WorldWideScience

Sample records for titanium modified austenitic

  1. Effect of prior cold work on creep properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayanand, V.D.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Laha, K.; Mathew, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    Prior cold worked (PCW) titanium-modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel (SS) is used as a core-structural material in fast breeder reactor because of its superior creep strength and resistance to void swelling. In this study, the influence of PCW in the range of 16–24% on creep properties of IFAC-1 SS, a titanium modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic SS, at 923 K and 973 K has been investigated. It was found that PCW has no appreciable effect on the creep deformation rate of the steel at both the test temperatures; creep rupture life increased with PCW at 923 K and remained rather unaffected at 973 K. The dislocation structure along with precipitation in the PCW steel was found to change appreciably depending on creep testing conditions. A well-defined dislocation substructure was observed on creep testing at 923 K; a well-annealed microstructure with evidences of recrystallization was observed on creep testing at 973 K

  2. Tensile properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and the weld joints after neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, K.; Ioka, I.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hamada, A.; Hishinuma, A. [and others

    1996-10-01

    Tensile specimens of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and its weldments fabricated with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques were irradiated to a peak dose of 19 dpa and a peak helium level of 250 appm in the temperature range between 200 and 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The He/dpa ratio of about 13 appm/dpa is similar to the typical helium/dpa ratio of a fusion reactor environment. The tensile tests were carried out at the irradiation temperature in vacuum. The irradiation caused an increase in yield stress to levels between 670 and 800 MPa depending on the irradiation temperature. Total elongation was reduced to less than 10%, however the specimens failed in a ductile manner. The results were compared with those of the specimens irradiated using irradiation capsules producing larger amount of He. Although the He/dpa ratio affected the microstructural change, the impact on the post irradiation tensile behavior was rather small for not only base metal specimens but also for the weld joint and the weld metal specimens.

  3. Irradiation creep and creep rupture of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels and their dependence on cold work level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Toloczko, M.B.; Kumar, A.S.

    1991-11-01

    A titanium-modified austenitic type stainless steel was tested at three cold work levels to determine its creep and creep rupture properties under both thermal aging and neutron irradiation conditions. Both the thermal and irradiation creep behavior exhibit a complex non-monotonic relationship with cold work level that reflects the competition between a number of stress-sensitive and temperature-dependent microstructural processes. Increasing the degree of cold work to 30% from the conventional 20% level was detrimental to its performance, especially for applications above 550 degrees c. The 20% cold work level is preferable to the 10% level, in terms of both in-reactor creep rupture response and initial strength

  4. Microstructural response of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels to neutron exposure of 70 dpa in FFTF/MOTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Kohno, Yutaka; Kohyama, Akira

    1994-01-01

    JPCA, a titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel, in solution-annealed or cold-worked condition and a compositionally modified JPCA in solution-annealed condition were examined by transmission electron microscopy following irradiation in FFTF/MOTA to an exposure level of up to about 70 dpa at 390 to 600 C. At lower temperatures, all the materials developed qualitatively similar cavity-, dislocation- and precipitate-microstructures. The lower-temperature swelling peak, which appeared at near 410 C, was more efficiently suppressed by phosphorus addition than cold-working. Irradiation at or above 520 C produced substantially large swelling in solution-annealed JPCA. The cavities contributed to this higher-temperature swelling developed in association with M 6 C-type precipitates. Neither cavities other than very small helium bubbles nor massive particles of M 6 C-type precipitates were observed in cold-worked and phosphorus-modified materials, in which MC-type precipitates developed at very high concentration. The effect of pre-irradiation microstructure and compositional modification on the behavior of these precipitates is discussed. ((orig.))

  5. Irradiation response in titanium modified austenitic stainless steels prepared by rapid solidification processing. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imeson, D.; Tong, C.H.; Parker, C.A.; Vander Sande, J.B.; Grant, N.J.; Harling, O.K.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1984-01-01

    Titanium carbide precipitation on dislocations during irradiation and recoil-induced particle dissolution are considered. The outline analysis given indicates that complete swelling suppression may occur in favorable conditions due to a counterbalancing of the effective dislocation interstitial bias. The behavior is, however, not stable against a return to normal swelling levels for type 316 steels. A model is presented which may serve as a basis for the interpretation of some aspects of the irradiation response in this system. (orig.)

  6. Effect of phosphorus and boron additions on helium bubble microstructure in titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jitsukawa, Shiro; Hojou, Kiichi; Hishinuma, Akimichi

    1992-01-01

    Ti-modified austenitic stainless steels (0.06C-0.5Si-15Cr-15Ni-2Mo-0.2Ti) plus P and/or B additions up to 0.06 wt% and 60 wtppm respectively, were irradiated with 10keV He + ions at a dose rate of 1.8 x 10 18 He + /m 2 s at 923K. Irradiation was performed on foil specimens in a transmission electron microscope equipped with an ion-accelerator up to a fluence of 1 x 10 21 He + /m 2 . Small (5 nm >) bubbles were formed in the depth region ranging between 5 and 15 nm from the foil surface of the specimen irradiated up to a fluence of 9 x 10 18 He + /m 2 . These bubbles grew continuously during the following irradiation. They were often observed to grow by coalescence. Bubble growth by coalescence was suppressed by Ti-modification. Both P and B additions enhanced the suppression effect of Ti-modification. (author)

  7. Effect of ageing on the microstructural stability of cold-worked titanium-modified 15Cr-15Ni-2.5Mo austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkadesan, S.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Rodriguez, P.; Padmanabhan, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    A titanium-modified 15Cr-15Ni-2.5Mo austenitic stainless steel conforming to ASTM A 771 (UNS S 38660), commercially called Alloy D9, is being indigenously developed for application as material for the fuel clad and the hexagonal wrapper for fuel subassemblies of the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. As this material would be used in the cold-worked condition and would be subjected to prolonged exposure to elevated service temperatures, the effect of ageing on the microstructural stability was studied as a function of the amount of cold work. The material was given 2.5-30% prior cold work and then aged at temperatures in the range 923 to 1173 K for times ranging from 0.25 to 1000 h. Hardness measurements made before and after ageing were correlated with the Larson-Miller parameter to determine the highest stable prior cold-work level. Optical microscopy was used to study the microstructural changes. The influence of prolonged exposure for two and three years at the operating temperatures of clad and wrapper, on the elevated temperature tensile properties of a 20% prior cold-worked Alloy D9 was also studied through accelerated ageing treatments based on the present parametric approach. (orig.)

  8. Irradiation response in titanium modified austenitic stainless steels prepared by rapid solidification processing. Pt. 3. A model for the effect of titanium addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imeson, D.; Tong, C.H.; Parker, C.A.; Vander Sande, J.B.; Grant, N.J.; Harling, O.K. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (USA). Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    1984-05-01

    Titanium carbide precipitation on dislocations during irradiation and recoil-induced particle dissolution are considered. The outline analysis given indicates that complete swelling suppression may occur in favorable conditions due to a counterbalancing of the effective dislocation interstitial bias. The behavior is, however, not stable against a return to normal swelling levels for type 316 steels. A model is presented which may serve as a basis for the interpretation of some aspects of the irradiation response in this system.

  9. Influence of titanium on the tempering structure of austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghuezaiel, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    The microstructure of titanium-stabilized and initially deformed (approximately 20%) austenitic stainless steels used in structures of fast neutrons reactors has been studied after one hour duration annealings (500 0 C) by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, microhardness and transmission electron microscopy. The studied alloys were either of industrial type CND 17-13 (0.23 to 0.45 wt% Ti) or pure steels (18% Cr, 14% Ni, 0 or 0.3 wt% Ti). During tempering, the pure steels presented some restauration before recristallization. In the industrial steels, only recristallization occurred, and this only in the most deformed steel. Precipitation does not occur in the titanium-free pure steel. In industrial steels, many intermetallic phases are formed when recristallization starts [fr

  10. Study of stress relief cracking in titanium stabilized austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabaud-Reytier, M.

    1999-01-01

    The heat affected zone (HAZ) of titanium stabilised austenitic stainless steel welds (AISI 321) may exhibit a serious form of intercrystalline cracking during service at high temperature. This type of cracking, called 'stress relief cracking', is known to be due to work hardening but also to ageing: a fine and abundant intragranular Ti(C,N) precipitation appears near the fusion line and modifies the mechanical behaviour of the HAZ. This study aims to better know the accused mechanism and to succeed in estimating the risk of such cracking in welded junctions of 321 stainless steel. To analyse this embrittlement mechanism, and to assess the lifetime of real components, different HAZ are simulated by heat treatments applied to the base material which is submitted to various cold rolling and ageing conditions in order to reproduce the HAZ microstructure. Then, we study the effects of work hardening and ageing on the titanium carbide precipitation, on the mechanical (tensile and creep) behaviour of the resulting material and on its stress relief cracking sensitivity. It is shown that work hardening is the main parameter of the mechanism and that ageing do not favour crack initiation although it leads to titanium carbide precipitation. The role of this precipitation is also discussed. Moreover, a creep damage model is identified by a local approach to fracture. Materials sensitive to stress relief cracking are selected. Then, creep tests are carried out on notched bars in order to quantify the intergranular damage of these different materials; afterwards, these measurements are combined with calculated mechanical fields. Finally, it is shown that the model gives good results to assess crack initiation for a compact tension (CT) specimen during relaxation tests, as well as for a notched tubular specimen tested at 600 deg. C under a steady torque. (author)

  11. Thermal Effects That Arise upon Different Heat Treatments in Austenitic Steels Alloyed with Titanium and Phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Berger, I. F.; Bobrovskii, V. I.; Voronin, V. I.; Danilov, S. E.; Kazantsev, V. A.; Kataev, N. V.; Sagaradze, V. V.

    2018-04-01

    Structural and microstructural changes that arise in the course of the heat treatment of Cr-Ni-Mo austenitic stainless steels with different concentrations of titanium and phosphorus have been studied. It has been found that the alloying with phosphorus decreases the lattice parameter of these steels. The phosphorus contribution to this effect is 0.015 ± 0.002 Å/at %. Aging at a temperature of 670 K for about 20 h leads to the precipitation of dispersed needle-like particles, which are most likely to be iron phosphides. In the temperature range of 700-800 K, in austenitic steels, the atomic separation of the solid solution occurs, the intensity of which decreases upon alloying with titanium or phosphorus at concentrations of 1.0 and 0.1 wt %, respectively. At higher temperatures (about 950 K), the formed precipitates of the Ni3Ti (γ') phase increase in size to 7-10 nm.

  12. Surface modification of austenitic stainless steel by titanium ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, P.J.; Hyvarinen, J.; Samandi, M.

    1995-01-01

    The wear properties of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel implanted with Ti were investigated for ion doses in the range (2.3-5.4)x10 16 ionscm -2 and average ion energies of 60 and 90keV. The implanted layer was examined by Rutherford backscattering, from which the retained doses were determined, and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. Following implantation, the surface microhardness was observed to increase with the greatest change occurring at higher ion energy. Pin-on-disc wear tests and associated friction measurements were also performed under both dry and lubricated conditions using applied loads of 2N and 10N. In the absence of lubrication, breakthrough of the implanted layer occurred after a short sliding time; only for a dose of 5.1x10 16 ionscm -2 implanted at an average energy of 90keV was the onset of breakthrough appreciably delayed. In contrast, the results of tests with lubrication showed a more gradual variation, with the extent of wear decreasing with implant dose at both 2N and 10N loads. Finally, the influence of Ti implantation on possible wear mechanisms is discussed in the light of information provided by several surface characterization techniques. ((orig.))

  13. Modified Monkman–Grant relationship for austenitic stainless steel foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman Ali, Hassan, E-mail: hassaninsan@gmail.com [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Tamin, Mohd Nasir, E-mail: taminmn@fkm.utm.my [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2013-02-15

    Characteristics of creep deformation for austenitic stainless steel foils are examined using the modified Monkman–Grant equation. A series of creep tests are conducted on AISI 347 steel foils at 700 °C and different stress levels ranging from 54 to 221 MPa. Results showed that at lower stress levels below 110 MPa, the creep life parameters ε{sub min},ε{sub r},t{sub r} can be expressed using the modified Monkman–Grant equation with exponent m′= 0.513. This indicates significant deviation of the creep behavior from the first order reaction kinetics theory for creep (m′ = 1.0). The true tertiary creep damage in AISI 347 steel foil begins after 65.9% of the creep life of the foil has elapsed at stress levels above 150 MPa. At this high stress levels, Monkman–Grant ductility factor λ{sup ′} saturates to a value of 1.3 with dislocation-controlled deformation mechanisms operating. At low stress levels, λ{sup ′} increases drastically (λ{sup ′}=190 at 54 MPa) when slow diffusion-controlled creep is dominant.

  14. Crystallization of modified hydroxyapatite on titanium implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovanova, O A; Izmailov, R R; Zaits, A V; Ghyngazov, S A

    2016-01-01

    Carbonated-hydroxyapatite (CHA) and Si-hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) precipitation have been synthesized from the model bioliquid solutions (synovial fluid and SBF). It is found that all the samples synthesized from the model solutions are single-phase and represent hydroxyapatite. The crystallization of the modified hydroxyapatite on alloys of different composition, roughness and subjected to different treatment techniques was investigated. Irradiation of the titanium substrates with the deposited biomimetic coating can facilitate further growth of the crystal and regeneration of the surface. (paper)

  15. Structure and phase composition of titanium nitride coating on austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovitskaya, N.V.; Kolenchenko, L.D.; Larikov, L.N.

    1989-01-01

    Structure and phase composition of titanium nitride coating deposited on 08Kh18N10T steel substrate using ''Bulat'' device are studied. Use of complex investigation methods permitted despite small coating thickness (1μm) to aquire information on hardness, porosity, to study phase composition in all coating thickness. The surface layer (∼0.1 μm) consists of ε-Ti 2 N, TiN 0.6 , TiC 0.35 , that is formed with carbon participation from oil vacuum. In more deeper layers beside ε-Ti 2 N TiC 0.14 N 0.77 is present. Effect of carbon diffusion from substrate to forming coating is stated. Gradient of element concentrations in the substrate-coating interface causes recrystallization of austenite

  16. Swelling behavior of titanium-modified AISI 316 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.; Puigh, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    It appears that titanium additions to stainless steels covering a wide compositional range around the specifications of AISI 316 result only in an increased delay period before neutron-induced void swelling proceeds. Once swelling is initiated the post transient behavior of both annealed and cold-worked titanium-modified steels is quite consistent with that of AISI 316, approaching a relatively temperature-independent swelling rate of approx. 1% per dpa

  17. The influence of combined addition of phosphorus and titanium on void swelling of austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys at 646-700 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, H.; Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of combined addition of phosphorus and titanium on void swelling of model Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys at 646 to 700 K under fast neutron irradiation has been investigated, in comparison with that of a complex austenitic alloy (JPCA-2). In the model alloys, void swelling decreased with increasing phosphorus content. Void average size and density of JPCA-2 were comparable to those of the 0.024P alloy. The fact that these two alloys have the same phosphorus level suggests the void swelling of the model alloys would be strongly suppressed by increasing the phosphorus concentration and/or coaddition of phosphorus and titanium. The present study demonstrated that the phosphorus level is the strongest determinant of void swelling of both model and complex austenitic alloys. ((orig.))

  18. Study of stress relief cracking in titanium stabilized austenitic stainless steel; Etude de la fissuration differee par relaxation d'un acier inoxydable austenitique stabilise au titane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabaud-Reytier, M

    1999-07-01

    The heat affected zone (HAZ) of titanium stabilised austenitic stainless steel welds (AISI 321) may exhibit a serious form of intercrystalline cracking during service at high temperature. This type of cracking, called 'stress relief cracking', is known to be due to work hardening but also to ageing: a fine and abundant intragranular Ti(C,N) precipitation appears near the fusion line and modifies the mechanical behaviour of the HAZ. This study aims to better know the accused mechanism and to succeed in estimating the risk of such cracking in welded junctions of 321 stainless steel. To analyse this embrittlement mechanism, and to assess the lifetime of real components, different HAZ are simulated by heat treatments applied to the base material which is submitted to various cold rolling and ageing conditions in order to reproduce the HAZ microstructure. Then, we study the effects of work hardening and ageing on the titanium carbide precipitation, on the mechanical (tensile and creep) behaviour of the resulting material and on its stress relief cracking sensitivity. It is shown that work hardening is the main parameter of the mechanism and that ageing do not favour crack initiation although it leads to titanium carbide precipitation. The role of this precipitation is also discussed. Moreover, a creep damage model is identified by a local approach to fracture. Materials sensitive to stress relief cracking are selected. Then, creep tests are carried out on notched bars in order to quantify the intergranular damage of these different materials; afterwards, these measurements are combined with calculated mechanical fields. Finally, it is shown that the model gives good results to assess crack initiation for a compact tension (CT) specimen during relaxation tests, as well as for a notched tubular specimen tested at 600 deg. C under a steady torque. (author)

  19. Mechanisms of stress relief cracking in titanium stabilised austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabaud-Reytier, M.; Allais, L.; Caes, C.; Dubuisson, P.; Pineau, A.

    2003-01-01

    The heat affected zone (HAZ) of AISI 321 welds may exhibit a serious form of cracking during service at high temperature. This form of damage, called 'stress relief cracking', is known to be due to work hardening but also to aging due to Ti(C,N) precipitation on dislocations which modifies the mechanical behaviour of the HAZ. The present study aims to analyse the latter embrittlement mechanism in one specific heat of 321 stainless steel. To this end, different HAZs are simulated using an annealing heat-treatment, followed by various cold rolling and aging conditions. Then, we study the effects of work hardening and aging on Ti(C,N) precipitation, on the mechanical (hardness, tensile and creep) behaviour of the simulated HAZs and on their sensitivity to intergranular crack propagation through stress relaxation tests performed on pre-cracked CT type specimens tested at 600 deg. C. It is shown that work hardening is the main parameter of the involved mechanism but that aging does not promote crack initiation although it leads to titanium carbide precipitation. Therefore, the role of Ti(C,N) precipitation on stress relief cracking mechanisms is discussed. An attempt is made to show that solute drag effects are mainly responsible for this form of intergranular damage, rather than Ti(C,N) precipitation

  20. Influence of mechanical and thermal treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium stabilized austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhom, H.

    1983-12-01

    Thermal and mechanical treatments for microstructure optimization in titanium stabilized austenitic stainless steels used in nuclear industry are examined. The steels studied Z10CNDT15-15B and Z6CNDT17-13 are of the type 15-15 Ti and 316 Ti. These treatments allow the elimination of casting heterogeneity produced by dendritic solidification, improve mechanical properties particularly creep and the best compromise between grain size solid solution of metal additions is obtained. Secondary precipitation of (TiMo)C on dislocations is improved by a previous strain hardening. The precipitation reinforce the good effect of strain hardening by stabilization of the microstructure producing a better resistance to recrystallization [fr

  1. Effect of heat treatment, with and without mechanical work, on the tensile and creep behaviour at 6000C of austenitic stainless steel stabilised with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of various heat treatments, with and without mechanical work, on the microstructure and the tensile and creep behaviour at 600 0 C of the titanium stabilised austenitic stainless steel DIN 1.4970, as well as the effects of aging temperature, pre-strain and small boron additions on the creep behaviour of these steels are discussed. The most probable mechanism is suggested. (Author) [pt

  2. Acidity characterization of a titanium and sulfate modified vermiculite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, W.Y.; Centeno, M.A.; Odriozola, J.A.; Moreno, S.; Molina, R.

    2008-01-01

    A natural vermiculite has been modified with titanium and sulfated by the intercalation and impregnation method in order to optimize the acidity of the clay mineral, and characterization of samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption isotherms, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and temperature programmed desorption with ammonia (TPD-NH 3 ). All the modified solids have a significantly higher number of acidic sites with respect to the parent material and in all of these, Broensted as well as Lewis acidity are identified. The presence of sulfate appears not to increase the number of acidic centers in the modified clay. For the materials sulfated with the intercalation method, it is observed that the strength of the acidic sites found in the material increases with the nominal sulfate/metal ratio. Nevertheless, when elevated quantities of sulfur are deposited, diffusion problems in the heptane reaction appear

  3. Elimination of casting heterogeneities by high temperature heat treatment on a titanium stabilized austenitic alloy. Effect on the microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decours, Jacques; Cadalbert, Robert; Sidhom, Habib.

    1982-06-01

    Microstructural observation on a longitudinal section of stainless steels often reveals the presence of a ''veined'' structure showing a segregation remainder due to the setting of the ingot. This casting heterogeneity can be eliminated by high temperature treatments. This study shows the change in the structure and the state of solubilization produced by these high temperature treatments and the effect of a stabilizing element such as titanium on Z6CNDT17.13 and Z10CNDT15.15B alloys compared with the Z6CND17.13 alloy. It is also shown that a high temperature treatment applied to these stabilized alloys deeply modifies the recrystallization kinetics [fr

  4. A Modified Porous Titanium Sheet Prepared by Plasma-Activated Sintering for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukimichi Tamaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a contamination-free porous titanium scaffold by a plasma-activated sintering within an originally developed TiN-coated graphite mold. The surface of porous titanium sheet with or without a coated graphite mold was characterized. The cell adhesion property of porous titanium sheet was also evaluated in this study. The peak of TiC was detected on the titanium sheet processed with the graphite mold without a TiN coating. Since the titanium fiber elements were directly in contact with the carbon graphite mold during processing, surface contamination was unavoidable event in this condition. The TiC peak was not detectable on the titanium sheet processed within the TiN-coated carbon graphite mold. This modified plasma-activated sintering with the TiN-coated graphite mold would be useful to fabricate a contamination-free titanium sheet. The number of adherent cells on the modified titanium sheet was greater than that of the bare titanium plate. Stress fiber formation and the extension of the cells were observed on the titanium sheets. This modified titanium sheet is expected to be a new tissue engineering material in orthopedic bone repair.

  5. Osteogenic potential of laser modified and conditioned titanium zirconium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P David Charles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The osseointegration of dental implant is related to their composition and surface treatment. Titanium zirconium (TiZr has been introduced as an alternative to the commercially pure titanium and its alloys as dental implant material, which is attributed to its superior mechanical and biological properties. Surface treatments of TiZr have been introduced to enhance their osseointegration ability; however, reliable, easy to use surface modification technique has not been established. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd-YAG laser surface treatment of TiZr implant alloy on their osteogenic potential. Materials and Methods: Twenty disc-shaped samples of 5 mm diameter and 2 mm height were milled from the TiZr alloy ingot. The polished discs were ultrasonically cleaned in distilled water. Ten samples each were randomly selected as Group A control samples and Group B consisted of Nd-YAG laser surface etched and conditioned test samples. These were evaluated for cellular response. Cellular adhesion and proliferation were quantified, and the results were statistically analyzed using nonparametric analysis. Cellular morphology was observed using electron and epiflurosence microscopy. Results: Nd-YAG laser surface modified and conditioned TiZr samples increased the osteogenic potential. Conclusion: Nd-YAG laser surface modification of TiZr, improves the cellular activity, surface roughness, and wettability, thereby increasing the osteogenic potential.

  6. Bacterial adhesion studies on titanium, titanium nitride and modified hydroxyapatite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyachandran, Y.L.; Venkatachalam, S.; Karunagaran, B.; Narayandass, Sa.K.; Mangalaraj, D.; Bao, C.Y.; Zhang, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative study on adhesion of the oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis on titanium (Ti), titanium nitride (TiN), fluorine modified hydroxyapatite (FHA) and zinc modified FHA (Zn-FHA) thin films is investigated. Ti and TiN thin films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and hydroxyapatite-based films were prepared by solgel method. The crystalline structure, optical characteristics, chemical composition and surface topography of the films were studied by XRD, optical transmission, XPS, EDAX and AFM measurements. The predominant crystallite orientation in the Ti and TiN films was along (002) and (111) of hcp and cubic structures, respectively. The Ti : O : N composition ratio in the surface of the Ti and TiN films was found to be 7 : 21 : 1 and 3 : 8 : 2, respectively. The atomic concentration ratio (Zn + Ca) / P in Zn-FHA film was found to be 1.74 whereby the Zn replaced 3.2% of Ca. The rough surface feature in modified HA films was clearly observed in the SEM images and the surface roughness (rms) of Ti and TiN films was 2.49 and 3.5 nm, respectively, as observed using AFM. The film samples were sterilized, treated in the bacteria culture medium, processed and analyzed using SEM. Surface roughness of the films was found to have least influence on the bacterial adhesion. More bacteria were observed on the TiN film with oxide nitride surface layer and less number of adhered bacteria was noticed on the Ti film with native surface oxide layer and on Zn-FHA film

  7. Bacterial adhesion studies on titanium, titanium nitride and modified hydroxyapatite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeyachandran, Y L [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Venkatachalam, S [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Karunagaran, B [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Narayandass, Sa K [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Mangalaraj, D [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Bao, C Y [West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhang, C L [West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2007-01-15

    A qualitative study on adhesion of the oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis on titanium (Ti), titanium nitride (TiN), fluorine modified hydroxyapatite (FHA) and zinc modified FHA (Zn-FHA) thin films is investigated. Ti and TiN thin films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and hydroxyapatite-based films were prepared by solgel method. The crystalline structure, optical characteristics, chemical composition and surface topography of the films were studied by XRD, optical transmission, XPS, EDAX and AFM measurements. The predominant crystallite orientation in the Ti and TiN films was along (002) and (111) of hcp and cubic structures, respectively. The Ti : O : N composition ratio in the surface of the Ti and TiN films was found to be 7 : 21 : 1 and 3 : 8 : 2, respectively. The atomic concentration ratio (Zn + Ca) / P in Zn-FHA film was found to be 1.74 whereby the Zn replaced 3.2% of Ca. The rough surface feature in modified HA films was clearly observed in the SEM images and the surface roughness (rms) of Ti and TiN films was 2.49 and 3.5 nm, respectively, as observed using AFM. The film samples were sterilized, treated in the bacteria culture medium, processed and analyzed using SEM. Surface roughness of the films was found to have least influence on the bacterial adhesion. More bacteria were observed on the TiN film with oxide nitride surface layer and less number of adhered bacteria was noticed on the Ti film with native surface oxide layer and on Zn-FHA film.

  8. Tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of a Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaprasad, P.V.; Venugopal, S.; Venkadesan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The flow-stress data of a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel in the temperature range 300 to 1,023 K was analyzed in terms of Ludwigson and Voce equations. The parameters of these equations were critically examined with respect to the effect of Ti/C ratio and test temperature. It was found that the Ludwigson equation described the flow behavior adequately up to the test temperature of 923 K, whereas the Voce equation could be employed in the full temperature range. The peaks/plateaus observed in the variation of these parameters as a function of temperature in the intermediate temperature range have been identified as one of the manifestations of dynamic strain aging (DSA). Also, the variation of these parameters with temperature clearly could bring out the different domains of DSA observed in this alloy. The work-hardening analysis of the flow-stress data revealed that in the DSA regime, the onset of stage III hardening is athermal

  9. Crystalline hydroxyapatite coatings synthesized under hydrothermal conditions on modified titanium substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchanek, Katarzyna; Bartkowiak, Amanda; Gdowik, Agnieszka; Perzanowski, Marcin; Kąc, Sławomir; Szaraniec, Barbara; Suchanek, Mateusz; Marszałek, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings were successfully produced on modified titanium substrates via hydrothermal synthesis in a Ca(EDTA) 2− and (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 solution. The morphology of modified titanium substrates as well as hydroxyapatite coatings was studied using scanning electron microcopy and phase identification by X-ray diffraction, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. The results show that the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite needle-like crystals with hexagonal symmetry occurred only on titanium substrates both chemically and thermally treated. No hydroxyapatite phase was detected on only acid etched Ti metal. This finding demonstrates that only a particular titanium surface treatment can effectively induce the apatite nucleation under hydrothermal conditions. - Highlights: • Bioactivation of titanium substrate by chemical and heat treatments • Precipitation of hydroxyapatite on modified titanium plates • Hydrothermal crystallization of hydroxyapatite by chelate decomposition method

  10. Crystalline hydroxyapatite coatings synthesized under hydrothermal conditions on modified titanium substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchanek, Katarzyna, E-mail: Katarzyna.Suchanek@ifj.edu.pl [The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Street 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Bartkowiak, Amanda [The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Street 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Gdowik, Agnieszka [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Perzanowski, Marcin [The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Street 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Kąc, Sławomir [Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewica 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Szaraniec, Barbara [Department of Biomaterials, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Suchanek, Mateusz [Department of Chemistry and Physics, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Mickiewicza 21, 31-120 Krakow (Poland); Marszałek, Marta [The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Street 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland)

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings were successfully produced on modified titanium substrates via hydrothermal synthesis in a Ca(EDTA){sup 2−} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} solution. The morphology of modified titanium substrates as well as hydroxyapatite coatings was studied using scanning electron microcopy and phase identification by X-ray diffraction, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. The results show that the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite needle-like crystals with hexagonal symmetry occurred only on titanium substrates both chemically and thermally treated. No hydroxyapatite phase was detected on only acid etched Ti metal. This finding demonstrates that only a particular titanium surface treatment can effectively induce the apatite nucleation under hydrothermal conditions. - Highlights: • Bioactivation of titanium substrate by chemical and heat treatments • Precipitation of hydroxyapatite on modified titanium plates • Hydrothermal crystallization of hydroxyapatite by chelate decomposition method.

  11. Determination of local constitutive properties of titanium alloy matrix in boron-modified titanium alloys using spherical indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreeranganathan, A.; Gokhale, A.; Tamirisakandala, S.

    2008-01-01

    The constitutive properties of the titanium alloy matrix in boron-modified titanium alloys are different from those of the corresponding unreinforced alloy due to the microstructural changes resulting from the addition of boron. Experimental and finite-element analyses of spherical indentation with a large penetration depth to indenter radius ratio are used to compute the local constitutive properties of the matrix alloy. The results are compared with that of the corresponding alloy without boron, processed in the same manner

  12. Intergranular corrosion behavior associated with delta-ferrite transformation of Ti-modified Super304H austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Guanshun; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Relationship between delta-ferrite transformation and IGC behavior was evaluated by DL-EPR test quantitatively. • The IGC site at austenite/ferrite grain boundary changes with aging time at 650 °C. • A higher fraction of delta-ferrite with poor stability increases the IGC sensitisation. • Self-healing of IGC was mainly induced by the Cr diffusion from primary austenite rather than the delta-ferrite. - Abstract: A double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test was conducted to investigate the relationship between the evolution of delta-ferrite and the intergranular corrosion (IGC) of Ti-modified Super304H, which was aged at 650 °C for 4–500 h. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were adopted to analyze the evolution of delta-ferrite. The results indicated that a higher fraction of delta-ferrite with poor stability increased the IGC sensitisation of Ti-modified Super304H. Moreover, the self-healing of the sensitisation of Ti-modified Super304H occurred after 48 h due to the diffusion of chromium atoms mainly from the adjacent primary austenite rather than the delta-ferrite

  13. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Titanium Surface Modified by PVD/PACVD Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Lee, Min-Joo; Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) via crystal violet staining assay on titanium surface modified by physical vapor deposition/plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. Specimens were divided into the following three groups: polished titanium (control group), titanium modified by DC magnetron sputtering (group TiN-Ti), and titanium modified by plasma nitriding (group N-Ti). Surface characteristics of specimens were observed by using nanosurface 3D optical profiler and field emission scanning electron microscope. Group TiN-Ti showed TiN layer of 1.2 microm in thickness. Group N-Ti was identified as plasma nitriding with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Roughness average (Ra) of all specimens had values 0.05). Within the process condition of this study, modified titanium surfaces by DC magnetron sputtering and plasma nitriding did not influence the adhesion of S. mutans.

  14. Physical and rheological properties of Titanium Dioxide modified asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhari, Rosnawati; Ezree Abdullah, Mohd; Khairul Ahmad, Mohd; Chong, Ai Ling; Haini, Rosli; Khatijah Abu Bakar, Siti

    2018-03-01

    Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) has been known as a useful photocatalytic material that is attributed to the several characteristics includes high photocatalytic activity compared with other metal oxide photocatalysts, compatible with traditional construction materials without changing any original performance. This study investigates the physical and rheological properties of modified asphalt with TiO2. Five samples of asphalt with different concentration of TiO2 were studied, namely asphalt 2%, 4%, 6% 8% and 10% TiO2. The tests includes are penetration, softening point, ductility, rotational viscosity and dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) test. From the results of this study, it is noted that addition of TiO2 has significant effect on the physical properties of asphalt. The viscosity tests revealed that asphalt 10% TiO2 has good workability among with reducing approximately 15°C compared to base asphalt. Based on the results from DSR measurements, asphalt 10% TiO2 has reduced temperature susceptibility and increase stiffness and elastic behaviour in comparison to base asphalt. As a result, TiO2 can be considered to be an additive to modify the properties of asphalt.

  15. Swelling behaviors in a fuel assembly for the wrapping wire and duct made of modified 316 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Ichiro; Akasaka, Naoaki

    2010-01-01

    Swelling behaviors in the wrapping wire and duct made of modified type 316 austenitic stainless steel were investigated in a fuel assembly irradiated in a fast breeder reactor. The temperature dependence of volumetric swelling was measured in the wrapping wire and the duct, and the peak temperatures of swelling were evaluated. The void distribution in the material was measured by microstructure observation with electron microscopy, and it was found that the voids prefentially grew near the surface. This phenomenon seemed to be caused by a surface effect on the neutron-irradiated materials. (author)

  16. The effects of phosphorus and boron on the behavior of a titanium-stabilized austenitic stainless steel developed for fast reactor service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Johnson, G.D.; Puigh, R.J.; Garner, F.A.; Maziasz, P.J.; Yang, W.J.S.; Abraham, N.

    1988-08-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are used for core component materials in liquid metal cooled reactors (LMRs). To extend the lifetime of LMR fuel assemblies, considerable effort was expended by the US breeder materials program to find ways to minimize radiation-induced dimensional changes (swelling and creep) and to maximize the creep rupture strength. After various elements were shown to strongly affect swelling and creep behavior, compositional modifications to a commercial grade austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316) produced an alloy with significant improvement in swelling resistance over the standard 300 series alloys. Changes were primarily in the concentrations of chromium, nickel, silicon and titanium, ASTM specification A771-83 was approved in 1983 for the new alloy, designated UNS S38660. Substantial improvement can be produced in the creep rupture behavior of this alloy. Elements such as phosphorus and boron, typically present in trace quantities, have a significant influence on the creep strength of austenitic stainless steels. Several heats of alloy S38660 were made that systematically varied the phosphorus and boron contents. Uniaxial creep tests were conducted at 704/degree/C (1300/degree/F) to evaluate the effects of these elements on the creep rate and the rupture life. The results of these tests were used to guide the production of reactor grade fuel pin cladding for further evaluations. Pressurized tube specimens were tested in the laboratory and also in a fast reactor. Results of these investigations have shown that the elements phosphorus and boron, present in minute but controlled amounts, increase both the in- reactor and ex-reactor rupture life and reduce both in-reactor swelling and creep rate. Microstructural evaluations were also conducted to help ascertain the mechanisms by which the improved properties were obtained. 41 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Crystalline hydroxyapatite coatings synthesized under hydrothermal conditions on modified titanium substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchanek, Katarzyna; Bartkowiak, Amanda; Gdowik, Agnieszka; Perzanowski, Marcin; Kąc, Sławomir; Szaraniec, Barbara; Suchanek, Mateusz; Marszałek, Marta

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings were successfully produced on modified titanium substrates via hydrothermal synthesis in a Ca(EDTA)(2-) and (NH4)2HPO4 solution. The morphology of modified titanium substrates as well as hydroxyapatite coatings was studied using scanning electron microcopy and phase identification by X-ray diffraction, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. The results show that the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite needle-like crystals with hexagonal symmetry occurred only on titanium substrates both chemically and thermally treated. No hydroxyapatite phase was detected on only acid etched Ti metal. This finding demonstrates that only a particular titanium surface treatment can effectively induce the apatite nucleation under hydrothermal conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cast and hipped gamma titanium aluminum alloys modified by chromium, boron, and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shyhchin.

    1993-01-01

    A cast body is described of a chromium, boron, and tantalum modified titanium aluminum alloy, said alloy consisting essentially of titanium, aluminum, chromium, boron, and tantalum in the following approximate atomic ratio: Ti-Al 45-50 Cr 1-3 Ta 1-8 B 0.1-0.3 , and said alloy having been prepared by casting the alloy to form said cast body and by HIPping said body

  19. Attenuation capability of low activation-modified high manganese austenitic stainless steel for fusion reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eissa, M.M. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El-kameesy, S.U.; El-Fiki, S.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Ghali, S.N. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El Shazly, R.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt); Saeed, Aly, E-mail: aly_8h@yahoo.com [Nuclear Power station Department, Faculty of Engineering, Egyptian-Russian University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Improvement stainless steel alloys to be used in fusion reactors. • Structural, mechanical, attenuation properties of investigated alloys were studied. • Good agreement between experimental and calculated results has been achieved. • The developed alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactors. - Abstract: Low nickel-high manganese austenitic stainless steel alloys, SSMn9Ni and SSMn10Ni, were developed to use as a shielding material in fusion reactor system. A standard austenitic stainless steel SS316L was prepared and studied as a reference sample. The microstructure properties of the present stainless steel alloys were investigated using Schaeffler diagram, optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction pattern. Mainly, an austenite phase was observed for the prepared stainless steel alloys. Additionally, a small ferrite phase was observed in SS316L and SSMn10Ni samples. The mechanical properties of the prepared alloys were studied using Vickers hardness and tensile tests at room temperature. The studied manganese stainless steel alloys showed higher hardness, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength than SS316L. On the other hand, the manganese stainless steel elongation had relatively lower values than the standard SS316L. The removal cross section for both slow and total slow (primary and those slowed down in sample) neutrons were carried out using {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. Gamma ray attenuation parameters were carried out for different gamma ray energy lines which emitted from {sup 60}Co and {sup 232}Th radioactive sources. The developed manganese stainless steel alloys had a higher total slow removal cross section than SS316L. While the slow neutron and gamma rays were nearly the same for all studied stainless steel alloys. From the obtained results, the developed manganese stainless steel alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactor system with low activation based on the short life

  20. Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Bedinger, George M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Titanium is a mineral commodity that is essential to the smooth functioning of modern industrial economies. Most of the titanium produced is refined into titanium dioxide, which has a high refractive index and is thus able to impart a durable white color to paint, paper, plastic, rubber, and wallboard. Because of their high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance, titanium metal and titanium metal alloys are used in the aerospace industry as well as for welding rod coatings, biological implants, and consumer goods.Ilmenite and rutile are currently the principal titanium-bearing ore minerals, although other minerals, including anatase, perovskite, and titanomagnetite, could have economic importance in the future. Ilmenite is currently being mined from two large magmatic deposits hosted in rocks of Proterozoic-age anorthosite plutonic suites. Most rutile and nearly one-half of the ilmenite produced are from heavy-mineral alluvial, fluvial, and eolian deposits. Titanium-bearing minerals occur in diverse geologic settings, but many of the known deposits are currently subeconomic for titanium because of complications related to the mineralogy or because of the presence of trace contaminants that can compromise the pigment production process.Global production of titanium minerals is currently dominated by Australia, Canada, Norway, and South Africa; additional amounts are produced in Brazil, India, Madagascar, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, and Sri Lanka. The United States accounts for about 4 percent of the total world production of titanium minerals and is heavily dependent on imports of titanium mineral concentrates to meet its domestic needs.Titanium occurs only in silicate or oxide minerals and never in sulfide minerals. Environmental considerations for titanium mining are related to waste rock disposal and the impact of trace constituents on water quality. Because titanium is generally inert in the environment, human health risks from titanium and titanium

  1. EUGENOL POLYMER MODIFIED TITANIUM ELECTRODE FOR THE ANALYSIS OF CARBOCYSTEINE

    OpenAIRE

    S. EL QOUATLI; R. T. NGONO; R. NAJIH; A. CHTAINI

    2012-01-01

    A eugenol polymer immobilized electrode was developed for the assay of the carbocysteine compound. The electrochemical sensor was made by in situ electropolymerization of eugenol at titanium electrode. Cyclic voltamperometry at prepared electrode permitted to point out a reversible pattern for carbocysteine electrooxidation.

  2. EUGENOL POLYMER MODIFIED TITANIUM ELECTRODE FOR THE ANALYSIS OF CARBOCYSTEINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. EL QOUATLI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A eugenol polymer immobilized electrode was developed for the assay of the carbocysteine compound. The electrochemical sensor was made by in situ electropolymerization of eugenol at titanium electrode. Cyclic voltamperometry at prepared electrode permitted to point out a reversible pattern for carbocysteine electrooxidation.

  3. Mass transfer behavior of a modified austenitic stainless steel in lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that was developed to resist neutron damage was exposed to lithium in the high-temperature part of a thermal convection loop for 6700 h. Specimens of this Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) composed of 65.0 Fe-15.9 Ni-13.0 Cr-1.9 Mo-1.9 Mn-1.7 Si-0.5 Ti-0.05 C (wt %) were exposed at 600 and 570 0 C in both solution annealed and cold worked forms. The dissolution process was found to be similar to other austenitic alloys in flowing lithium: weight losses of PCA eventually became linearly proportional to exposure time with the specimen surfaces exhibiting porous layers depleted in nickel and chromium. However, the measured weight losses and dissolution rates of these PCA specimens were higher than those of type 316 stainless steel exposed under similar conditions and can be attributed to the higher nickel concentration of the former alloy. The effect of cold work on dissolution rates was less definitive, particularly at 570 0 C. At longer exposure times, the annealed PCA specimen exposed at 600 0 C suffered greater dissolution than the cold worked material, while no effect of prior deformation was observed by analysis of the respective surfaces

  4. Bloodcompatibility improvement of titanium oxide film modified by phosphorus ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, P.; Leng, Y.X.; Zhao, A.S.; Zhou, H.F.; Xu, L.X.; Hong, S.; Huang, N.

    2006-01-01

    Our recent investigation suggested that Ti-O thin film could be a newly developed antithrombotic material and its thromboresistance could be related to its physical properties of wide gap semiconductor. In this work, titanium oxide film was modified by phosphorus ion implantation and succeeding vacuum annealing. RBS were used to investigate phosphorus distribution profile. Contact angle test results show that phosphorus-doped titanium oxide film becomes more hydrophilic after higher temperature annealing, while its electric conductivity increases. Antithrombotic property of phosphorus-doped titanium oxide thin films was examined by clotting time and platelet adhesion tests. The results suggest that phosphorus doping is an effective way to improve the bloodcompatibility of titanium oxide film, and it is related to the changes of electron structure and surface properties caused by phosphorus doping

  5. Treatment of Patellar Lower Pole Fracture with Modified Titanium Cable Tension Band Plus Patellar Tibial Tunnel Steel "8" Reduction Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaming; Wang, Decheng; He, Zhiliang; Shi, Hao

    2018-01-08

    To determine the efficacy of modified titanium tension band plus patellar tendon tunnel steel 8 "reduction band" versus titanium cable tension band fixation for the treatment of patellar lower pole fracture. 58 patients with lower patella fracture were enrolled in this study, including 30 patients treated with modified titanium cable tension band plus patellar tibial tunnel wire "8" tension band internal fixation (modified group), and 28 patients with titanium cable tension band fixation. All patients were followed up for 9∼15 months with an average of 11.6 months. Knee flexion was significantly improved in the modified group than in the titanium cable tension band group (111.33 ± 13 degrees versus 98.21 ± 21.70 degrees, P = 0.004). The fracture healing time showed no significant difference. At the end of the follow-up, the improvement excellent rate was 93.33% in the modified group, and 82.14% in the titanium cable tension band group. Titanium cable tension band internal fixation loosening was found in 2 cases, including 1 case of treatment by two surgeries without loose internal fixation. The modified titanium cable tension band with "8" tension band fixation showed better efficacy for lower patella fractures than titanium cable tension band fixation.

  6. Assessment of modified gold surfaced titanium implants on skeletal fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zainali, Kasra; Danscher, Gorm; Jakobsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    shown to liberate gold ions through the process termed dissolucytosis. Furthermore, gold ions are known to act in an anti-inflammatory manner by inhibiting cellular NF-κB-DNA binding. The present study investigated whether partial coating of titanium implants could augment early osseointegration...... and increase mechanical fixation. Cylindrical porous coated Ti-6Al4V implants partially coated with metallic gold were inserted in the proximal region of the humerus in ten canines and control implants without gold were inserted in contralateral humerus. Observation time was 4 weeks. Biomechanical push out...

  7. The structure and properties of fluoroplastic modified with titanium nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronin, G. S.; Buznik, V. M.; Dmitriev, O. S.; Zavrazhina, C. V.; Mishchenko, S. V.; Zavrazhin, D. O.; Khudyakov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    The results of studying the structure and properties of a mixture of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and fillers, which are composites of ultrafine polytetrafluoroethylene and titanium (TiFP) nanoparticles, are presented. These composites are obtained with pyrolytic redistribution of a powdered PTFE - (NH4)2TiF6 mixture. It has been found that the composite properties depend on the type and concentration of the inorganic filler and the composite production technology. The created composites exceed the original PTFE in a number of characteristics (deflection temperature, thermal conductivity and durability).

  8. Titanium dioxide modified with various amines used as sorbents of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapica-Kozar, Joanna; Pirog, Ewa; Kusiak-Nejman, Ewelina; Wrobel, Rafal J.; Gesikiewicz-Puchalska, Andzelika; Morawski, Antoni W.; Narkiewicz, Urszula; Michalkiewicz, Beata

    2017-01-01

    In this study, titanium dioxide was modified with various amines through hydrothermal treatment for adsorption of CO_2. The carbon dioxide adsorption performance of the prepared samples was measured using an STA 449 C thermo-balance (Netzsch Company, Germany). The morphological structures, functional groups and elemental compositions of the unmodified and amine-modified titanium dioxide sorbents were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR/DR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results showed that modification of TiO_2 with amines through hydrothermal treatment is a simple method to prepare CO_2 sorbents with high adsorption capacities. Moreover, the results revealed that TEPA-modified titanium dioxide shoved the highest adsorption capacity, enabling an increase in CO_2 uptake from 0.45 mmol CO_2 g"-"1 in the case of raw TiO_2 to 1.63 mmol CO_2 g"-"1. This result could be indirectly related to the fact that TEPA has the highest amino group content among the three amines used in our research. Additionally, durability tests performed by cyclic adsorption-desorption revealed that TEPA modified titanium dioxide also possesses excellent stability, despite a slight decrease in adsorption capacity over time. (authors)

  9. Arsenic removal from aqueous solutions by sorption onto zirconium- and titanium-modified sorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Ljubiša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic reduction in drinking water can include treatment by adsorption, switching to alternative water sources, or blending with water that has a lower arsenic concentration. Commercial sorbents MTM, Greensand and BIRM (Clack Corporation were modified with zirconium and titanium after activation. The modifications were performed with titanium tetrachloride and zirconium tetrachloride. The modified sorbents were dried at different temperatures. The sorption of arsenate and arsenite dissolved in drinking water (200μg L-1 onto the sorbents were tested using a batch procedure. After removal of the sorbent, the concentration of arsenic was determined by HG-AAS. Zirconium-modified BIRM showed the best performance for the removal of both arsenite and arsenate. Modification of the greensand did not affect arsenic sorption ability. Zirconium-modified BIRM diminished the concentration of total As to below 5 μg L-1.

  10. Modified titanium surface with gelatin nano gold composite increases osteoblast cell biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Bhattarai, Govinda; Aryal, Santosh; Lee, Nan-Hee; Lee, Min-Ho; Kim, Tae-Gun; Jhee, Eun-Chung; Kim, Hak-Yong; Yi, Ho-Keun

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the gelatin nano gold (GnG) composite for surface modification of titanium in addition to insure biocompatibility on dental implants or biomaterials. The GnG composite was constructed by gelatin and hydrogen tetrachloroaurate in presence of reducing agent, sodium borohydrate (NabH 4 ). The GnG composite was confirmed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A dipping method was used to modify the titanium surface by GnG composite. Surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The MC-3T3 E1 cell viability was assessed by trypan blue and the expression of proteins to biocompatibility were analyzed by Western blotting. The GnG composite showed well dispersed character, the strong absorption at 530 nm, roughness, regular crystal and clear C, Na, Cl, P, and Au signals onto titanium. Further, this composite allowed MC-3T3 E1 growth and viability compared to gelatin and pure titanium. It induced ERK activation and the expression of cell adherent molecules, FAK and SPARC, and growth factor, VEGF. However, GnG decreased the level of SAPK/JNK. This shows that GnG composite coated titanium surfaces have a good biocompatibility for osteoblast growth and attachment than in intact by simple and versatile dipping method. Furthermore, it offers good communication between cell and implant surfaces by regulating cell signaling and adherent molecules, which are useful to enhance the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces.

  11. Evaluation of Osseointegration of Titanium Alloyed Implants Modified by Plasma Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Gabler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available By means of plasma polymerization, positively charged, nanometre-thin coatings can be applied to implant surfaces. The aim of the present study was to quantify the adhesion of human bone cells in vitro and to evaluate the bone ongrowth in vivo, on titanium surfaces modified by plasma polymer coatings. Different implant surface configurations were examined: titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V coated with plasma-polymerized allylamine (PPAAm and plasma-polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA versus uncoated. Shear stress on human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells was investigated in vitro using a spinning disc device. Furthermore, bone-to-implant contact (BIC was evaluated in vivo. Custom-made conical titanium implants were inserted at the medial tibia of female Sprague-Dawley rats. After a follow-up of six weeks, the BIC was determined by means of histomorphometry. The quantification of cell adhesion showed a significantly higher shear stress for MG-63 cells on PPAAm and PPEDA compared to uncoated Ti6Al4V. Uncoated titanium alloyed implants showed the lowest BIC (40.4%. Implants with PPAAm coating revealed a clear but not significant increase of the BIC (58.5% and implants with PPEDA a significantly increased BIC (63.7%. In conclusion, plasma polymer coatings demonstrate enhanced cell adhesion and bone ongrowth compared to uncoated titanium surfaces.

  12. A Strontium-Modified Titanium Surface Produced by a New Method and Its Biocompatibility In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chundong Liu

    Full Text Available To present a new and effective method of producing titanium surfaces modified with strontium and to investigate the surface characteristics and in vitro biocompatibility of titanium (Ti surfaces modified with strontium (Sr for bone implant applications.Sr-modified Ti surfaces were produced by sequential treatments with NaOH, strontium acetate, heat and water. The surface characteristics and the concentration of the Sr ions released from the samples were examined. Cell adhesion, morphology and growth were investigated using osteoblasts isolated from the calvaria of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats. Expression of osteogenesis-related genes and proteins was examined to assess the effect of the Sr-modified Ti surfaces on osteoblasts.The modified titanium surface had a mesh structure with significantly greater porosity, and approximately5.37±0.35at.% of Sr was incorporated into the surface. The hydrophilicity was enhanced by the incorporation of Sr ions and water treatment. The average amounts of Sr released from the Sr-modified plates subjected to water treatment were slight higher than the plates without water treatment. Sr promoted cellular adhesion, spreading and growth compared with untreated Ti surfaces. The Sr-modified Ti plates also promoted expression of osteogenesis-related genes,and expression of OPN and COL-І by osteoblasts. Ti plates heat treated at 700°C showed increased bioactivity in comparison with those treated at 600°C. Water treatment upregulated the expression of osteogenesis-related genes.These results show that Sr-modification of Ti surfaces may improve bioactivity in vitro. Water treatment has enhanced the response of osteoblasts. The Sr-modified Ti heat-treated at 700°C exhibited better bioactivity compared with that heated at 600°C.

  13. A Strontium-Modified Titanium Surface Produced by a New Method and Its Biocompatibility In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chundong; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Lichao; Zhang, Xinhua; Chen, Qiuyue; Wu, Buling

    2015-01-01

    To present a new and effective method of producing titanium surfaces modified with strontium and to investigate the surface characteristics and in vitro biocompatibility of titanium (Ti) surfaces modified with strontium (Sr) for bone implant applications. Sr-modified Ti surfaces were produced by sequential treatments with NaOH, strontium acetate, heat and water. The surface characteristics and the concentration of the Sr ions released from the samples were examined. Cell adhesion, morphology and growth were investigated using osteoblasts isolated from the calvaria of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats. Expression of osteogenesis-related genes and proteins was examined to assess the effect of the Sr-modified Ti surfaces on osteoblasts. The modified titanium surface had a mesh structure with significantly greater porosity, and approximately5.37±0.35at.% of Sr was incorporated into the surface. The hydrophilicity was enhanced by the incorporation of Sr ions and water treatment. The average amounts of Sr released from the Sr-modified plates subjected to water treatment were slight higher than the plates without water treatment. Sr promoted cellular adhesion, spreading and growth compared with untreated Ti surfaces. The Sr-modified Ti plates also promoted expression of osteogenesis-related genes,and expression of OPN and COL-І by osteoblasts. Ti plates heat treated at 700°C showed increased bioactivity in comparison with those treated at 600°C. Water treatment upregulated the expression of osteogenesis-related genes. These results show that Sr-modification of Ti surfaces may improve bioactivity in vitro. Water treatment has enhanced the response of osteoblasts. The Sr-modified Ti heat-treated at 700°C exhibited better bioactivity compared with that heated at 600°C.

  14. The electrochemical behavior and surface structure of titanium electrodes modified by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, G.F.; Xie, Z.; Huang, W.Q.; Yang, S.B.; Zhao, L.H.

    2004-01-01

    Industrial grade titanium modified by ion implantation and sputtering was used as electrodes. The effect of ion beam modification on the electrochemical behavior and surface structure of electrodes was investigated. Also discussed is the hydrogen evolution process of the electrode in acidic solution. Several ions such as Fe + , C + , W + , Ni + and others, were implanted into the electrode. The electrochemical tests were carried out in 1N H 2 SO 4 solution at 30±1 deg. C. The electrode potential was measured versus a saturate calomel electrode as a function of immersion time. The cathodic polarization curves were measured by the stable potential static method. The surface layer composition and the chemical state of the electrodes were also investigated by Auger electron spectrometer (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique. The results show that: (1) the stability of modified electrodes depends on the active elements introduced by ion implantation and sputtering deposition. (2) The hydrogen evolution activity of industrial grade titanium may be improved greatly by ion beam modification. (3) Ion beam modification changed the composition and the surface state of electrodes over a certain depth range and forms an activity layer having catalytic hydrogen evolution, which inhibited the absorption of hydrogen and formation of titanium hydride. Thus promoted hydrogen evolution and improved the hydrogen evolution catalytic activity in industrial grade titanium

  15. Effect of Amelogenin Coating of a Nano-Modified Titanium Surface on Bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisato Terada

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between implants and host tissues depend on several factors. In particular, a growing body of evidence has demonstrated that the surface texture of an implant influences the response of the surrounding cells. The purpose of this study is to develop new implant materials aiming at the regeneration of periodontal tissues as well as hard tissues by coating nano-modified titanium with amelogenin, which is one of the main proteins contained in Emdogain®. We confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance evaluation that amelogenin is easy to adsorb onto the nano-modified titanium surface as a coating. Scanning electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses confirmed that amelogenin coated the nano-modified titanium surface following alkali-treatment. In vitro evaluation using rat bone marrow and periodontal ligament cells revealed that the initial adhesion of both cell types and the induction of hard tissue differentiation such as cementum were improved by amelogenin coating. Additionally, the formation of new bone in implanted surrounding tissues was observed in in vivo evaluation using rat femurs. Together, these results suggest that this material may serve as a new implant material with the potential to play a major role in the advancement of clinical dentistry.

  16. Radiation-induced evolution of austenite matrix in silicon-modified AISI 316 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    The microstructures of a series of silicon-modified AISI 316 alloys irradiated to fast neutron fluences of about 2-3 and 10 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV at temperatures ranging from 400 0 C to 600 0 C have been examined. The irradiation of AISI 316 leads to an extensive repartition of several elements, particularly nickel and silicon, between the matrix and various precipitate phases. The segregation of nickel at void and grain boundary surfaces at the expense of other faster-diffusing elements is a clear indication that one of the mechanisms driving the microchemical evolution is the Inverse Kirkendall effect. There is evidence that at one sink this mechanism is in competition with the solute drag process associated with interstitial gradients

  17. Using sewage sludge pyrolytic gas to modify titanium alloy to obtain high-performance anodes in bio-electrochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Ying, Kang; Shen, Dongsheng; Huang, Lijie; Ying, Xianbin; Huang, Haoqian; Cheng, Kun; Chen, Jiazheng; Zhou, Yuyang; Chen, Ting; Feng, Huajun

    2017-12-01

    Titanium is under consideration as a potential stable bio-anode because of its high conductivity, suitable mechanical properties, and electrochemical inertness in the operating potential window of bio-electrochemical systems; however, its application is limited by its poor electron-transfer capacity with electroactive bacteria and weak ability to form biofilms on its hydrophobic surface. This study reports an effective and low-cost way to convert a hydrophobic titanium alloy surface into a hydrophilic surface that can be used as a bio-electrode with higher electron-transfer rates. Pyrolytic gas of sewage sludge is used to modify the titanium alloy. The current generation, anodic biofilm formation surface, and hydrophobicity are systematically investigated by comparing bare electrodes with three modified electrodes. Maximum current density (15.80 A/m2), achieved using a modified electrode, is 316-fold higher than that of the bare titanium alloy electrode (0.05 A/m2) and that achieved by titanium alloy electrodes modified by other methods (12.70 A/m2). The pyrolytic gas-modified titanium alloy electrode can be used as a high-performance and scalable bio-anode for bio-electrochemical systems because of its high electron-transfer rates, hydrophilic nature, and ability to achieve high current density.

  18. Modified Titanium Surface-Mediated Effects on Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Chaudhari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of titanium implants is used to enhance osseointegration. The study objective was to evaluate five modified titanium surfaces in terms of cytocompatibility and pro-osteogenic/pro-angiogenic properties for human mesenchymal stromal cells: amorphous microporous silica (AMS, bone morphogenetic protein-2 immobilized on AMS (AMS + BMP, bio-active glass (BAG and two titanium coatings with different porosity (T1; T2. Four surfaces served as controls: uncoated Ti (Ti, Ti functionalized with BMP-2 (Ti + BMP, Ti surface with a thickened titanium oxide layer (TiO2 and a tissue culture polystyrene surface (TCPS. The proliferation of eGFP-fLuc (enhanced green fluorescence protein-firefly luciferase transfected cells was tracked non-invasively by fluorescence microscopy and bio-luminescence imaging. The implant surface-mediated effects on cell differentiation potential was tracked by determination of osteogenic and angiogenic parameters [alkaline phosphatase (ALP; osteocalcin (OC; osteoprotegerin (OPG; vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A]. Unrestrained cell proliferation was observed on (unfunctionalized Ti and AMS surfaces, whereas BAG and porous titanium coatings T1 and T2 did not support cell proliferation. An important pro-osteogenic and pro-angiogenic potential of the AMS + BMP surface was observed. In contrast, coating the Ti surface with BMP did not affect the osteogenic differentiation of the progenitor cells. A significantly slower BMP-2 release from AMS compared to Ti supports these findings. In the unfunctionalized state, Ti was found to be superior to AMS in terms of OPG and VEGF-A production. AMS is suggested to be a promising implant coating material for bioactive agents delivery.

  19. Crystallography and Morphology of MC Carbides in Niobium-Titanium Modified As-Cast HP Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Karl G.; Kral, Milo V.; Bishop, Catherine M.

    2014-07-01

    The microstructures of two as-cast heats of HP alloy stainless steels modified with niobium and titanium were examined with particular attention paid to the interdendritic niobium-titanium-rich carbides formed during solidification of these alloys. Generally, these precipitates obtain a blocky morphology in the as-cast condition. However, the (NbTi)C precipitates may obtain a nodular morphology. To provide further insight to the origin of the two different morphologies obtained by the (NbTi)C precipitates in the HP-NbTi alloy, the microstructure and crystallography of each have been studied in detail using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, various electron diffraction methods (EBSD, SAD, and CBED), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  20. Effect of Ti additions on the swelling of electron irradiated austenitic steels and Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbon, D.; Didout, G.; Le Naour, L.; Levy, V.

    1979-01-01

    It has been shown that titanium is a beneficial additive for the swelling of austenitic steels. The amplitude of the effects observed depends much on the nature and concentration of the other additives in the austenitic matrix [fr

  1. Optical, Physical, and Chemical Properties of Surface Modified Titanium Dioxide Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    PROPERTIES OF SURFACE MODIFIED TITANIUM DIOXIDE POWDERS fwn Scivrxc fa SciWcrrs Brendan G. DeLacy RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE David R. Redding ...NUMBER 5c PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) DeLacy, Brendan G. (SAIC) Redding , David R. (ECBC); and Matthews. Joshua 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...X3,300?t>5flm* ** aJI ^-15 SEf Figure 7 - SEM Image #1 of CR-470 •i i .#1. • ^ iW i > hp ^•R^^^Ay *£ $ ^< W^# K HB8 %^ vj\\ X

  2. Visible Light Photocatalytic Properties of Modified Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles via Aluminium Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessy Ariyanti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 has gained much attentions for the last few decades due to its remarkable performance in photocatalysis and some other related properties. However, its wide bandgap (~3.2 eV can only absorb UV energy which is only ~5% of solar light spectrum. The objective of this research was to improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 by improving the optical absorption to the visible light range. Here, colored TiO2 nanoparticles range from light to dark grey were prepared via aluminium treatment at the temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 oC. The modified TiO2 is able to absorb up to 50% of visible light (400-700 nm and shows a relatively good photocatalytic activity in organic dye (Rhodamine B degradation under visible light irradiation compared with the commercial TiO2. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 10th November 2015; Revised: 7th January 2016; Accepted: 7th January 20 How to Cite: Ariyanti, D., Dong, J.Z., Dong, J.Y., Gao, W. (2016. Visible Light Photocatalytic Properties of Modified Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles via Aluminium Treatment. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (1: 40-47. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.1.414.40-47 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.1.414.40-47

  3. Acute and subchronic toxicity analysis of surface modified paclitaxel attached hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubbu, Gopinath Devanand; Ramasamy, S; Gaddam, Pramod Reddy; Kumar, J

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are widely used for targeted drug delivery applications. Surface modification with appropriate polymer and ligands is carried out to target the drug to the affected area. Toxicity analysis is carried out to evaluate the safety of the surface modified nanoparticles. In this study, paclitaxel attached, folic acid functionalized, polyethylene glycol modified hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were used for targeted drug delivery system. The toxicological behavior of the system was studied in vivo in rats and mice. Acute and subchronic studies were carried out. Biochemical, hematological, and histopathological analysis was also done. There were no significant alterations in the biochemical parameters at a low dosage. There was a small change in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level at a high dosage. The results indicate a safe toxicological profile. PMID:26491315

  4. Osseointegration improvement by plasma electrolytic oxidation of modified titanium alloys surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry-Rendón, Mónica; Galvis, Oscar; Quintero Giraldo, David; Pavón, Juan; López-Lacomba, José Luis; Jiménez-Piqué, Emilio; Anglada, Marc; Robledo, Sara M; Castaño, Juan G; Echeverría, Félix

    2015-02-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a material frequently used in orthopedic applications, due to its good mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. However, formation of a non-adherent fibrous tissue between material and bone drastically could affect the osseointegration process and, therefore, the mechanical stability of the implant. Modifications of topography and configuration of the tissue/material interface is one of the mechanisms to improve that process by manipulating parameters such as morphology and roughness. There are different techniques that can be used to modify the titanium surface; plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is one of those alternatives, which consists of obtaining porous anodic coatings by controlling parameters such as voltage, current, anodizing solution and time of the reaction. From all of the above factors, and based on previous studies that demonstrated that bone cells sense substrates features to grow new tissue, in this work commercially pure Ti (c.p Ti) and Ti6Al4V alloy samples were modified at their surface by PEO in different anodizing solutions composed of H2SO4 and H3PO4 mixtures. Treated surfaces were characterized and used as platforms to grow osteoblasts; subsequently, cell behavior parameters like adhesion, proliferation and differentiation were also studied. Although the results showed no significant differences in proliferation, differentiation and cell biological activity, overall results showed an important influence of topography of the modified surfaces compared with polished untreated surfaces. Finally, this study offers an alternative protocol to modify surfaces of Ti and their alloys in a controlled and reproducible way in which biocompatibility of the material is not compromised and osseointegration would be improved.

  5. Titanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Muris, Joris; Jakobsen, Stig S

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to titanium (Ti) from implants and from personal care products as nanoparticles (NPs) is common. This article reviews exposure sources, ion release, skin penetration, allergenic effects, and diagnostic possibilities. We conclude that human exposure to Ti mainly derives from dental...... and medical implants, personal care products, and foods. Despite being considered to be highly biocompatible relative to other metals, Ti is released in the presence of biological fluids and tissue, especially under certain circumstances, which seem to be more likely with regard to dental implants. Although...... most of the studies reviewed have important limitations, Ti seems not to penetrate a competent skin barrier, either as pure Ti, alloy, or as Ti oxide NPs. However, there are some indications of Ti penetration through the oral mucosa. We conclude that patch testing with the available Ti preparations...

  6. Electrochemical and morphological analyses on the titanium surface modified by shot blasting and anodic oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szesz, Eduardo M., E-mail: eszesz@neoortho.com.br [Neoortho Research Institute, Rua Ângelo Domingos Durigan, 607-Cascatinha, CEP 82025-100 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Pereira, Bruno L., E-mail: brnl7@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Kuromoto, Neide K., E-mail: kuromoto@fisica.ufpr.br [Physics Department, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Marino, Claudia E.B., E-mail: claudiamarino@yahoo.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Souza, Gelson B. de, E-mail: gelsonbs@uepg.br [Physics Department, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84051-510 Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Soares, Paulo, E-mail: pa.soares@pucpr.br [Mechanical Engineering Department, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, 80215-901 Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, many surface modification processes have been developed in order to induce the osseointegration on titanium surface and thus to improve the implants' biocompatibility. In this work, Ti surface has been modified by shot blasting followed by anodic oxidation process in order to associate the good surface characteristics of both processes to obtain a rough and porous surface able to promote the titanium surface bioactivity. Commercially pure titanium (grade 2) plates were used on the surface treatments that were as follows: Shot blasting (SB) performed using alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) particles, and anodic oxidation (AO) using NaOH electrolyte. The morphology, structural changes and the open-circuit potentials (OCP) of the surfaces were analyzed. It can be observed that an increase on the roughness of the blasted surface and a rough and porous surface happens after the AO process. The anodic film produced is thin and followed the blasted surface topography. It can be observed that there are small pores with regular shape covering the entire surface. X-ray diffraction results showed the presence of the anatase and rutile phases on the blasted and anodized surface after heat treatment at 600 °C/1 h. Concerning electrochemical measurements, when the different samples were submitted to open-circuit conditions in a physiological electrolyte, the protective effect increases with the oxidation process due to the oxide layer. When the surface was blasted, the OCP was more negative when compared with the Ti surface without surface treatments. - Highlights: ► A combination of shot blasting and anodic oxidation surface treatments is proposed. ► Both processes produced an increase in roughness compared to the polished surface. ► The combination of processes produced a rough and porous surface. ► Open circuit results show that the protective effect increases with oxidation process. ► The combination of processes presents the better results in this

  7. Microstructural stability and thermomechanical processing of boron modified beta titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukuri, Balakrishna

    One of the main objectives during primary processing of titanium alloys is to reduce the prior beta grain size. Producing an ingot with smaller prior beta grain size could potentially eliminate some primary processing steps and thus reduce processing cost. Trace additions of boron have been shown to decrease the as-cast grain size in alpha + beta titanium alloys. The primary focus of this dissertation is to investigate the effect of boron on microstructural stability and thermomechanical processing in beta titanium alloys. Two metastable beta titanium alloys: Ti-15Mo-2.6Nb-3Al-0.2Si (Beta21S) and Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Ti5553) with 0.1 wt% B and without boron additions were used in this investigation. Significant grain refinement of the as-cast microstructure and precipitation of TiB whiskers along the grain boundaries was observed with boron additions. Beta21S and Beta21S-0.1B alloys were annealed above the beta transus temperature for different times to investigate the effect of boron on grain size stability. The TiB precipitates were very effective in restricting the beta grain boundary mobility by Zener pinning. A model has been developed to predict the maximum grain size as a function of TiB size, orientation, and volume fraction. Good agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental results. Beta21S alloys were solution treated and aged for different times at several temperatures below the beta transus to study the kinetics of alpha precipitation. Though the TiB phase did not provide any additional nucleation sites for alpha precipitation, the grain refinement obtained by boron additions resulted in accelerated aging. An investigation of the thermomechanical processing behavior showed different deformation mechanisms above the beta transus temperature. The non-boron containing alloys showed a non-uniform and fine recrystallized necklace structure at grain boundaries whereas uniform intragranular recrystallization was observed in boron containing

  8. Swelling and swelling resistance possibilities of austenitic stainless steels in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Fusion reactor helium generation rates in stainless steels are intermediate to those found in EBR-II and HFIR, and swelling in fusion reactors may differ from the fission swelling behavior. Advanced titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels exhibit much better void swelling resistance than AISI 316 under EBR-II (up to approx. 120 dpa) and HFIR (up to approx. 44 dpa) irradiations. The stability of fine titanium carbide (MC) precipitates plays an important role in void swelling resistance for the cold-worked titanium-modified steels irradiated in EBR-II. Futhermore, increased helium generation in these steels can (a) suppress void conversion, (b) suppress radiation-induced solute segregation (RIS), and (c) stabilize fine MC particles, if sufficient bubble nucleation occurs early in the irradation. The combined effects of helium-enhanced MC stability and helium-suppressed RIS suggest better void swelling resistance in these steels for fusion service than under EBR-II irradiation

  9. Influence of sodium evnironment on the uniaxial tensile behavior of titanium modified type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Chopra, O.K.; Kassner, T.F.

    1978-01-01

    True stress-true strain tensile data have been obtained for titanium modified type 316 stainless steel in the solution annealed condition and after exposure to a flowing sodium environment at temperature of 700, 650, 600 and 550 0 C. The specimens were exposed to sodium for times between 120 and 5012 h to produce carbon penetration depths in the range 0.05-0.30 mm. The Voce equation was used to describe tensile flow curves for plastic strains above 0.005. The results showed that, when compared with solution annealed specimens, the tensile flow behavior of the sodium exposed specimens is characterized by a higher strain hardening rate, which decreases rapidly as the flow stress increases. The loss in tensile ductility of the material due to carburization in sodium environment was found to be minimal. (Auth.)

  10. The corrosion performance of microcrystalline titanium-modified 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, N.; Searson, P.C.; Latanision, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The corrosion performance of rapidly solidified (RS), consolidated RS and conventionally processed titanium-modified nuclear grade 316 stainless steel was studied. As-solidified RS foils exhibited general corrosion behavior identical to that of the conventionally processed alloy, but inferior pitting resistance, due to the presence of dendritic microsegregation. The consolidated RS alloy exhibited inferior general and pitting corrosion performance due to the detrimental effect of the prior foil boundary formed during the consolidation process. The results of immersion tests in 6% FeC1 3 .6H 2 O solution showed that pit initiation occured primarily at the prior foil boundaries in the consolidated RS alloy. Studies of sensitization were inconclusive due to preferential attack on prior foil boundaries in the consolidated RS specimens which made the determination of the degree of sensitization difficult. (author)

  11. Potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac using scandium and silver modified titanium dioxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciola, R.A.; Oliveira, C.T.; Lopes, S.A.; Cavalheiro, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac drug was investigated using titanium dioxide thin films modified with two modifier types, scandium and silver, both prepared by Sol-Gel method. It was demonstrated by UVVis spectroscopy analysis of the solutions containing the drug, under UV-A light irradiation that the degradation efficiency of the titanium dioxide photocatalyst is dependent of the semiconductor nature and that the scandium accelerates the first step of the degradation when compared to the silver. This result seems to be related to the redox potential of the electron-hole pair, once the scandium modifying sample generates a p type semiconductor that reduces the band gap. The extra holes attract more strongly the chorine ion present in diclofenac and leading to the releasing more easily. However, after the first byproducts degradation the following steps are not facilitated, making the silver modifying more advantageous. (author)

  12. A new methodology based on ultrasonic attenuation to characterize dynamically recrystallized microstructure in a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, S.; Kumar, A.; Sivaprasad, P.V.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj; Kumar, S.; Samajdar, I.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a C-scan ultrasonic imaging system has been employed for imaging the microstructural variations during dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel. Four specimens were forged at 1273 K for different strains in the range of 0.1-0.5. It has been observed that the specimen with 0.2 strain or lower did not show any variation in the amplitude of the first backwall echo. However, at and above 0.3 strain, a visible variation in the C-scan images has been observed. This variation has been attributed to the evolution of fine grains. The formation of fine grains, on the other hand, was related to DRX, as indicated by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). (author)

  13. Characterization of friction stir welded joint of low nickel austenitic stainless steel and modified ferritic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Mounarik; Das, Hrishikesh; Ahn, Eun Yeong; Hong, Sung Tae; Kim, Moon-Jo; Han, Heung Nam; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of dissimilar stainless steels, low nickel austenitic stainless steel and 409M ferritic stainless steel, is experimentally investigated. Process responses during FSW and the microstructures of the resultant dissimilar joints are evaluated. Material flow in the stir zone is investigated in detail by elemental mapping. Elemental mapping of the dissimilar joints clearly indicates that the material flow pattern during FSW depends on the process parameter combination. Dynamic recrystallization and recovery are also observed in the dissimilar joints. Among the two different stainless steels selected in the present study, the ferritic stainless steels shows more severe dynamic recrystallization, resulting in a very fine microstructure, probably due to the higher stacking fault energy.

  14. Understanding long-term silver release from surface modified porous titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaram, Anish; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2017-08-01

    Prevention of orthopedic device related infection (ODRI) using antibiotics has met with limited amount of success and is still a big concern during post-surgery. As an alternative, use of silver as an antibiotic treatment to prevent surgical infections is being used due to the well-established antimicrobial properties of silver. However, in most cases silver is used in particulate form with wound dressings or with short-term devices such as catheters but not with load-bearing implants. We hypothesize that strongly adherent silver to load-bearing implants can offer longer term solution to infection in vivo. Keeping that in mind, the focus of this study was to understand the long term release study of silver ions for a period of minimum 6months from silver coated surface modified porous titanium implants. Implants were fabricated using a LENS™ system, a powder based additive manufacturing technique, with at least 25% volume porosity, with and without TiO 2 nanotubes in phosphate buffer saline (pH 7.4) to see if the total release of silver ions is within the toxic limit for human cells. Considering the fact that infection sites may reduce the local pH, silver release was also studied in acetate buffer (pH 5.0) for a period of 4weeks. Along with that, the osseointegrative properties as well as cytotoxicity of porous titanium implants were assessed in vivo for a period of 12weeks using a rat distal femur model. In vivo results indicate that porous titanium implants with silver coating show comparable, if not better, biocompatibility and bonding at the bone-implant interface negating any concerns related to toxicity related to silver to normal cells. The current research is based on our recently patented technology, however focused on understanding longer-term silver release to mitigate infection related problems in load-bearing implants that can even arise several months after the surgery. Prevention of orthopedic device related infection using antibiotics has met

  15. Modified surface of titanium dioxide nanoparticles-based biosensor for DNA detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadzirah, Sh.; Hashim, U.; Rusop, M.

    2018-05-01

    A new technique was used to develop a simple and selective picoammeter DNA biosensor for identification of E. coli O157:H7. This biosensor was fabricated from titanium dioxide nanoparticles that was synthesized by sol-gel method and spin-coated on silicon dioxide substrate via spinner. 3-Aminopropyl triethoxy silane (APTES) was used to modify the surface of TiO2. Simple surface modification approach has been applied; which is single dropping of APTES onto the TiO2 nanoparticles surface. Carboxyl modified probe DNA has been bind onto the surface of APTES/TiO2 without any amplifier element. Electrical signal has been used as the indicator to differentiate each step (surface modification of TiO2 and probe DNA immobilization). The I-V measurements indicate extremely low current (pico-ampere) flow through the device which is 2.8138E-10 A for pure TiO2 nanoparticles, 2.8124E-10 A after APTES modification and 3.5949E-10 A after probe DNA immobilization.

  16. Enhanced compatibility of chemically modified titanium surface with periodontal ligament cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kado, T.; Hidaka, T.; Aita, H.; Endo, K.; Furuichi, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cell-adhesive molecules were covalently immobilized on a Ti surface. ► Immobilized cell-adhesive molecules maintained native function on the Ti surface. ► Immobilized collagen enhanced adhesion of periodontal ligament cells to the Ti. - Abstract: A simple chemical modification method was developed to immobilize cell-adhesive molecules on a titanium surface to improve its compatibility with human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLCs).The polished titanium disk was immersed in 1% (v/v) p-vinylbenzoic acid solution for 2 h to introduce carboxyl groups onto the surface. After rinsing with distilled deionized water, the titanium disk was dipped into 1.47% 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide solution containing 0.1 mg/ml Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS), human plasma fibronectin (pFN), or type I collagen from calf skin (Col) to covalently immobilize the cell-adhesive molecules on the titanium surface via formation of peptide bonds. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that cell-adhesive molecules were successfully immobilized on the titanium surfaces. The Col-immobilized titanium surface revealed higher values regarding nano rough characteristics than the as-polished titanium surface under scanning probe microscopy. The number of HPDLCs attached to both the pFN- and Col-immobilized titanium surfaces was twice that attached to the as-polished titanium surfaces. The cells were larger with the cellular processes that stretched to a greater extent on the pFN- and Col-immobilized titanium surfaces than on the as-polished titanium surface (p < 0.05). HPDLCs on the Col-immobilized titanium surfaces showed more extensive expression of vinculin at the tips of cell projections and more contiguously along the cell outline than on the as-polished, GRGDS-immobilized and pFN-immobilized titanium surfaces. It was concluded that cell-adhesive molecules successfully immobilized on the titanium surface and improved the compatibility of the surface

  17. 2D-Titanium dioxide nanosheets modified with Nd, Ag and Au: Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pližingrová, Eva; Klementová, Mariana; Bezdička, Petr; Boháček, Jaroslav; Barbieriková, Z.; Dvoranová, D.; Mazúr, M.; Krýsa, J.; Šubrt, Jan; Brezová, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 281, MAR (2017), s. 165-180 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20744S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK178 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Modified titanium dioxide * Photocatalysis * Plasmonic effect * EPR spectroscopy * Lyophilization * Spin trapping Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 4.636, year: 2016

  18. Electrochemical Cathodic Polarization, a Simplified Method That Can Modified and Increase the Biological Activity of Titanium Surfaces: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Bernedo Alcazar

    Full Text Available The cathodic polarization seems to be an electrochemical method capable of modifying and coat biomolecules on titanium surfaces, improving the surface activity and promoting better biological responses.The aim of the systematic review is to assess the scientific literature to evaluate the cellular response produced by treatment of titanium surfaces by applying the cathodic polarization technique.The literature search was performed in several databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, Scielo and EBSCO Host, until June 2016, with no limits used. Eligibility criteria were used and quality assessment was performed following slightly modified ARRIVE and SYRCLE guidelines for cellular studies and animal research.Thirteen studies accomplished the inclusion criteria and were considered in the review. The quality of reporting studies in animal models was low and for the in vitro studies it was high. The in vitro and in vivo results reported that the use of cathodic polarization promoted hydride surfaces, effective deposition, and adhesion of the coated biomolecules. In the experimental groups that used the electrochemical method, cellular viability, proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, or bone growth were better or comparable with the control groups.The use of the cathodic polarization method to modify titanium surfaces seems to be an interesting method that could produce active layers and consequently enhance cellular response, in vitro and in vivo animal model studies.

  19. Influence of spacer length on heparin coupling efficiency and fibrinogen adsorption of modified titanium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbureck Uwe

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical bonding of the drug onto surfaces by means of spacer molecules is accompanied with a reduction of the biological activity of the drug due to a constricted mobility since normally only short spacer molecule like aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APMS are used for drug coupling. This work aimed to study covalent attachment of heparin to titanium(oxide surfaces by varying the length of the silane coupling agent, which should affect the biological potency of the drug due to a higher mobility with longer spacer chains. Methods Covalent attachment of heparin to titanium metal and TiO2 powder was carried out using the coupling agents 3-(Trimethoxysilyl-propylamine (APMS, N- [3-(Trimethoxysilylpropyl]ethylenediamine (Diamino-APMS and N1- [3-(Trimethoxy-silyl-propyl]diethylenetriamine (Triamino-APMS. The amount of bound coupling agent and heparin was quantified photometrically by the ninhydrin reaction and the tolidine-blue test. The biological potency of heparin was determined photometrically by the chromogenic substrate Chromozym TH and fibrinogen adsorption to the modified surfaces was researched using the QCM-D (Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring technique. Results Zeta-potential measurements confirmed the successful coupling reaction; the potential of the unmodified anatase surface (approx. -26 mV shifted into the positive range (> + 40 mV after silanisation. Binding of heparin results in a strongly negatively charged surface with zeta-potentials of approx. -39 mV. The retaining biological activity of heparin was highest for the spacer molecule Triamino-APMS. QCM-D measurements showed a lower viscosity for adsorbed fibrinogen films on heparinised surfaces by means of Triamino-APMS. Conclusion The remaining activity of heparin was found to be highest for the covalent attachment with Triamino-APMS as coupling agent due to the long chain of this spacer molecule and therefore the highest mobility of the drug

  20. Assessment of microstructure stability of cold worked Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel during aging using ultrasonic velocity measurements and correlation with mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, M.; Palanichamy, P.

    2003-01-01

    As ultrasonic velocity is sensitive to the changes in texture, it is a more reliable technique than mechanical property measurements for assessment of microstructural stability (recrystallization behaviour) of cold worked alloy where recrystallization is coupled with precipitation. Hence ultrasonic velocity measurements have been employed for studying the influence of Ti/C ratio on the microstructural stability of cold worked Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel during isochronal aging. In this alloy precipitation of TiC is known to retard recovery and recrystallization. The variation in ultrasonic velocity with aging temperature exhibited a three stage behaviour at all three frequencies employed (2, 10 and 20 MHz) and correlated well with the microstructural changes. Based on the microstructural investigations, the three stages have been identified to be recovery, progress of recrystallization and completion of recrystallization. There was one to one correspondence between the variation in the hardness, strength values and the variation in the ultrasonic velocity values as a function of aging temperature in assessing the microstructural changes, except when the interaction between the TiC precipitation and recrystallization is stronger

  1. Cathodic stripping voltammetric determination of chromium in coastal waters on cubic Nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao eHan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The novel cubical nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode for selective and sensitive detection of trace chromium (Cr in coastal water was established based on a simple approach. Nano-titanium carbide is used as the typical cubical nanomaterial with wonderful catalytic activity towards the reduction of Cr(VI. Gold nanoparticles with excellent physical and chemical properties can facilitate electron transfer and enhance the catalytic activity of the modified electrode. Taking advantage of the synergistic effects of nano-titanium carbide and gold nanoparticles, the excellent cathodic signal responses for the stripping determination of Cr(VI can be obtained. The detection limit of this method is calculated as 2.08 μg L-1 with the linear calibration curve ranged from 5.2 to 1040 μg L-1. This analytical method can be used to detect Cr(VI effectively without using any complexing agent. The fabricated electrode was successfully applied for the detection of chromium in coastal waters collected from the estuary giving Cr concentrations between 12.48 and 22.88 μg L-1 with the recovery between 96% and 105%.

  2. The effect of equal channel angular pressing on the tensile properties and microstructure of two medical implant materials: ASTM F-138 austenitic steel and Grade 2 titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes Filho, A. de A.; Sordi, V. L.; Kliauga, A. M.; Ferrante, M.

    2010-07-01

    Titanium and F-138 stainless steel are employed in bone replacement and repair. The former material was ECAP-deformed at room temperature and at 300°C, followed in some cases by cold rolling. The steel was ECAP-deformed at room temperature only. Work-hardening behavior was studied by making use of the Kocks-mecking plots and microstructural evolution was followed by TEM. Conclusions show that for Ti, ECAP combined with cold rolling gives the best strength-ductility combination, whilst room temperature ECAP increases the tensile strength of the steel but caused substantial ductility loss.

  3. The effect of equal channel angular pressing on the tensile properties and microstructure of two medical implant materials: ASTM F-138 austenitic steel and Grade 2 titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filho, A de A Mendes; Sordi, V L; Kliauga, A M; Ferrante, M, E-mail: ferrante@ufscar.b [Federal University of Sao Carlos, Materials Engineering Department, Sao Carlos, 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Titanium and F-138 stainless steel are employed in bone replacement and repair. The former material was ECAP-deformed at room temperature and at 300{sup 0}C, followed in some cases by cold rolling. The steel was ECAP-deformed at room temperature only. Work-hardening behavior was studied by making use of the Kocks-mecking plots and microstructural evolution was followed by TEM. Conclusions show that for Ti, ECAP combined with cold rolling gives the best strength-ductility combination, whilst room temperature ECAP increases the tensile strength of the steel but caused substantial ductility loss.

  4. Study on Modified Water Glass Used in High Temperature Protective Glass Coating for Ti-6Al-4V Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Sodium silicate water glass was modified with sodium polyacrylate as the binder, the composite slurry used for high-temperature oxidation-resistant coating was prepared by mixing glass powder with good lubrication properties in the binder. The properties of the modified binder and high-temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy coated with composite glass coating were studied by XRD, SEM, EDS, TG-DSC and so on. Results showed that sodium polyacrylate modified water glass could obviously improve the suspension stability of the binder, the pyrolytic carbon in the binder at high temperature could increase the surface tension in the molten glass system, and the composite glass coating could be smooth and dense after heating. Pyrolytic carbon diffused and combined with oxygen in the coating under the heating process to protect the titanium alloy from oxidation. The thickness of the oxide layer was reduced 51% after applying the high-temperature oxidation-resistant coating. The coating also showed a nearly 30% reduction in friction coefficient due to the boundary lubricant regime. During cooling, the coating could be peeled off easily because of the mismatched CTE between the coating and substrate.

  5. Wear evaluation of flank in burins of high speed steel modified with titanium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Caballero, J.; V-Niño, E. D.

    2017-12-01

    This report shows the results obtained researching the flank wearing resistance performed by the high-speed steel (HSS) burins without any surface treatment (reference substrate) and others with surface treatment based on Titanium ions. The flank wearing was carried out by means of an industrial process by chip removal with repetitive tests of dry finished turning of AISI/SAE 1045 steel bars. The useful service life of the burins was evaluated according to ISO 3685:1993, and it was found that the burins treated with Titanium ions showed an increase in the flank wearing resistance with respect to the ones used as reference.

  6. Precipitation and cavity formation in austenitic stainless steels during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Mansur, L.K.

    1982-01-01

    Microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels subjected to displacement damage at high temperature is strongly influenced by the interaction between helium atoms and second phase particles. Cavity nucleation occurs by the trapping of helium at partially coherent particle-matrix interfaces. The recent precipitate point defect collector theory describes the more rapid growth of precipitate-attached cavities compared to matrix cavities where the precipitate-matrix interface collects point defects to augment the normal point deflect flux to the cavity. Data are presented which support these ideas. It is shown that during nickel ion irradiation of a titanium-modified stainless steel at 675 0 C the rate of injection of helium has a strong effect on the total swelling and also on the nature and distribution of precipitate phases. (orig.)

  7. Osteoblast response on co-modified titanium surfaces via anodization and electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayram, Cem [Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Beytepe, 06800 (Turkey); Chemistry Department, Aksaray University, Aksaray, 68100 (Turkey); Demirbilek, Murat; Yalçın, Eda [Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Beytepe, 06800 (Turkey); Bozkurt, Murat; Doğan, Metin [Orthopaedics and Traumatology Division, Yıldırım Beyazıt University, School of Medicine, Cankaya, 06550 (Turkey); Denkbaş, Emir Baki, E-mail: denkbas@hacettepe.edu.tr [Chemistry Department, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Beytepe, 06800 (Turkey)

    2014-01-01

    Topography plays a key role in osseointegration and surface modifications at the subcellular level, increasing initial cell attachment in the early period. In the past decade, nanosized texture on metal like a nanotube layer and also more recently extracellular matrix like surface modifications – such as polymeric nanofibrils – have been proposed for a better osseointegration in the literature. Here, we investigate two types of nanoscaled modifications alone and together for the first time. We characterized different types of surface modifications morphologically and investigated how they affected osteoblast cells in vitro, in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content. We anodized titanium samples with a thickness of 0.127 mm to obtain a nanotubular titania layer and the silk fibroin (SF), as a biocompatible polymeric material, was electrospun onto both anodized and unanodized samples to acquire 4 sample groups. We analyzed the resulting samples morphologically by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cell adhesion, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium content were evaluated at 3, 7 and 14 days. We found that cell proliferation increased by 70% on the groups having two modifications respect to unmodified titanium and after 7 days, ALP activity and calcium content were 110% and 150%, respectively, higher on surfaces having both surface treatments than that of unmodified group. In conclusion, a nanotube layer and SF nanofibers on a titanium surface enhanced cell attachment and proliferation most. Comodification of titanium surfaces by anodization and SF electrospinning may be useful to enhance osseointegration but it requires in vivo confirmation.

  8. Titanium implants with modified surfaces: Meta-analysis of in vivo osteointegration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasik, Michael, E-mail: michael.gasik@aalto.fi [Aalto University Foundation, School of Chemical Technology, P.O. Box 16200, FIN-00076 AALTO (Finland); Braem, Annabel [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Chaudhari, Amol; Duyck, Joke [Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, BIOMAT Research Cluster, KU Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7a, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Vleugels, Jozef [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2015-04-01

    Titanium-based implants are widely used in modern clinical practice, but their “optimal” properties in terms of porosity and topology, roughness and hydrophilic parameters are being a subject of intensive discussions. Recent in vitro results have shown a possibility to optimize the surface of an implant with maximal repelling of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis) and improvement in human osteogenic and endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In this work, these different grades titanium implants were tested in vivo using the same analytical methodology. In addition to material parameters, key histomorphometrical parameters such a regeneration area, bone adaptation area and bone-to-implant contact were determined after 2 and 4 weeks of implantation in rabbit animal model. Porous implants have more clear differences than non-porous ones, with the best optimum values obtained on hydrothermally treated electrophoretically deposited titanium. These in vivo data correlate well with the optimal prediction made by in vitro tests. - Highlights: • Various titanium specimens were studied in vivo on osteointegration vs their properties. • Non-porous implants had a better performance when coated with bioactive glass. • Porous implants have shown the best results for hydrothermally treated specimens. • Good correlation was found with the previous in vitro tests. • New analysis of the in vivo data has shown benefits to assess biomaterials performance.

  9. Titanium implants with modified surfaces: Meta-analysis of in vivo osteointegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasik, Michael; Braem, Annabel; Chaudhari, Amol; Duyck, Joke; Vleugels, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Titanium-based implants are widely used in modern clinical practice, but their “optimal” properties in terms of porosity and topology, roughness and hydrophilic parameters are being a subject of intensive discussions. Recent in vitro results have shown a possibility to optimize the surface of an implant with maximal repelling of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis) and improvement in human osteogenic and endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In this work, these different grades titanium implants were tested in vivo using the same analytical methodology. In addition to material parameters, key histomorphometrical parameters such a regeneration area, bone adaptation area and bone-to-implant contact were determined after 2 and 4 weeks of implantation in rabbit animal model. Porous implants have more clear differences than non-porous ones, with the best optimum values obtained on hydrothermally treated electrophoretically deposited titanium. These in vivo data correlate well with the optimal prediction made by in vitro tests. - Highlights: • Various titanium specimens were studied in vivo on osteointegration vs their properties. • Non-porous implants had a better performance when coated with bioactive glass. • Porous implants have shown the best results for hydrothermally treated specimens. • Good correlation was found with the previous in vitro tests. • New analysis of the in vivo data has shown benefits to assess biomaterials performance

  10. Cell interaction with modified nanotubes formed on titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, H.; Vandrovcová, Marta; Chotová, K.; Fojt, J.; Průchová, E.; Joska, L.; Bačáková, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, Aug 1 (2016), s. 313-322 ISSN 0928-4931 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01558S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : titanium * electrochemical oxidation * hydrothermal modification * thermal treatment * protein adsorption * cell interaction Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 4.164, year: 2016

  11. Osseointegration properties of titanium dental implants modified with a nanostructured coating based on ordered porous silica and bioactive glass nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covarrubias, Cristian, E-mail: ccovarrubias@odontologia.uchile.cl [Laboratory of Nanobiomaterials, Institute for Research in Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Mattmann, Matías [Laboratory of Nanobiomaterials, Institute for Research in Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Von Marttens, Alfredo [Department of Prosthesis, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Caviedes, Pablo; Arriagada, Cristián [Laboratory of Cell Therapy, ICBM, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile (Chile); Valenzuela, Francisco [Laboratory of Nanobiomaterials, Institute for Research in Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Rodríguez, Juan Pablo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, INTA, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Corral, Camila [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The fabrication of a coating for osseointegration of titanium implant is presented. • The coating consists of nanoporous silica loaded with bioactive glass nanoparticles. • Coating accelerates the in vitro formation of apatite in simulated body fluid. • Coating promotes the osteogenic differentiation of stem cells. • Coating accelerates the formation of bone tissue in the periphery of the implant. - Abstract: The fabrication of a nanoporous silica coating loaded with bioactive glass nanoparticles (nBG/NSC) on titanium dental implant surface and its in vitro and in vivo evaluation is presented. The coating was produced by a combined sol–gel and evaporation induced self-assembly process. In vitro bioactivity was assessed in simulated body fluid (SBF) and investigating the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). A rat tibial model was employed to analyze the bone response to nBG/NSC-modified titanium implant surface in vivo. The nBG/NSC coating was confirmed at nano level to be constituted by a highly ordered nanoporous silica structure. The coating nanotopography in conjunction with the bioactivity of the BG particles accelerate the in vitro apatite formation and promote the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in absence of osteogenic supplements. These properties accelerate the formation of bone tissue in the periphery of the implant after 3 weeks of implantation. Backscattered scanning electron microscopy images revealed the presence of gaps and soft tissue in the unmodified implant after 6 weeks, whereas the nBG/NSC-modified implant showed mature bone in intimate contact with the implant surface. The nBG/NSC coating appears promising for accelerating the osseointegration of dental implants.

  12. Osseointegration properties of titanium dental implants modified with a nanostructured coating based on ordered porous silica and bioactive glass nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covarrubias, Cristian; Mattmann, Matías; Von Marttens, Alfredo; Caviedes, Pablo; Arriagada, Cristián; Valenzuela, Francisco; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Corral, Camila

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The fabrication of a coating for osseointegration of titanium implant is presented. • The coating consists of nanoporous silica loaded with bioactive glass nanoparticles. • Coating accelerates the in vitro formation of apatite in simulated body fluid. • Coating promotes the osteogenic differentiation of stem cells. • Coating accelerates the formation of bone tissue in the periphery of the implant. - Abstract: The fabrication of a nanoporous silica coating loaded with bioactive glass nanoparticles (nBG/NSC) on titanium dental implant surface and its in vitro and in vivo evaluation is presented. The coating was produced by a combined sol–gel and evaporation induced self-assembly process. In vitro bioactivity was assessed in simulated body fluid (SBF) and investigating the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). A rat tibial model was employed to analyze the bone response to nBG/NSC-modified titanium implant surface in vivo. The nBG/NSC coating was confirmed at nano level to be constituted by a highly ordered nanoporous silica structure. The coating nanotopography in conjunction with the bioactivity of the BG particles accelerate the in vitro apatite formation and promote the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in absence of osteogenic supplements. These properties accelerate the formation of bone tissue in the periphery of the implant after 3 weeks of implantation. Backscattered scanning electron microscopy images revealed the presence of gaps and soft tissue in the unmodified implant after 6 weeks, whereas the nBG/NSC-modified implant showed mature bone in intimate contact with the implant surface. The nBG/NSC coating appears promising for accelerating the osseointegration of dental implants.

  13. Osseointegration properties of titanium dental implants modified with a nanostructured coating based on ordered porous silica and bioactive glass nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias, Cristian; Mattmann, Matías; Von Marttens, Alfredo; Caviedes, Pablo; Arriagada, Cristián; Valenzuela, Francisco; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Corral, Camila

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of a nanoporous silica coating loaded with bioactive glass nanoparticles (nBG/NSC) on titanium dental implant surface and its in vitro and in vivo evaluation is presented. The coating was produced by a combined sol-gel and evaporation induced self-assembly process. In vitro bioactivity was assessed in simulated body fluid (SBF) and investigating the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). A rat tibial model was employed to analyze the bone response to nBG/NSC-modified titanium implant surface in vivo. The nBG/NSC coating was confirmed at nano level to be constituted by a highly ordered nanoporous silica structure. The coating nanotopography in conjunction with the bioactivity of the BG particles accelerate the in vitro apatite formation and promote the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in absence of osteogenic supplements. These properties accelerate the formation of bone tissue in the periphery of the implant after 3 weeks of implantation. Backscattered scanning electron microscopy images revealed the presence of gaps and soft tissue in the unmodified implant after 6 weeks, whereas the nBG/NSC-modified implant showed mature bone in intimate contact with the implant surface. The nBG/NSC coating appears promising for accelerating the osseointegration of dental implants.

  14. [Experimental study on the corrosion behavior of a type of oral near β-type titanium alloys modified with double glow plasma nitriding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ke; Li, Fenglan

    2015-12-01

    To study the electrochemical corrosion performance of a type of biomedical materials near beta titanium alloy(Ti-3Zr-2Sn-3Mo-25Nb, TLM) in artificial saliva before and after nitride changing, and to provide clinical basis for clinical application of titanium alloy TLM. The double glow plasma alloying technology was used to nitride the surface of titanium alloy TLM. The surface properties of the modified layer were observed and tested by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, glow discharge spectrum analyzer, X-ray diffraction and micro hardness tester. Then, electrochemical measurement system was used to test and compare titanium alloy TLM's electrochemical corrosion in artificial saliva before and after its surface change. Finally, the surface morphology of the original titanium alloy and the modified layer was compared by scanning electron microscope. By the technology of double glow plasma nitriding, the surface of the titanium alloy TLM had been successfully nitrided with a modified layer of 4-5 µm in thickness, uniform and compact. Its main compositions were Ti and Ti(2)N. The Microhardness of modified layer also had been improved from (236.8 ± 5.4) to (871.8 ± 5.2) HV. The self-corrosion potential in electrochemical corrosion tests had been increased from -0.559 V to -0.540 V, while the self- corrosion current density had been reduced from 2.091 × 10(-7) A/cm(2) to 7.188 × 10(-8) A/cm(2). Besides, alternating-current impedance(AC Impedance) had also been increased. With the scanning electron microscope, it's obvious that the diameter of corrosion holes on modified layer were approximately 10 µm. As to the diameter and number of corrosion holes on modified layer, they had been decreased comparing with the original titanium alloy. The type of near beta titanium alloy TLM can construct a nitriding modified layer on its surface. Meanwhile, the performance of its anti- corrosion in artificial saliva has been improved, comparing to the original

  15. Adherence of extracellular matrix components to modified surfaces of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelzer, C; Uhlmann, E; Meinke, M; Lademann, J; Hansen, U

    2009-01-01

    The adherence of biological materials on metal surfaces is of special importance in biology and medicine. The underlying interactions between surface and biological materials (e.g. extracellular matrix components or cells) are responsible for the application as a medical device. Numerous products are made of pure titanium and titanium alloys. This paper shows the influence of a laser production technology on machined surfaces of TiAl 6 V 4 and the resulting adherence of biological material on the basis of the surface characterisation. In this study, different machined TiAl 6 V 4 surfaces were used for coatings with extracellular matrix components. For this process, different coating with collagen I monomers and a complex mixture of extracellular matrix proteins derived from the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone were analysed. The efficiency of the coating was analysed by different methods and the results are presented in this paper

  16. Grain-resolved analysis of localized deformation in nickel-titanium wire under tensile load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedmák, P; Pilch, J; Heller, L; Kopeček, J; Wright, J; Sedlák, P; Frost, M; Šittner, P

    2016-08-05

    The stress-induced martensitic transformation in tensioned nickel-titanium shape-memory alloys proceeds by propagation of macroscopic fronts of localized deformation. We used three-dimensional synchrotron x-ray diffraction to image at micrometer-scale resolution the grain-resolved elastic strains and stresses in austenite around one such front in a prestrained nickel-titanium wire. We found that the local stresses in austenite grains are modified ahead of the nose cone-shaped buried interface where the martensitic transformation begins. Elevated shear stresses at the cone interface explain why the martensitic transformation proceeds in a localized manner. We established the crossover from stresses in individual grains to a continuum macroscopic internal stress field in the wire and rationalized the experimentally observed internal stress field and the topology of the macroscopic front by means of finite element simulations of the localized deformation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Effects of a hybrid micro/nanorod topography-modified titanium implant on adhesion and osteogenic differentiation in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjie; Li, Zihui; Huang, Qingfeng; Xu, Ling; Li, Jinhua; Jin, Yuqin; Wang, Guifang; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2013-01-01

    Various methods have been used to modify titanium implant surfaces with the aim of achieving better osseointegration. In this study, we fabricated a clustered nanorod structure on an acid-etched, microstructured titanium plate surface using hydrogen peroxide. We also evaluated biofunctionalization of the hybrid micro/nanorod topography on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to investigate the surface topography and phase composition of the modified titanium plate. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and seeded on the plate. The adhesion ability of the cells was then assayed by cell counting at one, 4, and 24 hours after cell seeding, and expression of adhesion-related protein integrin β1 was detected by immunofluorescence. In addition, a polymerase chain reaction assay, alkaline phosphatase and Alizarin Red S staining assays, and osteopontin and osteocalcin immunofluorescence analyses were used to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation behavior of the cells. The hybrid micro/nanoscale texture formed on the titanium surface enhanced the initial adhesion activity of the rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Importantly, the hierarchical structure promoted osteogenic differentiation of these cells. This study suggests that a hybrid micro/nanorod topography on a titanium surface fabricated by treatment with hydrogen peroxide followed by acid etching might facilitate osseointegration of a titanium implant in vivo.

  18. Collageneous matrix coatings on titanium implants modified with decorin and chondroitin sulfate: characterization and influence on osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Susanne; Douglas, Timothy; Hanke, Thomas; Scharnweber, Dieter; Tippelt, Sonja; Monsees, Thomas K; Funk, Richard H W; Worch, Hartmut

    2006-06-01

    Studies in developmental and cell biology have established the fact that responses of cells are influenced to a large degree by morphology and composition of the extracellular matrix. Goal of this work is to use this basic principle to improve the biological acceptance of implants by modifying the surfaces with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), utilizing the natural self-assembly potential of collagen in combination with further ECM components in close analogy to the situation in vivo. Aiming at load-bearing applications in bone contact, collagen type I in combination with the proteoglycan decorin and the glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate (CS) was used; fibrillogenesis, fibril morphology, and adsorption of differently composed fibrils onto titanium were assessed. Both decorin and CS could be integrated into the fibrils during fibrillogenesis, the amount bound respectively desorbed depending on the ionic strength of fibrillogenesis buffer. Including decorin always resulted in a significant decrease of fibril diameter, CS in only a slight decrease or even increase, depending on the collagen preparation used. No significant changes in adsorption to titanium could be detected. Osteoblastic cells showed different reactions for cytoskeletal arrangement and osteopontin expression depending on the composition of the ECM, with CS enhancing the osteoblast phenotype.

  19. Physicochemical properties and in vitro cytocompatibility of modified titanium surfaces prepared via micro-arc oxidation with different calcium concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Sui-Dan; Zhang, Hui [Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Dong, Xu-Dong [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Ning, Cheng-Yun [College of Material Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Fok, Alex S.L. [Minnesota Dental Research Center of Biomaterials and Biomechanics, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414 (United States); Wang, Yan, E-mail: wyan65@163.com [Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China)

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • MAO coating improves the surface characteristics and cytocompatibility of titanium. • Composition of MAO coating varies with the electrolyte concentration. • MAO coating properties can be optimized by adjusting the electrolyte concentration. • Higher CA concentration contributes to more favorable MAO coating cytocompatibility. - Abstract: Objective: To explore the effect of calcium concentration in the electrolyte solution on the physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of coatings formed by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) on titanium surfaces. Methods: The surfaces of pure titanium plates were modified by MAO in an electrolytic solution containing calcium acetate (CA; C{sub 4}H{sub 6}CaO{sub 4}) at concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 M and β-glycerophosphate disodium salt pentahydrate (β-GP; C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Na{sub 2}O{sub 6}P·5H{sub 2}O) at a fixed concentration of 0.02 M. Surface topography, elemental characteristics, phase composition, and roughness were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, and a surface roughness tester, respectively. To assess the cytocompatibility and osteoinductivity of the surfaces, MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts were cultured on the surfaces in vitro, and cell morphology, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation were observed. Results: The porous MAO coating was composed primarily of TiO{sub 2} rutile and anatase. The amount of TiO{sub 2} rutile, the Ca/P ratio, and the surface roughness of the MAO coating increased with increasing CA concentration in the electrolyte solution. Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, and CaTiO{sub 3} were formed on MAO-treated surfaces prepared with CA concentrations of 0.2 and 0.3 M. Cell proliferation and differentiation increased with increasing CA concentration, with MC3T3-E1 cells exhibiting favorable morphologies for bone–implant integration. Conclusions: MAO coating improves the surface characteristics and

  20. Physicochemical properties and in vitro cytocompatibility of modified titanium surfaces prepared via micro-arc oxidation with different calcium concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Sui-Dan; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Xu-Dong; Ning, Cheng-Yun; Fok, Alex S.L.; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • MAO coating improves the surface characteristics and cytocompatibility of titanium. • Composition of MAO coating varies with the electrolyte concentration. • MAO coating properties can be optimized by adjusting the electrolyte concentration. • Higher CA concentration contributes to more favorable MAO coating cytocompatibility. - Abstract: Objective: To explore the effect of calcium concentration in the electrolyte solution on the physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of coatings formed by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) on titanium surfaces. Methods: The surfaces of pure titanium plates were modified by MAO in an electrolytic solution containing calcium acetate (CA; C 4 H 6 CaO 4 ) at concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 M and β-glycerophosphate disodium salt pentahydrate (β-GP; C 3 H 7 Na 2 O 6 P·5H 2 O) at a fixed concentration of 0.02 M. Surface topography, elemental characteristics, phase composition, and roughness were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, and a surface roughness tester, respectively. To assess the cytocompatibility and osteoinductivity of the surfaces, MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts were cultured on the surfaces in vitro, and cell morphology, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation were observed. Results: The porous MAO coating was composed primarily of TiO 2 rutile and anatase. The amount of TiO 2 rutile, the Ca/P ratio, and the surface roughness of the MAO coating increased with increasing CA concentration in the electrolyte solution. Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , CaCO 3 , and CaTiO 3 were formed on MAO-treated surfaces prepared with CA concentrations of 0.2 and 0.3 M. Cell proliferation and differentiation increased with increasing CA concentration, with MC3T3-E1 cells exhibiting favorable morphologies for bone–implant integration. Conclusions: MAO coating improves the surface characteristics and cytocompatibility of titanium for osseointegration. Higher CA

  1. Determination of quercetin using a photo-electrochemical sensor modified with titanium dioxide and a platinum(II)-porphyrin complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Li; Wang, Binbin; Chen, Ruizhan; Gao, Ye; Chen, Yanling; Li, Tianjiao

    2015-01-01

    A glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified with a film containing titanium dioxide and a Pt(II)-porphyrin complex, and its response to quercetin was investigated employing cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The oxidation current caused by quercetin is largely enhanced under UV illumination. The effects of pH value, mass of TiO 2 in the film, UV illumination time and applied potential were studied. Under optimized conditions, the peak current at a typically applied voltage of +0.4 V depends linearly on the concentration of quercetin in the 0.002 to 50 mg L −1 range. The detection limit (at an SNR of 3) is 0.8 μg L −1 . The method was successfully applied to the determination of quercetin in (spiked) samples of tea and apple juice. (author)

  2. Attenuation of Neutron and Gamma Radiation by a Composite Material Based on Modified Titanium Hydride with a Varied Boron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastrebinskii, R. N.

    2018-04-01

    The investigations on estimating the attenuation of capture gamma radiation by a composite neutron-shielding material based on modified titanium hydride and Portland cement with a varied amount of boron carbide are performed. The results of calculations demonstrate that an introduction of boron into this material enables significantly decreasing the thermal neutron flux density and hence the levels of capture gamma radiation. In particular, after introducing 1- 5 wt.% boron carbide into the material, the thermal neutron flux density on a 10 cm-thick layer is reduced by 11 to 176 factors, and the capture gamma dose rate - from 4 to 9 times, respectively. The difference in the degree of reduction in these functionals is attributed to the presence of capture gamma radiation in the epithermal region of the neutron spectrum.

  3. Electrochemically assisted deposition of strontium modified magnesium phosphate on titanium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meininger, M.; Wolf-Brandstetter, C.; Zerweck, J.; Wenninger, F.; Gbureck, U.; Groll, J.; Moseke, C.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemically assisted deposition was utilized to produce ceramic coatings on the basis of magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) on corundum-blasted titanium surfaces. By the addition of defined concentrations of strontium nitrate to the coating electrolyte Sr 2+ ions were successfully incorporated into the struvite matrix. By variation of deposition parameters it was possible to fabricate coatings with different kinetics of Sr 2+ into physiological media, whereas the release of therapeutically relevant strontium doses could be sustained over several weeks. Morphological and crystallographic examinations of the immersed coatings revealed that the degradation of struvite and the release of Sr 2+ ions were accompanied by a transformation of the coating to a calcium phosphate based phase similar to low-crystalline hydroxyapatite. These findings showed that strontium doped struvite coatings may provide a promising degradable coating system for the local application of strontium or other biologically active metal ions in the implant–bone interface. - Highlights: • Sr-doped struvite coatings have been deposited on titanium by electrochemically assisted deposition. • Sr content can be adjusted by means of process time, current density and pulse mode. • Sr-doped coatings release therapeutically relevant Sr doses in physiological media for several weeks. • During immersion in physiological media Sr-doped struvite coatings transform into a low crystalline calcium phosphate phase.

  4. Cell spreading on titanium dioxide film formed and modified with aerosol beam and femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinonaga, Togo, E-mail: togo@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 1-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tsukamoto, Masahiro [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Akiko; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Hanawa, Takao [Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Matsushita, Nobuhiro [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Xie, Guoqiang [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Karahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Abe, Nobuyuki [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is widely used in biomaterials because of its excellent anti-corrosion properties and high strength. However, Ti has no biological function, so its bioactivity must be improved. Coating a titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) film on a Ti plate surface has been shown to improve the biocompatibility of Ti plates. If periodic nanostructures were formed on the film surface, the direction of cell spreading might be controlled by the direction of the grooves. Controlling cell spreading on biomaterials would contribute to the creation of advanced biomaterials. In this paper, a TiO{sub 2} film was formed on a Ti plate with an aerosol beam composed of sub micron-sized TiO{sub 2} particles and helium gas. Periodic nanostructures, lying perpendicular to the laser electric field polarization vector, were formed on the film by scanning the femtosecond laser focusing spot. The period and height of the periodic nanostructures were about 230 nm and 150 nm, respectively. In a cell test, cell spreading was observed along the grooves of the periodic nanostructures; in contrast, cell spreading did not show a definite direction on TiO{sub 2} a film without periodic nanostructures. These results suggest that the direction of cell spreading on the film can be controlled by periodic nanostructure formation generated using a femtosecond laser.

  5. Topography and nanostructural evaluation of chemically and thermally modified titanium substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Hoda; Behnamghader, Aliasghar; Afshar, Abdollah

    2016-10-01

    In this research, the effects of chemical and thermal treatment on the morphological and compositional aspects of titanium substrates and so, potentially, on development of biomimetic bone like layers formation during simulated body fluid (SBF) soaking was investigated. The HF, HF/HNO3 and NaOH solutions were used for chemical treatment and some of alkali-treated samples followed a heat treatment at 600°C. The treated samples before and after soaking were subjected to material characterization tests using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). White light interferometry (WLI) was used to determine the roughness parameters such as Ra, Rq, RKu and Rsk. The significance of the obtained data was assessed using ANOVA variance analysis between all samples. It was observed that the reaction at grain boundaries and sodium titanate intermediate layers play a great role in the nucleation of calcium phosphate layers. Based on the obtained results in this work, the calcium phosphate microstructure deposited on titanium substrates was more affected by chemical modification than surface topography.

  6. HIGH-QUALITY ORNAMENTAL FINE CONCRETES MODIFIED BY NANOPARTICLES OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazhenov Yuriy Mikhaylovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic method of generation of a stable suspension of nano-particles of titanium dioxide and the strengthening properties of the ornamental fine concrete that contains cement binders with a nano-dispersed additive constitute the subject of the research covered by the authors. Nanoparticles react with the basic chemical elements that compose the concrete and act as crystallization centres. Therefore, the concrete porosity is reduced, while physical and technology-related properties of the ornamental fine concrete are improved. The authors have proven that the application of the nano-dispersed additive that contains titanium dioxide influences the processes of the structure formation in respect of fine ornamental concretes and improves the strength, as well as the water and cold resistance of fine concretes. The improvement is attributed to the dense concrete structure and strong adhesion between cement grains and between the cement and the aggregate. This conclusion is based on the data obtained through the employment of an electronic microscope used to identify the porosity of fine concretes.

  7. Electrochemically assisted deposition of strontium modified magnesium phosphate on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meininger, M. [Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, D-97070 Würzburg (Germany); Wolf-Brandstetter, C. [Max Bergmann Center for Biomaterials, Technical University of Dresden, Budapester Straße 27, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Zerweck, J.; Wenninger, F.; Gbureck, U.; Groll, J. [Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, D-97070 Würzburg (Germany); Moseke, C., E-mail: claus.moseke@fmz.uni-wuerzburg.de [Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, D-97070 Würzburg (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Electrochemically assisted deposition was utilized to produce ceramic coatings on the basis of magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) on corundum-blasted titanium surfaces. By the addition of defined concentrations of strontium nitrate to the coating electrolyte Sr{sup 2+} ions were successfully incorporated into the struvite matrix. By variation of deposition parameters it was possible to fabricate coatings with different kinetics of Sr{sup 2+} into physiological media, whereas the release of therapeutically relevant strontium doses could be sustained over several weeks. Morphological and crystallographic examinations of the immersed coatings revealed that the degradation of struvite and the release of Sr{sup 2+} ions were accompanied by a transformation of the coating to a calcium phosphate based phase similar to low-crystalline hydroxyapatite. These findings showed that strontium doped struvite coatings may provide a promising degradable coating system for the local application of strontium or other biologically active metal ions in the implant–bone interface. - Highlights: • Sr-doped struvite coatings have been deposited on titanium by electrochemically assisted deposition. • Sr content can be adjusted by means of process time, current density and pulse mode. • Sr-doped coatings release therapeutically relevant Sr doses in physiological media for several weeks. • During immersion in physiological media Sr-doped struvite coatings transform into a low crystalline calcium phosphate phase.

  8. Cell spreading on titanium dioxide film formed and modified with aerosol beam and femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinonaga, Togo; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Nagai, Akiko; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Hanawa, Takao; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Xie, Guoqiang; Abe, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is widely used in biomaterials because of its excellent anti-corrosion properties and high strength. However, Ti has no biological function, so its bioactivity must be improved. Coating a titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) film on a Ti plate surface has been shown to improve the biocompatibility of Ti plates. If periodic nanostructures were formed on the film surface, the direction of cell spreading might be controlled by the direction of the grooves. Controlling cell spreading on biomaterials would contribute to the creation of advanced biomaterials. In this paper, a TiO 2 film was formed on a Ti plate with an aerosol beam composed of sub micron-sized TiO 2 particles and helium gas. Periodic nanostructures, lying perpendicular to the laser electric field polarization vector, were formed on the film by scanning the femtosecond laser focusing spot. The period and height of the periodic nanostructures were about 230 nm and 150 nm, respectively. In a cell test, cell spreading was observed along the grooves of the periodic nanostructures; in contrast, cell spreading did not show a definite direction on TiO 2 a film without periodic nanostructures. These results suggest that the direction of cell spreading on the film can be controlled by periodic nanostructure formation generated using a femtosecond laser.

  9. Immobilization of Ag nanoparticles/FGF-2 on a modified titanium implant surface and improved human gingival fibroblasts behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qianli; Mei, Shenglin; Ji, Kun; Zhang, Yumei; Chu, Paul K

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to form a rapid and firm soft tissue sealing around dental implants that resists bacterial invasion. We present a novel approach to modify Ti surface by immobilizing Ag nanoparticles/FGF-2 compound bioactive factors onto a titania nanotubular surface. The titanium samples were anodized to form vertically organized TiO(2) nanotube arrays and Ag nanoparticles were electrodeposited onto the nanotubular surface, on which FGF-2 was immobilized with repeated lyophilization. A uniform distribution of Ag nanoparticles/FGF-2 was observed on the TiO(2) nanotubular surface. The L929 cell line was used for cytotoxicity assessment. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) were cultured on the modified surface for cytocompatibility determination. The Ag/FGF-2 immobilized samples displayed excellent cytocompatibility, negligible cytotoxicity, and enhanced HGF functions such as cell attachment, proliferation, and ECM-related gene expression. The Ag nanoparticles also exhibit some bioactivity. In conclusion, this modified TiO(2) nanotubular surface has a large potential for use in dental implant abutment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Sol–gel synthesis of tantalum oxide and phosphonic acid-modified carbon nanotubes composite coatings on titanium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maho, Anthony; Detriche, Simon; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes used as fillers in composite materials are more and more appreciated for the outstanding range of accessible properties and functionalities they generate in numerous domains of nanotechnologies. In the framework of biological and medical sciences, and particularly for orthopedic applications and devices (prostheses, implants, surgical instruments, …), titanium substrates covered by tantalum oxide/carbon nanotube composite coatings have proved to constitute interesting and successful platforms for the conception of solid and biocompatible biomaterials inducing the osseous regeneration processes (hydroxyapatite growth, osteoblasts attachment). This paper describes an original strategy for the conception of resistant and homogeneous tantalum oxide/carbon nanotubes layers on titanium through the introduction of carbon nanotubes functionalized by phosphonic acid moieties (-P(=O)(OH) 2 ). Strong covalent C-P bonds are specifically inserted on their external sidewalls with a ratio of two phosphonic groups per anchoring point. Experimental results highlight the stronger “tantalum capture agent” effect of phosphonic-modified nanotubes during the sol–gel formation process of the deposits compared to nanotubes bearing oxidized functions (-OH, -C=O, -C(=O)OH). Particular attention is also paid to the relative impact of the rate of functionalization and the dispersion degree of the carbon nanotubes in the coatings, as well as their wrapping level by the tantalum oxide matrix material. The resulting effect on the in vitro growth of hydroxyapatite is also evaluated to confirm the primary osseous bioactivity of those materials. Chemical, structural and morphological features of the different composite deposits described herein are assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electronic microscopies, energy dispersive X-rays analysis (EDX) and peeling tests. Highlights: ► Formation of tantalum/carbon nanotube

  11. Sol–gel synthesis of tantalum oxide and phosphonic acid-modified carbon nanotubes composite coatings on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maho, Anthony [Laboratory of Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Surfaces, University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Fonds pour la Formation à la Recherche dans l' Industrie et dans l' Agriculture (FRIA), Rue d' Egmont 5, B-1000 Bruxelles (Belgium); Detriche, Simon; Delhalle, Joseph [Laboratory of Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Surfaces, University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Mekhalif, Zineb, E-mail: zineb.mekhalif@fundp.ac.be [Laboratory of Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Surfaces, University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes used as fillers in composite materials are more and more appreciated for the outstanding range of accessible properties and functionalities they generate in numerous domains of nanotechnologies. In the framework of biological and medical sciences, and particularly for orthopedic applications and devices (prostheses, implants, surgical instruments, …), titanium substrates covered by tantalum oxide/carbon nanotube composite coatings have proved to constitute interesting and successful platforms for the conception of solid and biocompatible biomaterials inducing the osseous regeneration processes (hydroxyapatite growth, osteoblasts attachment). This paper describes an original strategy for the conception of resistant and homogeneous tantalum oxide/carbon nanotubes layers on titanium through the introduction of carbon nanotubes functionalized by phosphonic acid moieties (-P(=O)(OH){sub 2}). Strong covalent C-P bonds are specifically inserted on their external sidewalls with a ratio of two phosphonic groups per anchoring point. Experimental results highlight the stronger “tantalum capture agent” effect of phosphonic-modified nanotubes during the sol–gel formation process of the deposits compared to nanotubes bearing oxidized functions (-OH, -C=O, -C(=O)OH). Particular attention is also paid to the relative impact of the rate of functionalization and the dispersion degree of the carbon nanotubes in the coatings, as well as their wrapping level by the tantalum oxide matrix material. The resulting effect on the in vitro growth of hydroxyapatite is also evaluated to confirm the primary osseous bioactivity of those materials. Chemical, structural and morphological features of the different composite deposits described herein are assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electronic microscopies, energy dispersive X-rays analysis (EDX) and peeling tests. Highlights: ► Formation of tantalum

  12. Laser-Modified Surface Enhances Osseointegration and Biomechanical Anchorage of Commercially Pure Titanium Implants for Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Omar; Simonsson, Hanna; Palmquist, Anders; Thomsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants inserted in the temporal bone are a vital component of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS). Despite low implant failure levels, early loading protocols and simplified procedures necessitate the application of implants which promote bone formation, bone bonding and biomechanical stability. Here, screw-shaped, commercially pure titanium implants were selectively laser ablated within the thread valley using an Nd:YAG laser to produce a microtopography with a superimposed nanotexture and a thickened surface oxide layer. State-of-the-art machined implants served as controls. After eight weeks’ implantation in rabbit tibiae, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) values increased from insertion to retrieval for both implant types, while removal torque (RTQ) measurements showed 153% higher biomechanical anchorage of the laser-modified implants. Comparably high bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC) were recorded for both implant types but with distinctly different failure patterns following biomechanical testing. Fracture lines appeared within the bone ~30–50 μm from the laser-modified surface, while separation occurred at the bone-implant interface for the machined surface. Strong correlations were found between RTQ and BIC and between RFA at retrieval and BA. In the endosteal threads, where all the bone had formed de novo, the extracellular matrix composition, the mineralised bone area and osteocyte densities were comparable for the two types of implant. Using resin cast etching, osteocyte canaliculi were observed directly approaching the laser-modified implant surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed canaliculi in close proximity to the laser-modified surface, in addition to a highly ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils aligned parallel to the implant surface contour. It is concluded that the physico-chemical surface properties of laser-modified surfaces (thicker oxide, micro- and nanoscale texture) promote bone bonding

  13. Antibacterial and microstructure properties of titanium surfaces modified with Ag-incorporated nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guangzhong; Cheng, Li [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research (China); Yang, Hui-lin [Department of Orthopaedics, Wuxi People' s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhao, Quan-ming, E-mail: abc8385@163.com [Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2016-07-15

    Although titanium (Ti) and its alloys have been widely used as implants in clinical settings, failures still occur mainly due to poor bioactivity and implant-associated infections. Here, we coated Ti implants with TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (TNTs) incorporated with the antibacterial agent Ag to produce Ag-TNTs, through anodization in AgNO{sub 3} and xenon light irradiation. We characterized surface morphology and composition of the coating with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. We investigated surface topography of the coatings by atomic force microscopy (AFM) operated in the tapping mode. The results indicate that Ag was successfully doped onto the TNTs, and that the nanoparticles were mainly distributed on the surface of TNTs. Finally, our antibacterial experiments reveal that Ag-TNTs on Ti implants exhibit excellent antibacterial activities, which promises to have significant clinical applications as implants. (author)

  14. Corrosion properties of modified PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water as a fuel cladding candidate material for supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazono, Yoshihisa; Iwai, Takeo; Abe, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) has been designed and investigated because of its high thermal efficiency and plant simplification. There are some advantages including the use of a single phase coolant with high enthalpy. Supercritical Water (SCW) has never been used in nuclear power applications. There are numerous potential problems, particularly with materials. As the operating temperature of SCWR will be between 553 K and 893 K with a pressure of 25 MPa, the selection of materials is difficult and important. The PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a nuclear fuel cladding material for a Na-cooled fast breeder reactor. Austenitic Fe-base steels were selected for possible use in supercritical water systems because of their corrosion resistance and radiation resistance. The PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel was selected for possible use in supercritical water systems. The corrosion data of PNC1520 in SCW is required but does not exist. The purpose of the present study is to research the corrosion properties for PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in SCW. The SCW corrosion test was performed for the standard PNC1520 (1520S) and the Ti-additional type of PNC1520 (1520T) by using a SCW autoclave. The 1520S and 1520T are the first trial production materials of SCWR cladding candidate material in our group. Corrosion and compatibility tests on the austenitic 1520S and 1520T steels in supercritical water were performed at 673, 773 and 600degC with exposures up to 1000 h. We have evaluated the amount of weight gain, weight loss and weight of scale after the corrosion test in SCW for 1520S and 1520T austenitic steels. After 1000 h corrosion test performed, the weight gains of both austenitic stainless steels were less than 2 g/m 2 at 400degC and 500degC. But 1520T weight increases more and weight loss than 1520S at 600degC. The SEM observation result of the surface after 1000 h corrosion of an test

  15. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I., E-mail: lotkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kashin, Oleg A., E-mail: okashin@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A., E-mail: yulia-k1970@mail.ru; Antonova, Larisa V., E-mail: antonova.la@mail.ru; Matveeva, Vera G., E-mail: matveeva-vg@mail.ru; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A., E-mail: sergeewa.ew@yandex.ru [Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, 650002 (Russian Federation); Kudryashov, Andrey N., E-mail: kudryashov@angioline.ru [Angioline Interventional Device Ltd, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  16. An enzymatic glucose biosensor based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with cylinder-shaped titanium dioxide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhanjun; Xu, Youbao; Li, Juan; Jian, Zhiqin; Yu, Suhua; Zhang, Yongcai; Hu, Xiaoya; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a highly sensitive electrochemical enzymatic glucose biosensor. A glassy carbon electrode was modified with cylinder-shaped titanium dioxide nanorods (TiO 2 -NRs) for the immobilization of glucose oxidase. The modified nanorods and the enzyme biosensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The glucose oxidase on the TiO 2 -NRs displays a high activity and undergoes fast surface-controlled electron transfer. A pair of well-defined quasi-reversible redox peaks was observed at −0.394 and −0.450 V. The TiO 2 -NRs provide a good microenvironment to facilitate the direct electron transfer between enzyme and electrode surface. The biosensor has two linear response ranges, viz. from 2.0 to 52 μM, and 0.052 to 2.3 mM. The lower detection limit is 0.5 μM, and the sensitivity is 68.58 mA M −1 cm −2 . The glucose biosensor is selective, well reproducible, and stable. In our perception, the cylindrically shaped TiO 2 -NRs provide a promising support for the immobilization of proteins and pave the way to the development of high-performance biosensors. (author)

  17. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified concrete materials - influence of utilizing recycled glass cullets as aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Combining the use of photocatalysts with cementitious materials is an important development in the field of photocatalytic air pollution mitigation. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on assessing the effectiveness of pollutant degradation by concrete surface layers that incorporate a photocatalytic material - Titanium Dioxide. The photocatalytic activity of the concrete samples was determined by photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) in the laboratory. Recycled glass cullets, derived from crushed waste beverage bottles, were used to replace sand in preparing the concrete surface layers. Factors, which may affect the pollutant removal performance of the concrete layers including glass color, aggregate size and curing age, were investigated. The results show a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity due to the use of glass cullets as aggregates in the concrete layers. The samples fabricated with clear glass cullets exhibited threefold NO removal efficiency compared to the samples fabricated with river sand. The light transmittance property of glass was postulated to account for the efficiency improvement, which was confirmed by a separate simulation study. But the influence of the size of glass cullets was not evident. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of concrete surface layers decreased with curing age, showing a loss of 20% photocatalytic activity after 56-day curing.

  18. Approach to modify the properties of titanium alloys for use in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilobrov, Iurii; Trachevsky, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The plasticity reserve of Ti-6Al-4V/LaB 6 in comparison with international standards is ∼10%. → Residual porosity may serve as a temporary storage of products of nuclear decay H and He. → Reinforcing additives of LaB x and TiB phases fill the volume of large pores in the material without degrading the properties of the matrix. - Abstract: This article discusses the metallurgical aspects of the modification of titanium alloys for use in the nuclear industry in the future. Irradiation leads to hardening, plastic instability and reduction in fracture toughness in Ti alloys. Sintered compositions Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-4V/LaB 6 have shown methods to reduce embrittlement. Residual porosity may serve as a temporary storage of products of nuclear decay H and He. High uniformity of the element distribution reduces the number of places predisposed to defect cluster formation. The plasticity reserve of Ti-6Al-4V/LaB 6 in comparison with international standards is ∼10%. The boron compounds to the partial absorption of neutrons fill the volume of residual pores in the material without degrading the properties of the matrix Ti-6Al-4V/LaB 6 alloy.

  19. The Photocatalytic Removal of Ortho Chlorophenol from Aqueous Solution Using Modified Fly Ash - Titanium Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Malakootian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The photocatalytic process is a useful method for the effective removal of phenolic compounds. Conducted in the spring‒summer 2013 at the Engineering Research Center for Environmental Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, this experimental study used a modified fly ash‒TiO2 mixture to enhance the photocatalytic removal efficiency of ortho-chlorophenol. Fly ash obatined from the Thermal Power Plant in Zarand, Kerman, was initially washed with sulfuric acid before being oxidized with potassium permanganate. The mixture of modified fly ash and TiO2 was then used for the removal of ortho-chlorophenol in the presence of UV light and the factors involved in the removal process were optimized. It was found that the ortho-chlorophenol removal efficiency recorded by the mixture of modified fly ash and TiO2 was higher than that by each of the modified fly ash or TiO2/UV alone. It was, further, observed that removal efficiency with a modified fly ash to TiO2 ratio of 3:1 rose to 98.8% under optimum conditions (i.e., pH: 2; contact time: 2 h; room temperature (29±2˚C, and a catalyst dose of 0.6 g. The ortho-chlorophenol removal efficiency in real wastewater from the Coal Wash Plant in Zarand was recorded at 88.4%. Based on the results obtained from simultaneous use of modified fly ash and TiO2, the proposed method may be recommended for industrial applications.

  20. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles modified by salicylic acid and arginine: Structure, surface properties and photocatalytic decomposition of p-nitrophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Shanxi Province Key Laboratory of Higee-Oriented Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Feng, Yujie, E-mail: yujief@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Liu, Youzhi; Wei, Bing; Guo, Jiaxin; Jiao, Weizhou [Shanxi Province Key Laboratory of Higee-Oriented Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Zhang, Zhaohan [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Zhang, Qiaoling, E-mail: zhangqiaoling@nuc.edu.cn [Shanxi Province Key Laboratory of Higee-Oriented Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: A simple and versatile synthetic method to produce TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles surface-modified with various organic capping agents can be used for novel multifunctional photocatalysts as required for various applications in energy saving and environmental protection. - Highlights: • SA and Arg was modified through the method of dipping treatment-based on chemical adsorption in saturated solution. • Surface modified TiO{sub 2} applied in photodecomposition of nitroaromatic. • The photoreduction of nitroaromatic and photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation were enhanced by TiO{sub 2}–SA–Arg. • TiO{sub 2}–SA–Arg showed better lipophilic, dispersion and adsorption properties. - Abstract: In this study, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were surface-modified with salicylic acid (SA) and arginine (Arg) using an environmentally friendly and convenient method, and the bonding structure, surface properties and degradation efficiency of p-nitrophenol (PNP) were investigated. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), water contact angle (WCA) measurements, ζ-potentiometric analysis, UV/visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–vis DRS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed to evaluate the modification effect. The degradation rates were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results show that bidentate or bridging bonds are most likely formed between SA/Arg and TiO{sub 2} surface. Surface modification with SA, Arg, or both can improve the lipophilic properties and decrease the zeta potential, and also result in a red shift of the absorption wavelength. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles modified by Arg or both SA and Arg show a large specific surface area and pore volume. Further, degradation

  1. A noninterventional study documenting use and success of implants with a new chemically modified titanium surface in daily dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Giuseppe; Oteri, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    A new chemically modified titanium surface, SLActive, has recently been developed. The results obtained in controlled clinical trials indicate that this implant can be safely used and that it offers predictable results. The goal of this noninterventional study was to verify that the success rates of implants used in daily dental practice are comparable to those reported in controlled clinical trials. This study was a prospective, noninterventional study using implants with a chemically modified surface according to the daily dental practice procedures applied by private practitioners. The choice of the implantation procedure and the loading protocol were the responsibility of the investigator and were chosen according to the patient's needs. Thirty clinical centers actively participated in this study, and 226 patients were treated, of which, 8 patients were lost to follow-up. Because of the noninterventional design of the study, the patients were not selected according to strictly defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Thus, the study included individuals with risk factors such as smoking (24%), untreated gingivitis or periodontitis (9%), and bruxism (6%). The implants were equally distributed between mandible (46%) and maxilla (54%). A bone augmentation procedure was done in 31% of the cases. Early loading (functional loading between 48 hours and 3 months after implant insertion) was applied most frequently (48%), followed by the conventional loading protocol (3 to 6 months after implant placement, 34%). Immediate restoration and immediate loading were rare (7% and 2%, respectively). Of 276 implants inserted and documented, 5 implants failures were reported, all of which were associated with a sinus floor augmentation procedure. The survival rate was 98.2% at the 1-year follow-up visit. The results showed that implants with a chemically modified surface can be successfully restored with success rates similar to those reported in formal clinical trials under more

  2. A comparative wear study of sputtered ZrN coatings on Si and titanium modified stainless steel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Akash; Kuppusami, P.; Thirumurugesan, R.; Mohandas, E.; Geetha, M.; Kamaraj, V.; Kumar, Niranjan

    2010-01-01

    In the present work wear behaviour of ZrN films grown by a pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering method is reported. The films were grown on silicon (100) and titanium modified stainless steel (alloy-D9) substrates by reactive sputtering in a mixture of argon and nitrogen gases. The structural parameters, preferred orientation and crystallite size as a function of substrate temperatures in the range 300-873 K were studied using X-Ray Diffraction. Deposition parameters have been found to influence the growth rate, crystalline structure and surface roughness, which affect the tribological behaviour of the films. A comparative wear study was performed on these substrates with steel and ceramic balls to evaluate the frictional properties of films. The best tribological performance was found for the sample grown with low flow rates of nitrogen (≤ 2 SCCM) at 873K. The coefficient of friction was found to be lower for the films deposited at higher temperature using steel and ceramic balls. This behaviour was correlated with microstructure and deformation behaviour of coatings. (author)

  3. Osteoblastic differentiating potential of dental pulp stem cells in vitro cultured on a chemically modified microrough titanium surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Colli, Marianna; Radunovic, Milena; Zizzari, Vincenzo L; DI Giacomo, Viviana; DI Nisio, Chiara; Piattelli, Adriano; Calvo Guirado, José L; Zavan, Barbara; Cataldi, Amelia; Zara, Susi

    2018-03-30

    Titanium surface modification is critical for dental implant success. Our aim was to determine surfaces influence on dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) viability and differentiation. Implants were divided into sandblasted/acid-etched (control) and sandblasted/acid-etched coated with calcium and magnesium ions (CaMg), supplied as composite (test). Proliferation was evaluated by MTT, differentiation checking osteoblastic gene expression, PGE2 secretion and matrix formation, inflammation by Interleukin 6 (IL-6) detection. MTT and IL-6 do not modify on test. A PGE2 increase on test is recorded. BMP2 is higher on test at early experimental points, Osterix and RUNX2 augment later. Alizarin-red S reveals higher matrix production on test. These results suggest that test surface is more osteoinductive, representing a start point for in vivo studies aiming at the construction of more biocompatible dental implants, whose integration and clinical performance are improved and some undesired effects, such as implant stability loss and further surgical procedures, are reduced.

  4. Microstructure and physical properties of laser Zn modified amorphous-nanocrystalline coating on a titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Ning; Gong, Shui-Li; Shi, Yi-Ning; Suo, Hong-Bo; Wang, Xi-Chang; Deng, Yun-Hua; Shan, Fei-Hu; Li, Jian-Quan

    2014-02-01

    A Zn modified amorphous-nanocrystalline coating was fabricated on a Ti-6Al-4V alloy by laser cladding of the Co-Ti-B4C-Zn-Y2O3 mixed powders. Such coating was researched by means of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), etc. Experimental results indicated that the Co5Zn21 and TiB2 nanocrystalline phases were produced through in situ metallurgical reactions, which blocked the motion of dislocation, and TiB2 grew along (010), (111) and (024). The Co5Zn21 nanocrystals were produced attached to the ceramics, which mainly consisted of the Co nanoparticles embedded in a heterogeneous zinc, and had varied crystalline orientations.

  5. Modified hyperbolic sine model for titanium dioxide-based memristive thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Raudah; Syahirah Kamarozaman, Nur; Fazlida Hanim Abdullah, Wan; Herman, Sukreen Hana

    2018-03-01

    Since the emergence of memristor as the newest fundamental circuit elements, studies on memristor modeling have been evolved. To date, the developed models were based on the linear model, linear ionic drift model using different window functions, tunnelling barrier model and hyperbolic-sine function based model. Although using hyperbolic-sine function model could predict the memristor electrical properties, the model was not well fitted to the experimental data. In order to improve the performance of the hyperbolic-sine function model, the state variable equation was modified. On the one hand, the addition of window function cannot provide an improved fitting. By multiplying the Yakopcic’s state variable model to Chang’s model on the other hand resulted in the closer agreement with the TiO2 thin film experimental data. The percentage error was approximately 2.15%.

  6. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified by Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodka, Dawid; Socha, Robert P.; Bielańska, Elżbieta; Elżbieciak-Wodka, Magdalena; Nowak, Paweł; Warszyński, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 1% Fe 2 O 3 /TiO 2 composite showing high activity in the photocatalytic oxidation of organics was synthetized. • Electrochemical analysis indicated that surface modification of Degussa P25 by Fe 2 O 3 causes the appearance of surface states in such a material. • The enhanced activity of the prepared composite may be ascribed to the occurrence of the photo-Fenton process. - Abstract: Photocatalytic activity of Fe 2 O 3 /TiO 2 composites obtained by precipitation was investigated. The composite material containing 1.0 wt% of iron(III) oxide nanoparticles was obtained by depositing Fe 2 O 3 on the Evonic-Degussa P25 titania surface. SEM, XPS, DRS, CV and EIS techniques were applied to examine synthetized pale orange photocatalyst. The XPS measurements revealed that iron is present mainly in the +3 oxidation state but iron in the +2 oxidation state can be also detected. Electrochemical analysis indicated that surface modification of Degussa P25 by Fe 2 O 3 causes the appearance of surface states in such a material. Nevertheless, based on the DRS measurement it was shown that iron(III) oxide nanoparticles modified the P25 spectral properties but they did not change the band gap width. The photocatalytic activity of Fe 2 O 3 /TiO 2 composite was compared to photocatalytic activity of pristine P25 in photooxidation reaction of model compounds: oxalic acid (OxA) and formic acid (FA). Photodecomposition reaction was investigated in a batch reactor containing aqueous suspension of a photocatalyst illuminated by either UV or artificial sunlight (halogen lamp). The tests proved that nanoparticles deposited on titania surface triggers the increase in photocatalytic activity, this increase depends however on the decomposed substance

  7. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified by Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodka, Dawid [J. Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry PAS, Niezapominajek 8, 30-239 Krakow (Poland); Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Geneva, 30 Quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Socha, Robert P.; Bielańska, Elżbieta [J. Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry PAS, Niezapominajek 8, 30-239 Krakow (Poland); Elżbieciak-Wodka, Magdalena [J. Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry PAS, Niezapominajek 8, 30-239 Krakow (Poland); Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Geneva, 30 Quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Nowak, Paweł, E-mail: ncnowak@cyf-kr.edu.pl [J. Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry PAS, Niezapominajek 8, 30-239 Krakow (Poland); Warszyński, Piotr [J. Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry PAS, Niezapominajek 8, 30-239 Krakow (Poland)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • 1% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} composite showing high activity in the photocatalytic oxidation of organics was synthetized. • Electrochemical analysis indicated that surface modification of Degussa P25 by Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} causes the appearance of surface states in such a material. • The enhanced activity of the prepared composite may be ascribed to the occurrence of the photo-Fenton process. - Abstract: Photocatalytic activity of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} composites obtained by precipitation was investigated. The composite material containing 1.0 wt% of iron(III) oxide nanoparticles was obtained by depositing Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Evonic-Degussa P25 titania surface. SEM, XPS, DRS, CV and EIS techniques were applied to examine synthetized pale orange photocatalyst. The XPS measurements revealed that iron is present mainly in the +3 oxidation state but iron in the +2 oxidation state can be also detected. Electrochemical analysis indicated that surface modification of Degussa P25 by Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} causes the appearance of surface states in such a material. Nevertheless, based on the DRS measurement it was shown that iron(III) oxide nanoparticles modified the P25 spectral properties but they did not change the band gap width. The photocatalytic activity of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} composite was compared to photocatalytic activity of pristine P25 in photooxidation reaction of model compounds: oxalic acid (OxA) and formic acid (FA). Photodecomposition reaction was investigated in a batch reactor containing aqueous suspension of a photocatalyst illuminated by either UV or artificial sunlight (halogen lamp). The tests proved that nanoparticles deposited on titania surface triggers the increase in photocatalytic activity, this increase depends however on the decomposed substance.

  8. Multi-scale cell/surface interaction on modified titanium aluminum vanadium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo

    This dissertation presents a series of experimental studies of the effects of multi-scale cell/surface interactions on modified Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. These include laser-grooved surfaces; porous structures and RGD-coated laser-grooved surfaces. A nano-second DPSS UV lasers with a Gaussian pulse energy profile was used to introduce the desired micro-groove geometries onto Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. This was done without inducing micro-cracks or significant changes in surface chemistry within the heat affected zones. The desired 8-12 mum groove depths and widths were achieved by the control of pulse frequency, scan speed, and the lens focal length that controls spot size. The interactions between human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells and laser-grooved Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were investigated after 48 hours of cell culture. The cell behavior, including cell spreading, alignment and adhesion, was elucidated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), immuno-fluorescence staining and enzymatic detachment. Contact guidance was shown to increase as grooved spacing decreased. For the range of micro-groove geometries studied, micro-grooves with groove spacings of 20 mum provided the best combination of cell orientation and adhesion. Short-term adhesion experiments (15 mins to 1 day) also revealed that there is a positive correlation between cell orientation and cell adhesion. Contact guidance on the micro-grooved surfaces is shown to be enhanced by nano- and micro-scale asperities that provide sites for the attachment of lamellopodia during cell locomotion and spreading. Contact guidance is also promoted by the geometrical confinement provided by laser grooves. An experimental study of initial cell spreading and ingrowth into Ti-6Al-4V porous structures was also carried out on porous structures with different pore sizes and geometries. A combination of SEM, the tetrazolium salt (MTT) colorimetric assay and enzymatic detachment were used to study cell spreading and adhesion. The extent of cell

  9. Characterization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles modified with polyacrylic acid and H2O2 for use as a novel radiosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kenta; Miyazaki, Serika; Numako, Chiya; Ikeno, Shinya; Sasaki, Ryohei; Nishimura, Yuya; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-12-01

    An induction of polyacrylic acid-modified titanium dioxide with hydrogen peroxide nanoparticles (PAA-TiO 2 /H 2 O 2 NPs) to a tumor exerted a therapeutic enhancement of X-ray irradiation in our previous study. To understand the mechanism of the radiosensitizing effect of PAA-TiO 2 /H 2 O 2 NPs, analytical observations that included DLS, FE-SEM, FT-IR, XAFS, and Raman spectrometry were performed. In addition, highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) which PAA-TiO 2 /H 2 O 2 NPs produced with X-ray irradiation were quantified by using a chemiluminescence method and a EPR spin-trapping method. We found that PAA-TiO 2 /H 2 O 2 NPs have almost the same characteristics as PAA-TiO 2 . Surprisingly, there were no significant differences in hROS generation. However, the existence of H 2 O 2 was confirmed in PAA-TiO 2 /H 2 O 2 NPs, because spontaneous hROS production was observed w/o X-ray irradiation. In addition, PAA-TiO 2 /H 2 O 2 NPs had a curious characteristic whereby they absorbed H 2 O 2 molecules and released them gradually into a liquid phase. Based on these results, the H 2 O 2 was continuously released from PAA-TiO 2 /H 2 O 2 NPs, and then released H 2 O 2 assumed to be functioned indirectly as a radiosensitizing factor.

  10. Mechanical and biodegradable properties of porous titanium filled with poly-L-lactic acid by modified in situ polymerization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Masaaki; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Ishii, Daisuke

    2011-10-01

    Porous titanium (pTi) can possess a low Young's modulus equal to that of human bone, depending on its porosity. However, the mechanical strength of pTi deteriorates greatly with increasing porosity. On the other hand, certain medical polymers exhibit biofunctionalities, which are not possessed intrinsically by metallic materials. Therefore, a biodegradable medical polymer, poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), was used to fill in the pTi pores using a modified in-situ polymerization technique. The mechanical and biodegradable properties of pTi filled with PLLA (pTi/PLLA) as fabricated by this technique and the effects of the PLLA filling were evaluated in this study. The pTi pores are almost completely filled with PLLA by the developed process (i.e., technique). The tensile strength and tensile Young's modulus of pTi barely changes with the PLLA filling. However, the PLLA filling improves the compressive 0.2% proof stress of pTi having any porosity and increases the compressive Young's modulus of pTi having relatively high porosity. This difference between the tensile and compressive properties of pTi/PLLA is considered to be caused by the differing resistances of PLLA in the pores to tensile and compressive deformations. The PLLA filled into the pTi pores degrades during immersion in Hanks' solution at 310 K. The weight loss due to PLLA degradation increases with increasing immersion time. However, the rate of weight loss of pTi/PLLA during immersion decreases with increasing immersion time. Hydroxyapatite formation is observed on the surface of pTi/PLLA after immersion for ≥8 weeks. The decrease in the weight-loss rate may be caused by weight gain due to hydroxyapatite formation and/or the decrease in contact area with Hanks' solution caused by its formation on the surface of pTi/PLLA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Osteogenic potential of bone marrow stromal cells on smooth, roughened, and tricalcium phosphate-modified titanium alloy surfaces.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Colombo, John S

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the influence of smooth, roughened, and tricalcium phosphate (TCP)-coated roughened titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) surfaces on the osteogenic potential of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

  12. Cultures and co-cultures of human blood mononuclear cells and endothelial cells for the biocompatibility assessment of surface modified AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stio, Maria; Martinesi, Maria; Treves, Cristina; Borgioli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Samples of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel were subjected either to grinding and polishing procedure, or to grinding and then low temperature glow-discharge nitriding treatment, or to grinding, nitriding and subsequently coating with collagen-I. Nitrided samples, even if only ground, show a higher corrosion resistance in PBS solution, in comparison with ground and polished AISI 316L. Biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro by incubating the samples with either peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), tested separately or in co-culture. HUVEC-PBMC co-culture and co-incubation of HUVEC with PBMC culture medium, after the previous incubation of PBMC with metallic samples, allowed to determine whether the incubation of PBMC with the different samples might affect HUVEC behaviour. Many biological parameters were considered: cell proliferation, release of cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and sICAM-1, gelatinolytic activity of MMPs, and ICAM-1 protein expression. Nitriding treatment, with or without collagen coating of the samples, is able to ameliorate some of the biological parameters taken into account. The obtained results point out that biocompatibility may be successfully tested in vitro, using cultures of normal human cells, as blood and endothelial cells, but more than one cell line should be used, separately or in co-culture, and different parameters should be determined, in particular those correlated with inflammatory phenomena. - Highlights: • Nitriding improves corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of ground AISI 316L. • The metallic samples differently affect different human cell cultures. • PBMC and HUVEC are a suitable model to test in vitro biocompatibility. • Co-cultures show that HUVEC are affected by pre-incubation of PBMC with the samples. • Inflammation parameters must be taken into account for assessing biocompatibility.

  13. Cultures and co-cultures of human blood mononuclear cells and endothelial cells for the biocompatibility assessment of surface modified AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stio, Maria; Martinesi, Maria; Treves, Cristina [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche ‘Mario Serio’, Sezione di Scienze Biochimiche, Università di Firenze, viale Morgagni 50, 50134 Firenze (Italy); Borgioli, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.borgioli@unifi.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale (DIEF), Università di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, 50139 Firenze (Italy)

    2016-12-01

    Samples of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel were subjected either to grinding and polishing procedure, or to grinding and then low temperature glow-discharge nitriding treatment, or to grinding, nitriding and subsequently coating with collagen-I. Nitrided samples, even if only ground, show a higher corrosion resistance in PBS solution, in comparison with ground and polished AISI 316L. Biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro by incubating the samples with either peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), tested separately or in co-culture. HUVEC-PBMC co-culture and co-incubation of HUVEC with PBMC culture medium, after the previous incubation of PBMC with metallic samples, allowed to determine whether the incubation of PBMC with the different samples might affect HUVEC behaviour. Many biological parameters were considered: cell proliferation, release of cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and sICAM-1, gelatinolytic activity of MMPs, and ICAM-1 protein expression. Nitriding treatment, with or without collagen coating of the samples, is able to ameliorate some of the biological parameters taken into account. The obtained results point out that biocompatibility may be successfully tested in vitro, using cultures of normal human cells, as blood and endothelial cells, but more than one cell line should be used, separately or in co-culture, and different parameters should be determined, in particular those correlated with inflammatory phenomena. - Highlights: • Nitriding improves corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of ground AISI 316L. • The metallic samples differently affect different human cell cultures. • PBMC and HUVEC are a suitable model to test in vitro biocompatibility. • Co-cultures show that HUVEC are affected by pre-incubation of PBMC with the samples. • Inflammation parameters must be taken into account for assessing biocompatibility.

  14. Improved stability of titanium based boron-doped chemical vapor deposited diamond thin-film electrode by modifying titanium substrate surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, P.Y.; Lin, F.Y.; Shih, H.C.; Ralchenko, V.G.; Varnin, V.P.; Pleskov, Yu.V.; Hsu, S.F.; Chou, S.S.; Hsu, P.L.

    2008-01-01

    The film quality and electrochemical properties of BDD (boron-doped diamond) thin films grown by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique on titanium substrates that had been subjected to a range of pre-treatment processes were evaluated. The pre-roughened Ti-substrates are shown to support more adherent BDD films. It is evident that acid-etching the Ti-substrate involves surface hydrogenation that enhances nucleation and formation of diamond thereon. The prepared BDD film exhibits wide potential window and electrochemical reversibility. It also demonstrated a better long-term electrochemical stability based on the low variation in voltametric background current upon the exposing of the electrodes to repeated cycles of electrochemical metal deposition/stripping process

  15. Impedimetric PSA aptasensor based on the use of a glassy carbon electrode modified with titanium oxide nanoparticles and silk fibroin nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvidi, Ali; Banaei, Maryam; Tezerjani, Marzieh Dehghan; Molahosseini, Hosein; Jahanbani, Shahriar

    2017-12-14

    This article describes an impedimetric aptasensor for the prostate specific antigen (PSA), a widely accepted prostate cancer biomarker. A glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified with titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 ) and silk fibroin nanofiber (SF) composite. The aptasensor was obtained by immobilizing a PSA-binding aptamer on the AuNP-modified with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol. The single fabrication steps were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The assay has two linear response ranges (from 2.5 fg.mL -1 to 25 pg.mL -1 , and from 25 pg.mL -1 to 25 ng.mL -1 ) and a 0.8 fg.mL -1 detection limit. After optimization of experimental conditions, the sensor is highly selective for PSA over bovine serum albumin and lysozyme. It was successfully applied to the detection of PSA in spiked serum samples. Graphical abstract Schematic of the fabrication of an aptasensor for the prostate specific antigen (PSA). It is based on the use of a glassy carbon electrode modified with gold nanoparticles and titanium oxide-silk fibroin. The immobilization process of aptamer and interaction with PSA were followed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique.

  16. A study of the carbon distribution in retained austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.P.; Drillet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Cold-rolled and annealed transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels were overaged to modify the carbon concentrations (C γ ) in retained austenite. Experimental C γ values were directly obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy and compared with data derived from X-ray diffraction measurements of the austenite lattice parameter (a γ ). In this way, we evaluated the different expressions available in the literature relating C γ to a γ

  17. Evaluation of a carbon paste electrode modified with Strontium substituted bismuth and titanium oxide nanoparticles in the toxic metal chromium (VI determination potentiometric method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Badri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Strontium substituted bismuth and titanium oxide nanoparticles with aurivillius morphology synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and were characterized using XRD. The nanopartcles were used in the composition of the carbon paste to improve conductivity and transduction of chemical signal to electrical signal. A procedure for the determination of chromium is described based on pre-concentration of the dichromate anion at a carbon paste electrode modified. A novel potentiometric Cr6+carbon paste electrode incorporating Strontium substituted bismuth and titanium oxide nanoparticles (SSBTO. Ina acetate buffer solution of pH 5, the sensor displays a rapid and linear response for Cr6+ over the concentration range 1.0×10-5 to 1.0×10-1mol L-1 M with an anionic slope of 54.8± 0.2 mV decade ’ and a detection limit of the order of0.002 /µg ml ‘. The sensor is used for determination of Cr6+ by direct monitoring of Cr6+.The average recoveries of Cr6+at concentration levels of 0.5~40 pg/ml ’is 98.3. The electrode has a short response time (<6s and can be used for at least twenty days without any considerable divergence in potentials and the working pH range was 4.5-6.5. The proposed electrode was successfully used as an indicator for potentiometric determination of Cr6+in water sample.

  18. Fabrication of dopamine-modified hyaluronic acid/chitosan multilayers on titanium alloy by layer-by-layer self-assembly for promoting osteoblast growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xinming, E-mail: xmzhang@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li, Zhaoyang, E-mail: zyli@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yuan, Xubo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2013-11-01

    The bare inert surface of titanium (Ti) alloy typically causes early failures in implants. Layer-by-layer self-assembly is one of the simple methods for fabricating bioactive multilayer coatings on titanium implants. In this study, a dopamine-modified hyaluronic acid/chitosan (DHA/CHI) bioactive multilayer was built on the surface of Ti–24Nb–2Zr (TNZ) alloy. Zeta potential oscillated between −2 and 17 mV for DHA- and CHI-ending layers during the assembly process, respectively. The DHA/CHI multilayer considerably decreased the contact angle and dramatically improved the wettability of TNZ alloy. Atomic force microscopy results revealed a rough surface on the original TNZ alloy, while the surface became smoother and more homogeneous after the deposition of approximately 5 bilayers (TNZ/(DHA/CHI){sub 5}). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that the TNZ/(DHA/CHI){sub 5} sample was completely covered by polyelectrolytes. Pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on the original TNZ alloy and TNZ/(DHA/CHI){sub 5} to evaluate the effects of DHA/CHI multilayer on osteoblast proliferation in vitro. The proliferation of osteoblasts on TNZ/(DHA/CHI){sub 5} was significantly higher than that on the original TNZ alloy. The results of this study indicate that the proposed technique improves the biocompatibility of TNZ alloy and can serve as a potential modification method in orthopedic applications.

  19. Fabrication of dopamine-modified hyaluronic acid/chitosan multilayers on titanium alloy by layer-by-layer self-assembly for promoting osteoblast growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xinming; Li, Zhaoyang; Yuan, Xubo; Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin

    2013-01-01

    The bare inert surface of titanium (Ti) alloy typically causes early failures in implants. Layer-by-layer self-assembly is one of the simple methods for fabricating bioactive multilayer coatings on titanium implants. In this study, a dopamine-modified hyaluronic acid/chitosan (DHA/CHI) bioactive multilayer was built on the surface of Ti–24Nb–2Zr (TNZ) alloy. Zeta potential oscillated between −2 and 17 mV for DHA- and CHI-ending layers during the assembly process, respectively. The DHA/CHI multilayer considerably decreased the contact angle and dramatically improved the wettability of TNZ alloy. Atomic force microscopy results revealed a rough surface on the original TNZ alloy, while the surface became smoother and more homogeneous after the deposition of approximately 5 bilayers (TNZ/(DHA/CHI) 5 ). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that the TNZ/(DHA/CHI) 5 sample was completely covered by polyelectrolytes. Pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on the original TNZ alloy and TNZ/(DHA/CHI) 5 to evaluate the effects of DHA/CHI multilayer on osteoblast proliferation in vitro. The proliferation of osteoblasts on TNZ/(DHA/CHI) 5 was significantly higher than that on the original TNZ alloy. The results of this study indicate that the proposed technique improves the biocompatibility of TNZ alloy and can serve as a potential modification method in orthopedic applications.

  20. Tribological evaluation of surface modified H13 tool steel in warm forming of Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The H13 hot-working tool steel is widely used as die material in the warm forming of Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet. However, under the heating condition, severe friction and lubricating conditions between the H13 tools and Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet would cause difficulty in guaranteeing forming quality. Surface modification may be used to control the level of friction force, reduce the friction wear and extend the service life of dies. In this paper, four surface modification methods (chromium plating, TiAlN coating, surface polishing and nitriding treatment were applied to the H13 surfaces. Taking the coefficient of friction (CoF and the wear degree as evaluation indicators, the high-temperature tribological behavior of the surface modified H13 steel was experimentally investigated under different tribological conditions. The results of this study indicate that the tribological properties of the TiAlN coating under dry friction condition are better than the others for a wide range of temperature (from room temperature to 500 °C, while there is little difference of tribological properties between different surface modifications under graphite lubricated condition, and the variation law of CoF with temperature under graphite lubricated is opposite to that under the dry friction.

  1. An in vivo study on the effect of coating stability on osteointegration performance of collagen/hyaluronic acid multilayer modified titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Haiyong; Zong, Jiajia; Nie, Yanjiao; Wan, Yizao; Zheng, Xiebin

    2018-03-01

    Aseptic loosening of implant is one of the main causes of Ti-based implant failure. In our previous work, a novel stable collagen/hyaluronic acid (Col/HA) multilayer modified titanium coatings (TCs) was developed by layer-by-layer (LBL) covalent immobilization technique, which showed enhanced biological properties compared with TCs that were physically absorbed with Col/HA multilayer in vitro . In this study, a rabbit model with femur condyle defect was employed to compare the osteointegration performance of them. Results indicated that Col/HA multilayer with favourable stability could better facilitate osteogenesis around implants and bone-implant contact. The Col/HA multilayer covalent-immobilized TC may reduce aseptic loosening of implant.

  2. Comparison of surface modified zirconia implants with commercially available zirconium and titanium implants: a histological study in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredes, Tomasz; Kubasiewicz-Ross, Pawel; Gedrange, Tomasz; Dominiak, Marzena; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2014-08-01

    New biomaterials and their various surface modifications should undergo in vitro and in vivo evaluation before clinical trials. The objective of our in vivo study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of newly created zirconium implant surfaces after implantation in the lower jaw of pigs and compare the osseointegration of these dental implants with commercially available zirconium and titanium implants. After a healing period of 12 weeks, a histological analysis of the soft and hard tissues and a histomorphometric analysis of the bone-implant contact (BIC) were performed. The implant surfaces showed an intimate connection to the adjacent bone for all tested implants. The 3 newly created zirconium implant surfaces achieved a BIC of 45% on average in comparison with a BIC of 56% from the reference zirconium implants and 35% from titanium implants. Furthermore, the new zirconium implants had a better attachment to gingival and bone tissues in the range of implant necks as compared with the reference implants. The results suggest that the new implants comparably osseointegrate within the healing period, and they have a good in vivo biocompatibility.

  3. Modified surface morphology of a novel Ti-24Nb-4Zr-7.9Sn titanium alloy via anodic oxidation for enhanced interfacial biocompatibility and osseointegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Tao; Hu, Jing; Li, Shujun; Zou, Qin; Li, Yunfeng; Jiang, Nan; Li, Hui; Li, Jihua

    2016-08-01

    The Ti-24Nb-4Zr-7.9Sn titanium alloy (Ti2448) has shown potential for use in biomedical implants, because this alloy possesses several important mechanical properties, such as a high fracture strength, low elastic modulus, and good corrosion resistance. In this study, we aimed to produce a hierarchical nanostructure on the surface of Ti2448 to endow this alloy with favorable biological properties. The chemical composition of Ti2448 (64.0wt% Ti, 23.9wt% Nb, 3.9wt% Zr, and 8.1wt% Sn) gives this material electrochemical properties that lead to the generation of topographical features under standard anodic oxidation. We characterized the surface properties of pure Ti (Ti), nanotube-Ti (NT), Ti2448, and nanotube-Ti2448 (NTi2448) based on surface morphology (scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy), chemical and phase compositions (X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), and wettability (water contact angle). We evaluated the biocompatibility and osteointegration of implant surfaces by observing the behavior of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured on the surfaces in vitro and conducting histological analysis after in vivo implantation of the modified materials. Our results showed that a hierarchical structure with a nanoscale bone-like layer was achieved along with nanotube formation on the Ti2448 surface. The surface characterization data suggested the superior biocompatibility of the NTi2448 surface in comparison with the Ti, NT, and Ti2448 surfaces. Moreover, the NTi2448 surface showed better biocompatibility for BMSCs in vitro and better osteointegration in vivo. Based on these results, we conclude that anodic oxidation facilitated the formation of a nanoscale bone-like structure and nanotubes on Ti2448. Unlike the modified titanium surfaces developed to date, the NTi2448 surface, which presents both mechanical compatibility and bioactivity, offers excellent biocompatibility and osteointegration, suggesting its potential for

  4. Potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac using scandium and silver modified titanium dioxide thin films; Potencial de degradacao fotocatalitica do diclofenaco potassico utilizando filmes finos de dioxido de titanio modificado com escandio e prata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciola, R.A.; Oliveira, C.T.; Lopes, S.A.; Cavalheiro, A.A., E-mail: rafaelciola@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Navirai, MS (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas Tecnologicas em Recursos Naturais

    2011-07-01

    The potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac drug was investigated using titanium dioxide thin films modified with two modifier types, scandium and silver, both prepared by Sol-Gel method. It was demonstrated by UVVis spectroscopy analysis of the solutions containing the drug, under UV-A light irradiation that the degradation efficiency of the titanium dioxide photocatalyst is dependent of the semiconductor nature and that the scandium accelerates the first step of the degradation when compared to the silver. This result seems to be related to the redox potential of the electron-hole pair, once the scandium modifying sample generates a p type semiconductor that reduces the band gap. The extra holes attract more strongly the chorine ion present in diclofenac and leading to the releasing more easily. However, after the first byproducts degradation the following steps are not facilitated, making the silver modifying more advantageous. (author)

  5. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C.; Gallego, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  6. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels. 3 figures, 3 tables

  7. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels

  8. Formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarins, Arturs, E-mail: arturs.zarins@lu.lv [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Valtenbergs, Oskars [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Kizane, Gunta; Supe, Arnis [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Knitter, Regina; Kolb, Matthias H.H.; Leys, Oliver [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-KWT), 76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Baumane, Larisa [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis, Aizkraukles Street 21, LV-1006, Riga (Latvia); Conka, Davis [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia)

    2016-03-15

    Lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) pebbles with 2.5 wt.% excess of silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) are the European Union's designated reference tritium breeding ceramics for the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Module (TBM). However, the latest irradiation experiments showed that the reference Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles may crack and form fragments under operation conditions as expected in the HCPB TBM. Therefore, it has been suggested to change the chemical composition of the reference Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles and to add titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), to obtain lithium metatitanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) as a second phase. The aim of this research was to investigate the formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) in the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with different contents of TiO{sub 2} for the first time, in order to estimate and compare radiation stability. The reference and the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles were irradiated with accelerated electrons (E = 5 MeV) up to 5000 MGy absorbed dose at 300–990 K in a dry argon atmosphere. By using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy it was determined that in the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles, several paramagnetic RD and RP are formed and accumulated, like, E' centres (SiO{sub 3}{sup 3−}/TiO{sub 3}{sup 3−}), HC{sub 2} centres (SiO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/TiO{sub 3}{sup −}) etc. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with TiO{sub 2} additions have comparable radiation stability with the reference pebbles. - Highlights: • Formation of RD and RP in modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with additions of TiO{sub 2} is analysed for the first time. • Due to additions of TiO{sub 2}, concentration of paramagnetic RD slightly increased in modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles. • Modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles have good radiation stability compared to

  9. Formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarins, Arturs; Valtenbergs, Oskars; Kizane, Gunta; Supe, Arnis; Knitter, Regina; Kolb, Matthias H. H.; Leys, Oliver; Baumane, Larisa; Conka, Davis

    2016-03-01

    Lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) pebbles with 2.5 wt.% excess of silicon dioxide (SiO2) are the European Union's designated reference tritium breeding ceramics for the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Module (TBM). However, the latest irradiation experiments showed that the reference Li4SiO4 pebbles may crack and form fragments under operation conditions as expected in the HCPB TBM. Therefore, it has been suggested to change the chemical composition of the reference Li4SiO4 pebbles and to add titanium dioxide (TiO2), to obtain lithium metatitanate (Li2TiO3) as a second phase. The aim of this research was to investigate the formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) in the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with different contents of TiO2 for the first time, in order to estimate and compare radiation stability. The reference and the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles were irradiated with accelerated electrons (E = 5 MeV) up to 5000 MGy absorbed dose at 300-990 K in a dry argon atmosphere. By using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy it was determined that in the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles, several paramagnetic RD and RP are formed and accumulated, like, E' centres (SiO33-/TiO33-), HC2 centres (SiO43-/TiO3-) etc. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with TiO2 additions have comparable radiation stability with the reference pebbles.

  10. Titanium ; dream new material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Tae; Kim Seung Eon; Heoon, Yong Taek; Jung, Hui Won

    2001-11-01

    The contents of this book are history of Titanium, present situation of Titanium industry, property of Titanium alloy, types of it, development of new alloy of Titanium smelting of Titanium, cast of Titanium and heat treatment of Titanium, Titanium alloy for plane, car parts, biological health care, and sport leisure and daily life, prospect, and Titanium industrial development of Titanium in China.

  11. Substitutional Carbon-Modified Anatase TiO2 Decahedral Plates Directly Derived from Titanium Oxalate Crystals via Topotactic Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ping; Wu, Tingting; Wen, Lei; Tan, Jun; Yang, Yongqiang; Zheng, Shijian; Liang, Yan; Li, Feng; Irvine, John Ts; Liu, Gang; Ma, Xiuliang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2018-03-30

    Changing the composition and/or structure of some metal oxides at the atomic level can significantly improve their performance in different applications. Although many strategies have been developed, the introduction of heteroatoms, particularly anions to the internal part of metal oxide particles, is still not adequate. Here, an effective strategy is demonstrated for directly preparing polycrystalline decahedral plates of substitutional carbon-doped anatase TiO 2 from titanium (IV) oxalate by a thermally induced topotactic transition in an inert atmosphere. Because of the carbon concentration gradient introduced in side of the plates, the carbon-doped TiO 2 (TiO 2- x C x ) shows an increased visible light absorption and a two orders of magnitude higher electrical conductivity than pure TiO 2 . Consequently, it can be used as a photocatalyst and an active material for lithium storage and shows much superior activity in generating hydroxyl radicals under visible light and greatly increased electrical-specific capacity at high charge-discharge rates. The strategy developed could also be applicable to the atomic-scale modification of other metal oxides. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Differential Expression of Osteo-Modulatory Molecules in Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells in Response to Modified Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed differential gene expression of signaling molecules involved in osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs subjected to different titanium (Ti surface types. PDLSCs were cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS, and four types of Ti discs (PT, SLA, hydrophilic PT (pmodPT, and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA with no osteoinductive factor and then osteogenic activity, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mRNA expression of runt-related gene 2, osterix, FOSB, FRA1, and protein levels of osteopontin and collagen type IA, were examined. The highest osteogenic activity appeared in PDLSCs cultured on SLA, compared with the TCPS and other Ti surfaces. The role of surface properties in affecting signaling molecules to modulate PDLSC behavior was determined by examining the regulation of Wnt pathways. mRNA expression of the canonical Wnt signaling molecules, Wnt3a and β-catenin, was higher on SLA and modSLA than on smooth surfaces, but gene expression of the calcium-dependent Wnt signaling molecules Wnt5a, calmodulin, and NFATc1 was increased significantly on PT and pmodPT. Moreover, integrin α2/β1, sonic hedgehog, and Notch signaling molecules were affected differently by each surface modification. In conclusion, surface roughness and hydrophilicity can affect differential Wnt pathways and signaling molecules, targeting the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs.

  13. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    Optical and X-ray metallography combined with ultrasonic testing by compression waves was used for inspection of stainless steel weld metal produced by three different welding techniques. X-ray diffraction showed that each weld possessed a characteristic fibre textured structure which was shown by optical microscopy to be parallel to columnar grain boundaries. Metallographic evidence suggested that the development of fibre texture is due to the mechanism of competitive growth. From observations made as a result of optical metallographic examination the orientation of the fibre axis could be predicted if the weld geometry and welding procedure were known. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements as a continuous function of grain orientation, made on cylinders machined from weld samples, showed that attenuation was strongly orientation dependent. It was concluded that the sensitivity of ultrasonic inspection to small defects is unlikely to be as high for austenitic welds as for ferritic even when transmission is improved by modifying the welding procedure to improve the ultrasonic transmission. (U.K.)

  14. Niobium effects on the austenitic grain growth and hardenability of steels for mechanical construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, R.R.; Arruda Camargo, L.M. de; Oliveira Junior, G.G. de; Dias Filho, A.G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The austenitic grain growth and hardenability of SAE 86XX and 5120 steels modified with 0,001 to 0,20 per-cent niobium content were studied when submitted to case hardening and quenching heat treatments. The results show that niobium controlS the austenite grain size better than molybdenum up to 950 0 C austenitization temperature. The hardenability, evaluated by the Jominy test which the modified SAE 8640 steels, is more strongly inflencied by the grain refining resulting from niobium addition than by any other supposed effect. (Author) [pt

  15. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken

  16. Austenitic stainless steel weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mech, S.J.; Emmons, J.S.; Michaels, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical techniques applied to ultrasonic waveforms obtained from inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds are described. Experimental results obtained from a variety of geometric and defect reflectors are presented. Specifically, frequency analyses parameters, such as simple moments of the power spectrum, cross-correlation techniques, and adaptive learning network analysis, all represent improvements over conventional time domain analysis of ultrasonic waveforms. Results for each of these methods are presented, and the overall inspection difficulties of austenitic stainless steel welds are discussed

  17. In vitro assessment of photocatalytic titanium oxide surface modified stainless steel orthodontic brackets for antiadherent and antibacterial properties against Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Alok Girish; Shetty, Pradeep Chandra; Ramachandra, C S; Bhat, N Sham; Laxmikanth, S M

    2011-11-01

    To assess the antiadherent and antibacterial properties of surface modified stainless steel orthodontic brackets with photocatalytic titanium oxide (TiO(2)) against Lactobacillus acidophilus. This study was done on 120 specimens of stainless steel preadjusted edgewise appliance (PEA) orthodontic brackets. The specimens were divided into four test groups. Each group consisted of 30 specimens. Groups containing uncoated brackets acted as a control group for their respective experimental group containing coated brackets. Surface modification of brackets was carried out by the radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method with photocatalytic TiO(2). Brackets then were subjected to microbiological tests for assessment of the antiadherent and antibacterial properties of photocatalytic TiO(2) coating against L acidophilus. Orthodontic brackets coated with photocatalytic TiO(2) showed an antiadherent effect against L acidophilus compared with uncoated brackets. The bacterial mass that was bound to the TiO(2)-coated brackets was less when compared with the uncoated brackets. Furthermore, TiO(2)-coated brackets had a bactericidal effect on L acidophilus, which causes dental caries. Surface modification of orthodontic brackets with photocatalytic TiO(2) can be used to prevent the accumulation of dental plaque and the development of dental caries during orthodontic treatment.

  18. Derivation of tensile flow characteristics for austenitic materials from instrumented indentation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K-W; Kim, K-H; Kim, J-Y; Kwon, D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a method for deriving the tensile flow characteristics of austenitic materials from an instrumented indentation technique is presented along with its experimental verification. We proposed a modified algorithm for austenitic materials that takes their hardening behaviour into account. First, the true strain based on sine function instead of tangent function was adapted. It was proved that the sine function shows constant degrees of hardening which is a main characteristic of the hardening of austenitic materials. Second, a simple and linear constitutive equation was newly suggested to optimize indentation flow curves. The modified approach was experimentally verified by comparing tensile properties of five austenitic materials from uniaxial tensile test and instrumented indentation tests

  19. Evaluation of radiation-induced sensitization using electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation technique for austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inazumi, T.; Bell, G.E.C.; Hishinuma, A.

    1990-01-01

    The electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test technique was applied to the determination of sensitization in a neutron-irradiated (420 degree C, 10 dpa) titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel. Miniaturized specimens (3 mm diam by 0.25 mm thick) in solution-annealed and 25% cold-worked conditions were tested. The degree of sensitization (DOS) was calculated in terms of the reactivation charge (Pa). Results indicated the occurrence of radiation-induced sensitization when compared to control specimens thermally aged at the irradiation temperature. Post-EPR examination of the specimen surfaces showed etching across the face of each grain as well as at grain boundaries. This indicates that the Pa value normalized by the total grain boundary area, which is an accepted EPR-DOS criterion, cannot be directly used as an indicator of the DOS to determine the susceptibility of this irradiated material to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Further investigations are necessary to correlate the results in this study to the IGSCC susceptibility of the irradiated stainless steel. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  20. V and Nb Influence on the Austenitic Stainless Steel Corrosion in 0.1 M HCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel GHARBI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium and niobium were added in AISI309 austenitic stainless steel composition to modify their structure and pitting corrosion resistance in 0.1 M HCl. The structural characterization was carried out by X-rays diffraction and optical microscopy. Corrosion behavior was investigated using potentiodynamic tests and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS .Results showed that vanadium and niobium addition precipitated stable carbides (VC, NbC to chromium carbides’ detriment and improved austenitic stainless steel corrosion resistance.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and photo catalytic activity of titanium oxide modified with nitrogen; Sintesis, caracterizacion y actividad fotocatalitica de oxido de titanio modificado con nitrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Enriquez, J. M.; Garcia Alamilla, R.; Garcia Serrano, L. A.; Cueto Hernandez, A.

    2011-07-01

    Titanium oxides (TiO{sub 2}) were synthesized by precipitation of titanium tetrachloride (TiCl{sub 4}) using ammonium hydroxide (NH{sub 4}OH). The synthesized materials were characterized by means of nitrogen physisorption, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, U.V.-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the photo catalytic activity of the samples were measured by the degradation of the methyl orange. By means of this synthesis method we have doped the titanium oxide structure with nitrogen (N-TiO{sub 2}), stabilizing the anatase phase and obtaining meso porous and nanocrystalline materials. The titanium oxide with higher specific surface area (132 m{sup 2}/g) degraded the azo-compound to 100% in 180 min of reaction. (Author) 33 refs.

  2. The influence of adding modified zirconium oxide-titanium dioxide nano-particles on mechanical properties of orthodontic adhesive: an in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Felemban, Nayef H.; Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this in-vitro study was to examine the effect of incorporating different concentrations of Zirconium oxide-Titanium dioxide (ZrO2-TiO2) nanoparticles, which can have antibacterial properties, on the mechanical properties of an orthodontic adhesive. Methods ZrO2-TiO2 (Zirconium oxide, HWNANO, Hongwu International Group Ltd, China) -Titanium dioxide, Nanoshell, USA) nanopowder were incorporated into orthodontic adhesive (Transbond XT, 3?M Unitek, Monrovia, USA) with di...

  3. Austenitic alloys Fe-Ni-Cr dominating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.C.; Korenko, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Austenitic alloy essentially comprising 42 to 48% nickel, 11 to 13% chromium, 2.6 to 3.4% niobium, 0.2 to 1.2% silicon, 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium, 2.6 to 3.4% molybdenum, 0.1 to 0.3% aluminium, 0.1 to 0.3% titanium, 0.02 to 0.05% carbon, 0.002 to 0.015% boron, up to 0.06% zirconium, the balance being iron. The characteristic of this alloy is a conventional elasticity limit to within 2% of at least 450 MPa, with a maximum tensile strength of at least 500 MPa at a test temperature of 650 0 C after immersion annealing at 1038 0 C and 30% hardening. To this effect the invention concerns Ni-Cr-Fe high temperature alloys possessing excellent mechanical strength characteristics, that can be obtained with lower levels of nickel and chromium than those used in alloys of this kind in the present state of the technique, a higher amount of niobium than in the previous alloys and with the addition of 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium [fr

  4. Feasibility analysis of modified AL-6XN steel for structure component application in supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinggang LI; Qingzhi YAN; Rong MA; Haoqiang WANG; Changchun GE

    2009-01-01

    Modified AL-6XN austenite steel was patterned after AL-6XN superaustenitic stainless steel by introducing microalloy elements such as zirconium and titanium in order to adapt to recrystallizing thermo-mechanical treatment and further improve crevice corrosion resistance. Modified AL-6XN exhibited comparable tensile strength, and superior plasticity and impact toughness to commercial AL-6XN steel. The effects of aging behavior on corrosion resistance and impact toughness were measured to evaluate the qualification of modified AL-6XN steel as an in-core component and cladding material in a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Attention should be paid to degradation in corrosion resistance and impact toughness after aging for 50 hours when modified AL-6XN steel is considered as one of the candidate materials for in-core components and cladding tubes in supercritical water-cooled reactors.

  5. Corrosion of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M C.M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1977-01-01

    Types of corrosion observed in a heat exchanger pipe and on a support of still of molasses fermented wort, both in austenitic stainless steel, are focused. Not only are the causes which might have had any kind of influence on them examined, but also the measures adopted in order to avoid and lessen its occurence.

  6. Characterization of microstructures in austenitic stainless steels by ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Palanichamy, P.; Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, Anish; Vasudevan, M.; Shankar, P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, many nondestructive techniques have been considered for microstructural characterization of materials to enable in-situ component assessment for pre-service quality and in-service performance. Ultrasonic parameters have been used for estimation of average grain size, evaluation of recrystallization after cold working, and characterization of Cr2N precipitation during thermal aging in different grades of austenitic stainless steels. Ultrasonic first back wall echo signals were obtained from several specimens of AISI type 316 stainless steel with different grain sizes. Shift in the spectral peak frequency and the change in the full width at half maximum of the autopower spectrum of the first back wall echo are correlated with the grain size in the range 30-150 microns. The advantages of this method are: (i) independence of variation in couplant conditions (ii), applicable even to highly attenuating materials, (iii) direct correlation of the ultrasonic parameters with yield strength and (iv) suitability for shop-floor applications. Recrystallization behavior (temperature range 973-1173 K and time durations 0.5-1000 h) of cold worked titanium modified 316 stainless steel (D9) has been characterized using ultrasonic velocity measurements. A velocity parameter derived using a combination of shear and longitudinal wave velocities is correlated with the degree of recrystallization. These velocity measurement could also identify onset, progress and completion of recrystallization more accurately as compared to hardness and strength measurements. Ultrasonic velocity measurements were performed in thermally aged (at 1123 K for 10 to 2000 h) nuclear grade 316 LN stainless steel. Change in velocity due to thermal aging treatment could be used to reveal the formation of (i) Cr-N clusters associated with high lattice strains, (ii) coherent Cr2N precipitation, (iii) loss of coherency and (iv) growth of incoherent Cr2N precipitates. Microstructural characterization by

  7. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Review on the Potential Use of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Nuclear Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Sümer; Übeyli, Mustafa

    2008-12-01

    Various engineering materials; austenitic stainless steels, ferritic/martensitic steels, vanadium alloys, refractory metals and composites have been suggested as candidate structural materials for nuclear fusion reactors. Among these structural materials, austenitic steels have an advantage of extensive technological database and lower cost compared to other non-ferrous candidates. Furthermore, they have also advantages of very good mechanical properties and fission operation experience. Moreover, modified austenitic stainless (Ni and Mo free) have relatively low residual radioactivity. Nevertheless, they can't withstand high neutron wall load which is required to get high power density in fusion reactors. On the other hand, a protective flowing liquid wall between plasma and solid first wall in these reactors can eliminate this restriction. This study presents an overview of austenitic stainless steels considered to be used in fusion reactors.

  9. Sandblasting induced stress release and enhanced adhesion strength of diamond films deposited on austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Ye, Jiansong; Zhang, Hangcheng; Feng, Tao; Chen, Jianqing; Hu, Xiaojun

    2017-08-01

    We firstly used sandblasting to treat austenite stainless steel and then deposited a Cr/CrN interlayer by close field unbalanced magnetron sputtering on it. After that, diamond films were prepared on the interlayer. It is found that the sandblasting process induces phase transition from austenite to martensite in the surface region of the stainless steel, which decreases thermal stress in diamond films due to lower thermal expansion coefficient of martensite phase compared with that of austenite phase. The sandblasting also makes stainless steel's surface rough and the Cr/CrN interlayer film inherits the rough surface. This decreases the carburization extent of the interlayer, increases nucleation density and modifies the stress distribution. Due to lower residual stress and small extent of the interlayer's carburization, the diamond film on sandblast treated austenite stainless steel shows enhanced adhesion strength.

  10. Tribological evaluation of surface modified H13 tool steel in warm forming of Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dan; Li, Heng; Yang, He; Ma, Jun; Li, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    The H13 hot-working tool steel is widely used as die material in the warm forming of Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet. However, under the heating condition, severe friction and lubricating conditions between the H13 tools and Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet would cause difficulty in guaranteeing forming quality. Surface modification may be used to control the level of friction force, reduce the friction wear and extend the service life of dies. In this paper, four surface modification methods (c...

  11. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, J R; Wagg, A R; Whittle, M J [N.D.T. Applications Centre, CEGB, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1980-11-01

    The metallurgical structure of austenitic welds is described and contrasted with that found in ferritic welds. It is shown that this structure imparts a marked elastic anisotropy in the ultrasonic propagation parameters. Measurements of variations in the apparent attenuation of sound and deviations in the beam direction are described. The measurements are interpreted in terms of the measured velocity anisotropy. Two applications of the fundamental work are described. In the first it is shown how, by using short pulse compression wave probes, and with major modification of the welding procedure, a stainless steel fillet weld in an AGR boiler can be inspected. In the second application, alternative designs of a transition butt weld have been compared for ease of ultrasonic inspection. The effects of two different welding processes on such an inspection are described. Finally, the paper examines the prospects for future development of inspection and defect-sizing techniques for austenitic welds. (author)

  12. Titanium modified with layer-by-layer sol-gel tantalum oxide and an organodiphosphonic acid: a coating for hydroxyapatite growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, C; Volcke, C; Lamarque, C; Thiry, P A; Delhalle, J; Mekhalif, Z

    2009-08-15

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used in surgical implants due to their appropriate properties like corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, and load bearing. Unfortunately when metals are used for orthopedic and dental implants there is the possibility of loosening over a long period of time. Surface modification is a good way to counter this problem. A thin tantalum oxide layer obtained by layer-by-layer (LBL) sol-gel deposition on top of a titanium surface is expected to improve biocorrosion resistance in the body fluid, biocompatibility, and radio-opacity. This elaboration step is followed by a modification of the tantalum oxide surface with an organodiphosphonic acid self-assembled monolayer, capable of chemically binding to the oxide surface, and also improving hydroxyapatite growth. The different steps of this proposed process are characterized by surfaces techniques like contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  13. A review of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, V.; Gill, T.P.S.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.

    1991-01-01

    The occurrence of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments is discussed with respect to its origin and metallurgical contributory factors. Of the three types of hot cracking, namely solidification cracking, liquation and ductility dip cracking, solidification cracking occurs in the interdendritic regions in weld metal while liquation and ductility dip cracking occur intergranularly in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). Segregation of impurity and minor elements such as sulphur, phosphorous, silicon, niobium, boron etc to form low melting eutectic phases has been found to be the major cause of hot cracking. Control of HAZ cracking requires minimisation of impurity elements in the base metal. In stabilized stainless steels containing niobium, higher amounts of delta-ferrite have been found necessary to prevent cracking than in unstabilized compositions. Titanium compounds have been found to cause liquation cracking in maraging steels and titanium containing stainless steels and superalloys. In nitrogen added stainless steels, cracking resistance decreases when the solidification mode changes to primary austenitic due to nitrogen addition. A review of the test methods to evaluate hot cracking behaviour showed that several external restraint and semi-self-restraint tests are available. The finger Test, WRC Fissure Bend Test, the PVR test and the Varestraint Test are described along with typical test results. Hot ductility testing to reveal HAZ cracking tendency during welding is described, which is of particular importance to stabilized stainless steels. Based on the literature, recommendations are made for welding stabilized and nitrogen added steels, indicating areas of further work. (author). 81 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab

  14. Some data of second sequence non standard austenitic ingot, A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurdin Effendi; Aziz K Jahja; Bandriana; Wisnu Ari Adi

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of second sequence austenite stainless steel named A2 using extracted minerals from Indonesian mines has been carried out. The starting materials for austenite alloy consist of granular ferro scrap, nickel, ferro-chrome, ferro-manganese, and ferro-silicon. The second sequence composition differs from the former first sequence. This A2 sequence contained more nickel, meanwhile titanium element had not been added explicitly to it, and just been found from raw materials contents or impurities, as well as carbon content in the alloy. However before the actual alloying work started, the first important step was to carry out the determination of the fractional amount of each starting material necessary to form an austenite stainless steel alloy as specified. Once the component fraction of each base alloy-element was determined, the raw materials are weighed on the mini-balance. After the fractional quantities of each constituent have been computed, an appropriate amount of these base materials are weighed separately on the micro scale. The raw materials were then placed in the induction foundry furnace, which was operated by an electromagnetic inductive-thermal system. The foundry furnace system performs the stirring of the molten materials automatically. The homogenized molten metals were poured down into sand casting prepared in advance. Some of the austenite stainless steel were normalized at 600°C for 6 hours. The average density is 7.8 g cm -1 and the average hardness value of 'normalized' austenite stainless-steels is in the range of 460 on the Vickers scale. The microstructure observation concludes that an extensive portion of the sample's structure is dendritic and the surface turns out to be homogenous. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the material belongs to the fcc crystallographic system, which fits in with the austenite class of the alloy. The experimental fractional elemental composition data acquired by OES method turn out to

  15. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo tests for surface-modified titanium by H2SO4 and H2O2 treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Il-Song; Min, Kwan-Sik; Ahn, Seung-Geun; Park, Ju-Mi; Song, Kwang-Yeob; Park, Charn-Woon

    2007-04-01

    Titanium is widely used as an implant material for artificial teeth. Furthermore, various studies have examined surface treatment with respect to the formation of a fine passive film on the surface of commercial titanium and its alloys and to improve the bioactivity with bone. However, there is insufficient data about the biocompatibility of implant materials in the body. The purpose of this study was to examine whether surface modification affects the precipitation of apatite on titanium metal. Specimens were chemically washed for 2 min in a 1∶1∶1.5 (vol.%) mixture of 48 %HF, 60%HNO3 and distilled water. The specimens were then chemically treated with a solution containing 97%H2SO4 and 30%H2O2 at the ratio of 1∶1 (vol.%) at 40°C for 1h, and subsequently heat-treated at 400°C for 1h. All the specimens were immersed in HBSS with pH 7.4 at 36.5°C for 15d, and the surface was examined with TF-XRD, SEM, EDX and XPS. In addition, specimens of commercial pure Ti, with and without surface treatment, were implanted in the abdominal connective tissue of mice for 28 d. Conventional aluminum and stainless steel 316L were also implanted for comparison. An amorphous titania gel layer was formed on the titanium surface after the titanium specimen was treated with a solution of H2SO4 and H2O2. The average roughness was 2.175 μm after chemical surface treatment. The amorphous titania was subsequently transformed into anatase by heat treatment at 400°C for 1h. The average thickness of the fibrous capsule surrounding the specimens implanted in the connective tissue was 47.1μm in the chemically treated Ti, and 52.2, 168.7 and 101.9μm, respectively, in the untreated commercial pure Ti, aluminum and stainless steel 316L.

  16. Effect of phosphorus on out-of-pile and in-pile behaviour of stabilized austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delalande, C.

    1992-02-01

    This work deals with the improvement of swelling resistance for austenitic stainless steels used as fuel pin cladding in Fast Breeder Reactor. The effect of phosphorus addition and multistabilization by Ti and Nb or Ti, Nb and V are studied on Fe-15Cr-15/25Ni based alloys. First, different ageings are performed to verify the stability of dislocation network, main condition of swelling absence at high irradiation temperature (T>550 deg C, and to study the precipitation, especially the one being able to form during irradiation and to control swelling at lower temperature. Then, 1 MeV electron irradiations are performed to estimate the swelling resistance of these multistabilized steels. Furthermore, neutron radiation induced microstructure of phosphorus modified steels already irradiated in reactor give us fundamental informations to predict and explain the effect of phosphorus and multistabilization on the behaviour of the multistabilized steels. Our results show that niobium plays the same role as titanium on the stabilization ratio in steels, but it is present in more phases. Vanadium seems to have less effect on stability of dislocation network and chemical composition of precipitates. Phosphorus increases the stability of dislocation network of multistabilized steels and FeNbP phosphides are observed at high temperature for phosphorus level above 600 ppm. 1 MeV electron irradiations show that multistabilized steels present good swelling resistance. Phosphorus addition increases the swelling resistance of neutron irradiated steels. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  17. Expanded austenite, crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburising of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article, recent results obtained with (a) homogeneous samples of various uniform ...

  18. Expanded austenite; crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburizing of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article recent results obtained with i) homogeneous samples of various uniform co...

  19. Martensitic transformations in titanium nickelide subject to sock wave loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, V.I.; Shorokhov, E.V.; Gundyrev, V.M.; Khejfets, A.Eh.; Frolova, N.Yu.; Khomskaya, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    The plates of titanium nickelide (Ti-50.5 at. % Ni) rolled in an austenitic state and subjected to impact shock with pressure of 10 and 50 GPa are under study. Dilatometric and X-ray diffraction studied show that shock wave loading induces anisotropic martensitic transformations in the plates. The anisotropy of transformations is conditioned by directed motion of the substance of the plate in shock waves. Austenitic memory of specimens prior to loading is changed to martensitic one typical of deformation of martensite. Martensitic memory not preserve after the reserve martensitic transformation, the specimens recall the initial state with austenitic memory. The particles of Ti 3 N 4 precipitated phase and the dislocation structure formed in rolling are the carriers of memory [ru

  20. Study of irradiation damage structures in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Shozo

    1997-08-01

    The irradiation damage microstructures in austenitic stainless steels, which have been proposed to be a candidate of structural materials of a fusion reactor, under ions and neutrons irradiation have been studied. In ion irradiation experiments, cross-sectional observation of the depth distribution of damage formed due to ion irradiation became available. Comparison and discussion between experimental results with TEM and the calculated ones in the depth profiles of irradiation damage microstructures. Further, dual-phase stainless steels, consisted of ferritic/austenitic phases, showed irradiation-induced/enhanced precipitation during ion irradiation. High Flux Isotope Reactor with high neutron fluxes was employed in neutron-irradiation experiments. Swelling of 316 steel showed irradiation temperature dependence and this had strong correlation with phase instability under heavy damage level. Swelling resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel, which has good swelling resistance, decreased during high damage level. This might be caused by the instability of Ti-carbide particles. The preparation method to reduce higher radioactivity of neutron-irradiated TEM specimen was developed. (author). 176 refs

  1. Study of irradiation damage structures in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shozo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-08-01

    The irradiation damage microstructures in austenitic stainless steels, which have been proposed to be a candidate of structural materials of a fusion reactor, under ions and neutrons irradiation have been studied. In ion irradiation experiments, cross-sectional observation of the depth distribution of damage formed due to ion irradiation became available. Comparison and discussion between experimental results with TEM and the calculated ones in the depth profiles of irradiation damage microstructures. Further, dual-phase stainless steels, consisted of ferritic/austenitic phases, showed irradiation-induced/enhanced precipitation during ion irradiation. High Flux Isotope Reactor with high neutron fluxes was employed in neutron-irradiation experiments. Swelling of 316 steel showed irradiation temperature dependence and this had strong correlation with phase instability under heavy damage level. Swelling resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel, which has good swelling resistance, decreased during high damage level. This might be caused by the instability of Ti-carbide particles. The preparation method to reduce higher radioactivity of neutron-irradiated TEM specimen was developed. (author). 176 refs.

  2. Morphological and structural evolution of the anatase phase of silicon modified titanium dioxide obtained by Sol-gel; Evolucao estrutural e morfologica da fase anatase de dioxido de titanio modificada com silicio obtido pelo Metodo Sol-Gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, S.A.; Oliveira, C.T.; Ciola, R.A.; Cavalheiro, A.A., E-mail: silvanicelopes@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul (CPTREN/UEMS), Navirai, MS (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas Tecnologicas em Recursos Naturais

    2011-07-01

    The photonic efficiency of the titanium dioxide photocatalyst is dependent on the crystalline structure and the anatase phase presents high efficiency in the border region between the UV-B and UV-A, with a redox potential sufficient to generate hydroxyl radicals and superoxide ion in order to oxidate organic compounds. In spite of the organic matter degradation effectiveness, the efficiency can be reduced substantially due to the presence of crystalline defects, which act as premature recombination centers of the electron-hole pair. The increasing of calcining temperature allows the elimination of most of these defects, but the structural ordering at temperatures around 600°C eventually leads to the phase transition toward rutile, which is not photoactive. In this work, it was demonstrated through FTIR and XRD that the silicon modifier presence stabilizes the anatase phase even at temperatures as high as 900°C. (author)

  3. Thermodynamic modeling of the stacking fault energy of austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtze, S.; Kuokkala, V.-T.; Oikari, A.; Talonen, J.; Haenninen, H.

    2011-01-01

    The stacking fault energies (SFE) of 10 austenitic steels were determined in the temperature range 50 ≤ T ≤ 600 K by thermodynamic modeling of the Fe-Cr-Ni-Mn-Al-Si-Cu-C-N system using a modified Olson and Cohen modeling approach (Olson GB, Cohen M. Metall Trans 1976;7A:1897 ). The applied model accounts for each element's contribution to the Gibbs energy, the first-order excess free energies, magnetic contributions and the effect of interstitial nitrogen. Experimental SFE values from X-ray diffraction measurements were used for comparison. The effect of SFE on deformation mechanisms was also studied by electron backscatter diffraction.

  4. Nondestructive characterization of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, Anish

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the non-destructive methodologies developed at the authors' laboratory for characterization of various microstructural features, residual stresses and corrosion in austenitic stainless steels. Various non-destructive evaluation (NDE) parameters such as ultrasonic velocity, ultrasonic attenuation, spectral analysis of the ultrasonic signals, magnetic hysteresis parameters and eddy current amplitude have been used for characterization of grain size, precipitation behaviour, texture, recrystallization, thermomechanical processing, degree of sensitization, formation of martensite from metastable austenite, assessment of residual stresses, degree of sensitization and propensity for intergranular corrosion in different austenitic steels. (author)

  5. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  6. Parametrical limits of SCC-susceptibility of austenitic and austenitic-ferritic Cr-Ni steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starosvetskij, D.I.; Baru, R.L.; Bondarenko, A.I.; Bogoyavlenskij, V.L.; Timonin, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Comparative investigations into corrosion cracking (CC) of austenitic (12Kh18N10T) and austenitic-ferritic (08Kh22N6T) chromium-nickel steels are performed for various chloride media in a wide range of chloride concentrations and temperatures. It is shown that the ratio between steels in terms of their CC-susceptibility is not definite and can undergo a reversal depending on parameters of medium, level and conditions of loading. Differences in mechanisms of corrosion cracking of austenitic and austenitic-ferritic steels are established

  7. Mechanodynamical analysis of nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruda, Carlos do Canto

    2002-01-01

    Nickel-titanium alloys may coexist in more than one crystalline structure. There is a high temperature phase, austenite, and a low temperature phase, martensite. The metallurgical basis for the superelasticity and the shape memory effect relies in the ability of these alloys to transform easily from one phase to another. There are three essential factors for the orthodontist to understand nickel-titanium alloys behaviour: stress; deflection; and temperature. These three factors are related to each other by the stress-deflection, stress-temperature and deflection-temperature diagrams. This work was undertaken with the objective to analyse commercial nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application, using the dynamical mechanical analyser - DMA. Four NiTi 0,017 X 0,025'' archwires were studied. The archwires were Copper NiTi 35 deg C (Ormco), Neo Sentalloy F200 (GAC), Nitinol Superelastic (Unitek) and NiTi (GAC). The different mechanodynamical properties such as elasticity and damping moduli were evaluated. Each commercial material was evaluated with and without a 1 N static force, aiming to evaluate phase transition temperature variation with stress. The austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, for the experiments without static force, was in the range of 1.59 to 1.85. For the 1 N static force tests the austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, ranged from 1.28 to 1.57 due to the higher martensite elasticity modulus. With elastic modulus variation with temperature behaviour, the orthodontist has the knowledge of the force variation applied in the tooth in relation to the oral cavity temperature change, for nickel-titanium alloys that undergo phase transformation. The damping capacity of the studied alloys depends on the materials state: martensitic phase; austenitic phase or during phase transformation. The martensitic phase shows higher dumping capacity. During phase transformation, an internal friction peak may be observed for the CuNiTi 35 deg C and Neo Sentalloy F

  8. Creating nanoshell on the surface of titanium hydride bead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO Vyacheslav Ivanovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on the modification of titanium hydride bead by creating titanium nanoshell on its surface by ion-plasma vacuum magnetron sputtering. To apply titanium nanoshell on the titanium hydride bead vacuum coating plant of multifunctional nanocomposite coatings QVADRA 500 located in the center of high technology was used. Analysis of the micrographs of the original surface of titanium hydride bead showed that the microstructure of the surface is flat, smooth, in addition the analysis of the microstructure of material surface showed the presence of small porosity, roughness, mainly cavities, as well as shallow longitudinal cracks. The presence of oxide film in titanium hydride prevents the free release of hydrogen and fills some micro-cracks on the surface. Differential thermal analysis of both samples was conducted to determine the thermal stability of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell. Hydrogen thermal desorption spectra of the samples of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell show different thermal stability of compared materials in the temperature range from 550 to 860о C. Titanium nanoshells applied in this way allows increasing the heat resistance of titanium hydride bead – the temperature of starting decomposition is 695о C and temperature when decomposition finishes is more than 1000о C. Modified in this way titanium hydride bead can be used as a filler in the radiation protective materials used in the construction or upgrading biological protection of nuclear power plants.

  9. Constitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han; Khan, A.

    2010-01-01

    A physically based, macroscale constitutive model has been developed that can describe the complex mechanical behavior of metastable austenitic stainless steels. In the developed model a generalized model for the mechanically induced martensitic transformation is introduced. Mechanical tests have

  10. Consitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih

    2008-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels combine high formability and high strength, which are generally opposing properties in materials. This property is a consequence of the martensitic phase transformation that takes place during deformation. This transformation is purely mechanically induced

  11. Preparation and Evaluation of Dexamethasone (DEX/Growth and Differentiation Factor-5 (GDF-5 Surface-Modified Titanium Using β-Cyclodextrin-Conjugated Heparin (CD-Hep for Enhanced Osteogenic Activity In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Hyeok Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The most ideal implant models in the dental and orthopedic fields to minimize the failure rate of implantation involve the improvement of osseointegration with host bone. Therefore, a focus of this study is the preparation of surface-modified titanium (Ti samples of disc and screw types using dexamethasone (DEX and/or growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5, as well as the evaluation of their efficacies on bone formation in vitro and in vivo. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and contact angle measurement were used to evaluate the surface chemical composition, surface morphology and wettability, respectively. The results showed that implant surfaces were successfully modified with DEX and/or GDF-5, and had rough surfaces along with hydrophilicity. DEX, GDF-5 or DEX/GDF-5 on the surface-modified samples were rapidly released within one day and released for 28 days in a sustained manner. The proliferation and bone formation of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on pristine and surface-modified implants in vitro were examined by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8 assay, as well as the measurements of alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and calcium deposition, respectively. MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on DEX/GDF-5–Ti showed noticeable ALP activity and calcium deposition in vitro. Active bone formation and strong osseointegration occurred at the interface between DEX/GDF-5–Ti and host bone, as evaluated by micro computed-tomography (micro CT analysis. Surface modification using DEX/GDF-5 could be a good method for advanced implants for orthopaedic and dental applications.

  12. The influence of adding modified zirconium oxide-titanium dioxide nano-particles on mechanical properties of orthodontic adhesive: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felemban, Nayef H; Ebrahim, Mohamed I

    2017-01-13

    The purpose of this in-vitro study was to examine the effect of incorporating different concentrations of Zirconium oxide-Titanium dioxide (ZrO2-TiO2) nanoparticles, which can have antibacterial properties, on the mechanical properties of an orthodontic adhesive. ZrO2-TiO2 (Zirconium oxide, HWNANO, Hongwu International Group Ltd, China) -Titanium dioxide, Nanoshell, USA) nanopowder were incorporated into orthodontic adhesive (Transbond XT, 3 M Unitek, Monrovia, USA) with different concentrations (0.5% weight nonofiller and 1% weight nanofiller). The size of nanoparticle was 70-80 nm for ZrO2 and less than 50 nm for TiO2. For measuring the shear bond strength of the three groups of orthodontic adhesives [Transbond (control), Transbond mixed with 0.5% weight ZrO2-TiO2, and Transbond mixed with 1% weight ZrO2-TiO2], 30 freshly extracted human first premolars were used and bonded with stainless steel metal brackets (Dentaurum®, Discovery®, Deutschland), using the 3 orthodontic adhesives and 3 M Unitek; Transbond TM Plus Self-Etching Primer (10 samples in each group). The recorded values of compressive strength and tensile strength (measured separately on 10 samples of orthodontic adhesives (add the 3 D size of sample, light cured for 40 s on both sides) of each orthodontic adhesives), as well as the shear bond strength in Mega Pascal unit (MPa) were collected and exposed to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post-hoc tests. orthodontic adhesive with 1% weight ZrO2-TiO2 showed the highest mean compressive (73.42 ± 1.55 MPa, p: 0.003, F: 12.74), tensile strength (8.65 ± 0.74 MPa, p: 0.001, F: 68.20), and shear bond strength (20.05 ± 0.2 MPa, p: 0.001, F: 0.17). Adding ZrO2-TiO2 nanoparticle to orthodontic adhesive increased compressive strength, tensile strength, and shear bond strength in vitro, but in vivo studies and randomized clinical trials are needed to validate the present findings.

  13. Glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase immobilized on a nanofilm composed of mesoporous hydroxyapatite, titanium dioxide, and modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Kuang, D.; Feng, Y.; Zhang, F.; Liu, M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a highly sensitive glucose biosensor that was fabricated from a composite made from mesoporous hydroxyapatite and mesoporous titanium dioxide which then were ultrasonically mixed with multi-walled carbon nanotubes to form a rough nanocomposite film. This film served as a platform to immobilize glucose oxidase onto a glassy carbon electrode. The morphological and electrochemical properties of the film were examined by scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were used to characterize the electrochemical performances of the biosensor which exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity to the oxidation of glucose. At an operating potential of 0. 3 V and pH 6. 8, the sensor displays a sensitivity of 57. 0 μA mM -1 cm -2 , a response time of <5 s, a linear dynamic range from 0. 01 to 15. 2 mM, a correlation coefficient of 0. 9985, and a detection limit of 2 μM at an SNR of 3. No interferences are found for uric acid, ascorbic acid, dopamine and most carbohydrates. The sensor is stable and was successfully applied to the determination of glucose in real samples. (author)

  14. Analysis of the compressive behaviour of the three-dimensional printed porous titanium for dental implants using a modified cellular solid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagg, Graham; Ghassemieh, Elaheh; Wiria, Florencia E

    2013-09-01

    A set of cylindrical porous titanium test samples were produced using the three-dimensional printing and sintering method with samples sintered at 900 °C, 1000 °C, 1100 °C, 1200 °C or 1300 °C. Following compression testing, it was apparent that the stress-strain curves were similar in shape to the curves that represent cellular solids. This is despite a relative density twice as high as what is considered the threshold for defining a cellular solid. As final sintering temperature increased, the compressive behaviour developed from being elastic-brittle to elastic-plastic and while Young's modulus remained fairly constant in the region of 1.5 GPa, there was a corresponding increase in 0.2% proof stress of approximately 40-80 MPa. The cellular solid model consists of two equations that predict Young's modulus and yield or proof stress. By fitting to experimental data and consideration of porous morphology, appropriate changes to the geometry constants allow modification of the current models to predict with better accuracy the behaviour of porous materials with higher relative densities (lower porosity).

  15. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available used, the following forms of titanium are produced: titanium sponge, sintered electrode sponge, powder, molten titanium, electroplated titanium, hydride powder, and vapor-phase depos- ited titanium. Comparing the economics of alter- native...-up for producing titanium via the Kroll process is approximately as follows: ilmenite ($0.27/kg titanium sponge); titanium slag ($0.75/kg titanium sponge); TiCl4 ($3.09/kg titanium sponge); titanium sponge raw materials costs ($5.50/kg titanium sponge); total...

  16. Purification and identification of O-GlcNAc-modified peptides using phosphate-based alkyne CLICK chemistry in combination with titanium dioxide chromatography and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Benjamin L; Gupta, Pankaj; Cordwell, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    A selective method for the enrichment of O-GlcNAcylated peptides using a novel CLICK chemistry reagent is described. Peptides modified by O-GlcNAc were enzymatically labeled with N-azidoacetylgalactosamine. The azide was then reacted with a phospho-alkyne using CLICK chemistry and O-GlcNAcGalNAzPO4...

  17. High temperature strength and aging behavior of 12%Cr-15%Mn austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Kazuya; Bae, Dong-Su; Sakai, Hidenori; Hosoi, Yuzo

    1993-01-01

    High Mn-Cr austenitic steels are still considered to be an important high temperature structural material from the point of view of reduced radio-activation. The objective of the present study is to make a fundamental research of mechanical properties and microstructure of 12%Cr-15%Mn austenitic steels. Especially the effects of alloying elements of V and Ti on the mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of high Mn-Cr steels were studied. Precipitation behaviors of carbides, nitrides and σ phase are investigated and their remarkable effects on the high temperature strength are found. The addition of V was very effective for strengthening the materials with the precipitation of fine VN. Ti was also found to be beneficial for the improvement of high temperature strength properties. The results of high temperature strengths of the 12Cr-15Mn austenitic steels were compared with those of the other candidate and/or reference materials, for example, JFMS (modified 9Cr-2Mo ferritic stainless steel) and JPCAs (modified 316 austenitic stainless steels). (author)

  18. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saadati, Shagayegh; Salimi, Abdollah; Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. ► First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. ► With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. ► Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 reduction. ► Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH 2 -IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH 2 -IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H 2 O 2 biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k s ) and Michaelis–Menten constant (K M ) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 × 10 −12 mol cm −2 , 5.28 s −1 and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 μA mM −1 cm −2 and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  19. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadati, Shagayegh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH{sub 2}-IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH{sub 2}-IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub M}) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} mol cm{sup -2}, 5.28 s{sup -1} and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  20. Constitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel (CD-rom)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han; Boisse, P.

    2008-01-01

    A stress-update algorithm is developed for austenitic metastable steels which undergo phase evolution during deformation. The material initially comprises only the soft and ductile austenite phase which due to the phenomenon of mechanically induced martensitic transformation, transforms completely

  1. Austenite grain growth and microstructure control in simulated heat affected zones of microalloyed HSLA steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Department of Machine Tools and Factory Management, Technical University of Berlin, Pascalstraße 8 – 9, 10587, Berlin (Germany); Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Kannengiesser, Thomas [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Materials and Joining Technology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Universitetsplatz 2, 39106, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    The roles of microalloying niobium, titanium and vanadium for controlling austenite grain growth, microstructure evolution and hardness were investigated at different simulated heat affected zones (HAZ) for high strength low alloy (HSLA) S690QL steel. High resolution FEG-SEM has been used to characterize fine bainitic ferrite, martensite and nanosized second phases at simulated coarse and fine grain HAZs. It was found that for Ti bearing steel (Ti/N ratio is 2) austenite grain had the slowest growth rate due to the presence of most stable TiN. The fine cuboidal particles promoted intragranular acicular ferrite (IGF) formation. Nb bearing steel exhibited relatively weaker grain growth retardation compared with titanium bearing steels and a mixed microstructure of bainite and martensite was present for all simulated HAZs. IGF existed at coarse grain HAZ of Ti+V bearing steel but it was totally replaced by bainite at fine grain HAZs. Hardness result was closely related to the morphology of bainitic ferrite, intragranular ferrite and second phases within ferrite. The microstructure and hardness results of different simulated HAZs were in good agreement with welded experimental results.

  2. Development of advanced austenitic stainless steels resistant to void swelling under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouxel, Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of studies about Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) of generation IV, the CEA is developing new austenitic steel grades for the fuel cladding. These steels demonstrate very good mechanical properties but their use is limited because of the void swelling under irradiation. Beyond a high irradiation dose, cavities appear in the alloys and weaken the material. The reference material in France is a 15Cr/15Ni steel, named AIM1, stabilized with titanium. This study try to understand the role played by various chemical elements and microstructural parameters on the formation of the cavities under irradiation, and contribute to the development of a new grade AIM2 more resistant to swelling. In an analytical approach, model materials were elaborated with various chemical compositions and microstructures. Ten grades were cast with chemical variations in Ti, Nb, Ni and P. Four specific microstructures for each alloy highlighted the effect of dislocations, solutes or nano-precipitates on the void swelling. These materials were characterized using TEM and SANS, before irradiation with Fe"2"+ (2 MeV) ions in the order to simulate the damages caused by neutrons. Comparing the irradiated microstructures, it is demonstrated that the solutes have a dominating effect on the formation of cavities. Specifically titanium in solid solution reduces the swelling whereas niobium does not show this effect. Finally, a matrix enriched by 15% to 25% of nickel is still favorable to limit swelling in these advanced austenitic stainless steels. (author) [fr

  3. Custom-made laser-welded titanium implant prosthetic abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesia-Puig, Miguel A

    2005-10-01

    A technique to create an individually modified implant prosthetic abutment is described. An overcasting is waxed onto a machined titanium abutment, cast in titanium, and joined to it with laser welding. With the proposed technique, a custom-made titanium implant prosthetic abutment is created with adequate volume and contour of metal to support a screw-retained, metal-ceramic implant-supported crown.

  4. Transformation in austenitic stainless steel sheet under different loading directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Krauer, J.; Hora, P.

    2011-01-01

    The stress-strain relation for austenitic stainless steels is based on 2 main contributions: work hardening and a phase transformation from austenite to martensite. The transformation is highly temperature dependent. In most models for phase transformation from austenite to martensite, the stress

  5. Transformation in Austenitic Stainless Steel Sheet under Different Loading Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Krauer, J.; Hora, P.

    2011-01-01

    The stress-strain relation for austenitic stainless steels is based on 2 main contributions: work hardening and a phase transformation from austenite to martensite. The transformation is highly temperature dependent. In most models for phase transformation from austenite to martensite, the stress

  6. Longitudinal wave ultrasonic inspection of austenitic weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, B.S.; Hudgell, R.J.; Seed, H.

    1980-01-01

    Successful volumetric inspection of LMFBR primary circuits, and also much of the secondary circuit, is dependent on the availability of satisfactory examination procedures for austenitic welds. Application of conventional ultrasonic techniques is hampered by the anisotropic, textured structure of the weld metal and this paper describes development work on the use of longitudinal wave techniques. In addition to confirming the dominant effects of the weld structure on ultrasound propagation some results are given of studies utilising deliberately induced defects in Manual Metal Arc Welds in 50 mm plate together with preliminary work on the inspection of narrow austenitic welds fabricated by automatic processes. (author)

  7. Recrystallization induced plasticity in austenite and ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Mingxin; Pineau, André; Bouaziz, Olivier; Vu, Trong-Dai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Plasticity can be induced by recrystallization in austenite and ferrite. ► Strain rate is proportional to recrystallization kinetics. ► Overall atomic flux selects a preferential direction may be the origin. - Abstract: New experimental evidences are provided to demonstrate that plastic strain can be induced by recrystallization in austenite and ferrite under an applied stress much smaller than their yield stresses. Such Recrystallization Induced Plasticity (RIP) phenomenon occurs because the overall atomic flux during recrystallization follows a preferential direction imposed by the applied stress.

  8. Reaction of uranium and plutonium carbides with austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouchnino, M.

    1967-01-01

    The reaction of uranium and plutonium carbides with austenitic steels has been studied between 650 and 1050 deg. C using UC, steel and (UPu)C, steel diffusion couples. The steels are of the type CN 18.10 with or without addition of molybdenum. The carbides used are hyper-stoichiometric. Tests were also carried out with UCTi, UCMo, UPuCTi and UPuCMo. Up to 800 deg. C no marked diffusion of carbon into stainless steel is observed. Between 800 and 900 deg. C the carbon produced by the decomposition of the higher carbides diffuses into the steel. Above 900 deg. C, decomposition of the monocarbide occurs according to a reaction which can be written schematically as: (U,PuC) + (Fe,Ni,Cr) → (U,Pu) Fe 2 + Cr 23 C 6 . Above 950 deg. C the behaviour of UPuCMo and that of the titanium (CN 18.12) and nickel (NC 38. 18) steels is observed to be very satisfactory. (author) [fr

  9. Stress relief cracking by relaxation in austenitic stainless steels welded junctions; Fissuration differee par relaxation des jonctions soudes en aciers inoxydables austenitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allais, L.; Auzoux, Q.; Chabaud-Reytier, M

    2003-07-01

    During service at high temperature (450 to 650 C), austenitic stainless steels are well known to present a risk of cracking near the welded junctions for times under the service life. This intergranular cracking in affected zones has been identified on titanium stabilized steels and is known as relief cracking by relaxation or reheat cracking. In order to control this cracking of welded junctions on titanium stabilized stainless steel AISI 321, a simulation of the affected zone has been realized. The results have been extended to non stabilized steels. (A.L.B.)

  10. The characteristics of corrosion, radiation degradation and dissolution of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Choi, B. S.; Lee, D. J.; Chang, M. H.

    2001-12-01

    In order to establish the technical bases of water chemistry design requirement related titanium alloys, we investigated the characteristics of corrosion, activation, radiation degradation, radiation hydrogen embrittlement of titanium alloys and dissolution of titanium dioxide. Titanium alloys generally have high corrosion resistance. Corrosion product release from PT-7M and PT-3V titanium alloy surface for 18 months of operation is negligible, and the corrosion penetration for about 30 years is about 1 μm, while the corrosion rates is not higher than one third of that of austenitic steel. Titanium only converts into Sc-46 with 85 day halflife after neutron irradiation, and its radioactivity is not higher than one thousandth of that produced from nickel. Therefore, under the condition without any neutron irradiation, the radiation damage of titanium alloys would have no problem. Titanium dioxide, that protects the metals from the corrosion, has retrograde solubility in neutral solutions. It does not form any complexes with ligands such as ammonia, but Ti(IV) gets more stable by complexing with water molecules. In conclusion, it is estimated that titanium alloys such as PT-7M would be applicable to steam generator materials

  11. Corrosion-resistant titanium nitride coatings formed on stainless steel by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium films 70nm thick were deposited on austenitic type 316L stainless steel substrates, and these specimens were irradiated with titanium ions of energy 70kV at a fluence of 1x10 17 ioncm -2 , using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) IV metallic ion source at room temperature. After irradiation, titanium nitride (TiN) films were deposited by titanium evaporation and simultaneous irradiation by a nitrogen ion beam, with transport ratios of Ti to N atoms from 0.5 to 10.0 and an ion acceleration voltage of 2kV. The preferred orientation of the TiN films varied from left angle 200 right angle to left angle 111 right angle normal to the surface when the transport ratio was increased. With the help of Auger electron spectroscopy, interfacial mixing was verified. Nitrogen atoms were present in the state of titanium nitride for all transport ratios from 0.5 up to 10.0. However, the chemical bonding state of titanium changed from titanium nitride to the metallic state with increasing transport ratio Ti/N. The corrosion behavior was evaluated in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid saturated with oxygen, using multisweep cyclic voltammetry measurements. Thin film deposition of pure titanium and titanium implantation prior to TiN deposition have beneficial effects on the suppression of transpassive chromium dissolution. ((orig.))

  12. Design of Wear-Resistant Austenitic Steels for Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, J. N.; Casati, R.; Lecis, N.; Andrianopoli, C.; Varone, A.; Montanari, R.; Vedani, M.

    2018-03-01

    Type 316L stainless steel feedstock powder was modified by alloying with powders containing carbide/boride-forming elements to create improved wear-resistant austenitic alloys that can be readily processed by Selective Laser Melting. Fe-based alloys with high C, B, V, and Nb contents were thus produced, resulting in a microstructure that consisted of austenitic grains and a significant amount of hard carbides and borides. Heat treatments were performed to modify the carbide distribution and morphology. Optimal hard-phase spheroidization was achieved by annealing the proposed alloys at 1150 °C for 1 hour followed by water quenching. The total increase in hardness of samples containing 20 pct of C/B-rich alloy powder was of 82.7 pct while the wear resistance could be increased by a factor of 6.

  13. Cadmium Telluride-Titanium Dioxide Nanocomposite for Photodegradation of Organic Substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontam, Areeporn; Khaorapapong, Nithima; Ogawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium telluride-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was prepared by hydrothermal reaction of sol-gel derived titanium dioxide and organically modified cadmium telluride. The crystallinity of titanium dioxide in the nanocomposite was higher than that of pure titanium dioxide obtained by the reaction under the same temperature and pressure conditions, showing that cadmium telluride induced the crystallization of titanium dioxide. Diffuse reflectance spectrum of the nanocomposite showed the higher absorption efficiency in the UV-visible region due to band-gap excitation of titanium dioxide. The nanocomposite significantly showed the improvement of photocatalytic activity for 4-chlorophenol with UV light.

  14. The irradiation performance of austenitic stainless steel clade PWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira e Silva, A.; Esteves, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The steady state irradiation performance of austenitic stainless steel clad pressurized water reactor fuel rods is modeled with fuel performance codes of the FRAP series. These codes, originally developed to model the thermal-mechanical behavior of zircaloy clad fuel rods, are modified to model stainless steel clad fuel rods. The irradiation thermal-mechanical behavior of type 348 stainless steel and zircaloy fuel rods is compared. (author) [pt

  15. Photoelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose at a ruthenium complex modified titanium dioxide electrode promoted by uric acid and ascorbic acid for photoelectrochemical fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shuo-Jian; Ji, Shi-Bo; Liu, Jun-Chen; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Shan

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous presence of uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) is first found to largely promote the photoelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose (GLU) at an indium-tin oxide (ITO) or TiO2 nanoparticles/ITO electrode modified with [Ru(tatp)3]2+ (tatp = 1,4,8,9-tetra-aza-triphenylene) possessing good redox activity and nanoparticle size distribution. A well-defined electrocatalytic peak for GLU oxidation is shown at 0.265 V (vs. SCE) under approximate physiological conditions upon incorporation of UA and AA. The [Ru(tatp)3]2+/ITO electrode exhibits attractive amperometric oxidation responses towards GLU, UA and AA, while controlled potentiostatically at 0.3 V, 0.7 V and 1.0 V, respectively, indicating high sensitivity and excellent reproducibility. On basis of the photoelectrocatalysis of [Ru(tatp)3]2+/TiO2/ITO anode, a GLU concentration-dependent photoelectrochemical fuel cell vs. SCE is elaborately assembled. The proposed free-enzyme photoelectrochemical fuel cell employing 0.1 M GLU associated with 0.01 M UA and 0.01 M AA as fuel shows open-circuit photovoltage of 0.608 V, short-circuit photocurrent density of 124.5 μA cm-2 and maximum power density of 21.75 μW cm-2 at 0.455 V, fill factor of 0.32 and photoenergy conversion efficiency of 36.65%, respectively.

  16. Welding metallurgy of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels welds are commonly found in nuclear reactor systems. The macrostructure and the transformation of delta -phase into γ - phase which occur during rapid solidification of such welds are discussed. Finally, several types of defects which are derived from the welding operation, particularly defects of crack type, are also discussed in brief. (author)

  17. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    395–398. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation. MOHSEN KAZEMINEZHAD. ∗. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Avenue, Tehran, Iran. MS received 17 January 2011; revised 9 July 2011. Abstract. In this research, an algorithm ...

  18. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  19. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K

  20. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection of austenitic pipe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, K.; Luecking, J.; Medenbach, S.

    1999-01-01

    The contribution explains the system of standard testing methods elaborated by ABB ZAQ GmbH for inspection of austenitic plant components. The inspection tasks explained in greater detail are basic materials testing (straight pipes, bends, and pipe specials), and inspection of welds and dissimilar welds. The techniques discussed in detail are those for detection and sizing of defects. (orig./CB) [de

  1. Titanium and titanium alloys: fundamentals and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leyens, C; Peters, M

    2003-01-01

    ... number of titanium alloys have paved the way for light metals to vastly expand into many industrial applications. Titanium and its alloys stand out primarily due to their high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance, at just half the weight of steels and Ni-based superalloys. This explains their early success in the aerospace and the...

  2. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades; Analise da austenita expandida em camadas nitretadas em acos inoxidaveis austeniticos e superaustenitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia de Materais, Aeronautica e Automobilistica; Oliveira, A.M. [Instituto de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranhao (IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Gallego, J., E-mail: gallego@dem.feis.unesp.b [UNESP, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Dept. Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  3. Titanium Nanosurface Modification by Anodization for Orthopedic Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yao, Chang; Slamovich, Elliott B; Webster, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    .... For this reason, the objective of the present in vitro study was to modify the surface of conventional titanium to include nanostructured surface features that promote the functions of osteoblasts (bone-forming cells...

  4. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements of austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the SINQ target irradiation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T.; Dai, Y.; Kikuchi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Titanium-doped austenitic stainless steel (JPCA) and reduced activated ferritic/martensitic steel (F82H) irradiated with high-energy protons and spallation neutrons were investigated by positron annihilation lifetime measurements. Subnanometer-sized (steel, the positron annihilation lifetime of the bubbles decreased with increasing irradiation dose and annealing temperature because the bubbles absorb additional He atoms. In the case of JPCA steel, the positron annihilation lifetime increased with increasing annealing temperature above 773 K, in which case the dissociation of complexes of vacancy clusters with He atoms and the growth of He bubbles was detected. He bubble size and density were also discussed.

  5. Evaluation of non-conformities of hip prostheses made of titanium alloys and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Ewerton de Oliveira Teotonio; Nascimento, Jose Jeferson da Silva; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Morais, Crislene Rodrigues da Silva; Campos, Karla Valeria Miranda de

    2017-01-01

    A large number of metallic alloys has satisfactory behavior when used to manufacture implants for hip prostheses. However, they must be in conformity with standards, to ensure their quality for long periods without losing its functionality. Therefore, this paper aims to study the non-conformities in two hip prostheses, one of titanium and other stainless steel according to standards. The implants studied passed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence, tensile test and optical microscopy (OM). Specimens for the tensile test were made according to ASTM E 8M, as well, MO samples passed by metallographic procedure. The results evidenced that some chemical compositions showed in relation to the standards. The XRD analysis showed peaks of austenite and absence of ferrite for the stainless steel, while the titanium alloy presents an alpha phase (HCP) more significant than the beta phase (BCC). The stainless steel alloys and titanium have yield strength and tensile strength that meet the standards. On the other hand, the elastic modulus of the titanium alloy and stainless steel, comes to be ten times greater than the human bone. Therefore, the high modulus of elasticity of the alloys, favors bone resorption problems. The stainless steel microstructure is typical of an austenitic matrix, while the titanium alloy presents α + β microstructure. (author)

  6. Austenitic stainless steels with cryogenic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarata, Daniela Florentina

    1999-01-01

    The most used austenitic stainless steels are alloyed with chromium and nickel and have a reduced carbon content, usually lower than 0.1 % what ensures corresponding properties for processing by plastic deformation at welding, corrosion resistance in aggressive environment and toughness at low temperatures. Steels of this kind alloyed with manganese are also used to reduce the nickel content. By alloying with manganese which is a gammageneous element one ensures the stability of austenites. Being cheaper these steels may be used extensively for components and equipment used in cryogenics field. The best results were obtained with steels of second group, AMnNi, in which the designed chemical composition was achieved, i.e. the partial replacement of nickel by manganese ensured the toughness at cryogenic temperatures. If these steels are supplementary alloyed, their strength properties may increase to the detriment of plasticity and toughness, although the cryogenic character is preserved

  7. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  8. The nucleation of austenite in ferritic ductile cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, J.M.; Hon, M.H.; Lee, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Austempered ductile cast iron has recently been receiving increasing attention because of its excellent combination of strength and ductility. Since the austenitization process has a significant influence on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron, several investigations on the nucleation sites of austenite and diffusion paths of carbon from spheroidal graphite have been reported in ferritic ductile cast iron. However, agreement on this subject has not ben reached. The purpose of this paper is to study the preferential nucleation sites of austenite during austenitization at two austenitizing temperatures in ferritic ductile cast iron. An attempt was made to understand the reasons which give rise to preferential austenite nucleation sites. The carbon diffusion paths from spheroidal graphite were also investigated

  9. Diffractometry of expanded austenite using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fewell, M.P.; Priest, J.M.; Collins, G.A.; Short, K.T.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The question of the structure of the nitrogen-rich surface layer produced in the nitriding of austenitic stainless steel has been controversial for some time. Diffractometry using conventional x-ray sources is routinely carried out on this material. The result universally seen shows an ostensibly f.c.c. lattice with a larger lattice parameter than that of the underlying austenite. The difficulty with this interpretation lies in the 200 reflection, which lies at slightly lower Bragg angle than expected on the basis of the 111, 220 and 311 reflections. This behaviour is seen in all work known to us, regardless of the grade of austenitic stainless steel or the details of the nitriding technique. It has been explained as due to a mixed f.c.c. phase with different grains having different lattice constants, or as due to a tetragonal distortion of the lattice or an f.c.c lattice with a high frequency of stacking faults, or as indicating a triclinic lattice with a unit cell having all sides equal and two angles equal

  10. Investigation on the Effect of Sulfur and Titanium on the Microstructure of Lamellar Graphite Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Stefanescu, Doru Michael; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to identify the inclusions in lamellar graphite cast iron in an effort to explain the nucleation of the phases of interest. Four samples of approximately the same carbon equivalent but different levels of sulfur and titanium were studied. The Ti/S ratios were from 0...... of complex Al, Ca, Mg oxide. An increased titanium level of 0.35 pct produced superfine interdendritic graphite (~10 μm) at low (0.012 wt pct) as well as at high-S contents. Ti also caused increased segregation in the microstructure of the analyzed irons and larger eutectic grains (cells). TiC did not appear...... to be a nucleation site for the primary austenite as it was found mostly at the periphery of the secondary arms of the austenite, in the last region to solidify. The effect of titanium in refining the graphite and increasing the austenite fraction can be explained through the widening of the liquidus...

  11. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarikaya. M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200/sup 0/C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different (111) variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample.

  12. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarikaya, M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200 0 C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different [111] variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample

  13. Nickel and titanium nanoboride composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimova, K A; Galevsky, G V; Rudneva, V V; Kozyrev, N A; Orshanskaya, E G

    2015-01-01

    Electrodeposition conditions, structural-physical and mechanical properties (microhardness, cohesion with a base, wear resistance, corrosion currents) of electroplated composite coatings on the base of nickel with nano and micro-powders of titanium boride are investigated. It has been found out that electro-crystallization of nickel with boride nanoparticles is the cause of coating formation with structural fragments of small sizes, low porosity and improved physical and mechanical properties. Titanium nano-boride is a component of composite coating, as well as an effective modifier of nickel matrix. Nano-boride of the electrolyte improves efficiency of the latter due to increased permissible upper limit of the cathodic current density. (paper)

  14. Dimensional changes in FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] austenitic cladding and ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makenas, B.J.; Chastain, S.A.; Gneiting, B.C.

    1990-11-01

    As the standard cladding and duct material for the Fast Flux Test Facility driver fuel, 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel has provided good service up to a fast fluence of 16 x 10 22 n/cm 2 in extreme cases. The titanium-stabilized variant of 316 SS, called D9, has extended the useful life of the austenitic alloys by increasing the incubation fluence necessary for the onset of volumetric swelling. Duct flat-to-flat, length and bow, pin bundle distortion, fuel pin diameter and length, as well as cladding volumetric swelling have been examined for high fluence components representing both alloys. These data emphasize the importance of the swelling process, the superiority of D9, and the interrelation between deformations in the duct, bundle, and individual pins. 8 refs., 10 figs

  15. Contribution on the influence of transformation structures under consideration of austenite deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peisker, D.; Doktorowski, A.; Dittrich, D.

    2001-01-01

    Hot forming represents a substantial part of the manufacturing process of many steel products. The crucial microstructural transformation process, which influences the characteristics of a steel considerably, is undisputed the γ/α-transformation. A successful aid to the interpretation of possible microstructural transformation processes during cooling from the austenitizing or deformation temperature is the determination and handling of CCT diagrams. In this article two steels are examined which differ only in their titanium content. Dilatometric investigations were performed varying the three parameters' transformation temperature, strain and cooling strategy. The insights gathered are illustrated and discussed with the aid of CCT diagrams. An additional transformation below A c1 with a brief curing reheat up to A c3 + 20 K leads to a substantially finer structure. The exploitation of this effect may be of great industrial importance. (orig.)

  16. Influence of the austenitic stainless steel microstructure on the void swelling under ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouxel Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the role of different metallurgical parameters on the void formation mechanisms, various austenitic stainless steels were elaborated and irradiated with heavy ions. Two alloys, in several metallurgical conditions (15Cr/15Ni–Ti and 15Cr/25Ni–Ti, were irradiated in the JANNUS-Saclay facility at 600 °C with 2 MeV Fe2+ ions up to 150 dpa. Resulting microstructures were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. Different effects on void swelling are highlighted. Only the pre-aged samples, which were consequently solute and especially titanium depleted, show cavities. The nickel-enriched matrix shows more voids with a smaller size. Finally, the presence of nano-precipitates combined with a dense dislocation network decreases strongly the number of cavities.

  17. Alloying effect on the structure and properties of austenitic heat-resistant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitin, V.V.; Grabovskij, V.Ya.; Korostelev, V.F.; Ryvkin, Yu.A.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated have been mechanical properties at test temperatures of 20-95O deg C, wear resistance, softening at thermomechanical cycling and microstructure of cast austenitic chromium-nickel steels (13%Cr + 35%Ni), produced by electroslag remelting with variations in Ti, Mo, Nb and W contents. Regression equations for relationship of the investigated characteristics to alloying element content have been obtained. Titanium, molybdenum and niobium increasing hardness and strength limit at room and high temperatures promote a decrease in ductility. Tungsten increases strength properties, wear resistance and thermal stability of the steels without negative effect on the impact strength. The impact strength decrease with an increase in alloying is due to brittle precipitations along the boundaries of as-cast grains, containing Ti, Mo, Nb and Si

  18. Quality of austenite chrome-nickel steel made by gas-oxygen refining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fel'dgandler, Eh.G.; Levin, F.L.; Moshkevich, E.A.; Shifrin, Eh.V.; Movshovich, V.S.; Pargamonov, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Properties and structure were investigated of austenitic 03Kh18N11 and 08KhN10T steels melted at gas oxygen refining aggregates. It was established that mechanical and corrosion properties of rolling of such steels were in agreement with standard properties of metal of open melting. Sheet 08Kh18N10T steel has the level of strength and plasticity regulated for 12Kh18N10T steel. As steel of 08Kh18N10T holds the complex of high mechanical and corrosion properties, 08Kh18N10T is recommended to be replace by 12Kh18N10T with the aim of decrease of titanium usage and increase of process efficiency

  19. Effect of cathodic polarization on coating doxycycline on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geißler, Sebastian; Tiainen, Hanna; Haugen, Håvard J., E-mail: h.j.haugen@odont.uio.no

    2016-06-01

    Cathodic polarization has been reported to enhance the ability of titanium based implant materials to interact with biomolecules by forming titanium hydride at the outermost surface layer. Although this hydride layer has recently been suggested to allow the immobilization of the broad spectrum antibiotic doxycycline on titanium surfaces, the involvement of hydride in binding the biomolecule onto titanium remains poorly understood. To gain better understanding of the influence this immobilization process has on titanium surfaces, mirror-polished commercially pure titanium surfaces were cathodically polarized in the presence of doxycycline and the modified surfaces were thoroughly characterized using atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and angle-resolved X-ray spectroscopy. We demonstrated that no hydride was created during the polarization process. Doxycycline was found to be attached to an oxide layer that was modified during the electrochemical process. A bacterial assay using bioluminescent Staphylococcus epidermidis Xen43 showed the ability of the coating to reduce bacterial colonization and planktonic bacterial growth. - Highlights: • Titanium hydride was found not to be involved in immobilization of doxycycline. • Doxycycline coating was strongly bound to a modified surface oxide layer. • Effect of coatings tested using a dynamic bacteria assay based on bioluminescence. • Topmost layer of adsorbed doxycycline was shown to have strong antibacterial effect.

  20. Tribological investigations of perfluoroalkylsilanes monolayers deposited on titanium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichomski, Michał

    2012-01-01

    Therefore the present work reports a systematic study of titanium modification by fluoroalkylsilanes and surface characterization from the tribological point of view. The vapor phase deposition method was used to modify titanium surfaces by fluoroalkylsilanes and the influence of the used modifier on the tribological properties is presented. The modification procedure efficiency, surface structure and morphology were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The effectiveness of modification of the titanium surface was monitored by the measurement of the wetting contact angle and the surface free energy. The increase of surface hydrophobicity was observed upon the modification by increasing the wetting contact angle and reducing the surface free energy. The tribological performance of various perfluoroalkylsilanes films on the titanium surface was investigated in mili- and nano-newton load ranges. Dependence of the adhesive force and coefficient of friction values obtained in nano- and micro-scale on fluoroalkyl chain length was observed. Nano- and micro-tribological measurements show that titanium modified by fluoroalkylsilanes has lower adhesion and coefficient of friction than unmodified one. The investigation also indicates a decrease of the friction coefficient with increasing fluoric alkyl chain length. It was found that the titanium modified by fluoroalkylsilanes with longer alkyl chains is a prime candidate for practical use as a lubricant in biomedical and electronic applications. -- Highlights: ► Titanium surface modification by perfluoroalkylsilanes was investigated. ► The effectiveness of modification was monitored by the surface free energy. ► The modification procedure correctness was characterized by ToF-SIMS, AFM, FT-IR measurements. ► The tribological performance of modified titanium in differed scale was studied.

  1. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  2. Microstructural evolution in deformed austenitic TWinning Induced Plasticity steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tol, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the effect of plastic deformation on the stability of the austenitic microstructure against martensitic transformation and diffusional decomposition and its role in the phenomenon of delayed fracture in austenitic manganese (Mn)-based TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels.

  3. Lattice expansion of carbon-stabilized expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice parameter of expanded austenite was determined as a function of the content of interstitially dissolved carbon in homogeneous, carburized thin stainless steel foils. For the first time this expansion of the face-centered cubic lattice is determined on unstrained austenite. It is found...

  4. Reverted austenite in PH 13-8 Mo maraging steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnitzer, Ronald; Radis, Rene; Noehrer, Matthias; Schober, Michael; Hochfellner, Rainer; Zinner, Silvia; Povoden-Karadeniz, E.; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Leitner, Harald

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of maraging steels are strongly influenced by the presence of reverted austenite. In this study, the morphology and chemical composition of reverted austenite in a corrosion resistant maraging steel was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Two types of austenite, i.e. granular and elongated, are present after aging at 575 o C, whereby the content of the latter increases during aging. The investigations revealed that the austenite phase is enriched in Ni, which prevents the transformation to martensite during cooling. Inside and next to the austenitc areas, Mo and Cr-rich carbides, which form during the aging treatment, were found. Various aging treatments were performed to obtain the activation energy for the formation of reverted austenite. Additionally, the experimental data are compared with thermodynamic and kinetic simulations. Based on these results and the chemical composition changes of the phases, a model for the formation of reverted austenite is presented. It is concluded that precipitation of B2-ordered NiAl and formation of reverted austenite take place simultaneously during aging and that dissolution of precipitates is not essential for the initial formation of reverted austenite.

  5. Classification of titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.; Garcia C, R.M.; Maya M, M.E.; Ita T, A. De; Palacios G, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) and the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy techniques are used with the purpose to achieve a complete identification of phases and mixture of phases of a crystalline material as titanium dioxide. The problem for solving consists of being able to distinguish a sample of titanium dioxide being different than a titanium dioxide pigment. A standard sample of titanium dioxide with NIST certificate is used, which indicates a purity of 99.74% for the TiO 2 . The following way is recommended to proceed: a)To make an analysis by means of X-ray diffraction technique to the sample of titanium dioxide pigment and on the standard of titanium dioxide waiting not find differences. b) To make a chemical analysis by the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy via in a microscope, taking advantage of the high vacuum since it is oxygen which is analysed and if it is concluded that the aluminium oxide appears in a greater proportion to 1% it is established that is a titanium dioxide pigment, but if it is lesser then it will be only titanium dioxide. This type of analysis is an application of the nuclear techniques useful for the tariff classification of merchandise which is considered as of difficult recognition. (Author)

  6. Tribocorrosion wear of austenitic and martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rozing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of tribocorrosion wear caused by an aggressive acidic media. Tests were conducted on samples made of stainless steel AISI 316L, 304L and 440C. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in quenched and tempered and then induction hardened state. Electrochemical corrosion resistance testing and analysis of the microstructure and hardness in the cross section was carried out on samples of selected steels. To test the possibility of applying surface modification of selected materials in conditions of use, tests were conducted on samples/parts in a worm press for final pressing.

  7. Microstructural features of dissimilar welds between 316LN austenitic stainless steel and alloy 800

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sireesha, M.; Sundaresan, S.

    2000-01-01

    For joining type 316LN austenitic stainless steel to modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for power plant application, a trimetallic configuration using an insert piece (such as alloy 800) of intermediate thermal coefficient of expansion (CTE) has been sometimes suggested for bridging the wide gap in CTE between the two steels. Two joints are thus involved and this paper is concerned with the weld between 316LN and alloy 800. These welds were produced using three types of filler materials: austenitic stainless steels corresponding to 316,16Cr-8Ni-2Mo, and the nickel-base Inconel 182 1 . The weld fusion zones and the interfaces with the base materials were characterised in detail using light and transmission electron microscopy. The 316 and Inconel 182 weld metals solidified dendritically, while the 16-8-2(16%Cr-8%Ni-2%Mo) weld metal showed a predominantly cellular substructure. The Inconel weld metal contained a large number of inclusions when deposited from flux-coated electrodes, but was relatively inclusion-free under inert gas-shielded welding. Long-term elevated-temperature aging of the weld metals resulted in embrittling sigma phase precipitation in the austenitic stainless steel weld metals, but the nickel-base welds showed no visible precipitation, demonstrating their superior metallurgical stability for high-temperature service. (orig.)

  8. Phase transformation by fatigue in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Y.S.; Kwun, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of strain induced martensite on the fatigue behavior of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel was investigated. During low cycle fatigue, the austenitic stainless steel showed a continuous cyclic hardening until fracture. The extent of cyclic hardening increased with decreasing austenite stability. The austenite stability was controlled by different aging time and temperature, which resulted in different carbide morphologies. The fatigue crack propagation rate near ΔK th varied also with the austenite stability inside the plastic zone at the crack up. Especially, the near-threshold fatigue crack propagation rate of the grain boundary carbide precipitated condition was the lowest. This was considered to be due to the roughness induced closure caused by intergranular facet. A new model for the intergranular facet formation and the fatigue crack propagation of grain boundary carbide precipitated condition was proposed. (Author)

  9. Electrowinning molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in it quest for global competitiveness CSIR Manufacturing and Materials Technology 3 Rationale – Titanium Cost Build-up Material Cost Ilmenite $0.27/kg Ti sponge Titanium slag $0.75/kg Ti Sponge TiCl4 and TiO2 $3....10/kg Ti Sponge Ti Sponge raw materials costs $5.50/kg Ti Sponge Total Ti Sponge cost $9-$11/kg Ti Sponge Ti ingot $15-17/kg Ti Aluminium $1.7/kg Al Supporting the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in its quest for global competitivenessorting...

  10. Damping Capacity of High Manganese Austenitic Stainless Steel with a Two Phase Mixed Structure of Martensite and Austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Tae Hyun; Kang, Chang-Yong

    2013-01-01

    The damping capacity of high manganese austenitic stainless steel with a two phase mixed structure of deformation-induced martensite and reversed austenite was studied. Reversed austenite with an ultra-fine grain size of less than 0.2 μm was obtained by reversion treatment. The two phase structure of deformation-induced martensite and reversed austenite was obtained by annealing treatment at a range of 500-700 °C and various times in cold rolled high manganese austenitic stainless steel. The damping capacity increased with an increasing annealing temperature and time. In high manganese stainless steel with the two phase mixed structure of martensite and austenite, the damping capacity decreased with an increasing volume fraction of deformation-induced martensite. Thus, the damping capacity was strongly affected by deformation-induced martensite. The results confirmed that austenitic stainless steel with a good combination of strength and damping capacity was obtained from the two phase mixed structure of austenite and martensite.

  11. Modeling of kinetics of isothermal idiomorphic ferrite formation in a medium carbon vanadium-titanium microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, C.; Caballer, E. G.; Garcia de Andres, C.

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented in this work to calculate the evolution of isothermal austenite-to-idiomorphic ferrite transformation in a medium carbon vanadium-titanium microalloyed steel. This model has been developed on the basis of the study of the nucleation and growth kinetics of idiomorphic ferrite, considering the influence of the nature, size and distribution of the inclusions, which are responsible of the intragranular nucleation of idiomorphic ferrite. Moreover, the influence of the austenite grain size on the isothermal decomposition of austenite in idiomorphic ferrite has been thoroughly analysed. An excellent agreement (85% in R''2) has been obtained between experimental and predicted values of volume fraction of idiomorphic ferrite. (Author) 32 refs

  12. Austenite strengthening and softening during hot deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tushinskij, L.I.; Vlasov, V.S.; Kazimirova, I.E.; Tokarev, A.O.

    1981-01-01

    Processes of formation of austenite structure of 20 and 12Kh18N10T steels during hot deformation and postdeformation isothermal holdings have been investigated by the methods of analysis of curves of hot deformation, high-temperature metallography and light microscopy. Deformation has been exercised by extention in vacuum with average 4x10 -2 s -1 rate. Deformation temperatures of steel 20 are 930 and 1000 deg C, of steel 12Kh18N10T - 1100 deg C. It is stated that dynamic recrystallization takes place in both investigated steels during hot deformation. In the carbonic steel it is developed by shifting sections of high-angular boundaries, flow stress in this case remains constant. Recrystallization is developed by subgrain coalescence in austenite steel, that brings about preservation of increased defect density in recrystallized volumes. As a result strengthening of steel is continued up to fracture during the increase of the deformation degree. Postdeformation weakening of 12Kh18N10T steel is slowed down as compared with weakening of carbonic steel [ru

  13. Magnetic properties of cyclically deformed austenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Arpan, E-mail: dasarpan1@yahoo.co.in

    2014-06-01

    In meta-stable austenitic stainless steels, low cycle fatigue deformation is accompanied by a partial stress/strain-induced solid state phase transformation of paramagnetic γ(fcc) austenite phase to ferromagnetic α{sup /}(bcc) martensite. The measured characteristic of magnetic properties, which are the saturation magnetization, susceptibility, coercivity, retentivity, and the area under the magnetic hysteresis loop are sensitive to the total strain amplitude imposed and the corresponding material behaviour. The morphologies and nucleation characteristics of deformation induced martensites (i.e., ϵ(hcp), α{sup /}(bcc)) have been investigated through analytical transmission electron microscope. It has been observed that deformation induced martensites can nucleate at a number of sites (i.e., shear band intersections, isolated shear bands, shear band–grain boundary intersection, grain boundary triple points, etc.) through multiple transformation sequences: γ(fcc)→ϵ(hcp), γ(fcc)→ϵ(hcp)→α{sup /}(bcc), γ(fcc)→ deformation twin →α{sup /}(bcc) and γ(fcc)→α{sup /}(bcc). - Highlights: • LCF tests were done at various strain amplitudes of 304LNSS. • Quantification of martensite was done through ferritecope. • Magnetic properties were characterised through VSM. • Correlation of magnetic properties with the cyclic plastic response was done. • TEM was done to investigate the transformation micro-mechanisms.

  14. Ultrasonic Surface Treatment of Titanium Alloys. The Submicrocrystalline State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenov, V. A.; Vlasov, V. A.; Borozna, V. Y.; Klopotov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the results of the research on improvement of physical-and- mechanical properties of titanium alloys VT1-0 and VT6 by modification of surfaces using ultrasonic treatment, and a comprehensive study of the microstructure and mechanical properties of modified surface layers. It has been established that exposure to ultrasonic treatment leads to formation in the surface layer of a structure with an average size of elements 50 - 100 nm, depending on the brand of titanium alloy.

  15. Characterization of the austenitic stability of metastable austenitic stainless steel with regard to its formability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Matthias; Liewald, Mathias

    2018-05-01

    During the last decade, the stainless steel market showed a growing volume of 3-5% p.a.. The austenitic grades are losing market shares to ferritic or 200-series grades due to the high nickel price, but still playing the most important role within the stainless steel market. Austenitic stainless steel is characterized by the strain-induced martensite formation, causing the TRIP-effect (Transformation Induced Plasticity) which is responsible for good formability and high strength. The TRIP-effect itself is highly dependent on the forming temperature, the strain as well as the chemical composition which has a direct influence on the stability of the austenite. Today the austenitic stability is usually characterized by the so called Md30-temperature, which was introduced by Angel and enhanced by several researches, particularly Nohara. It is an empirical formula based on the chemical composition and the grain size of a given material, calculating the temperature which is necessary to gain a 50 % martensite formation after 30 % of elongation in a tensile test. A higher Md30-temperature indicates a lower stability and therefore a higher tendency towards martensite formation. The main disadvantage of Md30 -temperature is the fact that it is not based on forming parameters and only describes a single point instead of the whole forming process. In this paper, an experimental set up for measuring martensite and temperature evolution in a non-isothermal tensile test is presented, which is based on works of Hänsel and Schmid. With this set up, the martensite formation rate for different steels of the steel grade EN 1.4301 and EN 1.4310 is measured. Based on these results a new austenitic stability criterion is defined. This criterion and the determined Md30-temperatures are related to the stretch formability of the materials. The results show that the new IFU criterion is with regard to the formability a much more useful characteristic number for metastable austenitic steels

  16. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  17. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  18. Soft tissue response to a new austenitic stainless steel with a negligible nickel content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschon, M; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Borsari, V; Lenger, H; Bernauer, J; Chiesa, R; Cigada, A; Chiusoli, L; Giardino, R

    2005-10-01

    This study evaluates the soft tissue response to a new austenitic stainless steel with a low nickel content (P558) in comparison with a conventional stainless steel (SSt)and a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Previous findings showed its in vitro biocompatibility by culturing P558 with healthy and osteoporotic osteoblasts and its in vivo effectiveness as bone implant material. Regarding its use as a material in osteosynthesis,P558 biocompatibility when implanted in soft tissues, as subcutis and muscle, was assessed. Disks and rods of these metals were implanted in rat subcutis and in rabbit muscle, respectively. Four and twelve weeks post surgery implants with surrounding tissue were retrieved for histologic and histomorphometric analysis: fibrous capsule thickness and new vessel formation were measured. Around all implanted materials, light microscopy highlighted a reactive and fibrous capsule formation coupled with ongoing neoangiogenesis both in rats and in rabbits. Histomorphometric measurements revealed a stronger inflammatory response,in terms of capsule thickness,surrounding SSt implants (9.8% Ni content) both in rat subcutis and in rabbit muscle independently of shape and site of implantation. A progressive decrease in capsule thickness around P558 (implantation. However,in the light of the previous and present studies, P558 is a good material, instead of titanium alloys, in orthopedic research.

  19. Phenomenological study of the microdeformations produced at the beginning of primary creep under low stresses in an austenitic stainless steel of Z3CND 18-13 type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvet, J.-N.; Le Bret, P.; Roulliay, R.

    1975-01-01

    A creep machine was modified enabling tests to be carried out at 550 deg C under 8hbar. The modulus of elasticity, yield strength, plastic deformation on loading, creep deformation and total plastic deformation were determined in an austenitic stainless steel of Z3CND 18-13 type. A relationship was established between the plastic deformation on loading and the creep deformation [fr

  20. Austenite Formation from Martensite in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P.F.; Sietsma, J.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of austenitization treatment of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) on austenite formation during reheating and on the fraction of austenite retained after tempering treatment is measured and analyzed. The results show the formation of austenite in two

  1. The Formation of Multipoles during the High-Temperature Creep of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howell, J.; Nielsson, O.; Horsewell, Andy

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that multipole dislocation configurations can arise during power-law creep of certain austenitic stainless steels. These multipoles have been analysed in some detail for two particular steels (Alloy 800 and a modified AISI 316L) and it is suggested that they arise either during...... instantaneous loading or during the primary creep stage. Trace analysis has shown that the multipoles are confined to {1 1 1} planes during primary creep but are not necessarily confined to these planes during steady-state creep unless they are pinned by interstitials....

  2. Chitosan patterning on titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Gilabert Chirivella, Eduardo; Pérez Feito, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Clarisse; Ribeiro, Sylvie; Correia, Daniela; González Martin, María Luisa; Manero Planella, José María; Lanceros Méndez, Senentxu; Gallego Ferrer, Gloria; Gómez Ribelles, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used in medical implants because of their excellent properties. However, bacterial infection is a frequent cause of titanium-based implant failure and also compromises its osseointegration. In this study, we report a new simple method of providing titanium surfaces with antibacterial properties by alternating antibacterial chitosan domains with titanium domains in the micrometric scale. Surface microgrooves were etched on pure titanium disks at i...

  3. Formation of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Coating on Titanium Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ievgen Volodymyrovych PYLYPCHUK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HA has long been used as a coating material in the implant industry for orthopedic implant applications. HA is the natural inorganic constituent of bone and teeth. By coating titanium (base material of implant engineering because of its lightness and durability with hydroxyapatite, we can provide higher biocompatibility of titanium implants, according to HA ability to form a direct biochemical bond with living tissues. This article reports a biomimetic approach for coating hydroxyapatite with titanium A method of modifying the surface of titanium by organic modifiers (for creating functional groups on the surface, followed by formation "self-assembled" layer of biomimetic hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF. FTIR and XPS confirmed the formation of hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium surface. Comparative study of the formation of HA on the surface of titanium plates modified by different functional groups: Ti(≡OH, Ti/(≡Si-OH and Ti/(≡COOH is conducted. It was found that the closest to natural stoichiometric hydroxyapatite Ca/P ratio was obtained on Ti/(≡COOH samples. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4974

  4. Production of titanium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Botbol, O.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a summary of results from theoperation of a laboratory scale for the production in batches of approximately 100 gs of titanium tetrachloride by chlorination with chloroform and carbon tetrachloride between 340 deg C and 540 deg C. Chlorination agent vapors were passed through a quartz column reacting with titanium oxide powder agglomerated in little spheres. Obtained titanium tetrachloride was condensed in a condenser, taken in a ballon and then purified by fractional distillation. Optimun temperature for chloroform was 400 deg C with 74 % yield and for carbon tetrachloride was 500 deg C with 69 % yield. (Author) [es

  5. Characterization of the corrosion behavior of an austenitic stainless steel for biomedical applications coated with Ti N, Ti CN And DLC PVD coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2006-01-01

    Metallic biomaterials must present a combination of properties such as corrosion resistance, biocompatibility and mechanical resistance. Austenitic stainless steels, especially AISI 316L combine these properties with the easy of fabrication at low cost. However, they are prone to corrosion in physiological solutions. Furthermore, their corrosion products may lead to infectious ou allergenic reactions in the tissues around the implant device. In the present work, coatings produced by physical vapour deposition (PVD) methods have been applied on the surface of a 316L stainless steel to increase its corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Three thin films were tested: titanium nitride (TiN), titanium carbonitride (TiCN) and diamond-like carbon (DLC). These materials present high hardness, wear resistance and intrinsic biocompatibility that are key features when considering biomedical applications. The characterization of the electrochemical behavior of the stainless steel coated with the three different films showed that the presence of surface defects are deleterious to the corrosion resistance of the substrate. These defects were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The evolution of the electrochemical behavior of the coated steel was explained through a mechanism based on the experimental results obtained using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Two different passivation treatments were carried out on the stainless steel surface, either in sulfuric or nitric acid solutions, to increase its corrosion resistance. The results suggested que these treatments were not efficient, but may be modified to improve its performance. The electronic properties of the passive films of the non-passivated and passivated stainless steel were studied using the Mott-Schottky approach. The films presented a duplex character. Below the flat band potential the behavior is typical of a highly doped type-p semiconductor. Above the flat band potential is typical of a highly

  6. Deformation behavior of austenitic stainless steel at deep cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wentuo; Liu, Yuchen; Wan, Farong; Liu, Pingping; Yi, Xiaoou; Zhan, Qian; Morrall, Daniel; Ohnuki, Somei

    2018-06-01

    The nonmagnetic austenite steels are the jacket materials for low-temperature superconductors of fusion reactors. The present work provides evidences that austenites transform to magnetic martensite when deformation with a high-strain is imposed at 77 K and 4.2 K. The 4.2 K test is characterized by serrated yielding that is related to the specific motion of dislocations and phase transformations. The in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations in nanoscale reveal that austenites achieve deformation by twinning under low-strain conditions at deep cryogenic temperatures. The generations of twins, martensitic transformations, and serrated yielding are in order of increasing difficulty.

  7. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  8. Titanium oxide fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jonge, D.; Visser, J.

    2012-01-01

    One measure to improve air quality is to apply photo-catalytic substances that capture NOx onto the road surface or onto baffle boards alongside the roads. The effect of titanium oxide containing clinkers with coating was discussed in the report 'Demonstration project of air-purifying pavement in Hengelo, The Netherlands' that was published in May 2011. This article examines the way in which the effectiveness of this study was determined. Can titanium oxide containing clinkers and coatings indeed capture NOx?. [nl

  9. Machining of titanium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  10. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shunichi; Hida, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Shirai, Tasuku.

    1982-05-01

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 55 0 from SUS side, 45 0 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 45 0 , inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 45 0 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  11. Effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Dong Jun; Shin, Eun Joo; Choi, Young Won; Lee, Jae Sang; Koo, Yang Mo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Non-equilibrium segregation of B in steel depends strongly on the cooling rate. ► A higher austenitization temperature reduced the B hardenability effect. ► An increase in B concentration at γ grain boundaries accelerates the B precipitation. ► The loss of B hardenability effect is due to intragranular borocarbide precipitation. ► The controlled cooling after hot deformation increased the B hardenability effect. - Abstract: The phase transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel was studied considering the segregation and precipitation behavior of boron (B). The effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of B-bearing steel as compared with B-free steel were investigated by using dilatometry, microstructural observations and analysis of B distribution. The effects of these variables on hardenability were discussed in terms of non-equilibrium segregation mechanism and precipitation behavior of B. The retardation of austenite-to-ferrite transformation by B addition depends strongly on cooling rate (CR); this is mainly due to the phenomenon of non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation of B. The hardenability effect of B-bearing steel decreased at higher austenitizing temperature due to the precipitation of borocarbide along austenite grain boundaries. Analysis of B distribution by second ion mass spectroscopy confirmed that the grain boundary segregation of B occurred at low austenitizing temperature of 900 °C, whereas B precipitates were observed along austenite grain boundaries at high austenitizing temperature of 1200 °C. The significant increase in B concentration at austenite grain boundaries due to grain coarsening and a non-equilibrium segregation mechanism may lead to the B precipitation. In contrast, solute B segregated to austenite grain boundaries during cooling after heavy deformation became more stable because the increase in boundary area by grain

  12. Effect of Nanosheet Surface Structure of Titanium Alloys on Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Komasa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium alloys are the most frequently used dental implants partly because of the protective oxide coating that spontaneously forms on their surface. We fabricated titania nanosheet (TNS structures on titanium surfaces by NaOH treatment to improve bone differentiation on titanium alloy implants. The cellular response to TNSs on Ti6Al4V alloy was investigated, and the ability of the modified surfaces to affect osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow cells and increase the success rate of titanium implants was evaluated. The nanoscale network structures formed by alkali etching markedly enhanced the functions of cell adhesion and osteogenesis-related gene expression of rat bone marrow cells. Other cell behaviors, such as proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin deposition, and mineralization, were also markedly increased in TNS-modified Ti6Al4V. Our results suggest that titanium implants modified with nanostructures promote osteogenic differentiation, which may improve the biointegration of these implants into the alveolar bone.

  13. Titanium by design: TRIP titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jamie

    Motivated by the prospect of lower cost Ti production processes, new directions in Ti alloy design were explored for naval and automotive applications. Building on the experience of the Steel Research Group at Northwestern University, an analogous design process was taken with titanium. As a new project, essential kinetic databases and models were developed for the design process and used to create a prototype design. Diffusion kinetic models were developed to predict the change in phase compositions and microstructure during heat treatment. Combining a mobility database created in this research with a licensed thermodynamic database, ThermoCalc and DICTRA software was used to model kinetic compositional changes in titanium alloys. Experimental diffusion couples were created and compared to DICTRA simulations to refine mobility parameters in the titanium mobility database. The software and database were able to predict homogenization times and the beta→alpha plate thickening kinetics during cooling in the near-alpha Ti5111 alloy. The results of these models were compared to LEAP microanalysis and found to be in reasonable agreement. Powder metallurgy was explored using SPS at GM R&D to reduce the cost of titanium alloys. Fully dense Ti5111 alloys were produced and achieved similar microstructures to wrought Ti5111. High levels of oxygen in these alloys increased the strength while reducing the ductility. Preliminary Ti5111+Y alloys were created, where yttrium additions successfully gettered excess oxygen to create oxides. However, undesirable large oxides formed, indicating more research is needed into the homogeneous distribution of the yttrium powder to create finer oxides. Principles established in steels were used to optimize the beta phase transformation stability for martensite transformation toughening in titanium alloys. The Olson-Cohen kinetic model is calibrated to shear strains in titanium. A frictional work database is established for common alloying

  14. Progress on sputter-deposited thermotractive titanium-nickel films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grummon, D.S.; Hou Li; Zhao, Z.; Pence, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    It is now well established that titanium-nickel alloys fabricated as thin films by physical vapor deposition can display the same transformation and shape-memory effects as their ingot-metallurgy counterparts. As such they may find important application to microelectromechanical and biomechanical systems. Furthermore, we show here that titanium-nickel films may be directly processed so as to possess extremely fine austenite grain size and very high strength. These films display classical transformational superelasticity, including high elastic energy storage capacity, the expected dependence of martensite-start temperature on transformation enthalpy, and large, fully recoverable anelastic strains at temperatures above A f . Processing depends on elevated substrate temperatures during deposition, which may be manipulated within a certain range to control both grain size and crystallographic texture. It is also possible to deposit crystalline titanium-nickel films onto polymeric substrates, making them amenable to lithographic patterning into actuator elements that are well-suited to electrical excitation of the martensite reversion transformation. Finally, isothermal annealing of nickel-rich films, under conditions of controlled extrinsic residual stress, leads to topotaxial orientation of Ni 4 Ti 3 -type precipitates, and the associated possibility of two-way memory effects. Much work remains to be done, especially with respect to precise control of composition. (orig.)

  15. Cyclic deformation behaviour of austenitic steels at ambient and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Fatigue; cyclic deformation behaviour; metastable austenitic steel; .... Figure 4 shows a sequence of the basic diagrams which can be used to assess the fatigue .... well as the change of temperature and the development of the magnetic ...

  16. Low-temperature creep of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. P.; Walsh, R. P.

    2017-09-01

    Plastic deformation under constant load (creep) in austenitic stainless steels has been measured at temperatures ranging from 4 K to room temperature. Low-temperature creep data taken from past and unreported austenitic stainless steel studies are analyzed and reviewed. Creep at cryogenic temperatures of common austenitic steels, such as AISI 304, 310 316, and nitrogen-strengthened steels, such as 304HN and 3116LN, are included. Analyses suggests that logarithmic creep (creep strain dependent on the log of test time) best describe austenitic stainless steel behavior in the secondary creep stage and that the slope of creep strain versus log time is dependent on the applied stress/yield strength ratio. The role of cold work, strain-induced martensitic transformations, and stacking fault energy on low-temperature creep behavior is discussed. The engineering significance of creep on cryogenic structures is discussed in terms of the total creep strain under constant load over their operational lifetime at allowable stress levels.

  17. Formation and stabilization of reversed austenite in supermartensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Hald, John

    2017-01-01

    of the reversed austenite phase fraction. Annealing at higher temperatures led to a gradual increase in hardness which was caused by formation of fresh martensite from reversed austenite. It was demonstrated that stabilization of reversed austenite is primarily based on chemical stabilization by partitioning......The formation and stabilization of reversed austenite upon inter-critical annealing was investigated in a X4CrNiMo16-5-1 (EN 1.4418) supermartensitic stainless steel by means of scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter-diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X......-ray spectroscopy and dilatometry. The results were supported by thermodynamics and kinetics models, and hardness measurements. Isothermal annealing for 2 h in the temperature range of 475 to 650 °C led to gradual softening of the material which was related to tempering of martensite and the steady increase...

  18. Nanostructured Bainite-Austenite Steel for Armours Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burian W.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite-austenite steels are applied in the armours construction due to their excellent combination of strength and ductility which enables to lower the armour weight and to improve the protection efficiency. Mechanical properties of the bainite-austenite steels can be controlled in the wide range by chemical composition and heat treatment. In the paper the results of investigation comprising measuring of quasi - static mechanical properties, dynamic yield stress and firing tests of bainite-austenite steel NANOS-BA® are presented. Reported results show that the investigated bainite-austenite steel can be used for constructing add-on armour and that the armour fulfils requirements of protection level 2 of STANAG 4569. Obtained reduction in weight of the tested NANOS-BA® plates in comparison with the present solutions is about 30%.

  19. Welding of austenitic stainless steel with a high molybdenum content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljas, A.; Holmberg, B.

    1984-01-01

    Welding of austenitic steel is discussed. Welding tests of AVESTA 250 SMO (six percent Mo) are reported. Welding without special additives can make the joints susceptible for corrosion in aggressive environments, e.g. sea water. (L.E.)

  20. Effects of austenitizing temperature in quenched niobium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, F.B.C. de; Assuncao, F.C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Three steel compositions with varying Nb content were austenitized at different temperatures and quenched in cold water. Metallographic examination and hardness measurements provided a basis for explaining the hardening mechanism and the role of Nb on the process. (Author) [pt

  1. Chemically Induced Phase Transformation in Austenite by Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Adina; Thaulow, Christian; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2014-03-01

    A highly stable austenite phase in a super duplex stainless steel was subjected to a combination of different gallium ion doses at different acceleration voltages. It was shown that contrary to what is expected, an austenite to ferrite phase transformation occurred within the focused ion beam (FIB) milled regions. Chemical analysis of the FIB milled region proved that the gallium implantation preceded the FIB milling. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction analysis also showed that the phase transformation was not followed by the typical shear and plastic deformation expected from the martensitic transformation. On the basis of these observations, it was concluded that the change in the chemical composition of the austenite and the local increase in gallium, which is a ferrite stabilizer, results in the local selective transformation of austenite to ferrite.

  2. Carburization behavior of AISI 316LN austenitic stainless steel - Experimental studies and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudha, C. [Physical Metallurgy Division, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India); Sivai Bharasi, N. [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India); Anand, R. [Physical Metallurgy Division, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India); Shaikh, H., E-mail: hasan@igcar.gov.i [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India); Dayal, R.K. [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India); Vijayalakshmi, M. [Physical Metallurgy Division, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India)

    2010-07-31

    AISI type 316LN austenitic stainless steel was exposed to flowing sodium at 798 K for 16,000 h in the bi-metallic (BIM) sodium loop. A modified surface layer of 10 {mu}m width having a ferrite structure was detected from X-ray diffraction and electron micro probe based analysis. Beneath the modified surface layer a carburized zone of 60 {mu}m width was identified which was found to consist of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. A mathematical model based on finite difference technique was developed to predict the carburization profiles in sodium exposed austenitic stainless steel. In the computation, effect of only chromium on carbon diffusion was considered. Amount of carbon remaining in solution was determined from the solubility parameter. The predicted profile showed a reasonably good match with the experimental profile. Calculations were extended to simulate the thickness of the carburized layer after exposure to sodium for a period of 40 years. Attempt was also made to predict the carburization profiles based on equilibrium calculations using Dictra and Thermocalc which contain both thermodynamic and kinetic databases for the system under consideration.

  3. Metallurgical characterization of controlled memory wire nickel-titanium rotary instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ya; Zhou, Hui-Min; Zheng, Yu-Feng; Campbell, Les; Peng, Bin; Haapasalo, Markus

    2011-11-01

    To improve the fracture resistance of nickel-titanium (NiTi) files, manufacturers have introduced new alloys and developed new manufacturing processes for the fabrication of NiTi files. This study aimed to examine the phase transformation behavior and microstructure of NiTi instruments from a novel controlled memory NiTi wire (CM wire). Instruments of EndoSequence (ES), ProFile (PF), ProFile Vortex (Vortex), Twisted Files (TF), Typhoon (TYP), and Typhoon™ CM (TYP CM), all size 25/.04, were examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Microstructures of etched instruments were observed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometric (EDS) analyses. The DSC analyses showed that each segment of the TYP CM and Vortex instruments had an austenite transformation completion or austenite-finish (A(f)) temperature exceeding 37°C, whereas the NiTi instruments made from conventional superelastic NiTi wire (ES, PF, and TYP) and TF had A(f) temperatures substantially below mouth temperature. The higher A(f) temperature of TYP CM instruments was consistent with a mixture of austenite and martensite structure, which was observed at room temperature with XRD. All NiTi instruments had room temperature martensite microstructures consisting of colonies of lenticular features with substantial twinning. EDS analysis indicated that the precipitates in all NiTi instruments were titanium-rich, with an approximate composition of Ti(2)Ni. The TYP CM and Vortex instruments with heat treatment contribute to increase austenite transformation temperature. The CM instrument has significant changes in the phase transformation behavior, compared with conventional superelastic NiTi instruments. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Baranowski

    Full Text Available Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES, and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants

  5. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  6. Industrial experience with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author)

  7. Weldability and microstructural analysis of nuclear-grade austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    This study evaluated the hot-ductility response, and hot-cracking susceptibility (fusion-zone solidification cracking and HAZ liquation cracking) of modified nuclear-grade and standard austenitic stainless steels. Extensive microstructural characterization using state-of-the-art analytical electron microscopy (TEM and STEM) as well as SEM (EDAX) and OLM was performed to correlate the material behavior with metallurgical characteristics. In addition, studies of the effect of Si, N, and rare earth elements on hot-cracking susceptibility, significance of the ductility dip phenomena and backfilled solidification cracks were also performed. Furthermore, based on the metallurgical evaluation, the possible mechanisms involved in solidification cracking and HAZ liquation cracking of the modified alloys are proposed. Finally, the optimized chemical specifications and requirements for nuclear-grade stainless steels are also suggested

  8. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-01-01

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  10. The effect of cooling rate and austenite grain size on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmailian, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different austenite grain size and different cooling rates on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in one Nb-microalloyed high strength low alloy steel has been investigated. Three different austenite grain sizes were selected and cooled at two different cooling rates for obtaining austenite to ferrite transformation temperature. Moreover, samples with specific austenite grain size have been quenched, partially, for investigation on the microstructural evolution. In order to assess the influence of austenite grain size on the ferrite transformation temperature, a temperature differences method is established and found to be a good way for detection of austenite to ferrite, pearlite and sometimes other ferrite morphologies transformation temperatures. The results obtained in this way show that increasing of austenite grain size and cooling rate has a significant influence on decreasing of the ferrite transformation temperature. Micrographs of different ferrite morphologies show that at high temperatures, where diffusion rates are higher, grain boundary ferrite nucleates. As the temperature is lowered and the driving force for ferrite formation increases, intragranular sites inside the austenite grains become operative as nucleation sites and suppress the grain boundary ferrite growth. The results indicate that increasing the austenite grain size increases the rate and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite in two different cooling rates. Moreover, by increasing of cooling rate, the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature decreases and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite increases.

  11. Thermogravimetric experiments with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, L.J.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-02-01

    In the process of preparing for pyrophoricity experiments involving uranium, we conducted hydriding and air-exposure experiments on titanium. In these experiments the hydriding reactions and response to air-exposure was generally within the range expected based on work reported by others. One aberrant behavior was a sudden weight gain followed by a significant weight loss. We speculate that loss may be due to hydrogen evolution from the TiH 2 resulting from local heating by oxidation reactions. We verified that titanium is not pyrophoric at temperatures less than 750 degree C. 18 refs. 1 fig

  12. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements of austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the SINQ target irradiation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K., E-mail: ksato@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Dai, Y. [Spallation Neutron Source Division, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kikuchi, K. [Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Titanium-doped austenitic stainless steel (JPCA) and reduced activated ferritic/martensitic steel (F82H) irradiated with high-energy protons and spallation neutrons were investigated by positron annihilation lifetime measurements. Subnanometer-sized (<{approx}0.8 nm) helium bubbles, which cannot be observed by transmission electron microscopy, were detected by positron annihilation lifetime measurements for the first time. For the F82H steel, the positron annihilation lifetime of the bubbles decreased with increasing irradiation dose and annealing temperature because the bubbles absorb additional He atoms. In the case of JPCA steel, the positron annihilation lifetime increased with increasing annealing temperature above 773 K, in which case the dissociation of complexes of vacancy clusters with He atoms and the growth of He bubbles was detected. He bubble size and density were also discussed.

  13. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements of austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the SINQ target irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T.; Dai, Y.; Kikuchi, K.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-doped austenitic stainless steel (JPCA) and reduced activated ferritic/martensitic steel (F82H) irradiated with high-energy protons and spallation neutrons were investigated by positron annihilation lifetime measurements. Subnanometer-sized (<∼0.8 nm) helium bubbles, which cannot be observed by transmission electron microscopy, were detected by positron annihilation lifetime measurements for the first time. For the F82H steel, the positron annihilation lifetime of the bubbles decreased with increasing irradiation dose and annealing temperature because the bubbles absorb additional He atoms. In the case of JPCA steel, the positron annihilation lifetime increased with increasing annealing temperature above 773 K, in which case the dissociation of complexes of vacancy clusters with He atoms and the growth of He bubbles was detected. He bubble size and density were also discussed.

  14. Interlot variations of transition temperature range and force delivery in copper-nickel-titanium orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompei-Reynolds, Renée C; Kanavakis, Georgios

    2014-08-01

    The manufacturing process for copper-nickel-titanium archwires is technique sensitive. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the interlot consistency of the mechanical properties of copper-nickel-titanium wires from 2 manufacturers. Wires of 2 sizes (0.016 and 0.016 × 0.022 in) and 3 advertised austenite finish temperatures (27°C, 35°C, and 40°C) from 2 manufacturers were tested for transition temperature ranges and force delivery using differential scanning calorimetry and the 3-point bend test, respectively. Variations of these properties were analyzed for statistical significance by calculating the F statistic for equality of variances for transition temperature and force delivery in each group of wires. All statistical analyses were performed at the 0.05 level of significance. Statistically significant interlot variations in austenite finish were found for the 0.016 in/27°C (P = 0.041) and 0.016 × 0.022 in/35°C (P = 0.048) wire categories, and in austenite start for the 0.016 × 0.022 in/35°C wire category (P = 0.01). In addition, significant variations in force delivery were found between the 2 manufacturers for the 0.016 in/27°C (P = 0.002), 0.016 in/35.0°C (P = 0.049), and 0.016 × 0.022 in/35°C (P = 0.031) wires. Orthodontic wires of the same material, dimension, and manufacturer but from different production lots do not always have similar mechanical properties. Clinicians should be aware that copper-nickel-titanium wires might not always deliver the expected force, even when they come from the same manufacturer, because of interlot variations in the performance of the material. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Surface engineering of titanium with potassium hydroxide and its effects on the growth behavior of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kaiyong; Lai, Min; Yang, Weihu; Hu, Ran; Xin, Renlong; Liu, Qing; Sung, K L Paul

    2010-06-01

    To improve the corrosion resistance and biological performance of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) substrates, potassium hydroxide was employed to modify the surfaces of titanium substrates, followed by biomimetic deposition of apatite on the substrates in a simulated body fluid. The morphologies of native and treated titanium substrates were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Treatment with potassium hydroxide led to the formation of intermediate layers of potassium titanate on the surfaces of titanium substrates, while apatite was subsequently deposited onto the intermediate layer. The formation of potassium titanate and apatite was confirmed by thin-film X-ray diffraction and FE-SEM equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that the formed potassium titanate layer improved the corrosion-resistance properties of titanium substrates. The influence of modified titanium substrates on the biological behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), including osteogenic differentiation, was investigated in vitro. Compared with cp-Ti substrates, MSCs cultured onto alkali- and heat-treated titanium substrates and apatite-deposited titanium substrates displayed significantly higher (P<0.05 or P<0.01) proliferation and differentiation levels of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin in 7 and 14day cultures, respectively. More importantly, our results suggest that the modified titanium substrates have great potential for inducing MSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts. The approach presented here may be exploited to fabricate titanium-based implants. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Superficial characterization of titanium league when submitted to abrasive blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, L.Y.; Leite, I.V.; Szesz, E.M.; Siqueira, C.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and some of its alloys exhibit a good biocompatibility. These characteristics are frequently used in the manufacture of orthopedic and dental implants. It is possible to modify its surface making it the bioactive using various methods, such as deposition of hydroxyapatite by plasma spray and increasing the roughness of the surface by abrasive blasting. This work is to modify the surface of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V ELI (ASTM F136: 02a) for abrasive blasting and study the morphology, crystallographic phases and the mechanical characteristics of the surface obtained. For such purpose, SEM images, diffraction of X-rays and tests of risk produced by nanoindenter. The sandblasting was done using alumina powder and blasting time of 6s. The morphology of the surfaces of Ti6Al4V ELI changed after sandblasting with increased roughness. It is possible to conclude that after sandblasting the titanium surface do not have a ductile behavior. (author)

  17. Solid-state (49/47)Ti NMR of titanium-based MCM-41 hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Ruth; Fajardo, Mariano; Sierra, Isabel; Force, Carmen; del Hierro, Isabel

    2009-11-03

    Titanium solid-state NMR spectroscopy data for a series of organic-inorganic titanium MCM-41 based materials have been collected. These materials have been synthesized by first modifying the mesoporous silica MCM-41 in one step with a mixture of silanes: a triazine propyl triethoxysilane acting as functional linker and methyltrimethoxysilane or hexamethyldisilizane as capped agents to mask the remaining silanol groups. Second, the appropiate titanium precursor Ti(OPr(i))(4), [{Ti(OPr(i))(3)(OMent)}(2)] (OMent = 1R,2S,5R-(-)-menthoxo), Ti(OPr(i))(4), or [Ti(eta(5)-C(5)HMe(4))Cl(3)], has been immobilized by reaction with the modified MCM-41. Finally, after Ti(OPr(i))(4) immobilization onto the organomodified support the reaction with the chiral (+)-diethyl-l-tartrate was accomplished. The materials without functional linker have been also prepared by reaction in one step of the capped agent and the titanium precursor with the mesoporous silica. Relevant correlations of titanium NMR resonance chemical shifts and line widths can be inferred depending on different factors. The immobilization procedure used to prepare titanium-based MCM-41 hybrid materials and the choice of the silylating reagents employed to mask the silanol groups present on the silica surfaces produce significant differences in the Ti NMR spectra. Furthermore, depending on the electronic and sterical influence of the substituents directly attached to the titanium center, chemical shifts and line widths are modified providing novel information about titanium structure.

  18. Effect of austenitization conditions on kinetics of isothermal transformation of austenite of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, E.V.; Bayazitov, V.M.; Abramov, O.V.; Kozlova, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of austenization of kinetics of pearlite and bainite transformations for steels with different carbon content differing by alloying character and degree has been investigated. Austenization temperature increase is shown to leads to retardation of ferrite-pearlite transformation in low- and medium-carbon alloyed steels. Step-like holding in the region of austenite stable state (850, 950 deg) after high-temperature heating (1100 deg C) increases the rate of transformation partially recovering its kinetics and decomposition velocity after low-temperature heating in steels alloyed advantageously with carbide-forming elements (08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3) and does not affect kinetics in the 35Kh, 30KhGSN2A, 45N5 steels. Increase of heating temperature and growth of an austenite grain cause considerable acceleration of bainite transformation, increase of the temperaure of bainite transformation beginning and increase of the transformation amplitude in the 08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3 steels and affect weakly kinetics in steels with mixed alloying (30KhGSN2A) or low-alloy one (35Kh). The bainite transformation rate in the 45N5 steelite does not depend on austenization. The effect of additional acceleration of bainite transformation as a result holding after high-temperature heating in those steels, where activation of transformation occurs with increase of heating temperature

  19. Reversed austenite for enhancing ductility of martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieck, S.; Rosemann, P.; Kromm, A.; Halle, T.

    2017-03-01

    The novel heat treatment concept, “quenching and partitioning” (Q&P) has been developed for high strength steels with enhanced formability. This heat treatment involves quenching of austenite to a temperature between martensite start and finish, to receive a several amount of retained austenite. During the subsequent annealing treatment, the so called partitioning, the retained austenite is stabilized due to carbon diffusion, which results in enhanced formability and strength regarding strain induced austenite to martensite transformation. In this study a Q&P heat treatment was applied to a Fe-0.45C-0.65Mn-0.34Si-13.95Cr stainless martensite. Thereby the initial quench end temperature and the partitioning time were varied to characterize their influence on microstructural evolution. The microstructural changes were analysed by dilatometer measurements, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, including electron back-scatter diffraction. Compression testing was made to examine the mechanical behaviour. It was found that an increasing partitioning time up to 30 min leads to an enhanced formability without loss in strength due to a higher amount of stabilized retained and reversed austenite as well as precipitation hardening.

  20. Modeling of Non-isothermal Austenite Formation in Spring Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Wang, Baoyu; Tang, Xuefeng; Li, Junling

    2017-12-01

    The austenitization kinetics description of spring steel 60Si2CrA plays an important role in providing guidelines for industrial production. The dilatometric curves of 60Si2CrA steel were measured using a dilatometer DIL805A at heating rates of 0.3 K to 50 K/s (0.3 °C/s to 50 °C/s). Based on the dilatometric curves, a unified kinetics model using the internal state variable (ISV) method was derived to describe the non-isothermal austenitization kinetics of 60Si2CrA, and the abovementioned model models the incubation and transition periods. The material constants in the model were determined using a genetic algorithm-based optimization technique. Additionally, good agreement between predicted and experimental volume fractions of transformed austenite was obtained, indicating that the model is effective for describing the austenitization kinetics of 60Si2CrA steel. Compared with other modeling methods of austenitization kinetics, this model, which uses the ISV method, has some advantages, such as a simple formula and explicit physics meaning, and can be probably used in engineering practice.

  1. Diffraction study of the retained austenite content in TRIP steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnaeupel-Herold, T., E-mail: tg-h@nist.gov [NIST Center for Neuron Research, 100 Bureau Dr., Gaithersburg MD 20899-6102 (United States); University of Maryland, Department of Material Science and Engineering., College Park MD 20742-2142 (United States); Creuziger, A., E-mail: adam.creuziger@nist.gov [NIST Metallurgy Division, 100 Bureau Dr., Gaithersburg MD 20899-8553 (United States); Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (United States)

    2011-04-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Novel orientation averaging scheme for retained austenite content measurement. {yields} assumption of random grain orientation generally not justified. {yields} Averaging scheme allows to disregard texture. {yields} unlike Rietveld method, averaging method does not orientation density function. {yields} Two independent (hkl) are necessary for retained austenite content. - Abstract: The results of a study of using neutron diffraction for determining the retained austenite content of TRIP steels are presented. The study covers a wide area of materials, deformation modes (uniaxial, biaxial and plane strain), strains, and the retained austenite content as a result of these variables. It was determined using basic principles of statistics that a minimum of two reflections (hkl) for each phase is necessary to calculate a phase mass fraction and the associated standard deviation. Texture from processing the steel is the largest source of uncertainty. Through the method of complete orientation averaging described in this paper, the texture effect and with it the standard deviation of the austenite mass fraction can be substantially reduced, regardless of the type or severity of the texture.

  2. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + γ → γ + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L → L + γ → γ. In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions

  3. Titanium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium pure and base alloys are protected by an oxide film with anionic vacancies which gives a very good resistance to corrosion in oxidizing medium, in some ph ranges. Results of pitting and crevice corrosion are given for Cl - , Br - , I - ions concentration with temperature and ph dependence, also with oxygenated ions effect. (A.B.). 32 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Dissimilar Austenitic/Super Duplex Stainless Steel Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of chemical composition on microstructural features and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex and austenitic stainless steels, welding was attempted by gas tungsten arc welding process with a super duplex (ER2594) and an austenitic (ER309LMo) stainless steel filler metal. While the austenitic weld metal had vermicular delta ferrite within austenitic matrix, super duplex stainless steel was mainly comprised of allotriomorphic grain boundary and Widmanstätten side plate austenite morphologies in the ferrite matrix. Also the heat-affected zone of austenitic base metal comprised of large austenite grains with little amounts of ferrite, whereas a coarse-grained ferritic region was observed in the heat-affected zone of super duplex base metal. Although both welded joints showed acceptable mechanical properties, the hardness and impact strength of the weld metal produced using super duplex filler metal were found to be better than that obtained by austenitic filler metal.

  5. Adaptation of fuel code for light water reactor with austenitic steel rod cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira; Giovedi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Light water reactors were used with steel as nuclear fuel cladding from 1960 to 1980. The high performance proved that the use of low-carbon alloys could substitute the current zirconium alloys. Stainless steel is an alternative that can be used as cladding. The zirconium alloys replaced the steel. However, significant experiences in-pile occurred, in commercial units such as Haddam Neck, Indian Point, and Yankee experiences. Stainless Steel Types 347 and 348 can be used as cladding. An advantage of using Stainless Steel was evident in Fukushima when a large number of hydrogens was produced at high temperatures. The steel cladding does not eliminate the problem of accumulating free hydrogen, which can lead to a risk of explosion. In a boiling water reactor, environments easily exist for the attack of intergranular corrosion. The Stainless Steel alloys, Types 321, 347, and 348, are stabilized against attack by the addition of titanium, niobium, or tantalum. The steel Type 348 is composed of niobium, tantalum, and cobalt. Titanium preserves type 321, and niobium additions stabilize type 347. In recent years, research has increased on studying the effects of irradiation by fast neutrons. The impact of radiation includes changes in flow rate limits, deformation, and ductility. The irradiation can convert crystalline lattices into an amorphous structure. New proposals are emerging that suggest using a silicon carbide-based fuel rod cladding or iron-chromium-aluminum alloys. These materials can substitute the classic zirconium alloys. Once the steel Type 348 was chosen, the thermal and mechanical properties were coded in a library of functions. The fuel performance codes contain all features. A comparative analysis of the steel and zirconium alloys was made. The results demonstrate that the austenitic steel alloys are the viable candidates for substituting the zirconium alloys. (author)

  6. Adaptation of fuel code for light water reactor with austenitic steel rod cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2015-07-01

    Light water reactors were used with steel as nuclear fuel cladding from 1960 to 1980. The high performance proved that the use of low-carbon alloys could substitute the current zirconium alloys. Stainless steel is an alternative that can be used as cladding. The zirconium alloys replaced the steel. However, significant experiences in-pile occurred, in commercial units such as Haddam Neck, Indian Point, and Yankee experiences. Stainless Steel Types 347 and 348 can be used as cladding. An advantage of using Stainless Steel was evident in Fukushima when a large number of hydrogens was produced at high temperatures. The steel cladding does not eliminate the problem of accumulating free hydrogen, which can lead to a risk of explosion. In a boiling water reactor, environments easily exist for the attack of intergranular corrosion. The Stainless Steel alloys, Types 321, 347, and 348, are stabilized against attack by the addition of titanium, niobium, or tantalum. The steel Type 348 is composed of niobium, tantalum, and cobalt. Titanium preserves type 321, and niobium additions stabilize type 347. In recent years, research has increased on studying the effects of irradiation by fast neutrons. The impact of radiation includes changes in flow rate limits, deformation, and ductility. The irradiation can convert crystalline lattices into an amorphous structure. New proposals are emerging that suggest using a silicon carbide-based fuel rod cladding or iron-chromium-aluminum alloys. These materials can substitute the classic zirconium alloys. Once the steel Type 348 was chosen, the thermal and mechanical properties were coded in a library of functions. The fuel performance codes contain all features. A comparative analysis of the steel and zirconium alloys was made. The results demonstrate that the austenitic steel alloys are the viable candidates for substituting the zirconium alloys. (author)

  7. High cycle fatigue of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.P.; Lehmann, D.; Picker

    1990-01-01

    This study concerns the evaluation of material data to be used in LMFBR design codes. High cycle fatigue properties of three austenitic stainless steels are evaluated: type AISI 316 (UKAEA tests), type AISI 316L (CEA tests) and type AISI 304 (Interatom tests). The data on these steels comprised some 550 data points from 14 casts. This data set covered a wide range of testing parameters: temperature from 20-625 0 C, frequency from 1-20 000 Hz, constant amplitude and random fatigue loading, with and without mean stress, etc. However, the testing conditions chosen by the three partners differed considerably because they had been fixed independently and not harmonized prior to the tests. This created considerable difficulties for the evaluations. Experimental procedures and statistical treatments used for the three subsets of data are described and discussed. Results are presented in tables and graphs. Although it is often difficult to single out the influence of each parameter due to the different testing conditions, several interesting conclusions can be drawn: The HCF properties of the three steels are consistent with the 0.2% proof stress, the fatigue limit being larger than the latter at temperatures above 550 0 C. The type 304 steel has lower tensile properties than the two other steels and hence also lower HCF properties. Parameters which clearly have a significant effect of HCF behaviour are mean stress or R-ratio (less in the non-endurance region than in the endurance region), temperature, cast or product. Other parameters have probably a weak or no effect but it is difficult to conclude due to insufficient data: environment, specimen orientation, frequency, specimen geometry

  8. Effect of titanium on the creep deformation behaviour of 14Cr-15Ni-Ti stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, S.; Mathew, M. D.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Mannan, S. L.

    2011-02-01

    14Cr-15Ni-Ti modified stainless steel alloyed with additions of phosphorus and silicon is a potential candidate material for the future cores of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. In order to optimise the titanium content in this steel, creep tests have been conducted on the heats with different titanium contents of 0.18, 0.23, 0.25 and 0.36 wt.% at 973 K at various stress levels. The stress exponents indicated that the rate controlling deformation mechanism was dislocation creep. A peak in the variation of rupture life with titanium content was observed around 0.23 wt.% titanium and the peak was more pronounced at lower stresses. The variation in creep strength with titanium content was correlated with transmission electron microscopic investigations. The peak in creep strength exhibited by the material with 0.23 wt.% titanium is attributed to the higher volume fraction of fine secondary titanium carbide (TiC) precipitates.

  9. Effect of titanium on the creep deformation behaviour of 14Cr-15Ni-Ti stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latha, S. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India); Mathew, M.D., E-mail: mathew@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India); Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India); Mannan, S.L. [National Engineering College, Kovilpatti, Tamil Nadu 628 503 (India)

    2011-02-28

    14Cr-15Ni-Ti modified stainless steel alloyed with additions of phosphorus and silicon is a potential candidate material for the future cores of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. In order to optimise the titanium content in this steel, creep tests have been conducted on the heats with different titanium contents of 0.18, 0.23, 0.25 and 0.36 wt.% at 973 K at various stress levels. The stress exponents indicated that the rate controlling deformation mechanism was dislocation creep. A peak in the variation of rupture life with titanium content was observed around 0.23 wt.% titanium and the peak was more pronounced at lower stresses. The variation in creep strength with titanium content was correlated with transmission electron microscopic investigations. The peak in creep strength exhibited by the material with 0.23 wt.% titanium is attributed to the higher volume fraction of fine secondary titanium carbide (TiC) precipitates.

  10. Effect of titanium on the creep deformation behaviour of 14Cr-15Ni-Ti stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latha, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Mannan, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    14Cr-15Ni-Ti modified stainless steel alloyed with additions of phosphorus and silicon is a potential candidate material for the future cores of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. In order to optimise the titanium content in this steel, creep tests have been conducted on the heats with different titanium contents of 0.18, 0.23, 0.25 and 0.36 wt.% at 973 K at various stress levels. The stress exponents indicated that the rate controlling deformation mechanism was dislocation creep. A peak in the variation of rupture life with titanium content was observed around 0.23 wt.% titanium and the peak was more pronounced at lower stresses. The variation in creep strength with titanium content was correlated with transmission electron microscopic investigations. The peak in creep strength exhibited by the material with 0.23 wt.% titanium is attributed to the higher volume fraction of fine secondary titanium carbide (TiC) precipitates.

  11. Surface characterization of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Manu; Seema, Saraswathy; Tiwari, Brijesh; Sharma, Himanshu S.; Londhe, Sanjay; Arora, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    Background Surface roughness of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires poses several clinical challenges. Surface modification with aesthetic/metallic/non metallic materials is therefore a recent innovation, with clinical efficacy yet to be comprehensively evaluated. Methods One conventional and five types of surface modified nickel titanium arch wires were surface characterized with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy and 3D profilometry. Root mean square roughness values were analyzed by one way analysis of variance and post hoc Duncan's multiple range tests. Results Study groups demonstrated considerable reduction in roughness values from conventional in a material specific pattern: Group I; conventional (578.56 nm) > Group V; Teflon (365.33 nm) > Group III; nitride (301.51 nm) > Group VI (i); rhodium (290.64 nm) > Group VI (ii); silver (252.22 nm) > Group IV; titanium (229.51 nm) > Group II; resin (158.60 nm). It also showed the defects with aesthetic (resin/Teflon) and nitride surfaces and smooth topography achieved with metals; titanium/silver/rhodium. Conclusions Resin, Teflon, titanium, silver, rhodium and nitrides were effective in decreasing surface roughness of nickel titanium arch wires albeit; certain flaws. Findings have clinical implications, considering their potential in lessening biofilm adhesion, reducing friction, improving corrosion resistance and preventing nickel leach and allergic reactions. PMID:26843749

  12. [Corrosion resistant properties of different anodized microtopographies on titanium surfaces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangjun, Huo; Li, Xie; Xingye, Tong; Yueting, Wang; Weihua, Guo; Weidong, Tian

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the corrosion resistant properties of titanium samples prepared by anodic oxidation with different surface morphologies. Pure titanium substrates were treated by anodic oxidation to obtain porous titanium films in micron, submicron, and micron-submicron scales. The surface morphologies, coating cross-sectional morphologies, crystalline structures, and surface roughness of these samples were characterized. Electrochemical technique was used to measure the corrosion potential (Ecorr), current density of corrosion (Icorr), and polarization resistance (Rp) of these samples in a simulated body fluid. Pure titanium could be modified to exhibit different surface morphologies by the anodic oxidation technique. The Tafel curve results showed that the technique can improve the corrosion resistance of pure titanium. Furthermore, the corrosion resistance varied with different surface morphologies. The submicron porous surface sample demonstrated the best corrosion resistance, with maximal Ecorr and Rp and minimal Icorr. Anodic oxidation technology can improve the corrosion resistance of pure titanium in a simulated body fluid. The submicron porous surface sample exhibited the best corrosion resistance because of its small surface area and thick barrier layer.

  13. Electrodeposition of amine-terminatedpoly(ethylene glycol) to titanium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yuta; Doi, Hisashi; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Hiromoto, Sachiko; Yoneyama, Takayuki; Asami, Katsuhiko; Imai, Hachiro; Hanawa, Takao

    2007-01-01

    The immobilization of poly(ethylene glycol), PEG, to a solid surface is useful to functionalize the surface, e.g., to prevent the adsorption of proteins. No successful one-stage technique for the immobilization of PEG to base metals has ever been developed. In this study, PEG in which both terminals or one terminal had been modified with amine bases was immobilized onto a titanium surface using electrodeposition. PEG was dissolved in a NaCl solution, and electrodeposition was carried out at 310 K with - 5 V for 300 min. The thickness of the deposited PEG layer was evaluated using ellipsometry, and the bonding manner of PEG to the titanium surface was characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy after electrodeposition. The results indicated that a certain amount of PEG was adsorbed on titanium through both electrodeposition and immersion when PEG was terminated by amine. However, terminated amines existed at the surface of titanium and were combined with titanium oxide as N-HO by electrodeposition, while amines randomly existed in the molecule and showed an ionic bond with titanium oxide by immersion. The electrodeposition of PEG was effective for the inhibition of albumin adsorption. This process is useful for materials that have electroconductivity and a complex morphology

  14. Overview of microstructural evolution in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are important structural materials common to several different reactor systems, including light water and fast breeder fission, and magnetic fusion reactors (LWR, FBR, and MFR, respectively). The microstructures that develop in 300 series austenitic stainless steels during neutron irradiation at 60-700 C include combinations of dislocation loops and networks, bubbles and voids, and various kinds of precipitate phases (radiation-induced, or -enhanced or -modified thermal phases). Many property changes in these steels during neutron irradiation are directly or indirectly related to radiation-induced microstructural evolution. Even more important is the fact that radiation-resistance of such steels during either FBR or MFR irradiation is directly related to control of the evolving microstructure during such irradiation. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the large and complex body of data accumulated from various fission reactor irradiation experiments conducted over the many years of research on microstructural evolution in this family of steels. The data can be organized into several different temperature regimes which then define the nature of the dominant microstructural components and their sensitivities to irradiation parameters (dose, helium/dpa ratio, dose rate) or metallurgical variables (alloy composition, pretreatment). The emphasis in this paper will be on the underlying mechanisms driving the microstructure to evolve during irradiation or those enabling microstructural stability related to radiation resistance. (orig.)

  15. Development of Creep-Resistant and Oxidation-Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Philip J.

    2018-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are cost-effective materials for high-temperature applications if they have the oxidation and creep resistance to withstand prolonged exposure at such conditions. Since 1990, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed advanced austenitic stainless steels with creep resistance comparable to Ni-based superalloy 617 at 800-900°C based on specially designed "engineered microstructures" utilizing a microstructure/composition database derived from about 20 years of radiation effect data on steels. The wrought high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened (HT-UPS) steels with outstanding creep resistance at 700-800°C were developed for supercritical boiler and superheater tubing for fossil power plants in the early 1990s, the cast CF8C-Plus steels were developed in 1999-2001 for land-based gas turbine casing and diesel engine exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications at 700-900°C, and, in 2015-2017, new Al-modified cast stainless steels with oxidation and creep resistance capabilities up to 950-1000°C were developed for automotive exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications. This article reviews and summarizes their development and their properties and applications.

  16. Plastic deformation and fracture behaviors of nitrogen-alloyed austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Songtao; Yang Ke; Shan Yiyin; Li Laifeng

    2008-01-01

    The plastic deformation and fracture behaviors of two nitrogen-alloyed austenitic stainless steels, 316LN and a high nitrogen steel (Fe-Cr-Mn-0.66% N), were investigated by tensile test and Charpy impact test in a temperature range from 77 to 293 K. The Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel showed ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) behavior, but not for the 316LN steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that the strain-induced martensite occurred in the 316LN steel, but no such transformation in the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel. Tensile tests showed that the temperature dependences of the yield strength for the two steels were almost the same. The ultimate tensile strength of the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel displayed less significant temperature dependence than that of the 316LN steel. The strain-hardening exponent increased for the 316LN steel, but decreased for the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel, with decreasing temperature. Based on the experimental results and the analyses, a modified scheme was proposed to explain the fracture behaviors of austenitic stainless steels

  17. Austenitic Reversion of Cryo-rolled Ti-Stabilized Austenitic Stainless Steel: High-Resolution EBSD Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiamiyu, A. A.; Odeshi, A. G.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was cryo-rolled and subsequently annealed at 650 and 800 °C to reverse BCC α'-martensite to FCC γ-austenite. The texture evolution associated with the reversion at the selected temperatures was investigated using high-resolution EBSD. After the reversion, TiC precipitates were observed to be more stable in 650 °C-annealed specimens than those reversed at 800 °C. {110} texture was mainly developed in specimens subjected to both annealing temperatures. However, specimens reversed at 650 °C have stronger texture than those annealed at 800 °C, even at the higher annealing time. The strong intensity of {110} texture component is attributed to the ability of AISI 321 ASS to memorize the crystallographic orientation of the deformed austenite, a phenomenon termed texture memory. The development of weaker texture in 800 °C-annealed specimens is attributed to the residual strain relief in grains, dissolution of grain boundary precipitates, and an increase in atomic migration along the grain boundaries. Based on the observed features of the reversed austenite grains and estimation from an existing model, it is suspected that the austenite reversion at 650 and 800 °C undergone diffusional and martensitic shear reversion, respectively.

  18. Anelastic mechanical loss spectrometry of hydrogen in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagodzinskyy, Y.; Andronova, E.; Ivanchenko, M.; Haenninen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic distribution of hydrogen, its elemental diffusion jumps and its interaction with dislocations in a number of austenitic stainless steels are studied with anelastic mechanical loss (AML) spectrometry in combination with the hydrogen thermal desorption method. Austenitic stainless steels of different chemical composition, namely, AISI 310, AISI 201, and AISI 301LN, as well as LDX 2101 duplex stainless steel are studied to clarify the role of different alloying elements on the hydrogen behavior. Activation analyses of the hydrogen Snoek-like peaks are performed with their decomposition to sets of Gaussian components. Fine structure of the composite hydrogen peaks is analyzed under the assumption that each component corresponds to diffusion transfer of hydrogen between octahedral positions with certain atomic compositions of the nearest neighbouring lattice sites. An additional component originating from hydrogen-dislocation interaction is considered. Binding energies for hydrogen-dislocation interaction are also estimated for the studied austenitic stainless steels.

  19. Effect of multiple austenitizing treatments on HT-9 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emigh, R.A.

    1985-12-01

    The effect of multiple austenitizing treatments on the toughness of an Fe-12Cr-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.3V (HT-9) steel was studied. The resulting microstructures were characterized by their mechanical properties, precipitated carbide distribution, and fracture surface appearance. It was proposed that multiple transformations would refine the martensite structure and improve toughness. Optical and scanning electron microscopic observations revealed that the martensite packet structure was somewhat refined by a second austenite transformation. Transmission electron microscopy studies of carbon extraction replicas showed that this multiple step treatment had eliminated grain boundary carbide films seen in single treated specimens on prior austenite grain boundaries. The 0.2% yield strength, tensile strength, and elongation were relatively unchanged, but the toughness measured by fatigue pre-cracked Charpy impact tests increased for the multiple step specimens

  20. Influence of strain-induced martensitic transformation on fatigue short crack behaviour in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baffie, N.; Stolarz, J.; Magnin, Th.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of martensitic transformation induced by cyclic straining on the mechanisms of low cycle fatigue damage in a metastable austenitic stainless steel with different grain sizes has been investigated using macroscopic measurements and microscopic observations of short crack evolutions. The amount of martensite formed during cyclic straining increases with increasing plastic strain amplitude and cumulative plastic strain but the dominant parameter is the grain size of austenite. The fine microstructure (D = 10 μm) with maximum martensite fraction of about 20% is characterised by a better fatigue resistance than the coarse one (D 40μm and only 2% of martensite) for the same plastic strain amplitude. Martensitic transformation is found to radically modify the cyclic response of the alloy and consequently the damage mechanisms. Indeed, both short crack nucleation and growth take place exclusively in the transformed regions. A mechanism of short crack propagation based on the γ→ α' transformation assisted by stress concentration at the crack tip is proposed. The indirect influence of grain boundaries in the austenite on crack propagation in the martensite is demonstrated. The better fatigue resistance of metastable alloys with fine granular structure can thus be understood. (authors)

  1. Neutron depolarisation study of the austenite grain size in TRIP steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, N.H. van; Zhao, L.; Rekveldt, M.Th.; Fredrikze, H.; Tegus, O.; Brueck, E.; Sietsma, J.; Zwaag, S. van der

    2004-01-01

    We have performed combined neutron depolarisation and magnetisation measurements in order to obtain an in situ determination of the average grain size and volume fraction of the retained austenite phase in TRIP steels. The average grain size of the retained austenite was found to decrease for an increase in austenite volume fraction at two different annealing temperatures

  2. Self-stabilization of untransformed austenite by hydrostatic pressure via martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Nobuo; Ishibashi, Yuji; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Takaki, Setsuo

    2016-01-01

    For improving the understanding of austenite stability in steel, hydrostatic pressure in untransformed austenite that is generated via martensitic transformation was evaluated from macro- and micro-viewpoints, and its effect on austenite stability was investigated in a Fe-27%Ni austenitic alloy. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the lattice parameter of untransformed austenite is continuously decreased via martensitic transformation only when martensite becomes the dominant phase in the microstructure. This suggests that the untransformed austenite is isotropically compressed by the surrounding martensite grains, i.e., hydrostatic pressure is generated in untransformed austenite dynamically at a later stage of martensitic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic strain mapping using the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicated that a finer untransformed austenite grain has a higher hydrostatic pressure, while a high density of dislocations is also introduced in untransformed austenite near the austenite/martensite interface because of lattice-invariant shear characterized by non-thermoelastic martensitic transformation. Furthermore, it was experimentally demonstrated that the hydrostatic pressure stabilizes the untransformed austenite; however, the austenite stabilization effect alone is not large enough to fully explain a large gap between martensite start and finish temperatures in steel.

  3. Hydroxyapatite electrodeposition on anodized titanium nanotubes for orthopedic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parcharoen, Yardnapar [Department of Biological Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok (Thailand); Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat [Center of Excellence on Environmental Research and Innovation, Faculty of Engineering, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok (Thailand); Sirivisoot, Sirinrath [Department of Biological Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok (Thailand); Termsuksawad, Preecha, E-mail: preecha.ter@kmutt.ac.th [Division of Materials Technology, School of Energy, Environment and Materials, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha Uthit Rd., Bang Mod, ThungKhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • We found that different anodization time of titanium significantly effects on nanotube length which further impacts adhesion strength of hydroxyapatite coating layers. • Adhesion strength of Hydroxyapatite (HA) coated on titanium dioxide nanotubes is better than that of HA coated on titanium plate. • Hydroxyapatite coated on titanium dioxide nanotubes showed higher cell density and better spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells (bone-forming cells) than that coated on titanium plate surface. - Abstract: Nanotubes modification for orthopedic implants has shown interesting biological performances (such as improving cell adhesion, cell differentiation, and enhancing osseointegration). The purpose of this study is to investigate effect of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotube feature on performance of hydroxyapatite-coated titanium (Ti) bone implants. TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were prepared by anodization using ammonium fluoride electrolyte (NH{sub 4}F) with and without modifiers (PEG400 and Glycerol) at various potential forms, and times. After anodization, the nanotubes were subsequently annealed. TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. The amorphous to anatase transformation due to annealing was observed. Smooth and highly organized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were found when high viscous electrolyte, NH{sub 4}F in glycerol, was used. Negative voltage (−4 V) during anodization was confirmed to increase nanotube thickness. Length of the TiO{sub 2} nanotubes was significantly increased by times. The TiO{sub 2} nanotube was electrodeposited with hydroxyapatite (HA) and its adhesion was estimated by adhesive tape test. The result showed that nanotubes with the tube length of 560 nm showed excellent adhesion. The coated HA were tested for biological test by live/dead cell straining. HA coated on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes showed higher cells density, higher live cells, and more spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells than that

  4. Evaluation of welds on a ferritic-austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleva, J.; Johansson, B.

    1984-01-01

    Five different welding methods for the ferritic-austenitic steel 22Cr6Ni3MoN have been evaluated on mill welded heavy wall pipes. The corrosion resistance of the weld joints has been tested both in standard tests and in special environments, related to certain oil and gas wells. The tests were conclusive in that a welding procedure with the addition of sufficient amounts of filler metal should be employed. TIG welds without or with marginal filler addition showed poor resistance to pitting, and to boiling nitric acid. Contents of main alloying elements in ferrite and austenite phases have been measured and causes of corrosion attack in welds are discussed

  5. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  6. Mechanochemistry of titanium oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljković Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanochemistry represents an alternative route in synthesis of nanomaterials. Mechanochemical routes are attractive because of their simplicity, flexibility, and ability to prepare materials by solid state reactions at room temperature. The aim of this work is the mechanochemical synthesis of nanostructured titanium oxides of different composition starting from mixtures of Ti and TiO2, TiO and TiO2 or Ti2O3 and TiO2. Emphasis is on the Magneli phases Ti4O7 and Ti5O9 because their mixture is commercially known as EBONEX material. The materials prepared were characterized by XRPD, TG/DTA analysis, SEM and optical microscopy. Titanium monoxide and several Magneli oxides, Ti4O7, Ti5O9 and Ti6O11, are successfully prepared. The results are very interesting because the EBONEX materials were prepared at lower than usual temperature, which would decrease the effective cost of production.

  7. Evolution behavior of nanohardness after thermal-aging and hydrogen-charging on austenite and strain-induced martensite in pre-strained austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Chengshuang; Hong, Yuanjian; Zheng, Jinyang; Zhang, Lin

    2018-05-01

    Nanoindentation has been used to study the effects of thermal-aging and hydrogen on the mechanical property of the metastable austenitic stainless steel. Thermal-aging at 473 K decreases the nanohardness of austenite, while it increases the nanohardness of strain-induced ɑ‧ martensite. Hydrogen-charging at 473 K increases the nanohardness of austenite, while it decreases the nanohardness of strain-induced ɑ‧ martensite. The opposite effect on austenite and ɑ‧ martensite is first found in the same pre-strained sample. This abnormal evolution behavior of hardness can be attributed to the interaction between dislocation and solute atoms (carbon and hydrogen). Carbon atoms are difficult to move and redistribute in austenite compared with ɑ‧ martensite. Therefore, the difference in the diffusivity of solute atoms between austenite and ɑ‧ martensite may result in the change of hardness.

  8. Industrial experience with titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, B M; Shoesmith, D W

    1997-09-01

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author) 83 refs., 17 tabs., 3 figs.

  9. Advances in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagle, S.R.; Wood, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    As described above, new developments in the aerospace market are focusing on higher temperature alloys for jet engine components and higher strength/toughness alloys for airframe applications. Conventional alloys for engines have reached their maximum useful temperature of about 1000 F (540 C) because of oxidation resistance requirements. IMI 834 and Ti-1100 advanced alloys show some improvement, however, the major improvement appears to be in gamma titanium aluminides which could extend the maximum usage temperature to about 1500 F (815 C). This puts titanium alloys in a competitive position to replace nickel-base superalloys. Advanced airframe alloys such as Ti-6-22-22S, Beta C TM , Ti-15-333 and Ti-10-2-3 with higher strength than conventional Ti-6-4 are being utilized in significantly greater quantities, both in military and commercial applications. These alloys offer improved strength with little or no sacrifice in toughness and improved formability, in some cases. Advanced industrial alloys are being developed for improved corrosion resistance in more reducing and higher temperature environments such as those encountered in sour gas wells. Efforts are focused on small precious metal additions to optimize corrosion performance for specific applications at a modest increase in cost. As these applications develop, the usage of titanium alloys for industrial markets should steadily increase to approach that for aerospace applications. (orig.)

  10. Study of Mechanical Features for Low Cycle Fatigue Samples of Metastable Austenitic Steel AISI 321 by Neutron Stress Analysis under Applied Load

    CERN Document Server

    Taran, Yu V; Eifler, D; Nebel, Th; Schreiber, J

    2002-01-01

    The elastoplastic properties of the austenitic matrix and martensitic volume areas induced during cyclic tensile-compressive loading of low carbon metastable austenitic stainless steel were studied in an in situ neutron diffraction stress rig experiment on the ENGIN instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron facility. Samples prepared from the steel AISI 321 annealed at 1050 ^{\\circ}C and quenched in water were subjected to low-cycle fatigue under total-strain control with an amplitude of 1 % at a frequency of 0.5 Hz. Subsequent applied stress?elastic strain responses of the austenitic and martensitic phases were obtained by Rietveld and Le Bail refinements of the neutron diffraction spectra, and were used to determine the elastic constants of the phases as a function of fatigue level. The results of modified refinements accounting for the elastic anisotropy in polycrystalline materials under load are also presented. The residual strains in the austenitic matrix were determined as a function of fatigue cycling, us...

  11. Titanium fasteners. [for aircraft industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Titanium fasteners are used in large quantities throughout the aircraft industry. Most of this usage is in aluminum structure; where titanium structure exists, titanium fasteners are logically used as well. Titanium fasteners offer potential weight savings to the designer at a cost of approximately $30 per pound of weight saved. Proper and least cost usage must take into consideration type of fastener per application, galvanic couples and installation characteristics of protective coatings, cosmetic appearance, paint adhesion, installation forces and methods available and fatigue performance required.

  12. Joining of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baeslack, William

    2002-01-01

    .... Although organized and presented by joining process, many of the observations made and relationships developed, particularly those regarding the weldability and welding metallurgy of gamma titanium...

  13. Bacterial adherence to anodized titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peremarch, C Perez-Jorge; Tanoira, R Perez; Arenas, M A; Matykina, E; Conde, A; De Damborenea, J J; Gomez Barrena, E; Esteban, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate Staphylococcus sp adhesion to modified surfaces of anodized titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Surface modification involved generation of fluoride-containing titanium oxide nanotube films. Specimens of Ti-6Al-4V alloy 6-4 ELI-grade 23- meets the requirements of ASTM F136 2002A (AMS 2631B class A1) were anodized in a mixture of sulphuric/hydrofluoric acid at 20 V for 5 and 60 min to form a 100 nm-thick porous film of 20 nm pore diameter and 230 nm-thick nanotube films of 100 nm in diameter. The amount of fluorine in the oxide films was of 6% and of 4%, respectively. Collection strains and six clinical strains each of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were studied. The adherence study was performed using a previously published protocol by Kinnari et al. The experiments were performed in triplicates. As a result, lower adherence was detected for collection strains in modified materials than in unmodified controls. Differences between clinical strains were detected for both species (p<0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test), although global data showed similar results to that of collection strains (p<0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Adherence of bacteria to modified surfaces was decreased for both species. The results also reflect a difference in the adherence between S. aureus and S. epidermidis to the modified material. As a conclusion, not only we were able to confirm the decrease of adherence in the modified surface, but also the need to test multiple clinical strains to obtain more realistic microbiological results due to intraspecies differences.

  14. Elasto-plastic hardening models adjustment to ferritic, austenitic and austenoferritic Rebar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hortigóna, B.; Gallardo, J.M.; Nieto-García, E.J.; López, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    The elastoplastic behaviour of steel used for structural member fabrication has received attention to facilitate a mechanical-resistant design. New Zealand and South African standards have adopted various theoretical approaches to describe such behaviour in stainless steels. With respect to the building industry, describing the tensile behaviour of steel rebar used to produce reinforced concrete structures is of interest. Differences compared with the homogenous material described in the above mentioned standards and related literatures are discussed in this paper. Specifically, the presence of ribs and the TEMPCORE® technology used to produce carbon steel rebar may alter the elastoplastic model. Carbon steel rebar is shown to fit a Hollomon model giving hardening exponent values on the order of 0.17. Austenitic stainless steel rebar behaviour is better described using a modified Rasmussen model with a free fitted exponent of 6. Duplex stainless steel shows a poor fit to any previous model. [es

  15. Development of a high temperature austenitic stainless steel for Stirling engine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, D.L.; Lemkey, F.D.

    1986-01-01

    An alloy, designed NASAUT 4G-A1, was developed which exhibited an excellent balance of oxidation resistance and high temperature strength while maintaining an austenitic matrix necessary for hydrogen compatibility. This alloy, having the composition 15Cr-15Mn-2Mo-1Nb-1Si-1.5C-bal. Fe in wt%, was microstructurally characterized and shown to contain a fine M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitated phase. Subsequent heat treatments were shown to substantially modify this microstructure resulting in improved mechanical properties. Yield, creep and low cycle fatigue strengths were found to be superior to the best iron base alloy thus far identified as a potential heater head candidate material, XF-818

  16. Characterization of poly(Sodium Styrene Sulfonate) Thin Films Grafted from Functionalized Titanium Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Gilad; Baio, Joe E.; Weidner, Tobias; Migonney, Veronique; Castner, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Biointegration of titanium implants in the body is controlled by their surface properties. Improving surface properties by coating with a bioactive polymer is a promising approach to improve the biological performance of titanium implants. To optimize the grafting processes, it is important to fully understand the composition and structure of the modified surfaces. The main focus of this study is to provide a detailed, multi-technique characterization of a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film grafted from titanium surfaces via a two-step procedure. Thin titanium films (~50 nm thick with an average surface roughness of 0.9±0.2nm) prepared by evaporation onto silicon wafers were used as smooth model substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) showed that the titanium film was covered with a TiO2 layer that was at least 10nm thick and contained hydroxyl groups present at the outermost surface. These hydroxyl groups were first modified with a 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) cross linker. XPS and ToF-SIMS showed that a monolayer of the MPS molecules were successfully attached onto the titanium surfaces. The pNaSS film was grafted from the MPS modified titanium through atom transfer radical polymerization. Again, XPS and ToF-SIMS were used to verify that the pNaSS molecules were successfully grafted onto the modified surfaces. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed that the film was smooth and uniformly covered the surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated an ordered array of grafted NaSS molecules were present on the titanium surfaces. Sum frequency generation vibration spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy illustrated that the NaSS molecules were grafted onto the titanium surface with a substantial degree of orientational order in the styrene rings. PMID:21892821

  17. Methodic recommendations on ultrasonic testing of pipeline austenitic butt joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebennik, V.S.; Lantukh, V.M.; Tajts, M.Z.; Ermolov, I.N.; Volkov, A.S.; Vyatskov, I.A.; Kesler, N.A.; Shchedrin, I.F.

    1989-01-01

    Recommendations for the application of ultrasonic testing of austenitic welded joints of the Du 500 pipelines with the walls 32-34 mm thick made of steel Kh18N10T are developed. The optimal values of the main parameters of ultrasonic testing are determined experimentally. Principles of calculation of the optimal parameters are considered. 1 ref.; 4 figs

  18. Nondestructive testing of austenitic casting and dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahdenperae, K.

    1995-01-01

    The publication is a literature study of nondestructive testing of dissimilar metal welds and cast austenitic components in PWR and BWR plants. A major key to the successful testing is a realistic mockup made of the materials to be tested. The inspectors must also be trained and validated using suitable mockups. (42 refs., 27 figs., 10 tabs.)

  19. On the elusive crystal structure of expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2017-01-01

    No consistent structural description exists for expanded austenite that accurately accounts for the hkl-dependent peak shifts and broadening observed in diffraction experiments. The best available description for homogeneous samples is a face-centered cubic lattice with stacking faults. Here Deby...

  20. To the corrosion of austenitic steels in sodium loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schad, M.

    1978-03-01

    This report describes the comparison between experimental corrosion and calculated corrosion effects on austenitic steels exposed to liquid sodium. As basis for the calculations served a diffusion model. The comparison showed that the model is able to predict the corrosion effects. In addition the model was used to calculate the corrosion effect along an actual fuel rod. (orig.) [de

  1. Phase Transformation of Metastable Austenite in Steel during Nano indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Taehong; Lee, Sung Bo; Han, Heung Nam; Park, Kyungtae

    2013-01-01

    These can produce geometrical softening accompanied by a sudden displacement excursion during load-controlled nanoindentation, which referred to in the literature as a pop-in. In this study, phase transformation of metastable austenite to stress-induced ε martensite which causes pop-ins during nanoindentation of steel will be reported and discussed. This study investigated the relationship between pop-in behavior of austenite in the early stage of nanoindentation and formation of ε martensite based on microstructural analyses. The load-displacement curve obtained from nanoindentation revealed stepwise pop-ins in the early stage of plastic deformation. From analyses of high resolution TEM images, a cluster of banded structure under the indent turned out a juxtaposition of (111) planes of γ austenite and (0001) planes of ε martensite. The calculation of displacement along indentation axis for (111) slip system by formation of ε martensite showed that geometrical softening can also occur by ε martensite formation when considering that the stress-induced ε martensite transformation is the predominant deformation mode in the early stage of plastic deformation and its monopartial nature as well. These microstructural investigations strongly suggest that the pop-in behavior in the early stage of plastic deformation of austenite is closely related to the formation of ε martensite

  2. Phase Transformation of Metastable Austenite in Steel during Nano indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Taehong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Bo; Han, Heung Nam [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyungtae [Hanbat National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    These can produce geometrical softening accompanied by a sudden displacement excursion during load-controlled nanoindentation, which referred to in the literature as a pop-in. In this study, phase transformation of metastable austenite to stress-induced ε martensite which causes pop-ins during nanoindentation of steel will be reported and discussed. This study investigated the relationship between pop-in behavior of austenite in the early stage of nanoindentation and formation of ε martensite based on microstructural analyses. The load-displacement curve obtained from nanoindentation revealed stepwise pop-ins in the early stage of plastic deformation. From analyses of high resolution TEM images, a cluster of banded structure under the indent turned out a juxtaposition of (111) planes of γ austenite and (0001) planes of ε martensite. The calculation of displacement along indentation axis for (111) slip system by formation of ε martensite showed that geometrical softening can also occur by ε martensite formation when considering that the stress-induced ε martensite transformation is the predominant deformation mode in the early stage of plastic deformation and its monopartial nature as well. These microstructural investigations strongly suggest that the pop-in behavior in the early stage of plastic deformation of austenite is closely related to the formation of ε martensite.

  3. Effect of shot peening on metastable austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fargas, G., E-mail: gemma.fargas@upc.edu [CIEFMA - Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Roa, J.J.; Mateo, A. [CIEFMA - Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-12

    In this work, shot peening was performed in a metastable austenitic stainless steel EN 1.4318 (AISI 301LN) in order to evaluate its effect on austenite to martensite phase transformation and also the influence on the fatigue limit. Two different steel conditions were considered: annealed, i.e., with a fully austenitic microstructure, and cold rolled, consisting of a mixture of austenite and martensite. X-ray diffraction, electron back-scattered diffraction and focus ion beam, as well as nanoindentation techniques, were used to elucidate deformation mechanisms activated during shot peening and correlate with fatigue response. Results pointed out that extensive plastic deformation and phase transformation developed in annealed specimens as a consequence of shot peening. However, the increase of roughness and the generation of microcracks led to a limited fatigue limit improvement. In contrast, shot peened cold rolled specimens exhibited enhanced fatigue limit. In the latter case, the main factor that determined the influence on the fatigue response was the distance from the injector, followed successively by the exit speed of the shots and the coverage factor.

  4. Laser cladding crack repair of austenitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding crack repair of austenitic stainless steel vessels subjected to internal water pressure was evaluated. The purpose of this investigation was to develop process parameters for in-situ repair of through-wall cracks in components...

  5. Carbon diffusion in carbon-supersaturated ferrite and austenite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 586, FEB (2014), s. 129-135 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : carbon diffusion * Carbon supersaturation * Carbon supersaturation * Ferrite * Austenite Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.999, year: 2014

  6. Modification of the Strength Anisotropy in an Austenitic ODS Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. K.; Jang, J.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, C. B.; Bae, C. S.; Kim, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    Among many candidate alloys for Gen IV reactors, the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy is widely considered as a good candidate material for the in-reactor component, like cladding tube. The ODS alloy is well known due to its good high temperature strength, and excellent irradiation resistance. For the previous two decades in the nuclear community, the ODS alloy developments have been mostly focused on the ferritic martensitic (F-M) steel-based ones. On the other hand, the austenitic stainless steels (e.g. 316L or 316LN) have been used as a structural material due to its good high temperature strength and a good compatibility with a media. However, the austenitic stainless steel showed unfavorable characteristics in the dimensional stability under neutron irradiation and cracking behavior with the media. It is thus expected that the austenitic ODS steels restrain the dimension stability under neutron irradiation. However, the ODS alloys usually reveal the anisotropic characteristic in mechanical strength in the hoop and longitudinal directions, which is attributed to the grain morphology strongly developed parallel to the rolling direction with a high aspect ratio. This study focuses on a modification of the strength anisotropy of an austenitic ODS alloy by a recrystallization heat treatment

  7. Factors which determine the swelling rate of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Once void nucleation subsides, the swelling rate of many austenitic alloys becomes rather insensitive to variables that control the transient regime of swelling. Models are presented which describe the roles of nickel, chromium and silicon in void nucleation. The relative insensitivity of steady-state swelling to temperature, displacement rate and composition is also discussed

  8. Mechanodynamical analysis of nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application; Analise mecanodinamica de ligas de niquel-titanio para aplicacao ortodontica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda, Carlos do Canto

    2002-07-01

    Nickel-titanium alloys may coexist in more than one crystalline structure. There is a high temperature phase, austenite, and a low temperature phase, martensite. The metallurgical basis for the superelasticity and the shape memory effect relies in the ability of these alloys to transform easily from one phase to another. There are three essential factors for the orthodontist to understand nickel-titanium alloys behaviour: stress; deflection; and temperature. These three factors are related to each other by the stress-deflection, stress-temperature and deflection-temperature diagrams. This work was undertaken with the objective to analyse commercial nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application, using the dynamical mechanical analyser - DMA. Four NiTi 0,017 X 0,025'' archwires were studied. The archwires were Copper NiTi 35 deg C (Ormco), Neo Sentalloy F200 (GAC), Nitinol Superelastic (Unitek) and NiTi (GAC). The different mechanodynamical properties such as elasticity and damping moduli were evaluated. Each commercial material was evaluated with and without a 1 N static force, aiming to evaluate phase transition temperature variation with stress. The austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, for the experiments without static force, was in the range of 1.59 to 1.85. For the 1 N static force tests the austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, ranged from 1.28 to 1.57 due to the higher martensite elasticity modulus. With elastic modulus variation with temperature behaviour, the orthodontist has the knowledge of the force variation applied in the tooth in relation to the oral cavity temperature change, for nickel-titanium alloys that undergo phase transformation. The damping capacity of the studied alloys depends on the materials state: martensitic phase; austenitic phase or during phase transformation. The martensitic phase shows higher dumping capacity. During phase transformation, an internal friction peak may be observed for the CuNiTi 35 deg C and Neo

  9. Mechanodynamical analysis of nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application; Analise mecanodinamica de ligas de niquel-titanio para aplicacao ortodontica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda, Carlos do Canto

    2002-07-01

    Nickel-titanium alloys may coexist in more than one crystalline structure. There is a high temperature phase, austenite, and a low temperature phase, martensite. The metallurgical basis for the superelasticity and the shape memory effect relies in the ability of these alloys to transform easily from one phase to another. There are three essential factors for the orthodontist to understand nickel-titanium alloys behaviour: stress; deflection; and temperature. These three factors are related to each other by the stress-deflection, stress-temperature and deflection-temperature diagrams. This work was undertaken with the objective to analyse commercial nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application, using the dynamical mechanical analyser - DMA. Four NiTi 0,017 X 0,025'' archwires were studied. The archwires were Copper NiTi 35 deg C (Ormco), Neo Sentalloy F200 (GAC), Nitinol Superelastic (Unitek) and NiTi (GAC). The different mechanodynamical properties such as elasticity and damping moduli were evaluated. Each commercial material was evaluated with and without a 1 N static force, aiming to evaluate phase transition temperature variation with stress. The austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, for the experiments without static force, was in the range of 1.59 to 1.85. For the 1 N static force tests the austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, ranged from 1.28 to 1.57 due to the higher martensite elasticity modulus. With elastic modulus variation with temperature behaviour, the orthodontist has the knowledge of the force variation applied in the tooth in relation to the oral cavity temperature change, for nickel-titanium alloys that undergo phase transformation. The damping capacity of the studied alloys depends on the materials state: martensitic phase; austenitic phase or during phase transformation. The martensitic phase shows higher dumping capacity. During phase transformation, an internal friction peak may be observed for the CuNiTi 35 deg C and Neo Sentalloy F

  10. Modification of the grain structure of austenitic welds for improved ultrasonic inspectability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra; Stubenrauch, Steffen; Jacobs, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Welding is an essential part of the fabrication of austenitic stainless steel components used in industrial plants, such as those designed for nuclear power generation, chemical processing, conventional power generation and, increasingly, for production of renewable energy. The welded austenitic material presents major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure of the weld metal. The typically coarse grain structure, in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material, leads to increased scattering and affects sound wave propagation in the weld. These effects result in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicate the interpretation of signals and the localisation of defects by ultrasonic inspection. This paper presents the results of a research project dealing with efforts to influence grain growth in the weld during the welding process, in particular during the solidification process, in order to produce smaller grains. The objective was to achieve improved sound propagation through the weld, so that inspectability can be improved. The welding process was modified by the application of alternating magnetic fields at different frequencies, as well as different temperature cycles and pulsed arc technology. Metallographic sections of the test welds show that modification of the grain structure can be achieved by the use of these techniques. For further optimisation, test blocks for ultrasonic testing were manufactured with testflaws to study sound propagation through the modified weld and to assess the detectability of test flaws. The results of this investigation are of importance in assessing the integrity of highly stressed components in industrial installations, particularly for those components with stringent requirements on safety and quality.

  11. Chemical changes of titanium and titanium dioxide under electron bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romins Brasca

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron induced effect on the first stages of the titanium (Ti0 oxidation and titanium dioxide (Ti4+ chemical reduction processes has been studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. Using factor analysis we found that both processes are characterized by the appearance of an intermediate Ti oxidation state, Ti2O3 (Ti3+.

  12. Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanostructures via Nitridation of Nanopatterned Titanium Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kim, Jongbum

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures are obtained via nitridation of titanium dioxide. Nanoparticles acquired a cubic shape with sharper edges following the rock-salt crystalline structure of TiN. Lattice constant of the resulting TiN nanoparticles matched well with the tabulated data. Energy...

  13. Bone response to a titanium aluminium nitride coating on metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, C O; Brook, I M

    2006-05-01

    The design, surface characteristics and strength of metallic implants are dependant on their intended use and clinical application. Surface modifications of materials may enable reduction of the time taken for osseointegration and improve the biological response of bio-mechanically favourable metals and alloys. The influence of a titanium aluminium nitride (TAN) coating on the response of bone to commercially pure titanium and austenitic 18/8 stainless steel wire is reported. TAN coated and plain rods of stainless steel and commercially pure titanium were implanted into the mid-shaft of the femur of Wistar rats. The femurs were harvested at four weeks and processed for scanning electron and light microscopy. All implants exhibited a favourable response in bone with no evidence of fibrous encapsulation. There was no significant difference in the amount of new bone formed around the different rods (osseoconduction), however, there was a greater degree of shrinkage separation of bone from the coated rods than from the plain rods (p = 0.017 stainless steel and p = 0.0085 titanium). TAN coating may result in reduced osseointegration between bone and implant.

  14. Production and several properties of single crystal austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kazutaka; Yoshinari, Akira; Kaneda, Junya; Aono, Yasuhisa; Kato, Takahiko

    1998-01-01

    The single crystal austenitic stainless steels Type 316L and 304L were grown in order to improve the resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) using a unidirectional solidification method which can provide the large size single crystals. The mechanical properties and the chemical properties were examined. The orientation and temperature dependence of tensile properties of the single crystals were measured. The yield stress of the single crystal steels are lower than those of the conventional polycrystal steels because of the grain boundary strength cannot be expected in the single crystal steels. The tensile properties of the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L depend strongly on the orientation. The tensile strength in orientation are about 200 MPa higher than those in the and orientations. The microstructure of the single crystal consists of a mixture of the continuous γ-austenitic single crystal matrix and the δ-ferrite phase so that the effects of the γ/δ boundaries on the chemical properties were studied. The effects of the δ-ferrite phases and the γ/δ boundaries on the resistance to SCC were examined by the creviced bent beam test (CBB test). No crack is observed in all the CBB test specimens of the single crystals, even at the γ/δ boundaries. The behavior of the radiation induced segregation (RIS) at the γ/δ boundaries in the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L was evaluated by the electron irradiation test in the high voltage electron microscope (HVEM). The depletion of oversized solute chromium at the γ/δ boundary in the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L is remarkably lower than that at the grain boundary in the polycrystalline-type 316L. (author)

  15. Thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels as AISI 316 LN and 304 L. Such damage has been clearly observed for some components used in Fast Breeder reactors (FBR) and Pressure Water Reactor (PWR). In order to investigate thermal fatigue, quasi-structural specimen have been used. In this frame, facilities enforcing temperature variations similar to those found under the operation conditions have been progressively developed. As for components, loading results from impeded dilatation. In the SPLASH facility, the purpose was to establish accurate crack initiation conditions in order to check the relevance of the usual component design methodology. The tested specimen is continuously heated by the passage of an electrical DC current, and submitted to cyclic thermal down shock (up to 1000 deg C/s) by means of periodical spraying of water on two opposite specimen faces. The number of cycles to crack initiation N i is deduced from periodic examinations of the quenched surfaces, by means of optical microscopy. It is considered that initiation occurs when at least one 50μm to 150□m long crack is observed. Additional SPLASH tests were performed for N >> N i , with a view to investigate the evolution of a surface multiple cracking network with the number of cycles N. The CYTHIA test was mainly developed for the purpose of assessing crack growth dynamics of one isolated crack in thermal fatigue conditions. Specimens consist of thick walled tubes with a 1 mm circular groove is spark-machined at the specimen centre. During the test, the external wall of the tube is periodically heated by using a HF induction coil (1 MHz), while its internal wall is permanently cooled by flowing water. Total crack growth is derived from post-mortem examinations, whereby the thermal fatigue final rupture surface is oxidized at the end of the test. The specimen is broken afterwards under mechanical fatigue at room temperature. All the tests confirm that

  16. Deposition of silver nanoparticles on titanium surface for antibacterial effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Juan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Liao Juan1, Zhu Zhimin3, Mo Anchun1,2, Li Lei1, Zhang Jingchao11State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, PR China; 2Department of Dental Implant, West China Stomatology Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, PR China; 3Department of Prosthodontics, West China Stomatology Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, PR ChinaAbstract: Microbial colonization on implanted devices and biofilm formation is a recurrent complication in implant surgery and may result in loss of implants. The aim of this study was to deposit silver nanoparticles on a titanium surface to obtain antibacterial properties. In the present study, we prepared a silver nanoparticle-modified titanium (Ti-nAg surface using silanization method. The morphology and chemical components of the Ti-nAg surface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Two species of bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, were utilized to test the antibacterial effect of the Ti-nAg treated surface. The SEM examination revealed that a small quantity of silver nanoparticles was sparsely deposited on the titanium surface. The diameter of these nanoparticles ranged from ten to several hundred nm. EDS analyses revealed that there was 4.26% of Ag present on the surface. After a 24-hour incubation, 94% of Staphylococcus aureus and over 95% of Escherichia coli had been killed on the Ti-nAg surface, and the SEM examination of anti-adhesive efficacy test showed that there were less bacteria attached to Ti-nAg surface than to a control surface of untreated Titanium. These data suggest that silver nanoparticle-modified titanium is a promising material with an antibacterial property that may be used as an implantable biomaterial.Keywords: nano-silver, titanium, antibacterial activity, silanization method

  17. Physical metallurgy of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Researches in electric, magnetic, thermophysical properties of titanium alloys in the wide range of temperatures (from helium upto elevated one), as well as stability of phases in alloys of different types are generalized. Fundamental description of physical properties of binary model alloys is given. Acoustic emission, shape memory and Bauschinger effects, pseudoelasticity, aging and other aspects of physical metallurgy of titanium alloys are considered

  18. Influence of thermo-mechanical treatment on the tensile properties of a modified 14Cr–15Ni stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayanand, V.D., E-mail: vdvijayanand@igcar.gov.in; Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.

    2014-10-15

    The titanium modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel is used as clad and wrapper material for fast breeder nuclear reactor. Thermo-mechanical treatments consisting of solution annealing at two different temperatures of 1273 and 1373 K followed by cold-work and thermal ageing have been imparted to the steel to tailor its microstructure for enhancing strength. Tensile tests have been carried out on the thermo-mechanically treated steel at nominal strain rate of 1.6 × 10{sup −4} s{sup −1} over a temperature range of 298–1073 K. The yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength of the steel increased with increase in solution treatment temperature and this has been attributed to the fine and higher density of Ti(C,N) precipitate. Tensile flow behaviour of the steel has been analysed using Ludwigson and Voce constitutive equations. The steel heat treated at higher solution temperature exhibited earlier onset of cross slip during tensile deformation. The rate of recovery at higher test temperatures was also influenced by variations in solution heat treatment temperature. In addition, dynamic recrystallization during tensile deformation at higher temperatures was profound for steel solution heat-treated at lower temperature. The differences in flow behaviour and softening mechanisms during tensile testing of the steel after different heat treated conditions have been attributed to the nature of Ti(C,N) precipitation.

  19. Influence of thermo-mechanical treatment on the tensile properties of a modified 14Cr–15Ni stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayanand, V.D.; Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    The titanium modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel is used as clad and wrapper material for fast breeder nuclear reactor. Thermo-mechanical treatments consisting of solution annealing at two different temperatures of 1273 and 1373 K followed by cold-work and thermal ageing have been imparted to the steel to tailor its microstructure for enhancing strength. Tensile tests have been carried out on the thermo-mechanically treated steel at nominal strain rate of 1.6 × 10 −4 s −1 over a temperature range of 298–1073 K. The yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength of the steel increased with increase in solution treatment temperature and this has been attributed to the fine and higher density of Ti(C,N) precipitate. Tensile flow behaviour of the steel has been analysed using Ludwigson and Voce constitutive equations. The steel heat treated at higher solution temperature exhibited earlier onset of cross slip during tensile deformation. The rate of recovery at higher test temperatures was also influenced by variations in solution heat treatment temperature. In addition, dynamic recrystallization during tensile deformation at higher temperatures was profound for steel solution heat-treated at lower temperature. The differences in flow behaviour and softening mechanisms during tensile testing of the steel after different heat treated conditions have been attributed to the nature of Ti(C,N) precipitation

  20. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelic, S.K., E-mail: susanne.michelic@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Loder, D. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A. [Outokumpu Nirosta GmbH, Essener Straße 244, 44793 Bochum (Germany); Bernhard, C. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  1. Titanium for salt water service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadiyar, H.S.; Shibad, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium has potential as major material of construction in desalination plants, in condensers and heat exchangers, in view of its excellent corrosion resistance to salt water upto at least 120deg C. The advantages of titanium in such applications are brought out. The various specific problems such as pitting, crevice and galvanic corrosion and the preventive methods, for adopting titanium have been discussed. The hydriding problem can be overcome by suitably controlling the operating parameters such as temperature and surface preparation. A case has been made to prove the economic viability of titanium in comparison to Al-brass and Cu-Ni alloy. The future of titanium seems to be very promising in view of the negligible tube failures and outages. (auth.)

  2. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam- 603 102 (India)

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  3. Reversed austenite in 0Cr13Ni4Mo martensitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y.Y., E-mail: songyuanyuan@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, X.Y.; Rong, L.J.; Li, Y.Y. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang 110016 (China); Nagai, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    The austenite reversion process and the distribution of carbon and other alloying elements during tempering in 0Cr13Ni4Mo martensitic stainless steel have been investigated by in-situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The microstructure of the reversed austenite was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results revealed that the amount of the reversed austenite formed at high temperature increased with the holding time. Direct experimental evidence supported carbon partitioning to carbides and Ni to the reversed austenite. The reversed austenite almost always nucleated in contact with lath boundary M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides during tempering and the diffusion of Ni promoted its growth. The Ni enrichment and the ultrafine size of the reversed austenite were considered to be the main factors that accounted for the stability of the reversed austenite. - Highlights: • The amount of the reversed austenite formed at high temperature increases with the holding time. • STEM results directly show that carbon is mainly partitioned into the carbides and Ni into the reversed austenite. • The Ni enrichment and the ultrafine size are the main factors leading to the stabilization of the reversed austenite.

  4. Surface Modification Reaction of Photocatalytic Titanium Dioxide with Triethoxysilane for Improving Dispersibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Jin; Kim, Ji Ho; Park, Young Tae

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out the surface modification of photocatalytic TiO 2 with triethoxysilane through dehydrogenation reaction and characterized the modified photocatalyst by spectroscopic methods, such as FT-IR, solid-state 29 Si MAS NMR, XPS, and XRF, etc. We also examined photocatalytic activity of the immobilized photocatalytic titanium dioxide with triethoxysilane by decolorization reaction of dyes such as cong red and methylene blue under visible light. Dispersion test showed that the photocatalytic titanium dioxide immobilized with triethoxysilane group has kept higher dispersibility than titanium dioxide itself. No appreciable precipitation takes place even after standing for 24 h in the 4:6 mixture ratio of ethanol and water

  5. Does surface anodisation of titanium implants change osseointegration and make their extraction from bone any easier?

    OpenAIRE

    Langhoff, J; Mayer, J; Faber, L; Kästner, S B; Guibert, G; Zlinszky, K; Auer, J A; von Rechenberg, B

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Titanium implants have a tendency for high bone-implant bonding, and, in comparison to stainless steel implants are more difficult to remove. The current study was carried out to evaluate, i) the release strength of three selected anodized titanium surfaces with increased nanohardness and low roughness, and ii) bone-implant bonding in vivo. These modified surfaces were intended to give improved anchorage while facilitating easier removal of temporary implants. Material and methods...

  6. The effect of shock-wave strain on the acoustic and elastic properties of titanium nickelide upon phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.N.; Panchenko, A.M.; Sevryugina, I.V.; Novikov, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    The data are obtained for the influence of preliminary plastic deformation of titanium nickelide in an austenitic state on the character of its elastic properties variation during various type phase transitions. It is shown that the defect structure evolution occurring as a result of shock wave loading has a combined ambiguous effect on microstructural mechanisms being the basis for martensitic phase transformations. Shock wave loading is stated to stimulate the dislocation-displacement mechanism of R-phase formation and to increase the stability of R-phase to R→B19'-transition [ru

  7. Surface modification of austenitic steel by various glow-discharge nitriding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Borowski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen intensive research on modifying glow-discharge nitriding processes. One of the most commonly used glow-discharge methods includes cathodic potential nitriding (conventional method, and active screen plasma nitriding. Each of these methods has a number of advantages. One very important, common feature of these techniques is full control of the microstructure, chemical and phase composition, thickness and the surface topography of the layers formed. Another advantage includes the possibility of nitriding such materials as: austenitic steels or nickel alloys, i.e. metallic materials which do not diffuse nitrogen as effectively as ferritic or martensitic steels. However, these methods have some disadvantages as well. In the case of conventional plasma nitriding, engineers have to deal with the edge effect, which makes it difficult to use this method for complexly shaped components. In turn, in the case of active screen plasma nitriding, the problem disappears. A uniform, smooth layer forms, but is thinner, softer and is not as resistant to friction compared to layers formed using the conventional method. Research is also underway to combine these methods, i.e. use an active screen in conventional plasma nitriding at cathodic potential. However, there is a lack of comprehensive data presenting a comparison between these three nitriding processes and the impact of pulsating current on the formation of the microstructure and functional properties of austenitic steel surfaces. The article presents a characterisation of nitrided layers produced on austenitic X2CrNiMo17-12-2 (AISI 316L stainless steel in the course of glow-discharge nitriding at cathodic potential, at plasma potential and at cathodic potential incorporating an active screen. All processes were carried out at 440 °C under DC glow-discharge conditions and in 100 kHz frequency pulsating current. The layers were examined in terms of their microstructure, phase and

  8. Characterization and understanding of ion irradiation effect on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volgin, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in nuclear industry for internal structures. These structures are located close to the fuel assemblies, inside the pressure vessel. The exposure of these elements to high irradiation doses (the accumulated dose, after 40 years of operation, can reach 80 dpa), at temperature close to 350 C, modifies the macroscopic behavior of the steel: hardening, swelling, creep and corrosion are observed. Moreover, in-service inspections of some of the reactor internal structures have revealed the cracking of some baffle bolts. This cracking has been attributed to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). In order to understand this complex phenomenon, a first step is to identify the microstructural changes occurring during irradiation, and to understand the mechanisms at the origin of this evolution. In this framework, a large part of the European project 'PERFORM 60' is dedicated to the study of the irradiation damage in austenitic stainless steels. The objective of this PhD work is to bring comprehensive data on the irradiation effects on microstructure. To reach this goal, two model alloys (FeNiCr and FeNiCrSi) and an industrial austenitic stainless steel (316 steel) are studied using Atom Probe Tomography (APT), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS). They are irradiated by Ni ions in CSNSM (Orsay) at two temperatures (200 and 450 C) and three doses (0.5, 1 and 5 dpa). TEM observations have shown the appearance of dislocation loops, cavities and staking fault tetrahedra. The dislocation loops in 316 steel were preferentially situated in the vicinity of dislocations, while they were randomly distributed in the FeNiCr alloy. APT study has shown the redistribution of Ni and Si under irradiation in FeNiCrSi model alloy and 316 steel, leading to the appearance of (a) Cottrell clouds along dislocation lines, dislocation loops and other non-identified crystalline defects and (b

  9. The stress rupture properties of austenitic steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.

    Elevated temperature stress rupture data on Mo containing and Mo free austenitic weld metals have been collected from French, Dutch, German and UK sources and the results analysed. The stress rupture strength of Mo containing weld metal is significantly higher than that of Mo free weld metal. At 10,000h the rupture strength of Mo containing weld metal is higher than that of Type 316 steel whereas the Mo free weld metal is about 20% lower than that of Type 304 steel. Austenitic weld metal can give low stress rupture ductility values. It is concluded that there are insufficient data to permit reliable extrapolations to long times and it is recommended that long term tests are performed to overcome this situation

  10. Thermodynamic stability of austenitic Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The performed research was aimed at determining thermodynamic stability of structures of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron castings. Examined were 35 alloys. The castings were tempered at 900 °C for 2 hours. Two cooling speeds were used: furnace-cooling and water-cooling. In the alloys with the nickel equivalent value less than 20,0 %, partial transition of austenite to martensite took place. The austenite decomposition ratio and the related growth of hardness was higher for smaller nickel equivalent value and was clearly larger in annealed castings than in hardened ones. Obtaining thermodynamically stable structure of castings requires larger than 20,0 % value of the nickel equivalent.

  11. STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF HIGH NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Bakajová

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the structural stability of an austenitic stainless steel with high nitrogen content. The investigated steel was heat treated at 800°C using different annealing times. Investigation was carried out using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermodynamic calculations. Three phases were identified by electron diffraction: Cr2N, sigma – phase and M23C6. The thermodynamic prediction is in good agreement with the experimental result. The only is the M23C6 carbide phase which is not thermodynamically predicted. Cr2N is the majority secondary phase and occurs in the form of discrete particles or cells (lamellas of Cr2N and austenite.

  12. An alternative to the crystallographic reconstruction of austenite in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    An alternative crystallographic austenite reconstruction programme written in Matlab is developed by combining the best features of the existing models: the orientation relationship refinement, the local pixel-by-pixel analysis and the nuclei identification and spreading strategy. This programme can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. Its applicability is demonstrated on both quenching and partitioning and as-quenched lath-martensite steels. - Highlights: • An alternative crystallographic austenite reconstruction program is developed. • The method combines a local analysis and a nuclei identification/spreading strategy. • The validity of the calculated orientation relationship is verified on a Q and P steel. • The accuracy of the reconstructed microtexture is investigated on a martensite steel

  13. Laser borided composite layer produced on austenitic 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczak Daria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Austenitic 316L steel is well-known for its good resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Therefore, this material is often used wherever corrosive media or high temperatures are to be expected. The main drawback of this material is very low hardness and low resistance to mechanical wear. In this study, the laser boriding was used in order to improve the wear behavior of this material. As a consequence, a composite surface layer was produced. The microstructure of laser-borided steel was characterized by only two zones: re-melted zone and base material. In the re-melted zone, a composite microstructure, consisting of hard ceramic phases (borides and a soft austenitic matrix, was observed. A significant increase in hardness and wear resistance of such a layer was obtained.

  14. Austin: austenitic steel irradiation E 145-02 Irradiation Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genet, F.; Konrad, J.

    1987-01-01

    Safety measures for nuclear reactors require that the energy which might be liberated in a reactor core during an accident should be contained within the reactor pressure vessel, even after very long irradiation periods. Hence the need to know the mechanical properties at high deformation velocity of structure materials that have received irradiation damage due to their utilization. The stainless steels used in the structures of reactors undergo damage by both thermal and fast neutrons, causing important changes in the mechanical properties of these materials. Various austenitic steels available as structural materials were irradiated or are under irradiation in various reactors in order to study the evolution of the mechanical properties at high deformation velocity as a function of the irradiation damage rate. The experiment called AUSTIN (AUstenitic STeel IrradiatioN) 02 was performed by the JRC Petten Establishment on behalf of Ispra in support of the reactor safety programme

  15. Residual stress studies of austenitic and ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrenko, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Residual studies have been made on austenitic and ferritic steels of the types used as structural materials. The residual stress results presented here will include residual stress measurements in the heat-affected zone on butt welded Type 304 stainless steel pipes, and the stresses induced in Type 304 austenitic stainless steel and Type A508 ferritic steel by several surface preparations. Such surface preparation procedures as machining and grinding can induce large directionality effects in the residual stresses determined by X-ray techniques and some typical data will be presented. A brief description is given of the mobile X-ray residual stress apparatus used to obtain most of the data in these studies. (author)

  16. Electron microscopy and plastic deformation of industrial austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Barry

    1976-01-01

    The different mechanisms of plastic deformation observed in austenitic stainless steels are described and the role of transmission electron microscopy in the elucidation of the mechanisms is presented. At temperatures below 0,5Tm, different variants of dislocation glide are competitive: slip of perfect and partial dislocations, mechanical twinning and strain-induced phase transformations. The predominance of one or other of these mechanisms can be rationalized in terms of the temperature and composition dependence of the stacking fault energy and the thermodynamic stability of the austenite. At temperatures above 0,5Tm dislocation climb and diffusion of point defects become increasingly important and at these temperatures recovery, recrystallization and precipitation can also occur during deformation [fr

  17. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Domankova; Katarína Bártová; Ivan Slatkovský; Peter Pinke

    2016-01-01

    The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with ...

  18. A discrete dislocation–transformation model for austenitic single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, J; Turteltaub, S; Remmers, J J C; Van der Giessen, E

    2008-01-01

    A discrete model for analyzing the interaction between plastic flow and martensitic phase transformations is developed. The model is intended for simulating the microstructure evolution in a single crystal of austenite that transforms non-homogeneously into martensite. The plastic flow in the untransformed austenite is simulated using a plane-strain discrete dislocation model. The phase transformation is modeled via the nucleation and growth of discrete martensitic regions embedded in the austenitic single crystal. At each instant during loading, the coupled elasto-plasto-transformation problem is solved using the superposition of analytical solutions for the discrete dislocations and discrete transformation regions embedded in an infinite homogeneous medium and the numerical solution of a complementary problem used to enforce the actual boundary conditions and the heterogeneities in the medium. In order to describe the nucleation and growth of martensitic regions, a nucleation criterion and a kinetic law suitable for discrete regions are specified. The constitutive rules used in discrete dislocation simulations are supplemented with additional evolution rules to account for the phase transformation. To illustrate the basic features of the model, simulations of specimens under plane-strain uniaxial extension and contraction are analyzed. The simulations indicate that plastic flow reduces the average stress at which transformation begins, but it also reduces the transformation rate when compared with benchmark simulations without plasticity. Furthermore, due to local stress fluctuations caused by dislocations, martensitic systems can be activated even though transformation would not appear to be favorable based on the average stress. Conversely, the simulations indicate that the plastic hardening behavior is influenced by the reduction in the effective austenitic grain size due to the evolution of transformation. During cyclic simulations, the coupled plasticity

  19. Integrity of austenitic stainless steel piping welds for nuclear service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canalini, A.; Lopes, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    A criterion applying K 1d concept was developed to determine the fracture mechanics properties of austenitic stainless steel nuclear piping welds. The critical dimensions, lenght and depth, for crack initiation were established and plotted in a chart. This study enables the dimensions of a discontinuity detected in an in-service inspection to be compared to the critical dimensions for crack initiation, and the indication can be judged critical or non-critical for the component. (author) [pt

  20. High Cycle Fatigue of Metastable Austenitic Stainless Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Fargas Ribas, Gemma; Zapata Dederle, Ana Cristina; Anglada Gomila, Marcos Juan; Mateo García, Antonio Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels are currently used in applications where severe forming operations are required, such as automotive bodies, due to its excellent ductility. They are also gaining interest for its combination of high strength and formability after forming. The biggest disadvantage is the difficulty to predict the mechanical response, which depends heavily on the amount of martensite formed. The martensitic transformation in metastable stainless steels can b...

  1. Diagnostic experimental results on the hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavriljuk, V.G.; Shivanyuk, V.N.; Foct, J

    2003-03-14

    Three main available hypotheses of hydrogen embrittlement are analysed in relation to austenitic steels based on the studies of the hydrogen effect on the interatomic bonds, phase transformations and microplastic behaviour. It is shown that hydrogen increases the concentration of free electrons, i.e. enhances the metallic character of atomic interactions, although such a decrease in the interatomic bonding cannot be a reason for brittleness and rather assists an increased plasticity. The hypothesis of the critical role of the hydrogen-induced {epsilon} martensite was tested in the experiment with the hydrogen-charged Si-containing austenitic steel. Both the fraction of the {epsilon} martensite and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement were increased due to Si alloying, which is at variance with the pseudo-hydride hypothesis. The hydrogen-caused early start of the microplastic deformation and an increased mobility of dislocations, which are usually not observed in the common mechanical tests, are revealed by the measurements of the strain-dependent internal friction, which is consistent with the hypothesis of the hydrogen-enhanced localised plasticity. An influence of alloying elements on the enthalpy E{sub H} of hydrogen migration in austenitic steels is studied using the temperature-dependent internal friction and a correlation is found between the values of E{sub H} and hydrogen-caused decrease in plasticity. A mechanism for the transition from the hydrogen-caused microplasticity to the apparent macrobrittle fracture is proposed based on the similarity of the fracture of hydrogenated austenitic steels to that of high nitrogen steels.

  2. Morphology change of retained austenite during austempering of carbide-free bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Christina, E-mail: christina.hofer@unileoben.ac.at [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Winkelhofer, Florian [Research and Development - Business Unit Coil, voestalpine Stahl GmbH, voestalpine‐Straße 3, A-4020 Linz (Austria); Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2016-05-10

    A change in the mechanical properties of a carbide-free bainitic steel was observed during prolonged holding at austempering temperature after termination of the bainitic transformation. To determine the origin of the property change, the microstructure was investigated by correlative electron microscopy. Although the retained austenite content remains the same during prolonged holding, its morphology changes from thin films separating the individual bainitic sub-units to a more globular structure. Since films of austenite contain a higher C concentration, the blocky austenite becomes gradually enriched in C during this morphology change. The more homogeneous distribution of the C after prolonged austempering leads to higher deformability as a result of a more pronounced TRIP effect. - Highlights: • Higher deformability after prolonged austempering of carbide-free bainite. • Microstructure-property relationship revealed by correlative electron microscopy. • Change in austenite morphology. • Spherodization of film austenite; C enrichment & homogenization of blocky austenite.

  3. Evaluation of non-conformities of hip prostheses made of titanium alloys and stainless steel; Avaliacao de nao conformidades de proteses de quadril fabricadas com ligas de titanio e aco inox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Ewerton de Oliveira Teotonio; Nascimento, Jose Jeferson da Silva; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Morais, Crislene Rodrigues da Silva; Campos, Karla Valeria Miranda de, E-mail: ewerton.teotonio@hotmail.com, E-mail: brunobarretodemaufcg@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academinca de Engenharia de Materiais

    2017-01-15

    A large number of metallic alloys has satisfactory behavior when used to manufacture implants for hip prostheses. However, they must be in conformity with standards, to ensure their quality for long periods without losing its functionality. Therefore, this paper aims to study the non-conformities in two hip prostheses, one of titanium and other stainless steel according to standards. The implants studied passed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence, tensile test and optical microscopy (OM). Specimens for the tensile test were made according to ASTM E 8M, as well, MO samples passed by metallographic procedure. The results evidenced that some chemical compositions showed in relation to the standards. The XRD analysis showed peaks of austenite and absence of ferrite for the stainless steel, while the titanium alloy presents an alpha phase (HCP) more significant than the beta phase (BCC). The stainless steel alloys and titanium have yield strength and tensile strength that meet the standards. On the other hand, the elastic modulus of the titanium alloy and stainless steel, comes to be ten times greater than the human bone. Therefore, the high modulus of elasticity of the alloys, favors bone resorption problems. The stainless steel microstructure is typical of an austenitic matrix, while the titanium alloy presents α + β microstructure. (author)

  4. Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels Strengthened by Laves Phase and MC Carbide Precipitates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Takeyama, M.; Maziasz, P. J.; Pint, B. A.

    2007-11-01

    Creep strengthening of Al-modified austenitic stainless steels by MC carbides or Fe2Nb Laves phase was explored. Fe-20Cr-15Ni-(0-8)Al and Fe-15Cr-20Ni-5Al base alloys (at. pct) with small additions of Nb, Mo, W, Ti, V, C, and B were cast, thermally-processed, and aged. On exposure from 650 °C to 800 °C in air and in air with 10 pct water vapor, the alloys exhibited continuous protective Al2O3 scale formation at an Al level of only 5 at. pct (2.4 wt pct). Matrices of the Fe-20Cr-15Ni-5Al base alloys consisted of γ (fcc) + α (bcc) dual phase due to the strong α-Fe stabilizing effect of the Al addition and exhibited poor creep resistance. However, adjustment of composition to the Fe-15Cr-20Ni-5Al base resulted in alloys that were single-phase γ-Fe and still capable of alumina scale formation. Alloys that relied solely on Fe2Nb Laves phase precipitates for strengthening exhibited relatively low creep resistance, while alloys that also contained MC carbide precipitates exhibited creep resistance comparable to that of commercially available heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels. Phase equilibria studies indicated that NbC precipitates in combination with Fe2Nb were of limited benefit to creep resistance due to the solution limit of NbC within the γ-Fe matrix of the alloys studied. However, when combined with other MC-type strengtheners, such as V4C3 or TiC, higher levels of creep resistance were obtained.

  5. Solid state alloying by plasma nitriding and diffusion annealing treatment for austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinedo, C.E.; Vatavuk, J.; Oliveira, S.D. de; Tschiptschin, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitrogen has been added to stainless steels to improve mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. High nitrogen steel production is limited by high gas pressure requirements and low nitrogen solubility in the melt. One way to overcome this limitation is the addition of nitrogen in solid state because of its higher solubility in austenite. However, gas and salt bath nitriding have been done at temperatures around 550 C, where nitrogen solubility in the steel is still very low. High temperature nitriding has been, thus proposed to increase nitrogen contents in the steel but the presence of oxide layers on top of the steel is a barrier to nitrogen intake. In this paper a modified plasma nitriding process is proposed. The first step of this process is a hydrogen plasma sputtering for oxide removal, exposing active steel surface improving nitrogen pickup. This is followed by a nitriding step where high nitrogen contents are introduced in the outermost layer of the steel. Diffusion annealing is then performed in order to allow nitrogen diffusion into the core. AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was plasma nitrided and diffusion annealed at 1423K, for 6 hours, with 0.2 MPa nitrogen pressure. The nitrided steel presented ∝60 μm outermost compact layer of (Fe,Cr) 3 N and (Fe,Cr) 4 N with 11 wt.% N measured by surface depth profiling chemical analysis - GDS system. During the annealing treatment the nitride layer was dissolved and nitrogen diffused to the core of the sample leaving more even nitrogen distribution into the steel. Using this technique one-millimetre thick sample were obtained having high nitrogen content and uniform distribution through the thickness. (orig.)

  6. Retained austenite thermal stability in a nanostructured bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avishan, Behzad; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Yazdani, Sasan; Caballero, Francisca G.

    2013-01-01

    The unique microstructure of nanostructured bainite consists of very slender bainitic ferrite plates and high carbon retained austenite films. As a consequence, the reported properties are opening a wide range of different commercial uses. However, bainitic transformation follows the T 0 criteria, i.e. the incomplete reaction phenomena, which means that the microstructure is not thermodynamically stable because the bainitic transformation stops well before austenite reaches an equilibrium carbon level. This article aims to study the different microstructural changes taking place when nanostructured bainite is destabilized by austempering for times well in excess of that strictly necessary to end the transformation. Results indicate that while bainitic ferrite seems unaware of the extended heat treatment, retained austenite exhibits a more receptive behavior to it. - Highlights: • Nanostructured bainitic steel is not thermodynamically stable. • Extensive austempering in these microstructures has not been reported before. • Precipitation of cementite particles is unavoidable at longer austempering times. • TEM, FEG-SEM and XRD analysis were used for microstructural characterization

  7. Retained austenite thermal stability in a nanostructured bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avishan, Behzad, E-mail: b_avishan@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Garcia-Mateo, Carlos, E-mail: cgm@cenim.csic.es [Department of Physical Metallurgy, National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM-CSIC), MATERALIA Research Group, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Yazdani, Sasan, E-mail: yazdani@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Caballero, Francisca G., E-mail: fgc@cenim.csic.es [Department of Physical Metallurgy, National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM-CSIC), MATERALIA Research Group, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-15

    The unique microstructure of nanostructured bainite consists of very slender bainitic ferrite plates and high carbon retained austenite films. As a consequence, the reported properties are opening a wide range of different commercial uses. However, bainitic transformation follows the T{sub 0} criteria, i.e. the incomplete reaction phenomena, which means that the microstructure is not thermodynamically stable because the bainitic transformation stops well before austenite reaches an equilibrium carbon level. This article aims to study the different microstructural changes taking place when nanostructured bainite is destabilized by austempering for times well in excess of that strictly necessary to end the transformation. Results indicate that while bainitic ferrite seems unaware of the extended heat treatment, retained austenite exhibits a more receptive behavior to it. - Highlights: • Nanostructured bainitic steel is not thermodynamically stable. • Extensive austempering in these microstructures has not been reported before. • Precipitation of cementite particles is unavoidable at longer austempering times. • TEM, FEG-SEM and XRD analysis were used for microstructural characterization.

  8. Weldability of newly developed austenitic alloy for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, T.; Koseki, T.

    1986-01-01

    The testing reported in this paper involved typical steels of the new grades such as STEEL-A (0.025C-14Ni-25Cr-0.35N), STEEL-B (0.04C-23Mn-13Cr-0.22N) and STEEL-C (0.20C-25Mn-5Cr), and commercial steels of Type 300 series. Weldments were made mainly using the GTAW, SMAW and SAW processes with experimental and commercial filler metals. Strength and toughness of weldments were examined at 77 K (-321 0 F) and 4 K. The strengthening of material through the addition of nitrogen was far greater in the weld metal that in the base metal at cryogenic temperature. In fact, 0.2% proof stress of weld metals bearging 0.20% to 0.40% nitrogen at 77 K exhibited a higher value by 60 to 150 MPa (8,740 to 21,760 psi) than that of the base metal. Impact absorbed energy of weld metals at 77 K decreased rapidly with nitrogen content, 60-90 J at 0.20%N to 20-50J at 0.35% N. Rather high impact absorbed energy was obtained when the weld metal solidified as primary austenitic phase, resulting in fully austenitic microstructure or austenite-eutectic ferrite mixture at ambient temperature. In addition, oxide inclusions, the number of which strongly depends on welding processes, were detrimental to toughness of weld metals at cryogenic temperature

  9. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray diffraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Foerster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  10. Low ductility creep failure in austenitic weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.

    Creep tests have been carried out for times of up to approx. 22,000 hrs on three austenitic weld metals of nominal composition 17Cr-8Ni-2Mo, 19Cr-12Ni-3Mo+Nb and 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo. The two former deposits were designed to produce delta-ferrite contents in the range 3-9% while the latter was designed to be fully austenitic. The common feature of all three weld metals was that they all gave very low strains at failure, typically approx. 1%. The microstructures of the failed creep specimens have been studied using optical and electron microscopy and the precipitate structures related to the occurrence of low creep strains. Creep deformation and fracture mechanisms in austenitic materials in general have been reviewed and this has been used as a basis for discussion of the observations of the present work. Finally, some of the factors that can be controlled to improve long-term creep ductility have been appraised

  11. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray difraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Forster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  12. Cryogenic properties of austenitic stainless steels for superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, K.; Kato, T.; Ono, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Suzuki, S.

    1983-01-01

    The present study examines the magnetic and mechanical properties of a variety of austenitic stainless steels and high maganese steel which are candidate materials for the superconducting magnet attached to high energy particle accelerators. The effect of a specified heat treatment for the precipitation of intermetallic compound Nb3Sn to be used as superconductor on ductility and toughness are especially examined. It is found that nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steels have high strength and good ductility and toughness, but that these are destroyed by precipitation treatment. The poor ductility and toughness after precipitation are caused by a weakening of the grain boundaries due to the agglomerated chromium carbide percipitates. The addition of vanadium suppresses this effect by refining the grain. Austenitic steels are found to have low magnetic permeabilities and Neel temperatures, and show serrated flow in traction test due to strained martensitic transformation. High manganese steel has extremely low permeability, a Neel temperature about room temperature, and has a serrated flow in traction test due to adiabatic deformation at liquid helium temperature

  13. Phase stability of high manganese austenitic steels for cryogenic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, K

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the austenitic stability against a' martensitic transformation of three non-magnetic austenitic steels : a new stainless steel X2CrMnNiMoN 19-12-11-1 grade, a traditional X8CrMnNiN 19-11-6 grade and a high manganese X8MnCrNi 28-7-1 grade. Measurements of relative magnetic susceptibility at room temperature are performed on strained tensile specimens at 4.2 K. A special extensometer for high precision strain measurements at low temperature has been developed at CERN to test specimens up to various levels of plastic strain. Moreover, the high precision strain recording of the extensometer enables a detailed study of the serrated yield phenomena associated with 4.2 K tensile testing and their influence on the evolution of magnetic susceptibility. The results show that high Mn contents increase the stability of the austenitic structure against a' martensitic transformation, while keeping high strength at cryogenic temperature. Moreover, proper elaboration through primary and possi...

  14. Austenite Grain Growth Behavior of AISI 4140 Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AISI 4140 alloy steel is widely applied in the manufacture of various parts such as gears, rams, and spindles due to its good performance of strength, toughness, and wear resistance. The former researches most focused on its deformation and recrystallization behaviors under high temperature. However, the evolution laws of austenite grain growth were rarely studied. This behavior also plays an important role in the mechanical properties of parts made of this steel. In this study, samples are heated to a certain temperature of 1073 K, 1173 K, 1273 K, and 1373 K at a heating rate of 5 K per second and hold for different times of 0 s, 120 s, 240 s, 360 s, and 480 s before being quenched with water. The experimental results suggest that the austenite grains enlarge with increasing temperature and holding time. A mathematical model and an application developed in Matlab environment are established on the basis of previous works and experimental results to predict austenite grains size in hot deformation processes. The predicted results are in good agreement with experimental results which indicates that the model and the application are reliable.

  15. Preparation of titanium diboride powders from titanium alkoxide and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Department of Materials and Manufacturing Process, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran. 15875-1744, Iran ... Titanium diboride is a hard refractory material with a high melting point ... (λ = 1⋅540598 Å) radiation. Morphology of the ...

  16. Change of austenite state before martensite transformation and Msub(el) temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.

    1978-01-01

    The N31 alloy austenite behaviour in the premartensite temperature range is investigated. To study the austenite state the method of resistance to microplastic deformation sensitive to the structural state of metals is used. The resistance to microplastic deformation was determined by amplitude dependence of internal friction. The Msub(el) temperature is found at which the change of austenite state is observed due to the appearence of elastic nuclei of martensite below the Msub(el) temperature

  17. Response of cast austenitic stainless steel to low temperature plasma carburizing.

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yong

    2008-01-01

    The response of a cast 316 type austenitic stainless steel to the novel low temperature plasma carburizing process has been investigated in this work. The cast steel has a dendritic structure with a mix of austenite, ferrite and carbide phases. The results show that such a complex structure responds well to the carburizing process, and the inter-dendrite regions containing ferrite and carbides can be transformed to expanded austenite to form a continuous and uniform layer supersat...

  18. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, G.W.; Davis, J.W.

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500 0 C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150 0 C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement

  19. Modification of the grain boundary microstructure of the austenitic PCA stainless steel to improve helium embrittlement resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Grain boundary MC precipitation was produced by a modified thermal-mechanical pretreatment in 25% cold worked (CW) austenitic prime candidate alloy (PCA) stainless steel prior to HFIR irradiation. Postirradiation tensile results and fracture analysis showed that the modified material (B3) resisted helium embrittlement better than either solution annealed (SA) or 25% CW PCA irradiated at 500 to 600 0 C to approx.21 dpa and 1370 at. ppM He. PCA SA and 25% CW were not embrittled at 300 to 400 0 C. Grain boundary MC survives in PCA-B3 during HFIR irradiation at 500 0 C but dissolves at 600 0 C; it does not form in either SA or 25% CW PCA during similar irradiation. The grain boundary MC appears to play an important role in the helium embrittlement resistance of PCA-B3

  20. Transformation of austenite to duplex austenite-ferrite assembly in annealed stainless steel 316L consolidated by laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidi, K.; Gao, X. [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Lofaj, F. [Institute of Materials Research of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, Košice (Slovakia); Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, 916 24 Trnava (Slovakia); Kvetková, L. [Institute of Materials Research of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, Košice (Slovakia); Shen, Z.J. [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Mechanical properties, phase and microstructure stability of laser melted steel was studied. • Duplex austenite-ferrite assembly with improved mechanical properties was formed. • Dissolution of Mo in the steel matrix resulted in ferrite stabilization and stress relief. • Enhanced mechanical properties were achieved compared to conventionally casted and annealed steel. - Abstract: Laser melting (LM), with a focused Nd:YAG laser beam, was used to form solid bodies from 316L austenite stainless steel powder and the laser melted samples were heat treated at various temperatures. The phase changes in heat treated samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Samples heat treated at 800 °C and 900 °C remained single austenite while in samples heat treated at 1100 °C and 1400 °C a dual austenite-ferrite phase assembly was formed. The ferrite formation was further verified by electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) and selective area diffraction (SAD). Microstructural changes were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). In samples heat treated up to 900 °C, coalescence of the cellular-sub grains was noticed, whereas in sample heat treated at and above 1100 °C the formation of ferrite phase was observed. The correlation between the microstructure/phase assembly and the measured strength/microhardness were investigated, which indicated that the tensile strength of the laser melted material was significantly higher than that of the conventional 316L steel even after heat treatment whereas caution has to be taken when laser melted material will be exposed to an application temperature above 900 °C.

  1. Reformed austenite transformation during fatigue crack propagation of 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, Denis, E-mail: thibault.denis@ireq.ca [Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800, boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Bocher, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.bocher@etsmtl.ca [Ecole de technologie superieure, 1100, rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 1K3 (Canada); Thomas, Marc, E-mail: marc.thomas@etsmtl.ca [Ecole de technologie superieure, 1100, rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 1K3 (Canada); Lanteigne, Jacques, E-mail: lanteigne.jacques@ireq.ca [Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800, boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Hovington, Pierre, E-mail: hovington.pierre@ireq.ca [Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800, boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Robichaud, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.robichaud@riotinto.com [Centre de recherche et de developpement Arvida (CRDA), 1955, boul. Mellon, Jonquiere, Quebec, G7S 4K8 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Reformed austenite in 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel transforms during fatigue crack growth. {yields} Low cycle fatigue tests showed that this transformation to martensite is gradual. {yields} XRD spectrums obtained on the fracture surface and have been correlated to LCF results. - Abstract: In the as-quenched state, 13%Cr-4%Ni martensitic stainless steels are essentially 100% martensitic. However, a certain amount of austenite is formed during the tempering of this alloy. This reformed austenite is thermally stable at room temperature but can transform to martensite under stress. This transformation is known to happen during impact testing but it has never been established if it occurs during fatigue crack propagation. This study presents the results of X-ray diffraction measurements of reformed austenite before and after crack growth testing. It has been found that reformed austenite does transform to martensite at the crack tip and that this transformation occurs even at a low stress intensity factor. Low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted to verify austenite transformation under cyclic straining. It was found that reformed austenite transforms only partially during the first strain reversal but that essentially all austenite has disappeared after 100 cycles. The relation between austenite transformation under low-cycle fatigue and its transformation during crack growth is also discussed.

  2. Use of overlapped reflection for determining the retained austenite by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.L.; Gonzalez, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Retainec austenite in high-carbon steels has been determined by means of new computation techniques applied to the processing of X-ray diffraction data. Instead of using the traditional procedure based on the weak (200) reflections of martensite and austenite, intensity measurements of the overlapped (110) peak of martensite and (111) peak of austenite were performed. The separation of the peaks was based on a Pearson VII function, which is capable of describing all diffraction profiles. The accuracy of integrated intensities was then improved with the beneficial effects of higher precision in the calculation of the amount of retained austenite. (author) [pt

  3. Reformed austenite transformation during fatigue crack propagation of 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibault, Denis; Bocher, Philippe; Thomas, Marc; Lanteigne, Jacques; Hovington, Pierre; Robichaud, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Reformed austenite in 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel transforms during fatigue crack growth. → Low cycle fatigue tests showed that this transformation to martensite is gradual. → XRD spectrums obtained on the fracture surface and have been correlated to LCF results. - Abstract: In the as-quenched state, 13%Cr-4%Ni martensitic stainless steels are essentially 100% martensitic. However, a certain amount of austenite is formed during the tempering of this alloy. This reformed austenite is thermally stable at room temperature but can transform to martensite under stress. This transformation is known to happen during impact testing but it has never been established if it occurs during fatigue crack propagation. This study presents the results of X-ray diffraction measurements of reformed austenite before and after crack growth testing. It has been found that reformed austenite does transform to martensite at the crack tip and that this transformation occurs even at a low stress intensity factor. Low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted to verify austenite transformation under cyclic straining. It was found that reformed austenite transforms only partially during the first strain reversal but that essentially all austenite has disappeared after 100 cycles. The relation between austenite transformation under low-cycle fatigue and its transformation during crack growth is also discussed.

  4. The sub-zero Celsius treatment of precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    A precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel AISI 632 grade was austenitized according to industrial specifications and thereafter subjected to isothermal treatment at sub-zero Celsius temperatures. During treatment, austenite transformed to martensite. The isothermal austenite-to-martensite...... treatment. Magnetometry showed that the additional thermal step in boiling nitrogen yields a minor increment of the fraction of martensite, but has a noteworthy accelerating effect on the transformation kinetics, which more pronounced when the isothermal holding is performed at a higher temperature. Data...... is interpreted in terms of instantaneous nucleation of martensite during cooling followed by time dependent growth during isothermal holding....

  5. Kinetics analysis of two-stage austenitization in supermartensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo; Hald, John

    2017-01-01

    The martensite-to-austenite transformation in X4CrNiMo16-5-1 supermartensitic stainless steel was followed in-situ during isochronal heating at 2, 6 and 18 K min−1 applying energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction at the BESSY II facility. Austenitization occurred in two stages, separated...... that the austenitization kinetics is governed by Ni-diffusion and that slow transformation kinetics separating the two stages is caused by soft impingement in the martensite phase. Increasing the lath width in the kinetics model had a similar effect on the austenitization kinetics as increasing the heating-rate....

  6. Effect of Austenitic and Austeno-Ferritic Electrodes on 2205 Duplex and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses the effect of different types of austenitic and austeno-ferritic electrodes (E309L, E309LMo and E2209) on the relationship between weldability, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of shielded metal arc welded duplex/austenitic (2205/316L) stainless steel dissimilar joints using the combined techniques of optical, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectrometer and electrochemical. The results indicated that the change in electrode composition led to microstructural variations in the welds with the development of different complex phases such as vermicular ferrite, lathy ferrite, widmanstatten and intragranular austenite. Mechanical properties of welded joints were diverged based on compositions and solidification modes; it was observed that ferritic mode solidified weld dominated property wise. However, the pitting corrosion resistance of all welds showed different behavior in chloride solution; moreover, weld with E2209 was superior, whereas E309L exhibited lower resistance. Higher degree of sensitization was observed in E2209 weld, while lesser in E309L weld. Optimum ferrite content was achieved in all welds.

  7. Microstructural evolution of a 2.25Cr - 1 Mo steel during austenitization and temper: austenite grain growth, carbide precipitation sequence and effects on mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depinoy, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This work aims at optimizing tensile and toughness properties of a 2.25Cr - 1Mo steel by controlling its microstructure through heat treatments. To this aim, phase transformations during austenitization, quenching and tempering have to be understood. Quantitative microstructural analyses were performed by means of SEM, TEM and XRD to characterize and model metallurgical evolution of the steel at each step of the heat treatment. The evolution of austenite during the austenitization stage, and its influence on the resulting as-quenched microstructure were thoroughly investigated. Austenite grain growth was modelled in order to understand its mechanisms, including the limited growth phenomenon observed at lower temperatures. The effect of austenitization conditions on further decomposition of austenite and on mechanical properties after quenching + tempering was experimentally determined. An optimal austenitization condition was selected and applied to study the tempering stage. Carbide precipitation was studied for various tempering temperatures and amounts of time. M3C carbides precipitate first, followed by M2C and M7C3; M23C6 are the equilibrium carbides. The influence of carbide precipitation on mechanical properties was studied. Tensile properties are closely linked to the tempering conditions in the range investigated, while impact toughness remains stable. (author) [fr

  8. Thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorev, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    The problems of the theory and practical application of thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys are presented. On the basis of the systematic investigations developed are the methods of thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys, established are the optimum procedures and produced are the bases of their industrial application with an account of alloy technological peculiarities and the procedure efficiency. It is found that those strengthening methods are more efficient at which the contribution of dispersion hardening prevails over the strengthening by phase hardening

  9. Detonation nanodiamonds biofunctionalization and immobilization to titanium alloy surfaces as first steps towards medical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Juliana P L; Shaikh, Afnan Q; Reitzig, Manuela; Kovalenko, Daria A; Michael, Jan; Beutner, René; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Scharnweber, Dieter; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds are a promising nanoscale material in various applications such as microelectronics, polishing, optical monitoring, medicine and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond characteristics like extreme hardness or high thermal conductivity, they have additional benefits as intrinsic fluorescence due to lattice defects without photobleaching, obtained during the high pressure high temperature process. Further the carbon surface and its various functional groups in consequence of the synthesis, facilitate additional chemical and biological modification. In this work we present our recent results on chemical modification of the nanodiamond surface with phosphate groups and their electrochemically assisted immobilization on titanium-based materials to increase adhesion at biomaterial surfaces. The starting material is detonation nanodiamond, which exhibits a heterogeneous surface due to the functional groups resulting from the nitrogen-rich explosives and the subsequent purification steps after detonation synthesis. Nanodiamond surfaces are chemically homogenized before proceeding with further functionalization. Suspensions of resulting surface-modified nanodiamonds are applied to the titanium alloy surfaces and the nanodiamonds subsequently fixed by electrochemical immobilization. Titanium and its alloys have been widely used in bone and dental implants for being a metal that is biocompatible with body tissues and able to bind with adjacent bone during healing. In order to improve titanium material properties towards biomedical applications the authors aim to increase adhesion to bone material by incorporating nanodiamonds into the implant surface, namely the anodically grown titanium dioxide layer. Differently functionalized nanodiamonds are characterized by infrared spectroscopy and the modified titanium alloys surfaces by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The process described shows an adsorption and

  10. Detonation nanodiamonds biofunctionalization and immobilization to titanium alloy surfaces as first steps towards medical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana P. L. Gonçalves

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds are a promising nanoscale material in various applications such as microelectronics, polishing, optical monitoring, medicine and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond characteristics like extreme hardness or high thermal conductivity, they have additional benefits as intrinsic fluorescence due to lattice defects without photobleaching, obtained during the high pressure high temperature process. Further the carbon surface and its various functional groups in consequence of the synthesis, facilitate additional chemical and biological modification. In this work we present our recent results on chemical modification of the nanodiamond surface with phosphate groups and their electrochemically assisted immobilization on titanium-based materials to increase adhesion at biomaterial surfaces. The starting material is detonation nanodiamond, which exhibits a heterogeneous surface due to the functional groups resulting from the nitrogen-rich explosives and the subsequent purification steps after detonation synthesis. Nanodiamond surfaces are chemically homogenized before proceeding with further functionalization. Suspensions of resulting surface-modified nanodiamonds are applied to the titanium alloy surfaces and the nanodiamonds subsequently fixed by electrochemical immobilization. Titanium and its alloys have been widely used in bone and dental implants for being a metal that is biocompatible with body tissues and able to bind with adjacent bone during healing. In order to improve titanium material properties towards biomedical applications the authors aim to increase adhesion to bone material by incorporating nanodiamonds into the implant surface, namely the anodically grown titanium dioxide layer. Differently functionalized nanodiamonds are characterized by infrared spectroscopy and the modified titanium alloys surfaces by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The process described shows an

  11. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  12. Precipitation sensitivity to alloy composition in Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic steels developed for reduced activation for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Special austenitic steels are being designed in which alloying elements like Mo, Nb, and Ni are replaced with Mn, W, V, Ti, and/or Ta to reduce the long-term radioactivity induced by fusion reactor irradiation. However, the new steels still need to have properties otherwise similar to commercial steels like type 316. Precipitation strongly affects strength and radiation-resistance in austenitic steels during irradiation at 400--600/degree/C, and precipitation is also usually quite sensitive to alloy composition. The initial stage of development was to define a base Fe-Cr-Mn-C composition that formed stable austenite after annealing and cold-working, and resisted recovery or excessive formation of coarse carbide and intermetallic phases during elevated temperature annealing. These studies produced a Fe-12Cr-20Mn-0.25C base alloy. The next stage was to add the minor alloying elements W, Ti, V, P, and B for more strength and radiation-resistance. One of the goals was to produce fine MC precipitation behavior similar to the Ti-modified Fe-Cr-Ni prime candidate alloy (PCA). Additions of Ti+V+P+B produced fine MC precipitation along network dislocations and recovery/recrystallization resistance in 20% cold worked material aged at 800/degree/C for 166h, whereas W, Ti, W+Ti, or Ti+P+B additions did not. Addition of W+Ti+V+P+B also produced fine MC, but caused some σ phase formation and more recrystallization as well. 29 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs

  13. Five-parameter crystallographic characteristics of the interfaces formed during ferrite to austenite transformation in a duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghdadi, N.; Cizek, P.; Hodgson, P. D.; Tari, V.; Rohrer, G. S.; Beladi, H.

    2018-05-01

    The crystallography of interfaces in a duplex stainless steel having an equiaxed microstructure produced through the ferrite to austenite diffusive phase transformation has been studied. The five-parameter interface character distribution revealed a high anisotropy in habit planes for the austenite-ferrite and austenite-austenite interfaces for different lattice misorientations. The austenite and ferrite habit planes largely terminated on (1 1 1) and (1 1 0) planes, respectively, for the austenite-ferrite interfaces associated with Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) and Nishiyama-Wasserman (N-W) orientation relationships. This was mostly attributed to the crystallographic preference associated with the phase transformation. For the austenite-ferrite interfaces with orientation relationships which are neither K-S nor N-W, both austenite and ferrite habit planes had (1 1 1) orientations. Σ3 twin boundaries comprised the majority of austenite-austenite interfaces, mostly showing a pure twist character and terminating on (1 1 1) planes due to the minimum energy configuration. The second highest populated austenite-austenite boundary was Σ9, which tended to have grain boundary planes in the tilt zone due to the geometrical constraints. Furthermore, the intervariant crystallographic plane distribution associated with the K-S orientation relationship displayed a general tendency for the austenite habit planes to terminate with the (1 1 1) orientation, mainly due to the crystallographic preference associated with the phase transformation.

  14. Surface Modification of Titanium with Heparin-Chitosan Multilayers via Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Y.; Zou, J.; Ou, G.; Wang, L.; Li, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM), like biomimetic surface modification of titanium implants, is a promising method for improving its biocompatibility. In this paper chitosan (Chi) and heparin (Hep) multilayer was coated on pure titanium using a layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique. The Hep-Chi multilayer growth was carried out by first depositing a single layer of positively charged poly-L-lysine (PLL) on the NaOH-treated titanium substrate (negatively charged surface), followed by alternate deposition of negatively charged Hep and positively charged Chi, and terminated by an outermost layer of Chi. The multilayer was characterized by DR-FTIR, SEM, and AFM, and osteoblasts were cocultured with the modified titanium and untreated titanium surfaces, respectively, to evaluate their cytocompatibility in vitro. The results confirmed that Hep-Chi multilayer was fabricated gradually on the titanium surface. The Hep-Chi multilayer-coated titanium improved the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Thus, the approach described here may provide a basis for the preparation of modified titanium surfaces for use in dental or orthopedic implants

  15. Dynamic mechanical properties of straight titanium alloy arch wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusy, R P; Wilson, T W

    1990-10-01

    Eight straight-wire materials were studied: an orthodontic titanium-molybdenum (Ti-Mo) product, TMA; three orthodontic nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) products, Nitinol, Titanal, and Orthonol; three prototype alloys, a martensitic, an austenitic, and a biphasic alloy; and a hybrid shape-memory-effect product, Biometal. Each wire was prepared with a length-to-cross-sectional area of at least 3600 cm-1. With an Autovibron Model DDV-II-C used in the tensile mode, each sample was scanned from -120 to +200 degrees C at 2 degrees C/min. From the data base, plots of the log storage modulus, log tan delta, and percent change in length vs. temperature were generated. Results showed that the dynamic mechanical properties of the alloys within this TI system are quite different. The Ti-Mo alloy, TMA, was invariant with temperature, having a modulus of 7.30 x 10(11) dyne/cm2 (10.6 x 10(6) psi). The three cold-worked alloys--Nitinol, Titanal, and Orthonol--appeared to be similar, having a modulus of 5.74 x 10(11) dyne/cm2 (8.32 x 10(6) psi). The biphasic shape-memory alloy displayed a phase transformation near ambient temperature; whereas the hybrid shape-memory product, Biometal, underwent a 3-5% change in length during its transformation between 95 and 125 degrees C. Among the Ni-Ti wires tested, several different types of alloys were represented by this intermetallic material.

  16. Nitrogen contribution to tribological behaviour improvement of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corre, Y.; Lebrun, J.P.; Douet, M.

    1996-01-01

    Titanium an titanium alloys are more used materials in mechanical applications. A low density and very interesting mechanical characteristics present these materials as a first choice in many fields (aeronautics, automobile precision mechanics, biomedical...). Nevertheless, their poor tribological qualities often negate them as a friction surface. Modifying their surface properties is thus a real concern. The introduction of nitrogen on the surface enables a significant improvement to the tribological behaviour of these materials. Nitrogen ionic implantation is a technique used in titanium alloy surface treatment. Industrial applications of this process are numerous (biomedical, aeronautics...) but the limitations its (essentially treatment depth) prevent its use in certain cases. The increase in treatment temperature can overcome these limitations. Thus, the analysis of the properties obtained after treatment at various temperatures (20 deg. C) enables us to find the best compromise between metallurgic, geometrical properties (surface condition, deformation) and friction properties. This compromise enables us to solve a majority of tribological problems of titanium alloys. (authors). 7 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs., 1 photo

  17. Evidence of antibacterial activity on titanium surfaces through nanotextures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seddiki, O.; Harnagea, C. [INRS – Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Levesque, L.; Mantovani, D. [Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering (CRC-I), Dept Min-Met-Materials Engineering and Research Center CHU-Quebec, Laval University, Quebec City (Canada); Rosei, F., E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca [INRS – Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Center for Self-Assembled Chemical Structures, McGill University, H3A 2K6 Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Nosocomial infections (Nis) are a major concern for public health. As more and more of the pathogens responsible for these infections are antibiotic resistant, finding new ways to overcome them is a major challenge for biomedical research. We present a method to reduce Nis spreading by hindering bacterial adhesion in its very early stage. This is achieved by reducing the contact interface area between the bacterium and the surface by nanoengineering the surface topography. In particular, we studied the Escheria Coli adhesion on titanium surfaces exhibiting different morphologies, that were obtained by a combination of mechanical polishing and chemical etching. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) characterization revealed that the titanium surface is modified at both micro- and nano-scale. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the surfaces have the same composition before and after piranha treatment, consisting mainly of TiO{sub 2}. Adhesion tests showed a significant reduction in bacterial accumulation on nanostructured surfaces that had the lowest roughness over large areas. SEM images acquired after bacterial culture on different titanium substrates confirmed that the polished titanium surface treated one hour in a piranha solution at a temperature of 25 °C has the lowest bacterial accumulation among all the surfaces tested. This suggests that the difference observed in bacterial adhesion between the different surfaces is due primarily to surface topography.

  18. Modification of titanium electrodes by a noble metal deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devilliers, D.; Mahe, E. [Pierre et Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France). Laboratoire LI2C, UMR CNRS

    2008-07-01

    Titanium is commonly used as a substrate for dimensionally stable anodes (DSAs) because it is corrosion-resistant in acid media and because a passive titanium oxide (TiO2) film can be formed on the surface. This paper reported on a study in which titanium substrates were first covered by anodization with a TiO2 layer. The electrochemical properties of the Ti/TiO2 electrodes were investigated. The modification of the substrates by cathodic electrodeposition of a noble metal was described. The reactivity of the Ti/TiO2/Pt structures were illustrated by impedance spectroscopy experiments. The impedance studies performed with Ti/ TiO2 electrodes in the presence of a redox couple in solution (Fe3+/Fe2+ system in sulphuric acid) showed that the electronic transfer is very slow. It was concluded that the deposition of a noble metal coating on Ti/TiO2 substrates leads to modified titanium electrodes that exhibit electrocatalytic behaviour versus specific electrochemical reactions. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  19. Evidence of antibacterial activity on titanium surfaces through nanotextures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddiki, O.; Harnagea, C.; Levesque, L.; Mantovani, D.; Rosei, F.

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial infections (Nis) are a major concern for public health. As more and more of the pathogens responsible for these infections are antibiotic resistant, finding new ways to overcome them is a major challenge for biomedical research. We present a method to reduce Nis spreading by hindering bacterial adhesion in its very early stage. This is achieved by reducing the contact interface area between the bacterium and the surface by nanoengineering the surface topography. In particular, we studied the Escheria Coli adhesion on titanium surfaces exhibiting different morphologies, that were obtained by a combination of mechanical polishing and chemical etching. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) characterization revealed that the titanium surface is modified at both micro- and nano-scale. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the surfaces have the same composition before and after piranha treatment, consisting mainly of TiO 2 . Adhesion tests showed a significant reduction in bacterial accumulation on nanostructured surfaces that had the lowest roughness over large areas. SEM images acquired after bacterial culture on different titanium substrates confirmed that the polished titanium surface treated one hour in a piranha solution at a temperature of 25 °C has the lowest bacterial accumulation among all the surfaces tested. This suggests that the difference observed in bacterial adhesion between the different surfaces is due primarily to surface topography.

  20. Osteoblast growth behavior on porous-structure titanium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yuan; Ding Siyang; Peng Hui; Lu Shanming; Wang Guoping; Xia Lu; Wang Peizhi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Micro-arc oxidation technology formed a porous feature on titanium surface. ► This porous surface accelerated adhesion, proliferation and differentiation compared with smooth surface. ► Osteogenesis-related proteins and genes were up regulated by this porous surface. ► It is anticipated that micro-arc oxidation surface could enhance osteoblastic activity and bone regeneration. - Abstract: A bioavailable surface generated by nano-technology could accelerate implant osteointegration, reduce healing time and enable implants to bear early loading. In this study, a nano-porous surface of titanium wafers was modified using micro-arc oxidation technique; surface of smooth titanium was used as control group. Surface characteristic was evaluated by investigating morphology, roughness and hydrophilicity of titanium wafers. In vitro studies, osteoblastic adhesion, proliferation and ALP activity, as well as gene and protein expressions relative to mineralization were assayed. Our results showed that a crater-liked nano-porous surface with greater roughness and better hydrophilicity were fabricated by micro-arc oxidation. It was further indicated that nano-porous surface could enhance adhesion, proliferation and ALP activity of osteoblasts compared with smooth surfaces. In addition, gene and protein expression of collagen-I, osteocalcin and osteopontin were also obviously increased. In summary, micro-arc oxidized techniques could form an irregular nano-porous morphology on implant surface which is favorable to improve osteoblastic function and prospected to be a potent modification of dental implant.

  1. Tribological Properties of Surface-Textured and Plasma-Nitrided Pure Titanium Under Oil Lubrication Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baosen; Dong, Qiangsheng; Ba, Zhixin; Wang, Zhangzhong; Shi, Hancheng; Xue, Yanting

    2018-01-01

    Plasma nitriding was conducted as post-treatment for surface texture on pure titanium to obtain a continuous nitriding layer. Supersonic fine particles bombarding (SFPB) was carried out to prepare surface texture. The surface morphologies and chemical composition were analyzed using scanning electron microscope and energy disperse spectroscopy. The microstructures of modified layers were characterized by transmission electron microscope. The tribological properties of surface-textured and duplex-treated pure titanium under oil lubrication condition were systematically investigated in the ball-on-plate reciprocating mode. The effects of applied load and sliding velocity on the tribological behavior were analyzed. The results show that after duplex treatments, the grains size in modified layer becomes slightly larger, and hardness is obviously improved. Wear resistance of duplex-treated pure titanium is significantly improved referenced to untreated and surface-textured pure titanium, which is 3.22 times as much as untreated pure titanium and 2.15 times of that for surface-textured pure titanium, respectively.

  2. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, M; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; A Iglič; Mazare, A; Schmuki, P; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Mozetič, M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO 2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO 2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO 2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties. (topical review)

  3. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, M.; Mazare, A.; Gongadze, E.; Perutkova, Š.; Kralj-Iglič, V.; Milošev, I.; Schmuki, P.; Iglič, A.; Mozetič, M.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  4. Determination of local carbon content in austenite during intercritical annealing of dual phase steels by PEELS analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Junceda, A.; Caballero, F.G.; Capdevila, C.; Garcia de Andres, C.

    2007-01-01

    Parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy has allowed to analyse and quantify local variations in the carbon concentration of austenite islands transformed during the intercritical annealing treatment of commercial dual-phase steels. These changes in the carbon content of different austenite regions are responsible for the different volume fractions of tempered martensite, martensite and retained austenite obtained after intercritical annealing and overaging treatment. This technique reveals how carbon distribution in austenite evolves as the transformation process advances

  5. Model for the interaction between interface migration and carbon diffusion during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite and interface migration during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures is modeled, assuming the same chemical potential of carbon in martensite and austenite at the interface and allowing the motion of the phase interface when a free-energy difference occurs. The simulations show that the motion of the martensite-austenite interface can be significant and can takes place in either direction

  6. SCC of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels exposed to PWR primary water conditions: susceptibility to initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herms, E.; Raquet, O.; Sejourne, L.; Vaillant, F.

    2009-01-01

    Heavily cold-worked austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304L and 316L types) could be significantly susceptible to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) when exposed to PWR nominal primary water conditions even in absence of any pollutants. Susceptibility to SCC was shown to be related with some conditions such as initial hardness, procedure of cold-work or dynamic straining. A dedicated program devoted to better understand the initiation stage on CW austenitic stainless steels in PWR water is presented. Initiation is studied thanks to SCC test conditions leading to an intergranular cracking propagation mode on a CW austenitic stainless steel which is the mode generally reported after field experience. SCC tests are carried out in typical primary water conditions (composition 1000 ppm B and 2 ppm Li) and for temperature in the range 290 - 340 C. Material selected is 316L cold-worked essentially by rolling (reduction in thickness of 40%). Initiation tests are carried out under various stress levels with the aim to investigate the evolution of the initiation period versus the value of applied stress. SCC tests are performed on cylindrical notched specimens in order to increase the applied stress and allow accelerated testing without modify the exposure conditions to strictly nominal hydrogenated PWR water. Respective influences of cyclic/dynamic conditions on SCC initiation are presented and discussed. Dedicated interrupted tests help to investigate the behaviour of the crack initiation process. These SCC tests have shown that crack initiation could be obtained after a very short time under dynamic loading conditions on heavily pre-strained austenitic stainless steels. Actual results show that the most limiting stage of the cracking process on CW 316L seems to be the transition from slow transgranular propagation of surface initiated cracks to intergranular fast propagation through the thickness of the sample. The duration of this stage during crack initiation tests is

  7. The mechanical stability of retained austenite in low-alloyed TRIP steel under shear loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondé, R., E-mail: r.j.p.blonde@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Jimenez-Melero, E., E-mail: enrique.jimenez-melero@manchester.ac.uk [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Zhao, L., E-mail: lie.zhao@tudelft.nl [Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Schell, N., E-mail: norbert.schell@hzg.de [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max Planck Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Brück, E., E-mail: e.h.bruck@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Zwaag, S. van der, E-mail: s.vanderzwaag@tudelft.nl [Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands); Dijk, N.H. van, E-mail: n.h.vandijk@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-01-31

    The microstructure evolution during shear loading of a low-alloyed TRIP steel with different amounts of the metastable austenite phase and its equivalent DP grade has been studied by in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction. A detailed powder diffraction analysis has been performed to probe the austenite-to-martensite transformation by characterizing simultaneously the evolution of the austenite phase fraction and its carbon concentration, the load partitioning between the austenite and the ferritic matrix and the texture evolution of the constituent phases. Our results show that for shear deformation the TRIP effect extends over a significantly wider deformation range than for simple uniaxial loading. A clear increase in average carbon content during the mechanically-induced transformation indicates that austenite grains with a low carbon concentration are least stable during shear loading. The observed texture evolution indicates that under shear loading the orientation dependence of the austenite stability is relatively weak, while it has previously been found that under tensile load the {110}〈001〉 component transforms preferentially. The mechanical stability of retained austenite in TRIP steel is found to be a complex interplay between the interstitial carbon concentration in the austenite, the grain orientation and the load partitioning.

  8. Simulation of the Growth of Austenite from As-Quenched Martensite in Medium Mn Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyan, Fei; Yan, Jia-Yi; Höglund, Lars; Ågren, John; Borgenstam, Annika

    2018-04-01

    As part of an ongoing development of third-generation advanced high-strength steels with acceptable cost, austenite reversion treatment of medium Mn steels becomes attractive because it can give rise to a microstructure of fine mixture of ferrite and austenite, leading to both high strength and large elongation. The growth of austenite during intercritical annealing is crucial for the final properties, primarily because it determines the fraction, composition, and phase stability of austenite. In the present work, the growth of austenite from as-quenched lath martensite in medium Mn steels has been simulated using the DICTRA software package. Cementite is added into the simulations based on experimental observations. Two types of systems (cells) are used, representing, respectively, (1) austenite and cementite forming apart from each other, and (2) austenite forming on the cementite/martensite interface. An interfacial dissipation energy has also been added to take into account a finite interface mobility. The simulations using the first type of setup with an addition of interfacial dissipation energy are able to reproduce the observed austenite growth in medium Mn steels reasonably well.

  9. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming B.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-10-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe-22.7Cr-2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride precipitates were formed firstly close to the surface and later throughout the sample with austenitic structure. Chromium-rich nitride precipitates with a rod or strip-like morphology was developed by a discontinuous cellular precipitation mechanism. STEM-EDS analysis demonstrated partitioning of metallic elements between austenite and nitrides, with chromium contents of about 80 wt.% in the precipitates. XRD analysis indicated that the Chromium-rich nitride precipitates are hexagonal (Cr, Mo)2N. Based on the TEM studies, (Cr, Mo)2N precipitates presented a (1 1 1)γ//(0 0 2)(Cr, Mo)2N, ?γ//?(Cr, Mo)2N orientation relationship with respect to the austenite matrix. EBSD studies revealed that the austenite in the regions that have transformed into austenite and (Cr, Mo)2N have no orientation relation to the untransformed austenite.

  10. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure investigation of nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    As-delivered austenitic stainless steel and nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite, both fully nitrided and denitrided (in H2), were investigated with Cr, Fe and Ni extended X-ray absorption fine structure. The data shows pronounced short-range ordering of Cr and N. For the denitrided specimen...

  11. Strain hardening of cold-rolled lean-alloyed metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papula, Suvi [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Anttila, Severi [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Talonen, Juho [Outokumpu Oyj, P.O. Box 245, FI-00181 Helsinki (Finland); Sarikka, Teemu; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2016-11-20

    Mechanical properties and strain hardening of two pilot-scale lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels having metastable austenite phase, present at 0.50 and 0.30 volume fractions, have been studied by means of tensile testing and nanoindentation. These ferritic-austenitic stainless steels have high strain-hardening capacity, due to the metastable austenite phase, which leads to an improved uniform elongation and higher tensile strength in comparison with most commercial lean duplex stainless steels. According to the results, even as low as 0.30 volume fraction of austenite seems efficient for achieving nearly 40% elongation. The austenite phase is initially the harder phase, and exhibits more strain hardening than the ferrite phase. The rate of strain hardening and the evolution of the martensite phase were found to depend on the loading direction: both are higher when strained in the rolling direction as compared to the transverse direction. Based on the mechanical testing, characterization of the microstructure by optical/electron microscopy, magnetic balance measurements and EBSD texture analysis, this anisotropy in mechanical properties of the cold-rolled metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels can be explained by the elongated dual-phase microstructure, fiber reinforcement effect of the harder austenite phase and the presence and interplay of rolling textures in the two phases.

  12. Strain direction dependency of martensitic transformation in austenitic stainless steels: The effect of gamma-texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilkhuijsen, P.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile tests on both a non-textured and a highly textured, fully austenitic stainless steel were performed in both the rolling and the transverse directions. Both materials show mechanically induced phase transformation from the austenitic FCC to the martensitic BCC phase. Differences in

  13. Effect of austenite deformation temperature on Nb clustering and precipitation in microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereloma, E.V.; Kostryzhev, A.G.; AlShahrani, A.; Zhu, C.; Cairney, J.M.; Killmore, C.R.; Ringer, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of thermomechanical processing conditions on Nb clustering and precipitation in both austenite and ferrite in a Nb–Ti microalloyed steel was studied using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. A decrease in the deformation temperature increased the Nb-rich precipitation in austenite and decreased the extent of precipitation in ferrite. Microstructural mechanisms that explain this variation are discussed

  14. Empirical Formulae for The Calculation of Austenite Supercooled Transformation Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzaska J.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents empirical formulae for the calculation of austenite supercooled transformation temperatures, basing on the chemical composition, austenitising temperature and cooling rate. The multiple regression method was used. Four equations were established allowing to calculate temperature of the start area of ferrite, perlite, bainite and martensite at the given cooling rate. The calculation results obtained do not allow to determine the cooling rate range of ferritic, pearlitic, bainitic and martensite transformations. Classifiers based on logistic regression or neural network were established to solve this problem.

  15. Pulsed magnetic welding application of fast breeder austenitic pins plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallizzi, H.; Colombe, G.

    1986-11-01

    For specific nuclear needs, we had to develop pulsed magnetic welding on high resistivity coefficient alloys as austenitic steels. The magnetic force produced by an explosive inductor is transmitted on weld pieces by the use of an aluminium driver. A theoretical work carried out permitted to compare pulsed magnetic welding with explosive welding. With specific recordings, it was possible to study electrical and magnetical behavior during the active welding phase. By means of these informations, we are able to specify and to realize, with the financial help of ANVAR organization, a low impedance high velocity generator permitting to weld with a non destructible inductor. 6 refs [fr

  16. Grain boundary precipitation in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.R.; Howell, P.R.; Ralph, B.

    The precipitation of second phase particles of niobium carbide in an austenitic stainless steel is shown to be considerably influenced by the degree of deformation introduced prior to the ageing treatment. Sites for the nucleation of second phase particles are identified and the importance of one type of nucleation site, extrinsic dislocations, to the evolution of the final boundary precipitate distributions is emphasized. Further, it is shown that the presence of a grain boundary can effect precipitation processes for some considerable distance into the matrix on either side of the boundary. (author)

  17. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with the corresponding incubation period 2.5 min.

  18. Decomposition kinetics of expanded austenite with high nitrogen contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the decomposition kinetics of synthesized homogeneous expanded austenite formed by gaseous nitriding of stainless steel AISI 304L and AISI 316L with nitrogen contents up to 38 at.% nitrogen. Isochronal annealing experiments were carried out in both inert (N2) and reducing (H2......) atmospheres. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetry were applied for identification of the decomposition reactions and X-ray diffraction analysis was applied for phase analysis. CrN precipitated upon annealing; the activation energies are 187 kJ/mol and 128 kJ/mol for AISI 316L and AISI 304L...

  19. Alkaline stress corrosion of iron-nickel-chromium austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocquellet, Dominique

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the behaviour in stress corrosion of austenitic iron-nickel-chromium alloys by means of tensile tests at imposed strain rate, in a soda solution at 50 pc in water and 350 degrees C. The author shows that the mechanical-chemical model allows the experimental curves to be found again, provided the adjustment of characteristic parameters, on the one hand, of corrosion kinetics, and on the other hand, of deformation kinetics. A classification of the studied alloys is proposed [fr

  20. Creep properties and microstructure of the new wrought austenitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasak, T.; Hakl, J.; Novak, P. [SVUM a.s., Prague (Czech Republic); Vyrostkova, A. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia). Inst. of Materials Research

    2010-07-01

    The contribution is oriented on the new wrought austenitic steel BGA4 (Cr23Ni15Mn6Cu3W1.5NbVMo) developed by the British Corus Company. Our main aim is to present creep properties studied in SVUM a.s. Prague during COST 536 programme. The dependencies of the creep strength, strength for specific creep strain and minimum creep strain rate were evaluated on the basis of long term creep tests carried out at temperature interval (625; 725) C. Important part of a paper is metallographic analysis. (orig.)

  1. The compatibility of various austenitic steels with molten sodium (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champeix, L.; Sannier, J.; Darras, R.; Graff, W.; Juste, P.

    1963-01-01

    Various techniques for studying corrosion by molten sodium have been developed and applied to the case of 18/10 austenitic steels. The results obtained are discussed as a function of various parameters: type of steel, temperature, oxygen content of the sodium, surface treatment, welds, mechanical strain. In general, these steels have an excellent resistance to sodium when the oxygen content is limited by a simple purification system of the 'cold trap' type, and when an attempt is made to avoid cavitation phenomena which are particularly dangerous, as is shown by the example given. (authors) [fr

  2. Resistance Element Welding of Magnesium Alloy/austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manladan, S. M.; Yusof, F.; Ramesh, S.; Zhang, Y.; Luo, Z.; Ling, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-material design is increasingly applied in the automotive and aerospace industries to reduce weight, improve crash-worthiness, and reduce environmental pollution. In the present study, a novel variant of resistance spot welding technique, known as resistance element welding was used to join AZ31 Mg alloy to 316 L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated. It was found that the nugget consisted of two zones, including a peripheral fusion zone on the stainless steel side and the main fusion zone. The tensile shear properties of the joints are superior to those obtained by traditional resistance spot welding.

  3. The tensile properties of austenitic steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Elevated temperature tensile data on Mo containing and Mo free austenitic weld metals have been collected from French, German and UK sources and the results analysed. In the as welded condition the proof strength is significantly higher than that of wrought material and Mo containing weld metal is stronger than Mo free weld metal. The differences in UTS values are not so marked, and on average at temperatures above 400 0 the weld metal UTS is slightly lower than that of wrought material. The ductility of weld metal is significantly lower than that for wrought material. 7 refs, 2 tables, 20 figs

  4. Residual stresses associated with welds in austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, R.

    1978-01-01

    Two exploratory welds have been made with AISI 316 austenitic steel and Armex GT electrodes by the manual metal-arc process, and residual stress measurements made in the as-welded condition and after various periods of stress relief. The results show that substantial stress relief occurs at temperatures of 850 0 and 750 0 C after 1 hr, but is not complete. The stress distributions are compared with those obtained from ferritic welds and the effect of differences in thermal expansion coefficients is examined using finite element analysis. (author)

  5. Void swelling behaviour of austenitic stainless steel during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Zhongqi; Xiao Hong; Peng Feng; Ti Zhongxin

    1994-04-01

    The irradiation swelling behaviour of 00Cr17Ni14Mo2 austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L) was investigated by means of high voltage electron microscope. Results showed that in solution annealed condition almost no swelling incubation period existed, and the swelling shifted from the transition period to the steady-state one when the displacement damage was around 40 dpa. In cold rolled condition there was evidently incubation period, and when the displacement damage was up to 84 dpa the swelling still remained in the transition period. The average size and density of voids in both conditions were measured, and the factors, which influenced the void swelling, were discussed. (3 figs.)

  6. Failures of austenitic stainless steel components during storage: Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, B.K.; Rastogi, P.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Kulkarni, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    Three studies of failures of austenitic stainless steel components during storage are described. In all cases, stress corrosion cracking was the failure mode by the action of residual stress alone. However, the source of residual stress was different for each case. Case 1 was the failure of a sample tube header for a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). In Case 2, a heat exchanger shell failed during a hydrotest in a fertilizer plant. Cases concerned the cracking of type 304L plates used for spent fuel pool lining of a nuclear power station

  7. The characteristics creep fracture of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.; Assis, A.M.C.A.

    1977-05-01

    The characteristics of fracture on creep of two AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steels tested at constant load from 600 to 800 0 C were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The morphological aspects of the fracture were analysed and correllated to the ductility level attained in creep. A marked change from intergranular to transgranular type of fracture was observed in going from 600 to 800 0 C. At 800 0 C on the other hand, the condition for crack nucleation at sigma phase as well as the special conditions of oxidation, are apparently responsible for that same change with the applied stress. (Author) [pt

  8. Kinetic of martensitic transformations induced by hydrogen in the austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio P. de; Saavedra, A.; Miranda, P.E.V. de

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray diffractometry technique was used, with an automatic data acquisition system to determine the kinetics of hydrogen induced martensitic phase transformations in an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel type, used in nuclear power plants. Hydrogenation was performed cathodically in a 1N sulfuric acid solution, containing 100 mg/l of arsenic trioxide, at 50 0 C, during 2 hours and with a current density of 200 A/m 2 . It was found that the microstructure of the steel plays a role on the generation of hydrogen induced martensitic phases and surface micro cracks. Both kinetics were slower on a pre-cold rolled steel. (Author) [pt

  9. Mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.

    1978-03-01

    A detailed review of the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in liquid sodium is presented. Consideration has been given to the influence of the of the impurities in reactor sodium and metallurgical variables upon the stress rupture life, the low cycle fatigue and combined creep/fatigue resistance, elastic-plastic crack propagation rates, the high cycle fatigue life, tensile properties and fracture toughness. The effects of exposure to contaminated sodium prior to testing are also discussed. Examples of the success of mechanistic interpretations of materials behaviour in sodium are given and additionally, the extent to which mechanical properties in sodium may be predicted with the use of appropriate data. (author)

  10. Facile hydrothermal preparation of titanium dioxide decorated reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Betty Yea Sze; Huang, Nay Ming; An’amt, Mohd Nor; Marlinda, Abdul Rahman; Norazriena, Yusoff; Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat; Harrison, Ian; Lim, Hong Ngee; Chia, Chin Hua

    2012-01-01

    A simple single-stage approach, based on the hydrothermal technique, has been introduced to synthesize reduced graphene oxide/titanium dioxide nanocomposites. The titanium dioxide nanoparticles are formed at the same time as the graphene oxide is reduced to graphene. The triethanolamine used in the process has two roles. It acts as a reducing agent for the graphene oxide as well as a capping agent, allowing the formation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution (~20 nm). Transmission electron micrographs show that the nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the reduced graphene oxide nanosheet. Thermogravimetric analysis shows the nanocomposites have an enhanced thermal stability over the original components. The potential applications for this technology were demonstrated by the use of a reduced graphene oxide/titanium dioxide nanocomposite-modified glassy carbon electrode, which enhanced the electrochemical performance compared to a conventional glassy carbon electrode when interacting with mercury(II) ions in potassium chloride electrolyte. PMID:22848166

  11. Microstructure and local texture evolution by plasma nitriding in a 316L austenitic stainless steel and consequences on its fatigue durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinville, Jean-Charles

    2010-01-01

    The present study concerns the surface and mechanical properties induced by specific low temperature (∼400 C) plasma nitriding of an AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel largely used for structural component in nuclear and chemical industries. It focuses especially on its influence on the fatigue durability. The great advantages of this plasma nitriding process are to produce thick nitrided layers with a high concentration of nitrogen atoms in solid solution into the material and to preserve the stainless character of the substrate. As a consequence a new phase named expanded austenite or γ N phase is formed and the lattice expansion associated with the high supersaturation of interstitial nitrogen atoms results in residual compressive stresses at the surface that exceed 2 GPa. The surface is then strongly modified as a result of complex effects including some crystallographic plane rotation, plasticity and damage in some grains depending on their orientation. The considerable increase of hardness and wear resistance produced by plasma nitriding of austenitic stainless steels is now well documented but there are practically no data on the influence on fatigue properties. Series of fatigue tests in air at room temperature carried out in the low cycle fatigue range show a significant improvement of the fatigue life. The results are discussed especially taking into account the compressive residual stresses induced by the nitrided layer. (authors)

  12. Titanium pigmentation. An electron probe microanalysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupre, A.; Touron, P.; Daste, J.; Lassere, J.; Bonafe, J.L.; Viraben, R.

    1985-01-01

    A patient had an unusual pigmentary disease induced by titanium dioxide. The use of a topical cream containing titanium dioxide caused a xanthomalike appearance on the patient's penis. Electron probe microanalysis was valuable in establishing the cause of this balanitis

  13. Austenite reversion in low-carbon martensitic stainless steels – a CALPHAD-assisted review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niessen, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Low-carbon martensitic stainless steels with 11.5–16 wt-% Cr and martensite upon inter-critical annealing. The review treats...... the mechanisms governing the formation and stabilisation of reverted austenite and is assisted by the computation of phase equilibria. Literature data on Cr and Ni concentrations of the reverted austenite/martensite dual-phase microstructure are assessed with respect to predicted concentrations. Reasonable...... agreement was found for concentrations in martensite. Systematic excess of Cr in austenite of approx. 2 wt-% relative to calculations was suspected to originate from the growth of M23C6 with a coherent interface to austenite. Within large scatter, measured values of Ni in austenite were on average 2 wt...

  14. Printing of Titanium implant prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiria, Florencia Edith; Shyan, John Yong Ming; Lim, Poon Nian; Wen, Francis Goh Chung; Yeo, Jin Fei; Cao, Tong

    2010-01-01

    Dental implant plays an important role as a conduit of force and stress to flow from the tooth to the related bone. In the load sharing between an implant and its related bone, the amount of stress carried by each of them directly related to their stiffness or modulus. Hence, it is a crucial issue for the implant to have matching mechanical properties, in particular modulus, between the implant and its related bone. Titanium is a metallic material that has good biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Whilst the modulus of the bulk material is still higher than that of bone, it is the lowest among all other commonly used metallic implant materials, such as stainless steel or cobalt alloy. Hence it is potential to further reduce the modulus of pure Titanium by engineering its processing method to obtain porous structure. In this project, porous Titanium implant prototype is fabricated using 3-dimensional printing. This technique allows the flexibility of design customization, which is beneficial for implant fabrication as tailoring of implant size and shape helps to ensure the implant would fit nicely to the patient. The fabricated Titanium prototype had a modulus of 4.8-13.2 GPa, which is in the range of natural bone modulus. The compressive strength achieved was between 167 to 455 MPa. Subsequent cell culture study indicated that the porous Titanium prototype had good biocompatibility and is suitable for bone cell attachment and proliferation.

  15. Enhancing anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation of titanium surface by sequential immobilization of poly(ethylene glycol) and collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Hou, Yan-Hua; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and collagen I were sequentially immobilized on the titanium surface to simultaneously improve the anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that PEG and collagen I were successfully immobilized on the titanium surface. Water contact angle results suggested the excellent hydrophilic surface after the immobilization. The anticoagulation experiments demonstrated that the immobilized PEG and collagen I on the titanium surface could not only obviously prevent platelet adhesion and aggregation but also prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), leading to the improved blood compatibility. Furthermore, immobilization of collagen to the end of PEG chain did not abate the anticoagulation. As compared to those on the pristine and PEG-modified titanium surfaces, endothelial cells exhibited improved proliferative profiles on the surface modified by the sequential immobilization of PEG and collagen in terms of CCK-8 assay, implying that the modified titanium may promote endothelialization without abating the blood compatibility. Our method may be used to modify the surface of blood-contacting biomaterials such as titanium to promote endothelialization and improve the anticoagulation, it may be helpful for development of the biomedical devices such as coronary stents, where endothelializaton and excellent anticoagulation are required.

  16. Phase transformation changes in thermocycled nickel-titanium orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzins, David W; Roberts, Howard W

    2010-07-01

    In the oral environment, orthodontic wires will be subject to thermal fluctuations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermocycling on nickel-titanium (NiTi) wire phase transformations. Straight segments from single 27 and 35 degrees C copper NiTi (Ormco), Sentalloy (GAC), and Nitinol Heat Activated (3M Unitek) archwires were sectioned into 5mm segments (n=20). A control group consisted of five randomly selected non-thermocycled segments. The remaining segments were thermocycled between 5 and 55 degrees C with five randomly selected segments analyzed with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC; -100150 degrees C at 10 degrees C/min) after 1000, 5000, and 10,000 cycles. Thermal peaks were evaluated with results analyzed via ANOVA (alpha=0.05). Nitinol HA and Sentalloy did not demonstrate qualitative or quantitative phase transformation behavior differences. Significant differences were observed in some of the copper NiTi transformation temperatures, as well as the heating enthalpy with the 27 degrees C copper NiTi wires (p<0.05). Qualitatively, with increased thermocycling the extent of R-phase in the heating peaks decreased in the 35 degrees C copper NiTi, and an austenite to martensite peak shoulder developed during cooling in the 27 degrees C copper NiTi. Repeated temperature fluctuations may contribute to qualitative and quantitative phase transformation changes in some NiTi wires. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Novel Quercetin Titanium Dioxide-Decorated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposite on Bacillus subtilis Biofilm Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S. Raie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was targeted to design a surface against cell seeding and adhering of bacteria, Bacillus subtilis. A multi-walled carbon nanotube/titanium dioxide nano-power was produced via simple mixing of carbon nanotube and titanium dioxide nanoparticles during the sol-gel process followed by heat treatment. Successfully, quercetin was immobilized on the nanocomposite via physical adsorption to form a quercetin/multi-walled carbon nanotube/titanium dioxide nanocomposite. The adhesion of bacteria on the coated-slides was verified after 24 h using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Results indicated that the quercetin/multi-walled carbon nanotube/titanium dioxide nanocomposite had more negativity and higher recovery by glass surfaces than its counterpart. Moreover, coating surfaces with the quercetin-modified nanocomposite lowered both hydrophilicity and surface-attached bacteria compared to surfaces coated with the multi-walled carbon nanotubes/titanium dioxide nanocomposite.

  18. Anodic growth of titanium dioxide nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of producing nanostructures of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) by anodisation of titanium (Ti) in an electrochemical cell, comprising the steps of: immersing a non-conducting substrate coated with a layer of titanium, defined as the anode, in an electrolyte solution...... an electrical contact to the layer of titanium on the anode, where the electrical contact is made in the electrolyte solution...

  19. Impact Strength of Austenitic and Ferritic-Austenitic Cr-Ni Stainless Cast Steel in -40 and +20°C Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandyk B.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies described in this paper relate to common grades of cast corrosion resistant Cr-Ni steel with different matrix. The test materials were subjected to heat treatment, which consisted in the solution annealing at 1060°C followed by cooling in water. The conducted investigations, besides the microstructural characteristics of selected cast steel grades, included the evaluation of hardness, toughness (at a temperature of -40 and +20oC and type of fracture obtained after breaking the specimens on a Charpy impact testing machine. Based on the results of the measured volume fraction of ferrite, it has been found that the content of this phase in cast austenitic steel is 1.9%, while in the two-phase ferritic-austenitic grades it ranges from 50 to 58%. It has been demonstrated that within the scope of conducted studies, the cast steel of an austenitic structure is characterised by higher impact strength than the two-phase ferritic-austenitic (F-A grade. The changing appearance of the fractures of the specimens reflected the impact strength values obtained in the tested materials. Fractures of the cast austenitic Cr-Ni steel obtained in these studies were of a ductile character, while fractures of the cast ferritic-austenitic grade were mostly of a mixed character with the predominance of brittle phase and well visible cleavage planes.

  20. Effect of small addition of Cr on stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Rumana; Pahlevani, Farshid, E-mail: f.pahlevani@unsw.edu.au; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2017-03-15

    High carbon steels with dual phase structures of martensite and austenite have considerable potential for industrial application in high abrasion environments due to their hardness, strength and relatively low cost. To design cost effective high carbon steels with superior properties, it is crucial to identify the effect of Chromium (Cr) on the stability of retained austenite (RA) and to fully understand its effect on solid-state phase transition. This study addresses this important knowledge gap. Using standard compression tests on bulk material, quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, nano-indentation on individual austenitic grains, transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction–based orientation microscopy techniques, the authors investigated the effect of Cr on the microstructure, transformation behaviour and mechanical stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel, with varying Cr contents. The results revealed that increasing the Cr %, altered the morphology of the RA and increased its stability, consequently, increasing the critical pressure for martensitic transformation. This study has critically addressed the elastoplastic behaviour of retained austenite – and provides a deep understanding of the effect of small additions of Cr on the metastable austenite of high carbon steel from the macro- to nano-level. Consequently, it paves the way for new applications for high carbon low alloy steels. - Highlights: • Effect of small addition of Cr on metastable austenite of high carbon steel from the macro- to nano-level • A multi-scale study of elastoplastic behaviour of retained austenite in high carbon steel • The mechanical stability of retained austenite during plastic deformation increased with increasing Cr content • Effect of grain boundary misorientation angle on hardness of individual retained austenite grains in high carbon steel.

  1. Fatigue life evaluation method of austenitic stainless steel in PWR water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Katsumi; Nomura, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Shigeki; Kanasaki, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Makoto

    2006-09-01

    It is known that the fatigue life in elevated temperature water is substantially reduced compared with that in the air. The fatigue life reduction has been investigated experimentally in EFT project of Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) to evaluate the environmental effect on fatigue life. Many tests have been done for carbon, low alloy, stainless steels and nickel-based alloy under the various conditions. In this paper, the results of the stainless steel in simulated PWR water environments were reported. Fatigue life tests in simulated PWR environments were carried out and the effect of key parameters on fatigue life reduction was examined. The materials used in this study were base and weld metal of austenitic stainless steel SS316, weld metal of SS304 and the base and aged metal of the duplex stainless steel SCS14A. In order to evaluate the effects of stain amplitude, strain rate, strain ratio, temperature, aging, water flow rate and strain holding time, many fatigue tests were examined. In transient condition in an actual plant, however, such parameters as temperature and strain rate are not constant. In order to evaluate fatigue damage in actual plant on the basis of experimental results under constant temperature and strain rate condition, the modified rate approach method was developed. Various kinds of transient have to be taken into account of in actual plant fatigue evaluation, and stress cycle of several ranges of amplitude has to be considered in assessing damage from fatigue. Generally, cumulative usage factor is applied in this type of evaluation. In this study, in order to confirm the applicability of modified rate approach method together with cumulative usage factor, fatigue tests were carried out by combining stress cycle blocks of different strain amplitude levels, in which strain rate changes in response to temperature in a simulated PWR water environment. Consequently, fatigue life could be evaluated with an accuracy of factor of 3

  2. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions on cathodic arc plasma-treated titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu W

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wei Zhu,1 George Teel,1 Christopher M O’Brien,1 Taisen Zhuang,1 Michael Keidar,1 Lijie Grace Zhang1–3 1Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3Department of Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Surface modification of titanium for use in orthopedics has been explored for years; however, an ideal method of integrating titanium with native bone is still required to this day. Since human bone cells directly interact with nanostructured extracellular matrices, one of the most promising methods of improving titanium’s osseointegration involves inducing biomimetic nanotopography to enhance cell–implant interaction. In this regard, we explored an approach to functionalize the surface of titanium by depositing a thin film of textured titanium nanoparticles via a cathodic arc discharge plasma. The aim is to improve human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC attachment and differentiation and to reduce deleterious effects of more complex surface modification methods. Surface functionalization was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle testing, and specific protein adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination demonstrate the deposition of titanium nanoparticles and the surface roughness change after coating. The specific fibronectin adsorption was enhanced on the modified titanium surface that associates with the improved hydrophilicity. MSC adhesion and proliferation were significantly promoted on the nanocoated surface. More importantly, compared to bare titanium, greater production of total protein, deposition of calcium mineral, and synthesis of alkaline phosphatase were observed from MSCs on nanocoated titanium after 21 days. The method described herein presents a promising alternative method for inducing more cell favorable nanosurface for improved orthopedic applications

  3. Uranium fluorides analysis. Titanium spectrophotometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Titanium determination in uranium hexafluoride in the range 0.7 to 100 microgrammes after transformation of uranium fluoride in sulfate. Titanium is separated by extraction with N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine, reextracted by hydrochloric-hydrofluoric acid. The complex titanium-N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine is extracted by chloroform. Spectrophotometric determination at 400 nm [fr

  4. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or on...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.2575 Section 73.2575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  7. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2) Color...

  8. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891, shall...

  9. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  10. Analysis of creep effective stress in austenitic heat resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, In Duck; Nam, Ki Woo

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the comparison of calculated effective stress with experimental one in austenitic heat resistant steels, STS310J1TB and STS310S with and without a small amount of Nb and N. Based on a solute atoms diffusion model, contribution from soluble nitrogen to the high-temperature strength was numerically examined for austenitic heat-resisting Fe-Cr-Ni-N(STS310J1TB) and Fe-Cr-Ni(STS310S) alloys. The solute atmosphere dragging stress of dislocation was calculated in optional dislocation velocity of STS310J1TB and STS310S at 650 degree C, 675 degree C and 700 degree C. As a result of the numerical calculation, the solute atmosphere dragging stress of STS310J1TB was about 50 times larger than that of STS310S. When the temperature became high, the maximum value of solute atmosphere dragging stress was small and the velocity of moving dislocation was fast. From the relationship between the dislocation rate and the solute atmosphere dragging stress, the relation of both was proportional and the inclination is about 1 in the level with low velocity of moving dislocation. From above results, the mechanism of dislocation movement in STS310J1TB was the solute atmosphere dragging stress. The solute atmosphere dragging stress, which was calculated from the numerical calculation was close to the effect stress in stress relaxation tests

  11. Peculiarities of austenitic state in premartensitic temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.

    1982-01-01

    A review of works on the study of austenite behaviour in premartensitic temperature range carried out using the investigation methods of resistance to microplastic deformation, mechanical properties and internal friction, is presented. The investigation is carried out using carbon-free iron-nickel alloy N31, alloy 40N24 and alloy 50Kh20N10. It is established that in premartensitic temperature range at a certain temperature Msub(elast.) exceeding by approximately 35 deg C the starting temperature of martensitic transformation, austenite state changes sharply: mechanical instability as to microplastic deformation appears. It manifests itself in an anomalous decrease of resistance to microplastic deformation at the temperature approaching the beginning of martensitic transformation. Martensitic transformation develops under tension in an elastic region. At the temperature above Msub(elast.) martensitic transformation develops only under the effect of plastic deformation. Decrease of temperature of martensitic transformation start as a result of microplastic deformation and subsequent ageing is connected with blocking of possible places of martensite initiation

  12. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  13. Fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in different environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Yawas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid and wet steam corrosive media has been investigated. The immersion time in the corrosive media was 30 days to simulate the effect on stainless steel structures/equipment in offshore and food processing applications and thereafter annealing heat treatment was carried out on the samples. The findings from the fatigue tests show that seawater specimens have a lower fatigue stress of 0.5 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the heat treated sample and 0.1 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the unheat-treated sample compared to the corresponding hydrochloric acid and steam samples. The post-welding heat treatment was found to increase the mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steel especially tensile strength but it reduces the transformation and thermal stresses of the samples. These findings were further corroborated by the microstructural examination of the stainless steel specimen.

  14. Monitoring of Fatigue Degradation in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkhof, D.; Niffenegger, M.; Leber, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    During cyclic loading of austenitic stainless steel, it was observed that microstructural changes occurred; these affect both the mechanical and physical properties of the material. For certain steels, a strain-induced martensite phase transformation was seen. The investigations showed that, for the given material and loading conditions, the volume fraction of martensite depends on the cycle number, temperature and initial material state. It was also found that the martensite content continuously increased with the cycle number. Therefore, the volume fraction of martensite was used as an indication of fatigue usage. It was noted that the temperature dependence of the martensite formation could be described by a Boltzmann function, and that the martensite content decreased with increasing temperature. Two different heats of the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiTi18-10 (AISI 321, DIN 1.4541) were investigated. It was found that the martensite formation rate was much higher for the cold-worked than for the solution-annealed material. All applied techniques - neutron diffraction and advanced magnetic methods - were successful in detecting the presence of martensite in the differently fatigued specimens. (author)

  15. Study of irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etienne, A. [GPM UMR CNRS 6634, Universite et INSA de Rouen (France); Material Department, University of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Pareige, P.; Radiguet, B. [GPM UMR CNRS 6634, Universite et INSA de Rouen (France); Cunningham, N.J.; Odette, G.O. [Material Department, University of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Pokor, C. [EDF RD, departement MMC, site des Renardieres, Moret-sur-Loing (France)

    2011-07-01

    Chemical analyses using Atom Probe Tomography were performed on a bolt made of cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steel, extracted from the internal structures of a pressurized water reactor after seventeen years of reactor service. The irradiation temperature of these samples was 633 K and the irradiation dose was estimated to 12 dpa. These analyses have shown that neutron irradiation has a strong effect on the intragranular distribution of solute atoms. A very high number density (6.10{sup 23} m{sup -3}) of Ni-Si enriched and Cr-Fe depleted clusters was detected after irradiation. In order to bring complementary experimental results and to determine the mechanism of formation of these Ni-Si nano-clusters, Fe{sup 5+} ion irradiations have been performed on a 316 austenitic stainless steel. As after neutron irradiation, the formation of solute enriched features is observed. Linear features and two kinds of clusters, rounded and torus shaped, are present. Considering that solute enriched features are probably formed by radiation induced segregation on point defect sinks, these different shapes are due to the nature of the sinks where segregation occurs. (authors)

  16. Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water was studied. The IASCC failure has been considered as a degradation phenomenon potential not only in the present light water reactors but rather common in systems where the materials are exposed simultaneously to radiation and water environments. In this study, effects of the material and environmental factors on the IASCC of austenitic stainless steels were investigated in order to understand the underlying mechanism. The following three types of materials were examined: a series of model alloys irradiated at normal water-cooled research reactors (JRR-3M and JMTR), the material irradiated at a spectrally tailored mixed-spectrum research reactor (ORR), and the material sampled from a duct tube of a fuel assembly used in the experimental LMFBR (JOYO). Post-irradiation stress corrosion cracking tests in a high-temperature water, electrochemical corrosion tests, etc., were performed at hot laboratories. Based on the results obtained, analyses were made on the effects of alloying/impurity elements, irradiation/testing temperatures and material processing, (i.e., post-irradiation annealing and cold working) on the cracking behavior. On the basis of the analyses, possible remedies against IASCC in the core internals were discussed from viewpoints of complex combined effects among materials, environment and processing factors. (author). 156 refs.

  17. Peculiarities of austenitic state in premartensitic temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.

    A review of works on the study of austenite behaviour in premartensitic temperature range carried out using the investigation methods of resistance to microplastic deformation, mechanical properties and internal friction, is presented. The investigation is carried out using carbon-free iron-nickel alloy N31, alloy 40N24 and alloy 50Kh20N10. It is established that in premartensitic temperature range at a certain temperature Msub(elast.) exceeding by approximately 35 deg C the starting temperature of martensitic transformation austenite state changes sharply: mechanical instability as to microplastic deformation appears. It manifests itself in an anomalous decrease of resistance to microplastic deformation at the temperature approaching the beginning of martensitic transformation. Martensitic transformation develops under tension in an elastic region. At the temperature above Msub(elast.) martensitic transformation develops only under the effect of plastic deformation. Decrease of temperature of martensitic transformation start as a result of microplastic deformation and subsequent ageing is connected with blocking of possible places of martensite initiation.

  18. Osteoblastic response to pectin nanocoating on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna, E-mail: kagu@sund.ku.dk [Research Center for Ageing and Osteoporosis, Departments of Medicine and Diagnostics, Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Ndr. Ringvej 57, 2600 Glostrup (Denmark); Institute of Odontology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Nørre Allé 20, 2200 Copenhagen N (Denmark); Svava, Rikke [Department of Plant Environment Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Copenhagen Center for Glycomics, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen N (Denmark); Yihua, Yu; Haugshøj, Kenneth Brian [Microtechnology and Surface Analysis, Danish Technological Institute, Gregersensvej 8, 2630 Taastrup (Denmark); Dirscherl, Kai [Dansk Fundamental Metrologi A/S, Matematiktorvet 307, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Levery, Steven B. [Copenhagen Center for Glycomics, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen N (Denmark); Byg, Inge [Department of Plant Environment Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Damager, Iben [Novozymes A/S, Krogshoejvej 36, 2880 Bagsvaerd (Denmark); Nielsen, Martin W. [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Matematiktorvet, Building 301, Kgs. Lyngby DK-2800 (Denmark); Jørgensen, Bodil [Department of Plant Environment Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Jørgensen, Niklas Rye [Research Center for Ageing and Osteoporosis, Departments of Medicine and Diagnostics, Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Ndr. Ringvej 57, 2600 Glostrup (Denmark); and others

    2014-10-01

    Osseointegration of titanium implants can be improved by organic and inorganic nanocoating of the surface. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of organic nanocoating of titanium surface with unmodified and modified pectin Rhamnogalacturonan-Is (RG-Is) isolated from potato and apple with respect to surface properties and osteogenic response in osteoblastic cells. Nanocoatings on titanium surfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of coated RG-Is on cell adhesion, cell viability, bone matrix formation and mineralization was tested using SaOS-2 cells. Nanocoating with pectin RG-Is affected surface properties and in consequence changed the environment for cellular response. The cells cultured on surfaces coated with RG-Is from potato with high content of linear 1.4-linked galactose produced higher level of mineralized matrix compared with control surfaces and surfaces coated with RG-I with low content of linear 1.4-linked galactose. The study showed that the pectin RG-Is nanocoating not only changed chemical and physical titanium surface properties, but also specific coating with RG-Is containing high amount of galactan increased mineralized matrix formation of osteoblastic cells in vitro. - Highlights: • Surface nanocoating with plant-derived Rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) is proposed. • Titanium surface became more hydrophilic after RG-Is nanocoating. • RG-Is with high galactose content resulted in high level of mineralized matrix. • RG-I is a new candidate for improvement of bone healing and osseointegration.

  19. The titanium oxide phi system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galehouse, D. C.; Davis, S. P.

    1980-01-01

    The phy system of titanium oxide has been studied in emission in the near-infrared, with the Fourier transform spectrometer at a resolution of 8000,000. Approximately 3000 lines from 25 bands of this system have been identified, including all five 0-0 and 0-1 bands corresponding to the five natural titanium isotopes. Eleven vibrational levels have been observed, and all bands have been rotationally analyzed. Band intensities are agreement with known isotopic abundances and calculated Franck-Condon factors.

  20. Micro-XRD and temperature-modulated DSC investigation of nickel-titanium rotary endodontic instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapati, Satish B; Brantley, William A; Iijima, Masahiro; Schricker, Scott R; Nusstein, John M; Li, Uei-Ming; Svec, Timothy A

    2009-10-01

    Employ Micro-X-ray diffraction and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry to investigate microstructural phases, phase transformations, and effects of heat treatment for rotary nickel-titanium instruments. Representative as-received and clinically used ProFile GT and ProTaper instruments were principally studied. Micro-XRD analyses (Cu Kalpha X-rays) were performed at 25 degrees C on areas of approximately 50 microm diameter near the tip and up to 9 mm from the tip. TMDSC analyses were performed from -80 to 100 degrees C and back to -80 degrees C on segments cut from instruments, using a linear heating and cooling rate of 2 degrees C/min, sinusoidal oscillation of 0.318 degrees C, and period of 60s. Instruments were also heat treated 15 min in a nitrogen atmosphere at 400, 500, 600 and 850 degrees C, and analyzed. At all Micro-XRD analysis regions the strongest peak occurred near 42 degrees , indicating that instruments were mostly austenite, with perhaps some R-phase and martensite. Tip and adjacent regions had smallest peak intensities, indicative of greater work hardening, and the intensity at other sites depended on the instrument. TMDSC heating and cooling curves had single peaks for transformations between martensite and austenite. Austenite-finish (A(f)) temperatures and enthalpy changes were similar for as-received and used instruments. Heat treatments at 400, 500 and 600 degrees C raised the A(f) temperature to 45-50 degrees C, and heat treatment at 850 degrees C caused drastic changes in transformation behavior. Micro-XRD provides novel information about NiTi phases at different positions on instruments. TMDSC indicates that heat treatment might yield instruments with substantial martensite and improved clinical performance.

  1. Helium trapping at Ti-rich MC particles in Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    Helium trapping by Ti-rich MC particles is characterized by first, the formation of a high concentration of tiny cavities at the interfaces and secondly, a cavity denuded zone that extends into the surrounding matrix. Very few cavities form on other phases in the system when MC is present. The trapping is effective in HFIR from at least 370 to 600 0 C. The phases produced in unmodified steel do not exhibit this type of strong helium trapping. This trapping helps minimize the swelling for a given amount of helium. Compositionally, MC is strongly enriched in Ti, Mo, V, and Nb and depleted in Si, Ni, Cr, and Fe, both thermally and after irradiation in HFIR. The compositional behavior of MC is unusual because phases that are stabilized by irradiation are generally enriched in Si and/or Ni. The data are obtained using quantitative x-ray EDS for particles on extraction replicas. The microstructural and compositional information is examined with respect to concepts or trends from several theories to begin to understand the nature of the helium trapping

  2. The difference in thermal and mechanical stabilities of austenite between carbon- and nitrogen-added metastable austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumura, Takuro; Nakada, Nobuo; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Takaki, Setsuo; Koyano, Tamotsu; Adachi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of carbon and nitrogen addition on the stability of austenite, athermal and deformation-induced α′-martensitic transformation behaviors were investigated using type 304-metastable austenitic stainless steels containing 0.1 mass% carbon or nitrogen. The difference in the development of the deformation microstructure in particular is discussed in terms of the stacking-fault energy (SFE). Since carbon-added steel has a lower SFE than that of nitrogen-added steel, deformation twins and ε-martensite were preferentially formed in the carbon-added steel, whereas a dislocation cell structure developed in the nitrogen-added steel. Crystallographic analysis using the electron backscatter diffraction method revealed that the difference in the deformation microstructure has a significant influence on the growth behavior of deformation-induced α′-martensite, that is, the interface of the deformation twins and ε-martensite suppresses the growth of α′-martensite, whereas dislocation cell boundaries are not effective. As a result, the mechanical stability of carbon-added steel is slightly higher than that of nitrogen-added steel, although the thermal stabilization effect of carbon is much lower than that of nitrogen

  3. Effect of Ge, Sn, Sb on the resistance to swelling of austenitic alloys irradiated by 1 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubuisson, P.; Levy, V.; Seran, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of new solute elements namely Ge, Sn and Sb on the void swelling resistance of austenitic alloys irradiated with 1 MeV electrons has been studied. Except for tin in Ti-modified 316, all solute improve the swelling resistance of base alloys. Tin addition shifts the swelling peak of 316 S.S. to high temperature. In fact, these solute additions have the same qualitative effect on the swelling components: they enhance the void density and decrease strongly void growth rate. This effect is opposite to the one of usual swelling inhibitors such as Si or Ti which decrease the void density. We have explained this influence on the void nucleation and void growth by introducing a strong interaction between vacancies and solute atoms in a void growth model

  4. Evaluation of neutron irradiation effect on SCC crack growth behaviour for austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used as structural components in reactor pressure vessel internals because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation results in changes in microstructure, mechanical properties and microchemistry of the steels. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) caused by the effect of neutron irradiation during long term plant operation in high temperature water environments is considered to take the form of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the critical fluence level has been reported to be about 5x10{sup 24}n/m{sup 2} (E>1MeV) in Type 304 stainless steel in BWR environment. JNES had been conducting IASCC project during the JFY (2000) - JFY (2008) period, and prepared an engineering database on IASCC. However, the data of Crack Growth Rate (CGR) below the critical fluence level are not sufficient. So, this project was initiated to obtain the CGR data below the critical fluence level. Test specimens have been irradiated in the Halden reactor, operating by the OECD Halden Reactor Project, and the post irradiation examination (PIE) will be conducted from JFY (2011) to JFY (2013), finally the modified IASCC guide will be prepared in JFY (2013). (author)

  5. Low cycle fatigue strength of austenitic stainless steel under large strain regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Michiya; Saito, Kiyoshi; Matsuura, Shinichi

    1998-01-01

    In order to establish realistic seismic safety of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to clarify the failure mode of each components and prepare a damage evaluation method. The authors have proposed the damage evaluation method based on the fully numerical approach to evaluate the low cycle fatigue (LCF) failure under seismic loadings. This method has been validated by comparison with the dynamic failure tests of thin elbows which should be the one of the important components of the FBR primary piping system. However, since there exists limited LCF data, fatigue lives under large strain regime have been extrapolated by available fatigue data. In this study, LCF tests have been conducted over a large strain range from 2% to 10% on austenitic stainless steel SUS304. From the results, the regressive LCF curve has been proposed to modify the Wada's best-fit LCF curve under large strain regime. The usage factors calculated by author's numerical approach using proposed LCF curve have been improved to correct the underestimation of the fatigue damage. (author)

  6. Evaluation of neutron irradiation effect on SCC crack growth behaviour of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used as structural materials alloy in reactor pressure vessel internal components because of their high strength, ductility and fracture toughness. However, exposure due to neutron irradiation results in changes in microstructure, mechanical properties and microchemistry of the material. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) caused by the effect of neutron irradiation during long term operation in high temperature water environments in nuclear power plants is considered to take the form of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the critical fluence level has been reported to be about 5x10{sup 24}n/m{sup 2} (E>1MeV) for Type 304 SS in BWR environment. JNES had been conducting IASCC project during from JFY 2000 to JFY 2008, and prepared an engineering database on IASCC. However, the data of crack growth rate (CGR) below the critical fluence level are not sufficient. Therefore, evaluation of neutron irradiation effect project (ENI) was initiated to obtain the CGR data below the critical fluence level, and prepare the SCC growth rate diagram for life time evaluation of core shroud. Test specimens have been irradiated in the OECD/Halden reactor, and the post irradiation experiments (PIE) have been conducting during from JFY 2011 to JFY 2013, finally the modified IASCC guide will be prepared in JFY 2013. (author)

  7. Modeling of Microstructure Evolution in Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated Under Light Water Reactor Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, J.; Stoller, R.E.; Was, G.S.

    1998-01-01

    A model for the development of microstructure during irradiation in fast reactors has been adapted for light water reactor (LWR) irradiation conditions (275 approximately 325 C, up to approximately10 dpa). The original model was based on the rate-theory, and included descriptions of the evolution of both dislocation loops and cavities. The model was modified by introducing in-cascade interstitial clustering, a term to account for the dose dependence of this clustering, and mobility of interstitial clusters. The purpose of this work was to understand microstructural development under LWR irradiation with a focus on loop nucleation and saturation of loop density. It was demonstrated that in-cascade interstitial clustering dominates loop nucleation in neutron irradiation in LWRS. Furthermore it was shown that the dose dependence of in-cascade interstitial clustering is needed to account for saturation behavior as commonly observed. Both quasi-steady-state (QSS) and non-steady-state (NSS) solutions to the rate equations were obtained. The difference between QSS and NSS treatments in the calculation of defect concentration is reduced at LWR temperature when in-cascade interstitial clustering dominates loop nucleation. The mobility of interstitial clusters was also investigated and its impact on loop density is to reduce the nucleation term. The ultimate goal of this study is to combine the evolution of microstructure and microchemistry together to account for the radiation damage in austenitic stainless steels

  8. Tribological behavior of an austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L nitrurated by DC-pulsed plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Las Heras, E; Walther, F; Corengia, P.A; Quinteiro, M.O; Cabo, A; Bruhl, S; Sommadossi, S

    2004-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in different applications because they withstands corrosion. Ionic nitruration has proven to be an adequate technique for modifying this type of steel, in order to improve its resistance to wear without diminishing its resistance to corrosion. While many publications have reported improvements in the tribological properties of the nitrurated AISI 316, systematic studies that evaluate this behavior using industrial equipment for its thermochemical treatment are of interest. This work studied the tribological behavior of an AISI 316L steel nitrurated by DC pulsed plasma in an industrial machine in an atmosphere of 25% N 2 and 75% H 2 for 20 h at 400 o C by means of abrasion tests under different conditions in an A 135 Amsler-disk machine. In order to characterize the abraded samples microhardness, optic and scanning electron microscopy profiles to determine the abrasion mechanisms were performed. The results showed substantial improvement in the abrasion resistance of the nitrurated samples compared to the non nitrurated ones and the different abrasion mechanisms are discussed to explain the test results (CW)

  9. In-situ observation of weld joint of austenitic stainless steel due to helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, S.; Hojou, K.; Hishinuma, A.

    1992-01-01

    Microstructural evolution during helium ions irradiation in a weld metal containing 10% delta-ferrite of a weld joint of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel were in-situ observed through a transmission electron microcopy. Very fine helium bubbles were observed in high number density in both a delta ferrite phase and a matrix to a dose of 3 x 10 19 ions·m -2 . Entirely different behavior appeared in both phases with increasing dose. Bubbles in a delta-ferrite phase were readily converted into voids during slight increment of dose, and these rapidly grew with additional increasing of dose. On the other hand, finer bubbles in a matrix were very stable during irradiation and did not grow any more up to 2 x 10 20 ions·m -2 . Swelling became much larger in a delta-ferrite phase than in a fcc matrix phase, resultantly ; This means an inverse phenomenon for conventional results that swelling is smaller in a ferrite phase than in a fcc phase. Sigma phase radiation-enhanced precipitated at the grain boundary between a delta-ferrite phase and a matrix at a dose 9 x 10 19 ions·m -2 . This phase grew in two dimensions with increasing dose. The chemical composition of the sigma phase observed during irradiation showed Cr and Mo enrichment, and Fe and Ni depletion compared with those of a sigma phase thermally produced. (author)

  10. Effects of surface treatment on the cavitation erosion of high-chrome steel, zirconium, titanium and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinin, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    The erosion resistance of some structural materials used for equipment components of the first and second circuits of NPPs is studied under cavitation created by an ultrasonic vibrator. It appears that after various thermomechanical treatments (programmed loading, low-temperature rolling) and coating deposition (titanium, zirconium and titanium nitride), the erosion resistance of the materials under consideration increases and the plasticity value is not notably modified. The titanium coatings deposited onto the steel increase the corrosion-fatigue resistance in a sodium chloride environment, in several cases

  11. Surface modification of 17-4PH stainless steel by DC plasma nitriding and titanium nitride film duplex treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, F.; Leng, Y.X.; Huang, N.; Bai, B.; Zhang, P.Ch.

    2007-01-01

    17-4PH stainless steel was modified by direct current (DC) plasma nitriding and titanium nitride film duplex treatment in this study. The microstructure, wear resistance and corrosion resistance were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), pin-on-disk tribological test and polarization experiment. The results revealed that the DC plasma nitriding pretreatment was in favor of improving properties of titanium nitride film. The corrosion resistance and wear resistance of duplex treatment specimen was more superior to that of only coated titanium nitride film

  12. Study on the crystallographic orientation relationship and formation mechanism of reversed austenite in economical Cr12 super martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Dong; Li, Shaohong; Li, Jun; Jiang, Wen; Su, Jie; Zhao, Kunyu

    2015-01-01

    Effect of carbides and crystallographic orientation relationship on the formation mechanism of reversed austenite of economical Cr12 super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) has been investigated mainly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The results indicate that the M_2_3C_6 precipitation and the formation of the reversed austenite have the interaction effect during tempering process in SMSS. The reversed austenite forms intensively at the sub-block boundary and the lath boundary within a misorientation range of 0–60°. M_2_3C_6 has the same crystallographic orientation relationship with reversed austenite. There are two different kinds of formation modes for reversed austenite. One is a nondiffusional shear reversion; the other is a diffusion transformation. Both are strictly limited by crystallographic orientation relationship. The austenite variants are limited to two kinds within one packet and five kinds within one prior austenite grain. - Highlights: • Reversed austenite forms at martensite boundaries with misorientation of 0–60° • M_2_3C_6 precipitation and reversed austenite formation have the interaction effect. • Two austenite variants with different orientations can be formed inside a packet. • Two reversed austenite formation modes: shear reversion; diffusion transformation

  13. Study on the crystallographic orientation relationship and formation mechanism of reversed austenite in economical Cr12 super martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Dong; Li, Shaohong; Li, Jun; Jiang, Wen [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Su, Jie [Institute for Structural Materials, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhao, Kunyu, E-mail: kyzhaoy@sina.com [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Effect of carbides and crystallographic orientation relationship on the formation mechanism of reversed austenite of economical Cr12 super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) has been investigated mainly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The results indicate that the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation and the formation of the reversed austenite have the interaction effect during tempering process in SMSS. The reversed austenite forms intensively at the sub-block boundary and the lath boundary within a misorientation range of 0–60°. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} has the same crystallographic orientation relationship with reversed austenite. There are two different kinds of formation modes for reversed austenite. One is a nondiffusional shear reversion; the other is a diffusion transformation. Both are strictly limited by crystallographic orientation relationship. The austenite variants are limited to two kinds within one packet and five kinds within one prior austenite grain. - Highlights: • Reversed austenite forms at martensite boundaries with misorientation of 0–60° • M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation and reversed austenite formation have the interaction effect. • Two austenite variants with different orientations can be formed inside a packet. • Two reversed austenite formation modes: shear reversion; diffusion transformation.

  14. Effect of Prior Austenite Grain Size on the Morphology of Nano-Bainitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kritika; Kumar, Avanish; Singh, Aparna

    2018-04-01

    The strength in nanostructured bainitic steels primarily arises from the fine platelets of bainitic ferrite embedded in carbon-enriched austenite. However, the toughness is dictated by the shape and volume fraction of the retained austenite. Therefore, the exact determination of processing-morphology relationships is necessary to design stronger and tougher bainite. In the current study, the morphology of bainitic ferrite in Fe-0.89C-1.59Si-1.65Mn-0.37Mo-1Co-0.56Al-0.19Cr (wt pct) bainitic steel has been investigated as a function of the prior austenite grain size (AGS). Specimens were austenitized at different temperatures ranging from 900 °C to 1150 °C followed by isothermal transformation at 300 °C. Detailed microstructural characterization has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the bainitic laths transformed in coarse austenite grains are finer resulting in higher hardness, whereas smaller austenite grains lead to the formation of thicker bainitic laths with a large fraction of blocky type retained austenite resulting in lower hardness.

  15. A new effect of retained austenite on ductility enhancement in high strength bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ying; Zhang Ke; Guo Zhenghong; Chen Nailu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Rong Yonghua, E-mail: yhrong@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new DARA effect in the bainitic steel is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conditions of DARA effect are proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism of retained austenite on ductility enhancement is clarified. - Abstract: A designed high strength bainitic steel with considerable amount of retained austenite is presented in order to study the effect of retained austenite on the ductility enhancement in bainitic steels. Transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) effect is verified by both X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement of retained austenite fraction in various deformation stages and transmission electron microscopy observation of the deformed twin-type martensite. Results from XRD line profile analysis reveal that the average dislocation density in bainite during the deformation is lower than that before deformation, and such a phenomenon can be explained by a new effect, dislocations absorption by retained austenite (DARA) effect, based on our previous investigation of martensitic steels. DARA effect availably enhances the compatibility of deformation ability of bainite with retained austenite. In view of microstructure similarity of bainitic steels with martensitic steels, the conditions of DARA effect are proposed. The effects of retained austenite on the ductility enhancement in bainitic steels are clarified.

  16. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-02-26

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO₂ nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO₂-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants.

  17. Advances in cost effective processing of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, O.E.

    1993-01-01

    Recently an industry expert pointed out that one of the greatest hindrances to the growth of titanium usage has been the low percentage of material usable in the final product. Due to the extensive processing, forming, and machining operations typically performed on titanium, yield losses are high. This is especially true in aerospace applications where most titanium is used. In engine components, the start to finish ratio, known as the buy to fly ratio, is often as high as 7 to 1. This can be illustrated by looking at the use of titanium in Pratt and Whitney engines. In the JT-8D-217 used on Boeing's 737-200, the titanium buyweight is 5,385 pounds, whereas the finished titanium, flyweight is just 758 pounds. This start to finish ratio is 7.1:1, giving titanium 17.0% of total engine weight. (orig.)

  18. Effect of additional minor elements on accumulation behavior of point defects under electron irradiation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekio, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Shinichiro; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito

    2014-01-01

    Addition of minor elements to a base alloy is often applied with the aim of mitigating void swelling by decreasing the vacancy diffusivity and flux which influence vacancy accumulation behavior. However, the comparative evaluations of parameters, such as the diffusivity and flux, between a base alloy and modified alloys with specific additives have not been studied in detail. In this study, type 316 austenitic stainless steel as a base alloy and type 316 austenitic stainless steels modified with vanadium (V) or zirconium (Zr) additions were used to perform evaluations from the changes of widths of the void denuded zone (VDZ) formed near a random grain boundary during electron irradiation because these widths depend on vacancy diffusivity and flux. The formations of VDZs were observed in in-situ observations during electron irradiation at 723 K and the formed VDZ widths were measured from the transmission electron microscopic images after electron irradiation. As a result, the VDZs were formed in both steels without and with V, and respective widths were ∼119 and ∼100 nm. On the other hand, the VDZ formation was not observed clearly in the steel with Zr. From the measured VDZ widths in the steels without and with V addition, the estimated ratio of the vacancy diffusivity in the steel with V to that in the steel without V was about 0.50 and the estimated ratio of the vacancy flux in the steel with V to that in the steel without V was about 0.71. This result suggests that the effect of additional minor elements on vacancy accumulation behaviors under electron irradiation could be estimated from evaluations of the VDZ width changes among steels with and without minor elements. Especially, because void swelling is closely related with the vacancy diffusion process, the VDZ width changes would also be reflected on void swelling behavior. (author)

  19. On the S-phase formation and the balanced plasma nitriding of austenitic-ferritic super duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Willian R.; Kurelo, Bruna C. E. S.; Ditzel, Dair G.; Serbena, Francisco C.; Foerster, Carlos E.; de Souza, Gelson B.

    2018-03-01

    The different physical responses of austenite (γ) and ferrite (α) iron structures upon nitriding result in technical challenges to the uniform modification of α-γ materials, as the super duplex stainless steel (SDSS). The effects of voltage (7-10 kV), frequency and pulse width on the nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation of SDSS (α ∼ 56%, γ ∼ 44%) were investigated, correlated with structural, morphological and mechanical analyses. By controlling the treatment power, temperatures ranged from 292 °C to 401 °C. Despite the overall increase in hardness for any of the employed parameters (from ∼6 GPa to ∼15 GPa), the structure of individual grains was strikingly dissimilar at the same temperatures, depending on the energetic conditions of implantation. Modified-α grains containing iron nitrides (ε-Fe2-3N, γ‧ -Fe4N) presented intense brittleness, whereas the expanded phase γN (S-phase) laid principally in modified-γ grains, exhibiting ductile-like deformation features and thicker layers. The γN was the dominant phase in both α-γ grains at ∼401 °C, providing them with balanced structure and mechanical behavior. These phenomena corroborate with γN as mediator of the process, through a mechanism involving the nitrogen-promoted ferrite to austenite conversion and nitrides dissolution at high temperatures. An approximately linear correlation of the γN content with respect to the ion energy per pulse was demonstrated, which properly embodies limiting effects to the treatment. This can be a parameter for the α-γ steel surface modification, consisting in a better adjustment to obtain more precise control along with temperature.

  20. Lactobacillusassisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Anal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn eco-friendlylactobacillussp. (microbe assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40–60 nm are found.