WorldWideScience

Sample records for titanium liquid pools

  1. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M.; Donaldson, A.D.

    1991-03-19

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools is disclosed, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figures.

  2. A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M., Donaldson, A.D.

    1990-12-12

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figs.

  3. Liquid sodium pool fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casselman, C [DSN/SESTR, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1979-03-01

    Experimental sodium pool combustion results have led to a definition of the combustion kinetics, and have revealed the hazards of sodium-concrete contact reactions and the possible ignition of organic matter (paint) by hydration of sodium peroxide aerosols. Analysis of these test results shows that the controlling mechanism is sodium evaporation diffusion. (author)

  4. Liquid sodium pool fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casselman, C.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental sodium pool combustion results have led to a definition of the combustion kinetics, and have revealed the hazards of sodium-concrete contact reactions and the possible ignition of organic matter (paint) by hydration of sodium peroxide aerosols. Analysis of these test results shows that the controlling mechanism is sodium evaporation diffusion. (author)

  5. Shedding Light on Dark Liquidity Pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degryse, H.A.; van Achter, M.; Wuyts, G.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the recent developments on dark liquidity pools starting from the theoretical and empirical academic literature. The number of dark liquidity pools as well as their trading volume has grown substantially in the last couple of years. We highlight the incentives of providers as

  6. Numerical modelling of methanol liquid pool fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kuldeep; Li, Chiping; Kailasanath, K.; Ndubizu, Chuka; Ananth, Ramagopal; Tatem, P. A.

    1999-12-01

    The focus of this paper is on numerical modelling of methanol liquid pool fires. A mathematical model is first developed to describe the evaporation and burning of a two-dimensional or axisymmetric pool containing pure liquid methanol. Then, the complete set of unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations for reactive flows are solved in the gas phase to describe the convection of the fuel gases away from the pool surface, diffusion of the gases into the surrounding air and the oxidation of the fuel into product species. Heat transfer into the liquid pool and the metal container through conduction, convection and radiation are modelled by solving a modified form of the energy equation. Clausius-Clapeyron relationships are invoked to model the evaporation rate of a two-dimensional pool of pure liquid methanol. The governing equations along with appropriate boundary and interface conditions are solved using the flux-corrected transport algorithm. Numerical results exhibit a flame structure that compares well with experimental observations. Temperature profiles and burning rates were found to compare favourably with experimental data from single- and three-compartment laboratory burners. The model predicts a puffing frequency of approximately 12 Hz for a 1 cm diameter methanol pool in the absence of any air co-flow. It is also observed that increasing the air co-flow velocity helps in stabilizing the diffusion flame, by pushing the vortical structures away from the flame region.

  7. Pool type liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, B.M.

    1978-08-01

    Various technical aspects of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), specifically pool type LMFBR's, are summarized. The information presented, for the most part, draws upon existing data. Special sections are devoted to design, technical feasibility (normal operating conditions), and safety (accident conditions). A survey of world fast reactors is presented in tabular form, as are two sets of reference reactor parameters based on available data from present and conceptual LMFBR's. (auth)

  8. Drop Impact on to Moving Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Beatriz Natividad; Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of droplets on to moving liquid substrates is an omnipresent situation both in nature and industry. A diverse spectrum of phenomena emerges from this simple process. In this work we present a parametric experimental study that discerns the dynamics of the impact in terms of the physical properties of the fluid and the relative velocity between the impacting drop and the moving liquid pool. The behaviour ranges from smooth coalescence (characterized by little mixing) to violent splashing (generation of multiple satellite droplets and interfacial vorticity). In addition, transitional regimes such as bouncing and surfing are also found. We classify the system dynamics and show a parametric diagram for the conditions of each regime. This work was supported by the EPSRC (Grant EP/H018913/1), the Royal Society, Becas Santander Universidades and the International Relationships Office of the University of Extremadura.

  9. Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2013-11-19

    The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

  10. Titanium distribution in swimming pool water is dominated by dissolved species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Holbrook, R.; Motabar, Donna; Quiñones, Oscar; Stanford, Benjamin; Vanderford, Brett; Moss, Donna

    2013-01-01

    The increased use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO 2 ) in consumer products such as sunscreen has raised concerns about their possible risk to human and environmental health. In this work, we report the occurrence, size fractionation and behavior of titanium (Ti) in a children's swimming pool. Size-fractionated samples were analyzed for Ti using ICP-MS. Total titanium concentrations ([Ti]) in the pool water ranged between 21 μg/L and 60 μg/L and increased throughout the 101-day sampling period while [Ti] in tap water remained relatively constant. The majority of [Ti] was found in the dissolved phase (<1 kDa), with only a minor fraction of total [Ti] being considered either particulate or microparticulate. Simple models suggest that evaporation may account for the observed variation in [Ti], while sunscreen may be a relevant source of particulate and microparticule Ti. Compared to diet, incidental ingestion of nano-Ti from swimming pool water is minimal. -- Highlights: •Total titanium concentrations in unfiltered swimming pool water ranged between 21 and 60 μg/L. •Evaporation of the swimming pool water is suspected of causing a temporal increase in [Ti]. •The vast majority of Ti is found in the dissolved phase (<1 kD). •Swimming pools are not a significant Ti source for human exposure via ingestion. -- In children's swimming pool water, the majority of titanium is found in the dissolved phase

  11. Titanium distribution in swimming pool water is dominated by dissolved species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Holbrook, R; Motabar, Donna; Quiñones, Oscar; Stanford, Benjamin; Vanderford, Brett; Moss, Donna

    2013-10-01

    The increased use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in consumer products such as sunscreen has raised concerns about their possible risk to human and environmental health. In this work, we report the occurrence, size fractionation and behavior of titanium (Ti) in a children's swimming pool. Size-fractionated samples were analyzed for Ti using ICP-MS. Total titanium concentrations ([Ti]) in the pool water ranged between 21 μg/L and 60 μg/L and increased throughout the 101-day sampling period while [Ti] in tap water remained relatively constant. The majority of [Ti] was found in the dissolved phase (microparticulate. Simple models suggest that evaporation may account for the observed variation in [Ti], while sunscreen may be a relevant source of particulate and microparticule Ti. Compared to diet, incidental ingestion of nano-Ti from swimming pool water is minimal. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Initial surface deformations during impact on a liquid pool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, W.; Hendrix, M.H.W.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Snoeijer, Jacobus Hendrikus

    2015-01-01

    A tiny air bubble can be entrapped at the bottom of a solid sphere that impacts onto a liquid pool. The bubble forms due to the deformation of the liquid surface by a local pressure buildup inside the surrounding gas, as also observed during the impact of a liquid drop on a solid wall. Here, we

  13. 13 CFR 120.1715 - Seller's Pool Loan liquidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seller's Pool Loan liquidation. 120.1715 Section 120.1715 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Establishment of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1715 Seller...

  14. Afterlife of a Drop Impacting a Liquid Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhishek; Wei, Yanju; Tang, Xiaoyu; Law, Chung K.

    2017-11-01

    Drop impact on liquid pool is ubiquitous in industrial processes, such as inkjet printing and spray coating. While merging of drop with the impacted liquid surface is essential to facilitate the printing and coating processes, it is the afterlife of this merged drop and associated mixing which control the quality of the printed or coated surface. In this talk we will report an experimental study on the structural evolution of the merged droplet inside the liquid pool. First, we will analyze the depth of the crater created on the pool surface by the impacted drop for a range of impact inertia, and we will derive a scaling relation and the associated characteristic time-scale. Next, we will focus on the toroidal vortex formed by the moving drop inside the liquid pool and assess the characteristic time and length scales of the penetration process. The geometry of the vortex structure which qualitatively indicates the degree of mixedness will also be discussed. Finally, we will present the results from experiments with various viscosities to demonstrate the role of viscous dissipation on the geometry and structure formed by the drop. This work is supported by the Army Research Office and the Xerox Corporation.

  15. Thermal convection of liquid metal in the titanium reduction reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimurazov, A.; Frick, P.; Stefani, F.

    2017-06-01

    The structure of the convective flow of molten magnesium in a metallothermic titanium reduction reactor has been studied numerically in a three-dimensional non-stationary formulation with conjugated heat transfer between liquid magnesium and solids (steel walls of the cavity and titanium block). A nonuniform computational mesh with a total of 3.7 million grid points was used. The Large Eddy Simulation technique was applied to take into account the turbulence in the liquid phase. The instantaneous and average characteristics of the process and the velocity and temperature pulsation fields are analyzed. The simulations have been performed for three specific heating regimes: with furnace heaters operating at full power, with furnace heaters switched on at the bottom of the vessel only, and with switched-off furnace heaters. It is shown that the localization of the cooling zone can completely reorganize the structure of the large-scale flow. Therefore, by changing heating regimes, it is possible to influence the flow structure for the purpose of creating the most favorable conditions for the reaction. It is also shown that the presence of the titanium block strongly affects the flow structure.

  16. Thermohydraulic behavior of liquid metal pool submitted to electronic bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, Patrice

    1998-01-01

    This thesis deals with the thermohydraulics of liquid metal molten by an electron beam. We study the relationship between the liquid metal pool and the vapor rate. The aim is to find good conditions increasing the metal vapor rate. In first place, energy losses are identified. Mains are convection (buoyancy and thermo-capillary) strengthen by the deformation of the molten pool. The first action is to reduce the liquid interface deformation with a transient spot realized by scanning the electron beam. I find that in this case, the optimum vapor rate is obtained when the crossing time of the beam is smaller than characteristic time of formation of the cavity, but greater than the heating time of the surface. Secondly, I impose forces to change the morphology of the flow. Two actions are tried: magnetic field application and rotating motion of the crucible. External magnetic field application may reduce convective flow, by the creation of a magnetic brake. But in my experiment, magnetic field deteriorates electron beam before to be effective. Results obtained by the rotating motion of the crucible approve this choice to reduce energy losses and increase vapor rate. This growth of vapor rate is due to an expansion of the emitted vapor source and an increase of the central temperature of the molten pool. Nevertheless with the increase of the rotation velocity and after the optimum vapor rate, I note that the flow is not axisymmetric. My observation give to think about instabilities that are developed by baroclinic waves. The comparison of my works with the Eady's linear theory gives good results. (author) [fr

  17. Simplified analysis of trasients in pool type liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The conceptual design of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor will require a great effort of development in several technical disciplines. One of them is the thermal-hydraulic design of the reactor and of the heat and fluid transport components inside the reactor vessel. A simplified model to calculate the maximum sodium temperatures is presented in this paper. This model can be used to optimize the layout of components inside the reactor vessel and was easily programmed in a small computer. Illustrative calculations of two transients of a typical hot pool type fast reactor are presented and compared with the results of other researchers. (author) [pt

  18. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  19. The preparation, physicochemical properties, and the cohesive energy of liquid sodium containing titanium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Jun-ichi; Itami, Toshio; Ara, Kuniaki

    2012-01-01

    Liquid sodium containing titanium nanoparticles (LSnanop) of 10-nm diameter was prepared by dispersing titanium nanoparticles (2 at.% Ti) into liquid sodium with the addition of stirring and ultrasonic sound wave. The titanium nanoparticles themselves were prepared by the vapor deposition method. This new liquid metal, LSnanop, shows a remarkable stability due to the Brownian motion of nanoparticles in liquid sodium medium. In addition, the difference of measured heat of reaction to water between this LSnanop and liquid sodium indicates the existence of cohesive energy between the liquid sodium medium and dispersed titanium nanoparticles. The origin of the cohesive energy, which serves to stabilize this new liquid metal, was explained by the model of screened nanoparticles in liquid sodium. In this model, negatively charged nanoparticles with transferred electrons from liquid sodium are surrounded by the positively charged screening shell, which may inhibit the gathering of nanoparticles by the “Coulombic repulsion coating.” The atomic volume of LSnanop shows the shrinkage from the linear law, which also suggests the existence of cohesive energy. The viscosity of LSnanop is almost the same as that of liquid sodium. This behavior was explained by the Einstein equation. The surface tension of LSnanop is 17 % larger than that of liquid sodium. The cohesive energy and the negative adsorption may be responsible to this increase. Titanium nanoparticles in liquid sodium seem to be free from the Coulomb fission. This new liquid metal containing nanoparticles suggests the possibility to prepare various stable suspensions with new properties.

  20. Laser ablation of titanium in liquid in external electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, “Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University)”, 9 Institutskiy per., 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Barmina, E.V., E-mail: barminaev@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31, Kashirskoye Highway, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in liquid is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. • Applied cathodic bias leads to increase in average size of self-organized nanostructures formed upon ablation of titanium target. • Laser ablation of Ti target in external electric field results in generation of elongated titanium oxide nanoparticles. - Abstract: Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in water is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. It is demonstrated that both lateral size of nanostructures (NS) on Ti surface and their density depend on the electric field applied to the target. Scanning Electron Microscopy of NS reveals the shift of their size distribution function toward larger sizes with applied field (cathodic bias, 25 V DC). Density of mushroom-like NS with applied electric field amounts to 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}. X-ray diffraction of generated nanoparticles (NPs) shows difference in the crystallographic structure of NPs of non-stoichiometric Ti oxides generated with and without electric field. This conclusion is corroborated with the optical absorption spectroscopy of obtained colloids. Transmission Electron Microscopy of NPs also shows difference in morphology of particles produced with and without cathodic bias. The results are interpreted on the basis of instability of the melt on Ti surface in the electric field.

  1. Liquid-liquid mixing by gas injection in a pool configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.

    1994-02-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to study the mixing process of two immiscible liquids, in a pool configuration, by bottom gas injection. The apparatus consisted of a vertical pyrex conduit of 15.2 centimeters of internal diameter. To the lower part of the conduit was attached a porous plate through which the gas was injected. The experiments were photographically recorded. The pictures were digitized and a method was developed to quantify the mixing region thickness. This method requires knowledge of the void fraction, for each liquid, as a function of the superficial gas velocity. Because of this, void fraction was measured for the bubbly and churn flow regimes, in a pool configuration for every liquid. A new correlation, based on the drift flux model, is proposed for void fraction as a function of superficial gas velocity. It has been observed that mixing can start either in bubbly or churn flow regimes, depending on the liquid pair properties. Three mechanistic models were derived to aid in correlating the data, two for bubbly flow and one for churn flow. A transition region between these two flow regimes, was deduced, but not directly measured. A set of correlations was developed from the models and it is proposed to be implemented in current codes that model Molten Core Concrete Interactions (MCCI). The implications that the present work has on MCCI have been described. It can be deduced that mixing between the oxidic and the metallic phases will occur during the interaction

  2. Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Bedinger, George M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Titanium is a mineral commodity that is essential to the smooth functioning of modern industrial economies. Most of the titanium produced is refined into titanium dioxide, which has a high refractive index and is thus able to impart a durable white color to paint, paper, plastic, rubber, and wallboard. Because of their high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance, titanium metal and titanium metal alloys are used in the aerospace industry as well as for welding rod coatings, biological implants, and consumer goods.Ilmenite and rutile are currently the principal titanium-bearing ore minerals, although other minerals, including anatase, perovskite, and titanomagnetite, could have economic importance in the future. Ilmenite is currently being mined from two large magmatic deposits hosted in rocks of Proterozoic-age anorthosite plutonic suites. Most rutile and nearly one-half of the ilmenite produced are from heavy-mineral alluvial, fluvial, and eolian deposits. Titanium-bearing minerals occur in diverse geologic settings, but many of the known deposits are currently subeconomic for titanium because of complications related to the mineralogy or because of the presence of trace contaminants that can compromise the pigment production process.Global production of titanium minerals is currently dominated by Australia, Canada, Norway, and South Africa; additional amounts are produced in Brazil, India, Madagascar, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, and Sri Lanka. The United States accounts for about 4 percent of the total world production of titanium minerals and is heavily dependent on imports of titanium mineral concentrates to meet its domestic needs.Titanium occurs only in silicate or oxide minerals and never in sulfide minerals. Environmental considerations for titanium mining are related to waste rock disposal and the impact of trace constituents on water quality. Because titanium is generally inert in the environment, human health risks from titanium and titanium

  3. Effect of liquid properties on laser ablation of aluminum and titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Peixuan, E-mail: oypx12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Center of Novel Materials for International Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Peijie [National Center of Novel Materials for International Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Leksina, E.G.; Michurin, S.V. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); He, Liangju [School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Porous surfaces are formed in Al alloy after wet ablation due to phase explosion. • A higher ablation rate is produced in glycerin than that in water and isopropanol. • Effect of liquid properties on mass-removal mechanisms was discussed. • Phase explosion and plasma-induced pressure contribute greatly to mass removal. • Density, heat conductivity and shock impendence of liquid affect ablation rates. - Abstract: In order to study the effect of liquid properties on laser ablation in liquids, aluminum 5A06 and titanium TB5 targets were irradiated by single-pulse infrared laser in isopropanol, distilled water, glycerin and as a comparison, in air, respectively. Craters induced by laser ablation were characterized using scanning electron and white-light interferometric microscopies. The results show that for liquid-mediated ablation, craters with porous surface structures were formed in aluminum target through phase explosion, while no micro-cavities were formed in titanium target owing to high critical temperature of titanium. In addition, ablation rates of aluminum and titanium targets vary with types of ambient media in accordance with such sequence: air < isopropanol < water < glycerin. Further, the influence of liquid properties on material-removal mechanisms for laser ablation in liquid is discussed. It is concluded that the density, thermal conductivity and acoustical impedance of liquid play a dominant role in laser ablation efficiency.

  4. The Promising Features of New Nano Liquid Metals—Liquid Sodium Containing Titanium Nanoparticles (LSnanop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Itami

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new kind of suspension liquid was developed by dispersing Ti nanoparticles (10 nm in liquid Na, which was then determined by TEM (transmission electron microscopy analysis. The volume fraction was estimated to be 0.0088 from the analyzed Ti concentration (2 at. % and the densities of Ti and Na. This suspension liquid, Liquid Sodium containing nanoparticles of titanium (LSnanop, shows, despite only a small addition of Ti nanoparticles, many striking features, namely a negative deviation of 3.9% from the ideal solution for the atomic volume, an increase of 17% in surface tension, a decrease of 11% for the reaction heat to water, and the suppression of chemical reactivity to water and oxygen. The decrease in reaction heat to water seems to be derived from the existence of excess cohesive energy of LSnanop. The excess cohesive energy was discussed based on simple theoretical analyses, with particular emphasis on the screening effect. The suppression of reactivity is discussed with the relation to the decrease of heat of reaction to water or the excess cohesive energy, surface tension, the action as a plug of Ti oxide, negative adsorption on the surface of LSnanop, and percolation.

  5. Effect of Laser Power and Scan Speed on Melt Pool Characteristics of Commercially Pure Titanium (CP-Ti)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Chandrakanth; Ahmed, Sazzad H.; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2017-07-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing technique that creates complex parts by selectively melting metal powder layer-by-layer using a laser. In SLM, the process parameters decide the quality of the fabricated component. In this study, single beads of commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) were melted on a substrate of the same material using an in-house built SLM machine. Multiple combinations of laser power and scan speed were used for single bead fabrication, while the laser beam diameter and powder layer thickness were kept constant. This experimental study investigated the influence of laser power, scan speed, and laser energy density on the melt pool formation, surface morphology, geometry (width and height), and hardness of solidified beads. In addition, the observed unfavorable effect such as inconsistency in melt pool width formation is discussed. The results show that the quality, geometry, and hardness of solidified melt pool are significantly affected by laser power, scanning speed, and laser energy density.

  6. Analysis of natural convection heat transfer and flows in internally heated stratified liquid pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubaidullin, A.A. Jr.; Dinh, T.N.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, natural convection flows and heat transfer in a liquid pool, with two superposed immiscible fluid layers, are analyzed. The objective of the study is to examine the effect of interfacial hydrodynamics and to develop a method which enables energy splitting to be evaluated in a stratified liquid pool. The thermal convection, with and without an internal heat source, in a rectangular cavity with different pairs of fluids was numerically simulated by a CFD code FLOW-3D. It was found that the code performs very well for prediction of heat transfer coefficients for different conditions. The hydrodynamic coupling between immiscible layers was found to have minor, if any, impact on the natural convection heat transfer for the conditions examined. Calculated results were used to develop, and validate, a new correlation for energy splitting and for heat transfer in stratified liquid pools

  7. Numerical modelling of inert gas bubble rising in liquid metal pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeep, Arjun; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Ponraju, D.; Nashine, B K.

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase flow finds several applications in safe operation of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Numerical modelling of bubble rise dynamics in liquid metal pool of SFR is essential for the evaluation of residence time and shape changes, which are of utmost importance for simulating associated heat and mass transfer processes involved in reactor safety. A numerical model has been developed based on OpenFOAM for the evaluation of two-dimensional inert gas bubble rise dynamics in stagnant liquid metal pool. The governing model equations are discretized and solved using the Volume of Fluid based solver available in OpenFOAM with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The model has been validated with available numerical benchmark results for laminar transient two-phase flow. The model has been used to evaluate velocity and rise trajectory of argon gas bubble with different diameters through a pool of liquid sodium. (author)

  8. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer characteristics of liquid pools with bubble agitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blottner, F.G.

    1979-11-01

    Estimates are given for the heat transfer coefficients at various interfaces which occur in molten pools on concrete. Previous simulant experiments and correlations are used to determine the hydrodynamic behavior of the pool and heat transfer coefficients for the liquids of interest. Other studies assume a gas film occurs between the concrete and molten pool, but the results of this investigation do not confirm this assumption. The results also indicate the significant influence the very viscous concrete slag has on the properties of the molten pool. Additional experiments and analysis are needed to improve the accuracy of the heat transfer coefficients estimated and to understand the behavior of the concrete slag at the interface between the pool and decomposing concrete

  9. Numerical simulation of pool boiling of a Lennard-Jones liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime

    2013-09-01

    We performed a numerical simulation of pool boiling by a molecular dynamics model. In the simulation, a liquid composed of Lennard-Jones particles in a uniform gravitational field is heated by a heat source at the bottom of the system. The model successfully reproduces the change in regimes of boiling from nucleate boiling to film boiling with the increase of the heat source temperature. We present the pool boiling curve by the model, whose general behavior is consistent with those observed in experiments of pool boiling. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical simulation of pool boiling of a Lennard-Jones liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2013-01-01

    We performed a numerical simulation of pool boiling by a molecular dynamics model. In the simulation, a liquid composed of Lennard-Jones particles in a uniform gravitational field is heated by a heat source at the bottom of the system. The model successfully reproduces the change in regimes of boiling from nucleate boiling to film boiling with the increase of the heat source temperature. We present the pool boiling curve by the model, whose general behavior is consistent with those observed in experiments of pool boiling. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigation of Processes Controlling Elution of Solutes from Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL) Pools into Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedabbasi, M.; Pirestani, K.; Holland, S. B.; Imhoff, P. T.

    2005-12-01

    Two major processes influencing the elution of solutes from porous media contaminated with nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are external mass transfer between the NAPL and groundwater and internal diffusion through NAPL ganglia and pools. There is a relatively large body of literature on the dissolution of single-species NAPLs. Less is known about the rates of elution of compounds dissolving from multicomponent NAPLs. We examined the mass transfer of one solute, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butanol (DMB) - a partitioning tracer, between groundwater and a dense NAPL - trichloroethylene (TCE). Diffusion cell experiments were used to measure the molecular diffusion coefficient of DMB in pure TCE and in porous media contaminated with a TCE pool. Measured diffusion coefficients were compared with empirical correlations (pure TCE) and a parallel resistance model (TCE pool). Based on the results from these analyses, a dimensionless Biot number was derived to express the ratio of the external rate of mass transfer from a NAPL pool to the internal rate of diffusion within the pool, which varies with NAPL saturation and NAPL-water partition coefficient. Biot numbers were then estimated for several laboratory scale experiments involving DMB transport between NAPL pools and groundwater. The estimated Biot numbers were in good agreement with experimental results. The expression for the Biot number developed here may be used to assess the processes controlling the elution of solutes from NAPL pools, which has implications on long-term predictions of solute dissolution from NAPLs in the field.

  12. Dynamic behavior of a solid particle bed in a liquid pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping; Yasunaka, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Morita, Koji; Fukuda, Kenji; Yamano, Hidemasa; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic behavior of solid particle beds in a liquid pool against pressure transients was investigated to model the mobility of core materials in a postulated disrupted core of a liquid metal fast reactor. A series of experiments was performed with a particle bed of different bed heights, comprising different monotype solid particles, where variable initial pressures of the originally pressurized nitrogen gas were adopted as the pressure sources. Computational simulations of the experiments were performed using SIMMER-III, a fast reactor safety analysis code. Comparisons between simulated and experimental results show that the physical model for multiphase flows used in the SIMMER-III code can reasonably represent the transient behaviors of pool multiphase flows with rich solid phases, as observed in the current experiments. This demonstrates the basic validity of the SIMMER-III code on simulating the dynamic behaviors induced by pressure transients in a low-energy disrupted core of a liquid metal fast reactor with rich solid phases

  13. Heat transfer in pool boiling liquid neon, deuterium and hydrogen, and critical heat flux in forced convection of liquid neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astruc, J.M.

    1967-12-01

    In the first part, free-convection and nucleate pool boiling heat transfer (up to burn-out heat flux) between a platinum wire of 0.15 mm in diameter in neon, deuterium and hydrogen has been studied at atmospheric pressure. These measurements were continued in liquid neon up to 23 bars (Pc ≅ 26.8 b). Film boiling heat transfer coefficients have been measured in pool boiling liquid neon at atmospheric pressure with three heating wires (diameters 0.2, 0.5, 2 mm). All the results have been compared with existing correlations. The second part is devoted to measurements of the critical heat flux limiting heat transfer with small temperature differences between the wall and the liquid neon flowing inside a tube (diameters 3 x 3.5 mm) heated by joule effect on 30 cm of length. Influences of flow stability, nature of electrical current, pressure, mass flow rate and subcooling are shown. In conclusion, the similarity of the heat transfer characteristics in pool boiling as well as in forced convection of liquid neon and hydrogen is emphasized. (author) [fr

  14. Heat and mass transfer in a liquid pool with wall ablation and composition effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Q.T.

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the thermal-hydraulics of a melt pool coupled with the physical chemistry for the purpose of describing the behaviour of mixtures of materials (non-eutectic). Evolution of transient temperature in a liquid melt pool heated by volumetric power dissipation has been described with solidification on the cooled wall. The model has been developed and is validated for the experimental results given by LIVE experiment, performed at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany. Under the conditions of these tests, it is shown that the interface temperature follows the liquidus temperature (corresponding to the composition of the liquid bath) during the whole transient. Assumption of interface temperature as liquidus temperature allows recalculating the evolution of the maximum melt temperature as well as the local crust thickness. Furthermore, we propose a model for describing the interaction between a non-eutectic liquid melt pool (subjected to volumetric power dissipation) and an ablated wall whose melting point is below the liquidus temperature of the melt. The model predictions are compared with results of ARTEMIS 2D tests. A new formulation of the interface temperature between the liquid melt and the solid wall (below liquidus temperature) has been proposed. (author) [fr

  15. Numerical analysis of isothermal JET injection into a denser liquid pool using RD-MPS Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, H. S. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Jeun, G. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    In this study, the rigid body dynamics coupled moving particle semi-implicit (RD-MPS) method was used to simulate a plunging liquid jet penetrating into a denser liquid pool. The phenomenon is related to fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) during severe accidents in nuclear power plants when coolant water is forcedly injected into a melt pool. A numerical particle method like MPS enables to simulate the complex multiphase flow in that significant deformation of fluids occurs due to its inherent grid less algorithm. However, the MPS method alone cannot continue the calculation for a long time as shown in the Ikea's work due to the large deformation of fluid surfaces and the difference in both liquid densities. In the RD-MPS method, the rigid body dynamics was coupled with the moving particle semi-implicit method to increase the overall stability of calculations and to calculate the multi-phase behavior of fluids. We performed two and three dimensional calculations to simulate jet penetration behaviors in a denser liquid pool, and the result was in good agreement with that of experiment. The simulation results suggested that the coupled model be useful in simulating dynamic interactions of multi-phase incompressible fluids as well as that the 3-D simulation for the plunging jet in a confined geometry predicted better agreement with experimental results than the 2-D simulation did.

  16. Numerical analysis of isothermal JET injection into a denser liquid pool using RD-MPS Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.; Park, H. S.; Jeun, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the rigid body dynamics coupled moving particle semi-implicit (RD-MPS) method was used to simulate a plunging liquid jet penetrating into a denser liquid pool. The phenomenon is related to fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) during severe accidents in nuclear power plants when coolant water is forcedly injected into a melt pool. A numerical particle method like MPS enables to simulate the complex multiphase flow in that significant deformation of fluids occurs due to its inherent grid less algorithm. However, the MPS method alone cannot continue the calculation for a long time as shown in the Ikea's work due to the large deformation of fluid surfaces and the difference in both liquid densities. In the RD-MPS method, the rigid body dynamics was coupled with the moving particle semi-implicit method to increase the overall stability of calculations and to calculate the multi-phase behavior of fluids. We performed two and three dimensional calculations to simulate jet penetration behaviors in a denser liquid pool, and the result was in good agreement with that of experiment. The simulation results suggested that the coupled model be useful in simulating dynamic interactions of multi-phase incompressible fluids as well as that the 3-D simulation for the plunging jet in a confined geometry predicted better agreement with experimental results than the 2-D simulation did

  17. Quantum chemical evaluation for the stability of liquid sodium containing titanium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ai; Inaba, Kenji; Ishizawa, Yukie; Miura, Ryuji; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Miyamoto, Akira; Saito, Jun-ichi; Ara, Kuniaki

    2015-01-01

    Recently, liquid sodium containing titanium nanoparticles (LSnanop) have attracted considerable attention. In this study, suspension state of Ti nanoparticle in liquid sodium was quantum chemically evaluated. The atomic interaction between Ti nanoparticles and sodium atoms in the liquid sodium medium was investigated. There were some literatures which gained quantum chemical insight into a nanoparticle with the surrounding sodium atom. However, liquid sodium medium itself together with a Ti nanoparticle under the realistic temperature has not yet been investigated theoretically. To overcome the problem of conventional theoretical method, we applied computationally low-load Tight Binding Quantum Chemical Molecular Dynamics (TB-QCMD) calculation method to investigate the suspension state of the Ti nanoparticle in liquid sodium metal. (author)

  18. Keyhole behavior and liquid flow in molten pool during laser-arc hybrid welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yasuaki; Katayama, Seiji; Matsunawa, Akira

    2003-03-01

    Hybrid welding was carried out on Type 304 stainless steel plate under various conditions using YAG laser combined with TIG arc. During arc and laser-arc hybrid welding, arc voltage variation was measured, and arc plasma, laser-induced plume and evaporation spots as well as keyhole behavior and liquid flow in the molten pool were observed through CCD camera and X-ray real-time transmission apparatus. It was consequently found that hybrid welding possessed many features in comparison with YAG laser welding. The deepest weld bead could be produced when the YAG laser beam of high power density was shot on the molten pool made beforehand stably with TIG arc. A keyhole was long and narrow, and its behavior was rather stable inside the molten pool. It was also confirmed that porosity was reduced by the suppression of bubble formation in hybrid welding utilizing a laser of a moderate power density.

  19. Study on the electrochemical of the metal deposition from ionic liquids for lithium, titanium and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Claudia A.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis was aimed to the characterization of electrochemically deposited film of lithium, titanium and dysprosium on Au(111) from different ionic liquids, finally dysprosium on neodymium-iron-boron magnate for industrial applications. The investigation of the deposits were performed using cyclic voltametry, in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy, electrochemical quartz microbalance, XPS and Auger electron spectroscopy. The sample preparation is described in detail. The deposition rate showed a significant temperature dependence.

  20. Nucleate pool boiling: High gravity to reduced gravity; liquid metals to cryogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Requirements for the proper functioning of equipment and personnel in reduced gravity associated with space platforms and future space station modules introduce unique problems in temperature control; power generation; energy dissipation; the storage, transfer, control and conditioning of fluids; and liquid-vapor separation. The phase change of boiling is significant in all of these. Although both pool and flow boiling would be involved, research results to date include only pool boiling because buoyancy effects are maximized for this case. The effective application of forced convection boiling heat transfer in the microgravity of space will require a well grounded and cogent understanding of the mechanisms involved. Experimental results are presented for pool boiling from a single geometrical configuration, a flat surface, covering a wide range of body forces from a/g = 20 to 1 to a/g = 0 to -1 for a cryogenic liquid, and from a/g = 20 to 1 for water and a liquid metal. Similarities in behavior are noted for these three fluids at the higher gravity levels, and may reasonably be expected to continue at reduced gravity levels.

  1. Flow transition criteria of a liquid jet into a liquid pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Shimpei, E-mail: s1630195@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Systems and Information Engineering, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Abe, Yutaka [Faculty of Engineering, Information and Systems, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Koyama, Kazuya [Reactor Core and Safety Design Department, Mitsubishi FBR Systems, Inc., 2-34-17 Jingumae, Shibuya, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Jet breakup and droplet formation in immiscible liquid-liquid systems was studied experimentally. • The observed jet breakup behavior was classified into characteristic regimes. • The droplet size distribution was analyzed using image processing. • The variation of droplet size was compared with available melt-jet experiments. • Extrapolation to the expected SFR conditions implied that most of the hydrodynamic conditions would be the atomization regime. - Abstract: To better understand the fundamental interactions between melt jet and coolant during a core-disruptive accident at a sodium-cooled fast reactor, the jet breakup and droplet formation in immiscible liquid-liquid systems were studied experimentally. Experiments using two different pairs of test fluids were carried out at isothermal conditions. The observed jet breakup behavior was classified into characteristic regimes based on the classical Ohnesorge classification in liquid-gas systems. The variation in breakup length obtained in the present liquid-liquid system was similar to that in a liquid-gas system. The droplet size distribution in each breakup regime was analyzed using image processing and droplet formation via pinch-off, satellite formation, and entrainment was observed. The measured droplet size was compared with those available from melt jet experiments. Based on the observation and analysis results, the breakup regimes were organized on a dimensionless operating diagram, with the derived correlations representing the criteria for regime boundaries of a liquid-liquid system. Finally, the experimental data were extrapolated to the expected conditions of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. From this, it was implied that most of the hydrodynamic conditions during an accident would be close to the atomization regime, in which entrainment is the dominant process for droplet formation.

  2. Titanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Muris, Joris; Jakobsen, Stig S

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to titanium (Ti) from implants and from personal care products as nanoparticles (NPs) is common. This article reviews exposure sources, ion release, skin penetration, allergenic effects, and diagnostic possibilities. We conclude that human exposure to Ti mainly derives from dental...... and medical implants, personal care products, and foods. Despite being considered to be highly biocompatible relative to other metals, Ti is released in the presence of biological fluids and tissue, especially under certain circumstances, which seem to be more likely with regard to dental implants. Although...... most of the studies reviewed have important limitations, Ti seems not to penetrate a competent skin barrier, either as pure Ti, alloy, or as Ti oxide NPs. However, there are some indications of Ti penetration through the oral mucosa. We conclude that patch testing with the available Ti preparations...

  3. Liquid-solid contact measurements using a surface thermocouple temperature probe in atmospheric pool boiling water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.Y.W.; Chen, J.C.; Nelson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Objective was to apply the technique of using a microthermocouple flush-mounted at the boiling surface for the measurement of the local-surface-temperature history in film and transition boiling on high temperature surfaces. From this measurement direct liquid-solid contact in film and transition boiling regimes was observed. In pool boiling of saturated, distilled, deionized water on an aluminum-coated copper surface, the time-averaged, local-liquid-contact fraction increased with decreasing surface superheat. Average contact duration increased monotonically with decreasing surface superheat, while frequency of liquid contact reached a maximum of approx. 50 contacts/s at a surface superheat of approx. 100 K and decreased gradually to 30 contacts/s near the critical heat flux. The liquid-solid contact duration distribution was dominated by short contacts 4 ms at low surface superheats, passing through a relatively flat contact duration distribution at about 80 0 K. Results of this paper indicate that liquid-solid contacts may be the dominant mechanism for energy transfer in the transition boiling process

  4. Interfacial bubbles formed by plunging thin liquid films in a pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkin, Louis; Schmit, Alexandre; David, Richard; Delvert, Alexandre; Gicquel, Eric; Panizza, Pascal; Courbin, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    We show that the immersion of a horizontally suspended thin film of liquid in a pool of the same fluid creates an interfacial bubble, that is, a bubble at the liquid-air interface. Varying the fluid properties, the film's size, and its immersion velocity, our experiments unveil two formation regimes characterized by either a visco-capillary or an inertio-capillary mechanism that controls the size of a produced bubble. To rationalize these results, we compare the pressure exerted by the air flow under a plunging film with the Laplace pressure needed to generate film dimpling, which subsequently yields air entrapment and the production of a bubble. This physical model explains the power-law variations of the bubble size with the governing dimensionless number for each regime.

  5. Interparticle potential of 10 nanometer titanium nanoparticles in liquid sodium: Theoretical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Jae; Park, Gun Yeop; Park, Hyun Sun; Baek, Je Hyun [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A suspension of titanium nanoparticles (Ti NPs) in liquid sodium (Na) has been proposed as a method to mitigate the violent sodium-water reaction (SWR). The interparticle potential between Ti NPs in liquid Na may play a significant role in the agglomeration of NPs on the reaction surface and in the bulk liquid Na, since the potential contributes to a reduction in the long-term dispersion stability. For the effective control of the SWR with NPs, a physical understanding of the molecular dynamics of NPs in liquid Na is key. Therefore in this study, the nonretarded Van der Waals model and the solvation potential model are employed to analyze the interparticle potential. The ab initio calculation reveals that a strong repulsive force driven by the solvation potential exceeds the interparticle attraction and predicts the agglomeration energy required for two 10-nm Ti NPs to be 4 x 10{sup -17} J. The collision theory suggests that Ti NPs can be effective suppressors of the SWR due to the high energy barrier that prevents significant agglomeration of Ti NPs in quiescent liquid Na.

  6. Solvent extraction of titanium(IV), zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) salicylates using liquid ion exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaramurthi, N M; Shinde, V M

    1989-02-01

    A solvent extraction method is proposed for the extraction of quadrivalent titanium, zirconium an hafnium from salicylate media using liquid ion exchangers such as Aliquat 336 and trioctylamine dissolved in xylene. The optimum conditions were evaluated from a critical study of the following: pH, salicylate concentration, amine concentration, diluent and period of equilibration. The method allows the separation of titanium, zirconium and hafnium from binary mixtures containing commonly associated metal ions and is applicable to the analysis of real samples such as BCS-CRM 387 nimonic 901, BCS-CRM 243/4 ferro-titanium, BCS-CRM 307 magnesium alloy and BCS-CRM 388 zircon. Titanium is determined either with hydrogen peroxide or by atomic absorption spectrometry whereas zirconium and hafnium are determined spectrophotometrically with Alizarin Red S and Zylenol Orange, respectively. The results of both separation and analysis are reported. The method is precise, accurate and fast.

  7. Effect of liquid environment on the titanium surface modification by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Nisar, E-mail: chnisarali@gmail.com [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Department of Basic Science and Humanities, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Faisalabad Campus, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Physics, GC University, Kachehri Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia [Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Umm-i-Kalsoom [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Physics, GC University, Kachehri Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Basic Science and Humanities, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Kala Shah Kaku Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Begum, Narjis [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore (Pakistan); Husinsky, Wolfgang [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Liquid assisted ablation effects on the titanium under varying number of laser pulses is investigated. • SEM analysis reveals the growth of various features like ripples, dendritic structures, pores, grains and craters. • Raman and XRD analyses shows the presence of TiO{sub 2} & TiH in both media whereas, TiC, TiCxOy are only identified in propanol. • Hardness of ablated Ti explored by Nano indentation is found to decrease with increasing number of pulses in both media. • Relationship between surface, structural and mechanical modifications is established. - Abstract: The effect of liquid environment (de-ionized water and propanol) on surface, structural and mechanical properties of femtosecond laser ablated titanium has been investigated. For this purpose, Ti: sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs, 1 kHz) has been employed, at a fluence of 3.6 J/cm{sup 2} in ambient environments of de-ionized water, and propanol for various number of laser pulses i.e. 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000. The surface features, chemical composition, structural analysis and mechanical properties of irradiated targets have been evaluated by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X -ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy and Nano-hardness tester. Various features like dendritic structures, globules, porous granular morphology, cones, crater, circular ripples and thermal stress cracking are observed at the ablated area after irradiation. These features are instigated by various thermal and chemical phenomena induced by laser heating at the solid–liquid interface. Decrease in nano-hardness observed in both ambient environments is attributable to the formation of hydrides after irradiation in both media.

  8. Demonstration test on decontamination of contaminated pool water using liquid-solid settling technology with flocculants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori; Adachi, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Tagawa, Akihiro; Hosobuchi, Shigeki; Takanashi, Junko

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of supplying agricultural water, a stationary purification system for contaminated water had been developed on the basis of the liquid-solid settling technology using flocculants. Two kinds of flocculants had been developed on the basis of preliminary tests: one that compounds iron ferrocyanide and the other that does not. With the use of this system and flocculants, a demonstration test was conducted to apply the decontamination technology on contaminated water in two swimming pools in an elementary school located at Motomiya City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. It is proved from the results that both the developed purification system and the flocculants can be established as a practicable decontamination technology for contaminated water: the treatment rate was 10 m 3 /hour and the elimination factor of radioactive materials was higher than 99%. (author)

  9. A simple parameterization for the rising velocity of bubbles in a liquid pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Hoon [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Hwan; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Byung Chul [FNC Technology, Co., Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The determination of the shape and rising velocity of gas bubbles in a liquid pool is of great importance in analyzing the radioactive aerosol emissions from nuclear power plant accidents in terms of the fission product release rate and the pool scrubbing efficiency of radioactive aerosols. This article suggests a simple parameterization for the gas bubble rising velocity as a function of the volume-equivalent bubble diameter; this parameterization does not require prior knowledge of bubble shape. This is more convenient than previously suggested parameterizations because it is given as a single explicit formula. It is also shown that a bubble shape diagram, which is very similar to the Grace's diagram, can be easily generated using the parameterization suggested in this article. Furthermore, the boundaries among the three bubble shape regimes in the E{sub o}–R{sub e} plane and the condition for the bypass of the spheroidal regime can be delineated directly from the parameterization formula. Therefore, the parameterization suggested in this article appears to be useful not only in easily determining the bubble rising velocity (e.g., in postulated severe accident analysis codes) but also in understanding the trend of bubble shape change due to bubble growth.

  10. A simple parameterization for the rising velocity of bubbles in a liquid pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Hoon; Park, Chang Hwan; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Byung Chul

    2017-01-01

    The determination of the shape and rising velocity of gas bubbles in a liquid pool is of great importance in analyzing the radioactive aerosol emissions from nuclear power plant accidents in terms of the fission product release rate and the pool scrubbing efficiency of radioactive aerosols. This article suggests a simple parameterization for the gas bubble rising velocity as a function of the volume-equivalent bubble diameter; this parameterization does not require prior knowledge of bubble shape. This is more convenient than previously suggested parameterizations because it is given as a single explicit formula. It is also shown that a bubble shape diagram, which is very similar to the Grace's diagram, can be easily generated using the parameterization suggested in this article. Furthermore, the boundaries among the three bubble shape regimes in the E_o–R_e plane and the condition for the bypass of the spheroidal regime can be delineated directly from the parameterization formula. Therefore, the parameterization suggested in this article appears to be useful not only in easily determining the bubble rising velocity (e.g., in postulated severe accident analysis codes) but also in understanding the trend of bubble shape change due to bubble growth

  11. Overcoming the challenges of conventional dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction: analysis of THMs in chlorinated swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Hakim; Helalizadeh, Masoumeh; Kordi, Mohammad Reza

    2018-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and sensitive approach to the analysis of trihalomethanes (THMs) in swimming pool water samples has been developed. The main goal of this study was to overcome or to improve the shortcomings of conventional dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and to maximize the realization of green analytical chemistry principles. The method involves a simple vortex-assisted microextraction step, in the absence of the dispersive solvent, followed by salting-out effect for the elimination of the centrifugation step. A bell-shaped device and a solidifiable solvent were used to simplify the extraction solvent collection after phase separation. Optimization of the independent variables was performed by using chemometric methods in three steps. The method was statistically validated based on authentic guidance documents. The completion time for extraction was less than 8 min, and the limits of detection were in the range between 4 and 72 ng L -1 . Using this method, good linearity and precision were achieved. The results of THMs determination in different real samples showed that in some cases the concentration of total THMs was more than threshold values of THMs determined by accredited healthcare organizations. This method indicated satisfactory analytical figures of merit. Graphical Abstract A novel green microextraction technique for overcoming the challenges of conventional DLLME. The proposed procedure complies with the principles of green/sustainable analytical chemistry, comprising decreasing the sample size, making easy automation of the process, reducing organic waste, diminishing energy consumption, replacing toxic reagents with safer reagents, and enhancing operator safety.

  12. Ion exchanger material based on Titanium phosphate for liquid radioactive waste treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslova, M.; Gerasimova, L. [Tananaev Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Rare Elements and Mineral Resources, Kola Scientific Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Apatity (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    A comparative study of the physicochemical and service properties of samples of Ti(OH) 1.36(HPO4) 1.32 * 2.3H2O sorbent in the finely dispersed and granulated forms, mastered for commercial production, was made. The sorption of Cs and Sr cations from solutions of various, compositions was studied in batch experiments, and the diffusion coefficients of the exchanging ions were determined. The hydrolytic stability of the. sorbents was examined with the aim to determine the optimal operation conditions. Experiments showed that the cation exchangers based on titanium phosphate are the most efficient in removal from liquid radioactive waste of induced radioactive isotopes of corrosion products, which is due to formation of weakly dissociating compounds of nonferrous metal ions with functional groups of the ion exchangers in the sorbent phase. (author)

  13. Phase formation in titanium alloys during their quenching from liquid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golub, S.Ya.; Kotko, A.V.; Kuz'menko, N.N.; Kulak, L.D.; Firstov, S.A.; Khaenko, B.V.

    1992-01-01

    Methods of X-ray diffractin analysis, light and electron microscopy were applied to study structural state of titanium base alloys quenched from liquid state by spinning with cooling in inert gas or at the surface of solid heat exchanger. Phase formation under rapid cooling conditions was considered. The morphology of phases and mutual orientation of their crystal lattices were investigated along with the character of crystallization texture. It was revealed that on melt quenching with 10 5 -10 6 K/s cooling rates the growth of columnar branches of degenerated dendrites was accopanied by Si atoms movement of the order of 0.1 μm. Structure and crack resistance of compacted articles produced from rapidly solidified powders were under study

  14. Study of void fraction and mixing of immiscible liquids in a pool configuration by an upward gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, J.C.; Corradini, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, investigations are performed to study the mixing between immiscible liquids in a pool configuration due to an upward gas flow. A water-R113 system is sued in the bubbly/churn-turbulent regimes to determine the effects of the unagitated pool depth on layer mixing. The superficial gas velocity at which full mixing is attained is observed to increase with the pool depth, although it is concluded that this is a weak dependency. Mixing in the churn-turbulent regime is studied with Wood's metal-water and Wood's metal-silicone fluid (100 cS) as pairs of fluids. Additional past mixing data from six other fluids are also included in the data base. A criterion is proposed to determine if two liquids will entrain in bubbly or churn-turbulent flow. Correlations are derived that, for a set of given conditions, allow prediction of the mixing state (mixed or segregated) of a system. Because of the indirect method of measuring the mixed layer thickness, pool void fraction experiments are also performed. For the case of water and R113, the effect of unagitated pool depth on the void fraction is studied

  15. Evaporation release behavior of volatile fission products from liquid sodium pool to the inert cover gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagiri, T; Miyahara, S [Oarai Engineering Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oaraimachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    In fuel failure of sodium cooled fast breeder reactors, released volatile fission products (VFPs) such as iodine and cesium from the fuel will be dissolved into the liquid sodium coolant and transferred to the cover vaporization. In the cover gas system of the reactor, natural convection occurs due to temperature differences between the sodium pool and the gas phase. The release rates of VFPs together with sodium vaporization are considered to be controlled by the convection. In this study, three analytical models are developed and examined to calculate the transient release rates using the equilibrium partition coefficients of VFPs. The calculated release rates are compared with experimental results for sodium and sodium iodide. The release rate of sodium is closest to the calculation by the heterogeneous nucleation theory. The release rate of sodium iodide obtained from the experiment is between the release rates calculated by the model based on heat-and-mass transfer analogy and the Hill`s theory. From this study, it is confirmed that the realistic release rate of sodium is able to be calculated by the model based on the heterogeneous nucleation theory. The conservative release rate of sodium iodide is able to be calculated by the model based on the Hill`s theory using the equilibrium partition coefficient of sodium iodide. (author) 7 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs.

  16. Assessment of three turbulence model performances in predicting water jet flow plunging into a liquid pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidouni Kendil Faiza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the current study is to numerically investigate, through computational fluid dynamics modeling, a water jet injected vertically downward through a straight circular pipe into a water bath. The study also aims to obtain a better understanding of jet behavior, air entrainment and the dispersion of bubbles in the developing flow region. For these purposes, three dimensional air and water flows were modeled using the volume of fluid technique. The equations in question were formulated using the density and viscosity of a 'gas-liquid mixture', described in terms of the phase volume fraction. Three turbulence models with a high Reynolds number have been considered i. e. the standard k-e model, realizable k-e model, and Reynolds stress model. The predicted flow patterns for the realizable k-e model match well with experimental measurements found in available literature. Nevertheless, some discrepancies regarding velocity relaxation and turbulent momentum distribution in the pool are still observed for both the standard k-e and the Reynolds stress model.

  17. On the Impact of Spheres onto Liquid Pools and Ultra-viscous Films

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad Mujtaba

    2016-06-01

    The free-surface impact of spheres is important to several applications in the military, industry and sports such as the water-entry of torpedoes, dip-coating procedures and slamming of boats. This two-part thesis attempts to explore this field by investigating cavity formation during the impact of spheres with deep liquid pools and cavitation in thin ultra-viscous films. Part I reports results from an experimental study on the formation of stable- streamlined and helical cavity wakes following the free-surface impact of heated Leidenfrost spheres. The Leidenfrost effect encapsulates the sphere by a vapor layer to prevent any physical contact with the surrounding liquid. This phenomenon is essential for the pacification of acoustic rippling along the cavity interface to result in a stable-streamlined cavity wake. Such a streamlined configuration experiences drag coefficients an order of magnitude lower than those acting on room temperature spheres. A striking observation is the formation of helical cavities which occur for impact Reynolds numbers 0 ≳ 1.4 × 105 and are characterized by multiple interfacial ridges, stemming from and rotating synchronously about an evident contact line around the sphere equator. This helical configuration has 40-55% smaller overall force coefficients than those obtained in the formation of stable cavity wakes. Part II of this thesis investigates the inception of cavitation and resulting structures when a sphere collides with a solid surface covered with a layer of non-Newtonian liquid having kinematic viscosities of up to 0 = 20,000,000 cSt. The existence of shear-stress- induced cavitation during sphere approach towards the base wall (i.e. the pressurization stage) in ultra-viscous films is shown using a synchronized dual-view high-speed imaging system. In addition, cavitation by depressurization is noted for a new class of non-contact cases whereby the sphere rebounds without any prior contact with the solid wall. Horizontal

  18. Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.; Wu Xiongjun; Chahine, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Jet impingement at shallow angles results in periodic cavity formation. ► Velocity profile affected both by buoyancy and splashing in the near field. ► Momentum diffusion leads to a velocity maximum at the gas–liquid interface for the far field. - Abstract: A circular water jet (Re = 1.6 × 10 5 ; We = 8.8 × 10 3 ) plunging at shallow angles (θ ≈ 12.5°) into a quiescent pool is investigated computationally and experimentally. A surprising finding from the work is that cavities, of the order of jet diameter, are formed periodically in the impact location, even though the impinging flow is smooth and completely devoid of such a periodicity. Computational prediction of these frequencies was compared with experimental findings, yielding excellent agreement. The region in the vicinity of the impact is characterized by strong churning due to splashing and formation of air cavities. Measured velocity profiles indicate a concentration of momentum beneath the free surface slightly beyond the impact location (X/D j ≈ 14), with a subsequent shift towards the free surface further downstream of this point (X/D j ≈ 30). This shift is due primarily to the action of buoyancy on the cavity/bubble population. Comparisons of the mean velocity profile between simulations and experiments are performed, yielding good agreement, with the exception of the relatively small churning flow region. Further downstream (X/D j ≳ 40), the flow develops mostly due to diffusion and the location of peak velocity coincides with the free surface. In this region, the free surface acts as an adiabatic boundary and restricts momentum diffusion, causing the peak velocity to occur at the free surface.

  19. Niobium, tantalum and titanium extraction from natural and technogenic raw materials of the Kola Peninsula by liquid-liquid extraction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassikova, N.I.; Kassikov, A.G.; Balabanov, Yu.I.; Petrov, V.B.; Kalinnikov, V.T.

    2003-01-01

    Such rare metals as niobium and tantalum are important strategic materials underlying many of the modern advanced technologies. Since the extraction and processing of rare metal concentrates from own deposits has diminished abruptly in recent years, it is essential to look into the possibility of extracting these elements from various production wastes. This work discusses liquid-liquid extraction and purification of niobium, tantalum and titanium from process solutions of loparite, perovskite and sphene concentrate decomposition with sulphuric and hydrochloric acids; niobium from lithium niobate production wastes decomposed by hydrochloric acid; and tantalum from tantalum capacitor and heat-resistant alloy wastes. (Original)

  20. Apparent and actual 14C retention in the slower turnover bicarbonate pool in man when using liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clague, M.B.; Keir, M.J.; Clayton, C.B.

    1979-01-01

    The use of liquid scintillation counting to determine 14 CO 2 expiration without correct calibration of the apparatus suggests that about 25% of the label is retained within the slower turnover bicarbonate pool. Calibration reduces this figure to 13% and is in agreement with the figure obtained using a calibrated ionisation chamber. The discrepancy is due to reduction in the specific radioactivity in the vial, the mechanism involved being unknown, but it may be a characteristic of certain liquid scintillators under certain conditions. (author)

  1. Migration of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Hao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The migration characteristics of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling were investigated experimentally. Four types of carbon nanotubes with the outside diameters from 15 to 80 nm and the lengths from 1.5 to 10 μm were used in the experiments. The refrigerants include R113, R141b and n-pentane. The oil concentration is from 0 to 10 wt.%, the heat flux is from 10 to 100 kW·m-2, and the initial liquid-level height is from 1.3 to 3.4 cm. The experimental results indicate that the migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the increase of the outside diameter or the length of carbon nanotube. For the fixed type of carbon nanotube, the migration ratio decreases with the increase of the oil concentration or the heat flux, and increases with the increase of the initial liquid-level height. The migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the decrease of dynamic viscosity of refrigerant or the increase of liquid phase density of refrigerant. A model for predicting the migration ratio of carbon nanotubes in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling is proposed, and the predictions agree with 92% of the experimental data within a deviation of ±20%.

  2. E-SCAPE: A scale facility for liquid-metal, pool-type reactor thermal hydraulic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tichelen, Katrien, E-mail: kvtichel@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Mirelli, Fabio, E-mail: fmirelli@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Greco, Matteo, E-mail: mgreco@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Viviani, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgiaviviani@gmail.com [University of Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The E-SCAPE facility is a thermal hydraulic scale model of the MYRRHA fast reactor. • The focus is on mixing and stratification in liquid-metal pool-type reactors. • Forced convection, natural convection and the transition are investigated. • Extensive instrumentation allows validation of computational models. • System thermal hydraulic and CFD models have been used for facility design. - Abstract: MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a flexible fast-spectrum research reactor under design at SCK·CEN. MYRRHA is a pool-type reactor with lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) as primary coolant. The proper understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor pool is an important issue in the design and licensing of the MYRRHA system and liquid-metal cooled reactors by extension. Model experiments are necessary for understanding the physics, for validating experimental tools and to qualify the design for the licensing. The E-SCAPE (European SCAled Pool Experiment) facility at SCK·CEN is a thermal hydraulic 1/6-scale model of the MYRRHA reactor, with an electrical core simulator, cooled by LBE. It provides experimental feedback to the designers on the forced and natural circulation flow patterns. Moreover, it enables to validate the computational methods for their use with LBE. The paper will elaborate on the design of the E-SCAPE facility and its main parameters. Also the experimental matrix and the pre-test analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and system thermal hydraulics codes will be described.

  3. Mixed convection and stratification phenomena in a heavy liquid metal pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarantino, Mariano, E-mail: mariano.tarantino@enea.it [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, C.R. ENEA Brasimone (Italy); Martelli, Daniele; Barone, Gianluca [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Industriale, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino, 1-56100 Pisa Italy (Italy); Di Piazza, Ivan [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, C.R. ENEA Brasimone (Italy); Forgione, Nicola [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Industriale, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino, 1-56100 Pisa Italy (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Results related to experiments reproducing PLOHS + LOF accident in CIRCE pool facility. • Vertical thermal stratification in large HLM pool. • Transition from forced to natural circulation in HLM pool under DHR conditions. • Heat transfer coefficient measurement in HLM pin bundle. • Nusselt numbers calculations and comparison with correlations. - Abstract: This work deals with an analysis of the first experimental series of tests performed to investigate mixed convection and stratification phenomena in CIRCE HLM large pool. In particular, the tests concern the transition from nominal flow to natural circulation regime, typical of decay heat removal (DHR) regime. To this purpose the CIRCE pool facility has been updated to host a suitable test section in order to reproduce the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of a HLM pool-type reactor. The test section basically consists of an electrical bundle (FPS) made up of 37 pins arranged in a hexagonal wrapped lattice with a pitch diameter ratio of 1.8. Along the FPS active length, three sections were instrumented to monitor the heat transfer coefficient along the bundle as well as the cladding temperatures at different ranks of the sub-channels. This paper reports the experimental data as well as a preliminary analysis and discussion of the results, focusing on the most relevant tests of the campaign, namely Test I (48 h) and Test II (97 h). Temperatures along three sections of the FPS and at inlet and outlet sections of the main components were reported and the Nusselt number in the FPS sub-channels was investigated together with the void fraction in the riser. Concerning the investigation of in-pool thermal stratification phenomena, the temperatures in the whole LBE pool were monitored at different elevations and radial locations. The analysis of experimental data obtained from Tests I and II underline the occurrence of thermal stratification phenomena in the region placed between the outlet sections of

  4. Experimental and analytical studies of iodine mass transfer from xenon-iodine mixed gas bubble to liquid sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, S.; Sagawa, N.; Shimoyama, K.

    1996-01-01

    In the fuel pin failure accident of a liquid metal fast reactor, volatile fission products play an important role in the assessment of radiological consequences. Especially the radioisotopes of elemental iodine are important because of their high volatility and of the low permissible dose to human thyroid. The released iodines are known to be retained in the coolant sodium as sodium iodide due to the chemical affinity between alkali metals and halogens. However, the xenon and krypton released with iodines into the sodium pool as bubbles may influence the reaction rate of iodine with sodium during the bubble rising. So far, the only few experimental results have been available concerning the decontamination factor (DF: the ratio of the initial iodine mass in the mixed gas bubble to the released mass into the cover gas) of iodine in this phenomenon. Therefore, experimental and analytical studies were carried out to study the mass transfer of iodine from a xenon-iodine mixed gas bubble to the liquid sodium pool. In the experiments, the bubble was generated in the sodium pool by cracking a quartz ball which contains the xenon-iodine mixed gas and then, the mixed gas released into the argon cover gas was collected to determine the transferred iodine mass into the pool. A rising velocity of the bubble was measured by Chen-type void sensors arranged vertically in the pool. From the measured rising velocity and another observation of bubble behavior in simulated water experiments, it is found that the generated bubble breaks up into several smaller bubbles of spherical cap type during the rising period. Transferred iodine mass per unit initial bubble volume from the bubble to the sodium pool shows increases with increasing time and the initial iodine concentration. A mass transfer rate obtained by differentiating the transferred iodine mass with respect to the time indicates a rapid decrease just after the bubble generation and a slow decrease for the successive period

  5. Spectral emissivities at wavelengths in the range 500--653 nm, enthalpies, and heat capacities of the liquid phases of cobalt, titanium, and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, J.; Roesner-Kuhn, M.; Drewes, K.; Thiedemann, U.; Kuppermann, G.; Camin, B.; Blume, R.; Frohberg, M.G.

    1997-01-01

    A review is given of the literature data for spectral emissivities at wavelengths (λ) in the range 500--653 nm, the enthalpies, and heat capacities of the liquid phases of cobalt, titanium, and zirconium. Emissivity measurements were carried out by means of electromagnetic levitation at the solid-to-liquid transition with a partial-radiation pyrometer operating at λ = 547 and 650 nm. Considering the sensitivity of the optical properties to surface impurities, investigations on the surfaces of several titanium and zirconium samples by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were performed that confirmed a nitrogen- and oxygen-free process atmosphere during the measurements. Liquid phase normal emissivities obtained were var-epsilon n,547 = 0.365 and var-epsilon n,650 = 0.331 for cobalt, var-epsilon n,547 = 0.409 and var-epsilon n,650 = 0.393 for titanium, and var-epsilon n,547 = 0.365 and var-epsilon n,650 = 0.355 for zirconium. Enthalpy measurements on the liquid metals were carried out by means of levitation-drop calorimetry in the range 1591--2159 K for cobalt, 1847--2430 K for titanium, and 2025--2897 K for zirconium. The resulting heat capacities (values in J·mol -1 ·K -1 ) obtained were 42.78 for cobalt, 43.79 for titanium, and 39.81 for zirconium

  6. 3D printed titanium micro-bore columns containing polymer monoliths for reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Talebi, Mohammad; Deverell, Jeremy; Sandron, Sara; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Heery, Brendan; Thompson, Fletcher; Beirne, Stephen; Wallace, Gordon G; Paull, Brett

    2016-03-03

    The potential of 3D selective laser melting (SLM) technology to produce compact, temperature and pressure stable titanium alloy chromatographic columns is explored. A micro bore channel (0.9 mm I.D. × 600 mm long) was produced within a 5 × 30 × 30 mm titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) cuboid, in form of a double handed spiral. A poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate) (BuMA-co-EDMA) monolithic stationary phase was thermally polymerised within the channel for application in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The prepared monolithic column was applied to the liquid chromatographic separation of intact proteins and peptides. Peak capacities of 69-76 (for 6-8 proteins respectively) were observed during isothermal separation of proteins at 44 °C which were further increased to 73-77 using a thermal step gradient with programmed temperature from 60 °C to 35 °C using an in-house built direct-contact heater/cooler platform based upon matching sized Peltier thermoelectric modules. Rapid temperature gradients were possible due to direct-contact between the planar metal column and the Peltier module, and the high thermal conductivity of the titanium column as compared to a similar stainless steel printed column. The separation of peptides released from a digestion of E.coli was also achieved in less than 35 min with ca. 40 distinguishable peaks at 210 nm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental and theoretical/numerical study of evaporation from shallow pools of organic liquids, at simulated work place conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennert, Anne Spandet

    1998-04-01

    The rate of evaporation from shallow pools of organic liquids was measured together with the global pollutant concentration distribution in a test chamber simulating work place conditions at room temperature. factorial data cover three liquids with different volatility, three pool geometries, and three room convective velocities in the range usually met in occupational hygiene. The data are compared to 6 semi-empirical correlations for mass tranfer employed in occupational hygiene and to 5 analytical correlations for boundary layer theory derived by the Reynolds analogy to heat transfer. The semi-empirical correlations generally showed a fair agreement for all experimental data, but tended to underestimate the evaporation especially at the lowest air velocity. All analytical correlations strongly underestimated all experimental data. A new simple correlation predicting evaporation rate based on the data was suggested. Three-dimensional CFD-predictions for laminar flow are in fair agreement with the data on the evaporation rates for the experiment that covers three organic compounds, all pool geometries and the two lowest levels of the air velocity. The global pollutant concentration distribution in case of convective air flow cannot be predicted by the model developed by Roach. If knowledge of the evaporation rate and pollutant concentration at some distance from the source were available, the predicted global pollutant concentration distribution by the model suggested by Scheff. offered a fair agreement with observed data. The box model suggested by Sinden generally offered a fair performance but tended to underestimate the pollutant concentration in region close to the source. Preliminary three-dimensional CFD-predictions of the pollutant concentration distribution in the test chamber covering the data with the lowest air velocity were in fair agreement with the average pollutant concentration but overestimated the average velocity. (au) 29 refs.

  8. Peak pool boiling heat flux from horizontal cylinders in subcooled liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkassabgi, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The peak pool boiling heat flux is observed on horizontal cylindrical heaters in acetone, Freon-113, methanol, and isopropanol over ranges of subcooling from zero to 120 0 C. Photographs, and the data themselves, reveal that there are three distinct burnout mechanisms at different levels of subcooling. Three interpretive models provide the basis for accurate correlations of the present data, and data from the literature, in each of the three regimes. Burnout is dictated by condensation on the walls of the vapor jets and columns at low subcooling. In the intermediate regime, burnout is limited by natural convection which becomes very effective as vapor near the heater reduces boundary layer resistance. Burnout in the high-subcooling regime is independent of the level of subcoooling and is limited by the process of molecular effusion

  9. Principle of a liquid nitrogen irradiation device and its realization for use in a swimming-pool type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochirol, L.; Doulat, J.; Weil, L.

    1961-01-01

    The problem of pile irradiation of samples immersed in liquid nitrogen has been solved with total elimination of explosion hazards and high reliability (no moving parts). The principle of the device is that of a double bath: one of high purity nitrogen cools the samples at the level of the core; a second of commercial nitrogen is located above the first one, outside the high radiation field, and works as a continuous condenser for the pure nitrogen, the flow-back of which is provided simply by gravity. The apparatus described in detail here has been designed for a swimming-pool pile. It was so designed as to provide absolute protection against radiations and to allow the irradiated samples to be easily removed in the cold condition. This apparatus has been in operation for several months. In a fast flux greater than 10 13 neutrons/cm 2 .s and a γ-flux of the order of 10 8 roentgens/h, the consumption of liquid nitrogen is of the order of 100 liters a day. (author) [fr

  10. Liquid Oxygen Rotating Friction Ignition Testing of Aluminum and Titanium with Monel and Inconel for Rocket Engine Propulsion System Contamination Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, S.; Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic contaminant was found in the liquid oxygen (LOX) pre-valve screen of the shuttle main engine propulsion system on two orbiter vehicles. To investigate the potential for an ignition, NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility performed (modified) rotating friction ignition testing in LOX. This testing simulated a contaminant particle in the low-pressure oxygen turbo pump (LPOTP) and the high-pressure oxygen turbo pump (HPOTP) of the shuttle main propulsion system. Monel(R) K-500 and Inconel(R) 718 samples represented the LPOTP and HPOTP materials. Aluminum foil tape and titanium foil represented the contaminant particles. In both the Monel(R) and Inconel(R) material configurations, the aluminum foil tape samples did not ignite after 30 s of rubbing. In contrast, all of the titanium foil samples ignited regardless of the rubbing duration or material configuration. However, the titanium foil ignitions did not propagate to the Monel and Inconel materials.

  11. Seismic analysis of a large pool-type LMR [liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.; Gvildys, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the seismic study of a 450-MWe liquid metal reactor (LMR) under 0.3-g SSE ground excitation. Two calculations were performed using the new design configuration. They deal with the seismic response of the reactor vessel, the guard vessel and support skirt, respectively. In both calculations, the stress and displacement fields at important locations of those components are investigated. Assessments are also made on the elastic and inelastic structural capabilities for other beyond-design basis seismic loads. Results of the reactor vessel analysis reveal that the maximum equivalent stress is only about half of the material yield stress. For the guard vessel and support skirt, the stress level is very small. Regarding the analysis if inelastic structural capability, solutions of the Newmark-Hall ductility modification method show that the reactor vessel can withstand seismics with ground ZPAs ranging from 1.015 to 1.31 g, which corresponds to 3.37 to 4.37 times the basic 0.3-g SSE. Thus, the reactor vessel and guard vessel are strong enough to resist seismic loads. 4 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Research on the fundamental process of thermal-hydraulic behaviors in severe accident. Heat transfer on the liquid-liquid interface between molten core pool and coolant. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H10-027-6. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Saito, Yasushi

    2002-03-01

    Heat transfer experiments under steady and transient conditions were performed using molten Wood's metal and distilled water to study heat transfer on the liquid-liquid interface between molten fuel pool and coolant under severe accident conditions. In the steady state experiment, boiling curve was measured over the range from natural convection region to film boiling region. The boiling behavior was observed using a high-speed video camera. In the transient experiment, distilled water was poured onto the hot molten metal surface, and the boiling curve was obtained in the cooling process. Comparing the measured boiling curve with existing correlations and experimental data for solid-liquid and liquid-liquid systems, the following conclusions were drawn: (a) When the interface surge is negligible and oxide layer is formed on the interface, the boiling curve at the liquid-liquid surface could be approximately reproduced by the heat transfer correlations for nucleate boiling and film boiling regions and the critical heat flux correlation for a liquid-solid system. (b) When no oxide layer is formed on the interface, the boiling curve at the liquid-liquid surface moved towards higher wall superheat than that at the liquid-solid surface, as Novakovic et al. observed in their experiment using mercury. (c) Transient heat transfer coefficient for film boiling at the liquid-liquid surface was about 100% higher than that predicted by the heat transfer correlation for a solid-liquid system. (author)

  13. Infrared transient-liquid-phase joining of SCS-6/{beta}21S titanium matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Materials Processing Group; Blue, R.A.; Lin, R.Y. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites (TMCs) are among the advanced materials being considered for use in the aerospace industry due to their light weight, high strength, and high modulus. A rapid infrared joining process has been developed for the joining of composites and advanced materials. Rapid infrared joining has been shown not to have many of the problems associated with conventional joining methods. Two models were utilized to predict the joint evolution and fiber reaction zone growth. TMC, 16-ply SCS-6/{beta}21S, has been successfully joined with total processing times of under 2 min utilizing the rapid infrared joining technique. The process utilizes a 50 C/sec ramping rate, 17-{micro}m Ti-15Cu-15Ni wt % filler material between the faying surfaces; a joining temperature of 1,100 C; and 120 sec of time to join the composite material. Joint shear strength testing of the rapid infrared joints at temperatures as high as 800 C has revealed no joint failures. Also, due to the rapid cooling of the process, no poststabilization of the matrix material is necessary to prevent the formation of a brittle omega phase during subsequent use of the TMC at intermediate temperatures, 270 to 430 C, for up to 20 h.

  14. Growth behaviors and biocidal properties of titanium dioxide films depending on nucleation duration in liquid phase deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sohyeon; Park, Joohee; Heo, Jiwoong; Hong, Bo Young; Hong, Jinkee

    2017-12-01

    Liquid phase deposition (LPD), which is a method to directly form a titanium dioxide (TiO2) film on a substrate, is the most practical method for applying TiO2 films to medical devices because it is performed at lower temperatures than other methods. The TiO2 films to be applied to medical devices should offer excellent antibacterial effect, but should be stable to normal cells and have appropriate strength. In this research, we observed that the size, shape, and density of TiO2 particles varied with the nucleation duration in LPD and confirmed that these results caused changes in several properties including the mechanical properties, cytotoxicity and antibacterial effect of TiO2 films. From the analysis of these results, we established the conditions for the preparation of TiO2 films that are suitable for medical devices and suggest a new approach to the study of TiO2 films prepared by LPD.

  15. Concentration and immobilization of 137Cs from liquid radioactive waste using sorbents based on hydrated titanium and zirconium oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, A. V.; Noskova, A. Y.; Gritskevich, E. Y.; Mashkovtsev, M. A.; Semenishchev, V. S.

    2017-09-01

    The possibility of use of sorbents based on hydrated titanium and zirconium oxides (T-3A, T-35, NPF-HTD) for concentration and immobilization of 137Cs from liquid radioactive waste of various chemical composition (fresh water, seawater, solutions containing NaNO3, ammonium acetate, EDTA) was evaluated. It was shown that the NPF-HTD and T-35 sorbents separate 137Cs from fresh water and seawater with distribution coefficients as high as 6.2.104 and 6.1.104, 4.0.105 and 1.6.105 L kg-1 respectively; in 1 M ammonium acetate these values were 2.0.103 and 1.0.103 L kg-1. The NPF-HTD sorbent showed the highest selectivity for cesium in NaNO3 solution: cesium distribution coefficients in 1M NaNO3 was 1.4.106 L kg-1. All studied sorbents are suitable for deactivation of solutions containing EDTA. Cesium distribution coefficients were around 102-103 L kg-1 depending on EDTA concentration. Chemical stability of the sorbents was also studied. It was shown that 137Cs leaching rate from all sorbents meet the requirements for matrix materials.

  16. Control of nitrogen concentration in liquid lithium by iron-titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakane, Shinji; Yoneoka, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Satoru

    2006-01-01

    Reducing the nitrogen concentration in liquid lithium is one of the most important steps in creating a liquid lithium blanket system. In this study, in order to verify the nitrogen gettering performance of Fe-Ti alloy, the variation in the nitrogen concentration in liquid lithium, into which Fe-10 at.% Ti or Fe-5 at.% Ti getter was immersed, was examined. The results confirmed a gettering performance of Fe-Ti alloy comparable to that of V-Ti alloy, although the effects were not durable in either the Fe-Ti or the V-Ti alloy. After the immersion test, the existing states of nitrogen absorbed in the gettering material were analyzed by means of XRD, XMA and XPS. TiN and some nitrogen dissolved in α-Fe without forming TiN were observed. It was indicated that nitrogen gettering is prevented not only by the surface nitrides, but also by the internal diffusion barriers originating from the absorbed nitrogen

  17. Controlling liquid pool depth in VAR of a 21.6 cm diameter ingot of Alloy 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Felipe; Beaman, Joseph; Williamson, Rodney; Taleff, Eric; Watt, Trevor

    It is believed that the final microstructure in vacuum arc remelted (VAR) ingots is strongly influenced by the molten metal pool profile. Thus, if the pool profile was properly controlled during the melt then defect-free microstructures would be obtained. The recent development of a reduced-order model of VAR solidification allowed the design of a pool depth controller to accomplish this task. The controller used a linear quadratic regulator and a Kalman filter to stabilize the melt pool solidification front under the effect of uncertain process dynamics and noisy measurements. Basic Axisymmetric Remelting (BAR), a high-fidelity VAR ingot model, was used in real time to provide pool depth measurements that were incorporated in the control loop. The controller was tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory in a 21.6 diameter Alloy 718 ingot. Details of the controller design will be presented, along with comparisons to experimentally-measured pool depths.

  18. Design, fabrication and test of a liquid hydrogen titanium honeycomb cryogenic test tank for use as a reusable launch vehicle main propellant tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, Patrick B.; Keller, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV's) utilizing LOX\\LH2 as the propellant require lightweight durable structural systems to meet mass fraction goals and to reduce overall systems operating costs. Titanium honeycomb sandwich with flexible blanket TPS on the windward surface is potentially the lightest-weight and most operable option. Light weight is achieved in part because the honeycomb sandwich tank provides insulation to its liquid hydrogen contents, with no need for separate cryogenic insulation, and in part because the high use temperature of titanium honeycomb reduces the required surface area of re-entry thermal protection systems. System operability is increased because TPS needs to be applied only to surfaces where temperatures exceed approximately 650 K. In order to demonstrate the viability of a titanium sandwich constructed propellant tank, a technology demonstration program was conducted including the design, fabrication and testing of a propellant tank-TPS system. The tank was tested in controlled as well as ambient environments representing ground hold conditions for a RLV main propellant tank. Data collected during each test run was used to validate predictions for air liquefaction, outside wall temperature, boil-off rates, frost buildup and its insulation effects, and the effects of placing a thermal protection system blanket on the external surface. Test results indicated that titanium honeycomb, when used as a RLV propellant tank material, has great promise as a light-weight structural system.

  19. Numerical analysis of weld pool oscillation in laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Ho [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Farson, Dave F [The Ohio State University, Columbus (United States); Hollis, Kendall; Milewski, John O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Volume of fluid (VOF) numerical simulation was used to investigate melt flow and volumetric oscillation of conduction-mode pulsed laser weld pools. The result is compared to high speed video stream of titanium laser spot welding experiment. The total simulation time is 10ms with the first 5 ms being heating and melting under constant laser irradiation and the remaining 5 ms corresponding to resolidification of the weld pool. During the melting process, the liquid pool did not exhibit periodic oscillation but was continually depressed by the evaporation recoil pressure. After the laser pulse, the weld pool was excited into volumetric oscillation by the release of pressure on its surface and oscillation of the weld pool surface was analyzed. The simulation model suggested adjusting thermal diffusivity to match cooling rate and puddle diameter during solidification which is distinguishable from previous weld pool simulation. The frequency continuously increased from several thousand cycles per second to tens of thousands of cycles per second as the weld pool solidified and its diameter decreased. The result is the first trial of investigation of small weld pool oscillation in laser welding although there have been several reports about arc welding.

  20. The release code package REVOLS/RENONS for fission product release from a liquid sodium pool into an inert gas atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starflinger, J.; Scholtyssek, W.; Unger, H.

    1994-12-01

    For aerosol source term considerations in the field of nuclear safety, the investigation of the release of volatile and non-volatile species from liquid surfaces into a gas atmosphere is important. In case of a hypothetical liquid metal fast breeder reactor accident with tank failure, primary coolant sodium with suspended or solved fuel particles and fission products may be released into the containment. The computer code package REVOLS/RENONS, based on a theoretical mechanistic model with a modular structure, has been developed for the prediction of sodium release as well as volatile and non-volatile radionuclide release from a liquid pool surface into the inert gas atmosphere of the inner containment. Hereby the release of sodium and volatile fission products, like cesium and sodium iodide, is calculated using a theoretical model in a mass transfer coefficient formulation. This model has been transposed into the code version REVOLS.MOD1.1, which is discussed here. It enables parameter analysis under highly variable user-defined boundary conditions. Whereas the evaporative release of the volatile components is governed by diffusive and convective transport processes, the release of the non-volatile ones may be governed by mechanical processes which lead to droplet entrainment from the wavy pool surface under conditions of natural or forced convection into the atmosphere. The mechanistic model calculates the liquid entrainment rate of the non-volatile species, like the fission product strontium oxide and the fuel (uranium dioxide) from a liquid pool surface into a parallel gas flow. The mechanistic model has been transposed into the computer code package REVOLS/RENONS, which is discussed here. Hereby the module REVOLS (RElease of VOLatile Species) calculates the evaporative release of the volatile species, while the module RENONS (RElease of NON-Volatile Species) computes the entrainment release of the non-volatile radionuclides. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Transient liquid phase bonding of titanium-, iron- and nickel-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A. H. M. Esfakur

    The operating temperature of land-based gas turbines and jet engines are ever-increasing to increase the efficiency, decrease the emissions and minimize the cost. Within the engines, complex-shaped parts experience extreme temperature, fatigue and corrosion conditions. Ti-based, Ni-based and Fe-based alloys are commonly used in gas turbines and jet engines depending on the temperatures of different sections. Although those alloys have superior mechanical, high temperature and corrosion properties, severe operating conditions cause fast degradation and failure of the components. Repair of these components could reduce lifecycle costs. Unfortunately, conventional fusion welding is not very attractive, because Ti reacts very easily with oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures, Ni-based superalloys show heat affected zone (HAZ) cracking, and stainless steels show intergranular corrosion and knife-line attack. On the other hand, transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding method has been considered as preferred joining method for those types of alloys. During the initial phase of the current work commercially pure Ti, Fe and Ni were diffusion bonded using commercially available interlayer materials. Commercially pure Ti (Ti-grade 2) has been diffusion bonded using silver and copper interlayers and without any interlayer. With a silver (Ag) interlayer, different intermetallics (AgTi, AgTi2) appeared in the joint centerline microstructure. While with a Cu interlayer eutectic mixtures and Ti-Cu solid solutions appeared in the joint centerline. The maximum tensile strengths achieved were 160 MPa, 502 MPa, and 382 MPa when Ag, Cu and no interlayers were used, respectively. Commercially pure Fe (cp-Fe) was diffusion bonded using Cu (25 m) and Au-12Ge eutectic interlayer (100 microm). Cu diffused predominantly along austenite grain boundaries in all bonding conditions. Residual interlayers appeared at lower bonding temperature and time, however, voids were observed in the joint

  2. 3-D numerical simulation on the vibration of liquid sodium's free surface in sodium pool of FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Biao; Yao Zhaohui; Ye Hongkai; Wang Xuefang

    1997-01-01

    This paper succeeds in simulating three-dimensional incompressible flows with free surface, complicated in-flow and out-flow boundary conditions and internal obstacles, and also can treat these fluid flows in arbitrary shape vessel using a partial cell. According to all kinds of the element influencing the free surface's vibration in sodium pool it may give the various wave's form, the highest and lowest position, and the amount of the vibration. This paper introduces the brief principle of VOF numerical method, develops the computational program based on NASA-VOF3D, provides some results about the free surface's vibration in sodium pool of FBR

  3. Cash pooling

    OpenAIRE

    Lozovaya, Karina

    2009-01-01

    This work makes a mention of cash management. At next chapter describes two most known theoretical models of cash management -- Baumol Model and Miller-Orr Model. Principal part of work is about cash pooling, types of cash pooling, cash pooling at Czech Republic and influence of cash pooling over accounting and taxes.

  4. Titanium ; dream new material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Tae; Kim Seung Eon; Heoon, Yong Taek; Jung, Hui Won

    2001-11-01

    The contents of this book are history of Titanium, present situation of Titanium industry, property of Titanium alloy, types of it, development of new alloy of Titanium smelting of Titanium, cast of Titanium and heat treatment of Titanium, Titanium alloy for plane, car parts, biological health care, and sport leisure and daily life, prospect, and Titanium industrial development of Titanium in China.

  5. Practical experience for liquid radioactive waste treatment from spent fuel storage pool on RA reactor in Vinca Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Pavlovic, R.; Pavlovic, S.

    2002-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of the preliminary removal of sludge from the bottom of the spent fuel storage pool in the RA reactor, mechanical filtration of the pool water and sludge conditioning and storage. Yugoslavia is a country without a nuclear power plant (NPP) on its territory. The law which strictly forbids NPP construction is still valid, but, nevertheless we must handle and dispose radioactive waste. This is not only because of radwaste originating from the use of radioactive materials in medicine and industry, but also because of the waste generated by research in the Nuclear Sciences Institute Vinca. In the last forty years, in the Vinca Institute, as a result of two research reactors being operational, named RA and RB, and as a result of the application of radionuclides in medicine, industry and agriculture, radioactive waste materials of different levels of specific activity were generated. As a temporary solution, radioactive waste materials are stored in two interim storages. Radwaste materials that were immobilized in the inactive matrices are to be placed in concrete containers, for further manipulation and disposal.(author)

  6. Exciting Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  7. Evaluation of filters in RSPCS (Reactor Service Pool Cooling System) and HWL (Hot Water Layer) in OPAL research reactor at ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization) using Gamma Spectrometry System and Liquid Scintillation Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jim In; Foy, Robin; Jung, Seong Moon; Park, Hyeon Suk; Ye, Sung Joon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization(ANSTO) has a research reactor, OPAL (Open Pool Australian Lightwater reactor) which is a state-of-art 20 MW reactor for various purposes. In OPAL reactor, there are many kinds of radionuclides produced from various reactions in pool water and those should be identified and quantified for the safe use of OPAL. To do that, it is essential to check the efficiency of filters which are able to remove the radioactive substance from the reactor pool water. There are two main water circuits in OPAL which are RSPCS (Reactor Service Pool Cooling System) and HWL (Hot Water Layer) water circuits. The reactor service pool is connected to the reactor pool via a transfer canal and provides a working area and storage space for the spent and other materials. Also, HWL is the upper part of the reactor pool water and it minimize radiation dose rates at the pool surface. We collected water samples from these circuits and measured the radioactivity by using Gamma Spectrometry System (GSS) and Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC) to evaluate the filters. We could evaluate the efficiency of filters in RSPCS and HWL in OPAL research reactor. Through the measurements of radioactivity using GSS and LSC, we could conclude that there is likely to be no alpha emitter in water samples, and for beta and gamma activity, there are very big differences between inlet and outlet results, so every filter is working efficiently to remove the radioactive substance.

  8. Effect of liquid subcooling on acoustic characteristics during the condensation process of vapor bubbles in a subcooled pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Jiguo; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Licheng; Li, Ya; Wang, Kaiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Deviations of signals increase first and then decrease with increase in subcooling. • Two typical waveforms are observed and correspond to bubble split-up and collapse. • Dominant frequency in low frequency region is found for all condensation regimes. • Peaks in high frequency region were only found in capillary wave regime. • Bubble collapse frequency is close to frequency of first peak in amplitude spectra. - Abstract: Sound characteristics of direct contact condensation of vapor bubbles in a subcooled pool were investigated experimentally with a hydrophone and a high-speed video camera. Three different condensation modes were observed, which were referred to as shape oscillation regime, transition regime and capillary wave regime in the paper. Time domain analysis indicated that the acoustic signals were boosted in their maximum amplitude with increase in subcooling, while their standard and average absolute deviations shifted to decrease after reaching a peak value. In addition, two different waveforms were found, possible sources of which were split-up and collapse of bubbles, respectively. From the amplitude spectra obtained by FFT, the first dominant frequency was found at frequency of 150–300 Hz for all condensation regimes, whereas some peaks in high frequency region were observed only for the capillary wave regime. The first dominant frequency was the result of the periodic variation in the vapor bubble volume, and the peaks in high frequency region were due to the high-frequency oscillation of water in pressure caused by sudden bubble collapse. The frequency of first peak was considered to be resulted from the periodic bubble collapse or split-up and thus was close to the bubble collapse frequency obtained from snapshots of bubble condensation. Moreover, according to results of short-time Fourier transform (STFT), the time intervals in which a certain process of bubble condensing occurred could be well known.

  9. Freeze-dried plasma enhances clot formation and inhibits fibrinolysis in the presence of tissue plasminogen activator similar to pooled liquid plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Benjamin R; Moore, Ernest E; Moore, Hunter B; Sauaia, Angela; Stettler, Gregory; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C

    2017-08-01

    Systemic hyperfibrinolysis is an integral part of trauma-induced coagulopathy associated with uncontrolled bleeding. Recent data suggest that plasma-first resuscitation attenuates hyperfibrinolysis; however, the availability, transport, storage, and administration of plasma in austere environments remain challenging and have limited its use. Freeze-dried plasma (FDP) is a potential alternative due to ease of storage, longer shelf life, and efficient reconstitution. FDP potentially enhances clot formation and resists breakdown better than normal saline (NS) and albumin and similar to liquid plasma. Healthy volunteers underwent citrated blood draw followed by 50% dilution with NS, albumin, pooled plasma (PP), or pooled freeze-dried plasma (pFDP). Citrated native and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-challenge (75 ng/mL) thrombelastography were done. Proteins in PP, pFDP, and albumin were analyzed by mass spectroscopy. pFDP and PP had superior clot-formation rates (angle) and clot strength (maximum amplitude) compared with NS and albumin in t-PA-challenge thrombelastographies (angle: pFDP, 67.9 degrees; PP, 67.8 degrees; NS, 40.6 degrees; albumin, 35.8 degrees; maximum amplitude: pFDP, 62.4 mm; PP, 63.5 mm; NS, 44.8 mm; albumin, 41.1 mm). NS and albumin dilution increased susceptibility to t-PA-induced hyperfibrinolysis compared with pFDP and PP (NS, 62.4%; albumin, 62.6%; PP, 8.5%; pFDP, 6.7%). pFDP was similar to PP in the attenuation of t-PA-induced fibrinolysis. Most proteins (97%) were conserved during the freeze-dry process, with higher levels in 12% of pFDP proteins compared with PP. pFDP enhances clot formation and attenuates hyperfibrinolysis better than NS and albumin and is a potential alternative to plasma resuscitation in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock. © 2017 AABB.

  10. Pool gateway seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr, J.A.; Steinert, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    A device for sealing a gateway between interconnectable pools in a nuclear facility comprising a frame supporting a liquid impermeable sheet positioned in a u-shaped gateway between the pools. An inflatable tube carried in a channel in the periphery of the frame and adjoining the gateway provides a seal therebetween when inflated. A restraining arrangement on the bottom edge of the frame is releasably engagable with an adjacent portion of the gateway to restrict the movement of the frame in the u-shaped gateway upon inflation of the tube, thereby enhancing the seal. The impermeable sheet is formed of an elastomer and thus is conformable to a liquid permeable supportive wall upon application of liquid pressure to the side of the sheet opposite the wall

  11. Electrodeposition of diamond-like carbon films on titanium alloy using organic liquids: Corrosion and wear resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcade, Tiago; Shmitzhaus, Tobias Eduardo; Gomes dos Reis, Otávio; Vargas, André Luis Marin; Hübler, Roberto; Müller, Iduvirges Lourdes; Fraga Malfatti, Célia de

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The electrodeposition may be conducted at room temperature. ► The DLC films have good resistance to corrosion in saline environments. ► The films have lower coefficient of friction than the uncoated substrate. ► The abrasive wear protection is evident in coated systems. - Abstract: Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been studied as coatings for corrosion protection and wear resistance because they have excellent chemical inertness in traditional corrosive environments, besides presenting a significant reduction in coefficient of friction. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films obtained by electrochemical deposition techniques have attracted a lot of interest, regarding their potential in relation to the vapor phase deposition techniques. The electrochemical deposition techniques are carried out at room temperature and do not need vacuum system, making easier this way the technological transfer. At high electric fields, the organic molecules polarize and react on the electrode surface, forming carbon films. The aim of this work was to obtain DLC films onto Ti6Al4V substrate using as electrolyte: acetonitrile (ACN) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and wear tests. The results show that these films can improve, significantly, the corrosion resistance of titanium and its alloys and their wear resistance.

  12. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saadati, Shagayegh; Salimi, Abdollah; Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. ► First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. ► With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. ► Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 reduction. ► Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH 2 -IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH 2 -IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H 2 O 2 biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k s ) and Michaelis–Menten constant (K M ) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 × 10 −12 mol cm −2 , 5.28 s −1 and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 μA mM −1 cm −2 and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  13. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadati, Shagayegh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH{sub 2}-IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH{sub 2}-IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub M}) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} mol cm{sup -2}, 5.28 s{sup -1} and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  14. Principle of a liquid nitrogen irradiation device and its realization for use in a swimming-pool type reactor; Principe d'un dispositif d'irradiation a azote liquide et sa realisation pour utilisation dans une pile piscine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochirol, L; Doulat, J; Weil, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The problem of pile irradiation of samples immersed in liquid nitrogen has been solved with total elimination of explosion hazards and high reliability (no moving parts). The principle of the device is that of a double bath: one of high purity nitrogen cools the samples at the level of the core; a second of commercial nitrogen is located above the first one, outside the high radiation field, and works as a continuous condenser for the pure nitrogen, the flow-back of which is provided simply by gravity. The apparatus described in detail here has been designed for a swimming-pool pile. It was so designed as to provide absolute protection against radiations and to allow the irradiated samples to be easily removed in the cold condition. This apparatus has been in operation for several months. In a fast flux greater than 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2}.s and a {gamma}-flux of the order of 10{sup 8} roentgens/h, the consumption of liquid nitrogen is of the order of 100 liters a day. (author) [French] On a resolu le probleme de l'irradiation en pile d'echantillons immerges dans l'azote liquide en construisant un appareil d'un fonctionnement sur (aucune partie n'est mobile) qui elimine completement les dangers d'explosion. Le principe de l'appareil est celui d'un double bain: l'un, d'azote pur, refroidit les echantillons au niveau du coeur du reacteur; l'autre, d'azote commercial, est situe au-dessus du premier, hors du champ de rayonnement intense, et sert de condenseur continu pour l'azote pur. Ce dernier ainsi reliquefie regagne son bain par simple gravite. L'appareil decrit en detail ici, est concu pour une pile piscine. Il a ete etudie de facon a ne creer aucune fuite de rayonnement et a permettre la recuperation aisee des echantillons irradies sans rechauffage de ceux-ci. Cet appareil est en fonctionnement depuis plusieurs mois. Dans un flux rapide superieur a 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2}.s et un flux {gamma} de l'ordre de 10{sup 8} roentgens/h, la consommation d

  15. Development of a Two-dimensional Thermohydraulic Hot Pool Model and ITS Effects on Reactivity Feedback during a UTOP in Liquid Metal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Jeong, Hae Yong; Cho, Chung Ho; Kwon, Young Min; Ha, Kwi Seok; Chang, Won Pyo; Suk, Soo Dong; Hahn, Do Hee

    2009-01-01

    The existence of a large sodium pool in the KALIMER, a pool-type LMR developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, plays an important role in reactor safety and operability because it determines the grace time for operators to cope with an abnormal event and to terminate a transient before reactor enters into an accident condition. A two-dimensional hot pool model has been developed and implemented in the SSC-K code, and has been successfully applied for the assessment of safety issues in the conceptual design of KALIMER and for the analysis of anticipated system transients. The other important models of the SSC-K code include a three-dimensional core thermal-hydraulic model, a reactivity model, a passive decay heat removal system model, and an intermediate heat transport system and steam generation system model. The capability of the developed two-dimensional hot pool model was evaluated with a comparison of the temperature distribution calculated with the CFX code. The predicted hot pool coolant temperature distributions obtained with the two-dimensional hot pool model agreed well with those predicted with the CFX code. Variations in the temperature distribution of the hot pool affect the reactivity feedback due to an expansion of the control rod drive line (CRDL) immersed in the pool. The existing CRDL reactivity model of the SSC-K code has been modified based on the detailed hot pool temperature distribution obtained with the two-dimensional pool model. An analysis of an unprotected transient over power with the modified reactivity model showed an improved negative reactivity feedback effect

  16. Pool scrubbing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Jimenez, J.; Herranz, J.; Escudero, M.J.; Espigares, M.M.; Peyres, V.; Polo, J.; Kortz, Ch.; Koch, M.K.; Brockmeier, U.; Unger, H.; Dutton, L.M.C.; Smedley, Ch.; Trow, W.; Jones, A.V.; Bonanni, E.; Calvo, M.; Alonso, A.

    1996-12-01

    The Source Term Project in the Third Frame Work Programme of the European Union Was conducted under and important joined effort on pool scrubbing research. CIEMAT was the Task Manager of the project and several other organizations participated in it: JRC-Ispra, NNC Limited, RUB-NES and UPM. The project was divided into several tasks. A peer review of the models in the pool scrubbing codes SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 was made, considering the different aspects in the hydrodynamic phenomenology, particle retention and fission product vapor abortions. Several dominant risk accident sequences were analyzed with MAAP, SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and the predictions were compared. A churn-turbulent model was developed for the hydrodynamic behaviour of the pool. Finally, an experimental programme in the PECA facility of CIEMAT was conducted in order to study the decontamination factor under jet injection regime, and the experimental observations were compared with the SPARC and BUSCA codes. (Author)

  17. Model of large pool fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fay, J.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)]. E-mail: jfay@mit.edu

    2006-08-21

    A two zone entrainment model of pool fires is proposed to depict the fluid flow and flame properties of the fire. Consisting of combustion and plume zones, it provides a consistent scheme for developing non-dimensional scaling parameters for correlating and extrapolating pool fire visible flame length, flame tilt, surface emissive power, and fuel evaporation rate. The model is extended to include grey gas thermal radiation from soot particles in the flame zone, accounting for emission and absorption in both optically thin and thick regions. A model of convective heat transfer from the combustion zone to the liquid fuel pool, and from a water substrate to cryogenic fuel pools spreading on water, provides evaporation rates for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic fires. The model is tested against field measurements of large scale pool fires, principally of LNG, and is generally in agreement with experimental values of all variables.

  18. Model of large pool fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    A two zone entrainment model of pool fires is proposed to depict the fluid flow and flame properties of the fire. Consisting of combustion and plume zones, it provides a consistent scheme for developing non-dimensional scaling parameters for correlating and extrapolating pool fire visible flame length, flame tilt, surface emissive power, and fuel evaporation rate. The model is extended to include grey gas thermal radiation from soot particles in the flame zone, accounting for emission and absorption in both optically thin and thick regions. A model of convective heat transfer from the combustion zone to the liquid fuel pool, and from a water substrate to cryogenic fuel pools spreading on water, provides evaporation rates for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic fires. The model is tested against field measurements of large scale pool fires, principally of LNG, and is generally in agreement with experimental values of all variables

  19. Determination of total ribonucleotide pool in plant materials by high-pH anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography following extraction with potassium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riondet, Christophe; Morel, Sylvain; Alcaraz, Gérard

    2005-06-10

    A new, improved method that only requires a potassium hydroxide extraction procedure is presented for the analysis of a full nucleotide pool in plant materials. Quantification was performed by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) with UV detection after a potassium hydroxide extraction, and allowed the quantification of 13 linear ribonucleotides in a single run. The method has been validated by comparison of six extraction methods and also by measurement of the intracellular nucleotide levels of three plant species (cell cultures and leaves). The evolution of the nucleotide pool of Nicotiana tabacum cell culture during growth has also been measured, and showed an increase in the pool until the fifth day, where the growth rate reaches a maximum, after which a decrease was observed.

  20. 13 CFR 120.1708 - Pool Certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... United States. (c) SBA purchase of a Loan Interest. SBA will determine whether to purchase a Loan... reserves the right to purchase a Loan Interest from a Pool at any time. (d) Self-liquidating. A Pool... market conditions and program experience, and will publish any such change in the Federal Register. (h...

  1. Hawaii ESI: POOLS (Anchialine Pool Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anchialine pools in Hawaii. Anchialine pools are small, relatively shallow coastal ponds that occur...

  2. The CRDL model of SSC-K code for the safety improvement of a pool-type liquid metal-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, H. Y.; Ha, K. S.; Jang, W. P.; Hu, S.; Lee, Y. B.

    2004-01-01

    With the increased thermal power of KALIMER-600, it becomes important to model accurately the reactivity feedback effects due to the thermal expansion of a fuel rod and internal structure during a transient. In KALIMER design, the fuel axial expansion, core radial expansion, and the control rod drive line/reactor vessel (CRDL/RV) thermal expansion are the important reactivity feedback mechanisms. It is required to develop a more detailed CRDL/RV model for the accurate analysis of the KALIMER-600 transient because the control rod drive line of 9.5 m is immersed in the hot pool. For this a new CRDL/RV model was developed to model the effect of expansion of CRDL utilizing the temperature distribution obtained with the hot-pool 2-D model of SSC-K code. It is estimated that the developed model describes more realistically the negative reactivity insertion effect due to the initial temperature change during the UTOP transient of KALIMER-150

  3. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available used, the following forms of titanium are produced: titanium sponge, sintered electrode sponge, powder, molten titanium, electroplated titanium, hydride powder, and vapor-phase depos- ited titanium. Comparing the economics of alter- native...-up for producing titanium via the Kroll process is approximately as follows: ilmenite ($0.27/kg titanium sponge); titanium slag ($0.75/kg titanium sponge); TiCl4 ($3.09/kg titanium sponge); titanium sponge raw materials costs ($5.50/kg titanium sponge); total...

  4. Sorption of cesium on titanium and zirconium phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, V.N.; Mel'nik, N.A.; Rudenko, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium phosphates were prepared from mineral raw materials of the Kola Peninsula. Their capability to recover cesium cations from the model solutions and liquid radioactive waste (LRW) was studied. Titanium phosphate prepared from solutions formed by titanite breakdown demonstrates greater distribution coefficients of cesium as compared to zirconium phosphate. Titanium phosphate as a cheaper agent featuring greater sorption capacity was recommended for treatment of LRW to remove cesium [ru

  5. Study of the hovering period and bubble size in fully developed pool nucleate boiling of saturated liquid with a time-dependent heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Nelson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the bubble behavior in saturated pool boiling with a time-dependent heat source is analyzed. The study is restricted to the period from fully developed nucleate boiling until critical heat flux occurs. The hovering period and the departure volume of the bubble are selected as the characteristic parameters for bubble behavior. These parameters are quantified by solving the equation of motion for an idealized bubble. This equation is solved for cases in which the surface heat flux changes linearly and exponentially as a function of time. After nondimensionalization, the results are compared directly with the results of the steady-state problem. The comparison shows that the transient heat input has practically no effect on the hovering period. However, the transient heat flux causes a decreased volume at bubble departure. The volume decrease is dependent on the severity of the transient. These results are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observation quoted in the literature

  6. Mechanism of cesium sorption on potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yongxia; Xu Shiping; Song Chongli

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of cesium sorption on potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate is described. The dependence of the sorption speed on temperature, particle granule size, and the stirring speed is studied. The results show that the sorption process is controlled by liquid film diffusion and particle diffusion. An exchange reaction occurs mainly between K + in the exchanger and Cs + in the solution, i.e. potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate, and Cs + of simulated high-level liquid waste

  7. Titanium and titanium alloys: fundamentals and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leyens, C; Peters, M

    2003-01-01

    ... number of titanium alloys have paved the way for light metals to vastly expand into many industrial applications. Titanium and its alloys stand out primarily due to their high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance, at just half the weight of steels and Ni-based superalloys. This explains their early success in the aerospace and the...

  8. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  9. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001357.htm Swimming pool granuloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin ...

  10. Electrocatalytic properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes with titanium dioxide and benzofuran derivative/ionic liquid for simultaneous determination of isoproterenol and serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazloum-Ardakani, Mohammad; Khoshroo, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • TiO 2 and benzofuran derivative were uniformly deposited onto carbon nanotubes • This nanocomposite can be used as a sensor in isoproterenol detection • This sensor shows a great enhancement in sensitivity, selectivity and stability - Abstract: In this paper we report synthesis and application of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 ), 9-(1,3-dithiolan-2-yl)-6,7-dihydroxy-3,3-dimethyl-3,4-dihydrodibenzo[b,d] furan-1(2H)-one (benzofuran derivative (DDF)) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (IL) as high sensitive sensors for simultaneous determination of isoproterenol (IP) and serotonin (5-HT) using glassy carbon electrode. The modified electrode was characterized by different methods including a scanning electron microscope (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and voltammetry. A pair of well-defined redox peaks of DDF was obtained at the modified glassy carbon electrode by direct electron transfer between the DDF and the electrode. Dramatically enhanced electrocatalytic activity was exemplified at the modified electrode, as an electrochemical sensor to study the electro oxidation of IP and 5-HT. The differential pulse voltammetry data showed that the obtained anodic peak currents were linearly dependent on the IP and 5-HT concentrations in the range of 0.1–1300.0 and 1.0–650.0 μM, respectively. The applicability of the modified electrode was demonstrated by simultaneous determination of IP and 5-HT in human serum

  11. Pool scrubbing models for iodine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, K [Battelle Ingenieurtechnik GmbH, Eschborn (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    Pool scrubbing is an important mechanism to retain radioactive fission products from being carried into the containment atmosphere or into the secondary piping system. A number of models and computer codes has been developed to predict the retention of aerosols and fission product vapours that are released from the core and injected into water pools of BWR and PWR type reactors during severe accidents. Important codes in this field are BUSCA, SPARC and SUPRA. The present paper summarizes the models for scrubbing of gaseous Iodine components in these codes, discusses the experimental validation, and gives an assessment of the state of knowledge reached and the open questions which persist. The retention of gaseous Iodine components is modelled by the various codes in a very heterogeneous manner. Differences show up in the chemical species considered, the treatment of mass transfer boundary layers on the gaseous and liquid sides, the gas-liquid interface geometry, calculation of equilibrium concentrations and numerical procedures. Especially important is the determination of the pool water pH value. This value is affected by basic aerosols deposited in the water, e.g. Cesium and Rubidium compounds. A consistent model requires a mass balance of these compounds in the pool, thus effectively coupling the pool scrubbing phenomena of aerosols and gaseous Iodine species. Since the water pool conditions are also affected by drainage flow of condensate water from different regions in the containment, and desorption of dissolved gases on the pool surface is determined by the gas concentrations above the pool, some basic limitations of specialized pool scrubbing codes are given. The paper draws conclusions about the necessity of coupling between containment thermal-hydraulics and pool scrubbing models, and proposes ways of further simulation model development in order to improve source term predictions. (author) 2 tabs., refs.

  12. Pool scrubbing models for iodine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.

    1996-01-01

    Pool scrubbing is an important mechanism to retain radioactive fission products from being carried into the containment atmosphere or into the secondary piping system. A number of models and computer codes has been developed to predict the retention of aerosols and fission product vapours that are released from the core and injected into water pools of BWR and PWR type reactors during severe accidents. Important codes in this field are BUSCA, SPARC and SUPRA. The present paper summarizes the models for scrubbing of gaseous Iodine components in these codes, discusses the experimental validation, and gives an assessment of the state of knowledge reached and the open questions which persist. The retention of gaseous Iodine components is modelled by the various codes in a very heterogeneous manner. Differences show up in the chemical species considered, the treatment of mass transfer boundary layers on the gaseous and liquid sides, the gas-liquid interface geometry, calculation of equilibrium concentrations and numerical procedures. Especially important is the determination of the pool water pH value. This value is affected by basic aerosols deposited in the water, e.g. Cesium and Rubidium compounds. A consistent model requires a mass balance of these compounds in the pool, thus effectively coupling the pool scrubbing phenomena of aerosols and gaseous Iodine species. Since the water pool conditions are also affected by drainage flow of condensate water from different regions in the containment, and desorption of dissolved gases on the pool surface is determined by the gas concentrations above the pool, some basic limitations of specialized pool scrubbing codes are given. The paper draws conclusions about the necessity of coupling between containment thermal-hydraulics and pool scrubbing models, and proposes ways of further simulation model development in order to improve source term predictions. (author) 2 tabs., refs

  13. Solar swimming pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This report examines the feasibility of using solar collectors to heat the water in a previously unheated outdoor swimming pool. The solar system is used in conjunction with a pool blanket, to conserve heat when the pool is not in use. Energy losses through evaporation can be reduced by as much as 70% by a pool blanket. A total of 130 m{sup 2} of highly durable black synthetic collectors were installed on a support structure at a 30{degree} angle from the horizontal, oriented to the south. Circulation of pool water though the collectors, which is controlled by a differential thermostat, was done with the existing pool pump. Before installation the pool temperature averaged 16{degree}C; after installation it ranged from 20{degree} to 26{degree}C. It was hard to distinguish how much pool heating was due to the solar system and how much heat was retained by the pool blanket. However, the pool season was extended by five weeks and attendance tripled. 2 figs.

  14. Condensation in a two-phase pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    We consider the case of vapor condensation in a liquid pool, when the heat transfer is controlled by heat losses through the walls. The analysis is based on drift flux theory for phase separation in the pool, and determines the two-phase mixture height for the pool. To our knowledge this is the first analytical treatment of this classic problem that gives an explicit result, previous work having established the result for the evaporative case. From conservation of mass and energy in a one-dimensional steady flow, together with a void relation between the liquid and vapor fluxes, we determine the increase in the mixture level from the base level of the pool. It can be seen that the thermal and hydrodynamic influences are separable. Thus, the thermal influence of the wall heat transfer appears through its effect on the condensing length L*, so that at high condensation rates the pool is all liquid, and at low rates overflows (the level swell or foaming effect). Similarly, the phase separation effect hydrodynamically determines the height via the relative velocity of the mixture to the entering flux. We examine some practical applications of this result to level swell in condensing flows, and also examine some limits in ideal cases

  15. Swimming-pool piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trioulaire, M.

    1959-01-01

    In France two swimming-pool piles, Melusine and Triton, have just been set in operation. The swimming-pool pile is the ideal research tool for neutron fluxes of the order of 10 13 . This type of pile can be of immediate interest to many research centres, but its cost must be reduced and a break with tradition should be observed in its design. It would be an advantage: - to bury the swimming-pool; - to reject the experimental channel; - to concentrate the cooling circuit in the swimming-pool; - to carry out all manipulations in the water; - to double the core. (author) [fr

  16. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaluzny, J. A. [Fermilab; Grimm, C. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  17. Spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Naoshi.

    1996-01-01

    Fences are disposed to a fuel exchange floor surrounding the upper surface of a fuel pool for preventing overflow of pool water. The fences comprise a plurality of flat boards arranged in parallel with each other in the longitudinal direction while being vertically inclined, and slits are disposed between the boards for looking down the pool. Further, the fences comprise wide boards and are constituted so as to be laid horizontally on the fuel exchange floor in a normal state and uprisen by means of the signals from an earthquake sensing device. Even if pool water is overflow from the fuel pool by the vibrations occurred upon earthquake and flown out to the floor of the fuel exchange floor, the overflow from the fuel exchange floor is prevented by the fences. An operator who monitors the fuel pool can observe the inside of the fuel pool through the slits formed to the fences during normal operation. The fences act as resistance against overflowing water upon occurrence of an earthquake thereby capable of reducing the overflowing amount of water due to the vibrations of pool water. The effect of preventing overflowing water can be enhanced. (N.H.)

  18. Collaborative Car Pooling System

    OpenAIRE

    João Ferreira; Paulo Trigo; Porfírio Filipe

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture for a collaborative Car Pooling System based on a credits mechanism to motivate the cooperation among users. Users can spend the accumulated credits on parking facilities. For this, we propose a business model to support the collaboration between a car pooling system and parking facilities. The Portuguese Lisbon-s Metropolitan area is used as application scenario.

  19. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  20. Characterization and Sintering of Armstrong Process Titanium Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyan; Nash, Philip; Mangabhai, Damien

    2017-04-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys have a high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance but also need longer time and have a higher cost on machining. Powder metallurgy offers a viable approach to produce near net-shape complex components with little or no machining. The Armstrong titanium powders are produced by direct reduction of TiCl4 vapor with liquid sodium, a process which has a relatively low cost. This paper presents a systematic research on powder characterization, mechanical properties, and sintering behavior and of Armstrong process powder metallurgy, and also discusses the sodium issue, and the advantages and disadvantages of Armstrong process powders.

  1. Classification of titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.; Garcia C, R.M.; Maya M, M.E.; Ita T, A. De; Palacios G, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) and the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy techniques are used with the purpose to achieve a complete identification of phases and mixture of phases of a crystalline material as titanium dioxide. The problem for solving consists of being able to distinguish a sample of titanium dioxide being different than a titanium dioxide pigment. A standard sample of titanium dioxide with NIST certificate is used, which indicates a purity of 99.74% for the TiO 2 . The following way is recommended to proceed: a)To make an analysis by means of X-ray diffraction technique to the sample of titanium dioxide pigment and on the standard of titanium dioxide waiting not find differences. b) To make a chemical analysis by the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy via in a microscope, taking advantage of the high vacuum since it is oxygen which is analysed and if it is concluded that the aluminium oxide appears in a greater proportion to 1% it is established that is a titanium dioxide pigment, but if it is lesser then it will be only titanium dioxide. This type of analysis is an application of the nuclear techniques useful for the tariff classification of merchandise which is considered as of difficult recognition. (Author)

  2. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates. 120.611 Section 120.611 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set...

  3. Spark plasma sintering of titanium aluminide intermetallics and its composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoshan, Abdelhakim Ahmed

    Titanium aluminide intermetallics are a distinct class of engineering materials having unique properties over conventional titanium alloys. gamma-TiAl compound possesses competitive physical and mechanical properties at elevated temperature applications compared to Ni-based superalloys. gamma-TiAl composite materials exhibit high melting point, low density, high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is one of the powder metallurgy techniques where powder mixture undergoes simultaneous application of uniaxial pressure and pulsed direct current. Unlike other sintering techniques such as hot iso-static pressing and hot pressing, SPS compacts the materials in shorter time (< 10 min) with a lower temperature and leads to highly dense products. Reactive synthesis of titanium aluminide intermetallics is carried out using SPS. Reactive sintering takes place between liquid aluminum and solid titanium. In this work, reactive sintering through SPS was used to fabricate fully densified gamma-TiAl and titanium aluminide composites starting from elemental powders at different sintering temperatures. It was observed that sintering temperature played significant role in the densification of titanium aluminide composites. gamma-TiAl was the predominate phase at different temperatures. The effect of increasing sintering temperature on microhardness, microstructure, yield strength and wear behavior of titanium aluminide was studied. Addition of graphene nanoplatelets to titanium aluminide matrix resulted in change in microhardness. In Ti-Al-graphene composites, a noticeable decrease in coefficient of friction was observed due to the influence of self-lubrication caused by graphene.

  4. Research progresses and future directions on pool boiling heat transfer

    OpenAIRE

    M. Kumar; V. Bhutani; P. Khatak

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the previous work carried on pool boiling heat transfer during heating of various liquids and commodities categorized as refrigerants and dielectric fluids, pure liquids, nanofluids, hydrocarbons and additive mixtures, as well as natural and synthetic colloidal solutions. Nucleate pool boiling is an efficient and effective method of boiling because high heat fluxes are possible with moderate temperature differences. It is characterized by the growth of bubbles on a heated s...

  5. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  6. Electrowinning molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in it quest for global competitiveness CSIR Manufacturing and Materials Technology 3 Rationale – Titanium Cost Build-up Material Cost Ilmenite $0.27/kg Ti sponge Titanium slag $0.75/kg Ti Sponge TiCl4 and TiO2 $3....10/kg Ti Sponge Ti Sponge raw materials costs $5.50/kg Ti Sponge Total Ti Sponge cost $9-$11/kg Ti Sponge Ti ingot $15-17/kg Ti Aluminium $1.7/kg Al Supporting the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in its quest for global competitivenessorting...

  7. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to ...

  8. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  9. Swimming pool special; Zwembadspecial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    This issue includes a few articles and messages on the use of heat pump systems in swimming pools. [Dutch] Dit nummer bevat onder meer een paar artikelen over het gebruik van warmtepompsystemen in zwembaden.

  10. Chitosan patterning on titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Gilabert Chirivella, Eduardo; Pérez Feito, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Clarisse; Ribeiro, Sylvie; Correia, Daniela; González Martin, María Luisa; Manero Planella, José María; Lanceros Méndez, Senentxu; Gallego Ferrer, Gloria; Gómez Ribelles, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used in medical implants because of their excellent properties. However, bacterial infection is a frequent cause of titanium-based implant failure and also compromises its osseointegration. In this study, we report a new simple method of providing titanium surfaces with antibacterial properties by alternating antibacterial chitosan domains with titanium domains in the micrometric scale. Surface microgrooves were etched on pure titanium disks at i...

  11. Laser-TIG Welding of Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulsky, I.; Somonov, V.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents the results of investigation the technological opportunity of laser-TIG welding of titanium alloys. The experimental stand for implementation of process with the capability to feed a filler wire was made. The research of the nature of transfer the filler wire into the welding pool has been demonstrated. The influence of distance between the electrode and the surface of the welded plates on the stability of the arc was shown. The relationship between welding velocity, the position of focal plane of the laser beam and the stability of penetration of plates was determined.

  12. Production of titanium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Botbol, O.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a summary of results from theoperation of a laboratory scale for the production in batches of approximately 100 gs of titanium tetrachloride by chlorination with chloroform and carbon tetrachloride between 340 deg C and 540 deg C. Chlorination agent vapors were passed through a quartz column reacting with titanium oxide powder agglomerated in little spheres. Obtained titanium tetrachloride was condensed in a condenser, taken in a ballon and then purified by fractional distillation. Optimun temperature for chloroform was 400 deg C with 74 % yield and for carbon tetrachloride was 500 deg C with 69 % yield. (Author) [es

  13. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure when gas-tungsten arc welded. This microstructure is susceptible to hydrogen cracking when water vapor is present in the welding environment. Because fusion zone microstructural refinement can reduce the hydrogen cracking susceptibility, titanium was used to inoculate the weld pool in iron aluminide alloy FA-129. Although the fusion zone microstructure was significantly refined by this method, the fracture stress was found to decrease with titanium additions. This decrease is attributed to an increase in inclusions at the grain boundaries.

  14. Controlling pool depth during VAR of Alloy 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, F.; Beaman, J.; Williamson, R.; Evans, D.

    2016-07-01

    A longtime goal of superalloy producers has been to control the geometry of the liquid pool in solidifying ingots. Accurate pool depth control at appropriate values is expected to result in ingots free of segregation defects. This article describes an industrial VAR experiment in which a 430mm (17 in) diameter Alloy 718 electrode was melted into a 510mm (20 in) ingot. In the experiment, the depth of the liquid pool at the mid-radius was controlled to three different set-points: 137 mm (nominal), 193 mm (deep) and 118 mm (shallow). At each level, the pool depth was marked by a power cutback of several minutes. The ingot was sectioned and longitudinal slices were cut out. Analysis of the photographed ingot revealed that accurate control was obtained for both the nominal and deep pool cases, while the third one was not conclusive.

  15. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  16. Titanium oxide fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jonge, D.; Visser, J.

    2012-01-01

    One measure to improve air quality is to apply photo-catalytic substances that capture NOx onto the road surface or onto baffle boards alongside the roads. The effect of titanium oxide containing clinkers with coating was discussed in the report 'Demonstration project of air-purifying pavement in Hengelo, The Netherlands' that was published in May 2011. This article examines the way in which the effectiveness of this study was determined. Can titanium oxide containing clinkers and coatings indeed capture NOx?. [nl

  17. Machining of titanium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  18. Comparative study about hydrogen sorption in sponge and powder titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasut, Felicia; Preda, Anisoara; Zamfirache, Marius; Ducu, Catalin; Malinovschi, Viorel

    2005-01-01

    Currently, hydrogen may be stored as a compressed gas or a cryogenic liquid. Neither method appears to be practical for many applications in which hydrogen use would otherwise be attractive. For example, gaseous storage of stationary fuel is not feasible because of the large volume or weight of the storage vessels. Liquid hydrogen could be use extensively but the liquefaction process is relatively expensive. The hydrogen can be stored for a long term with a high separation factor, as a solid metal hydride. Using hydride-forming metals and intermetallic compounds, for example, recovery, purification and storage of heavy isotopes in tritium containing system, can solve many problems arising in the nuclear-fuel cycle. The paper presents a comparative study about hydrogen sorption on two titanium structures: powder and sponge. Also, it is presented the characterization, by X-Ray diffraction, of two structures, before and after sorption process. From our results, one can conclude that sorption method is efficient for both samples. Kinetic curves indicates that sorption rate for titanium powder is lower than for sponge titanium. This is the effect of reaction surface, which is larger for powder titanium. Sorption capacity for hydrogen is lower in powder titanium for identical experimental conditions. The difference between storage capacities could be explained by activation temperature, which was lower for titanium powder than for sponge. (authors)

  19. Pool water cleaning facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Asano, Takashi

    1998-05-29

    Only one system comprising a suppression poor water cleaning system (SPCU) and a filtration desalting tower (F/D) is connected for a plurality of nuclear power plants. Pipelines/valves for connecting the one system of the SPCU pump, the F/D and the plurality of nuclear power plants are disposed, and the system is used in common with the plurality of nuclear power plants. Pipelines/valves for connecting a pipeline for passing SP water to the commonly used SPCU pump and a skimmer surge tank are disposed, and fuel pool water is cooled and cleaned by the commonly used SPCU pump and the commonly used F/D. The number of SPCU pumps and the F/D facilities can be reduced, and a fuel pool water cooling operation mode and a fuel pool water cleaning operation mode which were conducted by an FPC pump so far are conducted by the SPCU pump. (N.H.)

  20. Titanium by design: TRIP titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jamie

    Motivated by the prospect of lower cost Ti production processes, new directions in Ti alloy design were explored for naval and automotive applications. Building on the experience of the Steel Research Group at Northwestern University, an analogous design process was taken with titanium. As a new project, essential kinetic databases and models were developed for the design process and used to create a prototype design. Diffusion kinetic models were developed to predict the change in phase compositions and microstructure during heat treatment. Combining a mobility database created in this research with a licensed thermodynamic database, ThermoCalc and DICTRA software was used to model kinetic compositional changes in titanium alloys. Experimental diffusion couples were created and compared to DICTRA simulations to refine mobility parameters in the titanium mobility database. The software and database were able to predict homogenization times and the beta→alpha plate thickening kinetics during cooling in the near-alpha Ti5111 alloy. The results of these models were compared to LEAP microanalysis and found to be in reasonable agreement. Powder metallurgy was explored using SPS at GM R&D to reduce the cost of titanium alloys. Fully dense Ti5111 alloys were produced and achieved similar microstructures to wrought Ti5111. High levels of oxygen in these alloys increased the strength while reducing the ductility. Preliminary Ti5111+Y alloys were created, where yttrium additions successfully gettered excess oxygen to create oxides. However, undesirable large oxides formed, indicating more research is needed into the homogeneous distribution of the yttrium powder to create finer oxides. Principles established in steels were used to optimize the beta phase transformation stability for martensite transformation toughening in titanium alloys. The Olson-Cohen kinetic model is calibrated to shear strains in titanium. A frictional work database is established for common alloying

  1. Development and Characterization of Titanium Compound N anostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou

    The development and characterization of titanium compound nanostructures have been achieved, for potential applications in energy industry. Oil and gas, one of the traditional industry fields, observes accumulating demands on active implementations of nanotechnology, for the numerous advantages that nanomaterials can introduce to both product performances and field operations. By using chemical vapor deposition and liquid exfoliation, various titanium compound nanostructures have been synthesized through this project. Attractively, these two material fabrication methods have been recognized to be industrial friendly in terms of cost efficiency and productivity. The development of nanostructures, aiming at oil and gas field applications, presents novel solutions for existing issues, such as low durability of drilling tools, high friction in mechanical operations and ineffective heat dissipation. Titanium compound nanostructures, including titanium borides, nitrides and sulfides are therefore investigated for such applications as protective coating, lubrication and thermal management.

  2. Condensation of vapor bubble in subcooled pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, K.; Koiwa, Y.; Kaneko, T.; Ueno, I.

    2017-02-01

    We focus on condensation process of vapor bubble exposed to a pooled liquid of subcooled conditions. Two different geometries are employed in the present research; one is the evaporation on the heated surface, that is, subcooled pool boiling, and the other the injection of vapor into the subcooled pool. The test fluid is water, and all series of the experiments are conducted under the atmospheric pressure condition. The degree of subcooling is ranged from 10 to 40 K. Through the boiling experiment, unique phenomenon known as microbubble emission boiling (MEB) is introduced; this phenomenon realizes heat flux about 10 times higher than the critical heat flux. Condensation of the vapor bubble is the key phenomenon to supply ambient cold liquid to the heated surface. In order to understand the condensing process in the MEB, we prepare vapor in the vapor generator instead of the evaporation on the heated surface, and inject the vapor to expose the vapor bubble to the subcooled liquid. Special attention is paid to the dynamics of the vapor bubble detected by the high-speed video camera, and on the enhancement of the heat transfer due to the variation of interface area driven by the condensation.

  3. Laser beam welding of titanium nitride coated titanium using pulse-shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Sergio Fernandes de Lima

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A new welding method which allows the assembly of two titanium nitride coated titanium parts is proposed. The welding procedure utilizes the possibility for pulse-shaping in order to change the energy distribution profile during the laser pulse. The pulse-shaping is composed of three elements: a a short high power pulse for partial ablation at the surface; b a long pulse for thermal penetration; and c a quenching slope for enhanced weldability. The combination of these three elements produces crack-free welds. The weld microstructure is changed in comparison to normal welding, i.e. with a rectangular pulse, as the nitrogen and the microhardness are more homogenously distributed in the weld under pulse-shaping conditions. This laser pulse dissolves the TiN layer and allows nitrogen to diffuse into the melt pool, also contributing to an enhanced weldability by providing suitable thermal conditions.

  4. Structure of pool in reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shigeki.

    1997-01-01

    Shielding walls made of iron-reinforced concrete having a metal liner including two body walls rigidly combined to the upper surface of a reactor container are disposed at least to one of an equipment pool or spent fuel storage pool in a reactor building. A rack for temporarily placing an upper lattice plate is detachably attached at least above one of a steam dryer or a gas/liquid separator temporarily placed in the temporary pool, and the height from the bottom portion to the upper end of the shielding wall is determined based on the height of an upper lattice plate temporary placed on the rack and the water depth required for shielding radiation from the upper lattice plate. An operator's exposure on the operation floor can be reduced by the shielding wall, and radiation dose from the spent fuels is reduced. The increase of the height of a pool guarder enhances bending resistance as a ceiling. In addition, the total height of them is made identical with the depth of the spent fuel storage pool thereby enabling to increase storage area for spent fuels. (N.H.)

  5. Candida albicans biofilm on titanium: effect of peroxidase precoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahariz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Ahariz1, Philippe Courtois1,21Laboratory of Experimental Hormonology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, 2UER de Biologie Médicale, Haute Ecole Francisco Ferrer, Brussels, BelgiumAbstract: The present study aimed to document Candida albicans biofilm development on titanium and its modulation by a peroxidase-precoated material which can generate antimicrobials, such as hypoiodite or hypothiocyanite, from hydrogen peroxide, iodide, or thiocyanate. For this purpose, titanium (powder or foil was suspended in Sabouraud liquid medium inoculated with C. albicans ATCC10231. After continuous stirring for 2–21 days at room temperature, the supernatant was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm and titanium washed three times in sterile Sabouraud broth. Using the tetrazolium salt MTT-formazan assay, the titanium-adherent fungal biomass was measured as 7.50 ± 0.60 × 106 blastoconidia per gram of titanium powder (n = 30 and 0.50 ± 0.04 × 106 blastoconidia per cm² of titanium foil (n = 12. The presence of yeast on the surface of titanium was confirmed by microscopy both on fresh preparations and after calcofluor white staining. However, in the presence of peroxidase systems (lactoperoxidase with substrates such as hydrogen peroxide donor, iodide, or thiocyanate, Candida growth in both planktonic and attached phases appeared to be inhibited. Moreover, this study demonstrates the possible partition of peroxidase systems between titanium material (peroxidase-precoated and liquid environment (containing peroxidase substrates to limit C. albicans biofilm formation.Keywords: adhesion, material, oral, yeast

  6. Income pooling within families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Uldall-Poulsen, Hans

    This paper analyses the phenomenon of income-pooling by applying the Danish household expenditure survey, merged with authoritative register information. Responses to additional questions on income sharing among 1696 couples also allows us to analyses whether the intra-household distribution...

  7. Resorbable versus titanium plates for orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Nasser, Mona; Gill, Karanjot S

    2017-10-04

    Recognition of some of the limitations of titanium plates and screws used for the fixation of bones has led to the development of plates manufactured from bioresorbable materials. Whilst resorbable plates appear to offer clinical advantages over metal plates in orthognathic surgery, concerns remain about the stability of fixation and the length of time required for their degradation and the possibility of foreign body reactions. This review compares the use of titanium versus bioresorbable plates in orthognathic surgery and is an update of the Cochrane Review first published in 2007. To compare the effects of bioresorbable fixation systems with titanium systems used during orthognathic surgery. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 20 January 2017); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 11) in the Cochrane Library (searched 20 January 2017); MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 20 January 2017); and Embase Ovid (1980 to 20 January 2017). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register ClinicalTrials.gov (clinicaltrials.gov; searched 20 January 2017), and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (searched 20 January 2017) for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials comparing bioresorbable versus titanium fixation systems used for orthognathic surgery in adults. Two review authors independently screened the results of the electronic searches, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. We resolved disagreement by discussion. Clinical heterogeneity between the included trials precluded pooling of data, and only a descriptive summary is presented. This review included two trials, involving 103 participants, one comparing titanium with resorbable plates and screws and

  8. Investigation into boron reaction with titanium at extreme temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchagin, M.A.; Gusenko, S.N.; Aleksandrov, V.V.; Neronov, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of self-propagation high-temperature synthesis of titanium boride is studied using the translucent electron microscopy. Titanium interaction with boron film (approximately 1000 A thick) starts with the metal partial melting. A twozone layer of the reaction products, separating the reagents, is formed. In the zone adjacent to B, Ti 3 B 4 and fusible liquid phases are present. The second zone consists of TiB. The subsequent interaction is realized by Means of the dissolving and absorption by titanium of the layer of products during its continuous increase in boron. TiB 2 formation takes place at subsequent stages of interaction inside Ti liquid particles during their saturation by boron from the products absorbed [ru

  9. Characterization of titanium alloys for cryogenic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reytier, M.; Kircher, F.; Levesy, B.

    2002-01-01

    Titanium alloys are employed in the design of superconducting magnet support systems for their high mechanical strength associated with their low thermal conductivity. But their use requires a careful attention to their crack tolerance at cryogenic temperature. Measurements have been performed on two extra low interstitial materials (Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI and Ti-6Al-4V ELI) with different thickness and manufacturing process. The investigation includes the tensile properties at room and liquid helium temperatures using smooth and notched samples. Moreover, the fracture toughness has been determined at 4.2 K using Compact Tension specimens. The microstructure of the different alloys and the various fracture surfaces have also been studied. After a detailed description of the experimental procedures, practical engineering characteristics are given and a comparison of the different titanium alloys is proposed for cryogenic applications

  10. Research progresses and future directions on pool boiling heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the previous work carried on pool boiling heat transfer during heating of various liquids and commodities categorized as refrigerants and dielectric fluids, pure liquids, nanofluids, hydrocarbons and additive mixtures, as well as natural and synthetic colloidal solutions. Nucleate pool boiling is an efficient and effective method of boiling because high heat fluxes are possible with moderate temperature differences. It is characterized by the growth of bubbles on a heated surface. It occurs during boiling of liquids for excess temperature ranging from 5 to 30 °C in various processes related to high vaporization of liquid for specific purposes like sugarcane juice heating for jaggery making, milk heating for khoa making, steam generation, cooling of electronic equipments, refrigeration and etcetera. In this review paper, pool boiling method during heating of liquids for specific purpose is depicted. It is inferred that enhancement in pool boiling heat transfer is a challenging and complex task. Also, recent research and use of various correlations for natural convection pool boiling is reviewed.

  11. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  12. Industrial experience with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author)

  13. A novel approach to fabrication of three-dimensional porous titanium with controllable structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dong; Li, Qiuyan; Xu, Mingqin; Jiang, Guofeng; Zhang, Yunxia [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, and State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); He, Guo, E-mail: ghe@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, and State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Ship and Deep-Sea Exploration, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-02-01

    A new approach to fabrication of porous titanium by using the molybdenum wire as space holder was developed, in which titanium liquid was cast into the entangled molybdenum wires in a vacuum environment, and followed by etching off the space holder material in an aqua regia solution. This infiltration casting and acid corrosion method fabricated the porous titanium with different porosities with a pore diameter of 0.4 mm. The porous titanium with the porosity of 32–47% exhibited the Young's modulus in the range of 23–62 GPa and the yielding strength in the range of 76–192 MPa. The adhesion and spreadability of the bovine osteoblast cells on the porous titanium were also evaluated in vitro. The porous titanium with 47% porosity has great potential for implant applications. - Highlights: • A new approach to fabrication of porous titanium was developed. • The 3D morphology of the interconnected porous structure can be exactly controlled. • The as-prepared porous titanium exhibits adequate yielding strength. • The elastic modulus of the porous titanium matches well with that of cortical bone. • The as-prepared porous titanium has great potential for implant applications.

  14. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Backfitting swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roebert, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Calculations based on measurements in a critical assembly, and experiments to disclose fuel element surface temperatures in case of accidents like stopping of primary coolant flow during full power operation, have shown that the power of the swimming pool type research reactor FRG-2 (15 MW, operating since 1967) might be raised to 21 MW within the present rules of science and technology, without major alterations of the pool buildings and the cooling systems. A backfitting program is carried through to adjust the reactor control systems of FRG-2 and FRG-1 (5 MW, housed in the same reactor hall) to the present safety rules and recommendations, to ensure FRG-2 operation at 21 MW for the next decade. (author)

  16. Thermogravimetric experiments with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, L.J.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-02-01

    In the process of preparing for pyrophoricity experiments involving uranium, we conducted hydriding and air-exposure experiments on titanium. In these experiments the hydriding reactions and response to air-exposure was generally within the range expected based on work reported by others. One aberrant behavior was a sudden weight gain followed by a significant weight loss. We speculate that loss may be due to hydrogen evolution from the TiH 2 resulting from local heating by oxidation reactions. We verified that titanium is not pyrophoric at temperatures less than 750 degree C. 18 refs. 1 fig

  17. Fuel assembly storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiranuma, Hiroshi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To remove limitation of the number of storage of fuel assemblies to increase the number of storage thereof so as to relatively reduce the water depth required for shielding radioactive rays. Structure: Fuel assembly storage rack containers for receiving a plurality of spent fuel assembly racks are stacked in multi-layer fashion within a storage pool filled with water for shielding radioactive rays and removing heat. (Furukawa, Y.)

  18. CERN Electronics Pool presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Electronics Pool has organised a series of presentations in collaboration with oscilloscope manufacturers. The last one will take place according to the schedule below.   Time will be available at the end of the presentation to discuss your personal needs. The Agilent presentation had to be postponed and will be organised later. -     Lecroy: Thursday, 24 November 2011, in 530-R-030, 14:00 to 16:30.

  19. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation

  20. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation. Refs, figs, tabs.

  1. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  2. Characteristics of fission product release from a molten pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, J.I.; Suh, K.Y.; Kang, C.S.

    2001-01-01

    The volatile fission products are released from the debris pool, while the less volatile fission products tend to remain as condensed phases because of their low vapor pressure. The release of noble gases and the volatile fission products is dominated by bubble dynamics. The release of the less volatile fission products from the pool can be analyzed based on mass transport through a liquid with the convection flow. The physico-numerical models were orchestrated from existing submodels in various disciplines of engineering to estimate the released fraction of fission products from a molten pool. It was assumed that the pool has partially filled hemispherical geometry. For the high pool pressure, the diameter of the bubbles at detachment was calculated utilizing the Cole and Shulman correlation with the effect of system pressure. Sensitivity analyses were performed and results of the numerical calculations were compared with analysis results for the TMI-2 accident. (author)

  3. Titanium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium pure and base alloys are protected by an oxide film with anionic vacancies which gives a very good resistance to corrosion in oxidizing medium, in some ph ranges. Results of pitting and crevice corrosion are given for Cl - , Br - , I - ions concentration with temperature and ph dependence, also with oxygenated ions effect. (A.B.). 32 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a pool nuclear reactor fitted with a perfected system to raise the buckets into a vertical position at the bottom of a channel. This reactor has an inclined channel to guide a bucket containing a fuel assembly to introduce it into the reactor jacket or extract it therefrom and a damper at the bottom of the channel to stop the drop of the bucket. An upright vertically movable rod has a horizontally articulated arm with a hook. This can pivot to touch a radial lug on the bucket and pivot the bucket around its base in a vertical position, when the rod moves up [fr

  5. Pump/heat exchanger assembly for pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathenson, R.D.; Slepian, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    A heat exchanger and pump assembly comprising a heat exchanger including a housing for defining an annularly shaped cavity and supporting therein a plurality of heat transfer tubes. A pump is disposed beneath the heat exchanger and is comprised of a plurality of flow couplers disposed in a circular array. Each flow coupler is comprised of a pump duct for receiving a first electrically conductive fluid, i.e. the primary liquid metal, from a pool thereof, and a generator duct for receiving a second electrically conductive fluid, i.e. the intermediate liquid metal. The primary liquid metal is introduced from the reactor pool into the top, inlet ends of the tubes, flowing downward therethrough to be discharged from the tubes' bottom ends directly into the reactor pool. The primary liquid metal is variously introduced into the pump ducts directly from the reactor pool, either from the bottom or top end of the flow coupler. The intermediate fluid introduced into the generator ducts via the inlet duct and inlet plenum and after leaving the generator ducts passes through the annular cavity of the exchanger to cool the primary liquid in the tubes. The annular magnetic field of the pump is produced by a circular array of electromagnets having hollow windings cooled by a flow of the intermediate metal. (author)

  6. Corium quench in deep pool mixing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; McUmber, L.; Gregorash, D.; Aeschlimann, R.; Sienicki, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of two recent corium-water thermal interaction (CWTI) tests are described in which a stream of molten corium was poured into a deep pool of water in order to determine the mixing behavior, the corium-to-water heat transfer rates, and the characteristic sizes of the quenched debris. The corium composition was 60% UO 2 , 16% ZrO 2 , and 24% stainless steel by weight; its initial temperature was 3080 K, approx.160 K above the oxide phase liquidus temperature. The corium pour stream was a single-phase 2.2 cm dia liquid column which entered the water pool in film boiling at approx.4 m/s. The water subcooling was 6 and 75C in the two tests. Test results showed that with low subcooling, rapid steam generation caused the pool to boil up into a high void fraction regime. In contrast, with large subcooling no net steam generation occurred, and the pool remained relatively quiescent. Breakup of the jet appeared to occur by surface stripping. In neither test was the breakup complete during transit through the 32 cm deep water pool, and molten corium channeled to the base where it formed a melt layer. The characteristic heat transfer rates measured 3.5 MJ/s and 2.7 MJ/s during the fall stage for small and large subcooling, respectively; during the initial stage of bed quench, the surface heat fluxes measured 2.4 MW/m 2 and 3.7 MW/m 2 , respectively. A small mass of particles was formed in each test, measuring typically 0.1 to 1 mm and 1 to 5 mm dia for the large and small subcooling conditions, respectively. 9 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  7. Mechanochemistry of titanium oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljković Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanochemistry represents an alternative route in synthesis of nanomaterials. Mechanochemical routes are attractive because of their simplicity, flexibility, and ability to prepare materials by solid state reactions at room temperature. The aim of this work is the mechanochemical synthesis of nanostructured titanium oxides of different composition starting from mixtures of Ti and TiO2, TiO and TiO2 or Ti2O3 and TiO2. Emphasis is on the Magneli phases Ti4O7 and Ti5O9 because their mixture is commercially known as EBONEX material. The materials prepared were characterized by XRPD, TG/DTA analysis, SEM and optical microscopy. Titanium monoxide and several Magneli oxides, Ti4O7, Ti5O9 and Ti6O11, are successfully prepared. The results are very interesting because the EBONEX materials were prepared at lower than usual temperature, which would decrease the effective cost of production.

  8. Industrial experience with titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, B M; Shoesmith, D W

    1997-09-01

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author) 83 refs., 17 tabs., 3 figs.

  9. Advances in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagle, S.R.; Wood, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    As described above, new developments in the aerospace market are focusing on higher temperature alloys for jet engine components and higher strength/toughness alloys for airframe applications. Conventional alloys for engines have reached their maximum useful temperature of about 1000 F (540 C) because of oxidation resistance requirements. IMI 834 and Ti-1100 advanced alloys show some improvement, however, the major improvement appears to be in gamma titanium aluminides which could extend the maximum usage temperature to about 1500 F (815 C). This puts titanium alloys in a competitive position to replace nickel-base superalloys. Advanced airframe alloys such as Ti-6-22-22S, Beta C TM , Ti-15-333 and Ti-10-2-3 with higher strength than conventional Ti-6-4 are being utilized in significantly greater quantities, both in military and commercial applications. These alloys offer improved strength with little or no sacrifice in toughness and improved formability, in some cases. Advanced industrial alloys are being developed for improved corrosion resistance in more reducing and higher temperature environments such as those encountered in sour gas wells. Efforts are focused on small precious metal additions to optimize corrosion performance for specific applications at a modest increase in cost. As these applications develop, the usage of titanium alloys for industrial markets should steadily increase to approach that for aerospace applications. (orig.)

  10. Process for titanium powders spheroidization by RF induction plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Zhongtao; Ye Gaoying; Liu Chuandong; Tong Honghui

    2010-01-01

    Spherical titanium (Ti) particles were obtained by the process of heating irregularly shaped Ti powders under the radio frequency induction plasma (RF induction plasma) condition. The effect of feed rate, various dispersion methods and Ti particle size on the spheroidization efficiency was studied. The efficiency of the spheroidization is evaluated through the measurements of the percentage of powder spheroidized based on the electron microscopic observations and the tap density measurement of the processed powder. During the short flight of the particles in the plasma flow, of the order of a few milliseconds, the individual titanium particles of the powder are heated and melt, forming a spherical liquid droplet which upon freezing gives rise to the formation of a perfectly dense spherical solid particle. So RF induction plasma is a promising method for the preparation of spherical titanium powders with high flow ability. (authors)

  11. Titanium fasteners. [for aircraft industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Titanium fasteners are used in large quantities throughout the aircraft industry. Most of this usage is in aluminum structure; where titanium structure exists, titanium fasteners are logically used as well. Titanium fasteners offer potential weight savings to the designer at a cost of approximately $30 per pound of weight saved. Proper and least cost usage must take into consideration type of fastener per application, galvanic couples and installation characteristics of protective coatings, cosmetic appearance, paint adhesion, installation forces and methods available and fatigue performance required.

  12. Joining of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baeslack, William

    2002-01-01

    .... Although organized and presented by joining process, many of the observations made and relationships developed, particularly those regarding the weldability and welding metallurgy of gamma titanium...

  13. Chemical changes of titanium and titanium dioxide under electron bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romins Brasca

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron induced effect on the first stages of the titanium (Ti0 oxidation and titanium dioxide (Ti4+ chemical reduction processes has been studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. Using factor analysis we found that both processes are characterized by the appearance of an intermediate Ti oxidation state, Ti2O3 (Ti3+.

  14. Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanostructures via Nitridation of Nanopatterned Titanium Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kim, Jongbum

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures are obtained via nitridation of titanium dioxide. Nanoparticles acquired a cubic shape with sharper edges following the rock-salt crystalline structure of TiN. Lattice constant of the resulting TiN nanoparticles matched well with the tabulated data. Energy...

  15. Analysis of sodium pool fire in SFEF for assessing the limiting pool fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangarjuna Rao, P.; Ramesh, S.S.; Nashine, B.K.; Kasinathan, N.; Chellapandi, P.

    2011-01-01

    Accidental sodium leaks and resultant sodium fires in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems can create a threat to the safe operation of the plant. To avoid this defence-in depth approach is implemented from the design stage of reactor itself. Rapid detection of sodium leak and fast dumping of the sodium into the storage tank of a defective circuit, leak collection trays, adequate lining of load bearing structural concrete and extinguishment of the sodium fire are the important defensive measures in the design, construction and operation of a LMFBR for protection against sodium leaks and their resultant fires. Evaluation of sodium leak events and their consequences by conducting large scale engineering experiments is very essential for effective implementation of the above protection measures for sodium fire safety. For this purpose a Sodium Fire Experimental Facility (SFEF) is constructed at SED, IGCAR. SFEF is having an experimental hall of size 9 m x 6 m x 10 m with 540 m 3 volume and its design pressure is 50 kPa. It is a concrete structure and provided with SS 304 liner, which is fixed to the inside surfaces of walls, ceiling and floor. A leak tight door of size (1.8 m x 2.0 m) is provided to the experimental hall and the facility is provided with a sodium equipment hall and a control room. Experimental evaluation of sodium pool fire consequences is an important activity in the LMFBR sodium fire safety related studies. An experimental program has been planned for different types of sodium fire studies in SFEF. A prior to that numerical analysis have been carried out for enclosed sodium pool fires using SOFIRE-II sodium pool fire code for SFEF experimental hall configuration to evaluate the limiting pool fire. This paper brings out results of the analysis carried out for this purpose. Limiting pool fire of SFEF depends on the exposed surface area of the pool, amount of sodium in the pool, oxygen concentration and initial sodium temperature. Limiting

  16. Methods for determination of zirconium in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Two methods for determining zirconium content in titanium alloys are specified in this standard. One is the ion-exchange/mandelic acid gravimetry for Zr content below 20 % down to 1 % while the other is the mandelic acid gravimetry for Zr content below 20 % down to 0.5 %. In the former, a specimen is decomposed by hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid. After substances such as titanium are oxidized by adding nitric acid, the liquid is adjusted into a 4N hydrochloric acid - gN hydrofluoric acid solution, which is them passed through an ion-exchange column. The niobium and tantalum contents are absorbed while the titanium and zirconium contents flow out. Perchloric acid and sulfuric acid are poured in the solution to remove hydrofluoric acid. Aqueous ammonia is added to produce hydroxide of titanium and zirconium, which is then filtered out. The hydroxyde is dissolved in hydrochloric acid, and mandelic acid is poured to precipitate the zirconium content. The precipitate is ignited and the weight of the oxide formed is measured. The coprecipitated titanium content is determined by the absorptiometric method using hydrogen peroxide. Finally, the weight of the oxide is corrected. In the latter determination method, on the other hand, only several steps of the above procedure are used, namely, decomposition by hydrochloric acid, precipitation of zirconium, ignition of precipitate, measurement of oxide weight and weight correction. (Nogami, K.)

  17. Mitigated subsurface transfer line leak resulting in a surface pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCOTT, D.L.

    1999-02-08

    This analysis evaluates the mitigated consequences of a potential waste transfer spill from an underground pipeline. The spill forms a surface pool. One waste composite, a 67% liquid, 33% solid, from a single shell tank is evaluated. Even drain back from a very long pipeline (50,000 ft), does not pose dose consequences to the onsite or offsite individual above guideline values.

  18. Mitigated subsurface transfer line leak resulting in a surface pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCOTT, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    This analysis evaluates the mitigated consequences of a potential waste transfer spill from an underground pipeline. The spill forms a surface pool. One waste composite, a 67% liquid, 33% solid, from a single shell tank is evaluated. Even drain back from a very long pipeline (50,000 ft), does not pose dose consequences to the onsite or offsite individual above guideline values

  19. Melt pool vorticity in deep penetration laser material welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    weld pool has been evaluated in case of high power CO2 laser beam welding. The ... The experiments based on twin or triple spot interaction geometry have also ... while the other one is between the liquid and the solid states of the metal.

  20. Quantification of transformation rates of soil amino sugars and amino acids by a novel isotope pool dilution approach via liquid chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (LC/HRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuntao; Zheng, Qing; Noll, Lisa; Zhang, Shasha; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Organic nitrogen transformation processes are the key driver of soil nitrogen availability, strongly affecting the nitrogen turnover and carbon cycling of terrestrial ecosystems. Low molecular weight organic nitrogen compounds (e.g. amino acids and amino sugars) that can be directly utilized by plants or microorganisms are released by the extracellular cleavage of high molecular weight organic nitrogen compounds (e.g. proteins, peptidoglycan, and chitin) by hydrolytic enzymes. This decomposition process is believed to be the rate-limiting step in the soil N cycle. Direct measurements of the in situ transformation rates of these small N compounds is highly challenging but can be realized by applying the isotope pool dilution (IPD) technique, in which the target compound pool is labeled with isotopic tracers and subsequently the dilution of the tracers is measured. We have recently pioneered the development of IPD assays to investigate the in situ flux of proteinaceous amino acids and glucose due to decomposition of organic matter and microbial utilization, but the roles of fluxes of amino sugars and amino acid enantiomers in soil nitrogen transformation processes are still unknown due to the lack of feasible extraction, purification, separation and detection methods. Here we developed a 15N IPD assay by utilizing a novel LC/HRMS (Orbitrap) platform, with the aim to measure transformation rates of amino sugars and amino acid enantiomers. After the tracer experiments soil extracts were purified by solid phase extraction prior to the analysis by MS. The utilization of Orbitrap-HRMS allowed us to resolve the mass signals of unlabeled analytes, and their 15N labeled (tracers) and 13C labeled (internal standards) analogues. The commercially unavailable 15N and 13C labeled amino sugars and amino acid enantiomers were produced from bacterial cell walls after batch culture in labeled growth media. This workflow was validated with soils from two sampling sites, allowing us to

  1. The preparation of titanium-vanadium carbide/nickel cermets. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precht, W.; Sprissler, B.

    1976-01-01

    Titanium/vanadium alloy carbide rods were prepared by a zone melting procedure. Wetting studies were carried out using sections of the fused rods and candidate matrix material. It was established that nickel exhibits excellent wetting of (Ti, V) C, and accordingly cermet blends were prepared and liquid phase sintered. Processing parameters are discussed as well as their effect on the final microstructure. Alternate methods for cermet preparation are offered which use as received titanium carbide and vanadium carbide powders

  2. Physical metallurgy of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Researches in electric, magnetic, thermophysical properties of titanium alloys in the wide range of temperatures (from helium upto elevated one), as well as stability of phases in alloys of different types are generalized. Fundamental description of physical properties of binary model alloys is given. Acoustic emission, shape memory and Bauschinger effects, pseudoelasticity, aging and other aspects of physical metallurgy of titanium alloys are considered

  3. Titanium for salt water service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadiyar, H.S.; Shibad, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium has potential as major material of construction in desalination plants, in condensers and heat exchangers, in view of its excellent corrosion resistance to salt water upto at least 120deg C. The advantages of titanium in such applications are brought out. The various specific problems such as pitting, crevice and galvanic corrosion and the preventive methods, for adopting titanium have been discussed. The hydriding problem can be overcome by suitably controlling the operating parameters such as temperature and surface preparation. A case has been made to prove the economic viability of titanium in comparison to Al-brass and Cu-Ni alloy. The future of titanium seems to be very promising in view of the negligible tube failures and outages. (auth.)

  4. Design of hydrotherapy exercise pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, R F; Abidin, M R; Becker, D G; Pavlovich, L J; Dang, M T

    1988-01-01

    Several hydrotherapy pools have been designed specifically for a variety of aquatic exercise. Aqua-Ark positions the exerciser in the center of the pool for deep-water exercise. Aqua-Trex is a shallow underwater treadmill system for water walking or jogging. Swim-Ex generates an adjustable laminar flow that permits swimming without turning. Musculoskeletal conditioning can be accomplished in the above-ground Arjo shallow-water exercise pool. A hydrotherapy pool also can be custom designed for musculoskeletal conditioning in its shallow part and cardiovascular conditioning in a deeper portion of the pool. Regardless of the type of exercise, there is general agreement that the specific exercise conducted in water requires significantly more energy expenditure than when the same exercise is performed on land.

  5. [The cytotoxicity of N48 NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-Ming; Hou, Zhi-Ming; Chu, Ming

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of N48 NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride on the growth and apoptosis of L929 mouse fibroblast cells, and to determine the material biocompatibility. The NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride, bare NdFeB magnets and ordinary brackets were put into RPMI-1640 to prepare fusions. L929 mouse fibroblast cells were cultivated in the negative control liquid, positive control liquid, 100%, 50% and 25% sample fusions, respectively. The cell proliferation vitality was detected by MTT assay and the relative growth rate was calculated.Cell scatter diagrams of the negative control liquid, 100% titanium-nitride coated magnets fusion and bare magnets fusion were detected by flow cytometry Annexin V/PI double staining method. The ratios of normal cells, early apoptosis, advanced apoptosis and necrosis cells were calculated. The results were analyzed for paired t test using SPSS11.5 software package. The toxic levels of N48 NdFeB coated with titanium-nitride were ranked as 0-1. The toxic levels of bare magnets were ranked as 2. The cell scatter diagrams showed that there was no significant difference in living cell, early apoptosis and necrosis between magnets coated with titanium-nitride and control group. But there was significant difference between the bare magnets group and control group. The N48 NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride have good biocompatibility.

  6. Immobilization of radioactive waste sludge from spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, R.; Plecas, I.

    1998-01-01

    In the last forty years, in FR Yugoslavia, as result of the research reactors' operation and radionuclides application in medicine, industry and agriculture, radioactive waste materials of the different categories and various levels of specific activities were generated. As a temporary solution, these radioactive waste materials are stored in the two hanger type interim storages for solid waste and some type of liquid waste packed in plastic barrels, and one of three stainless steal underground containers for other types of liquid waste. Spent fuel elements from nuclear reactors in the Vinca Institute have been temporary stored in water filled storage pool. Due to the fact that the water in the spent fuel elements storage pool have not been purified for a long time, all metallic components submerged in the water have been hardly corroded and significant amount of the sludge has been settled on the bottom of the pool. As a first step in improving spent fuel elements storage conditions and slowing down corrosion in the storage spent fuel elements pool we have decided to remove the sludge from the bottom of the pool. Although not high, but slightly radioactive, this sludge had to be treated as radioactive waste material. Some aspects of immobilisation, conditioning and storage of this sludge are presented in this paper. (author

  7. Preparation of titanium diboride powders from titanium alkoxide and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Department of Materials and Manufacturing Process, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran. 15875-1744, Iran ... Titanium diboride is a hard refractory material with a high melting point ... (λ = 1⋅540598 Å) radiation. Morphology of the ...

  8. Sodium-water reaction in double pool LMFBR, (5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Kumagai, Hiromichi; Nishi, Yoshihisa; Uotani, Masaki

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were conducted using a 1/5 scale model of the Double Pool in order to evaluate a pressure rise caused by a large scale sodium-water reaction. The experiments were focused on the pressure rise caused by the piston motion of liquid sodium. It appeared from the results that the magnitude of this pressure rise depends on the depth of reaction point, and that a pressure rise more than 1 MPa would arise in the real Double Pool plant. A new design of steam generator is proposed to mitigate the pressure rise. (author)

  9. ENERGY STAR Certified Pool Pumps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 1.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Pool Pumps that are effective as of February 15,...

  10. Pooling and correlated neural activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Rosenbaum

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Correlations between spike trains can strongly modulate neuronal activity and affect the ability of neurons to encode information. Neurons integrate inputs from thousands of afferents. Similarly, a number of experimental techniques are designed to record pooled cell activity. We review and generalize a number of previous results that show how correlations between cells in a population can be amplified and distorted in signals that reflect their collective activity. The structure of the underlying neuronal response can significantly impact correlations between such pooled signals. Therefore care needs to be taken when interpreting pooled recordings, or modeling networks of cells that receive inputs from large presynaptic populations. We also show that the frequently observed runaway synchrony in feedforward chains is primarily due to the pooling of correlated inputs.

  11. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, G.W.; Davis, J.W.

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500 0 C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150 0 C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement

  12. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  13. Sustainability of common pool resources

    OpenAIRE

    Timilsina, Raja Rajendra; Kotani, Koji; Kamijo, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability has become a key issue in managing natural resources together with growing concerns for capitalism, environmental and resource problems. We hypothesize that the ongoing modernization of competitive societies, which we refer to as "capitalism," affects human nature for utilizing common pool resources, thus compromising sustainability. To test this hypothesis, we design and implement a set of dynamic common pool resource games and experiments in the following two types of Nepales...

  14. Contraction of an air disk caught between two different liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, M.-J.

    2013-12-17

    When a drop impacts a pool of liquid it entraps a thin disk of air under its center. This disk contracts rapidly into a bubble to minimize surface energy. Herein we use ultra-high-speed imaging to measure the contraction speed of this disk when the drop and pool are of different liquids. For miscible liquids the contraction rate is governed by the weaker of the two surface tensions. Some undulations are observed on the edge of the disk for a water drop impacting a pool of water, but not on a pool of lower surface tension. Similar results are observed for a pair of immiscible liquids.

  15. Thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorev, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    The problems of the theory and practical application of thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys are presented. On the basis of the systematic investigations developed are the methods of thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys, established are the optimum procedures and produced are the bases of their industrial application with an account of alloy technological peculiarities and the procedure efficiency. It is found that those strengthening methods are more efficient at which the contribution of dispersion hardening prevails over the strengthening by phase hardening

  16. Terminal solid solubility of hydrogen in titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroldi, J.P.; Vizcaino, Pablo; Banchik, Abraham David

    2003-01-01

    A Research and Development program to build a data base is currently under progress to support the local titanium fabrication. In the present work the temperature of the Terminal Solid Solubility on dissolution (TSSd) and precipitation (TSSp) of titanium hydrides in the Ti α-phase were both measured in the same thermal cycle with a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The local titanium producer (FAESA) provided ASTM grade 1 pure Ti bars of about 2,5 cm in diameter. Samples weighting between 50 to 200 mg were cut with a diamond disc and the parallelepiped faces were all carefully ground with SiC papers, then picked in a HNO 3 plus HF aqueous solution and finally dried out with ethanol and hot air. Pairs of (TSSd, TSSp) values for α + δ → α and α → α + δ transformation temperatures in titanium were determined with the same calorimetric procedure already used to calculate the TSS values in zirconium. Data were taken from the same sample during the heating up and cooling down cycle of the second calorimeter run made with the same rate of 20 C degrees / minute. The Cathodic Charging technique was used to charge the samples at different hydrogen concentrations between the 'as fabricated' value and the concentration corresponding to the eutectoid temperature. A mixture of glycerin and phosphoric acid in a 2:1 ratio and a current density of 0,05 to 0,1 Amp/cm 2 were applied to different samples during 24 to 96 hours to get a wide range of hydrogen concentrations. A homogenization heat treatment at 400 C degrees for 45 minutes -made at open air in an electric furnace- was applied to each sample to dissolve the massive hydrides at the sample surfaces and diffuse them into the bulk of the sample. The hydrogen concentration of each sample was measured after the final calorimetric run using the Extraction Method in Liquid State under an inert atmosphere using a Leco RH-404 model Hydrogen Determinator. The experimental data follows a linear relationship -with a

  17. Seismic analysis of large pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, R.G.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1976-11-17

    Large pools for storing spent, nuclear fuel elements are being proposed to augment present storage capacity. To preserve the ability to isolate portions of these pools, a modularization requirement appears desirable. The purpose of this project was to investigate the effects of modularization on earthquake resistance and to assess the adequacy of current design methods for seismic loads. After determining probable representative pool geometries, three rectangular pool configurations, all 240 x 16 ft and 40 ft deep, were examined. One was unmodularized; two were modularized into 80 x 40 ft cells in one case and 80 x 80 ft cells in the other. Both embedded and above-ground installations for a hard site and embedded installations for an intermediate hard site were studied. It was found that modularization was unfavorable in terms of reducing the total structural load attributable to dynamic effects, principally because one or more cells could be left unfilled. The walls of unfilled cells would be subjected to significantly higher loads than the walls of a filled, unmodularized pool. Generally, embedded installations were preferable to above-ground installations, and the hard site was superior to the intermediate hard site. It was determined that Housner's theory was adequate for calculating hydrodynamic effects on spent fuel storage pools. Current design methods for seismic loads were found to be satisfactory when results from these methods were compared with those from LUSH analyses. As a design method for dynamic soil pressure, we found the Mononobe-Okabe theory, coupled with correction factors as suggested by Seed, to be acceptable. The factors we recommend for spent fuel storage pools are tabulated.

  18. Seismic analysis of large pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, R.G.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    Large pools for storing spent, nuclear fuel elements are being proposed to augment present storage capacity. To preserve the ability to isolate portions of these pools, a modularization requirement appears desirable. The purpose of this project was to investigate the effects of modularization on earthquake resistance and to assess the adequacy of current design methods for seismic loads. After determining probable representative pool geometries, three rectangular pool configurations, all 240 x 16 ft and 40 ft deep, were examined. One was unmodularized; two were modularized into 80 x 40 ft cells in one case and 80 x 80 ft cells in the other. Both embedded and above-ground installations for a hard site and embedded installations for an intermediate hard site were studied. It was found that modularization was unfavorable in terms of reducing the total structural load attributable to dynamic effects, principally because one or more cells could be left unfilled. The walls of unfilled cells would be subjected to significantly higher loads than the walls of a filled, unmodularized pool. Generally, embedded installations were preferable to above-ground installations, and the hard site was superior to the intermediate hard site. It was determined that Housner's theory was adequate for calculating hydrodynamic effects on spent fuel storage pools. Current design methods for seismic loads were found to be satisfactory when results from these methods were compared with those from LUSH analyses. As a design method for dynamic soil pressure, we found the Mononobe-Okabe theory, coupled with correction factors as suggested by Seed, to be acceptable. The factors we recommend for spent fuel storage pools are tabulated

  19. Ab Initio Calculations of Transport in Titanium and Aluminum Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Nicholas; Novak, Brian; Tam, Ka Ming; Moldovan, Dorel; Jarrell, Mark

    In classical molecular dynamics simulations, the self-diffusion and shear viscosity of titanium about the melting point have fallen within the ranges provided by experimental data. However, the experimental data is difficult to collect and has been rather scattered, making it of limited value for the validation of these calculations. By using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations within the density functional theory framework, the classical molecular dynamics data can be validated. The dynamical data from the ab initio molecular dynamics can also be used to calculate new potentials for use in classical molecular dynamics, allowing for more accurate classical dynamics simulations for the liquid phase. For metallic materials such as titanium and aluminum alloys, these calculations are very valuable due to an increasing demand for the knowledge of their thermophysical properties that drive the development of new materials. For example, alongside knowledge of the surface tension, viscosity is an important input for modeling the additive manufacturing process at the continuum level. We are developing calculations of the viscosity along with the self-diffusion for aluminum, titanium, and titanium-aluminum alloys with ab initio molecular dynamics. Supported by the National Science Foundation through cooperative agreement OIA-1541079 and the Louisiana Board of Regents.

  20. CFD modeling of pool swell during large break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Jin; Bolger, Francis; Li, Guangjun; Mintz, Saul; Pappone, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    GE had conducted a series of one-third scale three-vent air tests in support the horizontal vent pressure suppression system used in Mark III containment design for General Electric BWR plants. During the test, the air-water interface has been tracked by conductivity probes. There are many pressure monitors inside the test rig. The purpose of the test was to provide a basis for the pool swell load definition for the Mark III containment. In this paper, a transient 3-Dimensional CFD model of the one-third scale Mark III suppression pool swell process is constructed. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) multiphase model is used to explicitly track the interface between the water liquid and the air. The CFD results such as flow velocity, pressure, interface locations are compared to those from the test. Through the comparisons, a technical approach to numerically model the pool swell phenomenon is established and benchmarked. (author)

  1. Liquids and liquid mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Rowlinson, J S; Baldwin, J E; Buckingham, A D; Danishefsky, S

    2013-01-01

    Liquids and Liquid Mixtures, Third Edition explores the equilibrium properties of liquids and liquid mixtures and relates them to the properties of the constituent molecules using the methods of statistical thermodynamics. Topics covered include the critical state, fluid mixtures at high pressures, and the statistical thermodynamics of fluids and mixtures. This book consists of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the liquid state and the thermodynamic properties of liquids and liquid mixtures, including vapor pressure and heat capacities. The discussion then turns to the thermodynami

  2. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, M; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; A Iglič; Mazare, A; Schmuki, P; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Mozetič, M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO 2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO 2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO 2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties. (topical review)

  3. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, M.; Mazare, A.; Gongadze, E.; Perutkova, Š.; Kralj-Iglič, V.; Milošev, I.; Schmuki, P.; Iglič, A.; Mozetič, M.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  4. Dry patch formed boiling and burnout in potassium pool boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michiyoshi, I.; Takenaka, N.; Takahashi, O.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on dry patch formed boiling and burnout in saturated potassium pool boiling on a horizontal plane heater for system pressures from 30 to 760 torr and liquid levels from 5 to 50 mm. The dry patch formation occurs in the intermittent boiling which is often encountered when liquid alkali metals are used under relatively low pressure conditions. Burnout is caused from both continuous nucleate and dry patch formed boiling. The burnout heat flux together with nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficients are empirically correlated with system pressures. A model is also proposed to predict the minimum heat flux to form the dry patch. (author)

  5. Saturated Pool Boiling in Vertical Annulus with Reduced Outflow Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myeong Gie

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of pool boiling heat transfer have been studied extensively to design efficient heat transfer devices or to assure the integrity of safety related systems. However, knowledge on pool boiling heat transfer in a confined space is still quite limited. The confined nucleate boiling is an effective technique to enhance heat transfer. Improved heat transfer might be attributed to an increase in the heat transfer coefficient due to vaporization from the thin liquid film on the heating surface or increased bubble activity. According to Cornwell and Houston, the bubbles sliding on the heated surface agitate environmental liquid. In a confined space a kind of pulsating flow due to the bubbles is created and, as a result very active liquid agitation is generated. The increase in the intensity of liquid agitation results in heat transfer enhancement. Sometimes a deterioration of heat transfer appears at high heat fluxes for confined boiling. The cause of the deterioration is suggested as active bubble coalescence. Recently, Kang published inflow effects on pool boiling heat transfer in a vertical annulus with closed bottoms. Kang regulated the gap size at the upper regions of the annulus and identified that effects of the reduced gaps on heat transfer become evident as the heat flux increases. This kind of geometry is found in an in-pile test section. Since more detailed analysis is necessary, effects of the outflow area on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer are investigated in this study. Up to the author's knowledge, no previous results concerning to this effect have been published yet

  6. Effects of carbon nanotube arrays on nucleate pool boiling

    OpenAIRE

    Ujereh, Sebastine; Fisher, Timothy; Mudawar, Issam

    2007-01-01

    Experiments were performed to assess the impact coating silicon and copper substrates with nanotubes (CNTs) have on pool boiling performance. Different CNT array densities and area coverages were tested on 1.27 1.27 mm2 samples in FC-72. The CNT preparation techniques used provided strong adherence of CNTs to both substrate materials. Very small contact angle enabled deep penetration of FC-72 liquid inside surface cavities of smooth uncoated silicon surfaces, requiring unusually high surface...

  7. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swimming pools. 1250.89 Section 1250.89 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.89 Swimming pools. (a) Fill and draw swimming pools shall not be installed or used. (b) Swimming pools of the recirculation type shall be...

  8. Patent pools: Intellectual property rights and competition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, V.F.

    2010-01-01

    Patent pools do not correct all problems associated with patent thickets. In this respect, patent pools might not stop the outsider problem from striking pools. Moreover, patent pools can be expensive to negotiate, can exclude patent holders with smaller numbers of patents or enable a group of major

  9. Titanium pigmentation. An electron probe microanalysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupre, A.; Touron, P.; Daste, J.; Lassere, J.; Bonafe, J.L.; Viraben, R.

    1985-01-01

    A patient had an unusual pigmentary disease induced by titanium dioxide. The use of a topical cream containing titanium dioxide caused a xanthomalike appearance on the patient's penis. Electron probe microanalysis was valuable in establishing the cause of this balanitis

  10. Printing of Titanium implant prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiria, Florencia Edith; Shyan, John Yong Ming; Lim, Poon Nian; Wen, Francis Goh Chung; Yeo, Jin Fei; Cao, Tong

    2010-01-01

    Dental implant plays an important role as a conduit of force and stress to flow from the tooth to the related bone. In the load sharing between an implant and its related bone, the amount of stress carried by each of them directly related to their stiffness or modulus. Hence, it is a crucial issue for the implant to have matching mechanical properties, in particular modulus, between the implant and its related bone. Titanium is a metallic material that has good biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Whilst the modulus of the bulk material is still higher than that of bone, it is the lowest among all other commonly used metallic implant materials, such as stainless steel or cobalt alloy. Hence it is potential to further reduce the modulus of pure Titanium by engineering its processing method to obtain porous structure. In this project, porous Titanium implant prototype is fabricated using 3-dimensional printing. This technique allows the flexibility of design customization, which is beneficial for implant fabrication as tailoring of implant size and shape helps to ensure the implant would fit nicely to the patient. The fabricated Titanium prototype had a modulus of 4.8-13.2 GPa, which is in the range of natural bone modulus. The compressive strength achieved was between 167 to 455 MPa. Subsequent cell culture study indicated that the porous Titanium prototype had good biocompatibility and is suitable for bone cell attachment and proliferation.

  11. Numerical investigation of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Andrijana D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidimensional numerical simulation of the atmospheric saturated pool boiling is performed. The applied modelling and numerical methods enable a full representation of the liquid and vapour two-phase mixture behaviour on the heated surface, with included prediction of the swell level and heated wall temperature field. In this way the integral behaviour of nucleate pool boiling is simulated. The micro conditions of bubble generation at the heated wall surface are modelled by the bubble nucleation site density, the liquid wetting contact angle and the bubble grow time. The bubble nucleation sites are randomly located within zones of equal size, where the number of zones equals the nucleation site density. The conjugate heat transfer from the heated wall to the liquid is taken into account in wetted heated wall areas around bubble nucleation sites. The boiling curve relation between the heat flux and the heated wall surface temperature in excess of the saturation temperature is predicted for the pool boiling conditions reported in the literature and a good agreement is achieved with experimentally measured data. The influence of the nucleation site density on the boiling curve characteristic is confirmed. In addition, the influence of the heat flux intensity on the spatial effects of vapour generation and two-phase flow are shown, such as the increase of the swell level position and the reduced wetting of the heated wall surface by the heat flux increase. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-33018 i br. OI-174014

  12. SBWR PCCS vent phenomena and suppression pool mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coddington, P. [Thermal-Hydraulics Lab., Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Andreani, M. [Nuclear Engineering Lab., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    The most important phenomena influencing the effectiveness of the pressure suppression capability of the water pool within the Wetwell compartment of the SBWR Containment, during the period of Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) venting, have been critically reviewed. In addition, calculations have been carried-out to determine the condensation of the vented steam and the distribution of the energy deposited in the liquid pool. It has been found that a large contribution to the vapour suppression is due to condensation inside the vent pipe. The condensation rate of the steam inside the bubbles, produced at the vent exit, during their rise to the surface, may however be rather low, because of the large size bubbles. This can lead to vapour channelling to the Wetwell gas space. The above comments are likely to be ameliorated if the vent exit is a distributed source or sparger. Due to the large water flow rates within the {open_quotes}bubbly two-phase plume{close_quotes} generated by the gas injection, the water in the pool above the vent exit is likely to be heated nearly isothermally (perfect mixing). The effect of the suppression pool walls would be to enhance the recirculation and, consequently to promote mixing. The large size of the bubbles therein and of the walls on pool mixing are the most severe difficulties in extrapolating the results from scaled experiments to prototypical conditions.

  13. Anodic growth of titanium dioxide nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of producing nanostructures of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) by anodisation of titanium (Ti) in an electrochemical cell, comprising the steps of: immersing a non-conducting substrate coated with a layer of titanium, defined as the anode, in an electrolyte solution...... an electrical contact to the layer of titanium on the anode, where the electrical contact is made in the electrolyte solution...

  14. Efficient pooling designs for library screening

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno, William J.; Knill, Emanuel; Balding, David J.; Bruce, D. C.; Doggett, N. A.; Sawhill, W. W.; Stallings, R. L.; Whittaker, Craig C.; Torney, David C.

    1994-01-01

    We describe efficient methods for screening clone libraries, based on pooling schemes which we call ``random $k$-sets designs''. In these designs, the pools in which any clone occurs are equally likely to be any possible selection of $k$ from the $v$ pools. The values of $k$ and $v$ can be chosen to optimize desirable properties. Random $k$-sets designs have substantial advantages over alternative pooling schemes: they are efficient, flexible, easy to specify, require fewer pools, and have er...

  15. EP BICYCLE POOL - VIGNETTES 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    EP-SMI Help Desk

    2002-01-01

    The vignettes (insurance certificates) for 2002 become obligatory from 1 June. If you have a bicycle from the EP Pool, please bring it to the EP-SMI Help Desk (Building 124) on any working day up to 31 May between 8h.30 - 12h.00 or 13h.30 - 17h.30. EP-SMI Help Desk

  16. Sculpting the Barnyard Gene Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Gina; Wolfe, Kim; Dupree, Alan; Young, Sheila; Caver, Jessica; Quintanilla, Ruby; Thornton, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Project-based learning (PBL) takes student engagement to a higher level through reflective collaboration, inquiry, critical thinking, problem solving, and personal relevance. This article explains how six high school teachers developed an interconnected, interdisciplinary STEM-focused PBL called "Sculpting the Barnyard Gene Pool." The…

  17. Uranium fluorides analysis. Titanium spectrophotometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Titanium determination in uranium hexafluoride in the range 0.7 to 100 microgrammes after transformation of uranium fluoride in sulfate. Titanium is separated by extraction with N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine, reextracted by hydrochloric-hydrofluoric acid. The complex titanium-N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine is extracted by chloroform. Spectrophotometric determination at 400 nm [fr

  18. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or on...

  20. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.2575 Section 73.2575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  1. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2) Color...

  2. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891, shall...

  3. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  4. Non-Contact Measurements of Thermophysical Properties of Titanium at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, W.; Paradis, P.

    1999-01-01

    Four thermophysical properties of both the solid and the liquid titanium measured using the high-temperature electrostatic levitator at JPL are presented. These properties are the density, the thermal expansion coefficient, the constant pressure heat capacity, and the hemispherical total emissivity.

  5. The titanium oxide phi system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galehouse, D. C.; Davis, S. P.

    1980-01-01

    The phy system of titanium oxide has been studied in emission in the near-infrared, with the Fourier transform spectrometer at a resolution of 8000,000. Approximately 3000 lines from 25 bands of this system have been identified, including all five 0-0 and 0-1 bands corresponding to the five natural titanium isotopes. Eleven vibrational levels have been observed, and all bands have been rotationally analyzed. Band intensities are agreement with known isotopic abundances and calculated Franck-Condon factors.

  6. Visualization of interfacial behavior of liquid jet in pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yuta; Abe, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Akiko; Nariai, Hideki; Matsuo, Eiji; Chitose, Keiko; Koyama, Kazuya; Itoh, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    For the safety design of the Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR), it is strongly required that the post accident heat removal (PAHR) is achieved after a postulated core disruptive accident (CDA). In the PAHR, it is important that the molten core material is quenched (breakup) in sodium coolant. In the previous studies, it is pointed out that the jet breakup behavior is significantly influenced by the fragmentation behavior on the jet surface in the coolant. However, the process from interfacial instability to fragmentation on the jet surface to jet breakup is not elucidated in detail yet. In the present study, the jet breakup behavior is observed to obtain the fragmentation behavior on the jet surface in coolant in detail. The transparent fluid is used as the core material and is injected into the water as the coolant. The velocity distribution of internal flow of the jet is measured by PIV technique and shear stress is calculated from PIV results. From experimental results, unstable interfacial wave is confirmed as upstream and grown up toward downstream. The fragments are torn apart at the end of developed wave. Shear stress is strongly acted on jet surface. From the results, the correlation between the interfacial behavior of the jet and the generation process of fragments are discussed. (author)

  7. Interaction between Nd-rich phase particles and liquid-solid interface in as-cast Ti-5Al-4Sn-2Zr-1Mo-0.25Si-1Nd titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.P.; Li, D.; Liu, Y.Y.; Hu, Z.Q.

    1995-01-01

    The composition (wt%) of ingot fir this investigation is 86.75%Ti, 5%Al, 4%Sn, 2%Zr, 1%Mo, 0.25%Si, 1%Nd. The alloy was prepared by vacuum arc melting in the form of buttons of mass 500 kg, which was remelted three times repeatedly to obtain homogeneous composition. The Nd-rich phase particles in the as-cast Ti-55 alloy are about 1.2∼11.07 microm and uniformly distribute in the matrix. The shapes of the particles are mainly ellipsoids together with short needle-like and blocky morphologies. The calculated diameter of the Nd-rich phase particles is ∼ 10 microm, which is within the 1.2∼11.07 microm range of the particle diameter experimentally measured in the as-cast Ti-55 alloy. The practical interface velocity is three orders of magnitude greater than V c, and the Nd-rich phase particles in the as-cast Ti-55 alloy are trapped by the liquid-solid interface

  8. "Ripples" in an Aluminum Pool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, James; Wang, Si-Yin; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2018-05-01

    Our motivation for this article is for students to realize that opportunities for discovery are all around them. Discoveries that can still puzzle present day researchers. Here we explore an observation by a middle school student concerning the production of what appears to be water-like "ripples" produced in aluminum foil when placed between two colliding spheres. We both applaud and explore the student's reasoning that the ripples were formed in a melted aluminum pool.

  9. Advances in cost effective processing of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, O.E.

    1993-01-01

    Recently an industry expert pointed out that one of the greatest hindrances to the growth of titanium usage has been the low percentage of material usable in the final product. Due to the extensive processing, forming, and machining operations typically performed on titanium, yield losses are high. This is especially true in aerospace applications where most titanium is used. In engine components, the start to finish ratio, known as the buy to fly ratio, is often as high as 7 to 1. This can be illustrated by looking at the use of titanium in Pratt and Whitney engines. In the JT-8D-217 used on Boeing's 737-200, the titanium buyweight is 5,385 pounds, whereas the finished titanium, flyweight is just 758 pounds. This start to finish ratio is 7.1:1, giving titanium 17.0% of total engine weight. (orig.)

  10. Sustainability of common pool resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsina, Raja Rajendra; Kotani, Koji; Kamijo, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability has become a key issue in managing natural resources together with growing concerns for capitalism, environmental and resource problems. We hypothesize that the ongoing modernization of competitive societies, which we refer to as "capitalism," affects human nature for utilizing common pool resources, thus compromising sustainability. To test this hypothesis, we design and implement a set of dynamic common pool resource games and experiments in the following two types of Nepalese areas: (i) rural (non-capitalistic) and (ii) urban (capitalistic) areas. We find that a proportion of prosocial individuals in urban areas is lower than that in rural areas, and urban residents deplete resources more quickly than rural residents. The composition of proself and prosocial individuals in a group and the degree of capitalism are crucial in that an increase in prosocial members in a group and the rural dummy positively affect resource sustainability by 65% and 63%, respectively. Overall, this paper shows that when societies move toward more capitalistic environments, the sustainability of common pool resources tends to decrease with the changes in individual preferences, social norms, customs and views to others through human interactions. This result implies that individuals may be losing their coordination abilities for social dilemmas of resource sustainability in capitalistic societies.

  11. Flashing oscillation in pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamasa, Tomoji; Kondo, Koichi; Hazuku, Tatsuya

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of high-pressure saturated water discharging into the pool water. The purpose of the experiment is to clarify the phenomena that occur in blow-down of high-pressure saturated water from the pressure vessel into the water-filled containment in the case of a wall-crack accident or a LOCA in an advanced reactor. The results revealed that a flashing oscillation (FO) occurs when high-pressure saturated water discharges into the pool water, under specified experimental settings. The range of the flashing oscillates between a point very close to and some distance from the vent hole. The pressures in the vent tube and pool water vary according to the flashing oscillation. The pressure oscillation and frequency of flashing position might be caused by the balancing action between the supply of saturated water, flashing at the control volume and its condensation on the steam-water interface. A linear analysis was conducted using a spherical flashing bubble model. The period of the flashing oscillation in the experiments can be explained by theoretical analysis

  12. Pressure supression pool thermal mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    A model is developed and verified to describe the thermal mixing that occurs in the pressure suppression pool (PSP) of a commercial BWR. The model is designed specifically for a Mark-I containment and is intended for use in severe accident sequence analyses. The model developed in this work produces space and time dependent temperature results throughout the PSP and is useful for evaluating the bulk PSP thermal mixing, the condensation effectiveness of the PSP, and the long-term containment integrity. The model is designed to accommodate single or multiple discharging T-quenchers, a PSP circumferential circulation induced by the residual heat removal system discharge, and the thermal stratification of the pool that occurs immediately after the relief valves close. The PSP thermal mixing is verified by comparing the model-predicted temperatures to experimental temperatures that were measured in an operating BWR suppression pool. The model is then used to investigate several PSP thermal mixing problems that include the time to saturate at full relief valve flow, the temperature response to a typical stuck open relief valve scenario, and the effect of operator rotation of the relief valve discharge point

  13. Pressure suppression pool thermal mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    A model is developed and verified to describe the thermal mixing that occurs in the pressure suppression pool (PSP) of a commercial BWR. The model is designed specifically for a Mark-I containment and is intended for use in severe accident sequence analyses. The model produces space and time dependent temperature results throughout the PSP and is useful for evaluating the bulk PSP thermal mixing, the condensation effectiveness of the PSP, and the long-term containment integrity. The model is designed to accommodate single or multiple discharging T-quenchers, a PSP circumferential circulation induced by the residual heat removal system discharge, and the thermal stratification of the pool that occurs immediately after the relief valves close. The PSP thermal mixing model is verified by comparing the model predicted temperatures to experimental temperatures that were measured in an operating BWR suppression pool. The model is then used to investigate several PSP thermal mixing problems that include the time to saturate at full relief valve flow, the temperature response to a typical stuck open relief valve scenario, and the effect of operator rotation of the relief valve discharge point

  14. Lactobacillusassisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Anal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn eco-friendlylactobacillussp. (microbe assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40–60 nm are found.

  15. On structural recrystallization in titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzaev, D.A.; Schastlivtsev, V.M.; Shtejnberg, M.M.; Ul'yanov, V.G.; AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Fiziki Metallov)

    1984-01-01

    The effect of preliminary superfast quenching on structural changes at inverse α→β transformation in titanium is studied. Cooling at rates more than 10 4 deg/s results in grain refining at succeeding annealing in β- and α- regions. The obtained effect is explained by additional phase transformation-induced hardening conditioned by decrease of the transformation point at superfast cooling

  16. Nanodispersed boriding of titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyuk, K.O.; Kostyuk, V.O.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of improving the operational reliability of machines is becoming increasingly important due to the increased mechanical, thermal and other loads on the details. There are many surface hardening methods for machines parts which breakdown begins with surface corruption. The most promising methods are chemical-thermal treatment. The aim of this work is to study the impact of boriding on the structure and properties of titanium alloy. Materials and Methods: The material of this study is VT3-1 titanium alloy. The boriding were conducted using nanodispersed powder blend based on boric substances. It is established that boriding of paste compounds allows obtaining the surface hardness within 30 - 29 GPa and with declining to 27- 26 GPa in layer to the transition zone (with total thickness up to 110 μm) owing to changes of the layer phase composition where T 2 B, TiB, TiB 2 titanium borides are formed. The increasing of chemical-thermal treatment time from 15 minutes to 2 hours leads to thickening of the borated layer (30 - 110 μm) and transition zone (30 - 190 μm). Due to usage of nanodispersed boric powder, the boriding duration is decreasing in 2 - 3 times. This allows saving time and electric energy. The developed optimal mode of boriding the VT3-1 titanium alloy allows obtaining the required operational characteristics and to combine the saturation of the surface layer with atomic boron and hardening

  17. Cell Attachment Following Instrumentation with Titanium and Plastic Instruments, Diode Laser, and Titanium Brush on Titanium, Titanium-Zirconium, and Zirconia Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Melissa S; Cerutis, D Roselyn; Miyamoto, Takanari; Nunn, Martha E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface characteristics and gingival fibroblast adhesion of disks composed of implant and abutment materials following brief and repeated instrumentation with instruments commonly used in procedures for implant maintenance, stage-two implant surgery, and periimplantitis treatment. One hundred twenty disks (40 titanium, 40 titaniumzirconium, 40 zirconia) were grouped into treatment categories of instrumentation by plastic curette, titanium curette, diode microlaser, rotary titanium brush, and no treatment. Twenty strokes were applied to half of the disks in the plastic and titanium curette treatment categories, while half of the disks received 100 strokes each to simulate implant maintenance occurring on a repetitive basis. Following analysis of the disks by optical laser profilometry, disks were cultured with human gingival fibroblasts. Cell counts were conducted from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Differences in surface roughness across all instruments tested for zirconia disks were negligible, while both titanium disks and titaniumzirconium disks showed large differences in surface roughness across the spectrum of instruments tested. The rotary titanium brush and the titanium curette yielded the greatest overall mean surface roughness, while the plastic curette yielded the lowest mean surface roughness. The greatest mean cell counts for each disk type were as follows: titanium disks with plastic curettes, titanium-zirconium disks with titanium curettes, and zirconia disks with the diode microlaser. Repeated instrumentation did not result in cumulative changes in surface roughness of implant materials made of titanium, titanium-zirconium, or zirconia. Instrumentation with plastic implant curettes on titanium and zirconia surfaces appeared to be more favorable than titanium implant curettes in terms of gingival fibroblast attachment on these surfaces.

  18. Consequences in a long time of the forced loss of coolant in a pool type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The fuel and pool water temperatures are calculated as a function of time using unidimensional models of heat conduction and momentum conservation, to simulate the natural convection flow of the coolant. The reactor building pressure due to the pool water evaporation is calculated using a homogeneous model with thermal equilibrium. The heat loss from the three main components of the building volume (liquid water, air, and steam) to solid surfaces such as the building walls are taking into account. (Author) [pt

  19. CDC Study Finds Fecal Contamination in Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Communication (404) 639-3286 CDC study finds fecal contamination in pools A study of public pools done ... The E. coli is a marker for fecal contamination. Finding a high percentage of E. coli-positive ...

  20. Sodium/water pool-deposit bed model of the CONACS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    A new Pool-Bed model of the CONACS (Containment Analysis Code System) code represents a major advance over the pool models of other containment analysis code (NABE code of France, CEDAN code of Japan and CACECO and CONTAIN codes of the United States). This new model advances pool-bed modeling because of the number of significant materials and processes which are included with appropriate rigor. This CONACS pool-bed model maintains material balances for eight chemical species (C, H 2 O, Na, NaH, Na 2 O, Na 2 O 2 , Na 2 CO 3 and NaOH) that collect in the stationary liquid pool on the floor and in the desposit bed on the elevated shelf of the standard CONACS analysis cell

  1. Fission product concentration evolution in sodium pool following a fuel subassembly failure in an LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.; Kasinathan, N.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.; Bhoje, S.

    2003-01-01

    During a fuel element failure in a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor, the fission products originating from the failed pins mix into the sodium pool. Delayed Neutron Detectors (DND) are provided in the sodium pool to detect such failures by way of detection of delayed neutrons emitted by the fission products. The transient evolution of fission product concentration is governed by the sodium flow distribution in the pool. Transient hydraulic analysis has been carried out using the CFD code PHOENICS to estimate fission product concentration evolution in hot pool. k- ε turbulence model and zero laminar diffusivity for the fission product concentration have been considered in the analysis. Times at which the failures of various fuel subassemblies (SA) are detected by the DND are obtained. It has been found that in order to effectively detect the failure of every fuel SA, a minimum of 8 DND in hot pool are essential

  2. Investigation of the crystallization process of titanium alloy ingots produced by vacuum arc melting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetyukhin, V.V.; Kurapov, V.N.; Trubin, A.N.; Demchenko, M.V.; Lazarev, V.G.; Ponedilko, S.V.; Dubrovina, N.T.; Kurapova, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    The process of crystallization and hardening of the VT3-1 and VT9 titanium alloys ingots during the vacuum-arc remelting (VAR) has been studied. In order to investigate the kinetics of the hole shape changing and the peculiarities of the ingot formation during the VAR, the radiography method has been used. It is established that the VAR of the titanium alloy ingots is basically a continuous process. An intense heating of the liquid bath mirror and the availability of high temperature gradients in the hole are the typical features of the VAR process

  3. 1968 Listing of Swimming Pool Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Testing Lab.

    An up-to-date listing of swimming pool equipment including--(1) companies authorized to display the National Sanitation Foundation seal of approval, (2) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standards relating to diatomite type filters, (3) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standard relating to sand type…

  4. Analysis of titanium content in titanium tetrachloride solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaoguo; Dong, Yingnan; Li, Shanshan; Guan, Duojiao; Wang, Jianyu; Tang, Meiling

    2018-03-01

    Strontium titanate, barium titan and lead titanate are new type of functional ceramic materials with good prospect, and titanium tetrachloride is a commonly in the production such products. Which excellent electrochemical performance of ferroelectric tempreature coefficient effect.In this article, three methods are used to calibrate the samples of titanium tetrachloride solution by back titration method, replacement titration method and gravimetric analysis method. The results show that the back titration method has many good points, for example, relatively simple operation, easy to judgment the titration end point, better accuracy and precision of analytical results, the relative standard deviation not less than 0.2%. So, it is the ideal of conventional analysis methods in the mass production.

  5. Clinical blood pool MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiner, Tim [Maastrich University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Goyen, Martin [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Rohrer, Mathias [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany). European Business Unit Diagnostic Imaging; Schoenberg, Stefan O. (eds.) [University Hospital Mannheim Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2008-07-01

    Clinical Blood Pool MR Imaging - This excellent treatise on Vasovist {sup registered} created by a team of exceptional faculty who are pioneers in MR Angiography covers the basic techniques, safety, efficacy, image processing and pharmaco-economic details to successfully implement a new level of MRA image quality with this new contrast agent. Martin Prince, Cornell University, New York The editors and authors have made groundbreaking contributions towards establishing MR angiography in various investigative settings, rendering it more precise and applying it for diverse indications. The work presented here is founded upon the extensive experience of the editors, as well as the broad range of experience from other scientific working groups. Maximilian Reiser, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich Vasovist {sup registered} (Gadofosveset), worldwide the first blood pool agent, has only recently become available for clinical use, but has already gained wide acceptance as a tool to improve magnetic resonance angiography. This book presents the first in-depth introduction to the basic physicochemical aspects of the agent, the application of Vasovist {sup registered} in clinical MRA, as well as potential clinical applications beyond MRA and patient management-related aspects. The first part of the book explains basic and technical properties of the agent and the differences of Vasovist {sup registered} compared to currently available extracellular agents. The second part contains detailed chapters on safety and efficacy. In the third part the focus is on MR angiographic applications, and in the fourth part of the book potential clinical fields beyond MRA are explored. All clinical chapters feature ready-to-use clinical protocols and a series of take home messages that concisely summarize the current role of blood pool imaging for each specific indication. (orig.)

  6. Iodine release from sodium pool combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagawa, N.; Fukushima, Y.; Yokota, N.; Akagane, K.; Mochizuki, K.

    1979-01-01

    Iodine release associated with sodium pool combustion was determined by heating 20 gr sodium containing sodium iodide, which was labelled with 131 I and dissolved in the sodium in concentration of 1∼1,000 ppm, to burn on a nickel crucible in conditioned atmosphere in a closed vessel of 0.4 m 3 . Oxygen concentration was changed in 5∼21% and humidity in 0∼89% by mixing nitrogen gas and air. Combustion products were trapped by a Maypack filter composed of particle filters, copper screens and activated charcoal beds and by a glass beads pack cooled by liquid argon. Iodine collected on these filter elements was determined by radio-gas chromatography. When the sodium sample burned in the atmosphere of air at room temperature, the release fractions observed were 6∼33% for sodium and 1∼20% for iodine added in the sodium. The release iodine was present in aerosol at a ratio of 98%, and the remainder in the gas form. The release fraction of iodine trended to decrease as oxygen concentration and humidity in the atmosphere increased. No organic iodide was detected in the combustion products. (author)

  7. Modeling of air toxics from hydrocarbon pool fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, K.A.; Aydil, M.L.; Barone, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    While there is guidance for estimating the radiation hazards of fires (ARCHIE), there is little guidance on modeling the dispersion of hazardous materials from fires. The objective of this paper is to provide a review of the methodology used for modeling the impacts of liquid hydrocarbon pool fires. The required input variables for modeling of hydrocarbon pool fires include emission strength, emission duration, and dispersion characteristics. Methods for predicting the products of combustion including the use of literature values, test data, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations are discussed. The use of energy balances coupled to radiative heat transfer calculations are presented as a method for determining flame temperature. Fire modeling literature is reviewed in order to determine other source release variables such as mass burn rate and duration and flame geometry

  8. Large-scale pool fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhaus Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of research into the burning behavior of large pool fires and fuel spill fires is presented. The features which distinguish such fires from smaller pool fires are mainly associated with the fire dynamics at low source Froude numbers and the radiative interaction with the fire source. In hydrocarbon fires, higher soot levels at increased diameters result in radiation blockage effects around the perimeter of large fire plumes; this yields lower emissive powers and a drastic reduction in the radiative loss fraction; whilst there are simplifying factors with these phenomena, arising from the fact that soot yield can saturate, there are other complications deriving from the intermittency of the behavior, with luminous regions of efficient combustion appearing randomly in the outer surface of the fire according the turbulent fluctuations in the fire plume. Knowledge of the fluid flow instabilities, which lead to the formation of large eddies, is also key to understanding the behavior of large-scale fires. Here modeling tools can be effectively exploited in order to investigate the fluid flow phenomena, including RANS- and LES-based computational fluid dynamics codes. The latter are well-suited to representation of the turbulent motions, but a number of challenges remain with their practical application. Massively-parallel computational resources are likely to be necessary in order to be able to adequately address the complex coupled phenomena to the level of detail that is necessary.

  9. Structural integrity assessment of HANARO pool cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jeong Soo

    2001-11-01

    This report is for the seismic analysis and the structural integrity evaluation of HANARO Pool Cover in accordances with the requirement of the Technical Specification for Seismic Analysis of HANARO Pool Cover. For performing the seismic analysis and evaluating the structural integrity for HANARO Pool Cover, the finite element analysis model using ANSYS 5.7 was developed and the dynamic characteristics were analyzed. The seismic response spectrum analyses of HANARO Pool Cover under the design floor response spectrum loads of OBE and SSE were performed. The analysis results show that the stress values in HANARO Pool Cover for the seismic loads are within the ASME Code limits. It is also confirmed that the fatigue usage factor is less than 1.0. Therefore any damage on structural integrity is not expected when an HANARO Pool Cover is installed in the upper part of the reactor pool

  10. Titanium gettering in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Grassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Campbell, G.

    1980-08-01

    The application of mild titanium gettering in the Doublet III tokamak has led to a significant improvement in the obtainable operating regimes and discharge parameters for all of the many plasma cross-sectional shapes studied. With gettering, low-Z impurities and radiated power are greatly reduced. The maximum line averaged electron density has increased 50% (anti n/sub e max/ approx. 1 x 10 20 /m 3 ), corresponding to a Murakami coefficient of nearly 6

  11. Analogy and differences between aluminium and titanium electrowinning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available larger market. The authors have tested this route experimentally, but could not produce pure titanium. The failure of electrowinning pure, molten titanium has been interpreted in terms of the analogy and differences between aluminium and titanium...

  12. Research and Development on Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-10-31

    information concerning the runs made * * In order to check the general operation of the train and furnace, a number of qualitative runs were made. These runs... General Technique. * . . * * . 109 The Analysis of Titanium . . . . ... ... 112 Notes and Comments, . . . .. . .. . . . 113 The Results from Vacuum...described in this report are as follows: 1. Arc ielting Titanium-Base Alloys. 2. Evaluation of Experimental Titanium-Base Alloys. 3. Investigation of

  13. Titanium metal obtention by fused salts electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Ares, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose.

    1989-01-01

    Potassium fluorotitanate dissolved in fused sodium chloride or potassium chloride may be electrolyzed under an inert gas atmosphere. Solid electrolysis products are formed on the cathode which contains titanium metal, sodium chloride, lower fluorotitanates and small quantities of alkali metal fluorotitanate. The extraction of titanium from the electrolysis products may be carried out by aqueous leaching (removal of chloride salts of alkali metals and a certain amount of fluorotitanates). Titanium metal obtained is relatively pure. (Author)

  14. Production of titanium from ilmenite: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohli, R.

    1981-12-01

    The general principles for beneficiation of titanium ores are reviewed and the specific processes used in individual units in various countries are discussed. This is followed by a critical evaluation of various current and potential reduction methods for the production of titanium metal from the processed concentrates. Finally, the report outlines a research program for the development of a commercially viable alternative method for the production of titanium metal.

  15. Strength and structure of nanocrystalline titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noskova, N.I.; Pereturina, I.A.; Elkina, O.A.; Stolyarov, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    Investigation results on strength and plasticity of nanocrystalline titanium VT-1 are presented. Specific features of plastic deformation on tension of this material specimens in an electron microscope column are studied in situ. It is shown that nanocrystalline titanium strength and plasticity at room temperature are dependent on the structure and nanograin size. It is revealed that deformation processes in nanocrystalline titanium are characterized by activation of deformation rotational modes and microtwinning [ru

  16. Cranioplasty with individual titanium implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishinov, S.; Stupak, V.; Sadovoy, M.; Mamonova, E.; Koporushko, N.; Larkin, V.; Novokshonov, A.; Dolzhenko, D.; Panchenko, A.; Desyatykh, I.; Krasovsky, I.

    2017-09-01

    Cranioplasty is the second procedure in the history of neurosurgery after trepanation, and it is still relevant despite the development of civilization and progress in medicine. Each cranioplasty operation is unique because there are no two patients with identical defects of the skull bones. The development of Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technique opened up the possibility of direct implant printing of titanium, a biocompatible metal used in medicine. This eliminates the need for producing any intermediate products to create the desired implant. We have produced 8 patient-specific titanium implants using this technique for patients who underwent different decompressive cranioectomies associated with bone tumors. Follow-up duration ranged from 6 to 12 months. We observed no implant-related reactions or complications. In all cases of reconstructive neurosurgery we achieved good clinical and aesthetic results. The analysis of the literature and our own experience in three-dimensional modeling, prototyping, and printing suggests that direct laser sintering of titanium is the optimal method to produce biocompatible surgical implants.

  17. Machinability evaluation of titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu

    2004-03-01

    In the present study, the machinability of titanium, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6A1-7Nb, and free-cutting brass was evaluated using a milling machine. The metals were slotted with square end mills under four cutting conditions. The cutting force and the rotational speed of the spindle were measured. The cutting forces for Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb were higher and that for brass was lower than that for titanium. The rotational speed of the spindle was barely affected by cutting. The cross sections of the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb chips were more clearly serrated than those of titanium, which is an indication of difficult-to-cut metals. There was no marked difference in the surface roughness of the cut surfaces among the metals. Cutting force and the appearance of the metal chips were found to be useful as indices of machinability and will aid in the development of new alloys for dental CAD/CAM and the selection of suitable machining conditions.

  18. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  19. Appcelerator Titanium patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Pollentine, Boydlee

    2013-01-01

    The book takes a step-by-step approach to help you understand CommonJS and Titanium architecture patterns, with easy to follow samples and plenty of in-depth explanations If you're an existing Titanium developer or perhaps a new developer looking to start off your Titanium applications "the right way", then this book is for you. With easy to follow examples and a full step-by-step account of architecting a sample application using CommonJS and MVC, along with chapters on new features such as ACS, you'll be implementing enterprise grade Titanium solutions in no time. You should have some JavaSc

  20. Criterion of titanium aviation alloy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasyunas, O.P.

    1976-01-01

    The most significant statistic mechanical characteristics are presented of titanium as compared with those of aluminium and steel. Based on these data one can draw conclusions as to the advantages and disadvantages of titanium. High chemical activity and diffusivity of titanium place limitations on the use of its alloys. Despite the promising features of a needle-like structure, specifications still keep relying on a globular structure, which is explained by the easeiness of the production. Titanium is expensive, sometimes its cost may by a factor of 20 exceed that of other aviation materials

  1. Titanium. Properties, raw datum surface, physicochemical basis and fabrication technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garmata, V.A.; Petrun'ko, A.N.; Galitskij, N.V.; Olesov, Yu.G.; Sandler, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    On the nowadays science and technology achievements the complex of titanium metallurgy problems comprising raw material base, physico-chemical basis and fabrication technique, properties and titanium usage fields is considered for the first time. A particular attention is given to raw material base, manufacturing titanium concentrates and titanium tetrachloride, metallothermal reduction, improvement of metal quality. Data on titanium properties are given, processes of titanium powder metallurgy, scrap and waste processing, problems of economics and complex raw material use are considered

  2. Removal of volatile iodine from gas bubbles rising in water pools: review and assessment of pool scrubbing codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo, J; Herranz, L E; Peyres, V; Escudero, M [CIEMAT, Nuclear Technology Institute, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-12-01

    During a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident with core damage the fission products released from the degrading fuel bundles often pass through aqueous beds before entering the containment, mitigating in part the source term. Several computer codes have been developed for predicting the fission product and aerosols removal in pool scrubbing scenarios. In addition to particle removal, these codes simulate the retention of some volatile iodine compounds. In this work a review of volatile iodine removal models included in SPARC and BUSCA codes is presented. Besides, the results and discussions of a validation of both codes against the available experimental data are summarized. SPARC and BUSCA codes model the diffusion of iodine toward the bubble interface by using the film penetration theory, which assumes a double layer gas-liquid at the interface. However, there are some differences between the two models, mainly related to the boundary conditions in the aqueous volume for the diffusion of molecular iodine. In SPARC, a set of fast reactions in the liquid phase control both the molecular iodine concentration in the pool and the partition coefficient of iodine at the interface. Thus, the aqueous chemistry plays an important role in the boundary conditions for the diffusion process. On the contrary, the BUSCA model has no chemical considerations at all, and assumes a null iodine concentration in the water bulk. Several sensitivity studies have been made in order to weight the effect of these differences. The variables examined in these studies were the pool temperature and the incoming iodine concentration in the pool. Additionally, sensitivity studies focused on the steam mass fraction of the injected gas were performed to study the effect of the different approach of both models for the condensation process. The results showed a different sensitivity of SPARC and BUSCA to the incoming concentration. (author) 5 tabs., 26 refs.

  3. Removal of volatile iodine from gas bubbles rising in water pools: review and assessment of pool scrubbing codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polo, J.; Herranz, L.E.; Peyres, V.; Escudero, M.

    1996-01-01

    During a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident with core damage the fission products released from the degrading fuel bundles often pass through aqueous beds before entering the containment, mitigating in part the source term. Several computer codes have been developed for predicting the fission product and aerosols removal in pool scrubbing scenarios. In addition to particle removal, these codes simulate the retention of some volatile iodine compounds. Nonetheless, experimental data on the matter are rather scarce and further validation remains to be done. In this work a review of volatile iodine removal models included in SPARC and BUSCA codes is presented. Besides, the results and discussions of a validation of both codes against the available experimental data are summarized. SPARC and BUSCA codes model the diffusion of iodine toward the bubble interface by using the film penetration theory, which assumes a double layer gas-liquid at the interface. However, there are some differences between the two models, mainly related to the boundary conditions in the aqueous volume for the diffusion of molecular iodine. In SPARC, a set of fast reactions in the liquid phase control both the molecular iodine concentration in the pool and the partition coefficient of iodine at the interface. Thus, the aqueous chemistry plays an important role in the boundary conditions for the diffusion process. On the contrary, the BUSCA model has no chemical considerations at all, and assumes a null iodine concentration in the water bulk. Several sensitivity studies have been made in order to weight the effect of these differences. The variables examined in these studies were the pool temperature and the incoming iodine concentration in the pool. Additionally, sensitivity studies focused on the steam mass fraction of the injected gas were performed to study the effect of the different approach of both models for the condensation process. The results showed a different sensitivity of SPARC

  4. Plasma arc melting of titanium-tantalum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, P.; Patterson, R.A.; Haun, R.

    1994-01-01

    Los Alamos has several applications for high temperature, oxidation and liquid-metal corrosion resistant materials. Further, materials property constraints are dictated by a requirement to maintain low density; e.g., less than the density of stainless steel. Liquid metal compatibility and density requirements have driven the research toward the Ti-Ta system with an upper bound of 60 wt% Ta-40 wt% Ti. Initial melting of these materials was performed in a small button arc melter with several hundred grams of material; however, ingot quantities were soon needed. But, refractory metal alloys whose constituents possess very dissimilar densities, melting temperatures and vapor pressures pose significant difficulty and require specialized melting practices. The Ti-Ta alloys fall into this category with the density of tantalum 16.5 g/cc and that of titanium 4.5 g/cc. Melting is further complicated by the high melting point of Ta(3020 C) and the relatively low boiling point of Ti(3287 C). Previous electron beam melting experience with these materials resulted, in extensive vaporization of the titanium and poor chemical homogeneity. Vacuum arc remelting(VAR) was considered as a melting candidate and discarded due to density and vapor pressure issues associated with electron beam. Plasma arc melting offered the ability to supply a cover gas to deal with vapor pressure issues as well as solidification control to help with macrosegregation in the melt and has successfully produced high quality ingots of the Ti-Ta alloys

  5. Pool Boiling Characteristics on the Microstructure surfaces with Both Rectangular Cavities and Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Eok; Myung, Byung-Soo [Kyungpook Nat’l Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, Su Cheong; Yu, Dong In [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Ho Seon [Incheon Nat’l Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Based on a surface design with rectangular cavities and channels, we investigated the effects of gravity and capillary pressure on pool-boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF). The microcavity structures could prevent liquid flow by the capillary pressure effect. In addition, the microchannel structures contributed to induce one-dimensional liquid flow on the boiling surface. The relationship between the CHF and capillary flow was clearly established. The driving potentials for the liquid supply into a boiling surface can be generated by the gravitational head and capillary pressure. Through an analysis of pool boiling and visualization data, we reveal that the liquid supplement to maintain the nucleate boiling condition on a boiling surface is closely related to the gravitational pressure head and capillary pressure effect.

  6. Excitation of cavitation bubbles in low-temperature liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Harada, Shingo

    2017-06-01

    We excited a cavitation bubble by irradiating a Nd:YAG laser pulse onto a titanium target that was installed in liquid nitrogen at a temperature below the boiling point. To our knowledge, this is the first experiment in which a cavitation bubble has been successfully excited in liquid nitrogen. We compared the cavitation bubble in liquid nitrogen with that in water on the basis of an equation reported by Florschuetz and Chao [J. Heat Transfer 87, 209 (1965)].

  7. Key asset - inherent safety of LMFBR Pool Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchaterre, J.F.; Sevy, R.H.; Lancet, R.T.; Mills, J.C.

    1984-04-01

    The safety approach used in the design of the Large Pool Plant emphasizes use of the intrinsic characteristics of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors to incorporate a high degree of safety in the design and reduce cost by providing simpler (more reliable) dedicated safety systems. Correspondingly, a goal was not to require the action of active systems to prevent significant core damage and/or provide large grace periods for all anticipated transients. The key safety features of the plant are presented and the analysis of representative flow and power transients are presented to show that the design goal has been satisfied

  8. Key asset--Inherent safety of LFMBR pool plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchaterre, J.F.; Lancet, R.T.; Mills, J.C.; Sevy, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The safety approach used in the design of the Large Pool Plant emphasizes use of the intrinsic characteristics of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors to incorporate a high degree of safety in the design and reduce cost by providing simpler (more reliable) dedicated safety systems. Correspondingly, a goal was not to require the action of active systems to prevent significant core damage and/or provide large grace periods for all anticipated transients. The key safety features of the plant are presented and the analysis of representative flow and power transients are presented to show that the design goal has been satisfied

  9. Livermore pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    The Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) has served a dual purpose since 1958--as an instrument for fundamental research and as a tool for measurement and calibration. Our early efforts centered on neutron-diffraction, fission, and capture gamma-ray studies. During the 1960's it was used for extensive calibration work associated with radiochemical and physical measurements on nuclear-explosive tests. Since 1970 the principal applications have been for trace-element measurements and radiation-damage studies. Today's research program is dominated by radiochemical studies of the shorter-lived fission products and by research on the mechanisms of radiation damage. Trace-element measurement for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program is the major measurement application today

  10. Cardiac blood pool emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itti, R.; Philippe, L.; Lorgeron, J.M.; Charbonnier, B.; Raynaud, P.; Brochier, M.

    1983-01-01

    After blood pool labeling using technetium-99m, a series of cardiac pictures is acquired during the rotation of a gamma-camera about the patient. Computer processing leads to reconstruction of various tomographic slices from the original planar projection. Electrocardiographic gating selects the different phases of the cardiac cycle. Individual slices through the left ventricular region are added in order to provide ''thick'' slices on which global and regional parameters of the left ventricular function can be determined. Due to the proportionality existing between count rates and labeled blood volumes, any geometrical model can be avoided. The delineation of regions of interest for count integration is made easier due to the absence of superimposition of structures; no correction for background is necessary. Tomography thus appears to be more consistent and more accurate than the classical methods using planar projections. In addition, right ventricular morphological and kinetic studies can be performed in the same conditions as for the left ventricle [fr

  11. Arc-weld pool interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-08-01

    The mechanisms involved in arc-weld pool interactions are extremely complex and no complete theory is presently available to describe much of the phenomena observed during welding. For the past several years, experimental and analytical studies have been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to increase basic understanding of the gas tungsten arc welding process. These studies have included experimental spectral analysis of the arc in order to determine arc temperature and analytical modeling of the arc and weld puddle. The investigations have been directed toward determining the cause and effects of variations in the energy distribution incident upon the weldment. In addition, the effect of weld puddle distortion on weld penetration was investigated, and experimental and analytical studies of weld process variables have been undertaken to determine the effects of the variables upon weld penetration and configuration. A review of the results and analysis of these studies are presented

  12. Method of solidifying radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetake, Naoto; Kawamura, Fumio; Kikuchi, Makoto; Fukazawa, Tetsuo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to confine the volatiling ingredients such as cesium in liquid wastes safely in glass solidification products while suppressing the volatilization thereof. Method: Acid salt of tetravalent metal such as titanium phosphate has an intense selective adsorption property to cesium. So liquid wastes stored in a high level liquid wastes tank is mixed with titanium phosphate gels stored in an adsorbent tank, then supplied to a mixer and mixed with a sodium silicate solution stored in a sodium silicate storage tank and boric acid stored in an additive tank, into gel-like state. The gel-like material thus formed is supplied to a drier. After being dried at a temperature of 200sup(o)C - 300sup(o)C, the material is melted under heating at a temperature of 1000sup(o)C - 1100sup(o)C, and then cooled to solidify. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. The vapour phase deposition of boron on titanium by the reaction between gaseous boron trichloride and titanium metal. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, D.J.; Shelton, R.A.J.

    1965-03-01

    The reaction, between boron trichloride vapour and titanium has been investigated in the temperature range 200 - 1350 deg. C. It has been found that an initial reaction leads to the formation of titanium tetrachloride and the deposition of boron on titanium, but that except for reactions between 900 and 1000 deg. C, the system is complicated by the formation of lower titanium chlorides due to secondary reactions between the titanium and titanium tetrachloride

  14. Qualification testing and full-scale demonstration of titanium-treated zeolite for sludge wash processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, W.J.

    1997-06-30

    Titanium-treated zeolite is a new ion-exchange material that is a variation of UOP (formerly Union Carbide) IONSIV IE-96 zeolite (IE-96) that has been treated with an aqueous titanium solution in a proprietary process. IE-96 zeolite, without the titanium treatment, has been used since 1988 in the West Valley Demonstration Project`s (WVDP) Supernatant Treatment System (STS) ion-exchange columns to remove Cs-137 from the liquid supernatant solution. The titanium-treated zeolite (TIE-96) was developed by Battelle-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Following successful lab-scale testing of the PNL-prepared TIE-96, UOP was selected as a commercial supplier of the TIE-96 zeolite. Extensive laboratory tests conducted by both the WVDP and PNL indicate that the TIE-96 will successfully remove comparable quantities of Cs-137 from Tank 8D-2 high-level radioactive liquid as was done previously with IE-96. In addition to removing Cs-137, TIE-96 also removes trace quantities of Pu, as well as Sr-90, from the liquid being processed over a wide range of operating conditions: temperature, pH, and dilution. The exact mechanism responsible for the Pu removal is not fully understood. However, the Pu that is removed by the TIE-96 remains on the ion-exchange column under anticipated sludge wash processing conditions. From May 1988 to November 1990, the WVDP processed 560,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive supernatant waste stored in Tank 8D-2. Supernatant is an aqueous salt solution comprised primarily of soluble sodium salts. The second stage of the high-level waste treatment process began November 1991 with the initiation of sludge washing. Sludge washing involves the mixing of Tank 8D-2 contents, both sludge and liquid, to dissolve the sulfate salts present in the sludge. Two sludge washes were required to remove sulfates from the sludge.

  15. Low temperature study of nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.

    2005-05-01

    By low temperature neutron diffraction method was studied structure in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide from room temperature up to 12K. It is found of low temperature phase in titanium carbide- TiC 0.71 . It is established region and borders of this phase. It is determined change of unit cell parameter. (author)

  16. Casting of Titanium and its Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    R. L. Saha; K. T. Jacob

    1986-01-01

    Titaniuni and its alloys have many applications in aerospace, marine and other engineering industries. Titanium requires special melting techniques because of its high reactivity at elevated temperatures and needs special mould materials and methods for castings. This paper reviews the development of titanium casting technology.

  17. Appcelerator Titanium business application development cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Bahrenberg, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Presented in easy to follow, step by step recipes, this guide is designed to lead you through the most important aspects of application design.Titanium developers who already have a basic knowledge of working with Appcelerator Titanium but want to further develop their knowledge for use with business applications

  18. Mineral resource of the month: titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Titanium is hip - at least when it comes to airplanes and jewelry. Known for its high strength-to weight ratio and its resistance to corrosion, titanium and its alloys can also be found in everything from knee replacements to eyeglass frames to baseball bats to fighter planes.

  19. Thermoexpanded graphite modification by titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semko, L.S.; Gorbik, P.P.; Chujko, O.O.; Kruchek, Ya.Yi.; Dzyubenko, L.S.; Orans'ka, O.Yi.

    2006-01-01

    A method of the synthesis of thermoexpanded graphite (TEG) powders coated by titanium dioxide is developed. The conversion of n-buthylorthotitanate into TiO 2 on the TEG surface is investigated. The optimal parameters of the synthesis and the structure of titanium dioxide clusters on the TEG surface are determined

  20. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhashi, Shimpei; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Ryo; Takano, Takao; Seko, Noriaki; Naganawa, Hirochika; Kuroki, Ryota; Saegusa, Jun

    2012-07-01

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  1. Current operating practices of nuclear insurance pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the nuclear pooling system and co-operation between the pools, present practice and capacity, with a breakdown of the limits for third party liability and material damage. The author also describes the relationship between the pools and the nuclear operators (the policyholders), and concludes that the nuclear pools have been successful in serving the interests of their member companies, their policyholders and the governments as they have provided a stable insurance market by making available capacity in amounts that had never before been assembled and placed at risk in a single location. 2 tabs

  2. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhashi, Shimpei; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Ryo; Takano, Takao; Seko, Noriaki; Naganawa, Hirochika; Kuroki, Ryota; Saegusa, Jun

    2012-07-15

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  3. Structure for nuclear fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, Sakae; Nichiei, Shinji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable leak detection in nuclear fuel storage pools, as well as prevent external leakages while keeping the strength of the constructional structures. Constitution: Protection plates are provided around pool linear plates and a leak reception is provided to the bottom. Leakages are detected by leak detecting pipeways and the external leakages are prevented by collecting them in a detection area provided in the intermediate layer. Since ferro-reinforcements at the bottom wall of the pool are disconnected by the protection plate making it impossible to form the constructional body, body hunches are provided to the bottom wall of the pool for processing the ferro-reinforcements. (Yoshino, Y.)

  4. Heat transfer from internally heated hemispherical pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Ellsion, P.G.; Cassulo, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on heat transfer from internally heated ZnSO 4 -H 2 O pools to the walls of hemispherical containers. This experimental technique provides data for a heat transfer system that has to date been only theoretically treated. Three different sizes of copper hemispherical containers were used: 240, 280, 320 mm in diameter. The pool container served both as a heat transfer surface and as an electrode. The opposing electrode was a copper disk, 50 mm in diameter located at the top of the pool in the center. The top surface of the pool was open to the atmosphere

  5. Vortex-Induced Vapor Explosion during Drop Impact on a Superheated Pool

    KAUST Repository

    Alchalabi, M.A.; Kouraytem, Nadia; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-01-01

    Ultra high-speed imaging is used to investigate the vapor explosion when a drop impacts onto a high-temperature pool. The two liquids are immiscible, a low boiling-temperature perfluorohexane drop, at room temperature, which impacts a high boiling-temperature soybean-oil pool, which is heated well above the boiling temperature of the drop. We observe different regimes: weak and strong nucleate boiling, film boiling or Leidenfrost regime and entrainment followed by vapor explosion. The vapor explosions were seen to depend on the formation of a rotational flow at the edge of the impact crater, near the pool surface, which resembles a vortex ring. This rotational motion entrains a thin sheet of the drop liquid, to become surrounded by the oil. In that region, the vapor explosion starts at a point after which it propagates azimuthally along the entire periphery at high speed.

  6. Vortex-Induced Vapor Explosion during Drop Impact on a Superheated Pool

    KAUST Repository

    Alchalabi, M.A.

    2017-04-18

    Ultra high-speed imaging is used to investigate the vapor explosion when a drop impacts onto a high-temperature pool. The two liquids are immiscible, a low boiling-temperature perfluorohexane drop, at room temperature, which impacts a high boiling-temperature soybean-oil pool, which is heated well above the boiling temperature of the drop. We observe different regimes: weak and strong nucleate boiling, film boiling or Leidenfrost regime and entrainment followed by vapor explosion. The vapor explosions were seen to depend on the formation of a rotational flow at the edge of the impact crater, near the pool surface, which resembles a vortex ring. This rotational motion entrains a thin sheet of the drop liquid, to become surrounded by the oil. In that region, the vapor explosion starts at a point after which it propagates azimuthally along the entire periphery at high speed.

  7. Titanium dioxide nanomaterials for photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Zhe; Green, Michael; Just, Michael; Chen, Xiaobo; Li, Yang Yang

    2017-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) has been long regarded as one of the more promising photocatalysts to remove environmental pollution and to generate hydrogen from water under sunlight irradiation via photocatalysis. TiO 2 is environmentally benign and thus is considered a ‘green’ catalyst. In this review we present a short introduction to the physical and electronic properties of TiO 2 , its photocatalytic mechanisms, and some recent examples of various TiO 2 materials used for photocatalysis; these examples include 0, 1, 2, 3D, faceted, defected, composited, and hydrogenated TiO 2 materials. (topical review)

  8. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-01-01

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials. PMID:28788113

  9. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  10. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  11. A comprehensive review on pool boiling of nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciloglu, Dogan; Bolukbasi, Abdurrahim

    2015-01-01

    Nanofluids are nanoparticle suspensions of small particle size and low concentration dispersed in base fluids such as water, oil and ethylene glycol. These fluids have been considered by researchers as a unique heat transfer carrier because of their thermophysical properties and a great number of potential benefits in traditional thermal engineering applications, including power generation, transportation, air conditioning, electronics devices and cooling systems. Many attempts have been made in the literature on nanofluid boiling; however, data on the boiling heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and the critical heat flux (CHF) have been inconsistent. This paper presents a review of recent researches on the pool boiling heat transfer behaviour of nanofluid. First, the development of nanofluids and their potential applications are briefly given. Then, the effects of various parameters on nanofluids pool boiling are discussed in detail. - Highlights: • A review on the pool boiling heat transfer of nanofluid is presented and discussed. • Nanoparticle deposition considerably affects the boiling heat transfer. • The HTC decreases due to the low contact angle and the high adhesion energy. • The HTC increases due to the formation of the new cavities and liquid suction. • The CHF increases due to the increase in roughness, wettability and capillarity

  12. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeche, Daniel; Mueller, Sven; Shinn, Michelle; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  13. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle; Müller, Sven; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  14. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  15. Flow behavior of volume-heated boiling pools: implications with respect to transition phase accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Jones, O.C. Jr.; Chen, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of two-phase flow fields in single-component volume-heated boiling pools were made. Photographic observations, together with pool-average void fraction measurements, indicate that the churn-turbulent flow regime is stable for superficial vapor velocities up to nearly five times the Kutateladze dispersal limit. Within this range of conditions, a churn-turbulent drift flux model provides a reasonable prediction of the pool-average void fraction data. An extrapolation of the data to transition phase accident conditions suggests that intense boilup could occur where the pool-average void fraction would be >0.6 for steel vaporization rates equivalent to power levels >1% of nominal liquid-metal fast breeder reactor power density. The extended stability of bubbly flow to unusually large vapor fluxes and void fractions, observed in some experiments, is a major unresolved issue

  16. Production of molten UO2 pools by internal heating: apparatus and preliminary experimental heat transfer results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasanov, M.G.; Gunther, W.H.; Baker, L. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The capability for removal of heat from a pool of molten fuel under postaccident conditions is an important consideration in liquid-metal fast breeder reactor safety analysis. No experimental data for pool heat transfer from molten UO 2 under conditions simulating internal heat generation by fission product decay have been reported previously in the literature. An apparatus to provide such data was developed and used to investigate heat transfer from pools containing up to 7.5 kg of UO 2 ; the internal heat generation rates and pool depths attained cover most of the ranges of interest for postaccident heat removal analysis. It was also observed in these studies that the presence of simulated fission products corresponding to approximately 150,000 kW-day/kg burnup had no significant effect on the observed heat transfer

  17. Oxidation kinetics of corium pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulatsky, A.A., E-mail: andrei314@mail.ru [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Smirnov, S.A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Kotova, S.Yu. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Fischer, M.; Hellmann, S. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Tromm, W.; Miassoedov, A. [Forschungzentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Karlsruhe (Germany); Bottomley, D. [EUROPÄISCHE KOMMISSION, Joint Research Centre Institut für Transurane (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Piluso, P. [CEA Cadarache-DEN/DTN/STRI, St.Paul-lez-Durance (France); Barrachin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire, St.Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • The analysis of experimental data on molten corium oxidation was been carried out. • The analysis has revealed the main factors influencing the oxidation kinetics. • The analysis was used for developing a qualitative analytical model. • The numerical modeling has confirmed the results of experimental data analysis. -- Abstract: Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies of oxidation kinetics of an open surface corium pool have been reported. The experiments have been carried out within OECD MASCA program and ISTC METCOR, METCOR-P and EVAN projects. It has been shown that the melt oxidation is controlled by an oxidant supply to the melt free surface from the atmosphere, not by the reducer supply from the melt. The project experiments have not detected any input of the zirconium oxidation kinetics into the process chemistry. The completed analysis puts forward a simple analytical model, which gives an explanation of the main features of melt oxidation process. The numerical modeling results are in good agreement with experimental data and theoretical considerations.

  18. Oxidation kinetics of corium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulatsky, A.A.; Smirnov, S.A.; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Kotova, S.Yu.; Fischer, M.; Hellmann, S.; Tromm, W.; Miassoedov, A.; Bottomley, D.; Piluso, P.; Barrachin, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The analysis of experimental data on molten corium oxidation was been carried out. • The analysis has revealed the main factors influencing the oxidation kinetics. • The analysis was used for developing a qualitative analytical model. • The numerical modeling has confirmed the results of experimental data analysis. -- Abstract: Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies of oxidation kinetics of an open surface corium pool have been reported. The experiments have been carried out within OECD MASCA program and ISTC METCOR, METCOR-P and EVAN projects. It has been shown that the melt oxidation is controlled by an oxidant supply to the melt free surface from the atmosphere, not by the reducer supply from the melt. The project experiments have not detected any input of the zirconium oxidation kinetics into the process chemistry. The completed analysis puts forward a simple analytical model, which gives an explanation of the main features of melt oxidation process. The numerical modeling results are in good agreement with experimental data and theoretical considerations

  19. Superfluid He testing of titanium-stainless steel transitions fabricated by explosive welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, Yu.; Sabirov, B.; Shirkov, G.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental setup was constructed to test in liquid He bimetallic (titanium-stainless steel) tube joints which were manufactured by an explosive welding method. The leak levels of the samples tested at room temperature 7.5·10 -10 and 7.5·10 -9 Torr·1/s at 77 K, correspondingly, measured at FNAL (Batavia, USA) after the thermocycling have coincided with the earlier results obtained at JINR (Dubna, Russia) and INFN (Pisa, Italy) data for the same samples. For the liquid helium test the tubes were welded in pairs by their titanium ends. At the room temperature the leak level of the three tested samples was 4.9·10 -10 Torr·l/s. At the first cryogenic tests (4-6 K) one of the samples manifested a leak. The investigation will be continued since the explosive welding seems to be a very perspective new generation technology

  20. Sequencing of BAC pools by different next generation sequencing platforms and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Uwe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation sequencing of BACs is a viable option for deciphering the sequence of even large and highly repetitive genomes. In order to optimize this strategy, we examined the influence of read length on the quality of Roche/454 sequence assemblies, to what extent Illumina/Solexa mate pairs (MPs improve the assemblies by scaffolding and whether barcoding of BACs is dispensable. Results Sequencing four BACs with both FLX and Titanium technologies revealed similar sequencing accuracy, but showed that the longer Titanium reads produce considerably less misassemblies and gaps. The 454 assemblies of 96 barcoded BACs were improved by scaffolding 79% of the total contig length with MPs from a non-barcoded library. Assembly of the unmasked 454 sequences without separation by barcodes revealed chimeric contig formation to be a major problem, encompassing 47% of the total contig length. Masking the sequences reduced this fraction to 24%. Conclusion Optimal BAC pool sequencing should be based on the longest available reads, with barcoding essential for a comprehensive assessment of both repetitive and non-repetitive sequence information. When interest is restricted to non-repetitive regions and repeats are masked prior to assembly, barcoding is non-essential. In any case, the assemblies can be improved considerably by scaffolding with non-barcoded BAC pool MPs.

  1. Experimental Study on Boiling Crisis in Pool Boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Satbyoul; Kim, Hyungdae [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    They postulated that failure in re-wetting of a dry patch by a cooling liquid is governed by microhydrodynamics near the wall. Chu et al. commonly observed that active coalescence of newly generated bubbles with preexisting bubbles results in a residual dry patch and prevents the complete rewetting of the dry patch, leading to CHF. In this work, to reveal the key physical mechanism of CHF during the rewetting process of a dry patch, dynamics of dry patches and thermal pattern of a boiling surface are simultaneously observed using TR and IR thermometry techniques. Local dynamics of dry patch and thermal pattern on a boiling surface in synchronized manner for both space and time using TR and IR thermometry were measured during pool boiling of water. Observation and quantitative examination of CHF was performed. - The hydrodynamic and thermal behaviors of irreversible dry patch were observed. The dry patches coalesce into a large dry patch and it locally dried out. Due to the failure of liquid rewetting, the dry patch is not completely rewetted, resulting in the burn out at which temperature is -140°C. - When temperature of a dry patch rises beyond the instantaneous nucleation temperature, several bubbles nucleate at the head of the advancing liquid meniscus and prevents the liquid front, and eventually the overheated dry patch remains alive after the departure of the massive bubble.

  2. Penetration of a heated pool into a melting miscible substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, G.; Werle, H.

    1986-01-01

    Core-catchers have been proposed, which, after a core disruptive accident in a nuclear reactor, prevent containment failure caused by contact of the molten debris with the underlying ex-vessel structural materials. Most of these core-catchers are provided with sacrificial layers which on melting consume some fraction of the decay heat and dilute the heat sources and the fissionable material as the core masses are dissolved by the molten sacrificial material. Dilution of the core masses results in relatively low heat fluxes and temperatures at the wall of the core-catcher and, in addition, reduces the probability of recriticality. An experimental study was conducted on melting systems consisting of a liquid over-lying a solid substrate, which after melting of the solid, are mutually miscible. To initiate melting, the liquid was heated either by a planar heater from above or internally by an ac current. The density of the liquid was varied systematically, and it was found that downward heat transfer increases strongly with this parameter. In addition to heat transfer, mass transfer was studied by measuring the local concentration of the molten material in the liquid. A few experiments were performed in which sideward melting and two-dimensional pool growth were investigated

  3. Titanium oxide fever; De titaniumoxidekoorts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jonge, D.; Visser, J. [Afdeling Luchtkwaliteit, GGD Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    One measure to improve air quality is to apply photo-catalytic substances that capture NOx onto the road surface or onto baffle boards alongside the roads. The effect of titanium oxide containing clinkers with coating was discussed in the report 'Demonstration project of air-purifying pavement in Hengelo, The Netherlands' that was published in May 2011. This article examines the way in which the effectiveness of this study was determined. Can titanium oxide containing clinkers and coatings indeed capture NOx?. [Dutch] Een van de maatregelen om de luchtkwaliteit te verbeteren is het aanbrengen van fotokatalytische stoffen waarmee NOx kan worden afgevangen op bijvoorbeeld wegdek of op geluidsschermen langs wegen. Over het effect van titaniumoxidehoudende straatklinkers en hierop aangebrachte coatings verscheen in mei 2011 het rapport 'Demonstration project of air-purifying pavement in Hengelo, The Netherlands'. Dit artikel gaat over de manier waarop de effectiviteit in het hiervoor genoemde onderzoek is bepaald. Kunnen titaniumoxidehoudende klinkers en coatings inderdaad NOx afvangen?.

  4. Adsorption of hydrogen in titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez R, T.

    1995-01-01

    In this work the absorption of hydrogen in titanium plates using a constant volume system has been realized. The changes of temperature and pressure were used to monitor the progress of the absorption. A stainless steel vacuum chamber with volume of 4,333 cm 3 was used. A titanium sample of 45 x 5.4 x 0.3 cm was located in the center of the chamber. The sample was heated by an electrical source connected to the system. The sample was preconditioned with a vacuum-thermal treatment at 10 -6 mbar and 800 Centigrade degrees for several days. Absorption was observed at room temperature and also at higher temperatures. The room temperature absorption was in the pressure range of 1.0 x 10 3 to 2.5 x 10 3 mbar, and other absorptions were from 180 to 630 Centigrade degrees at 3.5 x 10 -1 to 1.3 x 10 3 mbar. It was found that the gas absorbed was function of the vacuum-thermal pre-conditioned treatment, pressure and temperature. When the first absorption was developed, additional absorptions were realized in short time. We measured the electrical resistivity of the sample in the experiments but we could not see important changes due to the absorption. (Author)

  5. Adhesive-Bonded Tab Attaches Thermocouples to Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, C. F.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanical strength of titanium-alloy structures that support thermocouples is preserved by first spotwelding thermocouples to titanium tabs and then attaching tabs to titanium with a thermosetting adhesive. In contrast to spot welding, a technique previously used for thermocouples, fatigue strength of the titanium is unaffected by adhesive bonding. Technique is also gentler than soldering or attaching thermocouples with a tap screw.

  6. Compact fuel storage rack for fuel pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parras, F.; Louvat, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    ETS LEMER and FRAMATOME propose a new compact storage rack. This rack permits a considerable increase of the storage capacity of cooling pools. A short description of the structure and the components is presented, to propose racks that are: . Inalterable, . Compact, . Insensitive to earthquakes. Installation in pools already in operation is simplified by their light structure and the bearing device [fr

  7. The warm pool in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vinayachandran, P.N.; Shetye, S.R.

    is larger and warmer, a peculiarity of the pool in the Indian Ocean is its seasonal variation. The surface area of the pool changes from 24 x 106 km2 in April to 8 x 106 km2 in September due to interaction with the southwest monsoon. The annual cycles of sea...

  8. Big city consultants shut down our pool : a shocking community pool gets checked for stray voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, P. [Power Line Systems Engineering Inc., Markham, ON (Canada)

    2009-12-15

    This article discussed an investigation conducted at a community pool where swimmers complained of receiving electrical shocks both in the pool and on the pool's deck area. Electrical measurements taken at the pool revealed current flows from the pool water to various points around the deck area. Measured current flow in the pool area was 30 amps even when the main pool service breaker was opened to shut off power to the entire facility. Thirty amps of primary neutral current was then measured on the primary side aerial neutral in front of the pool. A 10 amp primary feeder from the pool joined up with the complex's primary neutral wire to increase the neutral current to 40 amps. The combined 40 amps current then returned to the secondary side of a nearby utility transformer substation. The study showed that the underground wet low-resistance grounded surface area of the pool was attracting the 30 amps of utility current from the surrounding ground area. The local utility disconnected the primary and secondary neutral interconnection at the pool's main 600-volt step-down transformer. The pool deck was removed in order to install additional copper bonding grounds. In order to avert serious injuries, many experts propose that all electric utilities should be required by law to reconfigure their power systems to prevent primary power neutral currents from entering private buildings. 1 tab., 2 figs.

  9. Ripples in a superconducting tidal pool

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, E

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of electrons in a metal is often compared to that of water in a pool. An empty pool is like a material that has all of its electrons removed. As electrons are 'poured' into the metal, they first occupy the lowest energies available - the bottom of the pool - and eventually fill up to the Fermi energy, the top of the pool. At this point we no longer discuss electrons but quasiparticles. These are electrons that have modified properties due to their interactions within the material. Waves in a pool can be excited, and their properties will depend on the depth of the water. Similarly in a metal, quasiparticles behave like waves that have a material-dependent dispersion relation between their energy and their wavevector, which specifies their direction and wavelength. This simple analogy also hints at an indirect method of measuring the dispersion relation of a metal, and hence the myriad of properties that depend on it. (U.K.)

  10. Microwave-assisted ionothermal synthesis of nanostructured anatase titanium dioxide/activated carbon composite as electrode material for capacitive deionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Po-I; Chung, Li-Ching; Shao, Hsin; Liang, Teh-Ming; Horng, Ren-Yang; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Chang, Min-Chao

    2013-01-01

    The nanostructured anatase titanium dioxide/activated carbon composite material for capacitive deionization electrode was prepared in a short time by a lower temperature two-step microwave-assisted ionothermal (sol–gel method in the presence of ionic liquid) synthesis method. This method includes a reaction and a crystallization step. In the crystallization step, the ionic liquid plays a hydrothermal analogy role in driving the surface anatase crystallization of amorphous titanium dioxide nanoparticles formed in the reaction step. The energy dispersive spectroscopic study of the composite indicates that the anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles are evenly deposited in the matrix of activated carbon. The electrochemical property of the composite electrode was investigated. In comparison to the pristine activated carbon electrode, higher specific capacitance was observed for the nanostructured anatase titanium dioxide/activated carbon composite electrode, especially when the composite was prepared with a molar ratio of titanium tetraisopropoxide/H 2 O equal to 1:15. Its X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic result indicates that it has the highest amount of Ti-OH. The Ti-OH group can enhance the wetting ability and the specific capacitance of the composite electrode. The accompanying capacitive deionization result indicates that the decay of electrosorption capacity of this composite electrode is insignificant after five cycle tests. It means that the ion electrosorption–desorption becomes a reversible process

  11. Design and Construction of Pool Door for Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kwangsub; Lee, Sangjin; Choi, Jinbok; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jongmin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The pool door is a structure to isolate the reactor pool from the service pool for maintenance. The pool door is installed before the reactor pool is drained. The pool door consists of structural component and sealing component. The main structures of the pool door are stainless steel plates and side frames. The plates and frames are assembled by welded joints. Lug is welded at the top of the plate. The pool door is submerged in the pool water when it is used. Materials of the pool door should be resistive to corrosion and radiation. Stainless steel is used in structural components and air nozzle assemblies. Features of design and construction of the pool door for the research reactor are introduced. The pool door is designed to isolate the reactor pool for maintenance. Structural analysis is performed to evaluate the structural integrity during earthquake. Tests and inspections are also carried out during construction to identify the safety and function of the pool door.

  12. Design and Construction of Pool Door for Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kwangsub; Lee, Sangjin; Choi, Jinbok; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jongmin

    2016-01-01

    The pool door is a structure to isolate the reactor pool from the service pool for maintenance. The pool door is installed before the reactor pool is drained. The pool door consists of structural component and sealing component. The main structures of the pool door are stainless steel plates and side frames. The plates and frames are assembled by welded joints. Lug is welded at the top of the plate. The pool door is submerged in the pool water when it is used. Materials of the pool door should be resistive to corrosion and radiation. Stainless steel is used in structural components and air nozzle assemblies. Features of design and construction of the pool door for the research reactor are introduced. The pool door is designed to isolate the reactor pool for maintenance. Structural analysis is performed to evaluate the structural integrity during earthquake. Tests and inspections are also carried out during construction to identify the safety and function of the pool door

  13. Mechanical properties and fracture of titanium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koketsu, Hideyuki; Taniyama, Yoshihiro; Yonezu, Akio; Cho, Hideo; Ogawa, Takeshi; Takemoto, Mikio; Nakayama, Gen

    2006-01-01

    Titanium hydrides tend to suffer fracture when their thicknesses reach a critical thickness. Morphology and mechanical property of the hydrides are, however, not well known. The study aims to reveal the hydride morphology and fracture types of the hydrides. Chevron shaped plate hydrides were found to be produced on the surface of pure titanium (Grade 1) and Grade 7 titanium absorbing hydrogen. There were tree types of fracture of the hydrides, i.e., crack in hydride layer, exfoliation of the layer and shear-type fracture of the hydride plates, during the growth of the hydrides and deformation. We next estimated the true stress-strain curves of the hydrides on Grade 1 and 7 titanium using the dual Vickers indentation method, and the critical strain causing the Mode-I fine crack by indentation. Fracture strength and strain of the hydrides in Grade 1 titanium were estimated as 566 MPa and 4.5%, respectively. Those of the hydride in Grade 7 titanium were 498 MPa and 16%. Though the fracture strains estimated from the plastic instability of true stress-strain curves were approximately the half of those estimated by finite element method, the titanium hydrides were estimated to possess some extent of toughness or plastic deformation capability. (author)

  14. Electron beam melting of sponge titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Hiroshi; Kusamichi, Tatsuhiko; Muraoka, Tetsuhiro; Onouye, Toshio; Nishimura, Takashi

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental investigations were done on electron beam (EB) melting of sponge titanium by using 80 kW EB melting furnace. Results obtained are as follows: (1) To increase the melting yield of titanium in EB melting of sponge titanium, it is important to recover splashed metal by installation of water-cooled copper wall around the hearth and to decrease evaporation loss of titanium by keeping the surface temperature of molten metal just above the melting temperature of titanium without local heating. (2) Specific power consumption of drip melting of pressed sponge titanium bar and hearth melting of sponge titanium are approximately 0.9 kWh/kg-Ti and 0.5-0.7 kWh/kg-Ti, respectively. (3) Ratios of the heat conducted to water-cooled mould in the drip melting and to water-cooled hearth in the hearth melting to the electron beam input power are 50-65% and 60-65%, respectively. (4) Surface defects of EB-melted ingots include rap which occurs when the EB output is excessively great, and transverse cracks when the EB output is excessively small. To prevent surface defects, the up-down withdrawal method is effective. (author)

  15. Ultrasonic effects on titanium tanning of leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Biyu; Shi, Bi; Sun, Danhong; Chen, Yaowen; Shelly, Dennis C

    2007-03-01

    The effects of ultrasound on titanium tanning of leather were investigated. Either 20 or 40 kHz ultrasound was applied to the titanium tanning of pigskins. Five different treatment conditions were carried out and the effects were examined, such as leather shrinkage temperature (T(s)), titanium content and titanium distribution in the leather. Overall heat loading was carefully controlled. Results showed that 20 kHz ultrasound effectively improves titanium agent penetration into the hide and increases the leather's shrinkage temperature. Doubling the frequency to 40 kHz produced negligible enhancements. An impressive 105.6 degrees C T(s) was achieved using 20 kHz ultrasound pretreatment of the tanning liquor followed by 20 kHz ultrasound in the tanning mixture (liquor plus pigskins) in a special salt-free medium. Finally, using a unique ultrasonic tanning drum with 26.5 kHz ultrasound, the T(s) reached a record level of 106.5 degrees C, a value not achieved in conventional (no ultrasound) titanium tanning. The ultrasonic effects on titanium tanning of leather are judged to make a superior mineral tanned leather.

  16. [The surface roughness analysis of the titanium casting founding by a new titanium casting investment material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qin-ye; Wu, Xia-yi; Lin, Xue-feng

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the surface roughness property of the titanium castings cast in a new investment for titanium casting. Six wax patterns (20 mm × 20 mm × 0.5 mm) were invested using two investments: three in a new titanium investment material and three in the control material (Rematitan Plus). Six titanium specimens were obtained by conventional casting. After casting, surface roughness of the specimens were evaluated with a surface profilometer. The surface roughness of the specimens cast in new titanium investment material was (1.72 ± 0.08) µm, which was much smaller than that from Rematitan Plus [(1.91 ± 0.15) µm, P cast using these two investment materials are both smooth enough to fulfill the demand of the titanium precision-casting for prosthodontic clinical use.

  17. Corrosion behaviour and galvanic coupling of titanium and welded titanium in LiBr solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion resistance and galvanic coupling of Grade 2 commercially pure titanium in its welded and non-welded condition were systematically analyzed in LiBr solutions. Galvanic corrosion was evaluated through two different methods: anodic polarization (according to the Mixed Potential Theory) and electrochemical noise (using a zero-resistance ammeter). Samples have been etched to study the microstructure. The action of lithium chromate as corrosion inhibitor has been evaluated. Titanium and welded titanium showed extremely low corrosion current densities and elevated pitting potential values (higher than 1 V). The results of both methods, anodic polarization and electrochemical noise, showed that the welded titanium was always the anodic element of the pair titanium-welded titanium, so that its corrosion resistance decreases due to the galvanic effect

  18. On the use of titanium hydride for powder injection moulding of titanium-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrenoo-Morelli, E.; Bidaux, J.-E.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Titanium and titanium-based alloys are excellent materials for a number of engineering applications because of their high strength, lightweight, good corrosion resistance, non magnetic characteristic and biocompatibility. The current processing steps are usually costly, and there is a growing demand for net-shape solutions for manufacturing parts of increasing complexity. Powder injection moulding is becoming a competitive alternative, thanks to the advances in production of good quality base-powders, binders and sintering facilities. Titanium hydride powders, have the attractiveness of being less reactive than fine titanium powders, easier to handle, and cheaper. This paper summarizes recent advances on PIM of titanium and titanium alloys from TiH2 powders, including shape-memory NiTi alloys. (author)

  19. Operation and maintenance techniques of pool and pool water purification system in IMEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soong, Woong Sup

    1999-03-01

    IMEF pool is used pass way between pool and hot cell in order to inlet and outlet of fuel pin in cask. All operation is performed conforming with naked eyes. Therefore floating matter is filtered so as to easy under water handling. Also radioactivity in pool water is controlled according to the nuclear law, radioactivity ration maintained less than 15mR/hr on pool side. Perfect operation and maintenance can be achieved well trained operator. Result obtained from the perfection can give more influence over restrain, spreading contamination of radioactivity materials. This report describes operation and maintenance technique of pool water purification system in IMEF. (Author). 7 refs., 13 figs.

  20. Operation and maintenance techniques of pool and pool water purification system in IMEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soong, Woong Sup

    1999-03-01

    IMEF pool is used pass way between pool and hot cell in order to inlet and outlet of fuel pin in cask. All operation is performed conforming with naked eyes. Therefore floating matter is filtered so as to easy under water handling. Also radioactivity in pool water is controlled according to the nuclear law, radioactivity ration maintained less than 15mR/hr on pool side. Perfect operation and maintenance can be achieved well trained operator. Result obtained from the perfection can give more influence over restrain, spreading contamination of radioactivity materials. This report describes operation and maintenance technique of pool water purification system in IMEF. (Author). 7 refs., 13 figs

  1. Titanium vs. polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody fusion: Meta-analysis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Scott; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Bydon, Mohamad; Torner, James C; Hitchon, Patrick W

    2017-10-01

    Spinal interbody fusion is a standard and accepted method for spinal fusion. Interbody fusion devices include titanium (Ti) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages with distinct biomechanical properties. Titanium and PEEK cages have been evaluated in the cervical and lumbar spine, with conflicting results in bony fusion and subsidence. Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we reviewed the available literature evaluating Ti and PEEK cages to assess subsidence and fusion rates. Six studies were included in the analysis, 3 of which were class IV evidence, 2 were class III, and 1 was class II. A total of 410 patients (Ti-228, PEEK-182) and 587 levels (Ti-327, PEEK-260) were studied. Pooled mean age was 50.8years in the Ti group, and 53.1years in the PEEK group. Anterior cervical discectomy was performed in 4 studies (395 levels) and transforaminal interbody fusion in 2 studies (192 levels). No statistically significant difference was found between groups with fusion (OR 1.16, 95% C.I 0.59-2.89, p=0.686, I 2 =49.7%) but there was a statistically significant the rate of subsidence with titanium (OR 3.59, 95% C.I 1.28-10.07, p=0.015, I 2 =56.9%) at last follow-up. Titanium and PEEK cages are associated with a similar rate of fusion, but there is an increased rate of subsidence with titanium cage. Future prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to further evaluate these cages using surgical and patient-reported outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Isothermal deformation of gamma titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Singh, J.P.; Tuval, E.; Weiss, I.

    1996-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminide has received considerable attention in recent years from the automotive industry as a potential material for making rotating and reciprocating components to produce a quieter and more efficient engine. The objectives of this study were to identify processing routes for the manufacture of automobile valves from gamma titanium aluminide. The issues considered were microstructure and composition of the material, and processing parameters such as deformation rates, temperatures, and total deformation. This paper examines isothermal deformation of gamma titanium aluminide in order to develop a processing window for this type of material

  3. Chemistry of titanium, zirconium and thorium picramates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, R.S.; Agrawal, S.P.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    Picramates of titanium, zirconium and thorium are prepared by treating the aqueous sulphate, chloride and nitrate solutions with sodium picramate. Micro-analysis, colorimetry and spectrophotometry are used to establish the compositions (metal : ligand ratio) of these picramates as 1 : 2 (for titanium and zirconium) and 1 : 4 (for thorium). IR studies indicate H 2 N → Me coordination (where Me denotes the metal). A number of explosive properties of these picramates point to the fact that the zirconium picramate is thermally more stable than the picramates of titanium and thorium. (orig.) [de

  4. Titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ataya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Yellow nail syndrome is a rare disease of unclear etiology. We describe a patient who develops yellow nail syndrome, with primary nail and sinus manifestations, shortly after amalgam dental implants. A study of the patient's nail shedding showed elevated nail titanium levels. The patient had her dental implants removed and had complete resolution of her sinus symptoms with no change in her nail findings. Since the patient's nail findings did not resolve we do not believe titanium exposure is a cause of her yellow nail syndrome but perhaps a possible relationship exists between titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome that requires further studies.

  5. Clinical bending of nickel titanium wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Chain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the evolution and the involvement of Nickel Titanium wires in the field of Orthodontics. The treatment plan has evolved with the use of low force Nickel Titanium wires. Because of their high springback, low stiffness, they are the key initial wires in leveling and alignment but have poor formability. Since poor formability limits its ability to create variable arch forms thus; limits the form of treatment. We have devised a method to bend the Nickel Titanium wires to help in our inventory but also customized the wire according to the treatment.

  6. Current assisted superplastic forming of titanium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guofeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current assisted superplastic forming combines electric heating technology and superplastic forming technology, and can overcome some shortcomings of traditional superplastic forming effectively, such as slow heating rate, large energy loss, low production efficiency, etc. Since formability of titanium alloy at room temperature is poor, current assisted superplastic forming is suitable for titanium alloy. This paper mainly introduces the application of current assisted superplastic forming in the field of titanium alloy, including forming technology of double-hemisphere structure and bellows.

  7. Gentamicin-Eluting Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Grown on the Ultrafine-Grained Titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Sima Hashemi; Hadjizadeh, Afra

    2017-08-01

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials is the most appropriate choices for the applications as orthopedic and dental implants. In this regard, ultrafine-grained (UFG) titanium with an enhanced mechanical properties and surface energy has attracted more attention. Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanotubes grown on the titanium could enhance bone bonding, cellular response and are good reservoirs for loading drugs and antibacterial agents. This article investigates gentamicin loading into and release from the TiO 2 nanotubes, grown on the UFG compared to coarse-grained (CG) titanium substrate surfaces. Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) was employed to produce the UFG structure titanium. TiO 2 nanotubes were grown by the anodizing technique on both UFG and CG titanium substrate surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging confirmed TiO 2 nanotube growth on the surface. The UV-vis spectroscopy analysis results show that the amount of gentamicin load-release in the anodized UFG titanium sample is higher than that of CG one which can be explained in terms of thicker TiO 2 nanotube arrays layer formed on UFG sample. Moreover, the anodized UFG titanium samples released the drug in a longer time than CG (1 day for the UFG titanium vs. 3 h for the CG one). Regarding wettability analysis, anodized UFG titanium sample showed more enhanced hydrophilicity than CG counterpart. Therefore, the significantly smaller grain size of pure titanium provided by the ECAP technique coupled with appropriate subsequent anodization treatment not only offers a good combination of biocompatibility and adequate mechanical properties but also it provides a delayed release condition for gentamicin.

  8. Swimming pool hydraulics and their significance for public pools. Bedeutung der Beckenhydraulik in oeffentlichen Schwimmbaedern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gansloser, G

    1989-11-01

    The term of swimming pool hydraulics means the process of letting in and drawing off water to and from the pool while ensuring that no inadmissible water-borne contaminant concentrations will occur anywhere within the pool. Measurements were performed on a pool to study the significance of correct pool hydraulics. The author points out that a wrong water recirculation design will bring to nought the effects of an elaborate water treatment system; by contrast, poor pool water quality can be greatly improved by redesigning the pool water hydraulics approach. In principle, systems with with water inlet at one side and water outlet at the far side will fall short of hygienic requirements. (BWI).

  9. Studies of thermal stratification in water pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, P.K.; Chandraker, D.K.; Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Large water pools are used as a heat sink for various cooling systems used in industry. In context of advance nuclear reactors like AHWR, it is used as ultimate heat sink for passive systems for decay heat removal and containment cooling. This system incorporates heat exchangers submerged in the large water pool. However, heat transfer by natural convection in pool poses a problem of thermal stratification. Due to thermal stratification hot layers of water accumulate over the relatively cold one. The heat transfer performance of heat exchanger gets deteriorated as a hot fluid envelops it. In the nuclear reactors, the walls of the pool are made of concrete and it may subject to high temperature due to thermal stratification which is not desirable. In this paper, a concept of employing shrouds around the heat source is studied. These shrouds provide a bulk flow in the water pool, thereby facilitating mixing of hot and cold fluid, which eliminate stratification. The concept has been applied to the a scaled model of Gravity Driven Water Pool (GDWP) of AHWR in which Isolation Condensers (IC) tubes are submerged for decay heat removal of AHWR using ICS and thermal stratification phenomenon was predicted with and without shrouds. To demonstrate the adequacy of the effectiveness of shroud arrangement and to validate the simulation methodology of RELAP5/Mod3.2, experiments has been conducted on a scaled model of the pool with and without shroud. (author)

  10. Spent fuel pool cleanup and stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.

    1987-06-01

    Each of the plutonium production reactors at Hanford had a large water-filled spent fuel pool to provide interim storage of irradiated fuel while awaiting shipment to the separation facilities. After cessation of reactor operations the fuel was removed from the pools and the water levels were drawn down to a 5- to 10-foot depth. The pools were maintained with the water to provide shielding and radiological control. What appeared to be a straightforward project to process the water, remove the sediments from the basin, and stabilize the contamination on the floors and walls became a very complex and time consuming operation. The sediment characteristics varied from pool to pool, the ion exchange system required modification, areas of hard-pack sediments were discovered on the floors, special arrangements to handle and package high dose rate items for shipment were required, and contract problems ensued with the subcontractor. The original schedule to complete the project from preliminary engineering to final stabilization of the pools was 15 months. The actual time required was about 25 months. The original cost estimate to perform the work was $2,651,000. The actual cost of the project was $5,120,000, which included $150,000 for payment of claims to the subcontractor. This paper summarizes the experiences associated with the cleanup and radiological stabilization of the 100-B, -C, -D, and -DR spent fuel pools, and discusses a number of lessons learned items

  11. Leaching of Titanium and Silicon from Low-Grade Titanium Slag Using Hydrochloric Acid Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Longsheng; Wang, Lina; Qi, Tao; Chen, Desheng; Zhao, Hongxin; Liu, Yahui; Wang, Weijing

    2018-05-01

    Acid-leaching behaviors of the titanium slag obtained by selective reduction of vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite concentrates were investigated. It was found that the optimal leaching of titanium and silicon were 0.7% and 1.5%, respectively. The titanium and silicon in the titanium slag were firstly dissolved in the acidic solution to form TiO2+ and silica sol, and then rapidly reprecipitated, forming hydrochloric acid (HCl) leach residue. Most of the silicon presented in the HCl leach residue as floccules-like silica gel, while most of the titanium was distributed in the nano-sized rod-like clusters with crystallite refinement and intracrystalline defects, and, as such, 94.3% of the silicon was leached from the HCl leach residue by alkaline desilication, and 96.5% of the titanium in the titanium-rich material with some rutile structure was then digested by the concentrated sulfuric acid. This provides an alternative route for the comprehensive utilization of titanium and silicon in titanium slag.

  12. Synthesis of Titanium Oxycarbide from Titanium Slag by Methane-Containing Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jie; Fatollahi-Fard, Farzin; Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2018-02-01

    In this study, reaction steps of a process for synthesis of titanium oxycarbide from titanium slag were demonstrated. This process involves the reduction of titanium slag by a methane-hydrogen-argon mixture at 1473 K (1200 °C) and the leaching of the reduced products by hydrofluoric acid near room temperature to remove the main impurity (Fe3Si). Some iron was formed by disproportionation of the main M3O5 phase before gaseous reduction started. Upon reduction, more iron formed first, followed by reduction of titanium dioxide to suboxides and eventually oxycarbide.

  13. Titanium disilicide formation by sputtering of titanium on heated silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanielian, M.; Blackstone, S.

    1984-09-01

    We have sputter deposited titanium on bare silicon substrates at elevated temperatures. We find that at a substrate temperature of about 515 °C titanium silicide is formed due to the reaction of the titanium with the Si. The resistivity of the silicide is about 15 μΩ cm and it is not etchable in a selective titanium etch. This process can have applications in low-temperature, metal-oxide-semiconductor self-aligned silicide formation for very large scale integrated

  14. Distributed Technologies in a Data Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, K.; Conover, H.; Graves, S.; He, Y.; Regner, K.; Smith, M.

    2004-12-01

    A Data Pool is an on-line repository providing interactive and programmatic access to data products through a variety of services. The University of Alabama in Huntsville has developed and deployed such a Data Pool in conjunction with the DISCOVER project, a collaboration with NASA and Remote Sensing Systems. DISCOVER provides long-term ocean and climate data from a variety of passive microwave satellite instruments, including such products as sea-surface temperature and wind, air temperature, atmospheric water vapor, cloud water and rain rate. The Data Pool provides multiple methods to access and visualize these products, including conventional HTTP and FTP access, as well as data services that provide for enhanced usability and interoperability, such as GridFTP, OPeNDAP, OpenGIS-compliant web mapping and coverage services, and custom subsetting and packaging services. This paper will focus on the distributed service technologies used in the Data Pool, which spans heterogeneous machines at multiple locations. For example, in order to provide seamless access to data at multiple sites, the Data Pool provides catalog services for all data products at the various data server locations. Under development is an automated metadata generation tool that crawls the online data repositories regularly to dynamically update the Data Pool catalog with information about newly generated data files. For efficient handling of data orders across distributed repositories, the Data Pool also implements distributed data processing services on the file servers where the data resides. Ontologies are planned to support automated service chaining for custom user requests. The UAH Data Pool is based on a configurable technology framework that integrates distributed data services with a web interface and a set of centralized database services for catalogs and order tracking. While this instantiation of the Data Pool was implemented to meet the needs of the DISCOVER project, the framework was

  15. Marangoni Convection during Free Electron Laser Nitriding of Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Müller, Sven; Rapin, Gerd; Shinn, Michelle; Remdt, Elvira; Gubisch, Maik; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Pure titanium was treated by free electron laser (FEL) radiation in a nitrogen atmosphere. As a result, nitrogen diffusion occurs and a TiN coating was synthesized. Local gradients of interfacial tension due to the local heating lead to a Marangoni convection, which determines the track properties. Because of the experimental inaccessibility of time-dependent occurrences, finite element calculations were performed, to determine the physical processes such as heat transfer, melt flow, and mass transport. In order to calculate the surface deformation of the gas-liquid interface, the level set approach was used. The equations were modified and coupled with heat-transfer and diffusion equations. The process was characterized by dimensionless numbers such as the Reynolds, Peclet, and capillary numbers, to obtain more information about the acting forces and the coating development. Moreover, the nitrogen distribution was calculated using the corresponding transport equation. The simulations were compared with cross-sectional micrographs of the treated titanium sheets and checked for their validity. Finally, the process presented is discussed and compared with similar laser treatments.

  16. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  17. Erbium diffusion in titanium dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Basse

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The diffusivity of erbium in the anatase phase of titanium dioxide (TiO2 has been studied for various temperatures ranging from 800 °C to 1, 000 °C. Samples of TiO2, with a 10 nm thick buried layer containing 0.5 at% erbium, were fabricated by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and subsequently heat treated. The erbium concentration profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, allowing for determination of the temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients. These were found to follow an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of ( 2.1 ± 0.2 eV. X-ray diffraction revealed that the TiO2 films consisted of polycrystalline grains of size ≈ 100 nm.

  18. A Pool of Distant Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Anyone who has wondered what it might be like to dive into a pool of millions of distant galaxies of different shapes and colours, will enjoy the latest image released by ESO. Obtained in part with the Very Large Telescope, the image is the deepest ground-based U-band image of the Universe ever obtained. It contains more than 27 million pixels and is the result of 55 hours of observations with the VIMOS instrument. A Sea of Galaxies ESO PR Photo 39/08 A Pool of Distant Galaxies This uniquely beautiful patchwork image, with its myriad of brightly coloured galaxies, shows the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), arguably the most observed and best studied region in the entire sky. The CDF-S is one of the two regions selected as part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), an effort of the worldwide astronomical community that unites the deepest observations from ground- and space-based facilities at all wavelengths from X-ray to radio. Its primary purpose is to provide astronomers with the most sensitive census of the distant Universe to assist in their study of the formation and evolution of galaxies. The new image released by ESO combines data obtained with the VIMOS instrument in the U- and R-bands, as well as data obtained in the B-band with the Wide-Field Imager (WFI) attached to the 2.2 m MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla, in the framework of the GABODS survey. The newly released U-band image - the result of 40 hours of staring at the same region of the sky and just made ready by the GOODS team - is the deepest image ever taken from the ground in this wavelength domain. At these depths, the sky is almost completely covered by galaxies, each one, like our own galaxy, the Milky Way, home of hundreds of billions of stars. Galaxies were detected that are a billion times fainter than the unaided eye can see and over a range of colours not directly observable by the eye. This deep image has been essential to the discovery of a large number of new galaxies

  19. Modal analysis of pool door in water tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Soo; Jeong, Kyeong Hoon; Park, Chan Gook; Koo, In Soo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A pool door is installed at the chase of the pool gate by means of an overhead crane in the building of a research reactor. The principal function of the pool door, which is located between the reactor pool and service pool, is to separate the reactor pool from the service pool for the maintenance and/or the removal of the equipment either in the reactor pool or service pool. The pool door consists of stainless steel plates supported by structural steel frames and sealing components. The pool door is equipped with double inflatable gaskets. The configuration of the pool door is shown in Figure 1. The FEM analysis and theoretical calculation by the formula were performed to evaluate the natural frequency for the pool door in the water. The results from the two methods were compared.

  20. The Role of Nuclear Insurance Pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, S. M. S.

    2006-01-01

    Since fifty years insurers respond to the need of both governments and the electricity industry to provide financial protection to cover the perils presented by the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. This paper aims at explaining what difficulties had to be solved in order to enable insurers to provide such protection, that as a solution to these difficulties Nuclear Insurance Pools were formed, how such pools operate and what security they provide. Thereby not only a number of universal principles underlying nuclear pool insurance will be explained, but also some differences in the characteristics of such insurance per group of countries. (author)

  1. Laser surveillance systems for fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.

    1985-06-01

    A Laser Surveillance System (LASSY) as a new safeguards device has been developed under the IAEA research contract No. 3458/RB at the Atominstitut Wien using earlier results by S. Fiarman. This system is designed to act as a sheet of light covering spent fuel assemblies in spent fuel storage pools. When movement of assemblies takes place, LASSY detects and locates the position of the movement in the pool and when interrogated, presents a list of pool positions and times of movement to the safeguards inspector. A complete prototype system was developed and built. Full scale tests showed the principal working capabilities of a LASSY underwater

  2. 10 CFR 36.63 - Pool water purity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pool water purity. 36.63 Section 36.63 Energy NUCLEAR... § 36.63 Pool water purity. (a) Pool water purification system must be run sufficiently to maintain the conductivity of the pool water below 20 microsiemens per centimeter under normal circumstances. If pool water...

  3. Carbon nanotube-based coatings on titanium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    mon method is the deposition of bioactive ceramic mate- rials on the metal ... tion of nanoparticle layer, including carbon nanoparti- ... Coatings made of CNTs provide implants with .... reaches composite of CNT built into titanium oxide formed.

  4. Titanium Brazing for Structures and Survivability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doherty, Kevin J; Tice, Jason R; Szewczyk, Steven T; Glide, Gary A

    2007-01-01

    .... While welding is the typical joining method for titanium, vacuum brazing is an option in areas that are difficult to access for welding as well as areas near other nonmetallic materials, such as ceramics...

  5. Titanium application to power plant condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, H.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, the growth of operating performance and construction plan of titanium-tubed condensers in thermal and unclear power plants has been very impressive. High-quality, thinner welded titanium tubes used for cooling tubes, matching design specifications of condensers, have been stably supplied through mass production. It now can be said that various technical problems for titanium-tubed condensers have been solved, but data on operating performance in large-scale commercial plants are still scarce, and site-by-site information needs be exchanged more frequently and on a larger scale. Projects to replace existing condenser cooling tubes with those of corrosion-resistant titanium have been actively furthered, with the only remaining barrier to full employment being cost effectiveness. It is hoped that condenser and tube manufacturers will conduct more joint value analyses

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R. C.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study (1) the basic electrochemical behavior of titanium in acid chloride solutions and (2) the response of the metal to dynamic straining in the same evironment. The aim of this group of experiments was to simulate, as nearly as possible, the actual conditions which exist at the tip of a crack. One of the foremost theories proposed to explain the propagation of stress corrosion cracks is a hydrogen embrittlement theory involving the precipitation of embrittling titanium hydrides inside the metal near the crack tip. An initial survey of the basic electrochemical literature indicated that surface hydrides play a critical role in the electrochemistry of titanium in acid solutions. A comprehensive analysis of the effect of surface films, particularly hydrides, on the electrochemical behavior of titanium in these solution is presented.

  7. Titanium Heat Pipe Thermal Plane, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase II program is to complete the development of the titanium heat pipe thermal plane and establish all necessary steps for production of this...

  8. Titanium Nanocomposite: Lightweight Multifunction Structural Material

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to research and develop lightweight metal matrix nanocomposites (MMnC) using a Titanium (Ti) metal matrix. Ti MMnC will crosscut the advancement of both...

  9. Corrosion resistance of titanium alloys for dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskawiec, J.; Michalik, R.

    2001-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys belong to biomaterials which the application scope in medicine increases. Some properties of the alloys, such as high mechanical strength, low density, low Young's modulus, high corrosion resistance and good biotolerance decide about it. The main areas of the application of titanium and its alloys are: orthopedics and traumatology, cardiosurgery, faciomaxillary surgery and dentistry. The results of investigations concerning the corrosion resistance of the technical titanium and Ti6Al14V alloy and comparatively a cobalt alloy of the Vitallium type in the artificial saliva is presented in the work. Significantly better corrosion resistance of titanium and the Ti6Al14V than the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was found. (author)

  10. Interfacial reactions between titanium and borate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saha, S.K.; Goldstein, J.I. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science

    1992-12-31

    Interfacial reactions between melts of several borate glasses and titanium have been investigated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A thin titanium boride interfacial layer is detected by XPS after short (30 minutes) thermal treatments. ASEM analyses after longer thermal treatments (8--120 hours) reveal boron-rich interfacial layers and boride precipitates in the Ti side of the interface.

  11. Lubrication for hot working of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotlib, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    The isothermal lubrication of the following composition is suggested, wt. %: aluminium powder 4-6, iron scale 15-25, vitreous enamel up to 100. The lubricant improves forming and decreases the danger of the metal fracture when titanium alloys working. It is advisable to use the suggested lubrication when stamping thin-walled products of titanium alloys at the blank temperature from 700 to 1000 deg C [ru

  12. Friction Welding of Titanium and Carbon Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi, HASUI; Yoichi, KIRA; Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University; Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd.

    1985-01-01

    Titanium-steel is a combination of dissimilar materials, which are difficult to weld in general, owing to inevitable formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. A prominent feature of friction welding process is ability to weld dissimilar materials in many kinds of combinations. This report deals with friction weldabilily of pure titanium and S25C steel, which are 12 mm in diameter. Main results are summarized as follows; (1) Suitable welding conditions to obtain a sound weld, which has a j...

  13. Mesoporous titanium phosphate molecular sieves with ion-exchange capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, A; Inagaki, S

    2001-01-31

    Novel open framework molecular sieves, titanium(IV) phosphates named, i.e., TCM-7 and -8 (Toyota Composite Materials, numbers 7 and 8), with new mesoporous cationic framework topologies obtained by using both cationic and anionic surfactants are reported. The (31)P MAS NMR, UV-visible absorption, and XANES data suggest the tetrahedral state of P and Ti, and stabilization of the tetrahedral state of Ti in TCM-7/8 is due to the incorporation of phosphorus (at Ti/P = 1:1) vis-à-vis the most stable octahedral state of Ti in the pure mesoporous TiO(2). Mesoporous TCM-7 and -8 show anion exchange capacity due to the framework phosphonium cation and cation exchange capacity due to defective P-OH groups. The high catalytic activity in the liquid-phase partial oxidation of cyclohexene with a dilute H(2)O(2) oxidant supports the tetrahedral coordination of Ti in these materials.

  14. Vortex-induced buckling of a viscous drop impacting a pool

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2017-07-20

    We study the intricate buckling patterns which can form when a viscous drop impacts a much lower viscosity miscible pool. The drop enters the pool by its impact inertia, flattens, and sinks by its own weight while stretching into a hemispheric bowl. Upward motion along the outer bottom surface of this bowl produces a vortical boundary layer which separates along its top and rolls up into a vortex ring. The vorticity is therefore produced in a fundamentally different way than for a drop impacting a pool of the same liquid. The vortex ring subsequently advects into the bowl, thereby stretching the drop liquid into ever thinner sheets, reaching the micron level. The rotating motion around the vortex pulls in folds to form multiple windings of double-walled toroidal viscous sheets. The axisymmetric velocity field thereby stretches the drop liquid into progressively finer sheets, which are susceptible to both axial and azimuthal compression-induced buckling. The azimuthal buckling of the sheets tends to occur on the inner side of the vortex ring, while their folds can be stretched and straightened on the outside edge. We characterize the total stretching from high-speed video imaging and use particle image velocimetry to track the formation and evolution of the vortex ring. The total interfacial area between the drop and the pool liquid can grow over 40-fold during the first 50 ms after impact. Increasing pool viscosity shows entrapment of a large bubble on top of the drop, while lowering the drop viscosity produces intricate buckled shapes, appearing at the earliest stage and being promoted by the crater motions. We also present an image collage of the most intriguing and convoluted structures observed. Finally, a simple point-vortex model reproduces some features from the experiments and shows variable stretching along the wrapping sheets.

  15. The hydrometeor partitioning and microphysical processes over the Pacific Warm Pool in numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Chih; Wang, Pao K.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical modeling is conducted to study the hydrometeor partitioning and microphysical source and sink processes during a quasi-steady state of thunderstorms over the Pacific Warm Pool by utilizing the microphysical model WISCDYMM to simulate selected storm cases. The results show that liquid-phase hydrometeors dominate thunderstorm evolution over the Pacific Warm Pool. The ratio of ice-phase mass to liquid-phase mass is about 41%: 59%, indicating that ice-phase water is not as significant over the Pacific Warm Pool as the liquid water compared to the larger than 50% in the subtropics and 80% in the US High Plains in a previous study. Sensitivity tests support the dominance of liquid-phase hydrometeors over the Pacific Warm Pool. The major rain sources are the key hail sinks: melting of hail and shedding from hail; whereas the crucial rain sinks are evaporation and accretion by hail. The major snow sources are Bergeron-Findeisen process, transfer of cloud ice to snow and accretion of cloud water; whereas the foremost sink of snow is accretion by hail. The essential hail sources are accretions of rain, cloud water, and snow; whereas the critical hail sinks are melting of hail and shedding from hail. The contribution and ranking of sources and sinks of these precipitates are compared with the previous study. Hydrometeors have their own special microphysical processes in the development and depletion over the Pacific Warm Pool. Microphysical budgets depend on atmospheric dynamical and thermodynamical conditions which determine the partitioning of hydrometeors. This knowledge would benefit the microphysics parameterization in cloud models and cumulus parameterization in global circulation models.

  16. The Nuclear Insurance Pools: Operations and Covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetley, M.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear insurance pools have provided insurance for the nuclear industry for over fifty years and it is fair to say that the development of civil nuclear power would not have been possible without the support of the commercial insurance market. The unknown risks presented by the nascent nuclear power industry in the 1950s required a leap of faith by insurers who developed specialist pooled insurance capacity to ensure adequate capacity to back up the operators' compensation obligations. Since then, nuclear insurance pools have evolved to become comprehensive suppliers of most types of insurance for nuclear plant globally. This paper will outline the structure, development, products and current operations of nuclear insurance pools.(author)

  17. Ingestion of swimming pool water by recreational

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Swimming pool water ingestion data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Dufour, A., L. Wymer, M. Magnuson, T. Behymer, and R. Cantu. Ingestion...

  18. Nuclear Insurance Pools: Worldwide Practice and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, S. M. S.

    1998-01-01

    The development of nuclear installations to produce electricity led to the establishment of Nuclear Insurance Pools and the introduction of international Conventions on Third Party Liability. Nuclear Pools offer both Third Party Liability insurance, reflecting the Conventions' principles, and other insurance products. They are market-wide, providing a facility for participation by insurers who could not otherwise write the insurance for the particularly sensitive nuclear risk. All acceptances are for the net retention of each Member without recourse to individual reinsurance protection. Common account reinsurance is arranged with other Nuclear Pools all over the world. Thus, a transparency is created, which ensures the highest degree of reinsurance security and imposes a known finite limit to each participating insurer's commitment. Therefore, Pool-members are prepared to make a greater commitment to nuclear risks than would be case where they felt uncertain as regards their total exposure following a significant loss. (author)

  19. AE/VCE Unconfirmed Vernal Pools

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is derived from a project by the Vermont Center for Ecostudies(VCE) and Arrowwood Environmental(AE) to map vernal pools throughout the state of Vermont....

  20. AE/VCE Confirmed Vernal Pools

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is derived from a project by the Vermont Center for Ecostudies(VCE) and Arrowwood Environmental(AE) to map vernal pools throughout the state of Vermont....

  1. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Tide Pool Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Students investigated the salinity of tide pools at different levels in the intertidal zone. Data are analyzed collectively. Students graphed and discussed data. Included are suggestions for evaluation and further study. (Author)

  2. 7 CFR 1126.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... excluded from the supply plant's shipments in computing the plant's shipping percentage. (d) A plant... part, or the plant has automatic pooling status under the other Federal order; and (7) That portion of...

  3. 7 CFR 1001.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... excluded from the supply plant's shipments in computing the percentages in paragraphs (c)(1) and (2) of... plant has automatic pooling status under the other Federal order. [64 FR 47954, Sept. 1, 1999, as...

  4. 7 CFR 1007.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-upon use other than Class I shall be excluded from the supply plant's shipments in computing the plant... under the order in this part, or such plant has automatic pooling status under such other order. (h) Any...

  5. Microbial quality of a marine tidal pool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genthe, Bettina

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the source of microbial pollution to a tidal pool was investigated. Both adjacent seawater which could contribute to possible faecal pollution and potential direct bather pollution were studied. The microbial quality of the marine...

  6. Robotic cleaning of a spent fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, H.T.; Marian, F.A.; Silverman, E.B.; Barkley, V.P.

    1987-01-01

    Spent fuel pools at nuclear power plants are not cleaned routinely, other than by purifying the water that they contain. Yet, debris can collect on the bottom of a pool and should be removed prior to fuel transfer. At Public Service Electric and Gas Company's Hope Creek Nuclear Power Plant, a submersible mobile robot - ARD Corporation's SCAVENGER - was used to clean the bottom of the spent fuel pool prior to initial fuel loading. The robotic device was operated remotely (as opposed to autonomously) with a simple forward/reverse control, and it cleaned 70-80% of the pool bottom. This paper reports that a simple cost-benefit analysis shows that the robotic device would be less expensive, on a per mission basis, than other cleaning alternatives, especially if it were used for other similar cleaning operations throughout the plant

  7. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, J.G.; Geremias, T.C.; Montero, J.F.D. [Center for Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), School of Dentistry (ODT), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-900 (Brazil); Vahey, B.R. [Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC, 925 W 34 St, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Benfatti, C.A.M.; Souza, J.C.M.; Magini, R.S. [Center for Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), School of Dentistry (ODT), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-900 (Brazil); Pimenta, A.L., E-mail: andrea@intelab.ufsc.br [Department of Biologia, ERRMECe, Université de Cergy Pontoise, 2, Av. Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy, Pontoise (France); Integrated Laboratories Technologies (InteLab), Dept. Chemical and Food Engineering (EQA), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-970 (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48 h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml{sup −1}), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5 × 10{sup 2} CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4 × 10{sup 2} CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. - Highlights: • A novel synthetic compound is tested on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces • Biofilm inhibition has been achieved on titanium surfaces containing the novel compound. • Planktonic growth of S. mutans was not affected by the presence of lactams on titanium.

  8. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, J.G.; Geremias, T.C.; Montero, J.F.D.; Vahey, B.R.; Benfatti, C.A.M.; Souza, J.C.M.; Magini, R.S.; Pimenta, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48 h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml −1 ), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5 × 10 2 CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4 × 10 2 CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. - Highlights: • A novel synthetic compound is tested on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces • Biofilm inhibition has been achieved on titanium surfaces containing the novel compound. • Planktonic growth of S. mutans was not affected by the presence of lactams on titanium.

  9. Pooling strategies for St Petersburg gamblers

    OpenAIRE

    Csörgö, Sandor; Simons, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    Peter offers to play exactly one St Petersburg game with each of [math] players, Paul [math] , [math] , Paul [math] , whose conceivable pooling strategies are described by all possible probability distributions [math] . Comparing infinite expectations, we characterize among all [math] those admissible strategies for which the pooled winnings, each distributed as [math] , yield a finite added value for each and every one of Paul [math] , [math] , Paul [math] in comparison with their individual...

  10. Welding pool measurement using thermal array sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that uses a high-power laser beam to melt metal powder in chamber of inert gas. The process starts by slicing the 3D CAD data as a digital information source into layers to create a 2D image of each layer. Melting pool was formed by using laser irradiation on metal powders which then solidified to consolidated structure. In a selective laser melting process, the variation of melt pool affects the yield of a printed three-dimensional product. For three dimensional parts, the border conditions of the conductive heat transport have a very large influence on the melt pool dimensions. Therefore, melting pool is an important behavior that affects the final quality of the 3D object. To meet the temperature and geometry of the melting pool for monitoring in additive manufacturing technology. In this paper, we proposed the temperature sensing system which is composed of infrared photodiode, high speed camera, band-pass filter, dichroic beam splitter and focus lens. Since the infrared photodiode and high speed camera look at the process through the 2D galvanometer scanner and f-theta lens, the temperature sensing system can be used to observe the melting pool at any time, regardless of the movement of the laser spot. In order to obtain a wide temperature detecting range, 500 °C to 2500 °C, the radiation from the melting pool to be measured is filtered into a plurality of radiation portions, and since the intensity ratio distribution of the radiation portions is calculated by using black-body radiation. The experimental result shows that the system is suitable for melting pool to measure temperature.

  11. Cooling and spreading of corium during its fall into water in a pressurised water nuclear plant severe accident: description of mechanical and thermal interactions in a three phase flow during spreading of cold or heated spheres in a liquid pool; Refroidissement et dispersion du corium lors de sa chute dans l'eau pendant un accident severe de reacteur nucleaire a eau pressurisee: description des interactions mecaniques et thermiques en ecoulement triphasique lors de la dispersion de spheres solides froides ou chaudes dans un bain liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duplat, F

    1998-10-26

    In the frame of nuclear safety studies about corium and water interactions, we address spreading and cooling stage of corium fragments in a liquid pool. Considering the complexity of encountered flow regimes and mechanical and thermal interactions coupling, modelling validation is based on a thermal-hydraulic computer code (MC3D). A bibliographical study shows that classical modelling of three phase flow is based on constitutive laws already established in the case of two phase flow. The present study states a complete analysis of BILLEAU experiments and defines a characterisation method for a sphere cloud. Some complementary QUEOS experiments are also described. Mechanical interaction terms such as added mass, lift and turbulent dispersion have been presented in the frame of a three phase flow and their influence has been tested in numerical simulations of BILLEAU tests. The effect of film vapour overheat, as well as particle diameter evolution have been studied. Moreover a radiative heat transfer modelling developed in Karlsruhe research centre (FZK) has been analysed and completed. Numerical simulations achieved for this study show that mechanical and thermal behaviour of the system are actually coupled. Taking into account lift and turbulent dispersion terms as well as heat transfer modifications all wed better results. This study also presents some considerations about flow regimes identification as a preliminary for studies about numerical diffusion that was already estimated in the present state of the computer code MC3D. (author)

  12. A Model to Simulate Titanium Behavior in the Iron Blast Furnace Hearth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bao-Yu; Zulli, Paul; Maldonado, Daniel; Yu, Ai-Bing

    2010-08-01

    The erosion of hearth refractory is a major limitation to the campaign life of a blast furnace. Titanium from titania addition in the burden or tuyere injection can react with carbon and nitrogen in molten pig iron to form titanium carbonitride, giving the so-called titanium-rich scaffold or buildup on the hearth surface, to protect the hearth from subsequent erosion. In the current article, a mathematical model based on computational fluid dynamics is proposed to simulate the behavior of solid particles in the liquid iron. The model considers the fluid/solid particle flow through a packed bed, conjugated heat transfer, species transport, and thermodynamic of key chemical reactions. A region of high solid concentration is predicted at the hearth bottom surface. Regions of solid formation and dissolution can be identified, which depend on the local temperature and chemical equilibrium. The sensitivity to the key model parameters for the solid phase is analyzed. The model provides an insight into the fundamental mechanism of solid particle formation, and it may form a basic model for subsequent development to study the formation of titanium scaffold in the blast furnace hearth.

  13. Recent advances in probabilistic species pool delineations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Nikolaus Karger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A species pool is the set of species that could potentially colonize and establish within a community. It has been a commonly used concept in biogeography since the early days of MacArthur and Wilson’s work on Island Biogeography. Despite their simple and appealing definition, an operational application of species pools is bundled with a multitude of problems, which have often resulted in arbitrary decisions and workarounds when defining species pools. Two recently published papers address the operational problems of species pool delineations, and show ways of delineating them in a probabilistic fashion. In both papers, species pools were delineated using a process-based, mechanistical approach, which opens the door for a multitude of new applications in biogeography. Such applications include detecting the hidden signature of biotic interactions, disentangling the geographical structure of community assembly processes, and incorporating a temporal extent into species pools. Although similar in their conclusions, both ‘probabilistic approaches’ differ in their implementation and definitions. Here I give a brief overview of the differences and similarities of both approaches, and identify the challenges and advantages in their application.

  14. The effect of titanium surface treatment on the interfacial strength of titanium – Thermoplastic composite joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Yibo; de Rooij, Matthijn; Grouve, Wouter; Akkerman, Remko

    2017-01-01

    Co-consolidated titanium – carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite hybrid joints show potential for application in aerospace structures. The strength of the interface between the titanium and the thermoplastic composite is crucial for the strength of the entire hybrid joint. Application of a

  15. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ralf; Schöllchen, Maximilian; Gauer, Tobias; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-02-01

    To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants. Zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line-distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. While titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium-zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting.

  16. An analytic model of pool boiling critical heat flux on an immerged downward facing curved surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Hui; Pan, Liang-ming; Wu, Yao; Chen, De-qi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thin liquid film and supplement of liquid contribute to the CHF. • CHF increases from the bottom to the upper of the lowerhead. • Evaporation of thin liquid film is dominant nearby bottom region. • The subcooling has significant effects on the CHF. - Abstract: In this paper, an analytical model of the critical heat flux (CHF) on the downward facing curved surface for pool boiling has been proposed, which hypothesizes that the CHF on the downward facing curved is composed of two parts, i.e. the evaporation of the thin liquid film underneath the elongated bubble adhering to the lower head outer surface and the depletion of supplement of liquid due to the relative motion of vapor bubbles along with the downward facing curved. The former adopts the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability analysis of vapor–liquid interface of the vapor jets which penetrating in the thin liquid film. When the heat flux closing to the CHF point, the vapor–liquid interface becomes highly distorted, which block liquid to feed the thin liquid film and the thin liquid film will dry out gradually. While the latter considers that the vapor bubbles move along with the downward facing curved surface, and the liquid in two-phase boundary layer enter the liquid film that will be exhausted when the CHF occurs. Based on the aforementioned mechanism and the energy balance between the thin liquid film evaporation and water feeding, and taking the subcooling of the bulk water into account, the mathematic model about the downward facing curved surface CHF has been proposed. The CHF of the downward facing curved surface for pool boiling increases along with the downward facing orientation except in the vicinity of bottom center region, because in this region the vapor bubble almost stagnates and the evaporation of the thin liquid film is dominant. In addition, the subcooling has significant effect on the CHF. Comparing the result of this model with the published experimental results show

  17. Simulation of droplet impact onto a deep pool for large Froude numbers in different open-source codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchagova, V. N.; Kraposhin, M. V.; Marchevsky, I. K.; Smirnova, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    A droplet impact on a deep pool can induce macro-scale or micro-scale effects like a crown splash, a high-speed jet, formation of secondary droplets or thin liquid films, etc. It depends on the diameter and velocity of the droplet, liquid properties, effects of external forces and other factors that a ratio of dimensionless criteria can account for. In the present research, we considered the droplet and the pool consist of the same viscous incompressible liquid. We took surface tension into account but neglected gravity forces. We used two open-source codes (OpenFOAM and Gerris) for our computations. We review the possibility of using these codes for simulation of processes in free-surface flows that may take place after a droplet impact on the pool. Both codes simulated several modes of droplet impact. We estimated the effect of liquid properties with respect to the Reynolds number and Weber number. Numerical simulation enabled us to find boundaries between different modes of droplet impact on a deep pool and to plot corresponding mode maps. The ratio of liquid density to that of the surrounding gas induces several changes in mode maps. Increasing this density ratio suppresses the crown splash.

  18. Visualization of nucleate pool boiling of freon 113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afify, M.A.; Fruman, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to give a fine description of the behaviour of vapour bubbles in nucleate pool boiling at sites of known sizes using high speed photography. The shapes and growth history of isolated bubbles were determined for a variety of experimental conditions. Coalescence effects between two adjacent or consecutive bubbles were also visualized and the occurrence of vapour patches and continuous vapour columns was demonstrated. Quantitative analysis of the films allows to determine the history and nucleation characteristics of bubbles as a function of various parameters such as heat flux, liquid subcooling and size and nature of nucleation sites. These results are in good agreement with those found in the literature

  19. Pool Boiling Enhancement of R-123 Using Perforated Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nae-Hyun [Incheon Nat’l Univ., Incheon(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we investigate the pool boiling enhancement caused by perforated plates on top of a smooth surface. We conduct tests using R-123 at atmospheric pressure. It was shown that perforated plates significantly enhanced the pool boiling of the smooth surface. The reason may be attributed to the increased bubble contact area between the plates. The results showed that the enhancement ratio was dependent on the heat flux. At high heat flux, the enhancement ratio increased as the porosity increased. However, at low heat flux, the enhancement ratio decreased as the porosity increased. For the present investigation, the optimum configuration had a pore diameter of 2.0 mm, pore pitch of 2.5 mm×5.0 mm or 5.0 mm×5.0 mm, and a gap width of 0.5 mm, which yielded heat-transfer coefficients that are close to those of GEWA-T. The optimum porosity for R-123 was significantly larger than that of water or ethanol. The reason for this may be the large liquid-to-vapor density ratio along with the small latent heat of vaporization of R-123. The perforated plates yielded smaller boiling hysteresis compared with that of the smooth surface.

  20. Spent-fuel pool thermal hydraulics: The evaporation question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, T.P.; Lai, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants are currently using dense fuel arrangements that increase the number of spent fuel elements stored in their spent-fuel pools (SFPs). The denser spent-fuel storage results in higher water temperatures, especially when certain event scenarios are analyzed. In some of these event scenarios, it is conservative to maximize the evaporation rate, while in other circumstances it is required to minimize the evaporation rates for conservatism. Evaporation is such a fundamental phenomenon that many branches of engineering developed various equations based on theory and experiments. The evaporation rates predicted by existing equations present a wide range of variation, especially at water temperatures >40 degrees C. Furthermore, a study on which equations provide the highest and lowest evaporation rates has not been done until now. This study explores the sensitivity of existing evaporation equations to various parameters and recommends the limiting evaporation equations for use in the solution of SFP thermal problems. Note that the results of this study may be applicable to a much wider range of applications from irrigation ponds, cooling lakes, and liquid-waste management to calculating adequate air exchange rate for swimming pools and health spas

  1. Nanobiotechnologies in the System of Farm Animals' Gene Pool Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtun, S. I.; Galagan, N. P.; Shcherbak, O. V.; Klymenko, N. Y.; Osypchuk, O. S.

    It has been determined that sperm viability and mobility upon long storage in liquid nitrogen is being reduced. This issue is relevant for gene pool objects' preservation and for reproductive medicine. The use of nanomaterials (NM) in reproductive biotechnology can expand to the methodology of the rational gene pool preservation technology, especially of valuable biomaterial. Use of nanoparticles, based on ultrafine silica (UFS) with different agents located on its surface gives a positive effect on the thawed sperm mobility, increasing its activity and survival rate and leading to increased fertilization ability. After thawing, the sperm of bulls had an average activity level of 47 %. This activity index of gametes in control was being maintained for 30 min. In the experimental groups after 30 min, the most active gametes were those with UFS + sucrose (52 %). A lower activity compared with the control and UFS + sucrose had gametes with UFS + D-galactosamine. Sperm activity with UFS + D-galactosamine decreased by 14 % compared with the control and by 19 % compared to the UFS + sucrose. So, the feasibility of adding NM with UFS + sucrose at a concentration of 0.001 % to thawed bull sperm that has been cryopreserved for a long time was proved.

  2. Development and Evaluation of Titanium Spacesuit Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Richard; Battisti, Brian; Ytuarte, Raymond, Jr.; Schultz, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z-series of spacesuits, designed with the intent of meeting a wide variety of exploration mission objectives, including human exploration of the Martian surface. Incorporating titanium bearings into the Z-series space suit architecture allows us to reduce mass by an estimated 23 lbs per suit system compared to the previously used stainless steel bearing race designs, without compromising suit functionality. There are two obstacles to overcome when using titanium for a bearing race- 1) titanium is flammable when exposed to the oxygen wetted environment inside the space suit and 2) titanium's poor wear properties are often challenging to overcome in tribology applications. In order to evaluate the ignitability of a titanium space suit bearing, a series of tests were conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) that introduced the bearings to an extreme test profile, with multiple failures imbedded into the test bearings. The testing showed no signs of ignition in the most extreme test cases; however, substantial wear of the bearing races was observed. In order to design a bearing that can last an entire exploration mission (approx. 3 years), design parameters for maximum contact stress need to be identified. To identify these design parameters, bearing test rigs were developed that allow for the quick evaluation of various bearing ball loads, ball diameters, lubricants, and surface treatments. This test data will allow designers to minimize the titanium bearing mass for a specific material and lubricant combination and design around a cycle life requirement for an exploration mission. This paper reviews the current research and testing that has been performed on titanium bearing races to evaluate the use of such materials in an enriched oxygen environment and to optimize the bearing assembly mass and tribological properties to accommodate for the high bearing cycle life for an

  3. Creating nanoshell on the surface of titanium hydride bead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO Vyacheslav Ivanovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on the modification of titanium hydride bead by creating titanium nanoshell on its surface by ion-plasma vacuum magnetron sputtering. To apply titanium nanoshell on the titanium hydride bead vacuum coating plant of multifunctional nanocomposite coatings QVADRA 500 located in the center of high technology was used. Analysis of the micrographs of the original surface of titanium hydride bead showed that the microstructure of the surface is flat, smooth, in addition the analysis of the microstructure of material surface showed the presence of small porosity, roughness, mainly cavities, as well as shallow longitudinal cracks. The presence of oxide film in titanium hydride prevents the free release of hydrogen and fills some micro-cracks on the surface. Differential thermal analysis of both samples was conducted to determine the thermal stability of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell. Hydrogen thermal desorption spectra of the samples of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell show different thermal stability of compared materials in the temperature range from 550 to 860о C. Titanium nanoshells applied in this way allows increasing the heat resistance of titanium hydride bead – the temperature of starting decomposition is 695о C and temperature when decomposition finishes is more than 1000о C. Modified in this way titanium hydride bead can be used as a filler in the radiation protective materials used in the construction or upgrading biological protection of nuclear power plants.

  4. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-10-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system.

  5. Titanium template for scaphoid reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefeli, M; Schaefer, D J; Schumacher, R; Müller-Gerbl, M; Honigmann, P

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of a non-united scaphoid with a humpback deformity involves resection of the non-union followed by bone grafting and fixation of the fragments. Intraoperative control of the reconstruction is difficult owing to the complex three-dimensional shape of the scaphoid and the other carpal bones overlying the scaphoid on lateral radiographs. We developed a titanium template that fits exactly to the surfaces of the proximal and distal scaphoid poles to define their position relative to each other after resection of the non-union. The templates were designed on three-dimensional computed tomography reconstructions and manufactured using selective laser melting technology. Ten conserved human wrists were used to simulate the reconstruction. The achieved precision measured as the deviation of the surface of the reconstructed scaphoid from its virtual counterpart was good in five cases (maximal difference 1.5 mm), moderate in one case (maximal difference 3 mm) and inadequate in four cases (difference more than 3 mm). The main problems were attributed to the template design and can be avoided by improved pre-operative planning, as shown in a clinical case. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Self-formed waterfall plunge pools in homogeneous rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheingross, Joel S.; Lo, Daniel Y.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Waterfalls are ubiquitous, and their upstream propagation can set the pace of landscape evolution, yet no experimental studies have examined waterfall plunge pool erosion in homogeneous rock. We performed laboratory experiments, using synthetic foam as a bedrock simulant, to produce self-formed waterfall plunge pools via particle impact abrasion. Plunge pool vertical incision exceeded lateral erosion by approximately tenfold until pools deepened to the point that the supplied sediment could not be evacuated and deposition armored the pool bedrock floor. Lateral erosion of plunge pool sidewalls continued after sediment deposition, but primarily at the downstream pool wall, which might lead to undermining of the plunge pool lip, sediment evacuation, and continued vertical pool floor incision in natural streams. Undercutting of the upstream pool wall was absent, and our results suggest that vertical drilling of successive plunge pools is a more efficient waterfall retreat mechanism than the classic model of headwall undercutting and collapse in homogeneous rock.

  7. Cooling device for reactor suppression pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togasaki, Susumu; Kato, Kiyoshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a cooling device of a reactor suppression pool, when a temperature of pool water is abnormally increased and a heat absorbing portion is heated by, for example, occurrence of an accident, coolants are sent to the outside of the reactor container to actuates a thermally operating portion by the heat energy of coolants and drive heat exchanging fluids of a secondary cooling system. If the heat exchanging fluids are sent to a cooling portion, the coolants are cooled and returned to the heat absorbing portion of the suppression pool water. If the heat absorbing portion is heat pipes, the coolants are evaporated by heat absorbed from the suppression pool water, steams are sent to the thermally operating portion, then coolants are liquefied and caused to return to the heat absorbing portion. If the thermal operation portion is a gas turbine, the gas turbine is operated by the coolants, and it is converted to a rotational force to drive heat exchanging fluids by pumps. By constituting the cooling portion with a condensator, the coolants are condensed and liquefied and returned to the heat absorbing portion of the suppression pool water. (N.H.)

  8. Effects of ablation energy and post-irradiation on the structure and properties of titanium dioxide nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillén, G. García [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455, México (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455, México (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León-CIIDIT, Apodaca, Nuevo León, México (Mexico); Palma, M. I. Mendivil [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Unidad Monterrey, PIIT, Apodaca, Nuevo León, México (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Roy, T.K. Das [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455, México (Mexico); and others

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Highlights • TiO{sub 2} nanomaterials were prepared by PLALM. • Characterized these nanomaterials using TEM, XPS, XRD, optical and luminescence measurements. • Morphology of these nanomaterials were dependent on ablation wavelength, fluence and post-irradiation time. • Laser post irradiation modified the size, morphology and structure of these TiO{sub 2} nanomaterials. - Abstract: Nanomaterials of titanium oxide were prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a titanium metal target in distilled water. The ablation was performed at different laser energy (fluence) using a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser output of 1064 and 532 nm. A post-irradiation of titanium oxide nanocolloids obtained by ablation using 532 nm was carried out to explore its effects on the structure and properties. Analysis of morphology, crystalline phase, elemental composition, chemical state, optical and luminescent properties were performed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), UV–-vis absorption spectroscopy and room temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. It was found that titanium oxide nanomaterial morphologies and optical properties were determined by ablation wavelength and fluence. Further, nanocolloids prepared by 532 nm ablation showed a crystalline phase change by laser post-irradiation. The results showed that pulsed laser ablation in liquid as well as post-irradiation were effective in modifying the final structure and properties of titanium oxide nanocolloids.

  9. Effects of ablation energy and post-irradiation on the structure and properties of titanium dioxide nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillén, G. García; Shaji, S.; Palma, M. I. Mendivil; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Roy, T.K. Das

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Highlights • TiO_2 nanomaterials were prepared by PLALM. • Characterized these nanomaterials using TEM, XPS, XRD, optical and luminescence measurements. • Morphology of these nanomaterials were dependent on ablation wavelength, fluence and post-irradiation time. • Laser post irradiation modified the size, morphology and structure of these TiO_2 nanomaterials. - Abstract: Nanomaterials of titanium oxide were prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a titanium metal target in distilled water. The ablation was performed at different laser energy (fluence) using a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser output of 1064 and 532 nm. A post-irradiation of titanium oxide nanocolloids obtained by ablation using 532 nm was carried out to explore its effects on the structure and properties. Analysis of morphology, crystalline phase, elemental composition, chemical state, optical and luminescent properties were performed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), UV–-vis absorption spectroscopy and room temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. It was found that titanium oxide nanomaterial morphologies and optical properties were determined by ablation wavelength and fluence. Further, nanocolloids prepared by 532 nm ablation showed a crystalline phase change by laser post-irradiation. The results showed that pulsed laser ablation in liquid as well as post-irradiation were effective in modifying the final structure and properties of titanium oxide nanocolloids.

  10. Surface Roughness and Tool Wear on Cryogenic Treated CBN Insert on Titanium and Inconel 718 Alloy Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamizhmanii, S; Mohideen, R; Zaidi, A M A; Hasan, S

    2015-01-01

    Machining of materials by super hard tools like cubic boron nitride (cbn) and poly cubic boron nitride (pcbn) is to reduce tool wear to obtain dimensional accuracy, smooth surface and more number of parts per cutting edge. wear of tools is inevitable due to rubbing action between work material and tool edge. however, the tool wear can be minimized by using super hard tools by enhancing the strength of the cutting inserts. one such process is cryogenic process. this process is used in all materials and cutting inserts which requires wear resistance. the cryogenic process is executed under subzero temperature -186° celsius for longer period of time in a closed chamber which contains liquid nitrogen. in this research, cbn inserts with cryogenically treated was used to turn difficult to cut metals like titanium, inconel 718 etc. the turning parameters used is different cutting speeds, feed rates and depth of cut. in this research, titanium and inconel 718 material were used. the results obtained are surface roughness, flank wear and crater wear. the surface roughness obtained on titanium was lower at high cutting speed compared with inconel 718. the flank wear was low while turning titanium than inconel 718. crater wear is less on inconel 718 than titanium alloy. all the two materials produced saw tooth chips. (paper)

  11. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average ...

  12. Lifetime of titanium filament at constant current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.S.; Lanni, C.

    1981-01-01

    Titanium Sublimation Pump (TSP) represents the most efficient and the least expensive method to produce Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) in storage rings. In ISABELLE, a proton storage accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, for example, TSP provides a pumping speed for hydrogen of > 2 x 10 6 l/s. Due to the finite life of titanium filaments, new filaments have to be switched in before the end of filament burn out, to ensure smooth operation of the accelerator. Therefore, several operational modes that can be used to activate the TSP were studied. The constant current mode is a convenient way of maintaining constant evaporating rate by increasing the power input while the filament diameter decreases as titanium evaporates. The filaments used in this experiment were standard Varian 916-0024 filaments made of Ti 85%, Mo 15% alloy. During their lifetime at a constant current of 48 amperes, the evaporation rate rose to a maximum at about 10% of their life and then flattened out to a constant value, 0.25 g/hr. The maximum evaporation rate occurs coincidently with the recrystallization of 74% Ti 26% Mo 2 from microstructure crystalline at higher titanium concentration to macrostructure crystalline at lower titanium concentration. As the macrocrystal grows, the slip plane develops at the grain boundary resulting in high resistance at the slip plane which will eventually cause the filament burn out due to local heating

  13. Experiments and CFD simulations of DTBP pool fires; Experimentelle Untersuchungen und CFD-Simulationen von DTBP-Poolfeuern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Hyunjoo

    2007-07-01

    Flammable liquids are used increasingly often world-wide. Their storage, transport and chemical reactions are a considerable safety problem in industrial plants. Heat release and combustion products of big fires are a high hazard for persons, the immediate vicinity and the environment in general. Investigations of pool fires were carried out for a realistic assessment of the potential hazards to persons and plants in the immediate vicinity. Most of the available data on fire effects, safety distances and other measures relevant to fire protection are for hydrocarbons, alcohols and liquefied gases. LIttle is known on pool fires of liquid organic peroxides, which have quite different combustion characteristics with higher mass burnup rates and higher heat emissions into the vicinity. The dissertation presents experiments to characterize the combustion characteristics of organic peroxides as a function of the pool diameter. Di-tert-butylperoxide (DTBPL) was chosen for the experiments because it has a relatively high thermal stability as compared to other organic peroxides. Mass burnup rates, flame temperatures, the surface emissive power (SEP), the strength of thermal radiation and the flame length were measured as a function of the pool diameter. Further, parameters required for CFD simulations of DTBP pool fires were identified experimentally in order to ensure realistic modelling of real fires as a basis, e.g., for assessing safety distances. Experiments on large pool fires are costly and require much equipment and technical preparations so that fires are limited to pool diameters of only a few meters as a rule. CFD simulations would be capable of improving the prediction of safety-relevant parameters like flame temperature, surface emissive power, radiation strength and flame length without limiting the pool diameter or the fuel volume. Appropriate sub-models were used for modelling pool fires of organic peroxides, and the simulation results were critically

  14. Experimental data on heat flux distribution from a volumetrically heated pool with frozen boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helle, Maria; Kymaelaeinen, Olli; Tuomisto, Harri

    1999-01-01

    The COPO II experiments are confirmatory experiments and a continuation project to the earlier COPO I experiments. As in COPO 1, a molten corium pool on the lower head of a RPV is simulated by a two - dimensional slice of it in linear scale 1:2. The corium is simulated by water-zinc sulfate solution with volumetric Joule heating. The heat flux distribution on the boundaries and the temperature distribution in the pool are measured. The major new feature in COPO II is the cooling arrangement which is based on circulation of liquid nitrogen on the outside of the pool boundaries. The use of liquid nitrogen leads to formation of ice on the inside of boundaries. Two geometrically different versions of the COPO II facility have been constructed: one with a tori-spherical bottom shape, simulating the RPV of a VVER-440 reactor as COPO I, and another one with semicircular bottom simulating a western PWR such as AP600. The modified Rayleigh number in the COPO II experiments corresponds to the one in a prototypic corium pool (∼ 10 15 ). This paper reports results from the COPO II-Lo and COPO II-AP experiments with homogenous pool. Results indicate that the upward heat fluxes are in agreement with the results of the COPO I experiments. Also, as expected, the time averaged upward heat flux profile was relatively flat. On the other hand, the heat fluxes at the side and bottom boundaries of the pool were slightly higher in COPO II-Lo than in COPO I. In COPO II-AP, the average heat transfer coefficients to the curved boundary were higher than predicted by Jahn's and Mayinger's correlation, but slightly lower than in BALI experiments. (authors)

  15. 13 CFR 120.1706 - Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pool Originator's retained interest in Pool. 120.1706 Section 120.1706 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Establishment of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan...

  16. A study on burning behavior and convective flows in Methanol pool fires bound by ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farahani, Hamed Farmahini; Jomaas, Grunde; Rangwala, Ali S.

    2017-01-01

    conditions to analyze burning parameters of methanol, 2- in a square glass tray with outside dimensions of 10 × 10 cm and a depth of 5 cm to obtain flow field of methanol pool with a two-dimensional PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) system. The results of the experiments of the first part show the cold...... of the cavity. The analysis of the results obtained by the PIV system showed the velocity magnitudes and flow patterns in the liquid-phase of icy methanol fire significantly change over the course of burning. In the instants after ignition a horizontal flow induced by Marangoni near the surface was observed......An experimental study on methanol pool fires bound by ice was carried to research the burning behavior and flow field (within the liquid-phase) of methanol. The experiments were conducted in two parts: 1- in a cylindrical ice cavity/pan (10.2 cm diameter and 6 cm depth) at three different...

  17. Titanium sublimation pumping systems and performances on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pico, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a brief history of the TMX-U Titanium Sublimation Pumping process (gettering). Titanium sublimation pumps offer an economical means of pumping chemically active gases (especially hydrogen) at high speeds, and serves as additional pumps, along with liquid nitrogen-cooled panels, to provide pumping during each physics experiment. Because of the size of the system, a complex computer program was written which is run-time compiled, and then run by the computer. With the multi-tasking capability of the computer, five programs are used in operation and run simultaneously. All getter wire history, deposition, and system notes are stored on the external disc drive. The progress and performance in the four years the system has been used, two year manually controlled, and two computer controlled with be covered. Emphasis on the computer control system and its by-products, which enhance the operation of the TMX-U, will be the subject of this paper

  18. Corrosion and microstructural aspects of dissimilar joints of titanium and type 304L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudali, U. Kamachi.; Ananda Rao, B.M.; Shanmugam, K.; Natarajan, R.; Raj, Baldev

    2003-01-01

    To link titanium and zirconium metal based (Ti, Zr-2, Ti-5%Ta, Ti-5%Ta-1.8Nb) dissolver vessels containing highly radioactive and concentrated corrosive nitric acid solution to other nuclear fuel reprocessing plant components made of AISI type 304L stainless steel (SS), high integrity and corrosion resistant dissimilar joints between them are necessary. Fusion welding processes produce secondary precipitates which dissolve in nitric acid, and hence solid-state processes are proposed. In this work, various dissimilar joining processes available for producing titanium-304L SS joints with adequate strength, ductility and corrosion resistance for this critical application are highlighted. Developmental efforts made at IGCAR, Kalpakkam are outlined. The possible methods and the microstructural-metallurgical properties of the joints along with corrosion results obtained with three phase (liquid, vapour, condensate) corrosion testing are discussed. Based on the results, dissimilar joint produced by the explosive joining process was adopted for plant application

  19. Titanium leaching from red mud by diluted sulfuric acid at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agatzini-Leonardou, S.; Oustadakis, P.; Tsakiridis, P.E.; Markopoulos, Ch.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory-scale research has focused on the recovery of titanium from red mud, which is obtained from bauxite during the Bayer process for alumina production. The leaching process is based on the extraction of this element with diluted sulfuric acid from red mud under atmospheric conditions and without using any preliminary treatment. Statistical design and analysis of experiments were used, in order to determine the main effects and interactions of the leaching process factors, which were: acid normality, temperature and solid to liquid ratio. The titanium recovery efficiency on the basis of red mud weight reached 64.5%. The characterization of the initial red mud, as well as this of the leached residues was carried out by X-ray diffraction, TG-DTA and scanning electron microscopy

  20. Strategies for chemically healthy public swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht

    spreading of pathogens between swimmers because of its residual disinfection effect. In addition to potential contamination of pathogenic microorganisms, swimming pool water is polluted by organic matter deposited from the bathers such as saliva, urine, sweat, hair and personal care products. Since chlorine...... is a strong oxidant it oxidizes the organic matter in the pool water and forms disinfection byproducts (DBPs). More than 100 different DBPs have been identified. Some of these have been found to be genotoxic and may pose an increased cancer risk for the bathers. The aim of this thesis was to give an overview...... of the strategies which can be used to achieve microbiological safe water with low levels of DBPs to ensure healthy environment for bathers. There are different approaches to achieve healthy environment in public swimming pools which in this thesis are divided into three strategies: alternatives to chlorination...

  1. HLM fuel pin bundle experiments in the CIRCE pool facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martelli, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.martelli@ing.unipi.it [University of Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Pisa (Italy); Forgione, Nicola [University of Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Pisa (Italy); Di Piazza, Ivan; Tarantino, Mariano [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, C.R. ENEA Brasimone (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The experimental results represent the first set of values for LBE pool facility. • Heat transfer is investigated for a 37-pin electrical bundle cooled by LBE. • Experimental data are presented together with a detailed error analysis. • Nu is computed as a function of the Pe and compared with correlations. • Experimental Nu is about 25% lower than Nu derived from correlations. - Abstract: Since Lead-cooled Fast Reactors (LFR) have been conceptualized in the frame of GEN IV International Forum (GIF), great interest has focused on the development and testing of new technologies related to HLM nuclear reactors. In this frame the Integral Circulation Experiment (ICE) test section has been installed into the CIRCE pool facility and suitable experiments have been carried out aiming to fully investigate the heat transfer phenomena in grid spaced fuel pin bundles providing experimental data in support of European fast reactor development. In particular, the fuel pin bundle simulator (FPS) cooled by lead bismuth eutectic (LBE), has been conceived with a thermal power of about 1 MW and a uniform linear power up to 25 kW/m, relevant values for a LFR. It consists of 37 fuel pins (electrically simulated) placed on a hexagonal lattice with a pitch to diameter ratio of 1.8. The FPS was deeply instrumented by several thermocouples. In particular, two sections of the FPS were instrumented in order to evaluate the heat transfer coefficient along the bundle as well as the cladding temperature in different ranks of sub-channels. Nusselt number in the central sub-channel was therefore calculated as a function of the Peclet number and the obtained results were compared to Nusselt numbers obtained from convective heat transfer correlations available in literature on Heavy Liquid Metals (HLM). Results reported in the present work, represent the first set of experimental data concerning fuel pin bundle behaviour in a heavy liquid metal pool, both in forced and

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Titanium Based Ceramic Coatings Deposited on Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Rania

    2016-01-01

    Titanium based ceramic films are increasingly used as coating materials because of their high hardness, excellent wear resistance and superior corrosion resistance. Using electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques, the electrochemical properties of different coatings deposited on different steels under different conditions were examined in this study. Thin films of titanium nitride (TiN), titanium diboride (TiB2), and titanium boronitride with different boron concentrations (TiBN-1&2) w...

  3. Corrosion of titanium and titanium alloys in spent fuel repository conditions - literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aho-Mantila, I.; Haenninen, H.; Aaltonen, P.; Taehtinen, S.

    1985-03-01

    The spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed in Finnish bedrock. The canister of spent fuel in waste repository is one barrier to the release of radionuclides. It is possible to choose a canister material with a known, measurable corrosion rate and to make it with thickness allowing corrosion to occur. The other possibility is to use a material which is nearly immune to general corrosion. In this second category there are titanium and titanium alloys which exhibit a very high degree of resistance to general corrosion. In this literature study the corrosion properties of unalloyed titanium, titanium alloyed with palladium and titanium alloyed with molybdenum and nickel are reviewed. The two titanium alloys own in addition to the excellent general corrosion properties outstanding properties against localized corrosion like pitting or crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatique of titanium seem not to be a problem in the repository conditions, but the possibilities of delayed cracking caused by hydrogen should be carefully appreciated. (author)

  4. Simulation of pool scrubbing experiments using BUSCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehbi, A.; Guentay, S.

    1994-01-01

    BUSCA-PSI is a computer code which predicts the aerosol scrubbing taking place when gas bubbles containing fission products rise through stagnant pools of water after a postulated severe accident. A Lagrangian formulation is adopted to follow the path of a bubble as it rises toward the surface of the pool. The BUSCA model includes most aerosol removal mechanisms which are thought to be significant, namely: Jet Impaction at tile orifice, Convection/Diffusiophoresis during steam condensation, Thermophoresis, Sedimentation, Centrifugal Impaction during bubble rise, and Brownian Diffusion. The hydraulic modelling offers a variety of options for the initial globule volume, the stable bubble size, tile bubble rise velocity, and the bubble shape. The heat and mass transfer part of tile model uses correlations found in the relevant literature. BUSCA simulations were performed to determine the decontamination factor (DF) dependence on key aerosol and thermal hydraulic parameters. The decontamination factor increases with height, pool temperature subcooling, and steam content. The decontamination factor exhibits a parabolic dependence on the particle radius. At low particle sizes, the DF is high due to Brownian Diffusion which is the dominant removal mechanism. The DF hits a minimum and then increases with particle size as Centrifugal Impaction and Sedimentation become important. In separate calculations, BUSCA was used to the simulate the aerosol scrubbing experiments performed by EPRI. For cold pool tests, the predicted scrubbing efficiencies were in a good, conservative agreement with the data for both Tin and CsI, and the discrepancies were within the reported measurement errors. For hot pool tests, the code systematically underpredicted the scrubbing DF's; this is potentially due to condensation in the gas space above the pool, a situation not currently modelled by BUSCA. The code was also tested against data produced by the Tepco-Toshiba-Hitachi experiments. The

  5. Zooplankton at deep Red Sea brine pools

    KAUST Repository

    Kaartvedt, Stein

    2016-03-02

    The deep-sea anoxic brines of the Red Sea comprise unique, complex and extreme habitats. These environments are too harsh for metazoans, while the brine–seawater interface harbors dense microbial populations. We investigated the adjacent pelagic fauna at two brine pools using net tows, video records from a remotely operated vehicle and submerged echosounders. Waters just above the brine pool of Atlantis II Deep (2000 m depth) appeared depleted of macrofauna. In contrast, the fauna appeared to be enriched at the Kebrit Deep brine–seawater interface (1466 m).

  6. One component, volume heated, boiling pool thermohydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bede, M.; Perret, C.; Pretrel, H.; Seiler, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Prior work on boiling pools provided heat exchange correlations valid for bubbly flow with laminar or turbulent boundary layers. New experiments performed with water (SEBULON) and UO 2 (SCARABEE BF2) in a churn-turbulent flow configuration show unexpected heat flux distributions for which the maximum heat flux may be situated well below the pool surface. The origin of this behaviour is attributed to condensation effects, very unstable boundary layer flow and surface oscillation. A calculation model is discussed which permits to approach the experimental heat flux distribution with reasonable accuracy. (authors). 7 figs., 2 appendix., 14 refs

  7. Numerical modeling of sodium fire – Part II: Pool combustion and combined spray and pool combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathiah, Pratap; Roelofs, Ferry

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A CFD based method is proposed for the simulation of sodium pool combustion. • A sodium evaporation based model is proposed to model sodium pool evaporation. • The proposed method is validated against sodium pool experiments of Newman and Payne. • The results obtained using the proposed method are in good agreement with the experiments. - Abstract: The risk of sodium-air reaction has received considerable attention after the sodium-fire accident in Monju reactor. The fires resulting from the sodium-air reaction can be detrimental to the safety of a sodium fast reactor. Therefore, predicting the consequences of a sodium fire is important from a safety point of view. A computational method based on CFD is proposed here to simulate sodium pool fire and understand its characteristics. The method solves the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equation and uses a non-premixed mixture fraction based combustion model. The mass transfer of sodium vapor from the pool surface to the flame is obtained using a sodium evaporation model. The proposed method is then validated against well-known sodium pool experiments of Newman and Payne. The flame temperature and location predicted by the model are in good agreement with experiments. Furthermore, the trends of the mean burning rate with initial pool temperature and oxygen concentration are captured well. Additionally, parametric studies have been performed to understand the effects of pool diameter and initial air temperature on the mean burning rate. Furthermore, the sodium spray and sodium pool combustion models are combined to simulate simultaneous spray and pool combustion. Simulations were performed to demonstrate that the combined code could be applied to simulate this. Once sufficiently validated, the present code can be used for safety evaluation of a sodium fast reactor

  8. Numerical modeling of sodium fire – Part II: Pool combustion and combined spray and pool combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiah, Pratap, E-mail: pratap.sathiah78@gmail.com [Shell Global Solutions Ltd., Brabazon House, Concord Business Park, Threapwood Road, Manchester M220RR (United Kingdom); Roelofs, Ferry, E-mail: roelofs@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A CFD based method is proposed for the simulation of sodium pool combustion. • A sodium evaporation based model is proposed to model sodium pool evaporation. • The proposed method is validated against sodium pool experiments of Newman and Payne. • The results obtained using the proposed method are in good agreement with the experiments. - Abstract: The risk of sodium-air reaction has received considerable attention after the sodium-fire accident in Monju reactor. The fires resulting from the sodium-air reaction can be detrimental to the safety of a sodium fast reactor. Therefore, predicting the consequences of a sodium fire is important from a safety point of view. A computational method based on CFD is proposed here to simulate sodium pool fire and understand its characteristics. The method solves the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equation and uses a non-premixed mixture fraction based combustion model. The mass transfer of sodium vapor from the pool surface to the flame is obtained using a sodium evaporation model. The proposed method is then validated against well-known sodium pool experiments of Newman and Payne. The flame temperature and location predicted by the model are in good agreement with experiments. Furthermore, the trends of the mean burning rate with initial pool temperature and oxygen concentration are captured well. Additionally, parametric studies have been performed to understand the effects of pool diameter and initial air temperature on the mean burning rate. Furthermore, the sodium spray and sodium pool combustion models are combined to simulate simultaneous spray and pool combustion. Simulations were performed to demonstrate that the combined code could be applied to simulate this. Once sufficiently validated, the present code can be used for safety evaluation of a sodium fast reactor.

  9. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  10. Spectroscopy and titanium gettering in SPHEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, G.; Giroud, C.; Summers, H.; Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon

    1994-01-01

    SPHEX is a spheromak wherein the toroidal and poloidal currents are generated and sustained by direct current injection from a Marshall gun, and organised by the effect of magnetic relaxation. In the past it has not achieved high temperature (Langmuir probes indicate a flat profile of about 20 eV), and this was thought to be due to radiation from impurities originating in the Marshall gun. For this paper, titanium has been applied to the plasma-facing surface of the flux conserver in an attempt to reduce impurity levels and plasma density. Calibrated spectrometers were used to measure plasma properties and impurity levels, both before and after application of titanium. The titanium is also found to have a surprisingly large effect on the magnetic properties, which gives some evidence regarding the relaxation mechanism. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Reaction of titanium polonides with carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abakumov, A.S.; Malyshev, M.L.; Reznikova, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    It has been ascertained that heating titanium and tantalum in carbon dioxide to temperatures of 500 or 800 0 C alters the composition of the gas phase, causing the advent of carbon monoxide and lowering the oxygen content. Investigation of the thermal stability of titanium polonides in a carbon dioxide medium has shown that titanium mono- and hemipolonides are decomposed at temperatures below 350 0 C. The temperature dependence of the vapor pressure of polonium produced in the decomposition of these polonides in a carbon dioxide medium have been determined by a radiotensimetric method. The enthalpy of the process, calculated from this relationship, is close to the enthalpy of vaporization of elementary polonium in vacuo

  12. Environmental effects in titanium aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.W.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental effects on titanium aluminide alloys are potentially of great importance for engineering applications of these materials, although little has been published to date on such effects. The primary emphasis in this paper is on hydrogen effects, with a brief reference to oxygen effects. Hydrogen is readily absorbed at elevated temperature into all the titanium aluminide compositions studied to date, in amounts as large as 10 at.%, and on cooling virtually all this hydrogen is precipitated as a hydride phase or phases. The presence of these precipitated hydride plates affects mechanical properties in ways similar to what is observed in other hydride forming materials, although effects per unit volume of hydride are not particularly severe in the titanium aluminides. Microstructure, and thus thermal and mechanical history, plays a major role in controlling the severity of hydrogen effects

  13. Enthalpy of formation of titanium diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhachinskij, V.V.; Chirin, N.A.

    1975-01-01

    The values given in the literature for the enthalpy of the formation of titanium diboride, as obtained experimentally and by theoretical estimation, range between -32 and -74.4 kcal/mol. In this paper the authors use the method of direct synthesis from elements in a Calvet calorimeter to determine the enthalpy of formation, ΔHsub(f) 0 , sub(298), of titanium diboride with the composition Tisub(1.000+-0.002)Bsub(2.056+-0.006)Csub(0.009)Nsub(0.003), which was found to be -76.78+-0.83 kcal/mol. They calculate that ΔHsub(f,298) (TiBsub(2.056)=-76.14+-0.85 kcal/mol. The procedure employed makes it possible to carry out the titanium diboride synthesis reaction with the calorimeter at room temperature

  14. 13 CFR 120.1705 - Pool formation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements. SBA may adjust the Pool characteristics periodically based on program experience and market... a Pool involving a Pool Loan it does not own, it must purchase the Loan Interest it proposes to pool... purchase the Loan Interest and take it into inventory or settle the purchase of the Loan Interest through...

  15. Delineating probabilistic species pools in ecology and biogeography

    OpenAIRE

    Karger, Dirk Nikolaus; Cord, Anna F; Kessler, Michael; Kreft, Holger; Kühn, Ingolf; Pompe, Sven; Sandel, Brody; Sarmento Cabral, Juliano; Smith, Adam B; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Tuomisto, Hanna; Weigelt, Patrick; Wesche, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Aim To provide a mechanistic and probabilistic framework for defining the species pool based on species-specific probabilities of dispersal, environmental suitability and biotic interactions within a specific temporal extent, and to show how probabilistic species pools can help disentangle the geographical structure of different community assembly processes. Innovation Probabilistic species pools provide an improved species pool definition based on probabilities in conjuncti...

  16. A strategy for optimizing item-pool management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariel, A.; van der Linden, Willem J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Item-pool management requires a balancing act between the input of new items into the pool and the output of tests assembled from it. A strategy for optimizing item-pool management is presented that is based on the idea of a periodic update of an optimal blueprint for the item pool to tune item

  17. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jwad, Tahseen, E-mail: taj355@bham.ac.uk; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  18. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  19. Photocatalytically active titanium dioxide nanopowders: Synthesis, photoactivity and magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikkanen, J-P; Heinonen, S; Saarivirta, E Huttunen; Honkanen, M; Levänen, E

    2013-01-01

    Two approaches were used to obtain nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) photocatalyst powders. Firstly, low-temperature synthesis method and secondly liquid flame spraying. The structural properties of the produced powders were determined with X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption tests. The photocatalytic properties of the powders were studied with methylene blue (MB) discoloration tests. After discolorations tests, TiO 2 was coagulated with magnetite particles using FeCl 3 ·6 H 2 O at a fixed pH value. Magnetic separation of coagulated TiO 2 and magnetite was carried out by a permanent magnet. The obtained results showed that the particle size of the powders synthesized at low-temperature was very small and the specific surface area high. The phase content of the powder was also shown to depend greatly on the acidity of the synthesis solution. Powder synthesized by liquid flame spraying was mixture of anatase and rutile phases with essentially larger particle size and lower specific surface area than those of low-temperature synthesized powders. The MB discoloration test showed that photocatalytic activity depends on the phase structure as well as the specific surface area of the synthesized TiO 2 powder. The magnetic separation of TiO 2 –magnetite coagulate from solution proved to be efficient around pH:8

  20. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  1. Solid particle effects on heat transfer in a multi-layered molten pool with gas injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao y Leon, Rosa Marina; Corradini, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    In the very unlikely event of a severe reactor accident involving core melt and pressure vessel failure, it is important to identify the circumstances that would allow the molten core material to cool down and resolidify, bringing core debris to a stable coolable state. To achieve this, it has been proposed to flood the cavity with water from above forming a layered structure where upward heat loss from the molten pool to the water will cause the core material to quench and solidify. In this situation the molten pool would become a three-phase mixture: e.g., a solid and liquid slurry formed by the molten pool as it cools to a temperature below the temperature of liquidus, agitated by the gases formed in the concrete ablation process. The present work quantifies the partition of the heat losses upward and downward in this multi-layered configuration, considering the influence of the viscosity and the solid fraction in the pool, from test data obtained from intermediate scale experiments at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. These experimental results show heat transfer behavior for multi-layered pools for a range of viscosities and solid fractions. These results are compared to previous experimental studies and well known correlations and models

  2. Convection in molten pool created by a concentrated energy flux on a solid metal target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikshit, B.; Zende, G. R.; Bhatia, M. S.; Suri, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    During surface evaporation of metals by use of a concentrated energy flux such as electron beam or lasers, a liquid metal pool having a very high temperature gradient is formed around the hot zone created by the beam. Due to temperature dependence of surface tension, density, and depression of the evaporating surface caused by back pressure of the emitted vapor in this molten pool, a strong convective current sets in the molten pool. A proposition is made that this convection may pass through three different stages during increase in the electron beam power depending upon dominance of the various driving forces. To confirm this, convective heat transfer is quantified in terms of dimensionless Nusselt number and its evolution with power is studied in an experiment using aluminum, copper, and zirconium as targets. These experimentally determined values are also compared to the theoretical values predicted by earlier researchers to test the validity of their assumptions and to know about the type of flow in the melt pool. Thus, conclusion about the physical characteristics of flow in the molten pool of metals could be drawn by considering the roles of surface tension and curvature of the evaporating surface on the evolution of convective heat transfer.

  3. Seismic analysis and design of spent subassembly storage bay (SSSB) pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Gani, H.I.; Ramanjaneyulu, K.V.S.; Pillai, C.S.; Chetal, S.C.

    2003-01-01

    Fuel bundles, after their specified stay in reactor core, are replaced by fresh fuel for sustaining power generation at rated levels. The irradiated fuel subassembly, removed fresh from core, known as spent fuel sub assembly, is radioactive and decay heat generating. It needs to be cooled before it becomes amenable for handling, either for reprocessing or for immobilisation. For this purpose, it is immersed in a pool of water, retained in a concrete structure referred as Spent Subassembly Storage Bay (SSSB) pool. The height of water column above fuel bundles is arrived from shielding considerations. SSSB pool is one of the nuclear safety related structures and warrants rigorous analysis and design. The SSSB pool, in case of PFBR 500 MW(e) is located in fuel building. It is a stainless steel lined. water retaining rectangular R.C.C. open tank of size 7.5 X 29.0 m, with a height of 11.0 m. This structure is analysed for two levels of site specific earthquakes taking in to account liquid structure interactions as per ASCE-4, 1998. The design of walls and bottom slab is carried out satisfying the AERB code for nuclear safety related structures. Analysis and design of SSSB pool of PFBR is presented in the following paper. (author)

  4. Titanium Isotopes Provide Clues to Lunar Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2012-05-01

    The idea that the Moon formed as the result of the giant impact of a Mars-sized impactor with the still-growing Earth explains two central facts about the Earth-Moon system: its total angular momentum (Earth's spin and the Moon's orbital motion), and the sizes of the metallic cores of the Earth (large) and Moon (tiny). This gives cosmochemists some confidence in the hypothesis, but they would greatly appreciate additional compositional tests. One undisputed point is the identical abundance of the three oxygen isotopes in Earth and Moon. Junjun Zhang and colleagues at the University of Chicago (USA) and the University of Bern (Switzerland) have added another isotopic system to the cosmochemical testing tool kit, titanium isotopes. They find that the ratio of titanium-50 to titanium-47 is identical in Earth and Moon to within four parts per million. In contrast, other solar system materials, such as carbonaceous chondrites, vary by considerably more than this-- up to 150 times as much. The identical oxygen and titanium isotopic compositions in Earth and Moon are surprising in light of what we think we know about planet formation and formation of the Moon after a giant impact. The variations in oxygen and titanium isotopes among meteorite types suggest that it is unlikely that the Moon-forming giant impactor would have had the same isotopic composition as the Earth. Simulations show that the Moon ends up constructed mostly (40-75%) from the impactor materials. Thus, the Moon ought to have different isotopic composition than does Earth. The isotopes might have exchanged in the complicated, messy proto-lunar disk (as has been suggested for oxygen isotopes), making them the same. However, Zhang and colleagues suggest that this exchange is unlikely for a refractory element like titanium. Could the impact simulations be greatly overestimating the contributions from the impactor? Was the mixing of building-block materials throughout the inner solar system much less than

  5. Creating mobile apps with Appcelerator Titanium

    CERN Document Server

    Brousseau, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Creating Mobile Apps with Appcelerator Titanium provides a hands-on approach and working examples on creating apps and games as well as embedding them onto a social networking website. Developers can then move on from there to develop their own applications based on the ones they have developed throughout the course of this book.""Creating Mobile Apps with Appcelerator Titanium"" is for developers who have experience with modern languages and development environments. Also, if you are familiar with the concepts of Object-oriented Programming (OOP), reusable components, AJAX closures, and so on

  6. Nickel and titanium nanoboride composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimova, K A; Galevsky, G V; Rudneva, V V; Kozyrev, N A; Orshanskaya, E G

    2015-01-01

    Electrodeposition conditions, structural-physical and mechanical properties (microhardness, cohesion with a base, wear resistance, corrosion currents) of electroplated composite coatings on the base of nickel with nano and micro-powders of titanium boride are investigated. It has been found out that electro-crystallization of nickel with boride nanoparticles is the cause of coating formation with structural fragments of small sizes, low porosity and improved physical and mechanical properties. Titanium nano-boride is a component of composite coating, as well as an effective modifier of nickel matrix. Nano-boride of the electrolyte improves efficiency of the latter due to increased permissible upper limit of the cathodic current density. (paper)

  7. The Properties of Titanium and Its Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    BIŠĆAN, VLATKA; LUETIĆ, VIKTORIJA

    2012-01-01

    Titanium metal is silver-grey color and high gloss, the ninth element of the abundance in the Earth’s crust, and can be found in meteorites. It has a low electrical conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion. Since titanium has a great passivity, its physical property is a high level of corrosion resistance to most mineral acids and chlorides. It has mechanical properties such as steel, has a high melting temperature and is light. Since it is highly resistant to corrosion it is app...

  8. Nickel contaminated titanium weld wire study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, G.R.; Sumstine, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Attachment of thermocouples to fuel rod welding problems at Exxon Nuclear Company and INEL prompted an investigation study of the titanium filler wire material. It was found that the titanium filler wire was contaminated with nickel which was jacketed on the wire prior to the drawing process at the manufacturers. A method was developed to 100% inspect all filler wire for future welding application. This method not only indicates the presence of nickel contamination but indicates quantity of contamination. The process is capable of high speed inspection necessary for various high speed manufacturing processes

  9. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  10. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-01-01

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed

  11. Titanium reinforced boron-polyimide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G. A.; Clayton, K. I.

    1969-01-01

    Processing techniques for boron polyimide prepreg were developed whereby composites could be molded under vacuum bag pressure only. A post-cure cycle was developed which resulted in no loss in room temperature mechanical properties of the composite at any time during up to 16 hours at 650 F. A design utilizing laminated titanium foil was developed to achieve a smooth transition of load from the titanium attachment points into the boron-reinforced body of the structure. The box beam test article was subjected to combined bending and torsional loads while exposed to 650 F. Loads were applied incrementally until failure occurred at 83% design limit load.

  12. Heat transfer characteristics around a single heated rod immersed in sodium pool with gas jet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideto Niikura; Kazuo Soga; Ken-ichiro Sugiyama; Akira Yamaguchi

    2005-01-01

    In a steam generator using liquid sodium, water intensely reacts with sodium when it leaks out from a heat transfer tube. It is important to evaluate the influence of sodium-water reaction to surrounding tubes and the shell. Hence, it has been desired to develop the simulation code for the evaluation of sodium-water reaction. From this viewpoint, the Japan Nuclear Cycle is now developing the SERAPHIM code. We reported a preliminary study to establish an experimental method for a single heated rod immersed in sodium pool with steam jet impingement planned in the near future as well as to obtain a preliminary data to verify the adequacy of SERAPHIM code. We first measured local and mean heat transfer coefficients around a horizontal single heated rod immersed in a water pool and a sodium pool with a limited volume in the experimental apparatus. It was confirmed that the mean heat transfer coefficients fairly agreed with the existing data for natural convection in water and sodium. Secondary we measured local and mean heat transfer coefficients around a horizontal single heated rod with Ar gas jet impingement immersed in the limited water pool and in the limited sodium pool. It was clearly observed that the local heat transfer coefficients in the sodium pool keep almost the same values in every angle regardless of increase in Ar gas jet velocity varied from about 8.7m/s to about 78m/s. On the other hand, it was confirmed in the water pool that local heat transfer coefficients on the forward stagnation side exposed in the Ar gas jet impingement increase with increasing the jet velocity while the local heat transfer coefficients on the opposite surface keep almost same values regardless of increase in the velocity. (authors)

  13. Direct dynamic synthesis of nanodispersed phases of titanium oxides upon sputtering of electrodischarge titanium plasma into an air atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivkov, A. A.; Gerasimov, D. Yu.; Nikitin, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the possibility of directly synthesizing nanodispersed crystalline phases of titanium dioxides with rutile and anatase structures in a hypervelocity jet of electroerosion plasma generated by a coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator with titanium electrodes are presented. A powder product containing nanosized polymorphic phases of titanium dioxide with a spherical shape of particles has been manufactured.

  14. Stress corrosion (Astm G30-90 standard) in 08x18H10T stainless steel of nuclear fuel storage pool in WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, V.; Zamora R, L.

    1997-01-01

    At the water storage of the irradiated nuclear fuel has been an important factor in its management. The actual pools have its walls covered with inoxidable steel and heat exchangers to dissipate the residual heat from fuel. It is essential to control the water purity to eliminate those conditions which aid to the corrosion process in fuel and at related components. The steel used in this research was obtained from an austenitic inoxidizable steel standardized with titanium 08x18H10T (Type 321) similar to one of the two steel coatings used to cover walls and the pools floor. the test consisted in the specimen deformation through an U ply according to the Astm G30-90 standard. The exposition of the deformed specimen it was realized in simulated conditions to the chemical regime used in pools. (Author)

  15. Public Swimming Pools | Florida Department of Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illness Disease Reporting and Surveillance Bureau of Public Health Laboratories Environmental Health Air Air Monitoring Carbon Monoxide Indoor Air Quality Mold Radon Water Aquatic Toxins Beach Water Quality purification, testing, treatment, and disinfection procedures. To ensure that the pool technicians are

  16. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a... shall notify all news media representatives who have requested interviews or visits that have not been...

  17. Stein's neuronal model with pooled renewal input

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rajdl, K.; Lánský, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 3 (2015), s. 389-399 ISSN 0340-1200 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Stein’s model * Poisson process * pooled renewal processes * first-passage time Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.611, year: 2015

  18. Phase analysis in gated blood pool tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Bunko, Hisashi; Tada, Akira; Taki, Junichi; Nanbu, Ichiro

    1984-01-01

    Phase analysis of gated blood pool study has been applied to detect the site of accessory conduction pathway (ACP) in the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome; however, there was a limitation to detect the precise location of ACP by phase analysis alone. In this study, we applied phase analysis to gated blood pool tomography using seven pin hole tomography (7PT) and gated emission computed tomography (GECT) in 21 patients with WPW syndrome and 3 normal subjects. In 17 patients, the sites of ACPs were confirmed by epicardial mapping and the result of the surgical division of ACP. In 7PT, the site of ACP grossly agreed to the abnormal initial phase in phase image in 5 out of 6 patients with left cardiac type. In GECT, phase images were generated in short axial, vertical and horizontal long axial sections. In 8 out of 9 patients, the site of ACP was correctly identified by phase images, and in a patient who had two ACPs, initial phase corresponded to one of the two locations. Phase analysis of gated blood pool tomography has advantages for avoiding overlap of blood pools and for estimating three-dimensional propagation of the contraction, and can be a good adjunctive method in patients with WPW syndrome. (author)

  19. Swimming-pool piles; Piles piscines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trioulaire, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    In France two swimming-pool piles, Melusine and Triton, have just been set in operation. The swimming-pool pile is the ideal research tool for neutron fluxes of the order of 10{sup 13}. This type of pile can be of immediate interest to many research centres, but its cost must be reduced and a break with tradition should be observed in its design. It would be an advantage: - to bury the swimming-pool; - to reject the experimental channel; - to concentrate the cooling circuit in the swimming-pool; - to carry out all manipulations in the water; - to double the core. (author) [French] En France, deux piles piscines, Melusine et Triton, viennent d'entrer en service. La pile piscine est l'outil de recherche ideal pour des flux de neutrons de l'ordre de 10{sup 13}. Ce type de pile peut interesser des maintenant de nombreux centres de recherches mais il faut reduire son prix de revient et rompre avec le conformisme de sa conception. Il y a avantage: - a enterrer la piscine; - a supprimer les canaux experimentaux; - a concentrer le circuit de refrigeration dans la piscine; - a effectuer toutes les manipulations dans l'eau; - a doubler le coeur. (auteur)

  20. Spectrum pooling in MnWave Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccardi, Federico; Shokri-Ghadikolaei, Hossein; Fodor, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the specific characteristics of mmWave technologies, we discuss the possibility of an authorization regime that allows spectrum sharing between multiple operators, also referred to as spectrum pooling. In particular, considering user rate as the performance measure, we assess...

  1. Pooling Objects for Recognizing Scenes without Examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordumova, S.; Mensink, T.; Snoek, C.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we aim to recognize scenes in images without using any scene images as training data. Different from attribute based approaches, we do not carefully select the training classes to match the unseen scene classes. Instead, we propose a pooling over ten thousand of off-the-shelf object

  2. The new pooled cohort equations risk calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preiss, David; Kristensen, Søren L

    2015-01-01

    disease and any measure of social deprivation. An early criticism of the Pooled Cohort Equations Risk Calculator has been its alleged overestimation of ASCVD risk which, if confirmed in the general population, is likely to result in statin therapy being prescribed to many individuals at lower risk than...

  3. DNA pooling strategies for categorical (ordinal) traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite reduced genotyping costs in recent years, obtaining genotypes for all individuals in a population may still not be feasible when sample size is large. DNA pooling provides a useful alternative to determining genotype effects. Clustering algorithms allow for grouping of individuals (observati...

  4. Pooling ASR data for closely related languages

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, C

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe several experiments that were conducted to assess the viability of data pooling as a means to improve speech-recognition performance for under-resourced languages. Two groups of closely related languages from the Southern Bantu language...

  5. "Teisele poole" Agambeniga ja Agambenita / Ragne Nukk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nukk, Ragne, 1984-

    2012-01-01

    Tallinna Fotokuu rahvusvahelise fotonäituse "Teisele poole" ideeliste lähtekohtade tõlgendamisest. Autor kõrvutab Adam Budaki kuraatornäituse aluseks olnud Giorgio Agambeni esseed „Viimne kohtupäev“ näitusel eksponeeritud piltidega

  6. 7 CFR 1033.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... association and it fulfills the following conditions: (1) The aggregate monthly quantity supplied by all... or aseptically-processed fluid milk products. (c) A supply plant from which the quantity of bulk... operator of a supply plant located within the marketing area may include deliveries to pool distributing...

  7. Characteristics and Modification of Non-metallic Inclusions in Titanium-Stabilized AISI 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Dirk; Garbers-Craig, Andrie

    2017-06-01

    This study describes an investigation into the improvement of castability, final surface quality and formability of titanium-stabilized AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel on an industrial scale. Non-metallic inclusions found in this industrially produced stainless steel were first characterized using SEM-EDS analyses through the INCA-Steel software platform. Inclusions were found to consist of a MgO·Al2O3 spinel core, which acted as heterogeneous nucleation site for titanium solubility products. Plant-scale experiments were conducted to either prevent the formation of spinel, or to modify it by calcium treatment. Modification to spherical dual-phase spinel-liquid matrix inclusions was achieved with calcium addition, which eliminated submerged entry nozzle clogging for this grade. Complete modification to homogeneous liquid calcium aluminates was achieved at high levels of dissolved aluminum. A mechanism was suggested to explain the extent of modification achieved.

  8. Manipulation of the osteoblast response to a Ti 6Al 4V titanium alloy using a high power diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, L.; Lawrence, J.; Li, L.

    2005-07-01

    To improve the bone integration of titanium-based implants a high power diode laser (HPDL) was used to modify the material for improved osteoblast cell response. The surface properties of un-treated and HPDL treated samples were characterized. Contact angles for the un-treated and the HPDL modified titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) were determined with selected biological liquids by the sessile drop technique. The analysis revealed that the wettability of the Ti-6Al-4V improved after HPDL laser treatment, indicating that better interaction with the biological liquids occurred. Moreover, an in vitro human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB 1.19) evaluation revealed a more favourable cell response on the HPDL laser treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy than on either un-treated sample or a mechanically roughened sample. It was consequently determined that the HPDL provides more a controllable and effective technique to improve the biocompatibility of bio-metals.

  9. Benthic assemblages of rock pools in northern Portugal: seasonal and between-pool variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacopo Bertocci

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the seasonal (winter vs summer and within season and spatial (between-pool variability of benthic assemblages of rock pools at mid-intertidal level along the shore of Viana do Castelo (North Portugal. Physical traits of rock pools, including size, depth and position along the shore, were also compared between pools. While pools did not differ for any of the examined physical traits, results indicated a clear seasonal difference in the structure of assemblages, including a total of 49 macroalgal and 13 animal taxa. This finding was driven by six taxa that are more abundant in winter (the reef-forming polychaete Sabellaria alveolata, the articulated coralline algae Corallina spp., the brown alga Bifurcaria bifurcata, the encrusting coralline alga Lithophyllum incrustans, the red alga Chondracanthus acicularis and the grazing snails Gibbula spp. and four algal taxa that are more abundant in summer (the invasive brown Sargassum muticum, the green Ulva spp., the kelp Laminaria ochroleuca and the filamentous red Ceramium spp.. These data provide a new contribution to the knowledge of rock pool systems and have potential implications for monitoring programmes aimed at assessing ecological modifications related to natural and anthropogenic disturbances and for identifying processes responsible for the variability of rock pool assemblages.

  10. Liquid Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qutaiba A. Tawfic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammals have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases, as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen, as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of theoretical advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. The potential for multiple clinical applications for liquid-assisted ventilation will be clarified and optimized in future. Keywords: Liquid ventilation; perfluorochemicals; perfluorocarbon; respiratory distress; surfactant.

  11. Experimental Study of Na based Titanium Nanofluid-Water Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gunyeop; Kim, Soo Jae; Baek, Jehyun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Oh, Sun Ryung; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In KALIMER-600, a sodium-cooled fast reactor designed by KAERI, thermal energy is transported from high-temperature liquid Na (526 .deg. C at 0.1 MPa) to low temperature water (230 .deg. C at - 19.5 MPa) through a heat exchanger. If any leakage or rupture occurs during the operation of this heat exchanger, highly pressurized liquid water can penetrate into the liquid Na channels; this contact should instantly cause SWR. As reaction continues, liquid water is soon vaporized by pressure drop and huge amount of reaction heat. This generated water vapor expands large reaction area and increases sodium-water vapor reaction process. Therefore, the rapid generation of reaction product (like H{sub 2}) and water vapor increases the system pressure that can cause the system failure in SFR. To reduce this strong chemical reaction phenomena between Na and water, some we have focused on suppressing the chemical reactivity of liquid Na by dispersing nanoparticles (NPs). For the real application of NaTiNF, the pressure change induced by NaTiNF-water reaction is compared with Na-water reaction in the present study. NaTiNF contains 100nm of Ti NPs at 0.2 vol. %. The reaction rate of NaTiNF-water reaction is also investigated as reaction temperature increases. Sodium-water vapor reaction (SVR) will occur when an SWR accident occurs in SFR. In this manner, NaTiNF-water vapor reaction is experimentally performed for ensuring the suppression of chemical reactivity of NaTiNF in contact with water vapor. In the basic step for reducing risk of an SWR in SFR, we have experimentally verified the suppressed chemical reactivity of liquid sodium using Ti NPs through SWR and SVR experiments. In SWR, Na based titanium nanofluid (NaTiNF) shows lower pressure change than Na. As T{sub R} increases, P{sub max} in Na-water reaction increases while NaTiNF does not. The reaction rate of NaTiNF shows twice slower than that of Na. In SVR, NaTiNF shows slower temperature increase than Na. The distinct

  12. Generalizing Pooling Functions in CNNs: Mixed, Gated, and Tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chen-Yu; Gallagher, Patrick; Tu, Zhuowen

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we seek to improve deep neural networks by generalizing the pooling operations that play a central role in the current architectures. We pursue a careful exploration of approaches to allow pooling to learn and to adapt to complex and variable patterns. The two primary directions lie in: (1) learning a pooling function via (two strategies of) combining of max and average pooling, and (2) learning a pooling function in the form of a tree-structured fusion of pooling filters that are themselves learned. In our experiments every generalized pooling operation we explore improves performance when used in place of average or max pooling. We experimentally demonstrate that the proposed pooling operations provide a boost in invariance properties relative to conventional pooling and set the state of the art on several widely adopted benchmark datasets. These benefits come with only a light increase in computational overhead during training (ranging from additional 5 to 15 percent in time complexity) and a very modest increase in the number of model parameters (e.g., additional 1, 9, and 27 parameters for mixed, gated, and 2-level tree pooling operators, respectively). To gain more insights about our proposed pooling methods, we also visualize the learned pooling masks and the embeddings of the internal feature responses for different pooling operations. Our proposed pooling operations are easy to implement and can be applied within various deep neural network architectures.

  13. Suncatcher and cool pool. Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, J.

    1981-03-01

    The Suncatcher is a simple, conical solar concentrating device that captures light entering clerestory windows and directs it onto thermal storage elements at the back of a south facing living space. The cone shape and inclination are designed to capture low angle winter sunlight and to reflect away higher angle summer sunlight. It is found that winter radiation through a Suncatcher window is 40 to 50% higher than through an ordinary window, and that the average solar fraction is 59%. Water-filled steal culvert pipes used for thermal storage are found to undergo less stratification, and thus to be more effective, when located where sunlight strikes the bottom rather than the top. Five Suncatcher buildings are described. Designs are considered for 32/sup 0/, 40/sup 0/ and 48/sup 0/ north latitude, and as the latitude increases, the inclination angle of the cone should be lowered. The Cool Pool is an evaporating, shaded roof pond which thermosiphons cool water into water-filled columns within a building. Preliminary experiments indicate that the best shade design has unimpeded north sky view, good ventilation, complete summer shading, a low architectural profile, and low cost attic vent lowers work. Another series of experiments established the satisfactory performance of the Cool Pool on a test building using four water-filled cylinders, two cylinders, and two cylinders connected to the Cool Pool through a heat exchanger. Although an unshaded pool cools better at night than a shaded one, daytime heat gain far offsets this advantage. A vinyl waterbag heat exchanger was developed for use with the Cool Pool. (LEW)

  14. Hydrogen embrittlement of titanium and its alloys - a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aho-Mantila, I.; Haemaelaeinen, H.

    1986-05-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement data of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Especially the results obtained in spent nuclear fuel repository conditions with commercially pure titanium and TiCode-12 alloy are examined. The results show that the mechanical properties of titanium are not much affected by hydrogen when tested by smooth specimens. Much greater effects can be expected with notched fracture mechanics specimens. However, only limeted data is available. Hydrogen distribution in titanium is affected by stress, alloy composition and temperature gradients. In order to model the hydrogen-induced crack growth in titanium much more mechanistic work is needed especially to understand the behaviour of hydrogen in crack tip stress field. (author)

  15. Structure and properties of Titanium for dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Greger

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes manufacture of nano-structural titanium, its structure and properties. Nano-titanium has higher specific strength properties than ordinary (coarse-grained titanium. Nano-titanium was produced by the equal-channel angular pressing (ETAP process. The research it self was focused on physical base of strengthening and softening processes and developments occurring at the grain boundaries during the ECAP process at half-hot temperature. Strength of nano-titanium varies around 960 MPa, grain size around 300 nm.

  16. Rough surfaces of titanium and titanium alloys for implants and prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conforto, E.; Aronsson, B.-O.; Salito, A.; Crestou, C.; Caillard, D.

    2004-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys for dental implants and hip prostheses were surface-treated and/or covered by metallic or ceramic rough layers after being submitted to sand blasting. The goal of these treatments is to improve the surface roughness and consequently the osteointegration, the fixation, and the stability of the implant. The microstructure of titanium and titanium alloys submitted to these treatments has been studied and correlated to their mechanical behavior. As-treated/covered and mechanically tested surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Structural analyses performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), mainly in cross-section, reveal the degree of adherence and cohesion between the surface layer and the substrate (implant). We observed that, although the same convenient surface roughness was obtained with the two types of process, many characteristics as structural properties and mechanical behavior are very different

  17. Rapid PMR determination of hydrogen in titanium hydride and dehydrogenated titanium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'enko, V.S.; Demidenko, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance (PMR) enables determining hydrogen quantitatively in titanium hydride and dehydrogenated titanium powders without destroying the specimen and is also more informative than high-temperature extraction methods. PMR provides data on the electron-nuclear interactions and the activation energies for hydrogen diffusion while also providing conclusions on the forms and positives of the hydrogen in the lattice and the binding to the metal atoms. The authors have developed a rapid method for determining hydrogen in titanium hydride and dehydrogenated titanium powders which reduces the analysis time and improves the metrological characteristics. The authors use a YaMR-5535 spectrometer working at 40 MHz upgraded for use with hydrogen in solids. The authors used specimens of mass about 2 g ground to 0.1 mm powder

  18. Subsidizing Liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinova, Katya; Park, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    the breakdown of trading fees between liquidity demanders and suppliers matters. Posted quotes adjust after the change in fee composition, but the transaction costs for liquidity demanders remain unaffected once fees are taken into account. However, as posted bid-ask spreads decline, traders (particularly......Facing increased competition over the last decade, many stock exchanges changed their trading fees to maker-taker pricing, an incentive scheme that rewards liquidity suppliers and charges liquidity demanders. Using a change in trading fees on the Toronto Stock Exchange, we study whether and why...... retail) use aggressive orders more frequently, and adverse selection costs decrease....

  19. Transformation and fragmentation behavior of molten aluminum in sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, S.; Kinoshita, I.; Ueda, N.; Sugiyama, K. I.

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the possibility of fragmentation of the metallic alloy fuel on liquid phase formed by metallurgical reactions, which is important in evaluating the sequence of core disruptive accidents for metallic fuel fast reactors, a series of experiments was carried out using molten aluminum and sodium under the condition that the boiling of sodium on the surface of the melt does not occur. The melting point of aluminum (933K) is roughly equivalent to the liquefaction temperature between the U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel and the SUS cladding (about 923K). The thermal fragmentation of a molten aluminum with a solid crust in the sodium pool is caused by the transient pressurization within the melt confined by the solid crust even under the condition that the instantaneous contact interface temperature between the melt and the sodium is below the boiling point of sodium. This indicates the possibility that the metallic alloy fuel on liquid phase formed by metallurgical reactions can be fragmented without occurring the boiling of sodium on the surface of the melt. The transient pressurization within the melt is considered to be caused by following two mechanisms. i) the overheating of the coolant entrapped hydrodynamically inside the aluminum melt confined by solid crust ii) the progression of solid crust inward and the squeeze of inner liquid part of the aluminum melt confined by solid crust It is found that the degree of fragmentation defined by mass median diameter has the same tendency for different dropping modes (drop or jet) with different mass and ambient Weber number of the melt in the present experimental conditions

  20. Heat transfer on liquid-liquid interface of molten-metal and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, T.; Saito, Yasushi; Mishima, Kaichiro

    2001-01-01

    Molten-core pool had been formed in the lower-head of TMI-2 pressure vessel at the severe accident. The lower head, however, didn't receive any damage by reactor core cooling. Heat transfer at outside of the lower head and boiling heat transfer at liquid-liquid interface of molten-metal and water, however, are important for initial cooling process of the molten-core pool. The heat transfer experiments for the liquid-liquid interface of molten-metal and water are carried out over the range of natural convection to film boiling region. Phenomenon on the heat transfer experiments are visualized by using of high speed video camera. Wood's metal and U-alloy 78 are used as molten-metal. The test section of the experiments consists of a copper block with heater, wood's metal, and water. Three thermocouple probes are used for temperature measurement of water side and the molten-metal side. Stability of the liquid-liquid interface is depended on the wetness of container wall for molten metal and the temperature distribution of the interface. Entrainment phenomena of molten-metal occurs by a fluctuation of the interface after boiling on the container wall surface. The boiling curves obtained from the liquid-liquid interface experiments are agree with the nucleate boiling and the film boiling correlations of solid-liquid system. (Suetake, M.)

  1. Titanium Metal Powder Production by the Plasma Quench Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Cordes; A. Donaldson

    2000-09-01

    The goals of this project included the scale-up of the titanium hydride production process to a production rate of 50 kg/hr at a purity level of 99+%. This goal was to be achieved by incrementally increasing the production capability of a series of reactor systems. This methodic approach was designed to allow Idaho Titanium Technologies to systematically address the engineering issues associated with plasma system performance, and powder collection system design and performance. With quality powder available, actual fabrication with the titanium hydride was to be pursued. Finally, with a successful titanium production system in place, the production of titanium aluminide was to be pursued by the simultaneously injection of titanium and aluminum precursors into the reactor system. Some significant accomplishments of the project are: A unique and revolutionary torch/reactor capable of withstanding temperatures up to 5000 C with high thermal efficiency has been operated. The dissociation of titanium tetrachloride into titanium powder and HC1 has been demonstrated, and a one-megawatt reactor potentially capable of producing 100 pounds per hour has been built, but not yet operated at the powder level. The removal of residual subchlorides and adsorbed HC1 and the sintering of powder to form solid bodies have been demonstrated. The production system has been operated at production rates up to 40 pounds per hour. Subsequent to the end of the project, Idaho Titanium Technologies demonstrated that titanium hydride powder can indeed be sintered into solid titanium metal at 1500 C without sintering aids.

  2. Titanium electroplating of copper in molten salt media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, Denis

    1985-01-01

    After a bibliographical survey on electroplating in molten salt media and on the electrolytic production of titanium, the author explains the reasons for the choice of the LiF-NaF-KF eutectic mix as solvent. He recalls the main properties which are used, and describes the conventional and convolutional processing of data obtained by linear volt-amperometry. He presents the electrolyte preparation mode which takes into account the existence of titanium ions with intermediate oxidation degree, and the reactivity of titanium with oxygenated species. Experimental results are discussed. Then, after the study of the mechanism of reduction of trivalent titanium into titanium on molybdenum (intermetallic diffusion is here negligible), he reports the study of this mechanism on copper (it is a more complicated situation, due to combinations between titanium and copper). The effect of different parameters (electrolyte purity, current density, electrode potential and temperature) is interpreted in order to identify optimal conditions for titanium electroplating of copper [fr

  3. SHORT COMMUNICATION TITANIUM-INDUCED SYNTHESIS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acyclic alkenes and intramolecular pathway on dicarbonyl compounds to yield ... Table 1, substituted benzofurans 2a-g were obtained in good yield and in the .... The titanium-induced synthesis of benzofurans has proved to be the method of ...

  4. Electrochemical surface modification of titanium in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyo-Han; Ramaswamy, Narayanan

    2009-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have good biocompatibility with body cells and tissues and are widely used for implant applications. However, clinical procedures place more stringent and tough requirements on the titanium surface necessitating artificial surface treatments. Among the many methods of titanium surface modification, electrochemical techniques are simple and cheap. Anodic oxidation is the anodic electrochemical technique while electrophoretic and cathodic depositions are the cathodic electrochemical techniques. By anodic oxidation it is possible to obtain desired roughness, porosity and chemical composition of the oxide. Anodic oxidation at high voltages can improve the crystallinity of the oxide. The chief advantage of this technique is doping of the coating of the bath constituents and incorporation of these elements improves the properties of the oxide. Electrophoretic deposition uses hydroxyapatite (HA) powders dispersed in a suitable solvent at a particular pH. Under these operating conditions these particles acquire positive charge and coatings are obtained on the cathodic titanium by applying an external electric field. These coatings require a post-sintering treatment to improve the coating properties. Cathodic deposition is another type of electrochemical method where HA is formed in situ from an electrolyte containing calcium and phosphate ions. It is also possible to alter structure and/or chemistry of the obtained deposit. Nano-grained HA has higher surface energy and greater biological activity and therefore emphasis is being laid to produce these coatings by cathodic deposition.

  5. Manufacture of titanium and zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mares, F.; Hanslik, T.

    1973-01-01

    A method is described of manufacturing titanium and zirconium hydrides by hydrogenation of said metals characterized by the reaction temperature ranging between 250 to 500 degC, hydrogen pressure of 20 to 300 atm and possibly by the presence of a hydride of the respective metal. (V.V.)

  6. Titanium impregnated borosilicate zeolites for epoxidation catalysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přech, Jan; Vitvarová, Dana; Lupínková, Lenka; Kubů, Martin; Čejka, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 212, AUG 2015 (2015), s. 28-34 ISSN 1387-1811 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/11/0819 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : borosilicate * titanium impregnation * epoxidation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.349, year: 2015

  7. Challenges of titanium metal injection moulding

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Benson, JM

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Titanium has fired the imagination of engineers and designers for decades by its ‘ideal’ combination of high strength, low density and good corrosion resistance. However, its application has unfortunately been limited to those niche markets where...

  8. Evaluating the Johanson theory for titanium powder

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chikosha, S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available . In this study, the Johanson theory was used to determine the rolling parameters of titanium powder. Preliminary results of the nip angle, nip pressures and maximum horizontal pressures of the mill for the powder rolled on a 55mm diameter roll with roll gap sizes...

  9. Super titanium blades for advanced steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    In 1986, the Alsthom Steam Turbines Department launched the manufacture of large titanium alloy blades: airfoil length of 1360 mm and overall length of 1520 mm. These blades are designed for the last-stage low pressure blading of advanced steam turbines operating at full speed (3000 rpm) and rating between 300 and 800 MW. Using titanium alloys for steam turbine exhaust stages as substitutes for chrome steels, due to their high strength/density ratio and their almost complete resistance to corrosion, makes it possible to increase the length of blades significantly and correspondingly that steam passage section (by up to 50%) with a still conservative stresses level in the rotor. Alsthom relies on 8 years of experience in the field of titanium, since as early as 1979 large titanium blades (airfoil length of 1240 mm, overall length of 1430 mm) were erected for experimental purposes on the last stage of a 900 MW unit of the Dampierre-sur-Loire power plant and now totals 45,000 operating hours without problems. The paper summarizes the main properties (chemical, mechanical and structural) recorded on very large blades and is based in particular on numerous fatigue corrosion test results to justify the use of the Ti 6 Al 4 V alloy in a specific context of micrographic structure

  10. Thermochemically active iron titanium oxide materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Miller, James E.

    2018-01-16

    A thermal oxidation-reduction cycle is disclosed that uses iron titanium oxide as the reactive material. The cycle may be used for the thermal splitting of water and/or carbon dioxide to form hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide. The formed compounds may be used as syngas precursors to form fuels.

  11. Obtention of titanium and zirconium metallic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, P.R.G.; Rover, C.F.S.; Amaral, F.L.L.

    1988-01-01

    The development works of techniques and equipments for titanium and zirconium sponges obtention are mentioned. The Kroll Process used for the sponges production is described, consisting in the reduction of the metal tetracloride with magnesium in an inert atmosphere of helium or argon. (C.G.C.) [pt

  12. Liquidity Runs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matta, R.; Perotti, E.

    2016-01-01

    Can the risk of losses upon premature liquidation produce bank runs? We show how a unique run equilibrium driven by asset liquidity risk arises even under minimal fundamental risk. To study the role of illiquidity we introduce realistic norms on bank default, such that mandatory stay is triggered

  13. Porous titanium bases for osteochondral tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nover, Adam B.; Lee, Stephanie L.; Georgescu, Maria S.; Howard, Daniel R.; Saunders, Reuben A.; Yu, William T.; Klein, Robert W.; Napolitano, Anthony P.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering of osteochondral grafts may offer a cell-based alternative to native allografts, which are in short supply. Previous studies promote the fabrication of grafts consisting of a viable cell-seeded hydrogel integrated atop a porous, bone-like metal. Advantages of the manufacturing process have led to the evaluation of porous titanium as the bone-like base material. Here, porous titanium was shown to support the growth of cartilage to produce native levels of Young’s modulus, using a clinically relevant cell source. Mechanical and biochemical properties were similar or higher for the osteochondral constructs compared to chondral-only controls. Further investigation into the mechanical influence of the base on the composite material suggests that underlying pores may decrease interstitial fluid pressurization and applied strains, which may be overcome by alterations to the base structure. Future studies aim to optimize titanium-based tissue engineered osteochondral constructs to best match the structural architecture and strength of native grafts. Statement of Significance The studies described in this manuscript follow up on previous studies from our lab pertaining to the fabrication of osteochondral grafts that consist of a bone-like porous metal and a chondrocyte-seeded hydrogel. Here, tissue engineered osteochondral grafts were cultured to native stiffness using adult chondrocytes, a clinically relevant cell source, and a porous titanium base, a material currently used in clinical implants. This porous titanium is manufactured via selective laser melting, offering the advantages of precise control over shape, pore size, and orientation. Additionally, this manuscript describes the mechanical influence of the porous base, which may have applicability to porous bases derived from other materials. PMID:26320541

  14. Managing liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pokutta, Sebastian; Schmaltz, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Large banking groups face the question of how to optimally allocate and generate liquidity: in a central liquidity hub or in many decentralized branches. We translate this question into a facility location problem under uncertainty. We show that volatility is the key driver behind (de......-)centralization. We provide an analytical solution for the 2-branch model and show that a liquidity center can be interpreted as an option on immediate liquidity. Therefore, its value can be interpreted as the price of information, i.e., the price of knowing the exact demand. Furthermore, we derive the threshold...... above which it is advantageous to open a liquidity center and show that it is a function of the volatility and the characteristic of the bank network. Finally, we discuss the n-branch model for real-world banking groups (10-60 branches) and show that it can be solved with high granularity (100 scenarios...

  15. Horizontal above-rack pool storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscardini, R.L.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes a unique method for storing spent, six year out of core, fuel at a prototypical PWR nuclear power station. The study describes a conceptual design, with favorable structural, thermal and criticality technical evaluations. However, economic considerations and licensing risks are judged to be less favorable. The concept study prescribes a fuel over fuel arrangement in an existing Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) with full maintenance of ALARA principles. This concept study is specific to a prototypical pool design, but may easily be projected to other nuclear facilities with other SFP conditions. For the prototypical PWR, the conceptual fuel bridge design will store over 200 additional fuel assemblies without significant facility modifications and for an indefinite time period

  16. Sodium pool fire model for CONACS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    The modeling of sodium pool fires constitutes an important ingredient in conducting LMFBR accident analysis. Such modeling capability has recently come under scrutiny at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) within the context of developing CONACS, the Containment Analysis Code System. One of the efforts in the CONACS program is to model various combustion processes anticipated to occur during postulated accident paths. This effort includes the selection or modification of an existing model and development of a new model if it clearly contributes to the program purpose. As part of this effort, a new sodium pool fire model has been developed that is directed at removing some of the deficiencies in the existing models, such as SOFIRE-II and FEUNA

  17. Pool Boiling CHF in Inclined Narrow Annuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myeong Gie

    2010-01-01

    Pool boiling heat transfer has been studied extensively since it is frequently encountered in various heat transfer equipment. Recently, it has been widely investigated in nuclear power plants for application to the advanced light water reactors designs. Through the review on the published results it can be concluded that knowledge on the combined effects of the surface orientation and a confined space on pool boiling heat transfer is of great practical importance and also of great academic interest. Fujita et al. investigated pool boiling heat transfer, from boiling inception to the critical heat flux (CHF, q' CHF ), in a confined narrow space between heated and unheated parallel rectangular plates. They identified that both the confined space and the surface orientation changed heat transfer much. Kim and Suh changed the surface orientation angles of a downward heating rectangular channel having a narrow gap from the downward-facing position (180 .deg.) to the vertical position (90 .deg.). They observed that the CHF generally decreased as the inclination angle (θ ) increased. Yao and Chang studied pool boiling heat transfer in a confined heat transfer for vertical narrow annuli with closed bottoms. They observed that when the gap size ( s ) of the annulus was decreased the effect of space confinement to boiling heat transfer increased. The CHF was occurred at much lower value for the confined space comparing to the unconfined pool boiling. Pool boiling heat transfer in narrow horizontal annular crevices was studied by Hung and Yao. They concluded that the CHF decreased with decreasing gap size of the annuli and described the importance of the thin film evaporation to explain the lower CHF of narrow crevices. The effect of the inclination angle on the CHF on countercurrent boiling in an inclined uniformly heated tube with closed bottoms was also studied by Liu et al. They concluded that the CHF reduced with the inclination angle decrease. A study was carried out

  18. Review and assessment of pool scrubbing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, L.E.; Escudero, M.J.; Peyres, V.; Polo, J.; Lopez-Jimenez, J.

    1996-01-01

    Decontamination of fission products bearing bubbles as they through aqueous pools becomes a crucial phenomenon for source term evaluation of hypothetical risk dominant sequences of Light Water Reactors. In the present report a peer review and assessment of models encapsulated in SPARC andBUSCA codes is presented. Several aspects of pool scrubbing have been addressed: particle removal, fission product vapour retention and bubble hydrodynamics. Particular emphasis has been given to the close link between retention and hydrodynamics, from both modelling and experimental point of view. In addition, RHR and SGTR sequences were simulated with SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and their results were compared with those obtained with MAAP 3.0B.As a result of this work, model capabilities and shortcomings have beenassessed and some areas susceptible of further research have been identified.(Author) 73 refs

  19. Review and assessment of pool scrubbing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, L.E.; Escudero, M.J.; Peyres, V.; Polo, J.; Lopez, J.

    1996-01-01

    Decontamination of fission products bearing bubbles as they pass through aqueous pools becomes a crucial phenomenon for source term evaluation of hypothetical risk dominant sequences of Light Water Reactors. In the present report a peer review and assessment of models encapsulated in SPARC and BUSCA codes is presented. Several aspects of pool scrubbing have been addressed: particle removal, fission product vapour retention and bubble hydrodynamics. Particular emphasis has been given to the close link between retention and hydrodynamics, from both modelling and experimental point of view. In addition, RHR and SGTR sequences were simulated with SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and their results were compared with those obtained with MAAP 3.0B. As a result of this work, model capabilities and shortcomings have been assessed and some areas susceptible of further research have been identified. (Author) 73 refs

  20. Review and assessment of pool scrubbing models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L.E.; Escudero, M.J.; Peyres, V.; Polo, J.; Lopez, J.

    1996-07-01

    Decontamination of fission products bearing bubbles as they pass through aqueous pools becomes a crucial phenomenon for source term evaluation of hypothetical risk dominant sequences of Light Water Reactors. In the present report a peer review and assessment of models encapsulated in SPARC and BUSCA codes is presented. Several aspects of pool scrubbing have been addressed: particle removal, fission product vapour retention and bubble hydrodynamics. Particular emphasis has been given to the close link between retention and hydrodynamics, from both modelling and experimental point of view. In addition, RHR and SGTR sequences were simulated with SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and their results were compared with those obtained with MAAP 3.0B. As a result of this work, model capabilities and shortcomings have been assessed and some areas susceptible of further research have been identified. (Author) 73 refs.

  1. Pricing Electricity in Pools With Wind Producers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales González, Juan Miguel; Conejo, A. J.; Kai Liu

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers an electricity pool that includes a significant number of wind producers and is cleared through a network-constrained auction, one day in advance and on an hourly basis. The hourly auction is formulated as a two-stage stochastic programming problem, where the first stage...... represents the clearing of the market and the second stage models the system operation under a number of plausible wind production realizations. This formulation co-optimizes energy and reserve, and allows deriving both pool energy prices and balancing energy prices. These prices result in both cost recovery...... for producers and revenue reconciliation. A case study of realistic size is used to illustrate the functioning of the proposed pricing scheme....

  2. Gene pool conservation of teak in Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin-Tun

    1995-01-01

    Myanmar with an area of 261, 228 Sq. miles is endowed with various types of forests which occupied nearly 50% of the country. Teak (Tectona grandis Linn. f.) is one of the most valuable timber species for its excellent wood quality and properties which are not observed with other timbers. Gene pool can be defined as a group of individual trees growing over a wide range of environmental conditions, and constituting different genetic complexes which can be transmitted to the offsprings. Topics such as: objectives of gene pool conservation, genetically improved seeds for large scale forest plantations, methodology of conservation, are discussed in the article. Myanmar teak dominates the world's teak market, and thus it is crucial to maintain the superiority in the conservation of gene complexes of teak. To some extent, the conservation of gene pools of teak and tree improvements are being undertaken by the Forest Research Institute of Myanmar. It is felt that the dissemination of the philosophy and concept of gene conservation to the personal involved in the forestry activities of the country are still inadequate

  3. Identification of radiopure titanium for the LZ dark matter experiment and future rare event searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Akerlof, C. W.; Akimov, D. Yu.; Alsum, S. K.; Araújo, H. M.; Arnquist, I. J.; Arthurs, M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Balashov, S.; Barry, M. J.; Belle, J.; Beltrame, P.; Benson, T.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boast, K. E.; Bolozdynya, A.; Boxer, B.; Bramante, R.; Brás, P.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. V.; Bunker, R.; Burdin, S.; Busenitz, J. K.; Carels, C.; Carlsmith, D. L.; Carlson, B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Cottle, A.; Coughlen, R.; Craddock, W. W.; Currie, A.; Dahl, C. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edberg, T. K.; Edwards, W. R.; Emmet, W. T.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Fruth, T.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gantos, N. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Gerhard, R. M.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Gomber, B.; Hall, C. R.; Hans, S.; Hanzel, K.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hillbrand, S.; Hjemfelt, C.; Hoff, M. D.; Holbrook, B.; Holtom, E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hor, J. Y.-K.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Hurteau, T. W.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kaboth, A.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Khazov, A.; Khromov, A. V.; Konovalov, A. M.; Korolkova, E. V.; Koyuncu, M.; Kraus, H.; Krebs, H. J.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Kumpan, A. V.; Kyre, S.; Lee, C.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J.; Leonard, D. S.; Leonard, R.; Lesko, K. T.; Levy, C.; Liao, F.-T.; Lin, J.; Lindote, A.; Linehan, R. E.; Lippincott, W. H.; Liu, X.; Lopes, M. I.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lorenzon, W.; Luitz, S.; Majewski, P.; Manalaysay, A.; Manenti, L.; Mannino, R. L.; Markley, D. J.; Martin, T. J.; Marzioni, M. F.; McConnell, C. T.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Meng, Y.; Miller, E. H.; Mizrachi, E.; Mock, J.; Monzani, M. E.; Morad, J. A.; Mount, B. J.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; Nikkel, J. A.; O'Dell, J.; O'Sullivan, K.; Olcina, I.; Olevitch, M. A.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Piepke, A.; Powell, S.; Preece, R. M.; Pushkin, K.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C. A.; Richards, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rose, H. J.; Rosero, R.; Rossiter, P.; Saba, J. S.; Sarychev, M.; Schnee, R. W.; Schubnell, M.; Scovell, P. R.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Skarpaas, K.; Skulski, W.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Stancu, I.; Stark, M. R.; Stephenson, S.; Stiegler, T. M.; Stifter, K.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Temples, D.; Terman, P. A.; Thomas, K. J.; Thomson, J. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; Timalsina, M.; To, W. H.; Tomás, A.; Tope, T. E.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Va'Vra, J.; Vacheret, A.; van der Grinten, M. G. D.; Verbus, J. R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Waldron, W. L.; Wang, R.; Watson, R.; Webb, R. C.; Wei, W.-Z.; While, M.; White, D. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Woodward, D.; Worm, S.; Xu, J.; Yeh, M.; Yin, J.; Zhang, C.; Lux-Zeplin (LZ) Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment will search for dark matter particle interactions with a detector containing a total of 10 tonnes of liquid xenon within a double-vessel cryostat. The large mass and proximity of the cryostat to the active detector volume demand the use of material with extremely low intrinsic radioactivity. We report on the radioassay campaign conducted to identify suitable metals, the determination of factors limiting radiopure production, and the selection of titanium for construction of the LZ cryostat and other detector components. This titanium has been measured with activities of 238Ue < 1.6 mBq/kg, 238Ul < 0.09 mBq/kg, 232The = 0.28 ± 0.03 mBq/kg, 232Thl = 0.25 ± 0.02 mBq/kg, 40K < 0.54 mBq/kg, and 60Co < 0.02 mBq/kg (68% CL). Such low intrinsic activities, which are some of the lowest ever reported for titanium, enable its use for future dark matter and other rare event searches. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to assess the expected background contribution from the LZ cryostat with this radioactivity. In 1,000 days of WIMP search exposure of a 5.6-tonne fiducial mass, the cryostat will contribute only a mean background of 0.160 ± 0.001(stat) ± 0.030(sys) counts.

  4. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  5. Detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods in steel and titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Tedrow, T. L.; Mullen, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    X-radiographic, liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and magnetic particle testing techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 4340 steel (180 KSI-UTS) and 6Al-4V titanium (STA) alloy specimens. Sixty steel specimens containing a total of 176 fatigue cracks and 60 titanium specimens containing a total of 135 fatigue cracks were evaluated. The cracks ranged in length from .043 cm (0.017 inch) to 1.02 cm (.400 inch) and in depth from .005 cm (.002 inch) to .239 cm (.094 inch) for steel specimens. Lengths ranged from .048 cm (0.019 inch) to 1.03 cm (.407 inch) and depths from 0.010 cm (.004 inch) to .261 cm (0.103 inch) for titanium specimens. Specimen thicknesses were nominally .152 cm (0.060 inch) and 0.635 cm (0.250 inch) and surface finishes were nominally 125 rms. Specimens were evaluated in the "as machined" surface condition, after etch surface and after proof loading in a randomized inspection sequence.

  6. A Classical Potential to Model the Adsorption of Biological Molecules on Oxidized Titanium Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julian; Ciacchi, Lucio Colombi

    2011-02-08

    The behavior of titanium implants in physiological environments is governed by the thin oxide layer that forms spontaneously on the metal surface and mediates the interactions with adsorbate molecules. In order to study the adsorption of biomolecules on titanium in a realistic fashion, we first build up a model of an oxidized Ti surface in contact with liquid water by means of extensive first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Taking the obtained structure as reference, we then develop a classical potential to model the Ti/TiOx/water interface. This is based on the mapping with Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials of the adsorption energy landscape of single water and ammonia molecules on the rutile TiO2(110) surface. The interactions with arbitrary organic molecules are obtained via standard combination rules to established biomolecular force fields. The transferability of our potential to the case of organic molecules adsorbing on the oxidized Ti surface is checked by comparing the classical potential energy surfaces of representative systems to quantum mechanical results at the level of density functional theory. Moreover, we calculate the heat of immersion of the TiO2 rutile surface and the detachment force of a single tyrosine residue from steered molecular dynamics simulations, finding good agreement with experimental reference data in both cases. As a first application, we study the adsorption behavior of the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide on the oxidized titanium surface, focusing particularly on the calculation of the free energy of desorption.

  7. Visualization and measurement of liquid velocity field of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow using neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yasushi; Suzuki, Tohru; Matsubayashi, Masahito

    2000-01-01

    In a core melt accident of a fast breeder reactor, a possibility of re-criticality is anticipated in the molten fuel-steel mixture pool. One of the mechanisms to suppress the re-criticality is the boiling of steel in the molten fuel-steel mixture pool because of the negative void reactivity effect. To evaluate the reactivity change due to boiling, it is necessary to know the characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in the molten fuel-steel mixture pool. For this purpose, boiling bubbles in a molten fuel-steel mixture pool were simulated by adiabatic gas bubbles in a liquid metal pool to study the basic characteristics of gas-liquid metal two-phase mixture. Visualization of the two-phase mixture and measurements of liquid phase velocity and void fraction were conducted by using neutron radiography and image processing techniques. From these measurements, the basic characteristics of gas-liquid metal two-phase mixture were clarified. (author)

  8. Film boiling heat transfer in liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inai, Nobuhiko

    1979-01-01

    The experimental data on the film boiling heat transfer in liquid helium are required for investigating the stability of superconducting wires. On the other hand, liquid helium has the extremely different physical properties as compared with the liquids at normal temperature such as water. In this study, the experiments on pool boiling were carried out, using the horizontal top surface of a 20 mm diameter copper cylinder in liquid helium. For observing individual bubbles, the experiments on film boiling from a horizontal platinum wire were performed separately in liquid nitrogen and liquid helium, and photographs of floating-away bubbles were taken. The author pointed out the considerable upward shift of the boiling curve near the least heat flux point in film boiling from the one given by the Berenson's equation which has been said to agree comparatively well with the data on the film boiling of the liquids at normal temperature, and the reason was investigated. Consequently, a model for film boiling heat transfer was presented. Also one equation expressing the film boiling at low heat flux for low temperature liquids was proposed. It represents well the tendency to shift from Berenson's equation of the experimental data on film boiling at the least heat flux point for liquid helium, liquid nitrogen and water having extremely different physical properties. Some discussions are added at the end of the paper. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, V.

    2000-01-01

    The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous

  10. Rapid prototyped porous nickel–titanium scaffolds as bone substitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Hoffmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available While calcium phosphate–based ceramics are currently the most widely used materials in bone repair, they generally lack tensile strength for initial load bearing. Bulk titanium is the gold standard of metallic implant materials, but does not match the mechanical properties of the surrounding bone, potentially leading to problems of fixation and bone resorption. As an alternative, nickel–titanium alloys possess a unique combination of mechanical properties including a relatively low elastic modulus, pseudoelasticity, and high damping capacity, matching the properties of bone better than any other metallic material. With the ultimate goal of fabricating porous implants for spinal, orthopedic and dental applications, nickel–titanium substrates were fabricated by means of selective laser melting. The response of human mesenchymal stromal cells to the nickel–titanium substrates was compared to mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on clinically used titanium. Selective laser melted titanium as well as surface-treated nickel–titanium and titanium served as controls. Mesenchymal stromal cells had similar proliferation rates when cultured on selective laser melted nickel–titanium, clinically used titanium, or controls. Osteogenic differentiation was similar for mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on the selected materials, as indicated by similar gene expression levels of bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin. Mesenchymal stromal cells seeded and cultured on porous three-dimensional selective laser melted nickel–titanium scaffolds homogeneously colonized the scaffold, and following osteogenic induction, filled the scaffold’s pore volume with extracellular matrix. The combination of bone-related mechanical properties of selective laser melted nickel–titanium with its cytocompatibility and support of osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells highlights its potential as a superior bone substitute as compared to clinically used

  11. Local pool boiling heat transfer on a 3 Degree inclined tube surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myeong Gie

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms of pool boiling heat transfer have been studied for a long time. Recently, it has been widely investigated in nuclear power plants for the purpose of acquiring inherent safety functions in case of no power supply. To design more efficient heat exchangers, effects of several parameters on heat transfer must be studied in detail. One of the major issues is variation in local heat transfer coefficients on a tube. Lance and Myers reported that the type of boiling liquid can change the trend of local heat transfer coefficients along the tube periphery. Lance and Myers said that as the liquid is methanol the maximum local heat transfer coefficient was observed at the tube bottom while the maximum was at the tube sides as the boiling liquid was n hexane. Corn well and Einarsson reported that the maximum local heat transfer coefficient was observed at the tube bottom, as the boiling liquid was R113. Corn well and Houston explained the reason of the difference in local heat transfer coefficients along the tube circumference with introducing effects of sliding bubbles on heat transfer. According to Gu pta et al., the maximum and the minimum local heat transfer coefficients were observed at the bottom and top regions of the tube circumference, respectively, using a tube bundle and water. Kang also reported the similar results using a single horizontal tube and water. However, the maximum heat transfer coefficient was observed at the angle of 45 deg. Sateesh et al. investigated variations in local heat transfer coefficients along a tube periphery as the inclination angle was changed. Summarizing the published results, some parts are still remaining to be investigated in detail. Although pool boiling analysis on a nearly horizontal tube is necessary for the design of the advanced power reactor plus, no previous results are published yet. Therefore, the present study is aimed to study variations in local pool boiling heat transfer coefficients for a 3 degree inclined

  12. Towards and FVE-FAC Method for Determining Thermocapillary Effects on Weld Pool Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canright, David; Henson, Van Emden

    1996-01-01

    Several practical materials processes, e.g., welding, float-zone purification, and Czochralski crystal growth, involve a pool of molten metal with a free surface, with strong temperature gradients along the surface. In some cases, the resulting thermocapillary flow is vigorous enough to convect heat toward the edges of the pool, increasing the driving force in a sort of positive feedback. In this work we examine this mechanism and its effect on the solid-liquid interface through a model problem: a half space of pure substance with concentrated axisymmetric surface heating, where surface tension is strong enough to keep the liquid free surface flat. The numerical method proposed for this problem utilizes a finite volume element (FVE) discretization in cylindrical coordinates. Because of the axisymmetric nature of the model problem, the control volumes used are torroidal prisms, formed by taking a polygonal cross-section in the (r, z) plane and sweeping it completely around the z-axis. Conservation of energy (in the solid), and conservation of energy, momentum, and mass (in the liquid) are enforced globally by integrating these quantities and enforcing conservation over each control volume. Judicious application of the Divergence Theorem and Stokes' Theorem, combined with a Crank-Nicolson time-stepping scheme leads to an implicit algebraic system to be solved at each time step. It is known that near the boundary of the pool, that is, near the solid-liquid interface, the full conduction-convection solution will require extremely fine length scales to resolve the physical behavior of the system. Furthermore, this boundary moves as a function of time. Accordingly, we develop the foundation of an adaptive refinement scheme based on the principles of Fast Adaptive Composite Grid methods (FAC). Implementation of the method and numerical results will appear in a later report.

  13. Infections Unlikely to be Spread Through Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Water Home Infections Unlikely to be Spread Through Swimming Pools Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... included below. Infections Unlikely to be Spread by Swimming Pools Head Lice Head lice are unlikely to ...

  14. Thermal analyses of solar swimming pool heating in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    2011-01-01

    Hotels and swimming clubs in Pakistan pay huge gas bills for heating Swimming pools in winter. Winter days in most parts of Pakistan remain sunny and unglazed low cost solar collectors may be used to extend the swimming season. Installing the pool in a wind-protected area, which receives unobstructed solar radiation, may further reduce the size of the solar collectors required to heat the swimming pools. The pools should be covered with plastic sheet to eliminate evaporative heat losses and to prevent dust and tree leaves falling in the pool. The results of the thermal analysis show that in some parts of the country, a solar exposed pool can maintain comfortable temperature simply by using a plastic sheet on the pool surface. On the other hand, there are cities where solar collector array equal to twice the surface area of the pool is required to keep desired temperature in winter. (author)

  15. One-Dimensional Analysis of Thermal Stratification in AHTR and SFR Coolant Pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

    2007-01-01

    Thermal stratification phenomena are very common in pool type reactor systems, such as the liquid-salt cooled Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) and liquid-metal cooled fast reactor systems such as the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). It is important to accurately predict the temperature and density distributions both for design optimation and accident analysis. Current major reactor system analysis codes such as RELAP5 (for LWR's, and recently extended to analyze high temperature reactors), TRAC (for LWR's), and SASSYS (for liquid metal fast reactors) only provide lumped-volume based models which can only give very approximate results and can only handle simple cases with one mixing source. While 2-D or 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze simple configurations, these methods require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, yet such fine grid resolution is difficult or impossible to provide for studying the reactor response to transients due to computational expense. Therefore, new methods are needed to support design optimization and safety analysis of Generation IV pool type reactor systems. Previous scaling has shown that stratified mixing processes in large stably stratified enclosures can be described using one-dimensional differential equations, with the vertical transport by free and wall jets modeled using standard integral techniques. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to three-dimensional numerical modeling of turbulent mixing in large enclosures. The BMIX++ (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) code was originally developed at UC Berkeley to implement such ideas. This code solves mixing and heat transfer problems in stably stratified enclosures. The code uses a Lagrangian approach to solve 1-D transient governing equations for the ambient fluid and uses analytical or 1-D integral models to compute substructures. By including liquid salt properties, BMIX++ code is

  16. Fragmentation of a single molten copper and silver droplets penetrating a sodium pool with solid crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wataru Itagaki; Ken-ichiro Sugiyama; Satoshi Nishimura; Izumi Kinoshita

    2005-01-01

    As a basic study of molten fuel-coolant interaction in liquid metal fast cooled reactors, we carried out a series of experiments for the fragmentation of molten copper droplet penetrating sodium pool at instantaneous contact interface temperatures below its freezing point. A single molten copper droplet with 5g in weight and with superheating varied from 0 degree C to 131 degree C was dropped into a sodium pool in a wide range of ambient Weber numbers 24 to 228. In addition to the experiment of molten copper droplet, molten silver droplet with 5gs in weight and with superheating varied from 3 degree C to 174 degree C was dropped into the sodium pool at an ambient Weber number of about 80. From the observation of the cross section of solidified silver droplet without fragmentation, it was clearly confirmed that sodium micro jet is driven into the inside from the upper surface of molten droplet keeping liquid phase, which is clear evidence for the thermal fragmentation mechanism proposed in the previous paper. Large scattering in the values of dimensionless mass median diameter observed in the present experimental study is recognized to be dependent on whether latent heat instantaneously released due to the injection of sodium micro jet can be effectively utilized for fragmentation. (authors)

  17. (Important hygienic aspects for swimming pools (author's transl))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somosi, G

    1981-01-01

    The major epidemics which occurred in Hungary and originated from water in swimming pools are reported. The difficulties encountered in producing epidemiological evidence and in monitoring infections originating from water in swimming pools are mentioned. The possibilities of controlling the water quality in swimming pools and of preventing infections are discussed. Reference is made to the existing bacteriological limit values in Hungary to be observed in the recirculation of water in swimming pools.

  18. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-04-28

    A ceramic composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness. No Drawings

  19. Relationship between surface properties (roughness, wettability) of titanium and titanium alloys and cell behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponsonnet, L.; Reybier, K.; Jaffrezic, N.; Comte, V.; Lagneau, C.; Lissac, M.; Martelet, C.

    2003-01-01

    Cell attachment and spreading to titanium-based alloy surfaces is a major parameter in implant technology. In this paper, substratum surface hydrophobicity, surface free energy, interfacial free energy and surface roughness were investigated to ascertain which of these parameters is predominant in human fibroblast spreading. Two methods for contact angle measurement were compared: the sessile drop method and the captive bubble two-probe method. The relationship between surface roughness and the sessile drop contact angles of various engineered titanium surfaces such as commercial pure titanium (cp-Ti), titanium-aluminium-vanadium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), and titanium-nickel (NiTi), was shown. Surface free energy (SFE) calculations were performed from contact angles obtained on smooth samples based on the same alloys in order to eliminate the roughness effect. SFE of the surfaces have been calculated using the Owens-Wendt (OW) and Van Oss (VO) approaches with the sessile drop method. The OW calculations are used to obtain the dispersive (γ d ) and polar (γ p ) component of SFE, and the VO approach allows to reach the apolar (γ LW ) and the polar acid-base component (γ ab ) of the surface. From captive bubble contact angle experiments (air or octane bubble under water), the interfacial free energy of the different surfaces in water was obtained. A relationship between cell spreading and the polar component of SFE was found. Interfacial free energy values were low for all the investigated surfaces indicating good biocompatibility for such alloys

  20. Titanium oxide nanocoating on a titanium thin film deposited on a glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cummings, F.R. [University of the Western Cape, Electron Microscopy Unit, Physics Department, Bellville 7535, Cape Town (South Africa); Turco, S. Lo; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M. [Center for Nano Science and Technology, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Milano, Italy Via Giovanni Pascoli, 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ramponi, R. [Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN)-CNR, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2016-03-31

    Thin films of titanium were deposited on a glass substrate using electron beam evaporator. Femtosecond laser pulses were focused on the surface of the films, and the samples were scanned while mounted on the motorized computer-controlled motion stage to produce an areal modification of the films. X-ray diffraction of the laser-patterned samples showed evidence of the formation of a γ-Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5} with a monoclinic phase. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry simulation showed that there is an increase in the oxygen concentration as the average laser fluence is increased. Time of flight secondary ions mass spectrometry analysis showed an even distribution of the titanium and oxygen ions on the sample and also ionized molecules of the oxides of titanium were observed. The formation of the oxide of titanium was further supported using the UV–Vis-NIR spectroscopy, which showed that for 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} fluence, the laser-exposed film showed the electron transfer band and the d–d transition peak of titanium was observed at lower wavelengths. - Highlights: • γ-Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5} formed using femtosecond laser. • Fluence and oxygen relation were studied. • Nanoflakes of γ-Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5} were observed under HRSEM.