in mole fraction of bergenin was correlated with semi-empirical models. Root mean square deviations were recorded <1% for the Apelblat model and <2% for the van’t Hoff model. The mole fraction solubility of bergenin was recorded highest in PEG-400 (4.15 × 10"−"2 at T = 318.15 K) followed by DMSO (2.30 × 10"−"2 at T = 318.15 K), Transcutol (2.28 × 10"−"2 at T = 318.15 K), PG (1.19 × 10"−"2 at T = 318.15 K), EG (1.17 × 10"−"2 at T = 318.15 K), ethanol (7.77 × 10"−"3 at T = 318.15 K), IPA (1.69 × 10"−"3 at T = 318.15 K), EA (6.71 × 10"−"4 at T = 318.15 K), 2-butanol (5.14 × 10"−"4 at T = 318.15 K), 1-butanol (4.92 × 10"−"4 at T = 318.15 K) and water (1.87 × 10"−"4 at T = 318.15 K). The results of apparent thermodynamic analysis in terms of standard enthalpy indicated that the dissolution of bergenin is endothermic in all pharmaceutically acceptable neat solvents. The solubility results of this study could be useful in

  6. Comparing Unique Title Coverage of Web of Science and Scopus in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Philip; Lascar, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The current journal titles in earth and atmospheric sciences, that are unique to each of two databases, Web of Science and Scopus, were identified using different methods. Comparing by subject category shows that Scopus has hundreds of unique titles, and Web of Science just 16. The titles unique to each database have low SCImago Journal Rank…

  7. Quinuclidine compounds differently act as agonists of Kenyon cell nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and induced distinct effect on insect ganglionic depolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Swale, Daniel; Leray, Xavier; Benzidane, Yassine; Lebreton, Jacques; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a new quinuclidine benzamide compound named LMA10203 acted as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Its specific pharmacological profile on cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons (DUM) helped to identify alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2 receptors. In the present study, we tested its effect on cockroach Kenyon cells. We found that it induced an inward current demonstrating that it bounds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on Kenyon cells. Interestingly, LMA10203-induced currents were completely blocked by the nicotinic antagonist α-bungarotoxin. We suggested that LMA10203 effect occurred through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors and did not involve α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2, previously identified in DUM neurons. In addition, we have synthesized two new compounds, LMA10210 and LMA10211, and compared their effects on Kenyon cells. These compounds were members of the 3-quinuclidinyl benzamide or benzoate families. Interestingly, 1 mM LMA10210 was not able to induce an inward current on Kenyon cells compared to LMA10211. Similarly, we did not find any significant effect of LMA10210 on cockroach ganglionic depolarization, whereas these three compounds were able to induce an effect on the central nervous system of the third instar M. domestica larvae. Our data suggested that these three compounds could bind to distinct cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  8. Analysis of phenolic compounds from different morphological parts of Helichrysum devium by liquid chromatography with on-line UV and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Sandra C; Castilho, Paula C

    2009-12-01

    A simple and rapid method has been used for the screening and identification of the main phenolic compounds from Helichrysum devium using high-performance liquid chromatography with on-line UV and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection (LC-DAD/ESI-MS(n)). The total aerial parts and different morphological parts of the plant, namely leaves, flowers and stems, were analyzed separately. A total of 34 compounds present in the methanolic extract from Helichrysum devium were identified or tentatively characterized based on their UV and mass spectra and retention times. Three of these compounds were positively identified by comparison with reference standards. The phenolic compounds included derivatives of quinic acid, O-glycosylated flavonoids, a caffeic acid derivative and a protocatechuic acid derivative. The characteristic loss of 206 Da from malonylcaffeoyl quinic acid was used to confirm the malonyl linkage to the caffeoyl group. This contribution presents one of the first reports on the analysis of phenolic compounds from Helichrysum devium using LC-DAD/ESI-MS(n) and highlights the prominence of quinic acid derivatives as the main group of phenolic compounds present in these extracts. We also provide evidence that the methanolic extract from the flowers was significantly more complex when compared to that of other morphological parts. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diarra Evelyne Aka-Anghui, Mamadou Zakaria, Christian Tanoh, Yapo Felix Boa, Ange-Eric Kouame-Assouan, Berthe Assi. Vol 23, No 1 (2004), DIFFERENT KINDS OF MEDICAL PAPERS LES DIFFERENTS TYPES DE TEXTES MEDICAUX (Francais), Abstract. Moustafa Mijiyawa. Vol 22, No 1 (2003), Difficultes de la Prise ...

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 4101 - 4150 of 11090 ... Vol 12, No 9 (2013), Effects of dietary protein level on growth and body composition of ... Vol 10, No 38 (2011), Effects of different fruit juices used as carbon ... on certain chemical contents of 'Braeburn' apple cultivar, Abstract PDF ... of different media concentartions on callogensis in sugar cane ...

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 3551 - 3600 of 11090 ... Vol 15, No 24 (2016), Effect of different microencapsulation materials on stability of Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 20174, Abstract PDF. Lulwah Y. Al-Furaih, Ibtisam M. Ababutain, Azzat B. Abd-El-Khalek, Ahmed M. Abdel-Salam. Vol 11, No 37 (2012), Effect of different oestrus synchronizations ...

  12. National Ignition Facility Title II Design Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpan, S

    1997-01-01

    This National Ignition Facility (NIF) Title II Design Plan defines the work to be performed by the NIF Project Team between November 1996, when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed Title I design and authorized the initiation of Title H design and specific long-lead procurements, and September 1998, when Title 11 design will be completed

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 674 ... Gender and Behaviour. ... Vol 6, No 1 (2008), Gender Differences In Mathematics Performance: Some Fresh Insights, Abstract ... Vol 14, No 1 (2016), Gender discrimination and the Nigerian scenario: a review, Abstract.

  14. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 9051 - 9100 of 11090 ... ... different varieties of maize cultivated in Ikwo Local Government Area ... amylase production by mixed culture of Aspergillus niger and ... enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover with low cellulase loadings, Abstract PDF.

  15. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 301 - 350 of 674 ... Vol 9, No 1 (2011), Gender role transition in Pakhtun culture with respect to ... Vol 11, No 1 (2013), Gender Stereotyping and Female Pupils' Perception of ... parenting: are male and female learners significantly different?

  16. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 47 of 47 ... Vol 2, No 1 (2006), African women: the fulcrum of the family, Abstract ... Explanation of the differences and interrelationships between human smuggling ... and kantian categorical imperative: towards its eradication, Abstract.

  17. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 1732 ... ... virus vaccine and cervical cancer screening among female health-care workers ... with different impression materials in angulated implants, Abstract PDF ... Vol 10, No 1 (2007), Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast at ...

  18. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 217 ... ... macrocarpon L.) produced under different nitrogen fertilizer rates, Abstract ... Vol 12, No 1 (2017), Groundwater hydrochemical assessment of the ... Vol 10, No 2 (2015), Informal Knowledge Institutions and Market ...

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 132 ... Vol 30, No 2 (2013), Growth, phenological and yield responses of a .... capacity and physicochemical properties of pomegranate grown in different ... soil nitrogen content using narrow-band indices from Eucalyptus ...

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 506 ... Vol 71, No 2 (2009), Individual tree growth differences in a clonal eucalypt blanking ... tenure and policy, domestication, intellectual property rights and ... in Eucalyptus grandis stands not subjected to soil water deficits: ...

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 4751 - 4800 of 11090 ... Vol 10, No 62 (2011), Evaluation of drought tolerance in different ... Vol 15, No 30 (2016), Evaluation of ethanol production from pito mash using Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Abstract PDF.

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 203 ... Vol 8 (2014): Special Edition, Development of ZSM-5 Zeolite from ... of Fluid at Different Temperatures Using Software Visualization Technique, Abstract .... Vol 7, No 1 (2012), Human resources development indicators for ...

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Type Silicon Single Crystals Of Different Surface Orientations, Abstract PDF. B Guel. Vol 8, No 1 (2002), Electron - positron correlation energy due to ... using surficial resistivity measurements: A case study from parts of ...

  4. Fiches pratiques: Vous et vos conversations; Lire le journal autrement; Detourner les titres; Entre Brel et Rimbaud (Practical Ideas: You and Your Conversations; Reading the Newspaper Differently; Deviating Titles; and Between Brel and Rimbaud).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Denis; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four ideas for language classroom activities are presented, including an exercise in oral discourse analysis, a newspaper-reading activity using the holistic approach, the use of slight phonological changes to turn a title into a joke or play on words, and an exercise looking at varieties of language style. (MSE)

  5. Extraction and formation dynamic of oak-related volatile compounds from different volume barrels to wine and their behavior during bottle storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Prieto, Luis J; López-Roca, Jose M; Martínez-Cutillas, Adrián; Pardo-Mínguez, Francisco; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2003-08-27

    The extraction rate of furfuryl aldehydes, guaiacol, and 4-methylguaiacol, cis- and trans-oak lactone, and vanillin and the formation rate of furfuryl alcohol and the volatile phenols 4-ethylguaiacol and 4-ethylphenol have been studied in wines matured in different capacity oak barrels (220, 500, and 1000 L). Also, the behavior of these compounds during 1 year of wine bottle storage was followed. The lactones were extracted at a linear rate with large differences that depended on barrel volume. Those compounds related to oak toasting (guaiacol, 4-methylguaiacol, furfuryl aldehydes, and vanillin) seemed to be extracted faster during the first days of oak maturation except for vanillin, which required at least 3 months to accumulate in the wine. The volatile phenols, 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol, were formed in large quantities after the first 90 days of oak maturation, coinciding with the end of spring and beginning of summer. Wines matured in 1000-L oak barrels resulted in the lowest levels of volatile compound accumulation. During bottle storage, some compounds decreased in their concentration (5-methylfurfural, vanillin), others experienced increases in their levels (lactones, furfural, 4-ethylguaiacol, 4-ethylphenol), and the concentration of other compounds hardly changed (guaiacol, furfuryl alcohol).

  6. New Approach to Evaluate the Antennal Response of an Adult Predator Insect to Different Volatile Chemical Compounds by using Electroantennogram Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonouda, Mourad L.

    The antennal response of adult syrphid flies to selected plant volatile chemical compounds was investigated in the present study. The main chemical classes and their chemical compounds were aldehydes (nonanal and benzaldehyde), monoterpene-alcohols (linalool and alpha-terpineol), ketones (6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one and 2-undecanone), hydrocarbons (tetradecane) and benzoids (methyl salicylate). Electroantennogram (EAG) records showed that the syrphid antennae were strongly responded to linalool, 6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one and methyl salicylate even at low concentrations, in addition to the high dose concentration of nonanal comparably to the other chemical compounds. The antennae of old syrphid adults were more responsive and elicited higher levels of responses to all compounds rather than young syrphid adults. The antennal sensitivity may differ from one compound to another according to the sex. The difference in responses could be attributed to the sensitivity of olfactory receptors and/or the characterization of binding protein(s). The quality of biocontrol agent could be improved if the chemical interaction between beneficial natural enemies and the surrounding environment is intensively studied and we clearly understand the chemical ecology of each natural enemy.

  7. Comparison of the contents of bioactive compounds and the level of antioxidant activity in different kiwifruit cultivars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Park, Y.S.; Leontowicz, H.; Leontowicz, M.; Namiesnik, J.; Suhaj, M.; Cvikrová, Milena; Martincová, Olga; Weisz, M.; Gorinstein, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 7 (2011), s. 963-970 ISSN 0889-1575 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Kiwifruits cultivars * Actinidia sp. * Bioactive compounds Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.079, year: 2011

  8. Occurrence of pharmaceutically active and non-steroidal estrogenic compounds in three different wastewater recycling schemes in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rifai, Jawad H; Gabelish, Candace L; Schäfer, Andrea I

    2007-10-01

    The discovery that natural and synthetic chemicals, in the form of excreted hormones and pharmaceuticals, as well as a vast array of compounds with domestic and industrial applications, can enter the environment via wastewater treatment plants and cause a wide variety of environmental and health problems even at very low concentrations, suggests the need for improvement of water recycling. Three Australian wastewater recycling schemes, two of which employ reverse osmosis (RO) technology, the other applying ozonation and biological activated carbon filtration, have been studied for their ability to remove trace organic contaminants including 11 pharmaceutically active compounds and two non-steroidal estrogenic compounds. Contaminant concentrations were determined using a sensitive analytical method comprising solid phase extraction, derivatization and GC with MS using selected ion monitoring. In raw wastewater, concentrations of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications were comparable to those found in wastewaters around the world. Remarkably, removal efficiencies for the three schemes were superior to literature values and RO was responsible for the greatest proportion of contaminant removal. The ability of RO membranes to concentrate many of the compounds was demonstrated and highlights the need for continued research into monitoring wastewater treatment, concentrate disposal, improved water recycling schemes and ultimately, safer water and a cleaner environment.

  9. Comparison of the levels of bioactive benzoxazinoids in different wheat and rye fractions and the transformation of these compounds in homemade foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanwir, Fariha; Fredholm, Maria; Gregersen, Per L.

    2013-01-01

    -benzoxazin-3-one (HBOA-glc-hexose) were the predominant compounds found in the different wheat and rye seed fractions followed by DIBOA-glc and DIBOA. The soaking and boiling of three rye-based breakfast cereals resulted in considerable changes in the benzoxazinoid contents. The soaking of pearled rye...

  10. 'Does my Diet Affect my Perfume?' Identification and Quantification of Cuticular Compounds in Five Drosophila melanogaster Strains Maintained over 300 Generations on Different Diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavković-Lučić, Sofija; Todosijević, Marina; Savić, Tatjana; Vajs, Vlatka; Trajković, Jelena; Anđelković, Boban; Lučić, Luka; Krstić, Gordana; Makarov, Slobodan; Tomić, Vladimir; Miličić, Dragana; Vujisić, Ljubodrag

    2016-02-01

    Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) in Drosophila melanogaster represent the basis of chemical communication being involved in many important biological functions. The aim of this study was to characterize chemical composition and variation of cuticular profiles in five D. melanogaster strains. These strains were reared for approximately 300 generations on five diets: standard cornmeal medium and substrates prepared with apple, banana, tomato, and carrot. Differences in quantity and/or quality in CHCs were assumed as a result of activation of different metabolic pathways involved in food digestion and adaptations to the particular diet type. In total, independently of sex and strain, 66 chemical compounds were identified. In females of all strains, 60 compounds were identified, while, in males, 47 compounds were extracted. Certain new chemical compounds for D. melanogaster were found. MANOVA confirmed that CHC amounts significantly depend on sex and substrates, as well as on their interactions. Discriminant analysis revealed that flies belonging to 'apple' and 'carrot' strains exhibited the most noticeable differences in CHC repertoires. A non-hydrocarbon pheromone, cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) also contributed to the variation in the pheromone bouquet among the strains. Variability detected in CHCs and cVA may be used in the explanation of differences in mating behaviour previously determined in analyzed fly strains. Copyright © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  11. Browse Title Index

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    Items 4401 - 4450 of 11090 ... Vol 10, No 1 (2011), Efficacy of lactic acid bacteria in the reduction of ... on yolk color and performance of laying hens, Abstract PDF ... Vol 15, No 35 (2016), Efficiency and response of conilon coffee ... of chickens fed diets with lycopene, fish oil and different chemical selenium forms, Abstract PDF.

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    EE Akporhonor, IO Asia ... Vol 4, No 6 (2005):, The effect of spawn grains, culture media, oil types and rates on ... and nutrients digestibility in broilers fed with diet containing different levels of phosphorous, Abstract PDF ... involved in ethylene biosynthesis and signal perception during tomato flower abscission, Abstract PDF.

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    Vol 13, No 9 (2014), Characterization of blue green algae isolated from Egyptian rice field with potential anti-hepatitis C active components, Abstract PDF .... of molecular variability in Rhizoctonia solani isolates from different agro-ecological zones by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers, Abstract PDF.

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    Items 451 - 500 of 789 ... Vol 38, No 1 (2015), On the inertia groups of the maximal subgroup 27:Sp6(2) in Aut(Fi22), Abstract. R.L. Fray, A.L. Prins. Vol 32, No 1 (2009), On the interlacing of zeros of linear combinations of Jacobi polynomials from different sequences, Abstract. Kathy Driver, Kerstin Jordaan, Norbert Mbuyi.

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    Items 51 - 100 of 130 ... Vol 13 (2015), Feed utilization and growth performance of cockerels fed with soldier ants (Dorylus spp Fabricius) as protein source, Abstract ... Vol 7 (2009), Growth performance and survival of hybrid African catfish larvae (Clarias gariepinus x Heterobranchus bidorsalis) fed on different diets, Abstract.

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    Items 51 - 100 of 241 ... Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research. ... Vol 30, No 1 (2018), Curriculum Review Process in the Context of ... Vol 16, No 3 (2004), Differences in pupils' mathematics self-concept by class level and gender in upper ...

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    Items 751 - 781 of 781 ... Vol 30, No 2 (2003), Types and frequency of udder shapes and abnormalities in West African Dwarf and Red Sokoto goats, Abstract ... Vol 16, No 1 (1989), Variation in yield and composition of milk from different udder quarters of lactating White Fulani cattle in a tropical environment, Abstract.

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    Items 301 - 350 of 985 ... Vol 30 (2015), Diatomic Molecules Effective Potential for an Harmonic Oscillator Model, Abstract. Emmanuel Anthony. Vol 11 (2007), Diffeomorphism groups of connected sum of three products of spheres, Abstract. SO Ajala. Vol 12 (2008), Differences between general relativity and dynamical theory of ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 159 ... Vol 4, No 1 (2015), Regional Differences in the Tunica Media of the Uterine Artery of ... Vol 3, No 2 (2014), The Changing Face of Human Anatomy Practice: ... spontaneous tubal twin ectopic pregnancy: A rare occurrence ...

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    Items 1 - 19 of 19 ... Vol 23 (2007), Effect Of Different Degrees Of Hepatic Dysfunction On The Pharmacokinetics Of Telmisartan, Abstract ... Vol 23 (2007), Effect Of Green Leaves And Germination And Boiling Treatments Of Fenugreek And Lupin Seeds On Chemical Composition, Serum Glucose, ... S A El-Adawy, A A Ramadan.

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    Vol 45, No 1 (2015), Dietary effect of silage type and combination with camelina seed on milk fatty acid profile and antioxidant capacity of sheep milk, Abstract PDF. D Mierlita, S ... Vol 29, No 2 (1999), Dietary influences on lutein pigments and carcass fat quality in wethers of different maturity types, Abstract PDF. EC Webb ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 366 ... Vol 61, No 5-8 (2015), Competency based ophthalmology training curriculum for ... Compliance and loss to follow up of HIV negative and positive ... of different frequencies of loading on healing in partial rupture of the ...

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    Items 701 - 750 of 1255 ... Vol 13, No 1 (2007), Infrared spectroscopy of the different types of second ... Of Drug Substances Using Inverse Gas Chromatography (IGC), Abstract PDF ... Vol 6, No 2 (2000), Laser jets in extra-galactic radio sources.

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    Items 51 - 100 of 172 ... Vol 3, No 1 (2011), Gender differences in internet usage intentions ... Iranian EFL Learners' Attitudes toward Learning English through ... Vol 2, No 1 (2010), Justification of a Multidisciplinary Approach to Teaching Language in Botswana ... Vol 2, No 1 (2010), Kiswahili usage in ICT in NEPAD secondary ...

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    Items 301 - 350 of 823 ... Vol 8, No 2 (2015), Effects of different heat processing methods on the ... Vol 10, No 1 (2017), Effects on the electro-mechanical properties of ... Vol 2, No 2 (2009), Ethanol oxidation over Au/TiO2 catalysis, Abstract PDF.

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    Items 51 - 100 of 106 ... Vol 24, No 1 (2013), Growth and yield components of tomato as influenced by nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer applications in different growing seasons ... Vol 21, No 1-2 (2011), Parthenium Weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.) Research in Ethiopia: Impacts on Food Production, Plant Biodiversity and ...

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    Items 201 - 232 of 232 ... Vol 11, No 1 (2012), The effect of ambient temperature and solar panel's surface temperature on output performance of solar power system, Abstract. J.A. Amusan, S.O. Azi, A.E. Edah. Vol 10, No 2 (2011), The effect of different solvent polarity on the precipitation of heavy organics from a crude oil ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 207 ... Vol 2, No 1 (2006), Farmers Preference For Different Farmer Education Methods, Abstract. C Nwankwo. Vol 3, No 2 (2007), Farmers ... Vol 1, No 1 (2005), Farmers' Adoption Of Improved Soil Conservation And Management Practices In A Rainforest Zone Of Nigeria, Abstract. Edna C Matthews-Njoku.

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    Items 51 - 100 of 204 ... Vol 4, No 1 (2001), Effect of harvest methods on yield and quality of Marketable flowers of greenhouse rose cultivars of different growth habits, Abstract PDF. TJ Msogoya, A ... Vol 3, No 2 (2000), Effects of moist heat and dry heat on the nutritional value of velvet beans (Mucuna pruriens Var. Utilis) for the ...

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    Items 201 - 250 of 674 ... Gender and Behaviour. ... Vol 4, No 2 (2006), Farming in the northern mountains of Pakistan: Role of women ... Vol 15, No 2 (2017), Fostering critical thinking in initial teacher education curriculums: a comprehensive literature review ... differences in work-family, family-work conflicts and stress among ...

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    Vol 10, No 57 (2011), Tetramethylpyrazine attenuates oleic acid-induced acute ... Vol 9, No 8 (2010), Thalassemia mutations in Gaziantep, Turkey, Abstract PDF ... The alcoholic fermentative efficiency of indigenous yeast strains of different origin ... in rats in vivo can be detected by ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 333 ... Vol 37, No 2 (2014), Comparison of Avifaunal Assemblage and their Association with Plant Cover in Protected and Unprotected Montane Grassland ... Vol 38, No 1 (2015), Diversity, density and management of trees in different agro-forestry practices of Yem Special District, Southern Ethiopia, Abstract ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 516 ... Vol 79, No 1 (2017), Differences in nitrogen cycling and soil mineralisation between a eucalypt plantation and a mixed eucalypt and Acacia mangium plantation on a sandy tropical soil, Abstract. Sogni Viviane Tchichelle, Daniel Epron, Fidèle Mialoundama, Lydie Stella Koutika, Jean-Michel Harmand, ...

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    Items 151 - 200 of 674 ... Vol 2, No 1 (2004), Education and Gender Inequality: A Nigerian Perspective, Abstract ... Vol 15, No 1 (2017), Effect of gender and marital status on ... Gender Differences in Intuitive Decision Making in the Workplace: ...

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    Items 251 - 300 of 775 ... Vol 8, No 1 (2015), Effect of imazapyr treated maize on Striga infestation and time of intercropping cowpea in Samaru, Nigeria, Abstract PDF ... Vol 3, No 1 (2010), Effect of water harvesting methods, nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer on leaf length of different date palm (phoenix d-) varieties, Abstract ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 98 ... ... No 2 (2015), An Empirical Analysis of the Relationship between Minimum Wage, ... in National Development: What Do We Know and What are the Gaps? ... Gender Differences in Rural Off-farm Employment Participation in ...

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    Items 3951 - 4000 of 11090 ... Vol 8, No 4 (2009), Effect of using different lignocellulosic ... Vol 11, No 42 (2012), Effect of varied quantities of zeolite on the .... Vol 12, No 31 (2013), Effect on some haematological indices of human whole blood ...

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    Items 351 - 400 of 879 ... Vol 21, No 4 (2007), Humanising education through technology: creating social presence in large classes, Abstract. F C Greyling, A Wentzel ... CL Brown, L Czerniewicz. Vol 23, No 5 (2009), Image and academic expectations of different levels of university students: A South African case, Abstract.

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    Items 851 - 900 of 11090 ... ... different host plants associated with resistance to Phenacoccus solenopsis- an invasive pest in .... Vol 12, No 10 (2013), Analysis of TNF-a and IL-10 gene polymorphisms in Zimbabwean children exposed to malaria, Abstract PDF ... from Trichoderma species and benlate solution on Ceratocystis ...

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    Items 3601 - 3650 of 11090 ... P Mwaura, T Dubois, T Losenge, D Coyne, E Kahangi. Vol 11, No 2 (2012), Effect of enriched Brachionus plicatilis and Artemia salina nauplii by microalga Tetraselmis chuii (Bütcher) grown on four different culture media on the growth and survival of Sparus aurata larvae, Abstract PDF. HM Khairy ...

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    Items 151 - 200 of 282 ... Vol 1, No 1 (1993), Methionine in Velvet Bean (Mucuna pruriens) Based Broiler Starter Diets and Bean Influence on Finishing Broilers, Abstract PDF. G Olaboro. Vol 13, No 2 (2012), Molecular diagnostic tools targeting different taxonomic levels of Xanthomonads aid in disease management, Abstract ...

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    Vol 14, No 29 (2015), Authenticating the Origin of Different Shrimp Products on the ... and fungi isolated from housefly (Musca domestica L.) larvae, Abstract PDF ... Vol 11, No 18 (2012), Bacteria response to non-thermal physical factors: A study on ... Vol 14, No 9 (2015), Bacterial mediated amelioration of drought stress in ...

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    Items 1 - 34 of 34 ... Vol 39, No 1 (2014), Comparative studies on different molecular methods for epidemiological typing of multi-drug-resistance Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated ... Vol 17 (2007), Serological Investigation And Interpreting Serum Chemistry Profile Of Natural Infected Cattle By Foot And Mouth Disease, Abstract.

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    Items 451 - 500 of 1255 ... Vol 8, No 3 (2002), Effects of lithology on geothermal gradient on the southeast Nigeria Delta, Nigeria, Abstract PDF. E.D. Uko, A.R.C Amakiri, K.O. Alagoa. Vol 11, No 2 (2005), Effects of long-term storage on the quality of soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, in different containers in southern Nigerian ...

  5. Effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) sources and nature of solid extraction sorbent on recoverable DOM composition: Implication into potential lability of different compound groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilian; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Jae-Eun; Kim, Hyun Sik; Hur, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Noting the source-dependent properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM), this study explored the recoverable compounds by solid phase extraction (SPE) of two common sorbents (C18 and PPL) eluted with methanol solvent for contrasting DOM sources via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Fresh algae and leaf litter extracts DOM, one riverine DOM, and one upstream lacustrine DOM were selected for the comparison. C18 sorbent was generally found to extract more diverse molecular formula, relatively higher molecular weight, and more heteroatomic DOM compounds within the studied mass range than PPL sorbent except for the leaf litter extract. Even with the same sorbent, the main molecular features of the two end member DOM were distributed on different sides of the axes of a multivariate ordination, indicating the source-dependent characteristics of the recoverable compounds by the sorbents. In addition, further examination of the molecular formula uniquely present in the two end members and the upstream lake DOM suggested that proteinaceous, tannin-like, and heteroatomic DOM constituents might be potential compound groups which are labile and easily degraded during their mobilization into downstream watershed. This study provides new insights into the sorbent selectivity of DOM from diverse sources and potential lability of various compound groups.

  6. Ru(II)-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Cyclopropenes with Diazo Compounds: Formation of Olefins from Two Different Carbene Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Yi, Heng; Zhang, Hang; Sun, Tong; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jianbo

    2018-01-19

    Formal carbene dimerization is a convergent method for the synthesis of alkenes. Herein, we report a Ru(II)-catalyzed carbene dimerization of cyclopropenes and diazo compounds. The yields are up to 97% and the stereoselectivity are up to >20:1. Mechanistically, it has been experimentally demonstrated that the catalyst reacts with cyclopropene first to generate a Ru(II)-carbene species, which is attacked by nucleophilic diazo substrate, followed by dinitrogen extrusion to form the double bond.

  7. Metabolomic profiling of the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum during growth on different reduced sulfur compounds and malate

    OpenAIRE

    Weissgerber, Thomas; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Hoefgen, Rainer; Dahl, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Environmental fluctuations require rapid adjustment of the physiology of bacteria. Anoxygenic phototrophic purple sulfur bacteria, like Allochromatium vinosum, thrive in environments that are characterized by steep gradients of important nutrients for these organisms, i.e., reduced sulfur compounds, light, oxygen and carbon sources. Changing conditions necessitate changes on every level of the underlying cellular and molecular network. Thus far, two global analyses of A. vinosum responses to ...

  8. Occurrence of pharmaceutically active and non-steroidal estrogenic compounds in three different wastewater recycling schemes in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rifai, J.; Gabelish, C. L.; Schaefer, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The discovery that natural and synthetic chemicals, in the form of excreted hormones and pharmaceuticals, as well as a vast array of compounds with domestic and industrial applications, can enter the environment via wastewater treatment plants and cause a wide variety of environmental and health problems even at very low concentrations, suggests the need for improvement of water recycling. Three Australian wastewater recycling schemes, two of which employ reverse osmosis (RO) technology, ...

  9. Transformation of technogenic compounds of Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb in different soil types in model experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladonin, D.V.; Smirnova, M.S.; Karpukhin, M.M.; Plyaskina, O.V.

    2008-01-01

    In model experiment fractional distribution of Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb in soils artificially polluted with readily and sparingly soluble compounds (nitrates and oxides respectively) of these heavy metals was investigated. It is shown that heavy metals fractional distribution may strongly vary depending on the form in which the metal deposits in the soil. Transformation of heavy metals oxides is controlled by two main factors: solubility of an oxide and characteristics of reactions between dissolution products and the soil components

  10. Extraction of oak volatiles and ellagitannins compounds and sensory profile of wine aged with French winewoods subjected to different toasting methods: behaviour during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chira, Kleopatra; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis

    2013-09-01

    In Merlot wines the evolution of volatile and non-volatile (ellagitannins) compounds extracted from winewoods while being macerated for 12 months was studied. Seven types of winewoods subjected to different toasting methods were used. Different rates of extraction, depending mainly on wood compounds origin (toasting or naturally present in wood) and on the watering process during toasting, were observed, which were reflected in sensory differences. Globally, volatile phenols together with aldehydes, phenols and lactones showed an increase with increasing maceration time. Ellagitannins were extracted faster during the first 3 months; after 6 months an important decrease was observed. Wines with winewoods subjected to watering during toasting were lower in ellagitannins concentrations and demonstrated the greatest decrease of these compounds during maceration. Astringency and bitterness intensified with increasing ellagitannins. Lactones induced positive sweetness sensations, whereas furanic and guaiacol compounds influenced bitterness and astringency. Spicy and vanilla descriptors were related to eugenol, vanillin and other odorous chemicals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bioactive compounds and antifungal activity of three different seaweed species Ulva lactuca, Sargassum tenerrimum and Laurencia obtusa collected from Okha coast, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Barot

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate bioactive compounds responsible for antifungal activity from seaweeds of Okha coast, Western India. Methods: Each species were extracted with different solvents with increasing polarity: hexane, ethyl acetate, chloroform and methanol using Soxhlet apparatus. The antifungal activity was determined by agar diffusion plate method by using fluconazole, ketoconazole and amphotericin B as standards. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis was done for identification of bioactive compounds present in crude extract. Results: The gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of all the extracts revealed the presence of steroids, fatty acids and esters compounds. Among the three species, the maximum crude extract yield (53.46% and the largest inhibition zone (36 mm were recorded in methanol extract of Ulva lactuca, whereas the minimum crude extract yield and inhibition zone were recorded in chloroform extract of the same species as 0.5% and 10 mm, respectively. Methanol and ethyl acetate extract showed the maximum antifungal activity and the major important compounds like steroids, fatty acids and esters were detected with higher amount in all the extracts. Conclusions: The present study revealed that the different seaweed extracts showed moderate to significant antifungal activity against the strains tested as compared with the standard fungicides, and polar solvents methanol and ethyl acetate were comparatively efficient for extraction of different metabolites that are responsible for antifungal activity.

  12. A ruthenium anticancer compound interacts with histones and impacts differently on epigenetic and death pathways compared to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona, Cynthia; Spaety, Marie-Elodie; Capuozzo, Antonelle; Ali, Moussa; Santamaria, Rita; Armant, Olivier; Delalande, Francois; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Cianferani, Sarah; Spencer, John; Pfeffer, Michel; Mellitzer, Georg; Gaiddon, Christian

    2017-01-10

    Ruthenium complexes are considered as potential replacements for platinum compounds in oncotherapy. Their clinical development is handicapped by a lack of consensus on their mode of action. In this study, we identify three histones (H3.1, H2A, H2B) as possible targets for an anticancer redox organoruthenium compound (RDC11). Using purified histones, we confirmed an interaction between the ruthenium complex and histones that impacted on histone complex formation. A comparative study of the ruthenium complex versus cisplatin showed differential epigenetic modifications on histone H3 that correlated with differential expression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) genes. We then characterized the impact of these epigenetic modifications on signaling pathways employing a transcriptomic approach. Clustering analyses showed gene expression signatures specific for cisplatin (42%) and for the ruthenium complex (30%). Signaling pathway analyses pointed to specificities distinguishing the ruthenium complex from cisplatin. For instance, cisplatin triggered preferentially p53 and folate biosynthesis while the ruthenium complex induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and trans-sulfuration pathways. To further understand the role of HDACs in these regulations, we used suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) and showed that it synergized with cisplatin cytotoxicity while antagonizing the ruthenium complex activity. This study provides critical information for the characterization of signaling pathways differentiating both compounds, in particular, by the identification of a non-DNA direct target for an organoruthenium complex.

  13. Profiles of Volatile Flavor Compounds in Milk Fermented with Different Proportional Combinations of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Tong; Wang, Dan; Wu, Shimei; Jin, Rulin; Ren, Weiyi; Sun, Tiansong

    2017-09-29

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus are key factors in the fermentation process and the final quality of dairy products worldwide. This study was performed to investigate the effects of the proportions of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus isolated from traditionally fermented dairy products in China and Mongolia on the profile of volatile compounds produced in samples. Six proportional combinations (1:1, 1:10, 1:50, 1:100, 1:1000, and 1:10,000) of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus IMAU20401 to S. thermophilus ND03 were considered, and the volatiles were identified and quantified by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) against an internal standard. In total, 89 volatile flavor compounds, consisting of aldehydes, ketones, acids, alcohols, esters, and aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified. Among these, some key flavor volatile compounds were identified, including acetaldehyde, 3-methylbutanal, acetoin, 2-heptanone, acetic acid, butanoic acid, and 3-methyl-1-butanol. The of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus IMAU20401 to S. thermophilus ND03 influenced the type and concentration of volatiles produced. In particular, aldehydes and ketones were present at higher concentrations in the 1:1000 treatment combination than in the other combinations. Our findings emphasize the importance of selecting the appropriate proportions of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus for the starter culture in determining the final profile of volatiles and the overall flavor of dairy products.

  14. Profiles of Volatile Flavor Compounds in Milk Fermented with Different Proportional Combinations of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Dan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus are key factors in the fermentation process and the final quality of dairy products worldwide. This study was performed to investigate the effects of the proportions of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus isolated from traditionally fermented dairy products in China and Mongolia on the profile of volatile compounds produced in samples. Six proportional combinations (1:1, 1:10, 1:50, 1:100, 1:1000, and 1:10,000 of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus IMAU20401 to S. thermophilus ND03 were considered, and the volatiles were identified and quantified by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS against an internal standard. In total, 89 volatile flavor compounds, consisting of aldehydes, ketones, acids, alcohols, esters, and aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified. Among these, some key flavor volatile compounds were identified, including acetaldehyde, 3-methylbutanal, acetoin, 2-heptanone, acetic acid, butanoic acid, and 3-methyl-1-butanol. The of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus IMAU20401 to S. thermophilus ND03 influenced the type and concentration of volatiles produced. In particular, aldehydes and ketones were present at higher concentrations in the 1:1000 treatment combination than in the other combinations. Our findings emphasize the importance of selecting the appropriate proportions of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus for the starter culture in determining the final profile of volatiles and the overall flavor of dairy products.

  15. Sensory analysis and volatile compounds of olive oil (cv. Cobrançosa from different irrigation regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes-Silva, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different irrigation strategies on the sensory quality of virgin olive oil (VOO from the cv. “cobrançosa” integrated into a protected denomination of origin of “Azeite de Trás-os-Montes” in the Northeast of Portugal. Three irrigation treatments were applied: (T2-full irrigation, which received a seasonal water equivalent of 100% of the estimated crop evapotranspiration (ETc, (T1-continuous deficit irrigation (30% ETc and (T0- rainfed treatment. Data were collected from two consecutive crop years (2005-2006. Olive oil samples were analyzed for volatiles by GC-MS and the results compared with sensory evaluation data. Total volatile compounds tended to decrease with the amount of water applied. The characteristics pungent and bitter were more pronounced in olive oils from T0 and T1, which had higher polyphenolic concentrations, with a strong positive relationship with this variable and the bitter attribute. The Principal Components Analysis clearly separates the three olive oils from 2005, the driest year, and aggregates into a single group the three samples from 2006, suggesting no effect of irrigation on volatile compounds in years with a rainy spring and a marked effect in years with severe drought, suggesting that the effect of the trees’ water status on these variables occurs throughout the crop season and not just during the oil accumulation phase. In general, olive oil from the cv. Cobrançosa is more bitter than pungent and has a typical nutty sensory attribute shown by a strong positive relationship between benzaldehyde and the sensory notes of almonds and nuts.

    Este estudio tiene como objetivo evaluar el efecto de distintas estrategias de riego en la composición relativa de los compuestos volátiles y en la calidad sensorial. El experimento se realizó en el Noreste de Portugal, dentro de la denominación de origen protegida “Azeites de Tr

  16. A tentative characterization of volatile compounds from Iberian Dry-Cured Ham according to different anatomical locations. A detailed study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narváez-Rivas, Mónica

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to carry out a characterization of the volatile fraction of 23 Iberian dry-cured hams by GC-iontrap- MS. Two different locations –subcutaneous fat and musclefrom the slices taken parallel to the femur from each ham were analyzed. The analyses were done by Gas Chromatography- Mass Spectrometry with a polar capillary column and after a previous extraction using the Purge and Trap method. A total of 109 volatile compounds were identified, twenty-eight of which for the first time in Iberian dry-cured ham (isopropanol, 4-methyl-5-decanol, 2-butyl-1-octanol, 2-etoxy-ethanol, 2-ethyl-phenol, 2-hexen-1-ol, 3,5-octadien-2-ol, 2-decen- 1-ol, 5-ethylcyclopent-1-enecarboxaldehyde, 2,4-heptadienal, 6-nonenal, cyclopentanone, 3-ethenyl-cyclohexanone, 2-methyl-cyclopentanone, 6-octen-2-one, 5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl- cyclopentanone, 3,5-octadien-2-one, 2-hydroxymethyl- 2,3,3-trimethyl-oxirane, 2-ethyl-hexyl 2-propenoate, 1-methoxypentane, 2,3-dihydrofurane, 2-D-2-pentadecyl-1,3-dioxolane, hexyl octyl eter, eucalyptol, di-(3-methyl-buthyl eter, piperidine, isopropylamine and 2-ethenyl-pyridine.

    El objetivo de este trabajo fue llevar a cabo una caracterización de la fracción volátil de 23 jamones curados de cerdo ibérico mediante GC-ion-trap-MS. Se analizaron dos zonas diferentes de las lonchas tomadas paralelas al fémur de cada jamón, Grasa subcutánea y magro. El análisis se realizó mediante cromatografía gaseosa en columna capilar de alta polaridad con detección de espectrometría de masas y extracción previa de la fracción volátil mediante purga y trampa. Un total de 109 compuestos volátiles fueron identificados, veintiocho de ellos descritos por primera vez en Jamón ibérico curado (isopropanol, 4-methyl-5-decanol, 2-butyl-1-octanol, 2-etoxy-ethanol, 2-ethyl-phenol, 2-hexen-1-ol, 3,5-octadien-2- ol, 2-decen-1-ol, 5-ethylcyclopent-1-enecarboxaldehyde, 2,4-heptadienal, 6-nonenal, cyclopentanone, 3-ethenyl

  17. INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the nineteenth revision of the INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles (IAEA-INIS-11). It lists 10,797 journal titles which have contained articles within the scope of INIS. The purpose of this Authority List is to provide descriptive cataloguers with a standard abbreviation for journal titles and to assist users of INIS products with a tool for verifying the full title of a journal. A journal, or periodical, is generally published within a defined, fixed interval between issues, which usually has more than one issue a year, and which usually includes a mixture of articles, letters, summaries, etc. Within this definition, annuals such as Annual Review of Nuclear Science are included. Series titles as, for example the McGraw-Hill Series in Nuclear Engineering, are not included in this Authority. Entries: Each entry consists of: - the full journal title (highlighted); - the abbreviated title; - ISSN, if available; - CODEN, if available; - additional information related to the journal title. Arrangement: In Part I, the full journal titles are grouped by country or international organization name and ordered alphabetically, followed by the ISSN, the CODEN in square brackets if available, and then the abbreviated title. The abbreviated title is based on the rules of ISO 4: Documentation - International Code for the Abbreviation of Titles of Periodicals. The abbreviations of the words are taken from the ISDS List of Periodical Title Word Abbreviation. In Part II, the order of the citations is reversed: the abbreviated journal titles are arranged alphabetically, followed by country code. Then the full journal titles are followed by the country of publication, and if available, ISSN and CODEN. Additional Information: There is important information related to the journal titles which are fundamental for tracing the history of the title and the present status. They are listed below and are entered whenever applicable: - Ceased publication; - Superseded by

  18. Characterization of phenolic compounds from different species of halophytes from Reserva Natural do Sapal de Castro Marim e Vila Real de Santo António (Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda R. Almeida

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Reserva Natural do Sapal de Castro Marim e Vila Real de Santo António (RNSCMVRSA is a natural reserve (SE of Portugal, Algarve region that has habitats with different saline conditions and great ecological importance. Halophytes are plants that grow in a wide variety of saline habitats, namely in RNSCMVRSA, and can accumulated in their biomass high contents of salt. This plant behavior can increase production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and consequently, the oxidative stress, cellular damage and metabolic disorders. In order to protect the cells from ROS, these plants developed an efficient antioxidant system. This system can be constituted by phenolics compounds that have an important effect on oxidative, anti-inflammatory and microbial stability important properties for food, dietary and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, this work aims to identify the phenolic compounds in biomass of different autochthones halophytes species growing on natural conditions in RNSCMVSRA. Composite samples of Salicornia patula, Salicornia ramosissima, Sarcoccornia fruticosa and Sarcocornia perennis were collected in 2013. Sequential extraction was realized: firstly the plant samples were subjected to soxhlet extraction using dichloromethane and then by a solid-liquid extraction with ethanol. Finally, the main compounds present in each extract were identified by GC-MS (Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. The total of phenolic compounds and polyphenolic antioxidants in the extracts was also determined by Folin-Ciocalteu method.

  19. Determination of Acetylcholinesrase and Butrylcholinestrase Activities in Whole Blood and Plasma from Different Communities of Khosestan Province (Iran-Iraq War Area) Exposed to Organophosphate Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heybatullah, K.; Jahangiri, A.; Mohebbi, G. H.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that Organophosphate Compounds are widely used as pesticides. Therefore while handling, applying or using these compounds care and safe use should be considered. The main mechanism of toxicity action of Organophosphate Compounds is the inhibition of Actylcholinestrase and Butrylcholinesrase enzymes. It is well known that the activity measurement of Acetylcholinestrase in whole blood and Butrylcholinestrase in plasma samples are potential biomarker of exposure to Organophosphates compounds.In this study AchE and BchE activities were determined in whole blood and plasma samples of farmers from two different area of Khosestan province of Iran Gotvand and Dashte Azadegan (Iran-Iraq war zone).Determination of enzymes activities were based on the Ellman colorimetric method which was modified byWorek et al. The results obtained in this study showed that Gotvand area showed lower than normal value and Dashte Azadegan (war area) were significantly lower than the mean of activities in reference group (P less than 0.05). Also results of this study showed Acetylcholinestrase and Butrylcholinestrase inhibition can provide a good biomarker of exposure to OP pesticides in field studies in human population with consideration of other different parameters and factors which will be discussed. (author)

  20. Electrolytic 99mTcO4- reduction: a different pathway to obtain 99mTc-labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savio, E.; Kremer, C.; Gambino, D.; Kremer, E.; Leon, A.

    1991-01-01

    Electrolytic reduction of 99m TcO 4 - at inert electrodes to obtain 99m Tc cationic complexes and in vitro stability of labelled compounds were studied. Amines were used as neutral N-donor ligands and a systematic analysis of various parameters involved in the reduction process was performed. Usefulness of electrolytic reduction was proved as an alternative 99m Tc-labelling method. Its most important advantages are: production of complexes with a high radiochemical purity, negligible presence of red-hyd- 99m Tc, lack of foreign materials, simplicity of development and possibility of further applications. (author)

  1. Comparison of different drying methods on the physical properties, bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of raspberry powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Xu; Chen, Qinqin; Bi, Jinfeng; Wu, Xinye; Yi, Jianyong; Zhou, Linyan; Li, Zhaolu

    2016-04-01

    Dehydration has been considered as one of the traditional but most effective techniques for perishable fruits. Raspberry powders obtained after dehydration can be added as ingredients into food formulations such as bakery and dairy products. In this study, raspberry powders obtained by hot air drying (HAD), infrared radiation drying (IRD), hot air and explosion puffing drying (HA-EPD), infrared radiation and microwave vacuum drying (IR-MVD) and freeze drying (FD) were compared on physical properties, bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. Drying techniques affected the physical properties, bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of raspberry powders greatly. FD led to significantly higher (P drying methods. However, thermal drying techniques, especially combined drying methods, were superior to FD in final total polyphenol content, total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity. The combined drying methods, especially IR-MVD, showed the highest total polyphenol content (123.22 g GAE kg(-1) dw) and total flavonoid content (0.30 g CAE kg(-1) dw). Additionally, IR-MVD performed better in antioxidant activity retention. Overall, combined drying methods, especially IR-MVD, were found to result in better quality of raspberry powders among the thermal drying techniques. IR-MVD could be recommended for use in the drying industry because of its advantages in time saving and nutrient retention. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. The human taste receptor hTAS2R14 responds to a variety of different bitter compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, Maik; Brockhoff, Anne; Kuhn, Christina; Bufe, Bernd; Winnig, Marcel; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    The recent advances in the functional expression of TAS2Rs in heterologous systems resulted in the identification of bitter tastants that specifically activate receptors of this family. All bitter taste receptors reported to date exhibit a pronounced selectivity for single substances or structurally related bitter compounds. In the present study we demonstrate the expression of the hTAS2R14 gene by RT-PCR analyses and in situ hybridisation in human circumvallate papillae. By functional expression in HEK-293T cells we show that hTAS2R14 displays a, so far, unique broad tuning towards a variety of structurally diverse bitter compounds, including the potent neurotoxins, (-)-α-thujone, the pharmacologically active component of absinthe, and picrotoxinin, a poisonous substance of fishberries. The observed activation of heterologously expressed hTAS2R14 by low concentrations of (-)-α-thujone and picrotoxinin suggests that the receptor is sufficiently sensitive to caution us against the ingestion of toxic amounts of these substances

  3. LOX Gene Transcript Accumulation in Olive (Olea europaea L. Fruits at Different Stages of Maturation: Relationship between Volatile Compounds, Environmental Factors, and Technological Treatments for Oil Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innocenzo Muzzalupo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of olive oil is influenced by genetic and environmental factors and by the maturation state of drupes, but it is equally affected by technological treatments of the process. This work investigates the possible correlation between olive LOX gene transcript accumulation, evaluated in fruits collected at different stages of maturation, and chemical biomarkers of its activity. During olive fruit ripening, the same genotype harvested from two different farms shows a positive linear trend between LOX relative transcript accumulation and the content of volatile compounds present in the olive oil aroma. Interestingly, a negative linear trend was observed between LOX relative transcript accumulation and the content of volatile compounds present in the olive pastes obtained from olive fruits with and without malaxation. The changes in the olive LOX transcript accumulation reveal its environmental regulation and suggest differential physiological functions for the LOXs.

  4. TITLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha K. M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The new millennium is seen as an epoch of entrepreneurship with entrepreneurs perceiving novel opportunities, organizing resources, undertaking risks to pursue their goals in establishing innovative ventures for scaling new horizons. Women entrepreneurs have the potency to confront numerous challenges, such as creating equity, equilibrium, ensuring sustainable and inclusive socio economic development in divergent economies, by seizing tremendous business opportunities in the contemporary commercial world. Kerala, the southern State of India, is experiencing an economic renovation through technological transformation and, in particular, through the growth of women oriented Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs. The study aims to; identify the growth trends of women’s entrepreneurship in the micro enterprises of Kerala; examine whether women’s entrepreneurial activities significantly vary across the form of women owned enterprises, type of organization and nature of activity; and also explore the prospects and challenges faced by women entrepreneurs through micro entrepreneurial activities. Research methodology involves the application of descriptive quantitative analysis on the secondary data primarily collected from the database of Directorate of Industries and District Industries Centre for a period of 7 years extending from 2007-08 to 2013-14. Findings reveal that MSMEs spawn better income distribution, by operating in heterogeneous areas of the economy with limited capital and creating more employment opportunities, thereby reducing poverty and inequalities. The trend analysis reflects an escalation in the number of enterprises, investments, profits and employment opportunities generated especially through micro enterprises of women. They play a crucial role in the economy in terms of creating self employment and generating employment opportunities for others. A paradigm shift is seen in the role of women’s entrepreneurship in terms of innovation, attitudes, leadership qualities, competitiveness, entrepreneurial skill and absorbing new entrants to the job market, empowering marginalized women.

  5. TITLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhamid Papzan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated entrepreneurial intention among graduate students of USM Engineering Campus. Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB; Ajzen, we examined the empirical model of entrepreneurial intention determinants. Although research has been conducted in entrepreneurial intention, limited study has been done among Iranian graduate students who are studying abroad. This research aims to fill this gap using Entrepreneurial Intention Questionnaire (EIQ, version 3.1. Accordingly, a survey study was applied and Iranian graduate students of the USM Engineering Campus were studied using the census method. The authors propose an empirical model and tested its reliability and validity using structural equation modeling. Data was analyzed using Spss16 and Amos18 software. Results revealed that the level of knowledge about business sources of assistance for entrepreneurs in addition to components of the TPB, affected entrepreneurial intention. Empirical model ‘s goodness of fit indices indicated good model fit x2=1.047, df=2, probability 0.592; NFI= 0.981; CFI= 1.000; RMSEA=0.000. It seems that current empirical model could be a guide for future research on this important topic.

  6. Volatile organic compounds in urban atmospheres: Long-term measurements of ambient air concentrations in differently loaded regions of Leipzig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knobloch, T.; Asperger, A.; Engewald, W. [University of Leipzig, Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Leipzig (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    For the comprehensive characterization of ambient air concentrations of a broad spectrum of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) an analytical method is described, consisting of adsorptive enrichment, thermal desorption without cryofocusing, and capillary gas chromatographic separation. The method was applied during two-week measuring campaigns in winter and summer 1995, and in the winter of 1996. Long-term sampling was carried out at sampling points in residential areas in the suburbs and near the city center of Leipzig. About 70 VOCs - mainly hydrocarbons from propene to hexadecane - were identified both by GC-MS and chromatographic retention data and quantified after external calibration. Mean values of VOC concentrations obtained during the sampling periods are reported and discussed with regard to the topographical location of the sampling points in the Leipzig area, seasonal variations, and possible emission sources. (orig.) With 7 figs., 3 tabs., 18 refs.

  7. A Simplified Method to Estimate Sc-CO2 Extraction of Bioactive Compounds from Different Matrices: Chili Pepper vs. Tomato By-Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Venturi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, the search for bioactive compounds or “target molecules” from natural sources or their by-products has become the most important application of the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE process. In this context, the present research had two main objectives: (i to verify the effectiveness of a two-step SFE process (namely, a preliminary Sc-CO2 extraction of carotenoids followed by the recovery of polyphenols by ethanol coupled with Sc-CO2 in order to obtain bioactive extracts from two widespread different matrices (chili pepper and tomato by-products, and (ii to test the validity of the mathematical model proposed to describe the kinetics of SFE of carotenoids from different matrices, the knowledge of which is required also for the definition of the role played in the extraction process by the characteristics of the sample matrix. On the basis of the results obtained, it was possible to introduce a simplified kinetic model that was able to describe the time evolution of the extraction of bioactive compounds (mainly carotenoids and phenols from different substrates. In particular, while both chili pepper and tomato were confirmed to be good sources of bioactive antioxidant compounds, the extraction process from chili pepper was faster than from tomato under identical operating conditions.

  8. 24 CFR 202.12 - Title II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INSTITUTIONS AND MORTGAGEES Title I and Title II Specific Requirements § 202.12 Title II. (a) Tiered pricing—(1... rate up to two percentage points under the mortgagee's customary lending practices must be based on... after accounting for the value of servicing rights generated by making the loan and other income to the...

  9. Are Shorter Article Titles More Attractive for Citations? Cross-sectional Study of 22 Scientific Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibzadeh, Farrokh; Yadollahie, Mahboobeh

    2010-01-01

    Aim To investigate the correlation between the length of the title of a scientific article and the number of citations it receives, in view of the common editorial call for shorter titles. Methods Title and the number of citations to all articles published in 2005 in 22 arbitrarily chosen English-language journals (n = 9031) were retrieved from citation database Scopus. The 2008 journal impact factors of these 22 journals were also retrieved from Thomson Reuters’ Journal Citation Report (JCR). Assuming the article title length as the independent variable, and the number of citations to the article as the dependent variable, a linear regression model was applied. Results The slope of the regression line for some journals (n = 6, when titles were measured in characters but 7 when titles were measured in words) was negative – none was significantly different from 0. The overall slope for all journals was 0.140 (when titles were measured in characters) and 0.778 (when titles were measured in words), significantly different from 0 (P articles with longer titles received more citations – Spearman ρ = 0.266 – when titles were measured in characters, and ρ = 0.244 when titles were measured in words (P 10 and for 2 out of 14 journals with impact factor <10 (P < 0.001, Fisher exact test). Conclusion Longer titles seem to be associated with higher citation rates. This association is more pronounced for journals with high impact factors. Editors who insist on brief and concise titles should perhaps update the guidelines for authors of their journals and have more flexibility regarding the length of the title. PMID:20401960

  10. 42 CFR 476.86 - Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions. 476.86 Section 476.86 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...) Qio Review Functions § 476.86 Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions. (a...

  11. The effects of different heat treatment annealing on structural properties of LaFe11.5Si1.5 compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norizan, Yang Nurhidayah Asnida; Din, Muhammad Faiz Md; Zamri, Wan Fathul Hakim W.; Hashim, Fakroul Ridzuan; Jusoh, Mohd Taufik; Rahman, Mohd Rashid Abdul

    2018-02-01

    The cubic NaZn13-type LaFe13-xSix based compounds have been studied systematically and has become one of the most interesting systems for exploring large MCE. Its magnetic properties are strongly doping dependent and provides many of advantage compare to other as magnetic materials for magnetic refrigerator application. In other to produce high quality of cubic NaZn13-type structure, the structural properties of LaFe11.5Si1.5 compounds annealed at different temperature have been investigated. The LaFe11.5Si1.5 compounds was prepared by arc melting and annealed at two different heat treatment which are 1323 K for 14 days and 1523 K for 4 hour. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that a short time and high temperature annealing process has benefits for the formation of the NaZn13-type phase compared to a long time and low temperature annealing process. This is shown by the weight fraction of cubic NaZn13- type structure increases from 80% for low temperature annealing to 83% for high temperature annealing. At the same time, high temperature annealing increase the main structure and decrease the impurity (α-Fe and LaFeSi). Furthermore, it can be clearly seen in the Rietveld refinement results that the lattice parameter is increase at the high temperature annealing because of more cubic NaZn13 is formed at higher temperature.

  12. Cultivation in space flight produces minimal alterations in the susceptibility of Bacillus subtilis cells to 72 different antibiotics and growth-inhibiting compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Michael D; Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2017-08-18

    Past results have suggested that bacterial antibiotic susceptibility is altered during space flight. To test this notion, Bacillus subtilis cells were cultivated in matched hardware, medium, and environmental conditions either in spaceflight microgravity on the International Space Station, termed Flight (FL) samples, or at Earth-normal gravity, termed Ground Control (GC) samples. Susceptibility of FL and GC samples was compared to 72 antibiotics and growth-inhibitory compounds using the Omnilog Phenotype Microarray (PM) system. Only 9 compounds were identified by PM screening as exhibiting significant differences ( P flight. Importance: This study addresses a major concern of mission planners for human spaceflight, that bacteria accompanying astronauts on long-duration missions might develop a higher level of resistance to antibiotics due to exposure to the spaceflight environment. The results of this study do not support that notion. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Rapid screening and distribution of bioactive compounds in different parts of Berberis petiolaris using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awantika Singh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Berberis petiolaris Wall. ex G. Don, an unexplored medicinal plant belonging to the family Berberidaceae, is a large deciduous shrub found in Western Himalaya between 1800–3000 m. Chemical profiling of fruit, leaf, root and stem was done by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry followed by multivariate analysis for discrimination among the plant parts. The bioactive compounds, including magnoflorine, berberine, jatrorrhizine, thalifendine/berberrubine, demethyleneberberine, reticuline, 8-oxoberberine, N-methyltetrahydroberberine, tetrahydropalmatine, tetrahydroberberine and palmatine, were identified by their exact mass measurement and the corresponding molecular formula of each compound. A comparative study of distribution pattern for all these bioactive alkaloids showed qualitative and quantitative variations in different parts of B. petiolaris. Principal component analysis clearly discriminated each part of B. petiolaris plant. Keywords: Berberis petiolaris, Alkaloids, Profiling, DART–TOF–MS, Statistical analysis

  14. Production of sensory compounds by means of the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis in different nitrogen sources with the prospect of producing cachaça.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Parente, Denise; Vidal, Esteban Espinosa; Leite, Fernanda Cristina Bezerra; de Barros Pita, Will; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The distilled spirit made from sugar cane juice, also known as cachaça, is a traditional Brazilian beverage that in recent years has increased its market share among international distilled beverages. Several volatile compounds produced by yeast cells during the fermentation process are responsible for the unique taste and aroma of this drink. The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has acquired increasing importance in the fermented beverage production, as the different metabolites produced by this yeast may be either beneficial or harmful to the end-product. Since D. bruxellensis is often found in the fermentation processes carried out in ethanol fuel distillation in Brazil, we employed this yeast to analyse the physiological profile and production of aromatic compounds and to examine whether it is feasible to regard it as a cachaça-producing microorganism. The assays were performed on a small scale and simulated the conditions for the production of handmade cachaça. The results showed that the presence of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids in the medium has a strong influence on the metabolism and production of flavours by D. bruxellensis. The assimilation of these alternative nitrogen sources led to different fermentation yields and the production of flavouring compounds. The influence of the nitrogen source on the metabolism of fusel alcohols and esters in D. bruxellensis highlights the need for further studies of the nitrogen requirements to obtain the desired level of sensory compounds in the fermentation. Our results suggest that D. bruxellensis has the potential to play a role in the production of cachaça. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Occurrence of different classes of perfluorinated compounds in Greek wastewater treatment plants and determination of their solid–water distribution coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvaniti, Olga S.; Ventouri, Elpida I.; Stasinakis, Athanasios S.; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Eighteen PFCs were determined in wastewater and sludge samples using LC–MS/MS. ► PFPeA, PFOA and PFOS were the dominating compounds in both WWTPs. ► No significant decrease or even increase of most PFCs was noticed in effluents. ► Distribution coefficients of PFCs were calculated for different types of sludge. ► Sorption potential was affected by the target compound and the type of sludge. - Abstract: The concentrations of eighteen perfluorinated compounds (PFCs: C5–C14 carboxylates, C4, C6–C8 and C10 sulfonates and 3 sulfonamides) were determined in wastewater and sludge samples originating from two different wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The analytes were extracted by solid phase extraction (dissolved phase) or sonication followed by solid phase extraction (solid phase). Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed by LC–MS/MS. According to the results, perfluoropentanoic acid (PFPeA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) were dominant in wastewater and sludge samples from both plants. The average concentrations in the raw and treated wastewater ranged up to 75.7 ng L −1 (perfluorotridecanoic acid, PFTrDA) and 76.0 ng L −1 (PFPeA), respectively. Concentrations of most PFCs were higher in effluents than in influents, indicating their formation during wastewater treatment processes. In sewage sludge, the average concentrations ranged up to 6.7 ng g −1 dry weight (PFOS). No significant seasonal variations in PFCs concentrations were observed, while higher concentrations of PFOA, PFOS and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) were determined in the WWTP receiving municipal and industrial wastewater. Significantly different distribution coefficient (K d ) values were determined for different PFCs and different type of sludge, ranging between 169 L kg −1 (PFHxS) to 12,922 L kg −1 (PFDA).

  16. Determination of Partition coefficients for a Mixture of Volatile Organic Compounds in Rats and Humans at Different Life Stages

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahle, Deidre A; Gearhart, Jeffrey M; Godfrey, Richard J; Mattie, David R; Cook, Robert S; Grisby, Claude C

    2004-01-01

    .... Partition coefficients (PCs) are an integral component of pharmacokinetic models and determining differences in tissue partitioning of volatile organic chemicals across life stages can help reduce the uncertainty in risk assessment...

  17. GC–MS analysis of bioactive compounds present in different extracts of an endemic plant Broussonetia luzonica (Blanco) (Moraceae) leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Franelyne Pataueg Casuga; Agnes Llamasares Castillo; Mary Jho-Anne Tolentino Corpuz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and characterize the chemical composition of the different crude extracts from the leaves of Broussonetia luzonica (Blanco) (Moraceae) (B. luzonica), an endemic plant in the Philippines. Methods: The air dried leaves were powdered and subjected to selective sequential extraction using solvents of increasing polarity through percolation, namely, n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol to obtain three different extracts. Then, each of the extracts was further subjected...

  18. Ce3+ 5d-centroid shift and vacuum referred 4f-electron binding energies of all lanthanide impurities in 150 different compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorenbos, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    A review on the wavelengths of all five 4f–5d transitions for Ce 3+ in about 150 different inorganic compounds (fluorides, chlorides, bromides, iodides, oxides, sulfides, selenides, nitrides) is presented. It provides data on the centroid shift and the crystal field splitting of the 5d-configuration which are then used to estimate the Eu 2+ inter 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy U(6,A) in compound A. The four semi-empirical models (the redshift model, the centroid shift model, the charge transfer model, and the chemical shift model) on lanthanide levels that were developed past 12 years are briefly reviewed. It will be demonstrated how those models together with the collected data of this work and elsewhere can be united to construct schemes that contain the binding energy of electrons in the 4f and 5d states for each divalent and each trivalent lanthanide ion relative to the vacuum energy. As example the vacuum referred binding energy schemes for LaF 3 and La 2 O 3 will be constructed. - Highlights: ► An compilation on all five Ce 3+ 4f–5d energies in 150 inorganic compounds is presented. ► The relationship between the 5d centroid shift and host cation electronegativity id demonstrated. ► The electronic structure scheme of the lanthanides in La 2 O 3 and LaF 3 is presented.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Phenolic Compound Characterization and Their Biosynthesis Genes between Two Diverse Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Varieties Differing for Chapatti (Unleavened Flat Bread) Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monica; Sandhir, Rajat; Singh, Anuradha; Kumar, Pankaj; Mishra, Ankita; Jachak, Sanjay; Singh, Sukhvinder P; Singh, Jagdeep; Roy, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic compounds (PCs) affect the bread quality and can also affect the other types of end-use food products such as chapatti (unleavened flat bread), now globally recognized wheat-based food product. The detailed analysis of PCs and their biosynthesis genes in diverse bread wheat ( Triticum aestivum ) varieties differing for chapatti quality have not been studied. In this study, the identification and quantification of PCs using UPLC-QTOF-MS and/or MS/MS and functional genomics techniques such as microarrays and qRT-PCR of their biosynthesis genes have been studied in a good chapatti variety, "C 306" and a poor chapatti variety, "Sonalika." About 80% (69/87) of plant phenolic compounds were tentatively identified in these varieties. Nine PCs (hinokinin, coutaric acid, fertaric acid, p-coumaroylqunic acid, kaempferide, isorhamnetin, epigallocatechin gallate, methyl isoorientin-2'-O-rhamnoside, and cyanidin-3-rutinoside) were identified only in the good chapatti variety and four PCs (tricin, apigenindin, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, and myricetin-3-glucoside) in the poor chapatti variety. Therefore, about 20% of the identified PCs are unique to each other and may be "variety or genotype" specific PCs. Fourteen PCs used for quantification showed high variation between the varieties. The microarray data of 44 phenolic compound biosynthesis genes and 17 of them on qRT-PCR showed variation in expression level during seed development and majority of them showed low expression in the good chapatti variety. The expression pattern in the good chapatti variety was largely in agreement with that of phenolic compounds. The level of variation of 12 genes was high between the good and poor chapatti quality varieties and has potential in development of markers. The information generated in this study can be extended onto a larger germplasm set for development of molecular markers using QTL and/or association mapping approaches for their application in wheat breeding.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Phenolic Compound Characterization and Their Biosynthesis Genes between Two Diverse Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Varieties Differing for Chapatti (Unleavened Flat Bread) Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monica; Sandhir, Rajat; Singh, Anuradha; Kumar, Pankaj; Mishra, Ankita; Jachak, Sanjay; Singh, Sukhvinder P.; Singh, Jagdeep; Roy, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic compounds (PCs) affect the bread quality and can also affect the other types of end-use food products such as chapatti (unleavened flat bread), now globally recognized wheat-based food product. The detailed analysis of PCs and their biosynthesis genes in diverse bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) varieties differing for chapatti quality have not been studied. In this study, the identification and quantification of PCs using UPLC-QTOF-MS and/or MS/MS and functional genomics techniques such as microarrays and qRT-PCR of their biosynthesis genes have been studied in a good chapatti variety, “C 306” and a poor chapatti variety, “Sonalika.” About 80% (69/87) of plant phenolic compounds were tentatively identified in these varieties. Nine PCs (hinokinin, coutaric acid, fertaric acid, p-coumaroylqunic acid, kaempferide, isorhamnetin, epigallocatechin gallate, methyl isoorientin-2′-O-rhamnoside, and cyanidin-3-rutinoside) were identified only in the good chapatti variety and four PCs (tricin, apigenindin, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, and myricetin-3-glucoside) in the poor chapatti variety. Therefore, about 20% of the identified PCs are unique to each other and may be “variety or genotype” specific PCs. Fourteen PCs used for quantification showed high variation between the varieties. The microarray data of 44 phenolic compound biosynthesis genes and 17 of them on qRT-PCR showed variation in expression level during seed development and majority of them showed low expression in the good chapatti variety. The expression pattern in the good chapatti variety was largely in agreement with that of phenolic compounds. The level of variation of 12 genes was high between the good and poor chapatti quality varieties and has potential in development of markers. The information generated in this study can be extended onto a larger germplasm set for development of molecular markers using QTL and/or association mapping approaches for their application in wheat breeding

  1. Synergistic interactions between phenolic compounds identified in grape pomace extract with antibiotics of different classes against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, Loreto; Melo, Ricardo; Montero, Ruth; Maisey, Kevin; Mendoza, Leonora; Wilkens, Marcela

    2017-01-01

    Synergy could be an effective strategy to potentiate and recover antibiotics nowadays useless in clinical treatments against multi-resistant bacteria. In this study, synergic interactions between antibiotics and grape pomace extract that contains high concentration of phenolic compounds were evaluated by the checkerboard method in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. To define which component of the extract is responsible for the synergic effect, phenolic compounds were identified by RP-HPLC and their relative abundance was determined. Combinations of extract with pure compounds identified there in were also evaluated. Results showed that the grape pomace extract combined with representatives of different classes of antibiotics as β-lactam, quinolone, fluoroquinolone, tetracycline and amphenicol act in synergy in all S. aureus and E. coli strains tested with FICI values varying from 0.031 to 0.155. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was reduced 4 to 75 times. The most abundant phenolic compounds identified in the extract were quercetin, gallic acid, protocatechuic acid and luteolin with relative abundance of 26.3, 24.4, 16.7 and 11.4%, respectively. All combinations of the extract with the components also showed synergy with FICI values varying from 0.031 to 0.5 and MIC reductions of 4 to 125 times with both bacteria strains. The relative abundance of phenolic compounds has no correlation with the obtained synergic effect, suggesting that the mechanism by which the synergic effect occurs is by a multi-objective action. It was also shown that combinations of grape pomace extract with antibiotics are not toxic for the HeLa cell line at concentrations in which the synergistic effect was observed (47 μg/mL of extract and 0.6-375 μg/mL antibiotics). Therefore, these combinations are good candidates for testing in animal models in order to enhance the effect of antibiotics of different classes and thus restore the currently unused

  2. Effect of different uranium compounds on the properties of U-Pt-Y-Ba-O double-perovskite pinning centres in textured Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Gandini, Alberto [Beam Particle Dynamics Laboratories, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2005-02-01

    An experiment was performed to test the effect of different uranium compounds on the properties of chemical pinning centres. UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 3}, and UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O wereadmixed to Y 123+Pt, and textured. Tests of J{sub c} via measurements of trapped field (B{sub trap}) indicate a clear dependence of B{sub trap} on the U compound admixed to create the pinning centres. In all three cases there is a monotonic increase in B{sub trap} as the mass (M{sub U}) of U is increased. However, the magnitude of the increase in B{sub trap} depends on the admixed U compound. The highest increase in B{sub trap} is measured in samples doped with UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, and the lowest is obtained in samples doped with UO{sub 2}. Microstructure studies indicate that the composition of the U-rich pinning deposits is the same in all three cases, i.e. all are the previously identified (U{sub 0.6}Pt{sub 0.4})Y Ba{sub 2}O{sub 6} compound. The primary difference among the three types of samples is that the size of the U-Pt-Y-Ba-O pinning deposits depends on the admixed U compound. While all are in the nanometre domain, the diameter of these deposits was markedly larger in UO{sub 2} doped samples than in UO{sub 3} doped samples, and smallest in UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O doped samples. Because some form of poisoning limits the amount of U that can be added to create pinning centres, to M{sub U} {approx}1 wt%, smaller deposits result in a greater number of pinning centres. We conclude that UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O is more effective than either UO{sub 3} or UO{sub 2} in the formation of U-Pt-Y-Ba-O pinning centres because of diminished pinning centre size, and consequent increase in pinning centre density.

  3. Synergistic interactions between phenolic compounds identified in grape pomace extract with antibiotics of different classes against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Sanhueza

    Full Text Available Synergy could be an effective strategy to potentiate and recover antibiotics nowadays useless in clinical treatments against multi-resistant bacteria. In this study, synergic interactions between antibiotics and grape pomace extract that contains high concentration of phenolic compounds were evaluated by the checkerboard method in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. To define which component of the extract is responsible for the synergic effect, phenolic compounds were identified by RP-HPLC and their relative abundance was determined. Combinations of extract with pure compounds identified there in were also evaluated. Results showed that the grape pomace extract combined with representatives of different classes of antibiotics as β-lactam, quinolone, fluoroquinolone, tetracycline and amphenicol act in synergy in all S. aureus and E. coli strains tested with FICI values varying from 0.031 to 0.155. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC was reduced 4 to 75 times. The most abundant phenolic compounds identified in the extract were quercetin, gallic acid, protocatechuic acid and luteolin with relative abundance of 26.3, 24.4, 16.7 and 11.4%, respectively. All combinations of the extract with the components also showed synergy with FICI values varying from 0.031 to 0.5 and MIC reductions of 4 to 125 times with both bacteria strains. The relative abundance of phenolic compounds has no correlation with the obtained synergic effect, suggesting that the mechanism by which the synergic effect occurs is by a multi-objective action. It was also shown that combinations of grape pomace extract with antibiotics are not toxic for the HeLa cell line at concentrations in which the synergistic effect was observed (47 μg/mL of extract and 0.6-375 μg/mL antibiotics. Therefore, these combinations are good candidates for testing in animal models in order to enhance the effect of antibiotics of different classes and thus restore the

  4. Real-Time Measurements of Gas/Particle Partitioning of Semivolatile Organic Compounds into Different Probe Particles in a Teflon Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Day, D. A.; Ziemann, P. J.; Krechmer, J. E.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    The partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) into and out of particles plays an essential role in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and evolution. Most atmospheric models treat the gas/particle partitioning as an equilibrium between bulk gas and particle phases, despite potential kinetic limitations and differences in thermodynamics as a function of SOA and pre-existing OA composition. This study directly measures the partitioning of oxidized compounds in a Teflon chamber in the presence of single component seeds of different phases and polarities, including oleic acid, squalane, dioctyl sebacate, pentaethylene glycol, dry/wet ammonium sulfate, and dry/wet sucrose. The oxidized compounds are generated by a fast OH oxidation of a series of alkanols under high nitric oxide conditions. The observed SOA mass enhancements are highest with oleic acid, and lowest with wet ammonium sulfate and sucrose. A chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) was used to measure the decay of gas-phase organic nitrates, which reflects uptake by particles and chamber walls. We observed clear changes in equilibrium timescales with varying seed concentrations and in equilibrium gas-phase concentrations across different seeds. In general, the gas evolution can be reproduced by a kinetic box model that considers partitioning and evaporation with particles and chamber walls, except for the wet sucrose system. The accommodation coefficient and saturation mass concentration of each species in the presence of each seed are derived using the model. The changes in particle size distributions and composition monitored by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) are investigated to probe the SOA formation mechanism. Based on these results, the applicability of partitioning theory to these systems and the relevant quantitative parameters, including the dependencies on seed particle composition, will

  5. Attractiveness of volatiles from different body parts to the malaria mosquito Anopheles coluzzii is affected by deodorant compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, Niels O.; Weldegergis, Berhane T.; Menger, David; Takken, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes display biting preferences among different sites of the human body. In addition to height or convection currents, body odour may play a role in the selection of these biting sites. Previous studies have shown that skin emanations are important host-finding cues for mosquitoes. In this

  6. INIS: Authority list for journal titles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    This is the twenty-ninth revision of the INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles (IAEA-INIS-11). It lists the titles of 12 990 journals which have contained articles within the scope of INIS. The purpose of this report is to provide descriptive cataloguers with a standard entry for the full title of a journal. In addition to the full journal title, the ISSN (International Standard Serial Number), administered by the ISSN International Centre, Paris, France, and/or CODEN, assigned by Chemical Abstracts Service, USA, are given in this manual. In order to help the reader to find titles easily, the list is divided into two parts. In Part I, the full journal titles are grouped by country or international organization responsible for coverage and ordered alphabetically. In Part II, the full journal titles of all countries or international organizations are arranged alphabetically. The country name or the international organization name responsible for coverage of the journal title to INIS is entered in parentheses. Journal titles marked with an asterisk are regularly scanned by INIS. Titles that have been identified by INIS Centres as 'Key Journals' are marked with the hash sign.

  7. INIS: Authority list for journal titles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This is the twenty-ninth revision of the INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles (IAEA-INIS-11). It lists the titles of 12 990 journals which have contained articles within the scope of INIS. The purpose of this report is to provide descriptive cataloguers with a standard entry for the full title of a journal. In addition to the full journal title, the ISSN (International Standard Serial Number), administered by the ISSN International Centre, Paris, France, and/or CODEN, assigned by Chemical Abstracts Service, USA, are given in this manual. In order to help the reader to find titles easily, the list is divided into two parts. In Part I, the full journal titles are grouped by country or international organization responsible for coverage and ordered alphabetically. In Part II, the full journal titles of all countries or international organizations are arranged alphabetically. The country name or the international organization name responsible for coverage of the journal title to INIS is entered in parentheses. Journal titles marked with an asterisk are regularly scanned by INIS. Titles that have been identified by INIS Centres as 'Key Journals' are marked with the hash sign

  8. Land Titles and Rice Production in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Broeck, Katleen; Newman, Carol; Tarp, Finn

    In most of the empirical literature on land titling, the household is regarded as unitary, and land rights are found to have ambiguous effects on land allocation, investment and productivity. Using data from 12 provinces in Vietnam, we diversify land titles, and show in a household fixed effects...... analysis of plot level rice yields that land titles are indeed important. Only exclusively held titles have the expected positive effects, and the positive effect on yields is found in male headed households. Furthermore, a household level rice yield function reveals that exclusive user rights...... are inefficiency decreasing, while jointly held user rights have no efficiency effects. Finally, once the gender of the head of household is controlled for, exclusively held female titles have a greater positive effect on the efficiency of the household than that of male held titles...

  9. A yearly spraying of olive mill wastewater on agricultural soil over six successive years: impact of different application rates on olive production, phenolic compounds, phytotoxicity and microbial counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdich, Salwa; Jarboui, Raja; Rouina, Béchir Ben; Boukhris, Makki; Ammar, Emna

    2012-07-15

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) spraying effects onto olive-tree fields were investigated. Three OMW levels (50, 100 and 200 m(3)ha(-1)year(-1)) were applied over six successive years. Olive-crop yields, phenolic compounds progress, phytotoxicity and microbial counts were studied at different soil depths. Olive yield showed improvements with OMW level applied. Soil polyphenolic content increased progressively in relation to OMW levels in all the investigated layers. However, no significant difference was noted in lowest treatment rate compared to the control field. In the soil upper-layers (0-40 cm), five phenolic compounds were identified over six consecutive years of OMW-spraying. In all the soil-layers, the radish germination index exceeded 85%. However, tomato germination test values decreased with the applied OMW amount. For all treatments, microbial counts increased with OMW quantities and spraying frequency. Matrix correlation showed a strong relationship between soil polyphenol content and microorganisms, and a negative one to tomato germination index. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 24 CFR 200.61 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Commissioner. (c) Endorsement of the credit instrument for insurance shall evidence the acceptability of title... GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application, Commitment, and Endorsement Generally...

  11. Crystal Structure and Magnetic Behavior of Two New Dinuclear Carbonato-Bridged Copper(II) Compounds. Superexchange Pathway for the Different Coordination Modes of the Carbonato Bridge in Polynuclear Copper(II) Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuer, Albert; Mautner, Franz A.; Peñalba, Evaristo; Vicente, Ramon

    1998-08-24

    Four new &mgr;-CO(3)(2-) copper(II) complexes with different coordination modes for the carbonato bridge have been obtained by fixation of atmospheric CO(2): {(&mgr;(3)-CO(3))[Cu(3)(ClO(4))(3)(Et(3)dien)(3)]}(ClO(4)) (1), Et(3)dien = N,N',N"-triethylbis(2-aminoethane)amine; {(&mgr;-CO(3))[Cu(2)(H(2)O)(Et(4)dien)(2)]}(ClO(4))(2).H(2)O (2), Et(4)dien = N,N,N",N"-tetraethyl-bis(2-aminoethane)amine; {(&mgr;-CO(3))[Cu(2)(H(2)O)(2)(EtMe(4)dien)(2)]} (ClO(4))(2).2H(2)O (3), EtMe(4)dien = N'-ethyl-N,N,N",N"-tetramethylbis(2-aminoethane)amine; and {(&mgr;-CO(3))[Cu(2)(H(2)O)(Me(5)dien)(2)]}(ClO(4))(2).H(2)O (4), Me(5)dien = N,N,N',N",N"-pentamethylbis(2-aminoethane)amine. The crystal structures have been solved for 2, monoclinic system, space group P2(1)/n, formula [C(25)H(62)Cl(2)Cu(2)N(6)O(13)] with a = 12.763(6) Å, b = 25.125(8) Å, c = 13.261(4) Å, beta = 111.85(3) degrees, Z = 4, and for 3, triclinic system, space group P&onemacr;, formula [C(21)H(58)Cl(2)Cu(2)N(6)O(15)] with a = 8.412(3) Å, b = 14.667(4) Å, c = 16.555(5) Å, alpha = 99.66(2) degrees, beta = 102.14(2) degrees, gamma = 104.72(2) degrees, Z = 2. Susceptibility measurements show ferromagnetic behavior (J = +6.7(6) cm(-)(1)) for the trinuclear compound 1 whereas 2-4 are antiferromagnetically coupled with J = -17.8(8), -125.5(9), and -21.2(3) cm(-)(1) respectively. Certain synthetic aspects that may be related to the nuclearity of the copper(II) &mgr;-CO(3)(2-) compounds and the superexchange pathway for the different coordination modes of the carbonato bridge are discussed.

  12. [Effect of different soil types on the remediation of copper-pyrene compound contaminated soils by EK-oxidation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guang-Ping; Cang, Long; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Zhou, Li-Xiang

    2011-11-01

    The effect of different soil types (red soil,yellow-brown soil and black soil) on the electrokinetic (EK)-oxidation remediation of heavy metals-organic pollutant contaminated soil was studied in laboratory-scale experiments. Copper and pyrene were chosen as model pollutant, and 12% H2O2, 10% hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and 0.01 mol x L(-1) NaNO3 solution were added into the anode and cathode cell. The applied voltage was 1 V x cm(-1). After 15 days of EK remediation, the removal rate of pyrene and copper in red soil, yellow-brown soil and black soil were 38.5%, 46.8%, 51.3% for pyrene and 85.0%, 22.6%, 24.1% for Cu, respectively. The high pH of black soil produced high electroosmotic flow and increased the exposure of oxidants and pollutants, meanwhile the low clay content was also conducive to the desorption of pyrene. The low pH and organic matter of red soil affected the chemical species distribution of Cu and increased its removal rate. It is concluded that soil pH, clay content and heavy metal speciation in soil are the dominant factors affecting the migration and removal efficiency of pollutants.

  13. Spot quantification in two dimensional gel electrophoresis image analysis: comparison of different approaches and presentation of a novel compound fitting algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Various computer-based methods exist for the detection and quantification of protein spots in two dimensional gel electrophoresis images. Area-based methods are commonly used for spot quantification: an area is assigned to each spot and the sum of the pixel intensities in that area, the so-called volume, is used a measure for spot signal. Other methods use the optical density, i.e. the intensity of the most intense pixel of a spot, or calculate the volume from the parameters of a fitted function. Results In this study we compare the performance of different spot quantification methods using synthetic and real data. We propose a ready-to-use algorithm for spot detection and quantification that uses fitting of two dimensional Gaussian function curves for the extraction of data from two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) images. The algorithm implements fitting using logical compounds and is computationally efficient. The applicability of the compound fitting algorithm was evaluated for various simulated data and compared with other quantification approaches. We provide evidence that even if an incorrect bell-shaped function is used, the fitting method is superior to other approaches, especially when spots overlap. Finally, we validated the method with experimental data of urea-based 2-DE of Aβ peptides andre-analyzed published data sets. Our methods showed higher precision and accuracy than other approaches when applied to exposure time series and standard gels. Conclusion Compound fitting as a quantification method for 2-DE spots shows several advantages over other approaches and could be combined with various spot detection methods. The algorithm was scripted in MATLAB (Mathworks) and is available as a supplemental file. PMID:24915860

  14. Effect of terroir on the phenolic compounds of Muscat of Bornova Wines from 3 different sub-regions of Aegean, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaoğlan Selin N. Yabaci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the phenolic compounds of wines from Muscat of Bornova, a native aromatic white grape variety (Vitis vinifera grown in the Aegean region of Turkey and the influence of terroir (Menderes, Halilbeyli and Kemaliye sub- regions on these compounds were investigated. From Muscat of Bornova growing sub regions, Menderes/İzmir has a typical Mediterranean climate at around 90 m altitude which is located Eagean cost area with a fertile sandy-loamy soil; Halilbeyli/İzmir sub-region is located in inner İzmir, close to Manisa with 115 m altitude with same soil structure of Menderes. Kemaliye/Manisa has a transition climate between Mediterranean and continental climate at about 245 m altitude. Its soil is pale with a distinct amount of lime (∼30% and sandy-loamy, as well. High performance liquid chromatography-diode array dedector (HPLC-DAD and mass spectrometry (MS were used for the phenolic compounds analysis. Four flavanols, eight phenolic acids and a flavonol were identified and quantified. It was observed that the total phenolic content in the Halilbeyli sub-region was the highest, fol- lowed by the Menderes and Kemaliye sub-regions. Procyanidin B4 was the most abundant flavanol and quercetin-3-O-glucoside was the only flavonol identified in all regions’ wines. Sensory analysis was also used to investigate the influences of terroir. Statistically significant (0.05 regional differences were observed. Based upon sensory analysis, the wine obtained from Halilbeyli was darker in color, and had more astringency and bitterness than the others, and was the least popular wine. Kemaliye and Menderes were both preferred due to their better coloring, flavour, less astringency and bitterness attributes.

  15. Electrochemical studies, in-situ and ex-situ characterizations of different manganese compounds electrodeposited in aerated solutions; Etudes electrochimiques, suivis in-situ et caracterisations ex-situ de divers composes de manganese electrodeposes dans des solutions aerees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peulon, S.; Lacroix, A.; Chausse, A. [Univ. d' Evry-val-d' Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation pour la Biologie et l' Environnement (LAMBE CNRS UMR 8587), 91 - Evry (France); Larabi-Gruet, N. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DPC/SECR/L3MR), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    This work deals with the electrodeposition of manganese compounds. A systematic study of the synthesis experimental conditions has been carried out, and the obtained depositions have been characterized by different ex-situ analyses methods (XRD, FTIR, SEM). The in-situ measurements of mass increase with a quartz microbalance during the syntheses have allowed to estimate the growth mechanisms which are in agreement with the ex-situ characterizations. The cation has an important role in the nature of the electrodeposited compounds. In presence of sodium, a mixed lamellar compound Mn(III)/Mn(IV), the birnessite, is deposited, whereas in presence of potassium, bixbyite is formed (Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}), these two compounds having a main role in the environment. The substrate can also influence the nature of the formed intermediary compounds. Little studied compounds such as feitkneichtite ({beta}-MnOOH) and groutite ({alpha}-MnOOH) have been revealed. (O.M.)

  16. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emission of Scots pine under drought stress - a 13CO2 labeling study to determine de novo and pool emissions under different treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüpke, M.

    2015-12-01

    Plants emit biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to e.g. communicate and to defend herbivores. Yet BVOCs also impact atmospheric chemistry processes, and lead to e.g. the built up of secondary organic aerosols. Abiotic stresses, such as drought, however highly influence plant physiology and subsequently BVOCs emission rates. In this study, we investigated the effect of drought stress on BVOCs emission rates of Scots pine trees, a de novo and pool emitter, under controlled climate chamber conditions within a dynamic enclosure system consisting of four plant chambers. Isotopic labeling with 13CO2 was used to detect which ratio of emissions of BVOCs derives from actual synthesis and from storage organs under different treatments. Additionally, the synthesis rate of the BVOCs synthesis can be determined. The experiment consisted of two campaigns (July 2015 and August 2015) of two control and two treated trees respectively in four controlled dynamic chambers simultaneously. Each campaign lasted for around 21 days and can be split into five phases: adaptation, control, dry-out, drought- and re-watering phase. The actual drought phase lasted around five days. During the campaigns two samples of BVOCs emissions were sampled per day and night on thermal desorption tubes and analyzed by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer and a flame ionization detector. Additionally, gas exchange of water and CO2, soil moisture, as well as leaf and chamber temperature was monitored continuously. 13CO2 labeling was performed simultaneously in all chambers during the phases control, drought and re-watering for five hours respectively. During the 13CO2 labeling four BVOCs emission samples per chamber were taken to identify the labeling rate on emitted BVOCs. First results show a decrease of BVOCs emissions during the drought phase and a recovery of emission after re-watering, as well as different strength of reduction of single compounds. The degree of labeling with 13

  17. Getting to one from title 10 + title 32 unity of effort in the homeland

    OpenAIRE

    Prosch, Caroline Ross.

    2011-01-01

    CHDS State/Local Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis bridges the knowledge gap between Title 10 Active Duty and Title 32 National Guard in order to breakdown cultural barriers and reach unity of effort for response operations in the homeland. Regrettably, a unified response was missing among Title 10 Active Duty and Title 32 National Guard members following Hurricane Katrina. Since then, initiatives based in doctrine, statutes and formal recommendations...

  18. Antioxidant activity of leaf extracts from different Hibiscus sabdariffa accessions and simultaneous determination five major antioxidant compounds by LC-Q-TOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Cao, Xianshuang; Jiang, Hao; Qi, Yadong; Chin, Kit L; Yue, Yongde

    2014-12-17

    Hibiscus sabdariffa has gained attention for its antioxidant activity. There are many accessions of H. sabdariffa in the world. However, information on the quantification of antioxidant compounds in different accessions is rather limited. In this paper, a liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) method for simultaneous determination of five antioxidant compounds (neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid, rutin, and isoquercitrin) in H. sabdariffa leaves was developed. The method was validated for linearity, sensitivity, precision, repeatability and accuracy. The validated method has been successfully applied for determination of the five analytes in eight accessions of H. sabdariffa. The eight accessions of H. sabdariffa were evaluated for their antioxidant activities by DPPH free radical scavenging assay. The investigated accessions of H. sabdariffa were rich in rutin and exhibited strong antioxidant activity. The two accessions showing the highest antioxidant activities were from Cuba (No. 2) and Taiwan (No. 5). The results indicated that H. sabdariffa leaves could be considered as a potential antioxidant source for the food industry. The developed LC-Q-TOF-MS method is helpful for quality control of H. sabdariffa.

  19. A Novel Natural Product-Derived Compound, Vestaine A1, Exerts both Pro-Angiogenic and Anti-Permeability Activity via a Different Pathway from VEGF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Ishimoto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a key molecule in the regulation of both angiogenesis and vascular permeability. However, it is known that overproduction of VEGF induces abnormal blood vessel formation and these vessels cause several disease pathologies, such as diabetic retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to find novel vasoactive compounds which have different properties from VEGF. Methods/Results: We screened a natural product library using a co-culture angiogenic assay of endothelial cells and fibroblasts. By focusing on morphological changes of endothelial cells, we isolated the novel compounds vestaine A1 and vestaine B1 from the cultured broth of an actinomycete strain, Streptomyces sp. SANK 63697. Vestaine A1 enhanced tube formation of endothelial cells in Matrigel and suppressed cell death induced by serum deprivation. Vestaine A1 activated both MEK1/2 and PI-3 kinase pathways independently of the VEGF pathway in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Finally, vestaine A1 potently suppressed VEGF-induced vascular permeability both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: Vestaine A1 has the potential to exhibit both pro-angiogenic and anti-permeability properties, and would therefore be useful for therapeutic treatment for abnormal vascular permeability-related diseases.

  20. Adjusted Poverty Measures and the Distribution of Title I Aid: Does Title I Really Make the Rich States Richer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bruce D.; Taylor, Lori; Levin, Jesse; Chambers, Jay; Blankenship, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Federal and state governments in the United States make extensive use of student poverty rates in compensatory aid programs like Title I. Unfortunately, the measures of student poverty that drive funding allocations under such programs are biased because they fail to reflect geographic differences in the cost of living. In this study, we construct…

  1. Pyrene conjugation and spectroscopic analysis of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose compounds successfully demonstrated a local dielectric difference associated with in vivo anti-prion activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Teruya

    Full Text Available Our previous study on prion-infected rodents revealed that hydroxypropyl methylcellulose compounds (HPMCs with different molecular weights but similar composition and degree of substitution have different levels of long-lasting anti-prion activity. In this study, we searched these HPMCs for a parameter specifically associated with in vivo anti-prion activity by analyzing in vitro chemical properties and in vivo tissue distributions. Infrared spectroscopic and thermal analyses revealed no differences among HPMCs, whereas pyrene conjugation and spectroscopic analysis revealed that the fluorescence intensity ratio of peak III/peak I correlated with anti-prion activity. This correlation was more clearly demonstrated in the anti-prion activity of the 1-year pre-infection treatment than that of the immediate post-infection treatment. In addition, the intensity ratio of peak III/peak I negatively correlated with the macrophage uptake level of HPMCs in our previous study. However, the in vivo distribution pattern was apparently not associated with anti-prion activity and was different in the representative tissues. These findings suggest that pyrene conjugation and spectroscopic analysis are powerful methods to successfully demonstrate local dielectric differences in HPMCs and provide a feasible parameter denoting the long-lasting anti-prion activity of HPMCs in vivo.

  2. How property title impacts urban consolidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Easthope, Hazel; Warnken, Jan; Sherry, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Continuing urbanisation is triggering an increase in multi-titled housing internationally. This trend has given rise to a substantial research interest in the social consequences of higher density living. Little enquiry, however, has been directed to examining how property title subdivisions gene...

  3. 31 CFR 505.01 - Short title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Short title. 505.01 Section 505.01 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN... CERTAIN MERCHANDISE BETWEEN FOREIGN COUNTRIES § 505.01 Short title. The regulations in this part may be...

  4. 33 CFR 401.1 - Short title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Short title. 401.1 Section 401.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations § 401.1 Short title. These regulations may be cited as the...

  5. 18 CFR 415.1 - Short title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Short title. 415.1 Section 415.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Generally § 415.1 Short title. This part shall be known...

  6. 25 CFR 151.13 - Title examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Title examination. 151.13 Section 151.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LAND ACQUISITIONS § 151.13 Title examination. If the Secretary determines that he will approve a request for the acquisition of land from...

  7. Student Achievement in Title I Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Abby T.

    2017-01-01

    This researcher seeks to answer the following question: How did two elementary Title I schools, identified as "high performing" on the first Smarter Balanced assessment, address elements of Maslow's hierarchy of needs when developing school-wide initiatives to enhance student achievement? Many students in Title I schools face barriers to…

  8. Land Titles and Rice Production in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Broeck, Katleen; Newman, Carol; Tarp, Finn

    analysis of plot level rice yields that land titles are indeed important. Only exclusively held titles have the expected positive effects, and the positive effect on yields is found in male headed households. Furthermore, a household level rice yield function reveals that exclusive user rights...

  9. 24 CFR 202.11 - Title I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... in 24 CFR 25.5. Civil money penalties may be imposed against Title I lenders and mortgagees pursuant... unacceptable risk to the Department; or (iv) Transfer of a Title I loan to a party that does not have a valid...

  10. Influence of nanoparticle addition on the formation and growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in Cu/Sn–Ag–Cu/Cu solder joint during different thermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting Tan, Ai; Wen Tan, Ai; Yusof, Farazila

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposite lead-free solders are gaining prominence as replacements for conventional lead-free solders such as Sn–Ag–Cu solder in the electronic packaging industry. They are fabricated by adding nanoparticles such as metallic and ceramic particles into conventional lead-free solder. It is reported that the addition of such nanoparticles could strengthen the solder matrix, refine the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formed and suppress the growth of IMCs when the joint is subjected to different thermal conditions such as thermal aging and thermal cycling. In this paper, we first review the fundamental studies on the formation and growth of IMCs in lead-free solder joints. Subsequently, we discuss the effect of the addition of nanoparticles on IMC formation and their growth under several thermal conditions. Finally, an outlook on the future growth of research in the fabrication of nanocomposite solder is provided. PMID:27877786

  11. Influence of nanoparticle addition on the formation and growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in Cu/Sn–Ag–Cu/Cu solder joint during different thermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting Tan, Ai; Wen Tan, Ai; Yusof, Farazila

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposite lead-free solders are gaining prominence as replacements for conventional lead-free solders such as Sn–Ag–Cu solder in the electronic packaging industry. They are fabricated by adding nanoparticles such as metallic and ceramic particles into conventional lead-free solder. It is reported that the addition of such nanoparticles could strengthen the solder matrix, refine the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formed and suppress the growth of IMCs when the joint is subjected to different thermal conditions such as thermal aging and thermal cycling. In this paper, we first review the fundamental studies on the formation and growth of IMCs in lead-free solder joints. Subsequently, we discuss the effect of the addition of nanoparticles on IMC formation and their growth under several thermal conditions. Finally, an outlook on the future growth of research in the fabrication of nanocomposite solder is provided. (review)

  12. Furanic compounds and furfural in different coffee products by headspace liquid-phase micro-extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: survey and effect of brewing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaichi, Maryam; Ghasemzadeh-Mohammadi, Vahid; Hashemi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Abdorreza

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the levels of furan, 2-methylfuran, 2,5-dimethylfuran, vinyl furan, 2-methoxymethyl-furan and furfural in different coffee products were evaluated. Simultaneous determination of these six furanic compounds was performed by a head space liquid-phase micro-extraction (HS-LPME) method. A total of 67 coffee powder samples were analysed. The effects of boiling and espresso-making procedures on the levels of furanic compounds were investigated. The results showed that different types of coffee samples contained different concentrations of furanic compounds, due to the various processing conditions such as temperature, degree of roasting and fineness of grind. Among the different coffee samples, the highest level of furan (6320 µg kg⁻¹) was detected in ground coffee, while coffee-mix samples showed the lowest furan concentration (10 µg kg⁻¹). Levels in brewed coffees indicated that, except for furfural, brewing by an espresso machine caused significant loss of furanic compounds.

  13. USE OF A MICRO TITLE PLATE DILUTION ASSAY TO MEASURE ACTIVITY OF ANTIFUNGAL COMPOUNDS AGAINST Mycosphaerella Fijiensis, MORELET. UTILIZACIÓN DE UN ENSAYO DE DILUCIÓN EN MICROPLATOS PARA MEDIR LA ACTIVIDAD ANTIFÚNGICA DE SUSTANCIAS CONTRA Mycosphaerella fijiensis, MORELET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Peláez Montoya

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Black Sigatoka, caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis is the most important disease in banana plantations. The fungus is controlled mainly by fungicide applications with an annual cost of about 350 million dollars in Latin and Central America. Due to the appearance of resistant strains and to the economical and environmental impact caused by the extensive use of fungicides, accurate methods are necessary for monitoring the fungal sensitivity to these agents. In this paper we describe the standarization of a method based on microplate dilutions that measures IC50 of different antifungal compounds against single ascospore cultures of M. fijiensis. The method was used to measure the sensitivity of 30 strains collected from different regions in Colombia against Propiconazol, Benomyl and Azoxystrobin. Used at a larger scale, this method could be useful to monitor M. fijiensis sensitivity against fungicides and to search for new compounds with activity against the fungus.La Sigatoka negra, causada por el hongo Mycosphaerella fijiensis, es la enfermedad más importante que afecta plantaciones de banano y plátano. El hongo es controlado principalmente mediante fungicidas químicos con un costo anual de cerca de 350 millones de dólares para América latina y 25 millones de dólares para Colombia. Debido al desarrollo de cepas del hongo resistentes a los fungicidas y a las consecuencias que para el medio ambiente tiene su uso intensivo, es importante el desarrollo de métodos que permitan monitorear de una manera precisa la aparición de resistencia. También es de gran utilidad disponer de un método que permita evaluar en forma sencilla la actividad de nuevas sustancias contra el hongo. En este artículo describimos la estandarización de un método basado en diluciones en microplatos que permite determinar la IC50 de diversos compuestos antifungicos contra cultivos monospóricos de M. fijiensis. Para su validación, el método fue utilizado

  14. 24 CFR 203.385 - Types of satisfactory title evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Types of satisfactory title... Title Waivers § 203.385 Types of satisfactory title evidence. The following types of title evidence shall be satisfactory to the Commissioner: (a) Fee or owner's title policy. A fee or owner's policy of...

  15. Quarterly title list for the period ending June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The title list contains: a) 17 titles and abstracts of laboratory reports, b) 36 titles of publications (32 with abstracts), c) 13 titles of articles submitted for publication (12 with abstracts), and d) 72 titles of lectures (52 with abstracts.) (GG) [de

  16. Synthesis of New Polyether Ether Ketone Derivatives with Silver Binding Site and Coordination Compounds of Their Monomers with Different Silver Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Girard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Polyether ether ketone (PEEK is a well-known polymer used for implants and devices, especially spinal ones. To overcome the biomaterial related infection risks, 4-4′-difluorobenzophenone, the famous PEEK monomer, was modified in order to introduce binding sites for silver ions, which are well known for their antimicrobial activity. The complexation of these new monomers with different silver salts was studied. Crystal structures of different intermediates were obtained with a linear coordination between two pyridine groups and the silver ions in all cases. The mechanical and thermal properties of different new polymers were characterized. The synthesized PEEKN5 polymers showed similar properties than the PEEK ones whereas the PEEKN7 polymers showed similar thermal properties but the mechanical properties are not as good as the ones of PEEK. To improve these properties, these polymers were complexed with silver nitrate in order to “cross-link” with silver ions. The presence of ionic silver in the polymer was then confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD. Finally, a silver-based antimicrobial compound was successfully coated on the surface of PEEKN5.

  17. Free and Bound Phenolic Compound Content and Antioxidant Activity of Different Cultivated Blue Highland Barley Varieties from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi-Juan; Dang, Bin; Fan, Ming-Tao

    2018-04-11

    , while chlorogenic acid, vanillic acid, ferulic acid and quercetin were the main contributors to the free radical scavenging capacity in the bound phenol extract. The study results show that the blue highland barley grains have rich phenolic compounds and high antioxidant activity, as well as significant varietal differences. The free and bound phenolic extracts in the blue hulless barley grains have an equivalent proportion in the total phenol, and co-exist in two forms. They can be used as a potential valuable source of natural antioxidants, and can aid in enhancing the development and daily consumption of foods relating to blue highland barley.

  18. Synthesis of a mixed-model stationary phase derived from glutamine for HPLC separation of structurally different biologically active compounds: HILIC and reversed-phase applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aral, Tarık; Aral, Hayriye; Ziyadanoğulları, Berrin; Ziyadanoğulları, Recep

    2015-01-01

    A novel mixed-mode stationary phase was synthesised starting from N-Boc-glutamine, aniline and spherical silica gel (4 µm, 60 Å). The prepared stationary phase was characterized by IR and elemental analysis. The new stationary phase bears an embedded amide group into phenyl ring, highly polar a terminal amide group and non-polar groups (phenyl and alkyl groups). At first, this new mixed-mode stationary phase was used for HILIC separation of four nucleotides and five nucleosides. The effects of different separation conditions, such as pH value, mobile phase and temperature, on the separation process were investigated. The optimum separation for nucleotides was achieved using HILIC isocratic elution with aqueous mobile phase and acetonitrile with 20°C column temperature. Under these conditions, the four nucleotides could be separated and detected at 265 nm within 14 min. Five nucleosides were separated under HILIC isocratic elution with aqueous mobile phase containing pH=3.25 phosphate buffer (10mM) and acetonitrile with 20°C column temperature and detected at 265 nm within 14 min. Chromatographic parameters as retention factor, selectivity, theoretical plate number and peak asymmetry factor were calculated for the effect of temperature and water content in mobile phase on the separation process. The new column was also tested for nucleotides and nucleosides mixture and six analytes were separated in 10min. The chromatographic behaviours of these polar analytes on the new mixed-model stationary phase were compared with those of HILIC columns under similar conditions. Further, phytohormones and phenolic compounds were separated in order to see influence of the new stationary phase in reverse phase conditions. Eleven plant phytohormones were separated within 13 min using RP-HPLC gradient elution with aqueous mobile phase containing pH=2.5 phosphate buffer (10mM) and acetonitrile with 20°C column temperature and detected at 230 or 278 nm. The best separation

  19. Activity artifacts in drug discovery and different facets of compound promiscuity [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4gz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Bajorath

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Compounds with apparent activity in a variety of assays might disable target proteins or produce false assay signals in the absence of specific interactions. In some instances, such effects are easy to detect, in others they are not. Observed promiscuity of compounds might be due to such non-specific assay artifacts. By contrast, promiscuity might also result from specific interactions with multiple targets. In the latter case, promiscuous compounds can be attractive candidates for certain therapeutic applications. However, compounds with artificial activity readouts are often not recognized and are further progressed, which presents a substantial problem for drug discovery. In this context, the concept of PAINS (pan-assay interference compounds should be seriously considered, which makes it possible to eliminate flawed compounds from the discovery pipeline, even if their activities appear to be sound at a first glance.

  20. INIS: Authority list for journal titles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This is the 31st revision of the INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles (IAEA-INIS-11). This list is published annually and includes the titles of all journals which have contained articles submitted to INIS at the time of publication. The current list contains 13,104 journal titles, 2,078 regularly scanned journals and 561 key journals. It was last updated in February 2005. The purpose of this report is to provide descriptive cataloguers with a standard entry for the full title of a journal. In addition to the full journal title, the ISSN (International Standard Serial Number), administered by the ISSN International Centre, Paris, France, and/or CODEN, assigned by Chemical Abstracts Service, USA, are given in this manual. In order to help the user find titles easily, the list is arranged in six parts, followed by summary statistics: In Part I, all key journals are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. In Part II, all key journals are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS is entered in parentheses within the body of the entry. In Part III, all journals that are regularly scanned by INIS Centers are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. In Part IV, all journals that are regularly scanned by INIS Centers are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS is entered in parentheses within the body of the entry. In Part V, all journals are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. In Part VI, all journals are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the

  1. INIS: Authority list for journal titles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-03-01

    This is the 31st revision of the INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles (IAEA-INIS-11). This list is published annually and includes the titles of all journals which have contained articles submitted to INIS at the time of publication. The current list contains 13,104 journal titles, 2,078 regularly scanned journals and 561 key journals. It was last updated in February 2005. The purpose of this report is to provide descriptive cataloguers with a standard entry for the full title of a journal. In addition to the full journal title, the ISSN (International Standard Serial Number), administered by the ISSN International Centre, Paris, France, and/or CODEN, assigned by Chemical Abstracts Service, USA, are given in this manual. In order to help the user find titles easily, the list is arranged in six parts, followed by summary statistics: In Part I, all key journals are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. In Part II, all key journals are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS is entered in parentheses within the body of the entry. In Part III, all journals that are regularly scanned by INIS Centers are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. In Part IV, all journals that are regularly scanned by INIS Centers are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS is entered in parentheses within the body of the entry. In Part V, all journals are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. In Part VI, all journals are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the

  2. INIS: Authority list for journal titles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This is the 32nd revision of the INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles (IAEA-INIS-11). This list is published annually and includes the titles of all journals which have contained articles submitted to INIS at the time of publication. The current list contains 13,231 journal titles, 2,125 regularly scanned journals and 555 key journals. It was last updated in February 2006. The purpose of this report is to provide descriptive cataloguers with a standard entry for the full title of a journal. In addition to the full journal title, the ISSN (International Standard Serial Number), administered by the ISSN International Centre, Paris, France, and/or CODEN, assigned by Chemical Abstracts Service, USA, are given in this manual. In order to help the user find titles easily, the list is arranged in six parts, followed by summary statistics: In Part I, all key journals are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. In Part II, all key journals are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS is entered in parentheses within the body of the entry. In Part III, all journals that are regularly scanned by INIS Centres are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. In Part IV, all journals that are regularly scanned by INIS Centres are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS is entered in parentheses within the body of the entry. In Part V, all journals are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. In Part VI, all journals are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the

  3. 20 CFR 404.535 - How much will we withhold from your title VIII and title XVI benefits to recover a title II...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How much will we withhold from your title... Officer § 404.535 How much will we withhold from your title VIII and title XVI benefits to recover a title II overpayment? (a) If past-due benefits are payable to you, we will withhold the lesser of the...

  4. Characterization of volatile organic compound adsorption on multiwall carbon nanotubes under different levels of relative humidity using linear solvation energy relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mei-syue; Wu, Siang Chen; Shih, Yang-hsin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • LSER equations successfully predicted VOC sorption on MCNT at different humidity. • The five parameters in LSER could be narrowed down to three ones. • Main interaction is dispersion and partly dipolarity as well as hydrogen-bonds. • With increasing RH, it changes to cavity formation and hydrogen-bond basicity. • This approach can facilitate the VOC control design and the fate prediction. - Abstract: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been used as an adsorbent for evaluating the gas/solid partitioning of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this study, 15 VOCs were probed to determine their gas/solid partitioning coefficient (Log K d ) using inverse gas chromatography at different relative humidity (RH) levels. Interactions between MWCNTs and VOCs were analyzed by regressing the observed Log K d with the linear solvation energy relationship (LSER). The results demonstrate that the MWCNT carbonyl and carboxyl groups provide high adsorption capacity for the VOCs (Log K d 3.72–5.24 g/kg/g/L) because of the π-/n-electron pair interactions and hydrogen-bond acidity. The increasing RH gradually decreased the Log K d and shifted the interactions to dipolarity/polarizability, hydrogen-bond basicity, and cavity formation. The derived LSER equations provided adequate fits of Log K d , which is useful for VOC-removal processes and fate prediction of VOC contaminants by MWCNT adsorption in the environment.

  5. Characterization of volatile organic compound adsorption on multiwall carbon nanotubes under different levels of relative humidity using linear solvation energy relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mei-syue; Wu, Siang Chen; Shih, Yang-hsin, E-mail: yhs@ntu.edu.tw

    2016-09-05

    Highlights: • LSER equations successfully predicted VOC sorption on MCNT at different humidity. • The five parameters in LSER could be narrowed down to three ones. • Main interaction is dispersion and partly dipolarity as well as hydrogen-bonds. • With increasing RH, it changes to cavity formation and hydrogen-bond basicity. • This approach can facilitate the VOC control design and the fate prediction. - Abstract: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been used as an adsorbent for evaluating the gas/solid partitioning of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this study, 15 VOCs were probed to determine their gas/solid partitioning coefficient (Log K{sub d}) using inverse gas chromatography at different relative humidity (RH) levels. Interactions between MWCNTs and VOCs were analyzed by regressing the observed Log K{sub d} with the linear solvation energy relationship (LSER). The results demonstrate that the MWCNT carbonyl and carboxyl groups provide high adsorption capacity for the VOCs (Log K{sub d} 3.72–5.24 g/kg/g/L) because of the π-/n-electron pair interactions and hydrogen-bond acidity. The increasing RH gradually decreased the Log K{sub d} and shifted the interactions to dipolarity/polarizability, hydrogen-bond basicity, and cavity formation. The derived LSER equations provided adequate fits of Log K{sub d}, which is useful for VOC-removal processes and fate prediction of VOC contaminants by MWCNT adsorption in the environment.

  6. Influence of pre-fermentation cold maceration treatment on aroma compounds of Cabernet Sauvignon wines fermented in different industrial scale fermenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jian; Zhu, Bao-Qing; Wang, Yun-He; Lu, Lin; Lan, Yi-Bin; Reeves, Malcolm J; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2014-07-01

    The influence of pre-fermentation cold maceration (CM) on Cabernet Sauvignon wines fermented in two different industrial-scale fermenters was studied. CM treatment had different effects on wine aroma depending on the types of fermenter, being more effective for automatic pumping-over tank (PO-tank) than automatic punching-down tank (PD-tank). When PO-tank was used, CM-treated wine showed a decrease in some fusel alcohols (isobutanol and isopentanol) and an increase in some esters (especially acetate esters). However, no significant changes were detected in these compounds when PD-tank was used. Ethyl 2-hexenoate and diethyl succinate were decreased, while geranylacetone was increased by the CM treatment in both fermenters. β-Damascenone was increased by the CM treatment in PO-tank fermented wines but decreased in PD-tank fermented wines. The fruity, caramel and floral aroma series were enhanced while chemical series were decreased by the CM treatment in PO-tank fermented wines. The content of (Z)-6-nonen-1-ol in the final wines was positively correlated to CM treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Linear and mass attenuation coefficient for CdTe compound of X-rays from 10 to 100 keV energy range in different phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saim, A., E-mail: saim1989asma@gmail.com; Tebboune, A.; Berkok, H.; Belameiri, N.; Belbachir, A.H.

    2014-07-25

    The Full Potential Linear Muffin Tin Orbitals method within the density functional theory has been utilized to calculate structural and electronic properties of the CdTe compound. We have checked that the CdTe has two phase-transitions from zinc-blend to cinnabar and from cinnabar to rocksalt. We have found that the rigidity, the energy and the nature of the gap change according to the phase change, so we can predict that a CdTe detector may have different behaviors in different phase conditions. In order to investigate this behavior change, the linear and the mass attenuation coefficients of X-ray in rocksalt, zinc-blend and cinnabar structures are calculated from 10 keV to100 keV, using the XCOM data. We have found that when CdTe undergoes a phase transition from zinc-blend to cinnabar, its linear attenuation coefficient decreases down to a value of about 100 times smaller than its initial one, and when it undergoes a transition from cinnabar to rocksalt it increases up to a value about 90 times larger than its initial one.

  8. Organolanthanoid compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Up to little more than a decade ago organolanthanoid compounds were still a curiosity. Apart from the description of an isolated number of cyclopentadienyl and indenyl derivatives, very few significant contributions had been made to this interesting sector of organometallic chemistry. However, subsequent systematic studies using modern preparative and analytical techniques, together with X-ray single crystal structure determinations, enabled the isolation and characterization of a large number of very interesting homoleptic and heteroleptic compounds in which the lanthanoid is bound to hydrogen, to substituted or unsubstituted cyclopentadienyl groups, to allyl or alkynyl groups, or even to phosphorus ylides, trimethylsilyl, and carbonylmetal groups. These compounds, which are all extremely sensitive to oxygen and water, open up new possibilities in the field of catalysis and have great potential in organic synthesis - as recent studies with pentamethylcyclopentadienyl derivatives, organolanthanoid(II) compounds, and hexamethyllanthanoid complexes have already shown. (orig.) [de

  9. 12 CFR 5.42 - Corporate title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 18 U.S.C. 709, regarding false advertising and the misuse of names to indicate a Federal agency, and... the appropriate district office if it changes its corporate title. The notice must contain the old and...

  10. Code of Federal Regulations Title 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database contains the most recent revision from the Government Printing Office (GPO) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 21 - Food and Drugs.

  11. The Need for Conciliation under Title VII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, William E.

    1975-01-01

    The AFL-CIO is committed to the task of eliminating discrimination and injustice in the workplace and is making efforts to expand the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's conciliation efforts under Title Seven. (MW)

  12. Service Locator - Family Planning Title X

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This locator tool will help you find Title X family planning centers that provide high quality and cost-effective family planning and related preventive health...

  13. Role of biodegradation in the removal of pharmaceutically active compounds with different bulk organic matter characteristics through managed aquifer recharge: Batch and column studies

    KAUST Repository

    Maeng, Sungkyu; Sharma, Saroj K.; Abel, Chol D T; Magic-Knezev, Aleksandra; Amy, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    Natural water treatment systems such as bank filtration have been recognized as providing effective barriers in the multi-barrier approach for attenuation of organic micropollutants for safe drinking water supply. In this study, the role of biodegradation in the removal of selected pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) during soil passage was investigated. Batch studies were conducted to investigate the removal of 13 selected PhACs from different water sources with respect to different sources of biodegradable organic matter. Neutral PhACs (phenacetine, paracetamol, and caffeine) and acidic PhACs (ibuprofen, fenoprofen, bezafibrate, and naproxen) were removed with efficiencies greater than 88% from different organic matter water matrices during batch studies (hydraulic retention time (HRT): 60 days). Column experiments were then performed to differentiate between biodegradation and sorption with regard to the removal of selected PhACs. In column studies, removal efficiencies of acidic PhACs (e.g., analgesics) decreased under conditions of limited biodegradable carbon. The removal efficiencies of acidic PhACs were found to be less than 21% under abiotic conditions. These observations were attributed to sorption under abiotic conditions established by a biocide (20 mM sodium azide), which suppresses microbial activity/biodegradation. However, under biotic conditions, the removal efficiencies of these acidic PhACs were found to be greater than 59%. This is mainly attributed to biodegradation. Moreover, the average removal efficiencies of hydrophilic (polar) neutral PhACs (paracetamol, pentoxifylline, and caffeine) with low octanol/water partition coefficients (log K ow less than 1) were low (11%) under abiotic conditions. However, under biotic conditions, removal efficiencies of the neutral PhACs were greater than 98%. In contrast, carbamazepine persisted and was not easily removed under either biotic or abiotic conditions. This study indicates that biodegradation

  14. Role of biodegradation in the removal of pharmaceutically active compounds with different bulk organic matter characteristics through managed aquifer recharge: Batch and column studies

    KAUST Repository

    Maeng, Sungkyu

    2011-10-01

    Natural water treatment systems such as bank filtration have been recognized as providing effective barriers in the multi-barrier approach for attenuation of organic micropollutants for safe drinking water supply. In this study, the role of biodegradation in the removal of selected pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) during soil passage was investigated. Batch studies were conducted to investigate the removal of 13 selected PhACs from different water sources with respect to different sources of biodegradable organic matter. Neutral PhACs (phenacetine, paracetamol, and caffeine) and acidic PhACs (ibuprofen, fenoprofen, bezafibrate, and naproxen) were removed with efficiencies greater than 88% from different organic matter water matrices during batch studies (hydraulic retention time (HRT): 60 days). Column experiments were then performed to differentiate between biodegradation and sorption with regard to the removal of selected PhACs. In column studies, removal efficiencies of acidic PhACs (e.g., analgesics) decreased under conditions of limited biodegradable carbon. The removal efficiencies of acidic PhACs were found to be less than 21% under abiotic conditions. These observations were attributed to sorption under abiotic conditions established by a biocide (20 mM sodium azide), which suppresses microbial activity/biodegradation. However, under biotic conditions, the removal efficiencies of these acidic PhACs were found to be greater than 59%. This is mainly attributed to biodegradation. Moreover, the average removal efficiencies of hydrophilic (polar) neutral PhACs (paracetamol, pentoxifylline, and caffeine) with low octanol/water partition coefficients (log K ow less than 1) were low (11%) under abiotic conditions. However, under biotic conditions, removal efficiencies of the neutral PhACs were greater than 98%. In contrast, carbamazepine persisted and was not easily removed under either biotic or abiotic conditions. This study indicates that biodegradation

  15. Role of biodegradation in the removal of pharmaceutically active compounds with different bulk organic matter characteristics through managed aquifer recharge: batch and column studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Sung Kyu; Sharma, Saroj K; Abel, Chol D T; Magic-Knezev, Aleksandra; Amy, Gary L

    2011-10-15

    Natural water treatment systems such as bank filtration have been recognized as providing effective barriers in the multi-barrier approach for attenuation of organic micropollutants for safe drinking water supply. In this study, the role of biodegradation in the removal of selected pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) during soil passage was investigated. Batch studies were conducted to investigate the removal of 13 selected PhACs from different water sources with respect to different sources of biodegradable organic matter. Neutral PhACs (phenacetine, paracetamol, and caffeine) and acidic PhACs (ibuprofen, fenoprofen, bezafibrate, and naproxen) were removed with efficiencies greater than 88% from different organic matter water matrices during batch studies (hydraulic retention time (HRT): 60 days). Column experiments were then performed to differentiate between biodegradation and sorption with regard to the removal of selected PhACs. In column studies, removal efficiencies of acidic PhACs (e.g., analgesics) decreased under conditions of limited biodegradable carbon. The removal efficiencies of acidic PhACs were found to be less than 21% under abiotic conditions. These observations were attributed to sorption under abiotic conditions established by a biocide (20 mM sodium azide), which suppresses microbial activity/biodegradation. However, under biotic conditions, the removal efficiencies of these acidic PhACs were found to be greater than 59%. This is mainly attributed to biodegradation. Moreover, the average removal efficiencies of hydrophilic (polar) neutral PhACs (paracetamol, pentoxifylline, and caffeine) with low octanol/water partition coefficients (log Kow less than 1) were low (11%) under abiotic conditions. However, under biotic conditions, removal efficiencies of the neutral PhACs were greater than 98%. In contrast, carbamazepine persisted and was not easily removed under either biotic or abiotic conditions. This study indicates that biodegradation

  16. INIS: Authority list for journal titles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This is the 34th revision of the INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles (IAEA-INIS-11). This list is published annually and includes the titles of all journals which have contained articles submitted to INIS at the time of publication. The current list contains 13 538 journal titles, 2 106 regularly scanned journals and 613 key journals. It was last updated in February 2008. A journal - or periodical - is a continuing publication issued in a succession of discrete parts, usually bearing numbering and/or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. It is generally published within a defined, fixed interval between issues and normally appears more than once per year. It includes a mixture of articles, letters, summaries, etc. Within this definition, annuals such as the Annual Review of Nuclear Science are included, but series titles such as the McGraw-Hill Series in Nuclear Engineering are not. The purpose of this document is to provide descriptive cataloguers with standard elements to include in bibliographic level 'S' of the INIS record. These elements include field (tag) 229 (Full Journal Title), 320 (ISSN) and 321 (CODEN). The full journal title is mandatory, and either the ISSN or the CODEN must be included (both may appear). Instructions on how to use this and other elements of the INIS record format are found in INIS: Guide to Bibliographic Description (IAEA-INIS-1). In order to help the user find titles easily, the list is arranged in six parts, followed by summary statistics: - In Part I, all key journals are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. - In Part II, all key journals are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS is entered in parentheses within the body of the entry. - In Part III, all journals that are regularly scanned by

  17. INIS: Authority list for journal titles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This is the 35th revision of the INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles (IAEA-INIS-11). This list is published annually and includes the titles of all journals which have contained articles submitted to INIS at the time of publication. The current list contains 13 750 journal titles, 1 965 regularly scanned journals and 593 key journals. It was last updated in March 2009. A journal - or periodical - is a continuing publication issued in a succession of discrete parts, usually bearing numbering and/or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. It is generally published within a defined, fixed interval between issues and normally appears more than once per year. It includes a mixture of articles, letters, summaries, etc. Within this definition, annuals such as the Annual Review of Nuclear Science are included, but series titles such as the McGraw-Hill Series in Nuclear Engineering are not. The purpose of this document is to provide descriptive cataloguers with standard elements to include in bibliographic level 'S' of the INIS record. These elements include field (tag) 229 (Full Journal Title), 320 (ISSN) and 321 (CODEN). The full journal title is mandatory, and either the ISSN or the CODEN must be included (both may appear). Instructions on how to use this and other elements of the INIS record format are found in INIS: Guide to Bibliographic Description (IAEA-INIS-1). In order to help the user find titles easily, the list is arranged in six parts, followed by summary statistics: - In Part I, all key journals are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. - In Part II, all key journals are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS is entered in parentheses within the body of the entry. - In Part III, all journals that are regularly scanned by the

  18. INIS: Authority list for journal titles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This is the 33rd revision of the INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles (IAEA-INIS-11). This list is published annually and includes the titles of all journals which have contained articles submitted to INIS at the time of publication. The current list contains 13 396 journal titles, 2 170 regularly scanned journals and 578 key journals. It was last updated in February 2007. A journal - or periodical - is a continuing publication issued in a succession of discrete parts, usually bearing numbering and/or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. It is generally published within a defined, fixed interval between issues and normally appears more than once per year. It includes a mixture of articles, letters, summaries, etc. Within this definition, annuals such as the Annual Review of Nuclear Science are included, but series titles such as the McGraw-Hill Series in Nuclear Engineering are not. The purpose of this document is to provide descriptive cataloguers with standard elements to include in bibliographic level 'S' of the INIS record. These elements include field (tag) 229 (Full Journal Title), 320 (ISSN) and 321 (CODEN). The full journal title is mandatory, and either the ISSN or the CODEN must be included (both may appear). Instructions on how to use this and other elements of the INIS record format are found in INIS: Guide to Bibliographic Description (IAEA-INIS-1). In order to help the user find titles easily, the list is arranged in six parts, followed by summary statistics: - In Part I, all key journals are grouped under the name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS, then sorted alphabetically under their title. - In Part II, all key journals are sorted alphabetically under their title. The name of the country or international organization responsible for their input in INIS is entered in parentheses within the body of the entry. - In Part III, all journals that are regularly scanned by

  19. Different profiles of anthropogenic and naturally produced organohalogen compounds in serum from residents living near a coastal area and e-waste recycling workers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Akifumi; Nomiyama, Kei; Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Subramanian, Annamalai; Bulbule, Kesav A; Parthasarathy, Peethambaram; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-10-15

    We determined the contamination status and accumulation profiles of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated PCB congeners (OH-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hydroxylated PBDEs (OH-PBDEs), methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs), and bromophenols (BPhs) in serum from e-waste recycling workers and residents near a coastal area in India. Residue levels of penta- to octa-chlorinated PCBs, penta- to octa-chlorinated OH-PCBs, 6MeO-BDE47, 6OH-BDE47, and 2,4,6-tri-BPh in serum from residents living near the coastal area were significantly higher than those in serum from e-waste recycling workers. Residue levels of tri- to tetra-chlorinated PCBs, tri- to tetra-chlorinated OH-PCBs, PBDEs, octa-brominated OH-PBDEs, and tetra-BPhs in serum from e-waste recycling workers were higher than those in serum from residents living near the coastal area. Principal component analysis revealed that residents living near the coastal area and e-waste recycling workers had different serum profiles of chlorinated and brominated compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Levels of potential bioactive compounds including carotenoids, vitamin C and phenolic compounds, and expression of their cognate biosynthetic genes vary significantly in different varieties of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) grown under uniform cultural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcarcel, Jesus; Reilly, Kim; Gaffney, Michael; O'Brien, Nora M

    2016-02-01

    In addition to their high carbohydrate content, potatoes are also an important dietary source of vitamin C and bioactive secondary metabolites, including phenolic compounds and carotenoids, which have been suggested to play a role in human health. The expression of genes encoding key enzymes involved in the synthesis of these compounds was assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and compared to the accumulation of the corresponding product in seven potato varieties showing contrasting levels of metabolite accumulation. Strong positive correlations were found between phenolic content in the flesh of tubers and transcript levels of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and chalcone synthase (CHS) genes. The expression of PAL and CHS was also related to that of AN1, a transcription factor involved in the synthesis of anthocyanins, suggesting that these genes are regulated in a coordinated manner. No clear relationship was found between transcript levels of phytoene synthase (PSY) or L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) genes and total carotenoid or vitamin C accumulation, respectively. Data indicate that levels of total phenolic and flavonoid compounds in potato are controlled primarily by PAL and CHS gene expression. Transcript levels of PSY and GLDH did not control accumulation of carotenoids or vitamin C. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.