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Sample records for titanium hydride formation

  1. In situ hydride formation in titanium during focused ion milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Rengen; Jones, Ian P

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that titanium and its alloys are sensitive to electrolytes and thus hydrides are commonly observed in electropolished foils. In this study, focused ion beam (FIB) milling was used to prepare thin foils of titanium and its alloys for transmission electron microscopy. The results show the following: (i) titanium hydrides were observed in pure titanium, (ii) the preparation of a bulk sample in water or acid solution resulted in the formation of more hydrides and (iii) FIB milling aids the precipitation of hydrides, but there were never any hydrides in Ti64 and Ti5553.

  2. Mechanical properties and fracture of titanium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koketsu, Hideyuki; Taniyama, Yoshihiro; Yonezu, Akio; Cho, Hideo; Ogawa, Takeshi; Takemoto, Mikio; Nakayama, Gen

    2006-01-01

    Titanium hydrides tend to suffer fracture when their thicknesses reach a critical thickness. Morphology and mechanical property of the hydrides are, however, not well known. The study aims to reveal the hydride morphology and fracture types of the hydrides. Chevron shaped plate hydrides were found to be produced on the surface of pure titanium (Grade 1) and Grade 7 titanium absorbing hydrogen. There were tree types of fracture of the hydrides, i.e., crack in hydride layer, exfoliation of the layer and shear-type fracture of the hydride plates, during the growth of the hydrides and deformation. We next estimated the true stress-strain curves of the hydrides on Grade 1 and 7 titanium using the dual Vickers indentation method, and the critical strain causing the Mode-I fine crack by indentation. Fracture strength and strain of the hydrides in Grade 1 titanium were estimated as 566 MPa and 4.5%, respectively. Those of the hydride in Grade 7 titanium were 498 MPa and 16%. Though the fracture strains estimated from the plastic instability of true stress-strain curves were approximately the half of those estimated by finite element method, the titanium hydrides were estimated to possess some extent of toughness or plastic deformation capability. (author)

  3. Alkali metal hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of producing alkali metal hydrides by absorbing hydrogen gas under pressure into a mixture of lower alkyl mono amines and alkali metal alkyl amides selected from sodium and potassium amides formed from said amines. The present invention also includes purification of a mixture of the amines and amides which contain impurities, such as is used as a catalytic exchange liquid in the enrichment of deuterium, involving the formation of the alkali metal hydride

  4. Manufacture of titanium and zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mares, F.; Hanslik, T.

    1973-01-01

    A method is described of manufacturing titanium and zirconium hydrides by hydrogenation of said metals characterized by the reaction temperature ranging between 250 to 500 degC, hydrogen pressure of 20 to 300 atm and possibly by the presence of a hydride of the respective metal. (V.V.)

  5. Creating nanoshell on the surface of titanium hydride bead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO Vyacheslav Ivanovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on the modification of titanium hydride bead by creating titanium nanoshell on its surface by ion-plasma vacuum magnetron sputtering. To apply titanium nanoshell on the titanium hydride bead vacuum coating plant of multifunctional nanocomposite coatings QVADRA 500 located in the center of high technology was used. Analysis of the micrographs of the original surface of titanium hydride bead showed that the microstructure of the surface is flat, smooth, in addition the analysis of the microstructure of material surface showed the presence of small porosity, roughness, mainly cavities, as well as shallow longitudinal cracks. The presence of oxide film in titanium hydride prevents the free release of hydrogen and fills some micro-cracks on the surface. Differential thermal analysis of both samples was conducted to determine the thermal stability of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell. Hydrogen thermal desorption spectra of the samples of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell show different thermal stability of compared materials in the temperature range from 550 to 860о C. Titanium nanoshells applied in this way allows increasing the heat resistance of titanium hydride bead – the temperature of starting decomposition is 695о C and temperature when decomposition finishes is more than 1000о C. Modified in this way titanium hydride bead can be used as a filler in the radiation protective materials used in the construction or upgrading biological protection of nuclear power plants.

  6. SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURE OF BIS(PHENYLTETRAMETHYLCYCLOPENTADIENYL)TITANIUM(III) HYDRIDE - THE FIRST MONOMERIC BIS(CYCLOPENTADIENYL)TITANIUM(III) HYDRIDE : The First Monomeric Bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium(III) Hydride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wolf, J.M.; Meetsma, A.; Teuben, J.H

    1995-01-01

    The first structurally characterized monomeric bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium(III) hydride, (C(5)PhMe(4))(2)TiH (4), was synthesized by hydrogenolysis of (C(5)PhMe(4))(2)TiMe (5). Hydride 4 was found to be a monomeric bent sandwich by X-ray diffraction methods, and the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl

  7. New ternary hydride formation in U-Ti-H system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Kayano, Hideo; Yamawaki, Michio.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen absorption properties of two titanium-rich uranium alloys, UTi 2 and UTi 4 , were studied in order to prepare and identify the recently found ternary hydride. They slowly reacted with hydrogen of the initial pressure of 10 5 Pa at 873K to form the ternary hydride. The hydrogenated specimen mainly consisted of the pursued ternary hydride but contained also U(or UO 2 ), TiH x , and some transient phases. X-ray powder diffraction and Electron Probe Micro Analysis proved that it was the UTi 2 H x with the expected MgCu 2 structure, though all the X-ray peaks were broad probably because of inhomogeneity. This compound had extremely high resistance to powdering on its formation, which showed high potential utilities for a non-powdering tritium storage system or for other purposes. (author)

  8. Rapid PMR determination of hydrogen in titanium hydride and dehydrogenated titanium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'enko, V.S.; Demidenko, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance (PMR) enables determining hydrogen quantitatively in titanium hydride and dehydrogenated titanium powders without destroying the specimen and is also more informative than high-temperature extraction methods. PMR provides data on the electron-nuclear interactions and the activation energies for hydrogen diffusion while also providing conclusions on the forms and positives of the hydrogen in the lattice and the binding to the metal atoms. The authors have developed a rapid method for determining hydrogen in titanium hydride and dehydrogenated titanium powders which reduces the analysis time and improves the metrological characteristics. The authors use a YaMR-5535 spectrometer working at 40 MHz upgraded for use with hydrogen in solids. The authors used specimens of mass about 2 g ground to 0.1 mm powder

  9. First principles characterisation of brittle transgranular fracture of titanium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Pär A.T.; Mrovec, Matous; Kroon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this work we have studied transgranular cleavage and the fracture toughness of titanium hydrides by means of quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory. The calculations show that the surface energy decreases and the unstable stacking fault energy increases with increasing hydrogen content. This is consistent with experimental findings of brittle behaviour of titanium hydrides at low temperatures. Based on Griffith-Irwin theory we estimate the fracture toughness of the hydrides to be of the order of 1 MPa⋅m"1"/"2, which concurs well with experimental data. To investigate the cleavage energetics, we analyse the decohesion at various crystallographic planes and determine the traction-separation laws based on the Rose's extended universal binding energy relation. The calculations predict that the peak stresses do not depend on the hydrogen content of the phases, but it is rather dependent on the crystallographic cleavage direction. However, it is found that the work of fracture decreases with increasing hydrogen content, which is an indication of hydrogen induced bond weakening in the material.

  10. On the use of titanium hydride for powder injection moulding of titanium-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrenoo-Morelli, E.; Bidaux, J.-E.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Titanium and titanium-based alloys are excellent materials for a number of engineering applications because of their high strength, lightweight, good corrosion resistance, non magnetic characteristic and biocompatibility. The current processing steps are usually costly, and there is a growing demand for net-shape solutions for manufacturing parts of increasing complexity. Powder injection moulding is becoming a competitive alternative, thanks to the advances in production of good quality base-powders, binders and sintering facilities. Titanium hydride powders, have the attractiveness of being less reactive than fine titanium powders, easier to handle, and cheaper. This paper summarizes recent advances on PIM of titanium and titanium alloys from TiH2 powders, including shape-memory NiTi alloys. (author)

  11. Titanium tritide radioisotope heat source development: palladium-coated titanium hydriding kinetics and tritium loading tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Shugard, Andrew D.; Walters, R. Tom

    2012-01-01

    We have found that a 180 nm palladium coating enables titanium to be loaded with hydrogen isotopes without the typical 400-500 C vacuum activation step. The hydriding kinetics of Pd coated Ti can be described by the Mintz-Bloch adherent film model, where the rate of hydrogen absorption is controlled by diffusion through an adherent metal-hydride layer. Hydriding rate constants of Pd coated and vacuum activated Ti were found to be very similar. In addition, deuterium/tritium loading experiments were done on stacks of Pd coated Ti foil in a representative-size radioisotope heat source vessel. The experiments demonstrated that such a vessel could be loaded completely, at temperatures below 300 C, in less than 10 hours, using existing department-of-energy tritium handling infrastructure.

  12. Hydride formation on deformation twin in zirconium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju-Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Dae [Korea Institute of Material Science (KIMS), 797 Changwondaero, Changwon, Gyeongnam, 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jonghun, E-mail: yooncsmd@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, 1271 Sa3-dong, Sangrok-gu, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do, 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Hydrides deteriorate the mechanical properties of zirconium (Zr) alloys used in nuclear reactors. Intergranular hydrides that form along grain boundaries have been extensively studied due to their detrimental effects on cracking. However, it has been little concerns on formation of Zr hydrides correlated with deformation twins which is distinctive heterogeneous nucleation site in hexagonal close-packed metals. In this paper, the heterogeneous precipitation of Zr hydrides at the twin boundaries was visualized using transmission electron microscopy. It demonstrates that intragranular hydrides in the twinned region precipitates on the rotated habit plane by the twinning and intergranular hydrides precipitate along the coherent low energy twin boundaries independent of the conventional habit planes. Interestingly, dislocations around the twin boundaries play a substantial role in the nucleation of Zr hydrides by reducing the misfit strain energy.

  13. Consolidation of titanium hydride powders during the production of titanium PM parts: The effect of die wall lubricants

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Machio, Christopher N

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of die wall lubricants on the cold compaction of titanium hydride powder are studied. Three commonly-used die wall powder metallurgy lubricants – zinc stearate, Acrawax® C dispersion and Mirror Glaze® – are compared. The influence...

  14. Predicting formation enthalpies of metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, A.

    2004-12-01

    In order for the hydrogen based society viz. a society in which hydrogen is the primary energy carrier to become realizable an efficient way of storing hydrogen is required. For this purpose metal hydrides are serious candidates. Metal hydrides are formed by chemical reaction between hydrogen and metal and for the stable hydrides this is associated with release of heat ({delta}H{sub f} ). The more thermodynamically stable the hydride, the larger {delta}H{sub f}, and the higher temperature is needed in order to desorp hydrogen (reverse reaction) and vice versa. For practical application the temperature needed for desorption should not be too high i.e. {delta}H{sub f} should not be too large. If hydrogen desorption is to be possible below 100 deg C (which is the ultimate goal if hydrogen storage in metal hydrides should be used in conjunction with a PEM fuel cell), {delta}H{sub f} should not exceed -48 kJ/mol. Until recently only intermetallic metal hydrides with a storage capacity less than 2 wt.% H{sub 2} have met this criterion. However, discovering reversible hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides such as NaAlH{sub 4} (5.5 wt. % reversible hydrogen capacity) have revealed a new group of potential candiates. However, still many combination of elements from the periodic table are yet to be explored. Since experimental determination of thermodynamic properties of the vast combinations of elements is tedious it may be advantagous to have a predictive tool for this task. In this report different ways of predicting {delta}H{sub f} for binary and ternary metal hydrides are reviewed. Main focus will be on how well these methods perform numerically i.e. how well experimental results are resembled by the model. The theoretical background of the different methods is only briefly reviewed. (au)

  15. Linear Dimerization of Terminal Alkynes by Bis( tetramethylphenylcyclopentadienyl) Titanium-Magnesium Hydride and Acetylide Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mach, Karel; Gyepes, R.; Horáček, Michal; Petrusová, Lidmila; Kubišta, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 10 (2003), s. 1877-1896 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/0774; GA ČR GA203/02/0436 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : titanium * alkynes * hydrides Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.041, year: 2003

  16. A new ternary magnesium-titanium hydride Mg{sub 7}TiH{sub x} with hydrogen desorption properties better than both binary magnesium and titanium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyoi, Daisuke; Sato, Toyoto; Roennebro, Ewa; Kitamura, Naoyuki; Ueda, Atsushi; Ito, Mikio; Katsuyama, Shigeru; Hara, Shigeta; Noreus, Dag; Sakai, Tetsuo

    2004-06-09

    A magnesium based titanium doped hydride was prepared in a high-pressure anvil cell by reacting a mixture of MgH{sub 2} and TiH{sub 1.9} at 8 GPa and 873 K. The metal structure has a Ca{sub 7}Ge type structure (a=9.532(2) A, space group Fm3-barm (no. 225), Z=4, V=866.06 A{sup 3}). The refined metal atom composition Mg{sub 7}Ti was almost in line with EDS analysis. This means that the new magnesium-titanium hydride has a structure that is more related to TiH{sub 1.9} than to MgH{sub 2}. The thermal properties of the new compound were also studied by TPD analysis. The new hydride, Mg{sub 7}TiH{sub x} exhibits 5.5 mass% (x{approx}12.7) and decomposes into Mg and TiH{sub 1.9} upon releasing 4.7 mass% of hydrogen around 605 K, that is at a 130 and 220 K lower desorption temperature compared to MgH{sub 2} and TiH{sub 1.9}, respectively.

  17. The effect of thermal pre-treatment of titanium hydride (TiH2) powder in argon condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciska P., L.; Erryani, Aprilia; Annur, Dhyah; Kartika, Ika

    2018-04-01

    Titanium hydride (TiH2) powders are used to enhance the foaming process in the formation of a highly porous metallic material with a cellular structure. But, the low temperature of hydrogen release is one of its problems. The present study, different thermal pre-treatment temperatures were employed to investigate the decomposition behavior of TiH2 to retard or delay a hydrogen gas release process during foaming. As a foaming agent, TiH2 was subjected to various heat treatments prior at 450 and 500°C during 2 hours in argon condition. To study the formation mechanism, the thermal behavior of titanium hydride and hydrogen release are investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The morphology of pre-treated titanium hydride powders were examined using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) while unsure mapping and elemental composition of the pre-treated powders processed by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). To study the phase formation was characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). In accordance with the results, an increase in pre-treatment temperature of TiH2 to higher degrees are changing the process of releasing hydrogen from titanium hydride powder. DTA/TGA results showed that thermal pre-treatment TiH2 at 450°C, released the hydrogen gas at 560°C in heat treatment when foaming process. Meanwhile, thermal pre-treatment in TiH2 at 500°C, released the hydrogen gas at 670°C when foaming process. There is plenty of direct evidence for the existence of oxide layers that showed by EDS analysis obtained in SEM. As oxygen is a light element and qualitative proof shows that the higher pre-treatment temperature produces more and thicker oxygen layers on the surface of the TiH2 powder particles. It might the thickness of oxide layer are different from different pre-treatment temperatures, which leading to the differences in the decomposition temperature. But from SEM result that oxidation of the powder does not

  18. Titanium compacts produced by the pulvimetallurgical hydride-dehydride method for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, M M [Materiales Dentales, Facultad de OdontologIa, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Marcelo T de Alvear 2142 (1122), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Grana, D R; Kokubu, G A [PatologIa I. Escuela de OdontologIa, Facultad de Medicina. Asociacion Odontologica Argentina-Universidad del Salvador, Tucuman 1845 (1050) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Luppo, M I; Mintzer, S; Vigna, G, E-mail: mbarreiro@mater.odon.uba.a, E-mail: dgrana@usal.edu.a, E-mail: luppo@cnea.gov.a, E-mail: vigna@cnea.gov.a [Departamento Materiales, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San MartIn, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-04-15

    Titanium powder production by the hydride-dehydride method has been developed as a non-expensive process. In this work, commercially pure grade two Ti specimens were hydrogenated. The hydrided material was milled in a planetary mill. The hydrided titanium powder was dehydrided and then sieved to obtain a particle size between 37 and 125{mu}m in order to compare it with a commercial powder produced by chemical reduction with a particle size lower than 150{mu}m. Cylindrical green compacts were obtained by uniaxial pressing of the powders at 343 MPa and sintering in vacuum. The powders and the density of sintered compacts were characterized, the oxygen content was measured and in vivo tests were performed in the tibia bones of Wistar rats in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. No differences were observed between the materials which were produced either with powders obtained by the hydride-dehydride method or with commercial powders produced by chemical reduction regarding modifications in compactation, sintering and biological behaviour.

  19. Titanium compacts produced by the pulvimetallurgical hydride-dehydride method for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, M M; Grana, D R; Kokubu, G A; Luppo, M I; Mintzer, S; Vigna, G

    2010-01-01

    Titanium powder production by the hydride-dehydride method has been developed as a non-expensive process. In this work, commercially pure grade two Ti specimens were hydrogenated. The hydrided material was milled in a planetary mill. The hydrided titanium powder was dehydrided and then sieved to obtain a particle size between 37 and 125 μm in order to compare it with a commercial powder produced by chemical reduction with a particle size lower than 150 μm. Cylindrical green compacts were obtained by uniaxial pressing of the powders at 343 MPa and sintering in vacuum. The powders and the density of sintered compacts were characterized, the oxygen content was measured and in vivo tests were performed in the tibia bones of Wistar rats in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. No differences were observed between the materials which were produced either with powders obtained by the hydride-dehydride method or with commercial powders produced by chemical reduction regarding modifications in compactation, sintering and biological behaviour.

  20. Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin via microwave-assisted ball milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Rong; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Qianxia; Bian, Zhibing; Dai, Haixiong; Zhang, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • TiH 2 was modified with epoxy resin by microwave-assisted ball milling. • The epoxy ring was opened under the coupling effect of microwave and ball milling. • Microwave-assisted ball milling improved the compatibility of TiH 2 with epoxy. - Abstract: Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin was carried out via microwave-assisted ball milling and the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetry (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). A sedimentation test was performed to investigate the compatibility of the modified nano titanium hydride with the epoxy resin. The results show that the epoxy resin molecules were grafted on the surface of nano titanium hydride particles during the microwave-assisted ball milling process, which led to the improvement of compatibility between the nanoparticles and epoxy resin. According to the FT-IR, the grafting site was likely to be located around the epoxy group due to the fact that the epoxy ring was opened. However, compared with microwave-assisted ball milling, the conventional ball milling could not realize the surface modification, indicating that the coupling effect of mechanical force and microwave played a key role during the process

  1. Tin and tin-titanium as catalyst components for reversible hydrogen storage of sodium aluminium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi Jia Fu; Shik Chi Tsang [University of Reading, Reading (United Kingdom). Surface and Catalysis Research Centre, School of Chemistry

    2006-10-15

    This paper is concerned with the effects of adding tin and/or titanium dopant to sodium aluminium hydride for both dehydrogenation and re-hydrogenation reactions during their reversible storage of molecular hydrogen. Temperature programmed decomposition (TPD) measurements show that the dehydrogenation kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4} are significantly enhanced upon doping the material with 2 mol% of tributyltin hydride, Sn(Bu)3H but the tin catalyst dopant is shown to be inferior than titanium. On the other hand, in this preliminary work, a significant synergetic catalytic effect is clearly revealed in material co-doped with both titanium and tin catalysts which shows the highest reversible rates of dehydrogenation and re-hydrogenation (after their hydrogen depletion). The re-hydrogenation rates of depleted Sn/Ti/NaAlH{sub 4} evaluated at both 9.5 and 140 bars hydrogen are also found to be favourable compared to the Ti/NaAlH{sub 4}, which clearly suggest the importance of the catalyst choice. Basing on these results some mechanistic insights for the catalytic reversible dehydrogenation and re-hydrogenation processes of Sn/Ti/NaAlH{sub 4} are therefore made. 31 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Fabrication and oxidation resistance of titanium carbide-coated carbon fibres by reacting titanium hydride with carbon fibres in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Z.J.; Li, X.K.; Yuan, G.M.; Cong, Y.; Li, N.; Jiang, Z.Y.; Hu, Z.J.

    2009-01-01

    Using carbon fibres and titanium hydride as a reactive carbon source and a metal source, respectively, a protective titanium carbide (TiC) coating was formed on carbon fibres in molten salts, composed of LiCl-KCl-KF, at 750-950 o C. The structure and morphology of the TiC coatings were characterised by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The oxidation resistance of the TiC-coated carbon fibres was measured by thermogravimetric analysis. The results reveal that control of the coating thickness is very important for improvement of the oxidation resistance of TiC-coated carbon fibres. The oxidative weight loss initiation temperature for the TiC-coated carbon fibres increases significantly when an appropriate coating thickness is used. However, thicker coatings lead to a decrease of the carbon fibres' weight loss initiation temperature due to the formation of cracks in the coating. The TiC coating thickness on carbon fibres can be controlled by adjusting the reaction temperature and time of the molten salt synthesis.

  3. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies on Titanium-doped Sodium Aluminum Hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culnane, Lance F.

    Hydrogen fuel cells play an important role in today's diverse and blossoming alternative energy industry. One of the greatest technological barriers for vehicular applications is the storage of hydrogen (which is required to power hydrogen fuel cells). Storing hydrogen as a gas is not volume efficient, and storing it as a liquid is not cost effective, therefore solid-state storage of hydrogen, such as in metal hydrides offers the most potential for success since many metal hydrides have attractive qualities for hydrogen storage such as: high volumetric capacity, cost efficiency, weight efficiency, low refueling times, and most importantly, high safety. Unfortunately, a compound has not been discovered which contains all of the attractive hydrogen storage qualities for vehicular applications. Sodium aluminum hydride (NaAlH 4) is one of the few compounds which is close to meeting requirements for car manufacturers, and has perhaps been researched the most extensively out of all metal hydrides in the last 15 years. This arises from the remarkable discovery by Bogdanovic who found that doping NaAlH4 with Ti dopants enabled the reversible dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of NaAlH 4 at mild conditions. Various evidence and theories have been proposed to suggest explanations for the enhanced kinetic effect that Ti-doping and ball-milling provide. However, the research community has not reached a consensus as to the exact role of Ti-dopants. If the role of titanium in the NaAlH4 dehydrogenation/hydrogenation mechanism could be understood, then more attractive metal hydrides could be designed. To this end, we conducted Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies to explain the role of the Ti dopants. The first known thorough particle size analysis of the NaAlH4 system was conducted, as well as TEM-EELS (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy), TEM-EDS (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy), and in-situ imaging studies. Preparation methods were found to be important for the

  4. Synthesis of Zn-MOF incorporating titanium-hydrides as active sites binding H{sub 2} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongsik, E-mail: jkim40@nd.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 182, Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Ok Kim, Dong; Wook Kim, Dong; Sagong, Kil [Hanwha Chemical Research & Development Center, 6, Shinseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-804 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes the synthetic effort for a Zn-MOF imparting Ti-H as a preferential binding site potentially capturing H{sub 2} molecules via Kubas-type interaction. The formation mechanism of Ti-H innate to the final material was potentially demonstrated to follow a radical dissociation rather than a β-hydrogen elimination and a C-H reductive elimination. - Graphical abstract: This study details the synthesis and the formation mechanism of Zn-MOF adsorbent site-isolating TiH{sub 3} that can potentially capture H{sub 2} molecules via Kubas-binding mechanism. - Highlights: • OH-functionalized Zn-MOF was employed as a reactive template to site-isolate TiH{sub 3}. • This MOF was post-synthetically modified using a tetracyclohexyl titanium (IV). • This intermediate was hydrogenolyzed to change ligand from cyclohexyl to hydride. • Formation mechanism of TiH{sub 3} was investigated via two control GC–MS experiments. • Final Zn-MOF potentially site-isolating TiH{sub 3} species was used as a H{sub 2} adsorbent.

  5. Peculiarities of formation of zirconium aluminides in hydride cycle mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muradyan, G.N.

    2016-01-01

    The zirconium aluminides are promising structural materials in aerospace, mechanical engineering, chemical industry, etc. They are promising for manufacturing of heat-resistant wires, that will improve the reliability and efficiency of electrical networks. In the present work, the results of study of zirconium aluminides formation in the Hydride Cycle (HC) mode, developed in the Laboratory of high-temperature synthesis of the Institute of Chemical Physics of NAS RA, are described. The formation of zirconium aluminides in HC proceeded according to the reaction xZrH_2+(1-x)Al → alloy Zr_xAl(1-x)+H_2↑. The samples were certified using: chemical analysis to determine the content of hydrogen (pyrolysis method); differential thermal analysis (DTA, derivatograph Q-1500, T_heating = 1000°C, rate 20°C/min); X-ray analysis (XRD, diffractometer DRON-0.5). The influences of the ratio of powders ZrH_2/Al in the reaction mixture, compacting pressure, temperature and heating velocity on the characteristics of the synthesized aluminides were determined. In HC, the solid solutions of Al in Zr, single phase ZrAl_2 and ZrAl_3 aluminides and Zr_3AlH_4.49 hydride were synthesized. Formation of aluminides in HC mode took place by the solid-phase mechanism, without melting of aluminum. During processing, the heating of the initial charge up to 540°C resulted in the decomposition of zirconium hydride (ZrH_2) to HCC ZrH_1.5, that interacted with aluminum at 630°C forming FCC alumohydride of zirconium. Further increase of the temperature up to 800°C led to complete decomposition of the formed alumohydride of zirconium. The final formation of the zirconium aluminide occurred at 1000-1100°C in the end of HC process. Conclusion: in the synthesis of zirconium aluminides, the HC mode has several significant advantages over the conventional modes: lower operating temperatures (1000°C instead of 1800°C); shorter duration (1.5-2 hours instead of tens of hours); the availability of

  6. In-situ X-ray diffraction : a useful tool to investigate hydride-formation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, P.H.L.; Daams, J.L.C.; Veirman, de A.E.M.; Staals, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-pressure X-ray diffraction (XRD) cell has been designed which allowed us to study simultaneously hydrogen absorption/desorption isotherms and XRD powder diffraction patterns on (de)hydrided intermetallic compounds. The hydride formation reaction was investigated in the case of LaNi5 under

  7. Understanding hydride formation in Zr-1Nb alloy through microstructural characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neogy, S.; Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Singh, R.N.; Dey, G.K.; De, P.K.; Banerjee, S.

    2003-07-01

    In this study the experimental results of hydride formation and their microstructure evolution in Zr-1Nb alloy is presented. This Zr-1Nb binary alloy and other Zr-1 Nb based ternary and quaternary alloys are being used as fuel tube materials and have the potential for meeting the requirement of high burn up fuel. Hydriding of Zr-1Nb alloy having a microstructure comprising equiaxed α grains and a uniform distribution of spherical particles of the β phase has been carried out in this study. The specimens have been hydrided by gaseous charging method to different hydrogen levels. The microstructures of hydrided samples were examined as a function of hydrogen content. The formation of δ hydride in slow cooled specimens and formation of γ hydride in rapidly cooled specimens has been studied with their morphology, habit plane and orientation relationship with the α matrix in view. The habit planes of either type of hydride phase has been determined and compared with those observed in other Zr-Nb alloys. The orientation relationship between the α matrix and the δ hydride was found to be the following: (0001) α // (111) δ and [1120] α // [110] δ . The orientation relationship between the α matrix and the γ hydride was of the following type: (0001) α // (111) γ and [1120] α // [110] γ . The internal structure of both types of hydride has been examined. The effect of the presence of the spherical β phase particles in the a matrix on the growth of the hydride plates has been investigated. (author)

  8. Enthalpy of formation of titanium diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhachinskij, V.V.; Chirin, N.A.

    1975-01-01

    The values given in the literature for the enthalpy of the formation of titanium diboride, as obtained experimentally and by theoretical estimation, range between -32 and -74.4 kcal/mol. In this paper the authors use the method of direct synthesis from elements in a Calvet calorimeter to determine the enthalpy of formation, ΔHsub(f) 0 , sub(298), of titanium diboride with the composition Tisub(1.000+-0.002)Bsub(2.056+-0.006)Csub(0.009)Nsub(0.003), which was found to be -76.78+-0.83 kcal/mol. They calculate that ΔHsub(f,298) (TiBsub(2.056)=-76.14+-0.85 kcal/mol. The procedure employed makes it possible to carry out the titanium diboride synthesis reaction with the calorimeter at room temperature

  9. Roles of texture in controlling oxidation, hydrogen ingress and hydride formation in Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, Jerzy A.; Qin, Wen; Li, Hualong; Kumar, Kiran

    2011-01-01

    Experimental observations shows that the oxide formed on Zr alloys are strongly textured. The texture and grain-boundary characteristics of oxide are dependent on the texture of metal substrate. Computer simulation and thermodynamic modeling clarify the effect of metal substrate on structure of oxide film, and intrinsic factors affecting the microstructure. Models of diffusion process of hydrogen atoms and oxygen diffusion through oxide are presented. Both intra-granular and inter-granular hydrides were found following (0001) α-Zr //(111) δ-ZrH1.5 relationship. The through-thickness texture inhomogeneity in cladding tubes, the effects of hoop stress on the hydride orientation and the formation of interlinked hydride structure were studied. A thermodynamic model was developed to analyze the nucleation and the stress-induced reorientation of intergranular hydrides. These works provide a framework for understanding the oxidation, the hydrogen ingress and the hydride formation in Zr alloys. (author)

  10. Hydride blister formation simulation in Candu type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, D.; Bollini, C.; Sangregorio, D.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a computer code for the probability study of hydride blister formation in pressure tubes named BLIFO. The basic hypothesis of the model are: the pressure tube is divided into five areas according to the existence of four garter springs. For each area the probability of blister formation is the probability of the hydrogen content exceeding a critical threshold when contact tube is present; the probability of a blister in a tube is the OR combination of the probabilities of a blister in each area; the tube contact is a function of the garter springs location, and the time; the critical hydrogen threshold is sorted over the areas within the pressure tube; hydrogen pick-up rate was sorted with a Gaussian distribution; the initial hydrogen content values for each tube were measured before the ensamble and they are used in the code. For Embalse evaluation, we build up a subroutine that simulate Gaussian distribution using the parameters of a typical nuclear power Candu reactor garter spring distribution. (author)

  11. Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T.C.; Hayes, S.L.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by the oxidation of uranium hydride are described. The models were developed to demonstrate that ignition of large uranium ingots could not occur as a result of possible hydride formation during storage. The thermodynamics-based analytical model predicted an overall 17 C temperature rise of the ingot due to hydride oxidation upon opening of the storage can in air. The numerical model predicted locally higher temperature increases at the surface; the transient temperature increase quickly dissipated. The numerical model was further used to determine conditions for which hydride oxidation does lead to ignition of uranium metal. Room temperature ignition only occurs for high hydride fractions in the nominally oxide reaction product and high specific surface areas of the uranium metal

  12. Hydrides formation In Zircaloy-4 irradiated with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, P; Flores, A V; Vicente Alvarez, M A; Banchik, A.D; Tolley, A; Condo, A; Santisteban, J R

    2012-01-01

    Under reactor operating conditions zirconium components go through transformations which affect their original properties. Two phenomena of significant consequences for the integrity of the components are hydrogen uptake and radiation damage, since both contribute to the material fragilization. In the case of the Atucha I nuclear power reactor, the cooling channels, Zircaloy-4 tubular structural components about 6 meters long, were designed to withstand the entire lifetime of the reactor. Inside them, fuel elements 5.3 meters long are located. The fuel elements are cooled by a heavy water flow which circulates from the bottom (250 o ) to the top of the reactor (305 o C). The channels are affected by a fast neutron flux (En>1 Mev), increasing from a nominal value of 1.35 x 10 13 neutrons/cm 2 sec at the bottom to 1.69 x 10 13 neutrons/cm 2 sec at the top, reaching a maximum value of 3.76 x 10 13 neutrons/cm 2 sec at the center of the channels. However, due to the reactor operating conditions, they are replaced after about 10 effective full power years, time at which they reach 10 22 neutrons/cm 2 at the most neutronically active regions of the reactor. Studies on cooling channels are meaningful from many points of view. The channels are structural components which do not work under internal pressure or any other type of structural stress. The typical temperature of the cladding tubes in the reactor is about 350 o C, at which many types of irradiation defects are annealed [1]. The temperature range of the cooling channels lies between 200 o C-235 o C (outer foil of the channels) and 260 o C-300 o C (internal tube), a difference which makes the defect recovery kinetics slower. In the present context, following the program developed in the research contract 15810, we continue with the work started on the effects of the radiation on the hydride formation focusing on the dislocation loops in the zirconium matrix and its possible role as preferential sites for hydride

  13. Unexpected formation of hydrides in heavy rare earth containing magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanding Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mg–RE (Dy, Gd, Y alloys show promising for being developed as biodegradable medical applications. It is found that the hydride REH2 could be formed on the surface of samples during their preparations with water cleaning. The amount of formed hydrides in Mg–RE alloys is affected by the content of RE and heat treatments. It increases with the increment of RE content. On the surface of the alloy with T4 treatment the amount of formed hydride REH2 is higher. In contrast, the amount of REH2 is lower on the surfaces of as-cast and T6-treated alloys. Their formation mechanism is attributed to the surface reaction of Mg–RE alloys with water. The part of RE in solid solution in Mg matrix plays an important role in influencing the formation of hydrides.

  14. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  15. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Denise C; Cooley, Lance D; Seidman, David N

    2013-01-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium–hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities. (paper)

  16. Attenuation of Neutron and Gamma Radiation by a Composite Material Based on Modified Titanium Hydride with a Varied Boron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastrebinskii, R. N.

    2018-04-01

    The investigations on estimating the attenuation of capture gamma radiation by a composite neutron-shielding material based on modified titanium hydride and Portland cement with a varied amount of boron carbide are performed. The results of calculations demonstrate that an introduction of boron into this material enables significantly decreasing the thermal neutron flux density and hence the levels of capture gamma radiation. In particular, after introducing 1- 5 wt.% boron carbide into the material, the thermal neutron flux density on a 10 cm-thick layer is reduced by 11 to 176 factors, and the capture gamma dose rate - from 4 to 9 times, respectively. The difference in the degree of reduction in these functionals is attributed to the presence of capture gamma radiation in the epithermal region of the neutron spectrum.

  17. Titanium disilicide formation by sputtering of titanium on heated silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanielian, M.; Blackstone, S.

    1984-09-01

    We have sputter deposited titanium on bare silicon substrates at elevated temperatures. We find that at a substrate temperature of about 515 °C titanium silicide is formed due to the reaction of the titanium with the Si. The resistivity of the silicide is about 15 μΩ cm and it is not etchable in a selective titanium etch. This process can have applications in low-temperature, metal-oxide-semiconductor self-aligned silicide formation for very large scale integrated

  18. Formation of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Coating on Titanium Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ievgen Volodymyrovych PYLYPCHUK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HA has long been used as a coating material in the implant industry for orthopedic implant applications. HA is the natural inorganic constituent of bone and teeth. By coating titanium (base material of implant engineering because of its lightness and durability with hydroxyapatite, we can provide higher biocompatibility of titanium implants, according to HA ability to form a direct biochemical bond with living tissues. This article reports a biomimetic approach for coating hydroxyapatite with titanium A method of modifying the surface of titanium by organic modifiers (for creating functional groups on the surface, followed by formation "self-assembled" layer of biomimetic hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF. FTIR and XPS confirmed the formation of hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium surface. Comparative study of the formation of HA on the surface of titanium plates modified by different functional groups: Ti(≡OH, Ti/(≡Si-OH and Ti/(≡COOH is conducted. It was found that the closest to natural stoichiometric hydroxyapatite Ca/P ratio was obtained on Ti/(≡COOH samples. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4974

  19. Bond Formation in Diatomic Transition Metal Hydrides: Insights from the Analysis of Domain-Averaged Fermi Holes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cooper, D.L.; Ponec, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 2 (2013), s. 102-111 ISSN 0020-7608 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0118 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : transition metal hydrides * bond formation * analysis of domain averaged Fermi holes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.166, year: 2013

  20. Formation of titanium nitride layers on titanium metal: Results of XPS and AES investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moers, H.; Pfennig, G.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Sirch, M.; Willin, E.

    1988-09-01

    The reaction of titanium metal with gaseous nitrogen and ammonia at temperatures of 890 0 C leads to the formation of nitridic overlayers on the metallic substrate. The thicknesses of the overlayers increase with increasing reaction time. Under comparable conditions ammonia reacts much slower than nitrogen. XPS and AES depth profile analyses show continuous changes of the in-depth compositions of the overlayers. This can be interpreted in terms of a very irregular thickness of the overlayers, an assumption which is substantiated by local AES analyses and by the observation of a pronounced crystalline structure of the substrate after annealing pretreatment, which can give rise to locally different reaction rates. The depth profile is also influenced by the broad ranges of stability of the titanium nitride phases formed during the reaction. The quantitative analysis of the titanium/nitrogen overlayers by AES is difficult because of the overlap of titanium and nitrogen Auger peaks. In quantitative XPS analysis problems arise due to difficulties in defining Ti 2p peak areas. This work presents practical procedures for the quantitative evaluation by XPS and AES of nitridic overlayers with sufficient accuracy. (orig.) [de

  1. Formation of palladium hydrides in low temperature Ar/H_2-plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, H.; Quaas, M.; Deutsch, H.; Ahrens, H.; Fröhlich, M.; Helm, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    20 nm thick Pd coatings deposited on Si substrates with 800 nm SiO_2 and 1 nm Cr buffer layers were treated in a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma source at 700 W plasma power and 40 Pa working pressure without substrate heating. For obtaining information on the effect of energy influx due to ion energy on the palladium films the substrate potential was varied from U_s_u_b = 0 V to − 150 V at constant gas flow corresponding to mean ion energies E_i from 0.22 eV ∙ cm"−"2 ∙ s"−"1 to 1.28 eV ∙ cm"−"2 ∙ s"−"1. In contrast to high pressure reactions with metallic Pd, under plasma exposure we do not observe solid solutions over a wide range of hydrogen concentration. The hydrogen incorporation in Pd films takes place discontinuously. At 0 V substrate voltage palladium hydride is formed in two steps to PdH_0_._1_4 and PdH_0_._5_7. At − 50 V substrate voltage PdH_0_._5_7 is formed directly. However, substrate voltages of − 100 V and − 150 V cause shrinking of the unit cell. We postulate the formation of two fcc vacancy palladium hydride clusters PdH_V_a_c(I) and PdH_V_a_c(II). Under longtime plasma exposure the fcc PdH_V_a_c(II) phase forms cubic PdH_1_._3_3. The fcc PdH_0_._5_7 phase decomposes at temperatures > 300 °C to form metallic fcc Pd. The hydrogen removal causes a decrease of lattice defects. In situ high temperature diffractometry measurements also confirm the existence of PdH_V_a_c(II) as a palladium hydride phase. Stoichiometric relationship between cubic PdH_1_._3_3 and fcc PdH_V_a_c(II) becomes evident from XR measurements and structure considerations. We assume both phases have the chemical composition Pd_3H_4. Up to 700 °C we observe phase transformation between both the fcc PdH_V_a_c(II) and cubic PdH_1_._3_3 phases. These phase transformations could be explained analog to a Bain distortion by displacive solid state structural changes. - Highlights: • Thin Pd films were treated under low pressure conditions by an Ar/H_2-plasma. • The

  2. Formation of palladium hydrides in low temperature Ar/H{sub 2}-plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, H., E-mail: wulff@uni-greifswald.de [University of Greifswald, Institute of Physics, Felix-Hausdorff-Straße 6, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Quaas, M. [LITEC-LP, Brandteichstraße 20, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Deutsch, H.; Ahrens, H. [University of Greifswald, Institute of Physics, Felix-Hausdorff-Straße 6, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Fröhlich, M. [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology e.V., Felix-Hausdorff-Straße 2 (Germany); Helm, C.A. [University of Greifswald, Institute of Physics, Felix-Hausdorff-Straße 6, 17487 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    20 nm thick Pd coatings deposited on Si substrates with 800 nm SiO{sub 2} and 1 nm Cr buffer layers were treated in a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma source at 700 W plasma power and 40 Pa working pressure without substrate heating. For obtaining information on the effect of energy influx due to ion energy on the palladium films the substrate potential was varied from U{sub sub} = 0 V to − 150 V at constant gas flow corresponding to mean ion energies E{sub i} from 0.22 eV ∙ cm{sup −2} ∙ s{sup −1} to 1.28 eV ∙ cm{sup −2} ∙ s{sup −1}. In contrast to high pressure reactions with metallic Pd, under plasma exposure we do not observe solid solutions over a wide range of hydrogen concentration. The hydrogen incorporation in Pd films takes place discontinuously. At 0 V substrate voltage palladium hydride is formed in two steps to PdH{sub 0.14} and PdH{sub 0.57}. At − 50 V substrate voltage PdH{sub 0.57} is formed directly. However, substrate voltages of − 100 V and − 150 V cause shrinking of the unit cell. We postulate the formation of two fcc vacancy palladium hydride clusters PdH{sub Vac}(I) and PdH{sub Vac}(II). Under longtime plasma exposure the fcc PdH{sub Vac}(II) phase forms cubic PdH{sub 1.33}. The fcc PdH{sub 0.57} phase decomposes at temperatures > 300 °C to form metallic fcc Pd. The hydrogen removal causes a decrease of lattice defects. In situ high temperature diffractometry measurements also confirm the existence of PdH{sub Vac}(II) as a palladium hydride phase. Stoichiometric relationship between cubic PdH{sub 1.33} and fcc PdH{sub Vac}(II) becomes evident from XR measurements and structure considerations. We assume both phases have the chemical composition Pd{sub 3}H{sub 4}. Up to 700 °C we observe phase transformation between both the fcc PdH{sub Vac}(II) and cubic PdH{sub 1.33} phases. These phase transformations could be explained analog to a Bain distortion by displacive solid state structural changes. - Highlights: • Thin Pd films

  3. Formation and characterization of titanium nitride and titanium carbide films prepared by reactive sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundgren, J.-E.

    1982-01-01

    Titanium has been reactively r.f. sputtered in mixed Ar-N 2 and Ar-CH 4 discharges on to substrates held at 775 K. The films obtained have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and by measurements of hardness and electrical resistivity. The compositions of the films have been determined using Auger electron spectroscopy. The processes occurring both on substrates and target surfaces have been studied and it is shown that the latter is of great importance for the composition and structure of deposited films. Titanium nitride films of full density and with electrical resistivity and hardness values close to those of bulk TiN were only obtained in a narrow range close to the stoichiometric composition. Titanium carbide films grown on non-biased substrates were found to have an open structure and thus a low density. A bias applied to the substrate, however, improved the quality of the films. It is also shown that the heat of formation of the compounds plays an important role in the formation of carbides and nitrides. A large value promotes the development of large grains and dense structures. (Auth.)

  4. Structural formation of aluminide phases on titanium alloy during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamaeva, A.A.; Romankov, S.E.; Sagdoldina, Zh.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The aluminum layer on the surface of titanium alloy has been formed by thermal deposition. The structural formation of aluminide phases on the surface has been studied. The sequence of structural transformations at the Ti/Al interface is limited by the reaction temperature and time. The sequence of aluminide phase formation is occurred in compliance with Ti-Al equilibrium phase diagram. At the initial stages at the Ti/Al interface the Al3Ti alloy starts forming as a result of interdiffusion, and gradually the whole aluminum films is spent on the formation of this layer. The Al3Ti layer decomposes with the increase of temperature (>600C). At 800C the two-phase (Ti3Al+TiAl) layer is formed on the titanium surface. The TiAl compound is unstable and later on with the increase of the exposure time at 800C gradually transforms into the Ti3Al. The chain of these successive transformations leads to the formation of the continuous homogeneous layer consisting of the Ti3Al compound on the surface. At temperatures exceeding the allotropic transformation temperature (>900C) the Ti3Al compound starts decomposing. All structural changes taking place at the Ti/Al interface are accompanied by considerable changes in micro hardness. The structure of initial substrate influences on kinetics of phase transformation and microstructure development. (author)

  5. The formation and characteristics of hydride blisters in c.w. Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, E G [ed.

    1994-09-01

    Under the auspices of the IAEA, a consultants` meeting was arranged in Vienna, 1994 July 25-29, at which a Canadian delegation, consisting of AECL and Ontario Hydro Technologies personnel, presented information on their knowledge of the behaviour of hydride blisters in Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes. This document contains the 10 papers presented by the Canadian delegation to the meeting. It is believed that they represent a good reference document on hydride blister phenomena.

  6. A review of uranium corrosion by hydrogen and the formation of uranium hydride

    OpenAIRE

    Banos, A.; Harker, N. J.; Scott, T. B.

    2018-01-01

    Uranium hydride (UH3) is the direct product of the reaction between uranium metal and gaseous hydrogen. In the context of uranium storage, this corrosion reaction is considered deleterious, not just because the structure of the metal may become significantly degraded but also because the resulting hydride is pyrophoric and therefore potentially flammable in air if present in significant quantity. The current review draws from the literature surrounding the uranium-hydrogen system accrued over...

  7. Influence of Zircaloy cladding composition on hydride formation during aqueous hydrogen charging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekhara, S. [Intel Corporation, 2501 NW 229th Av., Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States); Kotula, P.G.; Enos, D.G.; Doyle, B.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States); Clark, B.G., E-mail: blyclar@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Although hydrogen uptake in Zirconium (Zr) based claddings has been a topic of many studies, hydrogen uptake as a function of alloy composition has received little attention. In this work, commercial Zr-based cladding alloys (Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO™), differing in composition but with similar initial textures, grain sizes, and surface roughness, were aqueously charged with hydrogen for 100, 300, and 1000 s at nominally 90 °C to produce hydride layers of varying thicknesses. Transmission electron microscope characterization following aqueous charging showed hydride phase and orientation relationship were identical in all three alloys. However, elastic recoil detection measurements confirmed that surface hydride layers in Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 were an order of magnitude thicker relative to ZIRLO™. - Highlights: •Aqueous charging was performed to produce a layer of zirconium hydride for three different Zr-alloy claddings. •Hydride thicknesses were analyzed by elastic recoil detection and transmission electron microscopy. •Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 formed thicker hydride layers than ZIRLO™ for the same charging durations.

  8. Evaluation of anomalies during nickel and titanium silicide formation using the effective heat of formation mode

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pretorius, R

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available , as well as the observed sequence of growth of different silicide phases, are not in agree- ment with thermodynamic considerations [26]. In the case of the nickel silicides Ni,Si is nearly always found to be the first... to determine how the oxygen content in the silicon affects phase formation. We also show how the anomalous behaviour of titanium and nickel silicide formation can be explained thermodynamically by using the ?effective heat...

  9. Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Bedinger, George M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Titanium is a mineral commodity that is essential to the smooth functioning of modern industrial economies. Most of the titanium produced is refined into titanium dioxide, which has a high refractive index and is thus able to impart a durable white color to paint, paper, plastic, rubber, and wallboard. Because of their high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance, titanium metal and titanium metal alloys are used in the aerospace industry as well as for welding rod coatings, biological implants, and consumer goods.Ilmenite and rutile are currently the principal titanium-bearing ore minerals, although other minerals, including anatase, perovskite, and titanomagnetite, could have economic importance in the future. Ilmenite is currently being mined from two large magmatic deposits hosted in rocks of Proterozoic-age anorthosite plutonic suites. Most rutile and nearly one-half of the ilmenite produced are from heavy-mineral alluvial, fluvial, and eolian deposits. Titanium-bearing minerals occur in diverse geologic settings, but many of the known deposits are currently subeconomic for titanium because of complications related to the mineralogy or because of the presence of trace contaminants that can compromise the pigment production process.Global production of titanium minerals is currently dominated by Australia, Canada, Norway, and South Africa; additional amounts are produced in Brazil, India, Madagascar, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, and Sri Lanka. The United States accounts for about 4 percent of the total world production of titanium minerals and is heavily dependent on imports of titanium mineral concentrates to meet its domestic needs.Titanium occurs only in silicate or oxide minerals and never in sulfide minerals. Environmental considerations for titanium mining are related to waste rock disposal and the impact of trace constituents on water quality. Because titanium is generally inert in the environment, human health risks from titanium and titanium

  10. Hydrides blister formation and induced embrittlement on zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in reactivity initiated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellouin-De-Menibus, A.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim is to study the cladding fracture with mechanical tests more representative of RIA conditions, taking into account the hydrides blisters, representative strain rates and stress states. To obtain hydride blisters, we developed a thermodiffusion setup that reproduces blister growth in reactor conditions. By metallography, nano-hardness, XRD and ERDA, we showed that they are constituted by 80% to 100% of δ hydrides in a Zircaloy-4 matrix, and that the zirconium beneath has some radially oriented hydrides. We modeled the blister growth kinetics taking into account the hysteresis of the hydrogen solubility limit and defined the thermal gradient threshold for blister growth. The modeling of the dilatometric behavior of hydrided zirconium indicates the important role of the material crystallographic texture, which could explain differences in the blister shape. Mechanical tests monitored with an infrared camera showed that significant local heating occurred at strain rates higher than 0.1/s. In parallel, the Expansion Due to Compression test was optimized to increase the bi-axiality level from uniaxial stress to plane strain (HB-EDC and VHB-EDC tests). This increase in loading bi-axiality lowers greatly the fracture strain at 25 C and 350 C only in homogeneous material without blister. Eventually, the ductility decrease of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube in function of the blister depth was quantified. (author) [fr

  11. Study on the effects of titanium oxide based nanomaterials as catalysts on the hydrogen sorption kinetics of magnesium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Anderson de Farias; Jardim, Paula Mendes; Santos, Dilson Silva dos, E-mail: anderso.n@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Conceicao, Monique Osorio Talarico da [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda (UniFOA), RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Magnesium hydride is highly attractive for hydrogen storage in solid state in reason of its high gravimetric capacity (7,6 wt% of H{sub 2}) and low density (1,7 g/cm³), making it a promissory candidate for mobile applications [1]. However, its low sorption kinetics and desorption temperature are the main obstacles for its application. In the present study the catalytic role of TiO{sub 2} based nanomaterials with different morphologies on the sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2} was evaluated. The additions consisted on titanate nanotubes (TTNT-Low), TiO{sub 2} nanorods (TTNT-550) and nanoparticles (KA-100, TTNT-ACID). Transmission and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (S/TEM) associated with X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) mapping was used to characterize the catalysts' morphology and crystalline structure and their dispersion within magnesium hydride, altogether with other characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and BET technique for structure and surface area analysis. The sorption kinetics were evaluated by means of a volumetric gas absorption/desorption (Sievert-type) apparatus. The results indicated that all additives improved the sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}, but the samples with TTNT-550 (TiO{sub 2} nanorods) and TTNT-ACID (TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles) presented the best and the second best performances, respectively, suggesting that the 1D morphology may promote a slightly superior kinetics than particulate catalysts. (author)

  12. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available used, the following forms of titanium are produced: titanium sponge, sintered electrode sponge, powder, molten titanium, electroplated titanium, hydride powder, and vapor-phase depos- ited titanium. Comparing the economics of alter- native...-up for producing titanium via the Kroll process is approximately as follows: ilmenite ($0.27/kg titanium sponge); titanium slag ($0.75/kg titanium sponge); TiCl4 ($3.09/kg titanium sponge); titanium sponge raw materials costs ($5.50/kg titanium sponge); total...

  13. Application of invariant plane strain (IPS) theory to {gamma} hydride formation in dilute Zr-Nb alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, D. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)]. E-mail: dsrivastavabarc@yahoo.co.in; Neogy, S. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Dey, G.K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Banerjee, S. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Ranganathan, S. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)

    2005-04-25

    The crystallographic aspects associated with the formation of the {gamma} hydride phase (fct) from the {alpha} (hcp) phase and the {beta} (bcc) phase in Zr-Nb alloys have been studied in two distinct situations, viz., in the {alpha} matrix in pure Zr and Zr-2.5Nb and in the {beta} matrix in {beta} stabilized Zr-20Nb alloy. The {beta}-{gamma} formation can be treated primarily as a simple shear on the basal plane involving a change in the stacking sequence. A possible mechanism for {alpha}-{gamma} transformation has been presented in this paper. In this paper the {beta}->{gamma} transformation has been considered in terms of the invariant plane strain theory (IPS) in order to predict the crystallographic features of the {gamma} hydride formed. The lattice invariant shear (LIS) (110){sub {beta}}[1-bar 10]{sub {beta}}||(111){sub {gamma}}[12-bar 1]{sub {gamma}} has been considered and the crystallographic parameters associated with bcc->fct transformation, such as the habit plane and the magnitude of the LIS and the shape strain have been computed. The predictions made in the present analysis have been compared with experimentally observed habit planes. The {alpha}/{gamma} and {beta}/{gamma} interface has been examined by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) technique to compare with the interfaces observed in martensitic transformations.

  14. Application of invariant plane strain (IPS) theory to γ hydride formation in dilute Zr-Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Neogy, S.; Dey, G.K.; Banerjee, S.; Ranganathan, S.

    2005-01-01

    The crystallographic aspects associated with the formation of the γ hydride phase (fct) from the α (hcp) phase and the β (bcc) phase in Zr-Nb alloys have been studied in two distinct situations, viz., in the α matrix in pure Zr and Zr-2.5Nb and in the β matrix in β stabilized Zr-20Nb alloy. The β-γ formation can be treated primarily as a simple shear on the basal plane involving a change in the stacking sequence. A possible mechanism for α-γ transformation has been presented in this paper. In this paper the β->γ transformation has been considered in terms of the invariant plane strain theory (IPS) in order to predict the crystallographic features of the γ hydride formed. The lattice invariant shear (LIS) (110) β [1-bar 10] β ||(111) γ [12-bar 1] γ has been considered and the crystallographic parameters associated with bcc->fct transformation, such as the habit plane and the magnitude of the LIS and the shape strain have been computed. The predictions made in the present analysis have been compared with experimentally observed habit planes. The α/γ and β/γ interface has been examined by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) technique to compare with the interfaces observed in martensitic transformations

  15. Antiseptics and microcosm biofilm formation on titanium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia VERARDI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oral rehabilitation with osseointegrated implants is a way to restore esthetics and masticatory function in edentulous patients, but bacterial colonization around the implants may lead to mucositis or peri-implantitis and consequent implant loss. Peri-implantitis is the main complication of oral rehabilitation with dental implants and, therefore, it is necessary to take into account the potential effects of antiseptics such as chlorhexidine (CHX, chloramine T (CHT, triclosan (TRI, and essential oils (EO on bacterial adhesion and on biofilm formation. To assess the action of these substances, we used the microcosm technique, in which the oral environment and periodontal conditions are simulated in vitro on titanium discs with different surface treatments (smooth surface - SS, acid-etched smooth surface - AESS, sand-blasted surface - SBS, and sand-blasted and acid-etched surface - SBAES. Roughness measurements yielded the following results: SS: 0.47 µm, AESS: 0.43 µm, SB: 0.79 µm, and SBAES: 0.72 µm. There was statistical difference only between SBS and AESS. There was no statistical difference among antiseptic treatments. However, EO and CHT showed lower bacterial counts compared with the saline solution treatment (control group. Thus, the current gold standard (CHX did not outperform CHT and EO, which were efficient in reducing the biofilm biomass compared with saline solution.

  16. Effect of electronegativity on the mechanical properties of metal hydrides with a fluorite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masato; Setoyama, Daigo; Matsunaga, Junji; Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2006-01-01

    Bulk titanium, yttrium, and zirconium hydrides, which have the same structure as that of fluorite-type fcc C 1, were produced and their mechanical properties were investigated. With an increase in the hydrogen content, the lattice parameters of titanium and zirconium hydrides increased, whereas those of yttrium hydride decreased. The elastic moduli of titanium and zirconium hydrides decreased by hydrogen addition, whereas those of yttrium hydride increased. There are linear relations between the electronegativities and hydrogen content dependence of the properties. Therefore, the mechanical properties of the metal hydrides are considered to be determined by a common rule based on the electronegativity

  17. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  18. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  19. Formation of an ascorbate-apatite composite layer on titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Atsuo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Institute for Human Science and Biomedical Engineering, Central 6, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Sogo, Yu [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Institute for Human Science and Biomedical Engineering, Central 6, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Ebihara, Yuko [School of Science and Technology, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Onoguchi, Masahiro [School of Science and Technology, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Oyane, Ayako [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Nanotechnology Research Institute, Central 4, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Ichinose, Noboru [School of Science and Technology, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    An ascorbate-apatite composite layer was successfully formed on NaOH- and heat-treated titanium by coprecipitating L-ascorbic acid phosphate and low-crystalline apatite in a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution at 37 {sup 0}C for 48 h. The supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions used have chemical compositions attainable by mixing infusion fluids officially approved for clinical use. The amount of immobilized L-ascorbic acid phosphate ranged from 1.0 to 2.3 {mu}g mm{sup -2}, which is most likely to be sufficient for the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells on titanium. Since ascorbate is important for the collagen synthesis and subsequent osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells, titanium coated with the ascorbate-apatite composite layer would be useful as a scaffold in bone tissue engineering and as a bone substitute.

  20. Formation of an ascorbate-apatite composite layer on titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Atsuo; Sogo, Yu; Ebihara, Yuko; Onoguchi, Masahiro; Oyane, Ayako; Ichinose, Noboru

    2007-01-01

    An ascorbate-apatite composite layer was successfully formed on NaOH- and heat-treated titanium by coprecipitating L-ascorbic acid phosphate and low-crystalline apatite in a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution at 37 0 C for 48 h. The supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions used have chemical compositions attainable by mixing infusion fluids officially approved for clinical use. The amount of immobilized L-ascorbic acid phosphate ranged from 1.0 to 2.3 μg mm -2 , which is most likely to be sufficient for the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells on titanium. Since ascorbate is important for the collagen synthesis and subsequent osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells, titanium coated with the ascorbate-apatite composite layer would be useful as a scaffold in bone tissue engineering and as a bone substitute

  1. Roles of texture of Zr alloys in ZrO{sub 2} film formation and δ-hydride orientation near ZrO{sub 2}/Zr interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, W.; Szpunar, J.A., E-mail: weq565@mail.usask.ca, E-mail: jerzy.szpunar@usask.ca [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Kozinski, J., E-mail: janusz.kozinski@lassonde.yorku.ca [York Univ., Faculty of Science and Engineering, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Oxidation and hydrogen embrittlement are related to formation of cracks and failure of Zr alloys used in nuclear reactor applications. An in-depth understanding of the formation of ZrO{sub 2} film and the hydride precipitation and orientation is important for improving the corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys. In this work a theoretical model is developed to analyze the microstructure of ZrO{sub 2} film formed on Zr alloys and the effect of stress that results from ZrO{sub 2} formation on hydride reorientation in the region near oxide/metal interface. Our work shows that the macroscopic stress produced due to Pilling-Bedworth ratio for ZrO{sub 2}/Zr could lead to the hydride re-orientation in the region near ZrO{sub 2}/Zr interface. Whether or not this effect can occur is dependent on the texture of the zirconium alloys. Control of texture of zirconium alloys can affect the microstructure of ZrO{sub 2} film and can be responsible for change of hydride orientation. (author)

  2. In situ formation of titanium carbide using titanium and carbon-nanotube powders by laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savalani, M.M.; Ng, C.C.; Li, Q.H.; Man, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium metal matrix composite coatings are considered to be important candidates for high wear resistance applications. In this study, TiC reinforced Ti matrix composite layers were fabricated by laser cladding with 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% carbon-nanotube. The effects of the carbon-nanotube content on phase composition, microstructure, micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coating were studied. Microstructural observation using scanning electron microscopy showed that the coatings consisted of a matrix of alpha-titanium phases and the reinforcement phase of titanium carbide in the form of fine dendrites, indicating that titanium carbide was synthesized by the in situ reaction during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of carbon-nanotube in the starting precursor materials and were enhanced by increasing the carbon-nanotube content. Results indicated that the composite layers exhibit high hardness and excellent wear resistance.

  3. In situ formation of titanium carbide using titanium and carbon-nanotube powders by laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savalani, M.M., E-mail: mmfsmm@inet.polyu.edu.hk [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong); Ng, C.C.; Li, Q.H.; Man, H.C. [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong)

    2012-01-15

    Titanium metal matrix composite coatings are considered to be important candidates for high wear resistance applications. In this study, TiC reinforced Ti matrix composite layers were fabricated by laser cladding with 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% carbon-nanotube. The effects of the carbon-nanotube content on phase composition, microstructure, micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coating were studied. Microstructural observation using scanning electron microscopy showed that the coatings consisted of a matrix of alpha-titanium phases and the reinforcement phase of titanium carbide in the form of fine dendrites, indicating that titanium carbide was synthesized by the in situ reaction during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of carbon-nanotube in the starting precursor materials and were enhanced by increasing the carbon-nanotube content. Results indicated that the composite layers exhibit high hardness and excellent wear resistance.

  4. Difference in surface reactions between titanium and zirconium in Hanks' solution to elucidate mechanism of calcium phosphate formation on titanium using XPS and cathodic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Y.; Nishimura, D.; Doi, H.; Nomura, N.; Hanawa, T.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium were immersed in Hanks' solution with and without calcium and phosphate ions, and the surfaces were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine the mechanism of calcium phosphate formation on titanium in simulated body fluids and in a living body. In addition, they were cathodically polarized in the above solutions. XPS characterization and cathodic polarization revealed differences in the surface properties in the ability of calcium phosphate formation between titanium and zirconium. The surface oxide film on titanium is not completely oxidized and is relatively reactive; that on zirconium is more passive and protective than that on titanium. Neither calcium nor phosphate stably exists alone on titanium, and calcium phosphate is naturally formed on it; calcium phosphate formed on titanium is stable and protective. On the other hand, calcium is never incorporated on zirconium, while zirconium phosphate, which is easily formed on zirconium, is highly stable and protective. Our study presents new information regarding the surface property of titanium and demonstrates that the characteristics of titanium and zirconium may be applied to various medical devices and new surface modification techniques.

  5. Hydrogen storage as a hydride. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature concern the storage of hydrogen in various metal hydrides. Binary and intermetallic hydrides are considered. Specific alloys discussed are iron titanium, lanthanium nickel, magnesium copper and magnesium nickel among others.

  6. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Studies on the Formation of Superlattice Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuli Yan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microstructures of a series of La-Mg-Ni-based superlattice metal hydride alloys produced by a novel method of interaction of a LaNi5 alloy and Mg vapor were studied using a combination of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The conversion rate of LaNi5 increased from 86.8% into 98.2%, and the A2B7 phase abundance increased from 42.5 to 45.8 wt % and reduced to 39.2 wt % with the increase in process time from four to 32 h. During the first stage of reaction, Mg formed discrete grains with the same orientation, which was closely related to the orientation of the host LaNi5 alloy. Mg then diffused through the ab-phase of LaNi5 and formed the AB2, AB3, and A2B7 phases. Diffusion of Mg stalled at the grain boundary of the host LaNi5 alloy. Good alignments in the c-axis between the newly formed superlattice phases and LaNi5 were observed. The density of high-angle grain boundary decreased with the increase in process time and was an indication of lattice cracking.

  7. Exceptional Lithium Storage in a Co(OH) 2 Anode: Hydride Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunchul; Choi, Woon Ih [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, 130 Samsung-ro, Suwon 16678, South Korea; Jang, Yoonjung; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Lee, Wontae; Park, Gwi Ok; Park, Su Bin; Yoo, Jaeseung; Hong, Jin Seok [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, 130 Samsung-ro, Suwon 16678, South Korea; Choi, Youn-Suk [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, 130 Samsung-ro, Suwon 16678, South Korea; Lee, Hyo Sug [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, 130 Samsung-ro, Suwon 16678, South Korea; Bae, In Tae; Kim, Ji Man; Yoon, Won-Sub

    2018-02-26

    Current lithium ion battery technology is tied in with conventional reaction mechanisms such as insertion, conversion, and alloying reactions even though most future applications like EVs demand much higher energy densities than current ones. Exploring the exceptional reaction mechanism and related electrode materials can be critical for pushing current battery technology to a next level. Here, we introduce an exceptional reaction with a Co(OH)(2) material which exhibits an initial charge capacity of 1112 mAh g(-1), about twice its theoretical value based on known conventional conversion reaction, and retains its first cycle capacity after 30 cycles. The combined results of synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicate that nanosized Co metal particles and LiOH are generated by conversion reaction at high voltages, and CoxHy, Li2O, and LiH are subsequently formed by hydride reaction between Co metal, LiOH, and other lithium species at low voltages, resulting in a anomalously high capacity beyond the theoretical capacity of Co(OH)(2). This is further corroborated by AIMD simulations, localized STEM, and XPS. These findings will provide not only further understanding of exceptional lithium storage of recent nanostructured materials but also valuable guidance to develop advanced electrode materials with high energy density for next-generation batteries.

  8. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  9. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-02-26

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO₂ nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO₂-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants.

  10. Biofilm formation on titanium alloy and anatase-Bactercline® coated titanium healing screws: an in vivo human study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Scarano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim Bacterial adherence to implants is considered to be an important event in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In fact, this infection process is a first stage of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, and a positive correlation has been found between oral hygiene and marginal bone loss around implants in the edentulous mandible. Surface properties of transgingival implant components are important determinants in bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to characterize the biofilm formation, in vivo, on healing screws made of titanium alloy or coated with a combination of anatase and Bactercline® product. Materials and methods Twenty-five patients, between 21- 37 years, in excellent systemic health, participated in this study. In each of the 25 participants, one anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screw (Test and one titanium alloy (TI6Al4V healing screw (Control were adapted to two different implants. Quantitative and qualitative biofilm formation on healing abutments was analyzed by culture method.Results Bacterial adherence to the two different healing screws used in this study were compared. Statistically significant differences were found between the Control and the Test group for both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts (p<0,05. The microflora consisted both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and displayed a high variability. The anaerobic S. intermedius, potentially “pathogenic”, was isolated only from the Control group. Both healing screws harbored primarily Gram-positive rods as Actinomyces spp, A. naeslundii, A. viscosus and the Gram-negative rods (Fusobacterium spp, Prevotella spp, Capnocythophaga spp were mostly found on the Control healing screws.Conclusion Anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screws reduce the number of initially adhering bacteria, formed mainly of Gram-positive microorgnisms, while, on the contrary, the microflora covering the titanium alloy healing screws was, for the

  11. Preparation of beryllium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrance, B.R.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for the preparation of beryllium hydride which comprises pyrolyzing, while in solution in a solvent inert under the reaction conditions, with respect to reactants and products and at a temperature in the range of about 100 0 to about 200 0 C, sufficient to result in the formation of beryllium hydride, a di-t-alkyl beryllium etherate wherein each tertiary alkyl radical contains from 4 to 20 carbon atoms. The pyrolysis is carried out under an atmosphere inert under the reaction conditions, with respect to reactants and products. (U.S.)

  12. Formation of Silicate and Titanium Clouds on Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Diana; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Peter; Parmentier, Vivien

    2018-06-01

    We present the first application of a bin-scheme microphysical and vertical transport model to determine the size distribution of titanium and silicate cloud particles in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters. We predict particle size distributions from first principles for a grid of planets at four representative equatorial longitudes, and investigate how observed cloud properties depend on the atmospheric thermal structure and vertical mixing. The predicted size distributions are frequently bimodal and irregular in shape. There is a negative correlation between the total cloud mass and equilibrium temperature as well as a positive correlation between the total cloud mass and atmospheric mixing. The cloud properties on the east and west limbs show distinct differences that increase with increasing equilibrium temperature. Cloud opacities are roughly constant across a broad wavelength range, with the exception of features in the mid-infrared. Forward-scattering is found to be important across the same wavelength range. Using the fully resolved size distribution of cloud particles as opposed to a mean particle size has a distinct impact on the resultant cloud opacities. The particle size that contributes the most to the cloud opacity depends strongly on the cloud particle size distribution. We predict that it is unlikely that silicate or titanium clouds are responsible for the optical Rayleigh scattering slope seen in many hot Jupiters. We suggest that cloud opacities in emission may serve as sensitive tracers of the thermal state of a planet’s deep interior through the existence or lack of a cold trap in the deep atmosphere.

  13. Titanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Muris, Joris; Jakobsen, Stig S

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to titanium (Ti) from implants and from personal care products as nanoparticles (NPs) is common. This article reviews exposure sources, ion release, skin penetration, allergenic effects, and diagnostic possibilities. We conclude that human exposure to Ti mainly derives from dental...... and medical implants, personal care products, and foods. Despite being considered to be highly biocompatible relative to other metals, Ti is released in the presence of biological fluids and tissue, especially under certain circumstances, which seem to be more likely with regard to dental implants. Although...... most of the studies reviewed have important limitations, Ti seems not to penetrate a competent skin barrier, either as pure Ti, alloy, or as Ti oxide NPs. However, there are some indications of Ti penetration through the oral mucosa. We conclude that patch testing with the available Ti preparations...

  14. Formation of microspheres under the action of femtosecond laser radiation on titanium samples in hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochuev, D. A.; Khorkov, K. S.; Ivashchenko, A. V.; Prokoshev, V. G.; Arakelian, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the original method of laser synthesis of microspheres which contain titanium carbide. The formation of microspheres is carried out by the action of femtosecond laser radiation on the surface of titanium in the reaction medium - the ultimate hydrocarbon. The resulting microspheres have a high surface smoothness, a narrow particle size distribution, an average size of 1-3 μm. They can be used in applications of additive engineering, powder metallurgy as the main raw material, or as an alloying additive.

  15. Formation of nanocrystalline TiC from titanium and different carbon sources by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Haoling [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China); Zhang Zhonghua [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China)], E-mail: zh_zhang@sdu.edu.cn; Qi Zhen [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China); Liu Guodong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China); Bian Xiufang [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China)

    2009-03-20

    In this paper, the formation of nanocrystalline TiC from titanium powders and different carbon resources by mechanical alloying (MA) has been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results show that nanocrystalline TiC can be synthesized from Ti powders and different carbon resources (activated carbon, carbon fibres or carbon nanotubes) by MA at room temperature. Titanium and different carbon resources have a significant effect on the Ti-C reaction and the formation of TiC during MA. Moreover, the formation of nanocrystalline TiC is governed by a gradual diffusion reaction mechanism during MA, regardless of different carbon resources.

  16. Predicting Hydride Donor Strength via Quantum Chemical Calculations of Hydride Transfer Activation Free Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alherz, Abdulaziz; Lim, Chern-Hooi; Hynes, James T; Musgrave, Charles B

    2018-01-25

    We propose a method to approximate the kinetic properties of hydride donor species by relating the nucleophilicity (N) of a hydride to the activation free energy ΔG ⧧ of its corresponding hydride transfer reaction. N is a kinetic parameter related to the hydride transfer rate constant that quantifies a nucleophilic hydridic species' tendency to donate. Our method estimates N using quantum chemical calculations to compute ΔG ⧧ for hydride transfers from hydride donors to CO 2 in solution. A linear correlation for each class of hydrides is then established between experimentally determined N values and the computationally predicted ΔG ⧧ ; this relationship can then be used to predict nucleophilicity for different hydride donors within each class. This approach is employed to determine N for four different classes of hydride donors: two organic (carbon-based and benzimidazole-based) and two inorganic (boron and silicon) hydride classes. We argue that silicon and boron hydrides are driven by the formation of the more stable Si-O or B-O bond. In contrast, the carbon-based hydrides considered herein are driven by the stability acquired upon rearomatization, a feature making these species of particular interest, because they both exhibit catalytic behavior and can be recycled.

  17. Formation of mixed and patterned self-assembled films of alkylphosphonates on commercially pure titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudzka, Katarzyna; Sanchez Treviño, Alda Y.; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A., E-mail: marodri@ugr.es; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A.

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Chemically-tailored titanium surfaces were prepared by self-assembly of alkylphosphonates. • Mixed self-assembled films were prepared with aqueous mixtures of two alkylphosphonates. • Single self-assembled films were altered by laser abrasion. • Mixed and patterned self-assembled films on titanium may guide the bone-like formation. - Abstract: Titanium is extensively employed in biomedical devices, in particular as implant. The self-assembly of alkylphosphonates on titanium surfaces enable the specific adsorption of biomolecules to adapt the implant response against external stimuli. In this work, chemically-tailored cpTi surfaces were prepared by self-assembly of alkylphosphonate molecules. By bringing together attributes of two grafting molecules, aqueous mixtures of two alkylphosphonates were used to obtain mixed self-assembled films. Single self-assembled films were also altered by laser abrasion to produce chemically patterned cpTi surfaces. Both mixed and patterned self-assembled films were confirmed by AFM, ESEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Water contact angle measurements also revealed the composition of the self-assembly films. Chemical functionalization with two grafting phosphonate molecules and laser surface engineering may be combined to guide the bone-like formation on cpTi, and the future biological response in the host.

  18. Effects of different titanium zirconium implant surfaces on initial supragingival plaque formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Gordon; Becker, Jürgen; Schwarz, Frank

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the current study was the evaluation of biofilm development on different implant surfaces. Initial biofilm formation was investigated on five different implant surfaces, machined titanium (MTi), modified machined acid-etched titanium (modMATi), machined titanium zirconium (MTiZr), modified machined and acid-etched titanium zirconium (modMATiZr) and sandblasted large grid and acid-etched titanium zirconium surface (SLATiZr) for 24 and 48 h. Biocompatibility was tested after tooth brushing of the samples via cell viability testing with human gingival fibroblasts. After 24 h of biofilm collection, mean plaque surface was detected in the following descending order: After 24 h: MTiZr > MTi > SLATiZr > modMATiZr > modMATi. Both M surfaces showed significant higher biofilm formation than the other groups. After 48 h: MTiZr > MTi > SLATiZr > modMATiZr > modMATi. After tooth brushing: SLATiZr > modMATi > modMATiZr > MTi > MTiZr. All native samples depicted significant higher cell viability than their corresponding surfaces after biofilm removal procedure. The TiZr groups especially the modMATiZr group showed slower and less biofilm formation. In combination with the good biocompatibility, both modMA surfaces seem to be interesting candidates for surfaces in transgingival implant design. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Modification of Titanium Substrates with Chimeric Peptides Comprising Antimicrobial and Titanium-Binding Motifs Connected by Linkers To Inhibit Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zihao; Ma, Shiqing; Duan, Shun; Xuliang, Deng; Sun, Yingchun; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xinhua; Guan, Binbin; Wang, Chao; Hu, Meilin; Qi, Xingying; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2016-03-02

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are the primary causes of implant-associated infection, which is difficult to eliminate and may induce failure in dental implants. Chimeric peptides with both binding and antimicrobial motifs may provide a promising alternative to inhibit biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. In this study, chimeric peptides were designed by connecting an antimicrobial motif (JH8194: KRLFRRWQWRMKKY) with a binding motif (minTBP-1: RKLPDA) directly or via flexible/rigid linkers to modify Ti surfaces. We evaluated the binding behavior of peptides using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques and investigated the effect of the modification of titanium surfaces with these peptides on the bioactivity of Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) and Streptococcus sanguis (S. sanguis). Compared with the flexible linker (GGGGS), the rigid linker (PAPAP) significantly increased the adsorption of the chimeric peptide on titanium surfaces (p chimeric peptide with the rigid linker exhibited more effective antimicrobial ability than the peptide with the flexible linker. This finding was ascribed to the ability of the rigid linker to separate functional domains and reduce their interference to the maximum extent. Consequently, the performance of chimeric peptides with specific titanium-binding motifs and antimicrobial motifs against bacteria can be optimized by the proper selection of linkers. This rational design of chimeric peptides provides a promising alternative to inhibit the formation of biofilms on titanium surfaces with the potential to prevent peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis.

  20. Hydriding of metallic thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Masanobu; Katsura, Masahiro; Matsuki, Yuichi; Uno, Masayoshi

    1983-01-01

    Powdered thorium is usually prepared through a combination of hydriding and dehydriding processes of metallic thorium in massive form, in which the hydriding process consists of two steps: the formation of ThH 2 , and the formation of Th 4 H 15 . However, little has yet been known as to on what stage of hydriding process the pulverization takes place. It is found in the present study that the formation of Th 4 H 15 by the reaction of ThH 2 with H 2 is responsible for pulverization. Temperature of 70 deg C adopted in this work for the reaction of formation Th 4 H 15 seems to be much more effective for production of powdered thorium than 200 - 300 deg C in the literature. The pressure-composition-temperature relationships for Th-H system are determined at 200, 300, 350, and 800 deg C. From these results, a tentative equilibrium phase diagram for the Th-H system is proposed, attention being focused on the two-phase region of ThH 2 and Th 4 H 15 . Pulverization process is discussed in terms of the tentative phase diagram. (author)

  1. Characterization of electron beam evaporated carbon films and compound formation on titanium and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthin, J.; Linsmeier, C.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of carbon-based mixed materials is unavoidable on the plasma-facing components (e.g. first wall and divertor) of fusion devices when carbon is used together with other materials. On the surfaces of these components very different conditions with respect to particle and energy impact occur. To predict the mixed material formation under these conditions the precise knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms governing these interactions is essential. In this paper we present the results of carbon interaction with titanium and silicon, as model substances for metallic and covalent carbides, during thermal treatment. To perform basic studies of the reactions of carbon with different elements, thin carbon films are produced by electron beam evaporation on the different substrates under UHV conditions. All measurements for chemical analysis are performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We discuss first the properties of the deposited carbon films. The carbon films are characterized on inert gold surfaces and are compared to bulk graphite. Annealing of the carbon films up to 970 K leads to a transition from a disordered carbon network into a graphitic structure. Preparation of carbon films at room temperature on titanium or silicon leads to a limited carbide formation at the carbon/substrate interface. Carbon deposited in excess of several monolayers is present in elementary form. Annealing of the samples leads to complete carbidization consuming the available carbon in both cases. Titanium reacts to TiC and additional substoichiometric carbide, silicon forms SiC with exact stoichiometry. (orig.)

  2. tri-n-butyltin hydride-mediated radical reaction of a 2-iodobenzamide: formation of an unexpected carbon-tin bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcelo T.; Alves, Rosemeire B.; Cesar, Amary; Prado, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Alves, Ricardo J.; Queiroga, Carla G.; Santos, Leonardo S.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2007-01-01

    The tri-n-butyltin hydride-mediated reaction of methyl 2,3-di-O-benzyl-4-O-trans-cinnamyl- 6-deoxy-6-(2-iodobenzoylamino)-α-D-galactopyranoside afforded an unexpected aryltributyltin compound. The structure of this new tetraorganotin(IV) product has been elucidated by 1 H, 13 C NMR spectroscopy, COSY and HMQC experiments and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The formation of this new compound via a radical coupling reaction and a radical addition-elimination process is discussed. (author)

  3. Isothermal α″ formation in β metastable titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeby-Gautier, E.; Settefrati, A.; Bruneseaux, F.; Appolaire, B.; Denand, B.; Dehmas, M.; Geandier, G.; Boulet, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Isothermal kinetics of orthorhombic α″ formation is characterized by HEXRD. ► Cell parameters of parent and product phases are obtained. ► Partitioning of solutes during the transformation and the ageing is discussed. -- Abstract: Thanks to time resolved high energy X-ray diffraction, isothermal decomposition of β metastable phase was studied, directly after solution treatment in the β temperature range, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 450 °C for two beta metastable alloys (Ti 17 and Ti 5553). The formation of an orthorhombic α″ phase is clearly identified at the beginning of the transformation whatever the alloy studied. If transformation occurs at the higher temperature an evolution of α″ is observed toward the hexagonal α phase. The phase amounts and the mean cell parameters of each phase were quantified by the Rietveld refinement method. The obtained cell parameters evolutions and the orthorhombicity of α″ are discussed. Moreover, the orthorhombicity of α″ compared to that obtained for stress induced martensite may indicate a slight partitioning of solutes in isothermal α″

  4. Isothermal α″ formation in β metastable titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeby-Gautier, E., E-mail: Elisabeth.Gautier@mines.inpl-nancy.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS Nancy Université, UPVM 7198, Nancy (France); Settefrati, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS Nancy Université, UPVM 7198, Nancy (France); Airbus Operations, Materials and Processes, Toulouse (France); Bruneseaux, F. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS Nancy Université, UPVM 7198, Nancy (France); Appolaire, B. [Laboratoire d’Etudes des Microstructures ONERA – CNRS Chatillon (France); Denand, B.; Dehmas, M.; Geandier, G.; Boulet, P. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS Nancy Université, UPVM 7198, Nancy (France)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► Isothermal kinetics of orthorhombic α″ formation is characterized by HEXRD. ► Cell parameters of parent and product phases are obtained. ► Partitioning of solutes during the transformation and the ageing is discussed. -- Abstract: Thanks to time resolved high energy X-ray diffraction, isothermal decomposition of β metastable phase was studied, directly after solution treatment in the β temperature range, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 450 °C for two beta metastable alloys (Ti 17 and Ti 5553). The formation of an orthorhombic α″ phase is clearly identified at the beginning of the transformation whatever the alloy studied. If transformation occurs at the higher temperature an evolution of α″ is observed toward the hexagonal α phase. The phase amounts and the mean cell parameters of each phase were quantified by the Rietveld refinement method. The obtained cell parameters evolutions and the orthorhombicity of α″ are discussed. Moreover, the orthorhombicity of α″ compared to that obtained for stress induced martensite may indicate a slight partitioning of solutes in isothermal α″.

  5. Formation and Thermal Stability of Large Precipitates and Oxides in Titanium and Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Xiao-jun; WOO Dae-hee; WANG Xin-hua; LEE Hae-geon

    2008-01-01

    As-cast CC slabs of microalloyed steels are prone to surface and sub-surface cracking. Precipitation phenomena in-itiated during solidification reduce ductility at high temperature. The unidirectional solidification unit is employed to sim-ulate the solidification process during continuous casting. Precipitation behavior and thermal stability are systemati-cally investigated. Samples of adding titanium and niobium to steels have been examined using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EPMA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It has been found that the addition of titanium and niobium to high-strength low-alloyed (HSLA) steel resuited in undesirable large precipitation in the steels, i. e. , precipitation of large precipitates with various morphologies. The composition of the large precipitates has been determined. The effect of cooling rate on (Ti, Nb)(C, N) precipitate formation is investigated. With increasing the cooling rate, titanium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C, N) precipitates are transformed to niobium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitates. The thermal stability of these large precipitates and oxides have been assessed by carrying out various heat treatments such as holding and quenching from temperature at 800 and 1 200 ℃. It has been found that titanium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitate is stable at about 1 200 ℃ and niobi-um-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitate is stable at about 800 ℃. After reheating at 1 200 ℃ for 1 h, (Ca, Mn)S and TiN are precipitated from Ca-Al oxide. However, during reheating at 800 ℃ for 1 h, Ca-Al-Ti oxide in specimens was stable. The thermodynamic calculation of simulating the thermal process is employed. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Thermogravimetric experiments with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, L.J.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-02-01

    In the process of preparing for pyrophoricity experiments involving uranium, we conducted hydriding and air-exposure experiments on titanium. In these experiments the hydriding reactions and response to air-exposure was generally within the range expected based on work reported by others. One aberrant behavior was a sudden weight gain followed by a significant weight loss. We speculate that loss may be due to hydrogen evolution from the TiH 2 resulting from local heating by oxidation reactions. We verified that titanium is not pyrophoric at temperatures less than 750 degree C. 18 refs. 1 fig

  7. Review of consequences of uranium hydride formation in N-Reactor fuel elements stored in the K-Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, J.W.

    1994-09-28

    The 105-K Basins on the Hanford site are used to store uranium fuel elements and assemblies irradiated in and discharged from N Reactor. The storage cylinders in KW Basin are known to have some broken N reactor fuel elements in which the exposed uranium is slowly reacting chemically with water in the cylinder. The products of these reactions are uranium oxide, hydrogen, and potentially some uranium hydride. The purpose of this report is to document the results f the latest review of potential, but highly unlikely accidents postulated to occur as closed cylinders containing N reactor fuel assemblies are opened under water in the KW basin and as a fuel assembly is raised from the basin in a shipping cask for transportation to the 327 Building for examination as part of the SNF Characterization Program. The postulated accidents reviews in this report are considered to bound all potential releases of radioactivity and hydrogen. These postulated accidents are: (1) opening and refill of a cylinder containing significant amounts of hydrogen and uranium hydride; and (2) draining of the single element can be used to keep the fuel element submerged in water after the cask containing the can and element is lifted from the KW Basin. Analysis shows the release of radioactivity to the site boundary is significantly less than that allowed by the K Basin Safety Evaluation. Analysis further shows there would be no damage to the K Basin structure nor would there be injury to personnel for credible events.

  8. Mechanism of Nitrogenase H 2 Formation by Metal-Hydride Protonation Probed by Mediated Electrocatalysis and H/D Isotope Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khadka, Nimesh [Department of Chemistry; Milton, Ross D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, United States; Shaw, Sudipta [Department of Chemistry; Lukoyanov, Dmitriy [Department; Dean, Dennis R. [Department of Biochemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, United States; Minteer, Shelley D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, United States; Raugei, Simone [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Hoffman, Brian M. [Department; Seefeldt, Lance C. [Department of Chemistry

    2017-09-15

    Nitrogenase catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia (NH3) with obligatory reduction of protons (H+) to dihydrogen (H2) through a mechanism involving reductive elimination of two [Fe-H-Fe] bridging hydrides at its active site FeMo-cofactor. The overall rate-limiting step is associated with ATP-driven electron delivery from Fe protein, precluding isotope effect measurements on substrate reduction steps. Here, we use mediated bioelectrocatalysis to drive electron delivery to MoFe protein without Fe protein and ATP hydrolysis, thereby eliminating the normal rate-limiting step. The ratio of catalytic current in mixtures of H2O and D2O, the proton inventory, changes linearly with the D2O/H2O ratio, revealing that a single H/D is involved in the rate limiting step. Kinetic models, along with measurements that vary the electron/proton delivery rate and use different substrates, reveal that the rate-limiting step under these conditions is the H2 formation reaction. Altering the chemical environment around the active site FeMo-cofactor in the MoFe protein either by substituting nearby amino acids or transferring the isolated FeMo-cofactor into a different peptide matrix, changes the net isotope effect, but the proton inventory plot remains linear, consistent with an unchanging rate-limiting step. Density functional theory predicts a transition state for H2 formation where the proton from S-H+ moves to the hydride in Fe-H-, predicting the number and magnitude of the observed H/D isotope effect. This study not only reveals the mechanism of H2 formation, but also illustrates a strategy for mechanistic study that can be applied to other enzymes and to biomimetic complexes.

  9. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes enhance electrochemical properties of titanium to determine in situ bone formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Webster, Thomas J [Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)], E-mail: Thomas_Webster@Brown.edu

    2008-07-23

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) enhance osteoblast (bone-forming cell) calcium deposition compared to currently implanted materials (such as titanium). In this study, MWCNTs were grown out of nanopores anodized on titanium (MWCNT-Ti). The electrochemical responses of MWCNT-Ti were investigated in an attempt to ascertain if MWCNT-Ti can serve as novel in situ sensors of bone formation. For this purpose, MWCNT-Ti was subjected to a ferri/ferrocyanide redox couple and its electrochemical behavior measured. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) showed an enhanced redox potential for the MWCNT-Ti. These redox signals were superior to that obtained with bare unmodified Ti, which did not sense either oxidation or reduction peaks in the CVs. A further objective of this study was to investigate the redox reactions of MWCNT-Ti in a solution of extracellular components secreted by osteoblasts in vitro. It was found that MWCNT-Ti exhibited well-defined and persistent CVs, similar to the ferri/ferrocyanide redox reaction. The higher electrodic performance and electrocatalytic activity of the MWCNT-Ti compared to the bare titanium observed in this study were likely due to the fact that MWCNTs enhanced direct electron transfer and facilitated double-layer effects, leading to a strong redox signal. Thus these results encourage the further study and modification of MWCNT-Ti to sense new bone growth in situ next to orthopedic implants and perhaps monitor other events (such as infection and/or harmful scar tissue formation) to improve the current clinical diagnosis of orthopedic implants.

  10. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes enhance electrochemical properties of titanium to determine in situ bone formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Webster, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) enhance osteoblast (bone-forming cell) calcium deposition compared to currently implanted materials (such as titanium). In this study, MWCNTs were grown out of nanopores anodized on titanium (MWCNT-Ti). The electrochemical responses of MWCNT-Ti were investigated in an attempt to ascertain if MWCNT-Ti can serve as novel in situ sensors of bone formation. For this purpose, MWCNT-Ti was subjected to a ferri/ferrocyanide redox couple and its electrochemical behavior measured. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) showed an enhanced redox potential for the MWCNT-Ti. These redox signals were superior to that obtained with bare unmodified Ti, which did not sense either oxidation or reduction peaks in the CVs. A further objective of this study was to investigate the redox reactions of MWCNT-Ti in a solution of extracellular components secreted by osteoblasts in vitro. It was found that MWCNT-Ti exhibited well-defined and persistent CVs, similar to the ferri/ferrocyanide redox reaction. The higher electrodic performance and electrocatalytic activity of the MWCNT-Ti compared to the bare titanium observed in this study were likely due to the fact that MWCNTs enhanced direct electron transfer and facilitated double-layer effects, leading to a strong redox signal. Thus these results encourage the further study and modification of MWCNT-Ti to sense new bone growth in situ next to orthopedic implants and perhaps monitor other events (such as infection and/or harmful scar tissue formation) to improve the current clinical diagnosis of orthopedic implants

  11. In-Flight Formation of Nano-Crystalline Titanium Dioxide Powder in a Plasma Jet and Its Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Thiyagarajan, T. K.; Sreekumar, K. P.; Vijay, M.; Selvarajan, V.; Yu, Jiaguo; Liu, Shengwei

    2010-01-01

    Nanocrystalline titanium dioxide powder was synthesized by in-flight oxidation of titanium dihydride (TiH 2 ) powder in a thermal plasma jet. TiH 2 powder was injected into the thermal plasma jet and allowed to react with oxygen injected downstream the jet. Characterization of the powder by various analytical tools indicated that the powder consisted of nano-sized titanium dioxide particles consisting predominantly of the anatase phase. It is suggested that the thermo-chemistry of the oxidation process contributes significantly to the formation of nano-sized titania. The large energy released during the oxidation process dissociates the TiO 2 particles into TiO (g) and titanium vapour, which recombine downstream with oxygen and form nano particles of TiO 2 .

  12. Formation and quantification of calcium titanate with the perovskite structure from alternative sources of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gralik, G.; Raupp-Pereira, F.; Hotza, D.; Labrincha, J.A.; Zanelli, C.; Dondi, M.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate and quantify the formation of calcium titanate (CaTiO3) with perovskite structure from alternative sources of titanium (rutile, ilmenite). Commercial raw materials of the high purity were also characterized as reference. With base in the characterization by X-ray fluorescence of the mineral springs different compositions were formulated and subsequently sintered for 2 h in resistive furnace at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1400°C. After thermal processing the samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and the quantification of phases formed by the Rietveld method obtained. The results show that the formation and the amount of calcium titanate minerals from alternative sources depend on factors related to stages of sintering and impurities. The microstructures of the compositions were analyzed by SEM/EDS and bulk density also measured. (author)

  13. Depth probing of the hydride formation process in thin Pd films by combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Björn; Fredriksson, Mattias; Feng, Ligang; Lindahl, Niklas; Hagberg, Johan; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate a flexible combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy setup to gain insight into the depth evolution of electrochemical hydride and oxide formation in Pd films with thicknesses of 20 and 100 nm. The thicknesses of our model systems are chosen such that the films are thinner or significantly thicker than the optical skin depth of Pd to create two distinctly different situations. Low power white light is irradiated on the sample and analyzed in three different configurations; transmittance through, and, reflectance from the front and the back side of the film. The obtained optical sensitivities correspond to fractions of a monolayer of adsorbed or absorbed hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) on Pd. Moreover, a combined simultaneous readout obtained from the different optical measurement configurations provides mechanistic insights into the depth-evolution of the studied hydrogenation and oxidation processes.

  14. Pulse-radiolytic investigation of the reduction of titanium(III) ions in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micic, O.I.; Nenadovic, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    The absorption spectrum and decay kinetics of intermediates formed by the reaction of titanium(III) ions with H atoms, hydrated electrons, and carboxyl radicals have been studied in aqueous solution using the pulse-radiolysis technique. The product of the reaction with H atoms in acid solution is a Ti 3+ -H hydride intermediate which decomposes by a first-order process with a half-life of ca. 3 s. Titanium(II) is formed by reaction with hydrated electrons and CO 2 H radicals. The absorption spectrum of titanium(II) and the kinetics of its reactions are reported and discussed. The formation of molecular hydrogen by reaction of Ti 2+ with water is suppressed by the other solutes in the solutions. Titanium(III) reacts with CO 2 H, CH 2 CO 2 H, and CH(CO 2 H) 2 radicals to give titanium-radical complexes. (author)

  15. Food-grade titanium dioxide exposure exacerbates tumor formation in colitis associated cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Ortega, Ismael M; Garduño-Balderas, Luis G; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Flores-Flores, José O; González-Robles, Arturo; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Terrazas, Luis I; van Loveren, Henk; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2016-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the fourth worldwide cause of death and even if some dietary habits are consider risk factors, the contribution of food additives including foodgrade titanium dioxide (TiO2), designated as E171, has been poorly investigated. We hypothesized that oral E171 intake could have impact on the enhancement of colorectal tumor formation and we aimed to investigate if E171 administration could enhance tumor formation in a colitis associated cancer (CAC) model. BALB/c male mice were grouped as follows: a) control, b) E171, c) CAC and d) CAC + E171 group (n = 6). E171 used in this study formed agglomerates of 300 nm in water. E171 intragastric administration (5 mg/kg body weight/5 days/10 weeks) was unable to induce tumor formation but dysplastic alterations were observed in the distal colon but enhanced the tumor formation in distal colon (CAC + E171 group) measured by tumor progression markers. Some E171 particles were internalized in colonic cells of the E171 and CAC + E171 groups and both groups showed a decrease in goblet cells in the distal colon. However the CAC + E171 group showed a higher decrease of these cells that act as protection barrier in colon. These results suggest that E171 could worsen pre-existent intestinal diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding the effects of potassium ferricyanide on lead hydride formation in tetrahydroborate system and its application for determination of lead in milk using hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Biyang; Xu, Xiangshu; Xiao, Yan; Zhu, Pingchuan; Wang, Yingzi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposed a novel explanation for plumbane generation. • Expounded the role of K 3 Fe(CN) 6 in plumbane generation. • Clarified the controversial aspects in the mechanism of K 3 Fe(CN) 6 enhancement. • Used X-ray diffractometry to analyze the intermediates. • Developed a method to analyze lead in milk using K 3 Fe(CN) 6 and K 4 Fe(CN) 6 as new additives. - Absract: To understand the formation of plumbane in the Pb II -NaBH 4 -K 3 Fe(CN) 6 system, the intermediate products produced in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH 4 in the presence of K 3 Fe(CN) 6 were studied. The produced plumbane and elemental lead were measured through continuous flow hydride generation (HG)-inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and X-ray diffraction spectrometry techniques, respectively. Based on the experimental results, the explanations can be depicted in the following steps: (1) plumbane and black lead sediment (black Pb) are formed in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH 4 ; (2) the black Pb is oxidized by K 3 Fe(CN) 6 to form Pb 2 [Fe(CN) 6 ], which further reacts with NaBH 4 to form more plumbane and black Pb; and (3) another round starts in which the produced black Pb from the step 2 is then oxidized continuously by K 3 Fe(CN) 6 to form more Pb 2 [Fe(CN) 6 ] complex, which would produce more plumbane. In short, the black Pb and Pb 2 [Fe(CN) 6 ] complex are the key intermediate products for the formation of plumbane in the Pb II -NaBH 4 -K 3 Fe(CN) 6 system. Based on the enhancement effect of potassium ferricyanide and potassium ferrocyanide, a method was developed to analyze lead in milk with HG-ICP OES technique. The detection limit of the method was observed as 0.081 μg L −1 . The linearity range of lead was found between 0.3 and 50,000 μg L −1 with correlation coefficient of 0.9993. The recovery of lead was determined as 97.6% (n = 5) for adding 10 μg L −1 lead into the milk sample

  17. Phase formation in titanium alloys during their quenching from liquid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golub, S.Ya.; Kotko, A.V.; Kuz'menko, N.N.; Kulak, L.D.; Firstov, S.A.; Khaenko, B.V.

    1992-01-01

    Methods of X-ray diffractin analysis, light and electron microscopy were applied to study structural state of titanium base alloys quenched from liquid state by spinning with cooling in inert gas or at the surface of solid heat exchanger. Phase formation under rapid cooling conditions was considered. The morphology of phases and mutual orientation of their crystal lattices were investigated along with the character of crystallization texture. It was revealed that on melt quenching with 10 5 -10 6 K/s cooling rates the growth of columnar branches of degenerated dendrites was accopanied by Si atoms movement of the order of 0.1 μm. Structure and crack resistance of compacted articles produced from rapidly solidified powders were under study

  18. A study of nitride formation during the oxidation of titanium-tantalum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Lu, Y.C.; Kung, H.; Butt, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    The oxidation rates of Ti rich titanium-tantalum alloys are significantly lower in air than in oxygen. This nitrogen effect has been shown to be associated with the formation of a nitride layer at or near the scale-metal interface. In the present work the authors used transmission electron microscopy and microdiffraction to identify the nitrides formed on Ti5Ta and Ti40Ta (5 and 40 weight percent Ta alloys) during identical exposures. In both alloys the nitride develops in contact with the oxygen stabilized α-phase in the substrate. In Ti5Ta a continuous layer of TiN forms, while in Ti40Ta a discontinuous layer of Ti 2 N interspersed with Ta 2 O 5 (formed from the Ta rich β-phase) is formed. The nitride layer acts as an oxygen diffusion barrier, reducing the dissolution of oxygen in the substrate

  19. Anhydride-functional silane immobilized onto titanium surfaces induces osteoblast cell differentiation and reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria, E-mail: maria.godoy.gallardo@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Guillem-Marti, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.guillem.marti@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Sevilla, Pablo, E-mail: psevilla@euss.es [Department of Mechanics, Escola Universitària Salesiana de Sarrià (EUSS), C/ Passeig de Sant Bosco, 42, 08017 Barcelona (Spain); Manero, José M., E-mail: jose.maria.manero@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gil, Francisco J., E-mail: francesc.xavier.gil@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial infection in dental implants along with osseointegration failure usually leads to loss of the device. Bioactive molecules with antibacterial properties can be attached to titanium surfaces with anchoring molecules such as silanes, preventing biofilm formation and improving osseointegration. Properties of silanes as molecular binders have been thoroughly studied, but research on the biological effects of these coatings is scarce. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro cell response and antibacterial effects of triethoxysilypropyl succinic anhydride (TESPSA) silane anchored on titanium surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed a successful silanization. The silanized surfaces showed no cytotoxic effects. Gene expression analyses of Sarcoma Osteogenic (SaOS-2) osteoblast-like cells cultured on TESPSA silanized surfaces reported a remarkable increase of biochemical markers related to induction of osteoblastic cell differentiation. A manifest decrease of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation at early stages was observed on treated substrates, while favoring cell adhesion and spreading in bacteria–cell co-cultures. Surfaces treated with TESPSA could enhance a biological sealing on implant surfaces against bacteria colonization of underlying tissues. Furthermore, it can be an effective anchoring platform of biomolecules on titanium surfaces with improved osteoblastic differentiation and antibacterial properties. - Highlights: • TESPSA silane induces osteoblast differentiation. • TESPSA reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. • TESPSA is a promising anchoring platform of biomolecules onto titanium.

  20. Anhydride-functional silane immobilized onto titanium surfaces induces osteoblast cell differentiation and reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Sevilla, Pablo; Manero, José M.; Gil, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection in dental implants along with osseointegration failure usually leads to loss of the device. Bioactive molecules with antibacterial properties can be attached to titanium surfaces with anchoring molecules such as silanes, preventing biofilm formation and improving osseointegration. Properties of silanes as molecular binders have been thoroughly studied, but research on the biological effects of these coatings is scarce. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro cell response and antibacterial effects of triethoxysilypropyl succinic anhydride (TESPSA) silane anchored on titanium surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed a successful silanization. The silanized surfaces showed no cytotoxic effects. Gene expression analyses of Sarcoma Osteogenic (SaOS-2) osteoblast-like cells cultured on TESPSA silanized surfaces reported a remarkable increase of biochemical markers related to induction of osteoblastic cell differentiation. A manifest decrease of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation at early stages was observed on treated substrates, while favoring cell adhesion and spreading in bacteria–cell co-cultures. Surfaces treated with TESPSA could enhance a biological sealing on implant surfaces against bacteria colonization of underlying tissues. Furthermore, it can be an effective anchoring platform of biomolecules on titanium surfaces with improved osteoblastic differentiation and antibacterial properties. - Highlights: • TESPSA silane induces osteoblast differentiation. • TESPSA reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. • TESPSA is a promising anchoring platform of biomolecules onto titanium.

  1. Characterisation of hydrides in a zirconium alloy, by EBSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubhi, H.S.; Larsen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are used in nuclear reactors owing to their low capture cross-section for thermal neutrons and good mechanical and corrosion properties. However, they do suffer from delayed hydrogen cracking (DHC) due to formation of hydride particles. This study shows how the electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) technique can be used to characterise hydrides and their orientation relationship with the matrix. Hydrided EB weld specimens were prepared by electro-polishing, characterised using Oxford instruments AZtecHKL EBSD apparatus and software attached to a FEG SEM. Hydrides were found to exist as fine intra granular plates and having the Blackburn orientation relationship, i.e. (0002)Zr//(111)hydride and (1120)Zr//(1-10)hydride. The hydrides were also found to contain sigma 3 boundaries as well as local misorientations. (author)

  2. Oxygen-implanted induced formation of oxide layer enhances blood compatibility on titanium for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Wei-Chiang [School of Oral Hygiene, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Chang, Fang-Mo [School of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Yang, Tzu-Sen [Master Program in Graduate Institute of Nanomedicine and Medical Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Ou, Keng-Liang [School of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University-Shuang-Ho Hospital, Taipei 235, Taiwan (China); Lin, Che-Tong [School of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Peng, Pei-Wen, E-mail: apon@tmu.edu.tw [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China)

    2016-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) layers were prepared on a Ti substrate by using oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (oxygen PIII). The surface chemical states, structure, and morphology of the layers were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscope. The mechanical properties, such as the Young's modulus and hardness, of the layers were investigated using nanoindentation testing. The Ti{sup 4+} chemical state was determined to be present on oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces, which consisted of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} with a rutile structure. Compared with Ti substrates, the oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces exhibited decreased Young's moduli and hardness. Parameters indicating the blood compatibility of the oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces, including the clotting time and platelet adhesion and activation, were studied in vitro. Clotting time assays indicated that the clotting time of oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces was longer than that of the Ti substrate, which was associated with decreased fibrinogen adsorption. In conclusion, the surface characteristics and the blood compatibility of Ti implants can be modified and improved using oxygen PIII. - Highlights: • The Ti{sup 4+} chemical state was determined to be present on oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces. • The nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} with a rutile structure was formed on titanium surfaces. • A nanoporous TiO{sub 2} layer in the rutile phase prepared using oxygen PIII treatment can be used to prolong blood clot formation.

  3. pH-regulated antimony oxychloride nanoparticle formation on titanium oxide nanostructures: a photocatalytically active heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Buchholcz, Balázs

    2017-02-06

    Improving the catalytic activity of heterogeneous photocatalysts has become a hot topic recently. To this end, considerable progress has been made in the efficient separation of photogenerated charge carriers by e.g. the realization of heterojunction photocatalysts. V-VI-VII compound semiconductors, namely, bismuth oxyhalides, are popular photocatalysts. However, results on antimony oxyhalides [SbOX (X = Br, Cl, I)], the very promising alternatives to the well-known BiOX photomodifiers, are scarce. Here, we report the successful decoration of titanium oxide nanostructures with 8-11 nm diameter SbOX nanoparticles for the first time ever. The product size and stoichiometry could be controlled by the pH of the reactant mixture, while subsequent calcination could transform the structure of the titanate nanotube (TiONT) support and the prepared antimony oxychloride particles. In contrast to the ease of composite formation in the SbOX/TiONT case, anatase TiO could not facilitate the formation of antimony oxychloride nanoparticles on its surface. The titanate nanotube-based composites showed activity in a generally accepted quasi-standard photocatalytic test reaction (methyl orange dye decolorization). We found that the SbOCl/TiONT synthesized at pH = 1 is the most active sample in a broad temperature range.

  4. Radiation-induced defect-formation in lithium hydride and deuteride monocrystals. [Electron and X-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustovarov, V.A.; Betenekova, T.A.; Zav' yalov, N.A.; Cholakh, S.O. (Ural' skij Politekhnicheskij Inst., Sverdlovsk (USSR))

    1983-08-01

    Methods of stationary and pulse absorption spectroscopy were used to investigate into processes of formation and decay of radiation defects in cubic LiH and LiD crystals. F- and V-centers form at low temperatures during crystal irradiation by photons, creating excitons selectively, accelerator electrons, X-ray radiation. Analysis of possible mechanisms of defect formation shows that radiation defect formation in LiH is based on radiationless exciton decay. It is shown that efficiency of F- and V-centers generation in pure and impure crystals in 80-298 K range is the same. Exciton decay with formation of Frenkel radiation defects in pure LiH and LiD crystals takes place, probably, in regular crystal lattice points. Process of radiation defect formation as a result of near activator exciton decay takes place in impure LiH-Na, LiD-Na crystals.

  5. Understanding the effects of potassium ferricyanide on lead hydride formation in tetrahydroborate system and its application for determination of lead in milk using hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Biyang, E-mail: dengby16@163.com; Xu, Xiangshu; Xiao, Yan; Zhu, Pingchuan; Wang, Yingzi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposed a novel explanation for plumbane generation. • Expounded the role of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} in plumbane generation. • Clarified the controversial aspects in the mechanism of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} enhancement. • Used X-ray diffractometry to analyze the intermediates. • Developed a method to analyze lead in milk using K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} and K{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6} as new additives. - Absract: To understand the formation of plumbane in the Pb{sup II}-NaBH{sub 4}-K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} system, the intermediate products produced in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH{sub 4} in the presence of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} were studied. The produced plumbane and elemental lead were measured through continuous flow hydride generation (HG)-inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and X-ray diffraction spectrometry techniques, respectively. Based on the experimental results, the explanations can be depicted in the following steps: (1) plumbane and black lead sediment (black Pb) are formed in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH{sub 4}; (2) the black Pb is oxidized by K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} to form Pb{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 6}], which further reacts with NaBH{sub 4} to form more plumbane and black Pb; and (3) another round starts in which the produced black Pb from the step 2 is then oxidized continuously by K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} to form more Pb{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 6}] complex, which would produce more plumbane. In short, the black Pb and Pb{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 6}] complex are the key intermediate products for the formation of plumbane in the Pb{sup II}-NaBH{sub 4}-K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} system. Based on the enhancement effect of potassium ferricyanide and potassium ferrocyanide, a method was developed to analyze lead in milk with HG-ICP OES technique. The detection limit of the method was observed as 0.081 μg L{sup −1}. The linearity range of lead was found between 0.3 and 50,000 μg L{sup −1} with correlation coefficient of 0

  6. X-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy of titanium silicide formation in patterned microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F.

    1997-01-01

    Titanium silicide has the lowest resistivity of all the refractory metal silicides and has good thermal stability as well as excellent compatibility with Al metallization. It is used as an intermediate buffer layer between W vias and the Si substrate to provide good electrical contact in ULSI technology, whose submicron patterned features form the basis of the integrated circuits of today and tomorrow, in the self aligned silicide (salicide) formation process. TiSi 2 exists in two phases: a metastable C49 base-centered orthorhombic phase with specific resistivity of 60-90 μΩ-cm that is formed at a lower temperature (formation anneal) and the stable 12-15 μΩ-cm resistivity face-centered orthorhombic C54 phase into which C49 is transformed with a higher temperature (conversion anneal) step. C54 is clearly the target for low resistivity VLSI interconnects. However, it has been observed that when dimensions shrink below 1/mic (or when the Ti thickness drops below several hundred angstroms), the transformation of C49 into C54 is inhibited and agglomeration often occurs in fine lines at high temperatures. This results in a rise in resistivity due to incomplete transformation to C54 and because of discontinuities in the interconnect line resulting from agglomeration. Spectromicroscopy is an appropriate tool to study the evolution of the TiSi2 formation process because of its high resolution chemical imaging ability which can detect bonding changes even in the absence of changes in the relative amounts of species and because of the capability of studying thick open-quotes as isclose quotes industrial samples

  7. X-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy of titanium silicide formation in patterned microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Stoughton, WI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Titanium silicide has the lowest resistivity of all the refractory metal silicides and has good thermal stability as well as excellent compatibility with Al metallization. It is used as an intermediate buffer layer between W vias and the Si substrate to provide good electrical contact in ULSI technology, whose submicron patterned features form the basis of the integrated circuits of today and tomorrow, in the self aligned silicide (salicide) formation process. TiSi{sub 2} exists in two phases: a metastable C49 base-centered orthorhombic phase with specific resistivity of 60-90 {mu}{Omega}-cm that is formed at a lower temperature (formation anneal) and the stable 12-15 {mu}{Omega}-cm resistivity face-centered orthorhombic C54 phase into which C49 is transformed with a higher temperature (conversion anneal) step. C54 is clearly the target for low resistivity VLSI interconnects. However, it has been observed that when dimensions shrink below 1/mic (or when the Ti thickness drops below several hundred angstroms), the transformation of C49 into C54 is inhibited and agglomeration often occurs in fine lines at high temperatures. This results in a rise in resistivity due to incomplete transformation to C54 and because of discontinuities in the interconnect line resulting from agglomeration. Spectromicroscopy is an appropriate tool to study the evolution of the TiSi2 formation process because of its high resolution chemical imaging ability which can detect bonding changes even in the absence of changes in the relative amounts of species and because of the capability of studying thick {open_quotes}as is{close_quotes} industrial samples.

  8. Microtwin formation in the α phase of duplex titanium alloys affected by strain rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsiang; Wu, Shu-Ming; Kao, Fang-Hsin; Wang, Shing-Hoa; Yang, Jer-Ren; Yang, Chia-Chih; Chiou, Chuan-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The long and dense twins in α phase of SP700 alloy occurring at lower strain rates promote a good ductility. → The deformation in SP700 alloy changed to micro twins-controlled mechanism in α as the strain rate decreases. → The material has time to redistribute the deformed strain between α and β as the strain rate decreases. - Abstract: The effect of tensile strain rate on deformation microstructure was investigated in Ti-6-4 (Ti-6Al-4V) and SP700 (Ti-4.5Al-3V-2Mo-2Fe) of the duplex titanium alloys. Below a strain rate of 10 -2 s -1 , Ti-6-4 alloy had a higher ultimate tensile strength than SP700 alloy. However, the yield strength of SP700 was consistently greater than Ti-6-4 at different strain rates. The ductility of SP700 alloy associated with twin formation (especially at the slow strain rate of 10 -4 s -1 ), always exceeded that of Ti-6-4 alloy at different strain rates. It is caused by a large quantity of deformation twins took place in the α phase of SP700 due to the lower stacking fault energy by the β stabilizer of molybdenum alloying. In addition, the local deformation more was imposed on the α grains from the surrounding β-rich grains by redistributing strain as the strain rate decreased in SP700 duplex alloy.

  9. Environmental effects in titanium aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.W.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental effects on titanium aluminide alloys are potentially of great importance for engineering applications of these materials, although little has been published to date on such effects. The primary emphasis in this paper is on hydrogen effects, with a brief reference to oxygen effects. Hydrogen is readily absorbed at elevated temperature into all the titanium aluminide compositions studied to date, in amounts as large as 10 at.%, and on cooling virtually all this hydrogen is precipitated as a hydride phase or phases. The presence of these precipitated hydride plates affects mechanical properties in ways similar to what is observed in other hydride forming materials, although effects per unit volume of hydride are not particularly severe in the titanium aluminides. Microstructure, and thus thermal and mechanical history, plays a major role in controlling the severity of hydrogen effects

  10. In situ characterization of Ti-peroxy gel during formation on titanium surfaces in hydrogen peroxide containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muyco, Julie J.; Gray, Jeremy J.; Ratto, Timothy V.; Orme, Christine A.; McKittrick, Joanna; Frangos, John

    2006-01-01

    Three possible functions of Ti-peroxy gel are: reduction of the inflammatory response through the reduction of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species; creation of a favorable surface for calcium phosphate nucleation; and as a transitional layer between the compliant surrounding tissue and the stiff titanium. Traditional surface characterization techniques operate in high vacuum environments that alter the actual sample-solution interface. Our studies used techniques that allowed samples to remain in solution and be observed over time. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Raman spectroscopy were each used in situ to define kinetic and mechanical properties of Ti-peroxy gel as it formed over time on titanium during exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Our studies enabled us to monitor real-time changes in the native oxide layer on titanium in hydrogen peroxide containing solution, including the formation of a Ti-peroxy gel layer above the native oxide. Peaks attributed to Ti-peroxy gel were seen to emerge over the course of several hours using in situ Raman spectroscopy. Force-distance curves suggest a layer that thickens with time on the titanium sample surface. EIS data showed that changes in the surface layers could be monitored in solution over time

  11. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium as a method to reduce the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Alexandre [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bordeaux University, Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), European Institute of Chemistry and Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac (France); Elie, Anne-Marie [Bordeaux University, CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS, Bordeaux Science Agro, 1 Rue du G. de Gaulle, 33170 Gradignan (France); Plawinski, Laurent [Bordeaux University, Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), European Institute of Chemistry and Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac (France); Serro, Ana Paula [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, CQE-Centro de Química Estrutural, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, CQFM-Centro de Química-Física Molecular and Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology - IN, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Almeida, Amélia [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Urdaci, Maria C. [Bordeaux University, CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS, Bordeaux Science Agro, 1 Rue du G. de Gaulle, 33170 Gradignan (France); Durrieu, Marie-Christine [Bordeaux University, Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), European Institute of Chemistry and Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac (France); Vilar, Rui, E-mail: rui.vilar@tecnico.ulisboa.pt [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The short-term adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus onto femtosecond laser textured surfaces of titanium was investigated. • The laser textured surfaces consist of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars. • The laser treatment enhances the hydrophilicity and the surface free energy of the material. • The laser treatment reduces significantly the adhesion of S. aureus and biofilm formation. • Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium is a simple and promising method for endowing dental and orthopedic implants with antibacterial properties. - Abstract: The aim of the present work was to investigate the possibility of using femtosecond laser surface texturing as a method to reduce the colonization of Grade 2 Titanium alloy surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus and the subsequent formation of biofilm. The laser treatments were carried out with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system with a central wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 500 fs. Two types of surface textures, consisting of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars, were produced. The topography, chemical composition and phase constitution of these surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was assessed by the sessile drop method using water and diiodomethane as testing liquids. The response of S. aureus put into contact with the laser treated surfaces in controlled conditions was investigated by epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy 48 h after cell seeding. The results achieved show that the laser treatment reduces significantly the bacterial adhesion to the surface as well as biofilm formation as compared to a reference polished surfaces and suggest that femtosecond laser texturing is a simple and promising method

  12. Mesoporous titanium dioxide (TiO2) with hierarchically 3D dendrimeric architectures: formation mechanism and highly enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Li-Hua; Rooke, Joanna Claire; Deng, Zhao; Hu, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Shao-Zhuan; Wang, Li; Li, Yu; Krief, Alain; Su, Bao-Lian

    2013-03-15

    Mesoporous TiO(2) with a hierarchically 3D dendrimeric nanostructure comprised of nanoribbon building units has been synthesized via a spontaneous self-formation process from various titanium alkoxides. These hierarchically 3D dendrimeric architectures can be obtained by a very facile, template-free method, by simply dropping a titanium butoxide precursor into methanol solution. The novel configuration of the mesoporous TiO(2) nanostructure in nanoribbon building units yields a high surface area. The calcined samples show significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity and degradation rates owing to the mesoporosity and their improved crystallinity after calcination. Furthermore, the 3D dendrimeric architectures can be preserved after phase transformation from amorphous TiO(2) to anatase or rutile, which occurs during calcination. In addition, the spontaneous self-formation process of mesoporous TiO(2) with hierarchically 3D dendrimeric architectures from the hydrolysis and condensation reaction of titanium butoxide in methanol has been followed by in situ optical microscopy (OM), revealing the secret on the formation of hierarchically 3D dendrimeric nanostructures. Moreover, mesoporous TiO(2) nanostructures with similar hierarchically 3D dendrimeric architectures can also be obtained using other titanium alkoxides. The porosities and nanostructures of the resultant products were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, and N(2) adsorption-desorption measurements. The present work provides a facile and reproducible method for the synthesis of novel mesoporous TiO(2) nanoarchitectures, which in turn could herald the fabrication of more efficient photocatalysts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomineralized diamond-like carbon films with incorporated titanium dioxide nanoparticles improved bioactivity properties and reduced biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, F S; Oliveira, J R; Milani, J; Oliveira, L D; Machado, J P B; Trava-Airoldi, V J; Lobo, A O; Marciano, F R

    2017-12-01

    Recently, the development of coatings to protect biomedical alloys from oxidation, passivation and to reduce the ability for a bacterial biofilm to form after implantation has emerged. Diamond-like carbon films are commonly used for implanted medical due to their physical and chemical characteristics, showing good interactions with the biological environment. However, these properties can be significantly improved when titanium dioxide nanoparticles are included, especially to enhance the bactericidal properties of the films. So far, the deposition of hydroxyapatite on the film surface has been studied in order to improve biocompatibility and bioactive behavior. Herein, we developed a new route to obtain a homogeneous and crystalline apatite coating on diamond-like carbon films grown on 304 biomedical stainless steel and evaluated its antibacterial effect. For this purpose, films containing two different concentrations of titanium dioxide (0.1 and 0.3g/L) were obtained by chemical vapor deposition. To obtain the apatite layer, the samples were soaked in simulated body fluid solution for up to 21days. The antibacterial activity of the films was evaluated by bacterial eradication tests using Staphylococcus aureus biofilm. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering spectroscopy, and goniometry showed that homogeneous, crystalline, and hydrophilic apatite films were formed independently of the titanium dioxide concentration. Interestingly, the diamond-like films containing titanium dioxide and hydroxyapatite reduced the biofilm formation compared to controls. A synergism between hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide that provided an antimicrobial effect against opportunistic pathogens was clearly observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Formation of titanium diboride coatings during the anodic polarization of titanium in a chloride melt with a low boron oxide content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshina, L. A.; Malkov, V. B.; Molchanova, N. G.

    2015-02-01

    The corrosion-electrochemical behavior of titanium in a molten eutectic mixture of cesium and sodium chlorides containing up to 1 wt % boron oxide is studied in the temperature range 810-870 K in an argon atmosphere. The potential, the current, and the rate of titanium corrosion are determined. The optimum conditions of forming a dense continuous titanium diboride coating on titanium with high adhesion to the metallic base are found for the anodic activation of titanium in the molten electrolyte under study.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R. C.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study (1) the basic electrochemical behavior of titanium in acid chloride solutions and (2) the response of the metal to dynamic straining in the same evironment. The aim of this group of experiments was to simulate, as nearly as possible, the actual conditions which exist at the tip of a crack. One of the foremost theories proposed to explain the propagation of stress corrosion cracks is a hydrogen embrittlement theory involving the precipitation of embrittling titanium hydrides inside the metal near the crack tip. An initial survey of the basic electrochemical literature indicated that surface hydrides play a critical role in the electrochemistry of titanium in acid solutions. A comprehensive analysis of the effect of surface films, particularly hydrides, on the electrochemical behavior of titanium in these solution is presented.

  16. Preparation of beryllium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for preparing beryllium hydride by the direct reaction of beryllium borohydride and aluminum hydride trimethylamine adduct. Volatile by-products and unreacted reactants are readily removed from the product mass by sublimation and/or evaporation. (U.S.)

  17. Titanium embedded cage structure formation in AlnTi+ clusters and their interaction with Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M. B.; Vega, A.; Balbás, L. C.; Aguilera-Granja, F.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Ar physisorption was used as a structural probe for the location of the Ti dopant atom in aluminium cluster cations, Al n Ti + [Lang et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 22, 1508 (2011)]. As an experiment result, the lack of Ar complexes for n > n c determines the cluster size for which the Ti atom is located inside of an Al cage. To elucidate the decisive factors for the formation of endohedrally Al n Ti + , experimentalists proposed detailed computational studies as indispensable. In this work, we investigated, using the density functional theory, the structural and electronic properties of singly titanium doped cationic clusters, Al n Ti + (n = 16–21) as well as the adsorption of an Ar atom on them. The first endohedral doped cluster, with Ti encapsulated in a fcc-like cage skeleton, appears at n c = 21, which is the critical number consistent with the exohedral-endohedral transition experimentally observed. At this critical size the non-crystalline icosahedral growth pattern, related to the pure aluminium clusters, with the Ti atom in the surface, changes into a endohedral fcc-like pattern. The map of structural isomers, relative energy differences, second energy differences, and structural parameters were determined and analyzed. Moreover, we show the critical size depends on the net charge of the cluster, being different for the cationic clusters (n c = 21) and their neutral counterparts (n c = 20). For the Al n Ti + · Ar complexes, and for n n Ti + clusters keeps unaltered in the Ar-cluster complexes. This fact indicates that Ar adsorption does not influence the cluster structure, providing support to the experimental technique used. For n c = 21, the smallest size of endohedral Ti doped cationic clusters, the Ar binding energy decreases drastically, whereas the Ar-cluster distance increases substantially, point to Ar physisorption, as assumed by the experimentalists. Calculated Ar adsorption energies agree well with available experimental binding

  18. The effect of diabetes on bone formation following application of the GBR principle with the use of titanium domes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Bok; Retzepi, Maria; Petrie, Aviva; Hakimi, Ahmad-Reza; Schwarz, Frank; Donos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of experimental diabetes and metabolic control on de novo bone formation following the GBR principle under titanium dome with a hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface. Three groups of equal number of randomly allocated Wistar strain rats were created: (a) uncontrolled, streptozotocin-induced diabetes (D); (b) insulin-controlled diabetes (CD); (c) healthy (H). Each group was then further divided into two groups according to either 7 or 42 days of healing period, which received either a hydrophobic (SLA: A) or a hydrophilic (SLActive: B) dome. The undecalcified sections were evaluated by qualitative and quantitative histological analysis and the differences between means for the groups (D, CD, and H) and the type of domes (SLA and SLActive) at each of two observational periods (i.e. 7 and 42 days) were assessed by performing a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). In all experimental groups, significant de novo bone formation under the domes was observed at 42 days of healing. There was a tendency of increased new total bone (TB) formation in H and CD groups compared to D group at 42 days of healing. Also, the SLActive titanium surface showed a trend of promoting superior TB formation at the early observational period among the experimental groups, however these differences did not reach statistical significance. In regards to the bone-to-implant contact (BIC%) under the both dome treatments (SLA and SLActive), there was no statistically significant difference among the H, CD, and D groups at both 7 and 42 days. Despite of the presence of uncontrolled diabetes, substantial de novo bone formation can be achieved in titanium domes with a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic surface. The use of SLActive titanium surface may present a tendency to promote new bone formation in healthy and diabetic conditions at 7 days of healing, however the obtained data do not allow any robust conclusions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Prediction of superconducting ternary hydride MgGeH6: from divergent high-pressure formation routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanbin; Duan, Defang; Shao, Ziji; Li, Da; Wang, Liyuan; Yu, Hongyu; Tian, Fubo; Xie, Hui; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2017-10-18

    Invigorated by the high temperature superconductivity in some binary hydrogen-dominated compounds, we systematically explored high-pressure phase diagrams and superconductivity of a ternary Mg-Ge-H system using ab initio methods. Stoichiometric MgGeH 6 with high hydrogen content exhibiting Pm3[combining macron] symmetry was predicted from a series of high-pressure synthesis paths. We performed an in-depth study on three distinct formation routes to MgGeH 6 , i.e., Mg + Ge + 3H 2 → MgGeH 6 , MgGe + 3H 2 → MgGeH 6 and MgH 2 + GeH 4 → MgGeH 6 at high pressures. By directly squeezing three elemental solids Mg + Ge + 3H 2 , we obtained ternary MgGeH 6 at 200 GPa. By adding a little bit of the MgGe alloy into hydrogen, we found that MgGeH 6 can form and stabilize at about 200 GPa. More intriguingly, upon compressing MgH 2 and GeH 4 to 250 GPa, we also predicted the same MgGeH 6 . Electron structure calculations reveal that the cubic MgGeH 6 is a good metal and takes on ionic character. Electron-phonon coupling calculation reveals a large λ = 1.16 for MgGeH 6 at 200 GPa. In particular, we found that ternary MgGeH 6 could be a potential high temperature superconductor with a superconducting transition temperature T c of ∼67 K at 200 GPa.

  20. Studies in group IV organometallic chemistry XXX. Synthesis of compounds containing tin---titanium and tin---zirconium bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, H.M.J.C.; Verbeek, F.; Noltes, J.G.

    1968-01-01

    Starting from the tetrakis(diethylamino) derivatives of titanium and zirconium and pheyltin hydrides six intermetalic compounds contianing up to nine tin and titanium(or zirconium) atoms have been obtained by hydrostannolysis type reactions.

  1. Hydridation of Ti-6Al-4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domizzi, G; Luppo, M.I; Ortiz, M; Vigna, G

    2004-01-01

    The production of Ti pieces or their alloys through powder metallurgy is an economical alternative that replaces the costly methods commonly used. The Ti-6AI-4V alloy is widely used in the aerospace, chemical and medical industries. The use of powder from the alloy instead of using more pure alloyed titanium powders, further simplifies the production process. The presence of V allows the phase β to stabilize at very low temperatures and both alloys alter the Ti-H equilibrium diagram. This work analyzes to what degree these effects influence the obtaining of powders from this alloy from that of hydridation and dehydridation. Although it has slower kinetics, powders can be produced in times similar to those found for grade 2 Ti since the distribution of hydrides in the sample is uniform and the material is fragile enough for concentrations of approximately 0.7 H/Ti (CW)

  2. Investigation on the effect of collagen and vitamins on biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating formation on titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Ciobanu, Octavian

    2013-04-01

    This study uses an in vitro experimental approach to investigate the roles of collagen and vitamins in regulating the deposition of hydroxyapatite layer on the pure titanium surface. Titanium implants were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer under biomimetic conditions by using a supersaturated calcification solution (SCS), modified by adding vitamins A and D3, and collagen. The hydroxyapatite deposits on titanium were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results obtained have shown that hydroxyapatite coatings were produced in vitro under vitamins and collagen influence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Incorporating catechol into electroactive polypyrrole nanowires on titanium to promote hydroxyapatite formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengao Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To improve the osteointegration property of biomedical titanium, nano-architectured electroactive coating was synthesized through the electrochemical polymerization of dopamine and pyrrole. The highly binding affinity of Ca2+ to the catechol moiety of doped dopamine enabled efficient interaction between polypyrrole/polydopamine nanowires and mineral ions. The results indicate that the PPy/PDA nanowires preserved its efficient electro-activity and accelerated the hydroxyapatite deposition in a simulated body fluid. The PPy/PDA nanowires coating could be applied to promote the osteointegration of titanium implant.

  4. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce oxidative stress and DNA-adduct formation but not DNA-breakage in human lung cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schins Roel PF

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Titanium dioxide (TiO2, also known as titanium (IV oxide or anatase, is the naturally occurring oxide of titanium. It is also one of the most commercially used form. To date, no parameter has been set for the average ambient air concentration of TiO2 nanoparticles (NP by any regulatory agency. Previously conducted studies had established these nanoparticles to be mainly non-cyto- and -genotoxic, although they had been found to generate free radicals both acellularly (specially through photocatalytic activity and intracellularly. The present study determines the role of TiO2-NP (anatase, ∅ in vitro. For comparison, iron containing nanoparticles (hematite, Fe2O3, ∅ 2-NP did not induce DNA-breakage measured by the Comet-assay in both cell types. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was measured acellularly (without any photocatalytic activity as well as intracellularly for both types of particles, however, the iron-containing NP needed special reducing conditions before pronounced radical generation. A high level of DNA adduct formation (8-OHdG was observed in IMR-90 cells exposed to TiO2-NP, but not in cells exposed to hematite NP. Our study demonstrates different modes of action for TiO2- and Fe2O3-NP. Whereas TiO2-NP were able to generate elevated amounts of free radicals, which induced indirect genotoxicity mainly by DNA-adduct formation, Fe2O3-NP were clastogenic (induction of DNA-breakage and required reducing conditions for radical formation.

  5. Formation of titanium dioxide nanotubes on Ti–30Nb–xTa alloys by anodizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Sil [Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yong-Hoon [Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Division of Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Choe, Han-Cheol, E-mail: hcchoe@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Brantley, William A. [Division of Restorative, Prosthetic and Primary Care Dentistry, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-12-31

    The goal of this study was to investigate the formation of titanium dioxide nanotubes on the surface of cast Ti–30Nb–xTa alloys by anodizing. The anodization technique for creating the nanotubes utilized a potentiostat and an electrolyte containing 1 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with 0.8 wt.% NaF. The grain size of the Ti–30Nb–xTa alloys increased as the Ta content increased. Using X-ray diffraction, for the Ti–30Nb alloy the main peaks were identified as α″ martensite with strong peaks of β phase. The phases in the Ti–30Nb–xTa alloys changed from a duplex (α″ + β) microstructure to solely β phase with increasing Ta content. The nanotubes that formed on the surface of the Ti–30Nb–xTa alloys were amorphous TiO{sub 2} without an evidence of the crystalline anatase or rutile forms of TiO{sub 2}. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the average diameters of the small and large nanotubes on the Ti–30Nb alloy not containing Ta were approximately 100 nm and 400 nm, respectively, whereas the small and large nanotubes on the alloy had diameters of approximately 85 nm and 300 nm, respectively. As the Ta content increased from 0 to 15 wt.%, the average lengths of the nanotubes increased from 2 μm to 3.5 μm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the nanotubes were principally composed of Ti, Nb, Ta, O and F. Contact angle measurements showed that the nanotube surface had good wettability by water droplets. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanotube layers on anodized Ti-30Nb-xTa alloys have been investigated. • Nanotube surface had an amorphous structure without heat treatment. • Nanotube diameter of Ti-30Nb-xTa decreased, whereas tube layer increased with Ta content. • The nanotube surface exhibited the low contact angle and good wettability.

  6. Formation of titanium dioxide nanotubes on Ti–30Nb–xTa alloys by anodizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun-Sil; Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Choe, Han-Cheol; Brantley, William A.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the formation of titanium dioxide nanotubes on the surface of cast Ti–30Nb–xTa alloys by anodizing. The anodization technique for creating the nanotubes utilized a potentiostat and an electrolyte containing 1 M H 3 PO 4 with 0.8 wt.% NaF. The grain size of the Ti–30Nb–xTa alloys increased as the Ta content increased. Using X-ray diffraction, for the Ti–30Nb alloy the main peaks were identified as α″ martensite with strong peaks of β phase. The phases in the Ti–30Nb–xTa alloys changed from a duplex (α″ + β) microstructure to solely β phase with increasing Ta content. The nanotubes that formed on the surface of the Ti–30Nb–xTa alloys were amorphous TiO 2 without an evidence of the crystalline anatase or rutile forms of TiO 2 . Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the average diameters of the small and large nanotubes on the Ti–30Nb alloy not containing Ta were approximately 100 nm and 400 nm, respectively, whereas the small and large nanotubes on the alloy had diameters of approximately 85 nm and 300 nm, respectively. As the Ta content increased from 0 to 15 wt.%, the average lengths of the nanotubes increased from 2 μm to 3.5 μm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the nanotubes were principally composed of Ti, Nb, Ta, O and F. Contact angle measurements showed that the nanotube surface had good wettability by water droplets. - Highlights: • TiO 2 nanotube layers on anodized Ti-30Nb-xTa alloys have been investigated. • Nanotube surface had an amorphous structure without heat treatment. • Nanotube diameter of Ti-30Nb-xTa decreased, whereas tube layer increased with Ta content. • The nanotube surface exhibited the low contact angle and good wettability

  7. C-H Bond Functionalization via Hydride Transfer: Formation of α-Arylated Piperidines and 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinolines via Stereoselective Intramolecular Amination of Benzylic C-H Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Vadola, Paul A.; Carrera, Ignacio; Sames, Dalibor

    2012-01-01

    We here report a study of the intramolecular amination of sp3 C-H bonds via the hydride transfer cyclization of N-tosylimines (HT-amination). In this transformation, 5-aryl-aldehydes are subjected to N-toluenesulfonamide in the presence of BF3•OEt2 to effect imine formation and HT-cyclization, leading to 2-aryl-piperidines and 3-aryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolines in a one-pot procedure. We examined the reactivity of a range of aldehyde substrates as a function of their conformational flexib...

  8. Formation of pyridine N-oxides using mesoporous titanium silicalite-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Perez-Ferreras, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous titanium silicalite-1 (TS-1) prepared by carbon-templating is significantly more active than conventional TS-1 for the oxidation of pyridine derivatives using aqueous hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The catalytic activity is increased by the system of mesopores that helps to overcome the...

  9. Hydrogen content in titanium and a titanium–zirconium alloy after acid etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Matthias J.; Walter, Martin S. [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1109, Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway); Institute of Medical and Polymer Engineering, Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstrasse 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lyngstadaas, S. Petter [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1109, Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway); Wintermantel, Erich [Institute of Medical and Polymer Engineering, Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstrasse 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Haugen, Håvard J., E-mail: h.j.haugen@odont.uio.no [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1109, Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-04-01

    Dental implant alloys made from titanium and zirconium are known for their high mechanical strength, fracture toughness and corrosion resistance in comparison with commercially pure titanium. The aim of the study was to investigate possible differences in the surface chemistry and/or surface topography of titanium and titanium–zirconium surfaces after sand blasting and acid etching. The two surfaces were compared by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and profilometry. The 1.9 times greater surface hydrogen concentration of titanium zirconium compared to titanium was found to be the major difference between the two materials. Zirconium appeared to enhance hydride formation on titanium alloys when etched in acid. Surface topography revealed significant differences on the micro and nanoscale. Surface roughness was increased significantly (p < 0.01) on the titanium–zirconium alloy. High-resolution images showed nanostructures only present on titanium zirconium. - Highlights: ► TiZr alloy showed increased hydrogen levels over Ti. ► The alloying element Zr appeared to catalyze hydrogen absorption in Ti. ► Surface roughness was significantly increased for the TiZr alloy over Ti. ► TiZr alloy revealed nanostructures not observed for Ti.

  10. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  11. Tritium immobilization and packaging using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtslander, W.J.; Yaraskavitch, J.M.

    1981-04-01

    Tritium recovered from CANDU heavy water reactors will have to be packaged and stored in a safe manner. Tritium will be recovered in the elemental form, T 2 . Metal tritides are effective compounds in which to immobilize the tritium as a stable non-reactive solid with a high tritium capacity. The technology necessary to prepare hydrides of suitable metals, such as titanium and zirconium, have been developed and the properties of the prepared materials evaluated. Conceptual designs of packages for containing metal tritides suitable for transportation and long-term storage have been made and initial testing started. (author)

  12. Blistering and hydride embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals have been categorized into several groups. Two of the groups, hydrogen blistering and hydride embrittlement, are reasonably well understood, and problems relating to their occurrence may be avoided if that understanding is used as a basis for selecting alloys for hydrogen service. Blistering and hydride embrittlement are described along with several techniques of materials selection and used to minimize their adverse effects. (U.S.)

  13. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium as a method to reduce the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Alexandre; Elie, Anne-Marie; Plawinski, Laurent; Serro, Ana Paula; Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria; Almeida, Amélia; Urdaci, Maria C.; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Vilar, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the possibility of using femtosecond laser surface texturing as a method to reduce the colonization of Grade 2 Titanium alloy surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus and the subsequent formation of biofilm. The laser treatments were carried out with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system with a central wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 500 fs. Two types of surface textures, consisting of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars, were produced. The topography, chemical composition and phase constitution of these surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was assessed by the sessile drop method using water and diiodomethane as testing liquids. The response of S. aureus put into contact with the laser treated surfaces in controlled conditions was investigated by epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy 48 h after cell seeding. The results achieved show that the laser treatment reduces significantly the bacterial adhesion to the surface as well as biofilm formation as compared to a reference polished surfaces and suggest that femtosecond laser texturing is a simple and promising method for endowing dental and orthopedic titanium implants with antibacterial properties, reducing the risk of implant-associated infections without requiring immobilized antibacterial substances, nanoparticles or coatings.

  14. Effects of hydrophilicity and microtopography of titanium implant surfaces on initial supragingival plaque biofilm formation. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, F; Sculean, A; Wieland, M; Horn, N; Nuesry, E; Bube, C; Becker, J

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the present pilot study is to investigate the effects of hydrophilicity and microtopography of titanium implant surfaces on initial supragingival plaque biofilm formation. Test specimens were manufactured from commercially pure grade 2 titanium according to one of the following procedures: polished (P), acid-etched (A), chemically modified (mod) A (modA), sand-blasted large grit and A (SLA), and modSLA. Intraoral splints were used to collect an in vivo supragingival plaque biofilm in each group at 12, 24, and 48 h. Stained plaque biofilm (PB) areas (%) were morphometrically assessed. All groups exhibited significant increases of mean PB areas over time (p P > A =modA (p modSLA = P > A = modA (p A = modA (p < 0.001; respectively). Within the limits of a pilot study, it could be concluded that hydrophilicity had no apparent effect, while microtopography had a highly uneven and unpredictable influence on supragingival plaque biofilm formation.

  15. The growth of crystals of erbium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimshaw, J.A.; Spooner, F.J.; Wilson, C.G.; McQuillan, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Crystals of the rare-earth hydride ErH 2 have been produced with face areas greater than a square millimetre and corresponding volumes exceeding those of earlier crystals by orders of magnitude. The hydride, which was produced in bulk polycrystalline form by hydriding erbium metal at 950 0 C, has been examined by optical and X-ray techniques. For material of composition ErH 2 and ErHsub(1.8) the size of the grains and their degree of strain appears to depend more on oxygen contamination during formation and on the subsequent cooling procedure, than on the size of erbium metal crystals in the starting material. (author)

  16. Investigation on the effect of collagen and vitamins on biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating formation on titanium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Ciobanu, Octavian

    2013-01-01

    This study uses an in vitro experimental approach to investigate the roles of collagen and vitamins in regulating the deposition of hydroxyapatite layer on the pure titanium surface. Titanium implants were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer under biomimetic conditions by using a supersaturated calcification solution (SCS), modified by adding vitamins A and D 3 , and collagen. The hydroxyapatite deposits on titanium were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results obtained have shown that hydroxyapatite coatings were produced in vitro under vitamins and collagen influence. - Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite was grown on Ti using a modified supersaturated calcification solution (M-SCS). ► Vitamins (A and D3) and collagen in M-SCS have a significant effect on apatite precipitation. ► M-SCS stimulates a biomimetic apatite deposition with 0.5–1 μm thickness in a short time. ► Hydroxyapatite crystallites have thin plate morphologies and size below 1 μm

  17. Investigation on the effect of collagen and vitamins on biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating formation on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela, E-mail: gciobanu03@yahoo.co.uk [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Prof. dr. docent Dimitrie Mangeron Rd., no. 63, zip: 700050, Iasi (Romania); Ciobanu, Octavian [“Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, Universitatii Str., no. 16, zip: 700115, Iasi (Romania)

    2013-04-01

    This study uses an in vitro experimental approach to investigate the roles of collagen and vitamins in regulating the deposition of hydroxyapatite layer on the pure titanium surface. Titanium implants were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer under biomimetic conditions by using a supersaturated calcification solution (SCS), modified by adding vitamins A and D{sub 3}, and collagen. The hydroxyapatite deposits on titanium were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results obtained have shown that hydroxyapatite coatings were produced in vitro under vitamins and collagen influence. - Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite was grown on Ti using a modified supersaturated calcification solution (M-SCS). ► Vitamins (A and D3) and collagen in M-SCS have a significant effect on apatite precipitation. ► M-SCS stimulates a biomimetic apatite deposition with 0.5–1 μm thickness in a short time. ► Hydroxyapatite crystallites have thin plate morphologies and size below 1 μm.

  18. Neutron diffraction study of the formation kinetics of ordered antiphase domains in titanium carbohydride TiCxHy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khidirov, I.

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of formation and growth of ordered antiphase domains (APDs) in titanium carbohydride TiC 0.50 H 0.21 has been investigated by neutron diffraction. A model of ordered APDs is proposed. It is established that the pronounced ordering of interstitial atoms and APDs begin at 450°C. It is shown that the period of ordered APDs (P ≈ 10–12) is independent of the exposure time at a constant temperature. It is found that the temperature of ordered APDs, T OAPD , increases nonlinearly with an increase in the carbon concentration in the range 0.50 ≤ C/Ti ≤ 0.70. The formation temperature of ordered APDs is found to correlate with the concentration dependence of the order–disorder transition temperature and be 0.60 of the order–disorder transition temperature: T APD = 0.60Τ C

  19. Titanium for salt water service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadiyar, H.S.; Shibad, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium has potential as major material of construction in desalination plants, in condensers and heat exchangers, in view of its excellent corrosion resistance to salt water upto at least 120deg C. The advantages of titanium in such applications are brought out. The various specific problems such as pitting, crevice and galvanic corrosion and the preventive methods, for adopting titanium have been discussed. The hydriding problem can be overcome by suitably controlling the operating parameters such as temperature and surface preparation. A case has been made to prove the economic viability of titanium in comparison to Al-brass and Cu-Ni alloy. The future of titanium seems to be very promising in view of the negligible tube failures and outages. (auth.)

  20. Effect of cathodic polarization on coating doxycycline on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geißler, Sebastian; Tiainen, Hanna; Haugen, Håvard J., E-mail: h.j.haugen@odont.uio.no

    2016-06-01

    Cathodic polarization has been reported to enhance the ability of titanium based implant materials to interact with biomolecules by forming titanium hydride at the outermost surface layer. Although this hydride layer has recently been suggested to allow the immobilization of the broad spectrum antibiotic doxycycline on titanium surfaces, the involvement of hydride in binding the biomolecule onto titanium remains poorly understood. To gain better understanding of the influence this immobilization process has on titanium surfaces, mirror-polished commercially pure titanium surfaces were cathodically polarized in the presence of doxycycline and the modified surfaces were thoroughly characterized using atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and angle-resolved X-ray spectroscopy. We demonstrated that no hydride was created during the polarization process. Doxycycline was found to be attached to an oxide layer that was modified during the electrochemical process. A bacterial assay using bioluminescent Staphylococcus epidermidis Xen43 showed the ability of the coating to reduce bacterial colonization and planktonic bacterial growth. - Highlights: • Titanium hydride was found not to be involved in immobilization of doxycycline. • Doxycycline coating was strongly bound to a modified surface oxide layer. • Effect of coatings tested using a dynamic bacteria assay based on bioluminescence. • Topmost layer of adsorbed doxycycline was shown to have strong antibacterial effect.

  1. Calcium carbonate hybrid coating promotes the formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Marcos Antônio E.; Ruiz, Gilia C.M. [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil); Faria, Amanda N. [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia-Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Zancanela, Daniela C.; Pereira, Lourivaldo S.; Ciancaglini, Pietro [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil); Ramos, Ana P., E-mail: anapr@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CaCO{sub 3} continuous films were deposited on titanium discs using a biomimetic approach. • The coatings origin hydroxyapatite when immersed in simulated body fluid. • The wettability and the free energy of the surfaces were increased after the treatment. • The coated titanium discs are bioactive and non-toxic to osteoblasts. - Abstract: CaCO{sub 3} particles dispersed in liquid media have proven to be good inductors of hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. However, the use of CaCO{sub 3} deposited as thin films for this propose is unknown. Here, we report the growth of CaCO{sub 3} continuous films on Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) modified titanium surfaces and its use as HAp growth inductor. The Ti surfaces were modified with two, four, and six layers of dihexadecylphosphate (DHP)-LB films containing Ca{sup 2+}, exposed to CO{sub 2} (g) for 12 h. The modified surfaces were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 36 h and submitted to bioactivity studies. This procedure originates bioactive coatings composed by non-stoichiometric HAp as evidenced by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of the CaCO{sub 3} film as pre-coating diminished the time necessary to growth continuous and homogeneous HAp films using a biomimetic approach. The surface properties of the films regarding their roughness, composition, charge, wettability, and surface free energy (γ{sub s}) were accessed. The presence of HAp increased the wettability and γ{sub s} of the surfaces. The coatings are not toxic for osteoblasts as observed for cell viability assays obtained after 7 and 14 days of culture. Moreover, the CaCO{sub 3} thin films promote the recovery of the osteoblasts viability more than the Ti surfaces themselves.

  2. Calcium carbonate hybrid coating promotes the formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Marcos Antônio E.; Ruiz, Gilia C.M.; Faria, Amanda N.; Zancanela, Daniela C.; Pereira, Lourivaldo S.; Ciancaglini, Pietro; Ramos, Ana P.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CaCO 3 continuous films were deposited on titanium discs using a biomimetic approach. • The coatings origin hydroxyapatite when immersed in simulated body fluid. • The wettability and the free energy of the surfaces were increased after the treatment. • The coated titanium discs are bioactive and non-toxic to osteoblasts. - Abstract: CaCO 3 particles dispersed in liquid media have proven to be good inductors of hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. However, the use of CaCO 3 deposited as thin films for this propose is unknown. Here, we report the growth of CaCO 3 continuous films on Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) modified titanium surfaces and its use as HAp growth inductor. The Ti surfaces were modified with two, four, and six layers of dihexadecylphosphate (DHP)-LB films containing Ca 2+ , exposed to CO 2 (g) for 12 h. The modified surfaces were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 36 h and submitted to bioactivity studies. This procedure originates bioactive coatings composed by non-stoichiometric HAp as evidenced by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of the CaCO 3 film as pre-coating diminished the time necessary to growth continuous and homogeneous HAp films using a biomimetic approach. The surface properties of the films regarding their roughness, composition, charge, wettability, and surface free energy (γ s ) were accessed. The presence of HAp increased the wettability and γ s of the surfaces. The coatings are not toxic for osteoblasts as observed for cell viability assays obtained after 7 and 14 days of culture. Moreover, the CaCO 3 thin films promote the recovery of the osteoblasts viability more than the Ti surfaces themselves.

  3. Conference 'Chemistry of hydrides' Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This collection of thesis of conference of Chemistry hydrides presents the results of investigations concerning of base questions of chemistry of nonorganic hydrides, including synthesis questions, studying of physical and chemical properties, thermodynamics, analytical chemistry, investigation of structure, equilibriums in the systems of metal-hydrogen, behaviour of nonorganic hydrides in non-water mediums and applying investigations in the chemistry area and technology of nonorganic hydrides

  4. Titanium Metal Powder Production by the Plasma Quench Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Cordes; A. Donaldson

    2000-09-01

    The goals of this project included the scale-up of the titanium hydride production process to a production rate of 50 kg/hr at a purity level of 99+%. This goal was to be achieved by incrementally increasing the production capability of a series of reactor systems. This methodic approach was designed to allow Idaho Titanium Technologies to systematically address the engineering issues associated with plasma system performance, and powder collection system design and performance. With quality powder available, actual fabrication with the titanium hydride was to be pursued. Finally, with a successful titanium production system in place, the production of titanium aluminide was to be pursued by the simultaneously injection of titanium and aluminum precursors into the reactor system. Some significant accomplishments of the project are: A unique and revolutionary torch/reactor capable of withstanding temperatures up to 5000 C with high thermal efficiency has been operated. The dissociation of titanium tetrachloride into titanium powder and HC1 has been demonstrated, and a one-megawatt reactor potentially capable of producing 100 pounds per hour has been built, but not yet operated at the powder level. The removal of residual subchlorides and adsorbed HC1 and the sintering of powder to form solid bodies have been demonstrated. The production system has been operated at production rates up to 40 pounds per hour. Subsequent to the end of the project, Idaho Titanium Technologies demonstrated that titanium hydride powder can indeed be sintered into solid titanium metal at 1500 C without sintering aids.

  5. Influence of deformation conditions on texture formation and ductility in titanium alloys under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekun, A.M.; Kushakevich, S.A.; Adamesku, R.A.; Khmelinin, Yu.F.; Beresnev, B.I.; Shishmintsev, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of hot pressing parameters on microstructure, texture and mechanical properties of bars from titanium alloys VT1-0, VT5-1, (α-alloys) and VT3-1 (α+ν-alloy) has been investigated. Mechanical testing of samples has been performed under hydrostatic pressure from 200 to 800 MPa. It is shown that the temperature, deformation degree and type of the structure obtained exert a slight effect on mechanical properties of bars. The texture heterogeneity is more pronounced in α-alloys. It has been found that hydrostatic pressure during sample tensile testing improves their ductility characteristics

  6. Alkali treatment of microrough titanium surfaces affects macrophage/monocyte adhesion, platelet activation and architecture of blood clot formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Milleret

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Titanium implants are most commonly used for bone augmentation and replacement due to their favorable osseointegration properties. Here, hyperhydrophilic sand-blasted and acid-etched (SBA titanium surfaces were produced by alkali treatment and their responses to partially heparinized whole human blood were analyzed. Blood clot formation, platelet activation and activation of the complement system was analyzed revealing that exposure time between blood and the material surface is crucial as increasing exposure time results in higher amount of activated platelets, more blood clots formed and stronger complement activation. In contrast, the number of macrophages/monocytes found on alkali-treated surfaces was significantly reduced as compared to untreated SBA Ti surfaces. Interestingly, when comparing untreated to modified SBA Ti surfaces very different blood clots formed on their surfaces. On untreated Ti surfaces blood clots remain thin (below 15 mm, patchy and non-structured lacking large fibrin fiber networks whereas blood clots on differentiated surfaces assemble in an organized and layered architecture of more than 30 mm thickness. Close to the material surface most nucleated cells adhere, above large amounts of non-nucleated platelets remain entrapped within a dense fibrin fiber network providing a continuous cover of the entire surface. These findings might indicate that, combined with findings of previous in vivo studies demonstrating that alkali-treated SBA Ti surfaces perform better in terms of osseointegration, a continuous and structured layer of blood components on the blood-facing surface supports later tissue integration of an endosseous implant.

  7. Room temperature oxidative intercalation with chalcogen hydrides: Two-step method for the formation of alkali-metal chalcogenide arrays within layered perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranmohotti, K.G. Sanjaya; Montasserasadi, M. Dariush; Choi, Jonglak; Yao, Yuan; Mohanty, Debasish; Josepha, Elisha A.; Adireddy, Shiva; Caruntu, Gabriel; Wiley, John B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Topochemical reactions involving intercalation allow construction of metal chalcogenide arrays within perovskite hosts. ► Gaseous chalcogen hydrides serve as effect reactants for intercalation of sulfur and selenium. ► New compounds prepared by a two-step intercalation strategy are presented. -- Abstract: A two-step topochemical reaction strategy utilizing oxidative intercalation with gaseous chalcogen hydrides is presented. Initially, the Dion-Jacobson-type layered perovskite, RbLaNb 2 O 7 , is intercalated reductively with rubidium metal to make the Ruddlesden-Popper-type layered perovskite, Rb 2 LaNb 2 O 7 . This compound is then reacted at room-temperature with in situ generated H 2 S gas to create Rb-S layers within the perovskite host. Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data (tetragonal, a = 3.8998(2) Å, c = 15.256(1) Å; space group P4/mmm) shows the compound to be isostructural with (Rb 2 Cl)LaNb 2 O 7 where the sulfide resides on a cubic interlayer site surrounded by rubidium ions. The mass increase seen on sulfur intercalation and the refined S site occupation factor (∼0.8) of the product indicate a higher sulfur content than expected for S 2− alone. This combined with the Raman studies, which show evidence for an H-S stretch, indicate that a significant fraction of the intercalated sulfide exists as hydrogen sulfide ion. Intercalation reactions with H 2 Se (g) were also carried out and appear to produce an isostructural selenide compound. The utilization of such gaseous hydride reagents could significantly expand multistep topochemistry to a larger number of intercalants.

  8. Room temperature oxidative intercalation with chalcogen hydrides: Two-step method for the formation of alkali-metal chalcogenide arrays within layered perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranmohotti, K.G. Sanjaya; Montasserasadi, M. Dariush; Choi, Jonglak; Yao, Yuan; Mohanty, Debasish; Josepha, Elisha A.; Adireddy, Shiva; Caruntu, Gabriel [Department of Chemistry and the Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148-2820 (United States); Wiley, John B., E-mail: jwiley@uno.edu [Department of Chemistry and the Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148-2820 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Topochemical reactions involving intercalation allow construction of metal chalcogenide arrays within perovskite hosts. ► Gaseous chalcogen hydrides serve as effect reactants for intercalation of sulfur and selenium. ► New compounds prepared by a two-step intercalation strategy are presented. -- Abstract: A two-step topochemical reaction strategy utilizing oxidative intercalation with gaseous chalcogen hydrides is presented. Initially, the Dion-Jacobson-type layered perovskite, RbLaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7}, is intercalated reductively with rubidium metal to make the Ruddlesden-Popper-type layered perovskite, Rb{sub 2}LaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7}. This compound is then reacted at room-temperature with in situ generated H{sub 2}S gas to create Rb-S layers within the perovskite host. Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data (tetragonal, a = 3.8998(2) Å, c = 15.256(1) Å; space group P4/mmm) shows the compound to be isostructural with (Rb{sub 2}Cl)LaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7} where the sulfide resides on a cubic interlayer site surrounded by rubidium ions. The mass increase seen on sulfur intercalation and the refined S site occupation factor (∼0.8) of the product indicate a higher sulfur content than expected for S{sup 2−} alone. This combined with the Raman studies, which show evidence for an H-S stretch, indicate that a significant fraction of the intercalated sulfide exists as hydrogen sulfide ion. Intercalation reactions with H{sub 2}Se{sub (g)} were also carried out and appear to produce an isostructural selenide compound. The utilization of such gaseous hydride reagents could significantly expand multistep topochemistry to a larger number of intercalants.

  9. Preferred hydride growth orientations on oxide-coated gadolinium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamar, G.M.; Schweke, D.; Kimmel, G.; Mintz, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The preferred hydride growth orientations on gadolinium metal coated by a thin oxide layer are presented. ► A preferred growth of the (1 0 0) h plane of the face centered cubic (FCC) GdH 2 is observed for the hydride spots forming below the oxidation layer. ► A change to the (1 1 1) h plane of the cubic hydride dominates for the hydride's Growth Centers. ► The texture change is attributed to the surface normal compressive stress component exerted by the oxidation layer on the developing hydride. - Abstract: The initial development of hydrides on polycrystalline gadolinium (Gd), as on some other hydride forming metals, is characterized by two sequential steps. The first step involves the rapid formation of a dense pattern of small hydride spots (referred to as the “small family” of hydrides) below the native oxidation layer. The second stage takes place when some of the “small family” nucleants (referred to as “growth centers”, GCs) break the oxide layer, leading to their rapid growth and finally to the massive hydriding of the sample. In the present study, the texture of the two hydride families was studied, by combining X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis with a microscopic analysis of the hydride, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It has been observed that for the “small family”, a preferred growth of the (1 0 0) h plane of the cubic GdH 2 takes place, whereas for the GCs, a change to the (1 1 1) h plane of the cubic hydride dominates. These preferred growth orientations were analyzed by their structure relation with the (0 0 .1) m basal plane of the Gd metal. It has been concluded that the above texture change is due to the surface normal compressive stress component exerted by the oxidation overlayer on the developing hydride, preventing the (0 0 .1) m ||(1 1 1) h growth orientation. This stress is relieved upon the rupture of that overlayer and the development of the GCs, leading to

  10. Neutron diffraction study of the formation of ordered antiphase domains in cubic titanium carbide TiC0.60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khidirov, I.; Parpiev, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    A series of superstructural reflections (described within the sp. gr. Fd3m) are found to be split into three symmetric parts in the neutron powder diffraction pattern of titanium carbide TiC 0.60 annealed at a temperature of 600°C. No splitting of superstructural reflections is observed in the neutron diffraction pattern of TiC 0.60 annealed at relatively high temperatures (780°C). This phenomenon can be explained by that fact that the ordering of carbon atoms at relatively high temperatures (780°C) is accompanied by the formation of randomly oriented rather large antiphase domains (APDs) (450 Å). At relatively low temperatures (600°C), stacking faults arise in the arrangement of partially ordered carbon atoms. In this case, relatively small ordered APDs (290 Å) are formed, along with disordered ones.

  11. Quantifying the stress fields due to a delta-hydride precipitate in alpha-Zr matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tummala, Hareesh [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Capolungo, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This report is a preliminary study on δ-hydride precipitate in zirconium alloy performed using 3D discrete dislocation dynamics simulations. The ability of dislocations in modifying the largely anisotropic stress fields developed by the hydride particle in a matrix phase is addressed for a specific dimension of the hydride. The influential role of probable dislocation nucleation at the hydride-matrix interface is reported. Dislocation nucleation around a hydride was found to decrease the shear stress (S13) and also increase the normal stresses inside the hydride. We derive conclusions on the formation of stacks of hydrides in zirconium alloys. The contribution of mechanical fields due to dislocations was found to have a non-negligible effect on such process.

  12. Metallorganic routes to nanoscale iron and titanium oxide particles encapsulated in mesoporous alumina: formation, physical properties, and chemical reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J J; Czap, N; Hagen, J; Engstler, J; Ensling, J; Gütlich, P; Reinoehl, U; Bertagnolli, H; Luis, F; de Jongh, L J; Wark, M; Grubert, G; Hornyak, G L; Zanoni, R

    2000-12-01

    Iron and titanium oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized in parallel mesopores of alumina by a novel organometallic "chimie douce" approach that uses bis(toluene)iron(0) (1) and bis(toluene)titanium(0) (2) as precursors. These complexes are molecular sources of iron and titanium in a zerovalent atomic state. In the case of 1, core shell iron/iron oxide particles with a strong magnetic coupling between both components, as revealed by magnetic measurements, are formed. Mössbauer data reveal superparamagnetic particle behavior with a distinct particle size distribution that confirms the magnetic measurements. The dependence of the Mössbauer spectra on temperature and particle size is explained by the influence of superparamagnetic relaxation effects. The coexistence of a paramagnetic doublet and a magnetically split component in the spectra is further explained by a distribution in particle size. From Mössbauer parameters the oxide phase can be identified as low-crystallinity ferrihydrite oxide. In agreement with quantum size effects observed in UV-visible studies, TEM measurements determine the size of the particles in the range 5-8 nm. The particles are mainly arranged alongside the pore walls of the alumina template. TiO2 nanoparticles are formed by depositing 2 in mesoporous alumina template. This produces metallic Ti, which is subsequently oxidized to TiO2 (anatase) within the alumina pores. UV-visible studies show a strong quantum confinement effect for these particles. From UV-visible investigations the particle size is determined to be around 2 nm. XPS analysis of the iron- and titania- embedded nanoparticles reveal the presence of Fe2O3 and TiO2 according to experimental binding energies and the experimental line shapes. Ti4+ and Fe3+ are the only oxidation states of the particles which can be determined by this technique. Hydrogen reduction of the iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles at 500 degrees C under flowing H2/N2 produces a catalyst, which is active

  13. Biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces and a micro/nanofabrication-based preventive strategy using colloidal lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Vyas, Varun; Salve, Tushar S; Dellasega, David; Cortelli, Daniele; Podestà, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo; Gade, W N

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of implant devices as a result of biofilm formation through bacterial infection has instigated major research in this area, particularly to understand the mechanism of bacterial cell/implant surface interactions and their preventions. In this paper, we demonstrate a controlled method of nanostructured titanium oxide surface synthesis using supersonic cluster beam depositions. The nanoscale surface characterization using atomic force microscopy and a profilometer display a regulated evolution in nanomorphology and physical properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses display a stoichiometric nanostructured TiO 2 film. Measurement of the water contact angle shows a nominal increase in the hydrophilic nature of ns-TiO 2 films, whereas the surface energy increases with decreasing contact angle. Bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli interaction with nanostructured surfaces shows an increase in adhesion and biofilm formation with increasing nanoscale morphological properties. Conversely, limiting ns-TiO 2 film distribution to micro/nanopatterned designed substrates integrated with bovine serum albumin functionalization leads to a reduction in biofilm formations due to a globally decreased bacterial cell–surface interaction area. The results have potential implications in inhibiting bacterial colonization and promoting mammalian cell–implant interactions. (paper)

  14. Long-term release of antibiotics by carbon nanotube-coated titanium alloy surfaces diminish biofilm formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Akinoglu, Eser M; Wirtz, Dieter C; Hoerauf, Achim; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Jepsen, Søren; Haddouti, El-Mustapha; Limmer, Andreas; Giersig, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial biofilms cause a considerable amount of prosthetic joint infections every year, resulting in morbidity and expensive revision surgery. To address this problem, surface modifications of implant materials such as carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings have been investigated in the past years. CNTs are biologically compatible and can be utilized as drug delivery systems. In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) coated TiAl6V4 titanium alloy discs were fabricated and impregnated with Rifampicin, and tested for their ability to prevent biofilm formation over a period of ten days. Agar plate-based assays were employed to assess the antimicrobial activity of these surfaces against Staphylococcus epidermidis. It was shown that vertically aligned MWCNTs were more stable against attrition on rough surfaces than on polished TiAl6V4 surfaces. Discs with coated surfaces caused a significant inhibition of biofilm formation for up to five days. Therefore, MWCNT-modified surfaces may be effective against pathogenic biofilm formation on endoprostheses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lunar-derived titanium alloys for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, S.; Hertzberg, A.; Woodcock, G.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen gas, which plays an important role in many projected lunar power systems and industrial processes, can be stored in metallic titanium and in certain titanium alloys as an interstitial hydride compound. Storing and retrieving hydrogen with titanium-iron alloy requires substantially less energy investment than storage by liquefaction. Metal hydride storage systems can be designed to operate at a wide range of temperatures and pressures. A few such systems have been developed for terrestrial applications. A drawback of metal hydride storage for lunar applications is the system's large mass per mole of hydrogen stored, which rules out transporting it from earth. The transportation problem can be solved by using native lunar materials, which are rich in titanium and iron.

  16. Formation of metastable phases in magnesium–titanium system by high-pressure torsion and their hydrogen storage performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edalati, Kaveh; Emami, Hoda; Staykov, Aleksandar; Smith, David J.; Akiba, Etsuo; Horita, Zenji

    2015-01-01

    No binary phases exist in the Mg–Ti binary equilibrium phase diagram and the two elements are totally immiscible even in liquid form. This study shows that four metastable phases (two with the bcc and fcc structures and two with the hcp structures) are formed in the Mg–Ti system by severe plastic deformation (SPD) through the process of high-pressure torsion (HPT). Investigation of hydrogenation properties reveals that these metastable phases are decomposed to pure Mg and Ti during heating before they can absorb the hydrogen in the form of ternary Mg–Ti hydrides. First-principles calculations show that the hydrogenation reaction should occur thermodynamically, and ternary Mg–Ti hydrides with the cubic structure should form at low temperature. However, the slow kinetics for this reaction appears to be the limiting step. Calculations show that the binding energy of hydrogen increases and the thermodynamic stability of hydrides undesirably increases by addition of Ti to Mg

  17. Electrolytic hydriding and hydride distribution in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, M.H.L.

    1974-01-01

    A study has been made of the electrolytic hydriding of zircaloy-4 in the range 20-80 0 C, for reaction times from 5 to 30 hours, and the effect of potential, pH and dissolved oxygen has been investigated. The hydriding reaction was more sensitive to time and temperature conditions than to the electrochemical variables. It has been shown that a controlled introduction of hydrides in zircaloy is feasible. Hydrides were found to be plate like shaped and distributed mainly along grain-boundaries. It has been shown that hydriding kinetics do not follow a simple law but may be described by a Johnson-Mehl empirical equation. On the basis of this equation an activation energy of 9.400 cal/mol has been determined, which is close to the activation energy for diffusion of hydrogen in the hydride. (author)

  18. Keyhole formation and thermal fluid flow-induced porosity during laser fusion welding in titanium alloys: Experimental and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panwisawas, Chinnapat; Perumal, Bama; Ward, R. Mark; Turner, Nathanael; Turner, Richard P.; Brooks, Jeffery W.; Basoalto, Hector C.

    2017-01-01

    High energy-density beam welding, such as electron beam or laser welding, has found a number of industrial applications for clean, high-integrity welds. The deeply penetrating nature of the joints is enabled by the formation of metal vapour which creates a narrow fusion zone known as a “keyhole”. However the formation of the keyhole and the associated keyhole dynamics, when using a moving laser heat source, requires further research as they are not fully understood. Porosity, which is one of a number of process induced phenomena related to the thermal fluid dynamics, can form during beam welding processes. The presence of porosity within a welded structure, inherited from the fusion welding operation, degrades the mechanical properties of components during service such as fatigue life. In this study, a physics-based model for keyhole welding including heat transfer, fluid flow and interfacial interactions has been used to simulate keyhole and porosity formation during laser welding of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. The modelling suggests that keyhole formation and the time taken to achieve keyhole penetration can be predicted, and it is important to consider the thermal fluid flow at the melting front as this dictates the evolution of the fusion zone. Processing induced porosity is significant when the fusion zone is only partially penetrating through the thickness of the material. The modelling results are compared with high speed camera imaging and measurements of porosity from welded samples using X-ray computed tomography, radiography and optical micrographs. These are used to provide a better understanding of the relationship between process parameters, component microstructure and weld integrity.

  19. Engineered chimeric peptides with antimicrobial and titanium-binding functions to inhibit biofilm formation on Ti implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hongjuan; Yuan, Yang; Adayi, Aidina; Zhang, Xu; Song, Xin; Gong, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) implants have been commonly used in oral medicine. However, despite their widespread clinical application, these implants are susceptible to failure induced by microbial infection due to bacterial biofilm formation. Immobilization of chimeric peptides with antibacterial properties on the Ti surface may be a promising antimicrobial approach to inhibit biofilm formation. Here, chimeric peptides were designed by connecting three sequences (hBD-3-1/2/3) derived from human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3) with Ti-binding peptide-l (TBP-l: RKLPDAGPMHTW) via a triple glycine (G) linker to modify Ti surfaces. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the properties of individual domains of the chimeric peptides were evaluated for their binding activity toward the Ti surface. The antimicrobial and anti-biofilm efficacy of the peptides against initial settlers, Streptococcus oralis (S. oralis), Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) and Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), was evaluated with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to study cell membrane changes and the underlying antimicrobial mechanism. Compared with the other two peptides, TBP-1-GGG-hBD3-3 presented stronger antibacterial activity and remained stable in saliva and serum. Therefore, it was chosen as the best candidate to modify Ti surfaces in this study. This peptide inhibited the growth of initial streptococci and biofilm formation on Ti surfaces with no cytotoxicity to MC3T3-E1 cells. Disruption of the integrity of bacterial membranes and decreased expression of adhesion protein genes from S. gordonii revealed aspects of the antibacterial mechanism of TBP-1-GGG-hBD3-3. We conclude that engineered chimeric peptides with antimicrobial activity provide a potential solution for inhibiting biofilm formation on Ti surfaces to reduce or prevent the occurrence of peri

  20. A Novel Investigation of the Formation of Titanium Oxide Nanotubes on Thermally Formed Oxide of Ti-6Al-4V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Arman; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Patel, Sweetu; Royhman, Dmitry; Sukotjo, Cortino; Mathew, Mathew T; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Takoudis, Christos

    2015-10-01

    Traditionally, titanium oxide (TiO2) nanotubes (TNTs) are anodized on Ti-6Al-4V alloy (Ti-V) surfaces with native TiO2 (amorphous TiO2); subsequent heat treatment of anodized surfaces has been observed to enhance cellular response. As-is bulk Ti-V, however, is often subjected to heat treatment, such as thermal oxidation (TO), to improve its mechanical properties. Thermal oxidation treatment of Ti-V at temperatures greater than 200°C and 400°C initiates the formation of anatase and rutile TiO2, respectively, which can affect TNT formation. This study aims at understanding the TNT formation mechanism on Ti-V surfaces with TO-formed TiO2 compared with that on as-is Ti-V surfaces with native oxide. Thermal oxidation-formed TiO2 can affect TNT formation and surface wettability because TO-formed TiO2 is expected to be part of the TNT structure. Surface characterization was carried out with field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, water contact angle measurements, and white light interferometry. The TNTs were formed on control and 300°C and 600°C TO-treated Ti-V samples, and significant differences in TNT lengths and surface morphology were observed. No difference in elemental composition was found. Thermal oxidation and TO/anodization treatments produced hydrophilic surfaces, while hydrophobic behavior was observed over time (aging) for all samples. Reduced hydrophobic behavior was observed for TO/anodized samples when compared with control, control/anodized, and TO-treated samples. A method for improved surface wettability and TNT morphology is therefore discussed for possible applications in effective osseointegration of dental and orthopedic implants.

  1. Effect of aluminium on formation of metastable phases in titanium-niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenogina, T.L.; Derevyanko, V.N.; Vozilkin, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    Specific features of phase transformations in the alloy of Ti-20Nb-29Al (at.%) are investigated in comparison with those in the aluminium-free Ti-21Nb alloy. It is states that in the alloy Ti-20Nb-29Al on quenching the ordering of β-solid solution takes place with B2-structure formation. The B2-matrix experiences decomposition with the formation of ordered Ω 0 -phase which field ranges up to 700 deg C. The investigation results show that the sequence of phase formation in Ti-Nb-Al and aluminium-free alloys is much the same. The only difference between them is the formation of ordered phases in the alloy Ti-20Nb-29Al [ru

  2. Preparation of beryllium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, C.R.; Baker, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Beryllium hydride of high bulk density, suitable for use as a component of high-energy fuels, is prepared by the pyrolysis, in solution in an inert solvent, of a ditertiary-alkyl beryllium. An agitator introduces mechanical energy into the reaction system, during the pyrolysis, at the rate of 0.002 to 0.30 horsepower per gallon of reaction mixture. (U.S.)

  3. Air and metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  4. Mechanochemical synthesis of nanostructured chemical hydrides in hydrogen alloying mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronski, Z.; Varin, R.A.; Chiu, C.; Czujko, T.; Calka, A.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical alloying of magnesium metal powders with hydrogen in specialized hydrogen ball mills can be used as a direct route for mechanochemical synthesis of emerging chemical hydrides and hydride mixtures for advanced solid-state hydrogen storage. In the 2Mg-Fe system, we have successfully synthesized the ternary complex hydride Mg 2 FeH 6 in a mixture with nanometric Fe particles. The mixture of complex magnesium-iron hydride and nano-iron released 3-4 wt.%H 2 in a thermally programmed desorption experiment at the range 285-295 o C. Milling of the Mg-2Al powder mixture revealed a strong competition between formation of the Al(Mg) solid solution and the β-MgH 2 hydride. The former decomposes upon longer milling as the Mg atoms react with hydrogen to form the hydride phase, and drive the Al out of the solid solution. The mixture of magnesium dihydride and nano-aluminum released 2.1 wt.%H 2 in the temperature range 329-340 o C in the differential scanning calorimetry experiment. The formation of MgH 2 was suppressed in the Mg-B system; instead, a hydrogenated amorphous phase (Mg,B)H x , was formed in a mixture with nanometric MgB 2 . Annealing of the hydrogen-stabilized amorphous mixture produced crystalline MgB 2

  5. The effect of titanium implant surface modification on the dynamic process of initial microbial adhesion and biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, A.; Li, X.; Huang, B.; Tsoi, J.K.-H.; Matinlinna, J.P.; Chen, Z.; Deng, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate the dynamic process of biofilm adhesion on titanium implant with two surface treatments, either pickled (PT) or moderately roughened by sandblasting with large grits and acid-etched (SLA). Materials and methods: Two types of titanium disks with

  6. U-8 wt %Mo and 7 wt %Mo alloys powder obtained by an hydride-de hydride process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balart, Silvia N.; Bruzzoni, Pablo; Granovsky, Marta S.; Gribaudo, Luis M. J.; Hermida, Jorge D.; Ovejero, Jose; Rubiolo, Gerardo H.; Vicente, Eduardo E.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are been tested as a component in high-density LEU dispersion fuels with very good performances. These alloys need to be transformed to powder due to the manufacturing requirements of the fuels. One method to convert ductile alloys into powder is the hydride-de hydride process, which takes advantage of the ability of the U-α phase to transform to UH 3 : a brittle and relatively low-density compound. U-Mo alloys around 7 and 8 wt % Mo were melted and heat treated at different temperature ranges in order to partially convert γ -phase to α -phase. Subsequent hydriding transforms this α -phase to UH 3 . The volume change associated to the hydride formation embrittled the material which ends up in a powdered alloy. Results of the optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction during different steps of the process are shown. (author)

  7. Kinetics of the formation of the titanium nitruro film (TiN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas Andres; Devia C, Alfonso; Alzate Rafael

    1999-01-01

    They are presented in succinct form the factors that intervene in the growth, adhesion of the film and election of the support material in the process of formation of TiN film. Equally it's carried out the kinetic development of the possible reactions (ionization and excitement) involved in the process

  8. High pressure hydriding of sponge-Zr in steam-hydrogen mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.S.

    1997-01-01

    Hydriding kinetics of thin sponge-Zr layers metallurgically bonded to a Zircaloy disk has been studied by thermogravimetry in the temperature range 350-400 C in 7 MPa hydrogen-steam mixtures. Some specimens were prefilmed with a thin oxide layer prior to exposure to the reactant gas; all were coated with a thin layer of gold to avoid premature reaction at edges. Two types of hydriding were observed in prefilmed specimens, viz., a slow hydrogen absorption process that precedes an accelerated (massive) hydriding. At 7 MPa total pressure, the critical ratio of H 2 /H 2 O above which massive hydriding occurs at 400 C is ∝200. The critical H 2 /H 2 O ratio is shifted to ∝2.5 x 10 3 at 350 C. The slow hydriding process occurs only when conditions for hydriding and oxidation are approximately equally favorable. Based on maximum weight gain, the specimen is completely converted to δ-ZrH 2 by massive hydriding in ∝5 h at a hydriding rate of ∝10 -6 mol H/cm 2 s. Incubation times of 10-20 h prior to the onset of massive hydriding increases with prefilm oxide thickness in the range of 0-10 μm. By changing to a steam-enriched gas, massive hydriding that initially started in a steam-starved condition was arrested by re-formation of a protective oxide scale. (orig.)

  9. Process for production of a metal hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  10. Influence of structure of basis grounds and clays on formation of chlorides of Indium and Titanium at their atomic emission spectral definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachadjanov, D.N.; Gazieva, M.T.; Djulaev, A.S.; Pometun, E.A.; Kabgov, Kh.B.

    2008-01-01

    It is established that the structure of a basis of grounds and clays can influence on chloride formation of small amounts of the titanium and indium. It is showed that this influence is caused by deficiency chlorine of its reagent which cooperates not only with investigated metals, but also with macro-components of a basis. Influence of structure of a basis can be removed if appropriate macro-components to transfer in iodides

  11. Bacterial biofilm formation versus mammalian cell growth on titanium-based mono- and bi-functional coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Subbiahdoss

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials-associated-infections (BAI are serious complications in modern medicine. Although non-adhesive coatings, like polymer-brush coatings, have been shown to prevent bacterial adhesion, they do not support cell growth. Bi-functional coatings are supposed to prevent biofilm formation while supporting tissue integration. Here, bacterial and cellular responses to poly(ethylene glycol (PEG brush-coatings on titanium oxide presenting the integrin-active peptide RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (bioactive “PEG-RGD” were compared to mono-functional PEG brush-coatings (biopassive “PEG” and bare titanium oxide (TiO2 surfaces under flow. Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 35983 was deposited on the surfaces under a shear rate of 11 s-1 for 2 h followed by seeding of U2OS osteoblasts. Subsequently, both S. epidermidis and U2OS cells were grown simultaneously on the surfaces for 48 h under low shear (0.14 s-1. After 2 h, staphylococcal adhesion was reduced to 3.6±1.8 × 103 and 6.0±3.9 × 103 cm-2 on PEG and PEG-RGD coatings respectively, compared to 1.3±0.4 × 105 cm-2 for the TiO2 surface. When allowed to grow for 48 h, biofilms formed on all surfaces. However, biofilms detached from the PEG and PEG-RGD coatings when exposed to an elevated shear (5.6 s-1 U2OS cells neither adhered nor spread on PEG brush-coatings, regardless of the presence of biofilm. In contrast, in the presence of biofilm, U2OS cells adhered and spread on PEG-RGD coatings with a significantly higher surface coverage than on bare TiO2. The detachment of biofilm and the high cell surface coverage revealed the potential significance of PEG-RGD coatings in the context of the “race for the surface” between bacteria and mammalian cells.

  12. Zircaloy-4 hydridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, Pablo

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this work can be summarized as: 1) To reproduce, by heat treatments, matrix microstructures and hydride morphologies similar to those observed in structural components of the CNA-1 and CNE nuclear power plants; 2) To study the evolution of the mechanical properties of the original material with different hydrogen concentrations, such as microhardness, and its capacity to distinguish these materials; 3) To find parameters that allow to estimate the hydrogen content of a material by quantitative metallographic techniques, to be used as complementary in the study of the radioactive materials from reactors

  13. Hydride embrittlement in zircaloy components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Raquel M.; Andrade, Arnaldo H.P.; Castagnet, Mariano, E-mail: rmlobo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Zirconium alloys are used in nuclear reactor cores under high-temperature water environment. During service, hydrogen is generated by corrosion processes, and it is readily absorbed by these materials. When hydrogen concentration exceeds the terminal solid solubility, the excess hydrogen precipitates as zirconium hydride (ZrH{sub 2}) platelets or needles. Zirconium alloys components can fail by hydride cracking if they contain large flaws and are highly stressed. Zirconium alloys are susceptible to a mechanism for crack initiation and propagation termed delayed hydride cracking (DHC). The presence of brittle hydrides, with a K{sub Ic} fracture toughness of only a few MPa{radical}m, results in a severe loss in ductility and toughness when platelet normal is oriented parallel to the applied stress. In plate or tubing, hydrides tend to form perpendicular to the thickness direction due to the texture developed during fabrication. Hydrides in this orientation do not generally cause structural problems because applied stresses in the through-thickness direction are very low. However, the high mobility of hydrogen in a zirconium lattice enables redistribution of hydrides normal to the applied stress direction, which can result in localized embrittlement. When a platelet reaches a critical length it ruptures. If the tensile stress is sufficiently great, crack initiation starts at some of these hydrides. Crack propagation occurs by repeating the same process at the crack tip. Delayed hydride cracking can degrade the structural integrity of zirconium alloys during reactor service. The paper focuses on the fracture mechanics and fractographic aspects of hydride material. (author)

  14. The effects of different nickel-titanium instruments on dentinal microcrack formations during root canal preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Yakup; Aslan, Tugrul; Sagsen, Burak; Kesim, Bertan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the incidence of dentinal microcracks caused by different preparation techniques. 120 extracted human mandibular incisor teeth were divided into five experimental groups and one control group (n = 20): Group 1: Hand preparation with balanced force technique up to #25 K-file. Group 2: Preparation with only ProTaper F2 instrument in a reciprocating movement. Group 3: Preparation with Reciproc R25 instrument in a reciprocating movement. Group 4: Preparation with ProTaper instruments up to F2 instrument. Group 5: Preparation with ProTaper Next instruments up to X2 instrument. No procedure was applied to control group. The roots were sectioned horizontally at 3, 6 and 9 mm from the apex and examined. Absence or presence of dentinal microcracks was noted. The Chi-square test was performed to compare the appearance of cracked roots between all groups. There were no significant differences among the groups (P > 0.05). In conclusion, except the hand file and control group, all experimental groups showed microcrack formations.

  15. Formation of gallium nitride templates and freestanding substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy for homoepitaxial growth of III-nitride devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Adrian Daniel

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is a direct wide band gap semiconductor currently under heavy development worldwide due to interest in its applications in ultra-violet optoelectronics, power electronics, devices operating in harsh environments (high temperature or corrorsive), etc. While a number of devices have been demonstrated with this material and its related alloys, the unavailability of GaN substrates is seen as one of the current major bottlenecks to both material quality and device performance. This dissertation is concerned with the synthesis of high quality GaN substrates by the hydride vapor phase epitaxy method (HVPE). In this work, the flow of growth precursors in a home-built HVPE reactor was modeled by the Navier-Stokes equation and solved by finite element analysis to promote uniformity of GaN on 2'' sapphire substrates. Kinetics of growth was studied and various regimes of growth were identified to establish a methodology for HVPE GaN growth, independent of reactor geometry. GaN templates as well as bulk substrates were fabricated in this work. Realization of freestanding GaN substrates was achieved through discovery of a natural stress-induced method of separating bulk GaN from sapphire via mechanical failure of a low-temperature GaN buffer layer. Such a process eliminates the need for pre- or post-processing of sapphire substrates, as is currently the standard. Stress in GaN-on-sapphire is discussed, with the dominant contributor identified as thermal stress due to thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the two materials. This thermal stress is analyzed using Stoney's equation and conditions for crack-free growth of thick GaN substrates were identified. An etch-back process for planarizing GaN templates was also developed and successfully applied to rough GaN templates. The planarization of GaN has been mainly addressed by chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP) methods in the literature, with notable shortcomings including the inability to effectively

  16. Formation of titanium oxide coatings on NiTi shape memory alloys by selective oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, M.; Glogowski, T.; Kuehn, S.; Hessing, C.; Unterumsberger, F.

    2008-01-01

    Materials used for medical devices that are in contact with human tissue must have good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) are often used in medical applications due to their special functional and mechanical properties (shape memory effect, pseudo elasticity). Because of the high Ni content in nearly stoichiometric NiTi SMAs, the possibility of Ni being released needs to be considered as Ni may cause problems in the human body. SMAs exhibit a high intrinsic corrosion resistance because of the thermodynamic stability of Ni (thermodynamic reason) and the low degree of disorder in a thin protective TiO 2 -layer (kinetic reason). While therefore there is no need to be concerned too much about a normal corrosive attack in the human body, it has to be kept in mind that in medical applications, these materials represent one part of a tribological system where wear processes need to be considered. The formation of a uniform TiO 2 -layer can be beneficial in this respect. The selective oxidation of Ti to TiO 2 on the surface is a promising method to decrease the Ni release significantly. This can be achieved by controlling the partial pressure of oxygen during a controlled oxidation process. The atmosphere must be adjusted so that TiO 2 is stable while NiO cannot yet form. The result of a selective oxidation is a TiO 2 -layer that has an excellent degree of purity and represents a safe barrier against Ni emission

  17. Multidimensional simulations of hydrides during fuel rod lifecycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    In light water reactor fuel rods, waterside corrosion of zirconium-alloy cladding introduces hydrogen into the cladding, where it is slightly soluble. When the solubility limit is reached, the hydrogen precipitates into crystals of zirconium hydride which decrease the ductility of the cladding and may lead to cladding failure during dry storage or transportation events. The distribution of the hydride phase and the orientation of the crystals depend on the history of the spatial temperature and stress profiles in the cladding. In this work, we have expanded the existing hydride modeling capability in the BISON fuel performance code with the goal of predicting both global and local effects on the radial, azimuthal and axial distribution of the hydride phase. We compare results from 1D simulations to published experimental data. We demonstrate the new capability by simulating in 2D a fuel rod throughout a lifecycle that includes irradiation, short-term storage in the spent fuel pool, drying, and interim storage in a dry cask. Using the 2D simulations, we present qualitative predictions of the effects of the inter-pellet gap and the drying conditions on the growth of a hydride rim. - Highlights: • We extend BISON fuel performance code to simulate lifecycle of fuel rods. • We model hydrogen evolution in cladding from reactor through dry storage. • We validate 1D simulations of hydrogen evolution against experiments. • We show results of 2D axisymmetric simulations predicting hydride formation. • We show how our model predicts formation of a hydride rim in the cladding.

  18. Zirconium hydrides and Fe redistribution in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy under ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrees, Y.; Yao, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Cui, J.; Shek, G.K. [Kinetrics, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Daymond, M.R., E-mail: daymond@queensu.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2016-11-15

    Zr-2.5%Nb alloy is used to fabricate the pressure tubes of the CANDU reactor. The pressure tube is the primary pressure boundary for coolant in the CANDU design and is susceptible to delayed hydride cracking, reduction in fracture toughness upon hydride precipitation and potentially hydride blister formation. The morphology and nature of hydrides in Zr-2.5%Nb with 100 wppm hydrogen has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The effect of hydrides on heavy ion irradiation induced decomposition of the β phase has been reported. STEM-EDX mapping was employed to investigate the distribution of alloying elements. The results show that hydrides are present in the form of stacks of different sizes, with length scales from nano- to micro-meters. Heavy ion irradiation experiments at 250 °C on as-received and hydrided Zr-2.5%Nb alloy, show interesting effects of hydrogen on the irradiation induced redistribution of Fe. It was found that Fe is widely redistributed from the β phase into the α phase in the as-received material, however, the loss of Fe from the β phase and subsequent precipitation is retarded in the hydrided material. This preliminary work will further the current understanding of microstructural evolution of Zr based alloys in the presence of hydrogen. - Graphical abstract: STEM HAADF micrographs at low magnification showing the hydride structure in Zr-2.5Nb alloy.

  19. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today......’s hydride batteries, but a much poorer stability towards repeated charge/discharge cycling. The aim was to see if the cycleability of CaNi5 could be enhanced enough by modifications to make the compound a suitable electrode material. An alloying method based on mechanical alloying in a planetary ball mill...

  20. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  1. The vapour phase deposition of boron on titanium by the reaction between gaseous boron trichloride and titanium metal. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, D.J.; Shelton, R.A.J.

    1965-03-01

    The reaction, between boron trichloride vapour and titanium has been investigated in the temperature range 200 - 1350 deg. C. It has been found that an initial reaction leads to the formation of titanium tetrachloride and the deposition of boron on titanium, but that except for reactions between 900 and 1000 deg. C, the system is complicated by the formation of lower titanium chlorides due to secondary reactions between the titanium and titanium tetrachloride

  2. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  3. Titanium ; dream new material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Tae; Kim Seung Eon; Heoon, Yong Taek; Jung, Hui Won

    2001-11-01

    The contents of this book are history of Titanium, present situation of Titanium industry, property of Titanium alloy, types of it, development of new alloy of Titanium smelting of Titanium, cast of Titanium and heat treatment of Titanium, Titanium alloy for plane, car parts, biological health care, and sport leisure and daily life, prospect, and Titanium industrial development of Titanium in China.

  4. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  5. Solubility of hydrogen isotopes in stressed hydride-forming metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Ambler, J.F.R.

    1983-01-01

    Components made from hydride-forming metals can be brittle when particles of hydride are present. The solid solubility limit of hydrogen in these metals needs to be known so that fracture resistance can be properly assessed. Stress affects the solubility of hydrogen in metals. As hydrogen dissolves the metal volume increases, an applied hydrostatic tensile stress supplies work to increase the solubility. Precipitation of hydrides increases the volume further. A hydrostatic tensile stress promotes the formation of hydrides and tends to reduce the terminal solubility. For materials containing hydrogen in solution in equilibrium with hydrides, the effect of stress on the terminal solubility is given. Hydrogen migrates up tensile stress gradients because of the effect of stress on the solubility and solubility limit. Consequently, hydrogen concentrates at flaws. When hydrides are present in the metal matrix, those remote from the flaw tip will preferentially dissolve in favor of those precipitated at the flaw. If the stress is large enough, at some critical condition the hydrides at the flaw will crack. This is delayed hydrogen cracking. Notched and fatigue-cracked cantilever beam specimens (6) (38 x 4 x 3 mm) were machined from the circumferential direction of several cold-worked Zr-2.5 at. % Nb pressure tubes. The chemical compositions had the ranges (in atomic %) Nb - 2.5 to 2.7; O - 0.58 to 0.71; H - 0.018 to 0.18. The effect of test temperature is for a specimen containing 0.13 at. % protium and 0.29 at .% deuterium. Between 505 K and 530 K was less than 1 hr, between 530 K and 537 K it increased to 25.8 h, while at 538 K no cracking was observed up to the 54 h

  6. Development of titanium based biocomposite by powder metallurgy processing with in situ forming of Ca-P phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karanjai, Malobika [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur P.O., Hyderabad 500005, Andhra Pradesh (India)]. E-mail: malobika@arci.res.in; Sundaresan, Ranganathan [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur P.O., Hyderabad 500005, Andhra Pradesh (India); Rao, Gummididala Venkata Narasimha [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur P.O., Hyderabad 500005, Andhra Pradesh (India); Mohan, Tallapragada Raja Rama [Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Kashyap, Bhagwati Prasad [Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India)

    2007-02-25

    Composites of titanium and calcium-phosphorus phases were developed by powder metallurgy processing and evaluated for bioactivity. Titanium hydride powder and precursors of calcium and phosphorus in the form of calcium carbonate and di-ammonium hydrogen orthophosphate were mixed in different proportions, compacted and calcined in different atmospheres. The calcined compacts were subsequently crushed, recompacted and sintered in vacuum. In situ formation of bioactive phases like hydroxylapatite, tricalcium phosphate and calcium titanate during the calcination and sintering steps was studied using X-ray diffraction. The effect of calcination atmosphere on density, interconnected porosity, phase composition and modulus of rupture of sintered composites was examined. The sintered composites were immersed in simulated body fluid for 7 days to observe their in vitro behaviour with XRD and FTIR spectroscopic identification of deposits. Composites with 10 wt% precursors sintered from vacuum calcined powder gave the best results in terms of bioactive phases, density and strength.

  7. The electrochemical behavior and surface structure of titanium electrodes modified by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, G.F.; Xie, Z.; Huang, W.Q.; Yang, S.B.; Zhao, L.H.

    2004-01-01

    Industrial grade titanium modified by ion implantation and sputtering was used as electrodes. The effect of ion beam modification on the electrochemical behavior and surface structure of electrodes was investigated. Also discussed is the hydrogen evolution process of the electrode in acidic solution. Several ions such as Fe + , C + , W + , Ni + and others, were implanted into the electrode. The electrochemical tests were carried out in 1N H 2 SO 4 solution at 30±1 deg. C. The electrode potential was measured versus a saturate calomel electrode as a function of immersion time. The cathodic polarization curves were measured by the stable potential static method. The surface layer composition and the chemical state of the electrodes were also investigated by Auger electron spectrometer (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique. The results show that: (1) the stability of modified electrodes depends on the active elements introduced by ion implantation and sputtering deposition. (2) The hydrogen evolution activity of industrial grade titanium may be improved greatly by ion beam modification. (3) Ion beam modification changed the composition and the surface state of electrodes over a certain depth range and forms an activity layer having catalytic hydrogen evolution, which inhibited the absorption of hydrogen and formation of titanium hydride. Thus promoted hydrogen evolution and improved the hydrogen evolution catalytic activity in industrial grade titanium

  8. Effect of reversible hydrogen alloying and plastic deformation on microstructure development in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murzinova, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen leads to degradation in fracture-related mechanical properties of titanium alloys and is usually considered as a very dangerous element. Numerous studies of hydrogen interaction with titanium alloys showed that hydrogen may be considered not only as an impurity but also as temporary alloying element. This statement is based on the following. Hydrogen stabilizes high-temperature β-phase, leads to decrease in temperature of β→α transformation and extends (α + β )-phase field. The BCC β-phase exhibits lower strength and higher ductility in comparison with HCP α -phase. As a result, hydrogen improves hot workability of hard-to-deform titanium alloys. Hydrogen changes chemical composition of the phases, kinetics of phase transformations, and at low temperatures additional phase transformation (β→α + TiH 2 ) takes place, which is accompanied with noticeable change in volumes of phases. As a result, fine lamellar microstructure may be formed in hydrogenated titanium alloys after heat treatment. It was shown that controlled hydrogen alloying improves weldability and machinability of titanium alloys. After processing hydrogenated titanium preforms are subjected to vacuum annealing, and the hydrogen content decreases up to safe level. Hydrogen removal is accompanied with hydrides dissolution and β→α transformation that makes possible to control structure formation at this final step of treatment. Thus, reversible hydrogen alloying of titanium alloys allows to obtain novel microstructure with enhanced properties. The aim of the work was to study the effect of hydrogen on structure formation, namely: i) influence of hydrogen content on transformation of lamellar microstructure to globular one during deformation in (α+β)-phase field; ii) effect of dissolved hydrogen on dynamic recrystallization in single α- and β- phase regions; iii) influence of vacuum annealing temperature on microstructure development. The work was focused on the optimization of

  9. Titanium embedded cage structure formation in Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} clusters and their interaction with Ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, M. B., E-mail: begonia@ubu.es [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de Burgos, 09006 Burgos (Spain); Vega, A.; Balbás, L. C. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Aguilera-Granja, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidad de San Luis Potosí, 78000 San Luis de Potosí (Mexico)

    2014-05-07

    Recently, Ar physisorption was used as a structural probe for the location of the Ti dopant atom in aluminium cluster cations, Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} [Lang et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 22, 1508 (2011)]. As an experiment result, the lack of Ar complexes for n > n{sub c} determines the cluster size for which the Ti atom is located inside of an Al cage. To elucidate the decisive factors for the formation of endohedrally Al{sub n}Ti{sup +}, experimentalists proposed detailed computational studies as indispensable. In this work, we investigated, using the density functional theory, the structural and electronic properties of singly titanium doped cationic clusters, Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} (n = 16–21) as well as the adsorption of an Ar atom on them. The first endohedral doped cluster, with Ti encapsulated in a fcc-like cage skeleton, appears at n{sub c} = 21, which is the critical number consistent with the exohedral-endohedral transition experimentally observed. At this critical size the non-crystalline icosahedral growth pattern, related to the pure aluminium clusters, with the Ti atom in the surface, changes into a endohedral fcc-like pattern. The map of structural isomers, relative energy differences, second energy differences, and structural parameters were determined and analyzed. Moreover, we show the critical size depends on the net charge of the cluster, being different for the cationic clusters (n{sub c} = 21) and their neutral counterparts (n{sub c} = 20). For the Al {sub n} Ti {sup +} · Ar complexes, and for n < 21, the preferred Ar adsorption site is on top of the exohedral Ti atom, with adsorption energy in very good agreement with the experimental value. Instead, for n = 21, the Ar adsorption occurs on the top an Al atom with very low absorption energy. For all sizes the geometry of the Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} clusters keeps unaltered in the Ar-cluster complexes. This fact indicates that Ar adsorption does not influence the cluster structure, providing support

  10. Hydriding failure in water reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, D.N.; Ramadasan, E.; Unnikrishnan, K.

    1980-01-01

    Hydriding of the zircaloy cladding has been one of the important causes of failure in water reactor fuel elements. This report reviews the causes, the mechanisms and the methods for prevention of hydriding failure in zircaloy clad water reactor fuel elements. The different types of hydriding of zircaloy cladding have been classified. Various factors influencing zircaloy hydriding from internal and external sources in an operating fuel element have been brought out. The findings of post-irradiation examination of fuel elements from Indian reactors, with respect to clad hydriding and features of hydriding failure are included. (author)

  11. Evaluation of hydride blisters in zirconium pressure tube in CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Y. M.; Kim, Y. S.; Gong, U. S.; Kwon, S. C.; Kim, S. S.; Choo, K.N.

    2000-09-01

    When the garter springs for maintaining the gap between the pressure tube and the calandria tube are displaced in the CANDU reactor, the sagging of pressure tube results in a contact to the calandria tube. This causes a temperature difference between the inner and outer surface of the pressure tube. The hydride can be formed at the cold spot of outer surface and the volume expansion by hydride dormation causes the blistering in the zirconium alloys. An incident of pressure tube rupture due to the hydride blisters had happened in the Canadian CANDU reactor. This report describes the theoretical development and models on the formation and growth of hydride blister and some experimental results. The evaluation methodology and non-destructive testing for hydride blister in operating reactors are also described

  12. Evaluation of hydride blisters in zirconium pressure tube in CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Y M; Kim, Y S; Gong, U S; Kwon, S C; Kim, S S; Choo, K N

    2000-09-01

    When the garter springs for maintaining the gap between the pressure tube and the calandria tube are displaced in the CANDU reactor, the sagging of pressure tube results in a contact to the calandria tube. This causes a temperature difference between the inner and outer surface of the pressure tube. The hydride can be formed at the cold spot of outer surface and the volume expansion by hydride dormation causes the blistering in the zirconium alloys. An incident of pressure tube rupture due to the hydride blisters had happened in the Canadian CANDU reactor. This report describes the theoretical development and models on the formation and growth of hydride blister and some experimental results. The evaluation methodology and non-destructive testing for hydride blister in operating reactors are also described.

  13. Influence of Tensile Stresses on α+β – Titanium Alloy VT22 Corrosion Resistance in Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Puchkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tensile stresses and hydrogen render strong influence on the titanic alloys propensity for delayed fracture. The protective film serves аs a barrier for penetration in hydrogen alloy. Therefore to study the stress effect on its structure and protective properties is of significant interest.The aim of this work is to research the tensile stress influence on the passivation, indexes of corrosion, protective film structure and reveal reasons for promoting hydrogenation and emerging propensity for delayed fracture of titanium alloy VТ22 in the marine air atmosphere.The fulfillеd research has shown that:- there is а tendency to reduce the passivation abilities of the alloy VТ22 in synthetic marine water (3 % solution of NaCl with increasing tensile stresses up to 1170 МPа, namely to reduce the potential of free corrosion and the rate of its сhange, thus the alloy remains absolutely (rather resistant;- the protective film consists of a titanium hydroxide layer under which there is the titanium oxide layer adjoining to the alloy, basically providing the corrosion protection.- the factors providing hydrogenation of titanium alloys and formation in their surface zone fragile hydrides, causing the appearing propensity for delayed fracture, alongside with tensile stresses are:- substances promoting chemisorbtion of hydrogen available in the alloy and on its surface;- the cathodic polarization caused by the coupling;- the presence of the structural defects promoting the formation of pitting and local аcidifying of the environment surrounding the alloy.

  14. Formation of simple nitrogen hydrides NH and NH2 at cryogenic temperatures through N + NH3→ NH + NH2 reaction: dark cloud chemistry of nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourry, Sendres; Krim, Lahouari

    2016-07-21

    Although NH3 molecules interacting with ground state nitrogen atoms N((4)S) seem not to be a very reactive system without providing additional energy to initiate the chemical process, we show through this study that, in the solid phase, at very low temperature, NH3 + N((4)S) reaction leads to the formation of the amidogen radical NH2. Such a dissociation reaction previously thought to occur exclusively through UV photon or energetic particle irradiation is in this work readily occurring just by stimulating the mobility of N((4)S)-atoms in the 3-10 K temperature range in the solid sample. The N((4)S)-N((4)S) recombination may be the source of metastable molecular nitrogen N2(A), a reactive species which might trigger the NH3 dissociation or react with ground state nitrogen atoms N((4)S) to form excited nitrogen atoms N((4)P/(2)D) through energy transfer processes. Based on our obtained results, it is possible to propose reaction pathways to explain the NH2 radical formation which is the first step in the activation of stable species such as NH3, a chemical induction process that, in addition to playing an important role in the origin of molecular complexity in interstellar space, is known to require external energy supplies to occur in the gas phase.

  15. Periodontal ligament formation around different types of dental titanium implants. I. The self-tapping screw type implant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, K; Karring, T; Gotfredsen, K

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a periodontal ligament can form around self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants. Implants were inserted in contact with the periodontal ligament of root tips retained in the mandibular jaws of 7 monkeys. In each side of the mandible, 1 premolar......, a periodontal ligament can form on self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants in areas where a void is present between the surrounding bone and the implant at the time of insertion....... and 2 molars were removed in such a manner that in approximately half the cases, the root tips were retained. Following healing, the experimental areas were examined on radiographs, and sites were selected for the insertion of the implants, so that every second implant would have a close contact...

  16. High-pressure hydriding of Zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.S.

    1996-01-01

    The hydriding characteristics of Zircaloy-2(Zry), sponge zirconium (as a liner on Zry plate), and crystal-bar zirconium exposed to pure H 2 at 0.1 MPa or 7 MPa and 400 C were determined in a thermogravimetric apparatus. The morphology of the hydrided specimens was also examined by optical microscopy. For all specimen types, the rate of hydriding in 7 MPa H 2 was two orders of magnitude greater than in 0.1 MPa H 2 . For Zry, uniform bulk hydriding was revealed by hydride precipitates at room temperature and on one occasion, a sunburst hydride. In addition, all specimen types exhibited a hydride surface layer. In a duplex Zry/sponge-Zr specimen, Zry is more heavily hydrided than the sponge Zr layer. (orig.)

  17. Hydride Olefin complexes of tantalum and niobium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, Aan Hendrik

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations on low-valent tantalum and niobium hydride and alkyl complexes, particularly the dicyclopentadienyl tantalum hydride olefin complexes Cp2Ta(H)L (L=olefin). ... Zie: Summary

  18. Neutron diffraction study of the formation kinetics of ordered antiphase domains in titanium carbohydride TiC{sub x}H{sub y}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khidirov, I., E-mail: khidirov@inp.uz [Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Uzbekistan)

    2015-09-15

    The kinetics of formation and growth of ordered antiphase domains (APDs) in titanium carbohydride TiC{sub 0.50}H{sub 0.21} has been investigated by neutron diffraction. A model of ordered APDs is proposed. It is established that the pronounced ordering of interstitial atoms and APDs begin at 450°C. It is shown that the period of ordered APDs (P ≈ 10–12) is independent of the exposure time at a constant temperature. It is found that the temperature of ordered APDs, T{sub OAPD}, increases nonlinearly with an increase in the carbon concentration in the range 0.50 ≤ C/Ti ≤ 0.70. The formation temperature of ordered APDs is found to correlate with the concentration dependence of the order–disorder transition temperature and be 0.60 of the order–disorder transition temperature: T{sub APD} = 0.60Τ{sub C}.

  19. Metal hydride compositions and lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Kwo; Nei, Jean

    2018-04-24

    Heterogeneous metal hydride (MH) compositions comprising a main region comprising a first metal hydride and a secondary region comprising one or more additional components selected from the group consisting of second metal hydrides, metals, metal alloys and further metal compounds are suitable as anode materials for lithium ion cells. The first metal hydride is for example MgH.sub.2. Methods for preparing the composition include coating, mechanical grinding, sintering, heat treatment and quenching techniques.

  20. Neutron diffraction study of ordering of atoms and antiphase domains in titanium carbohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khidirov, I.; Mirzaev, B.B.; Sultanova, S.Kh.; Mukhtarova, N.N.; Getmanskiy, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: As a result of neutron diffraction study of titanium carbon hydrides of a number of compositions at the lower limit of the carbon homogeneity region (TiC 0.47 H 0.22 , TiC 0.47 H 0.19 , TiC 0.47 H 0.07 , TiC 0.50 H 0.21 ) after by heat treatment using special regime for preventing exit of hydrogen out of the lattice, five temperature ranges of temperature of structural changes are found out. 1. T ≥ 1200 o C, at which titanium carbon hydrides have disordered cubic structure, is described within the framework of sp. gr. Fd3m, where the carbon atoms occupy octahedral interstices and the hydrogen atoms - tetrahedral ones. 2. 1000 o C ≤ T ≤ 1100 o C: it is still observed the disordered cubic structure in which the hydrogen atoms statistically are arranged on both octahedral and tetrahedral interstices. 3. 800 0 C ≤ T ≤ 1000 o C: formation of long-range order is observed. Crystal structure of the ordered phase is described within the framework of sp. gr. Fd3m, where the carbon atoms occupy one type of octahedral interstices 16 (c) and the hydrogen atoms - the other type of octahedral interstices 16 (d). 4. 600 o C ≤ T ≤ 800 o C: the decay of ordered cubic phase with segregation of α-Ti is observed. 5. T≤ 475 o C: the formation of metastable ordered cubic phase with the formation of periodic antiphase domains is observed, at these temperatures process of the decay is hindered. It should be noted that the formation of ordered periodic antiphase domains (long-period structure) in the interstitial phase is found for the first time. This work was supported by the Center of Science and Technology of the Republic of Uzbekistan (contract No F-2.1.2)

  1. Neutron diffraction study of ordering of atoms and antiphase domains in titanium carbohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khidirov, I.; Mirzaev, B.B.; Sultanova, S.Kh.; Mukhtarova, N.N.; Getmanskiy, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    As a result of neutron diffraction study of titanium carbon hydrides of a number of compositions at the lower limit of the carbon homogeneity region (TiC 0.47 H 0.22 , TiC 0.47 H 0.19 , TiC 0.47 H 0.07 , TiC 0.50 H 0.21 ) after by heat treatment using special regime for preventing exit of hydrogen out of the lattice, five temperature ranges of temperature of structural changes are found out. 1. T ≥ 1200 o C, at which titanium carbon hydrides have disordered cubic structure, is described within the framework of sp. gr. Fd3m, where the carbon atoms occupy octahedral interstices and the hydrogen atoms - tetrahedral ones. 2. 1000 o C ≤ T ≤ 1100 o C: it is still observed the disordered cubic structure in which the hydrogen atoms statistically are arranged on both octahedral and tetrahedral interstices. 3. 800 0 C ≤ T ≤ 1000 o C: formation of long-range order is observed. Crystal structure of the ordered phase is described within the framework of sp. gr. Fd3m, where the carbon atoms occupy one type of octahedral interstices 16 (c) and the hydrogen atoms - the other type of octahedral interstices 16 (d). 4. 600 o C ≤ T ≤ 800 o C: the decay of ordered cubic phase with segregation of α-Ti is observed. 5. T≤ 475 o C: the formation of metastable ordered cubic phase with the formation of periodic antiphase domains is observed, at these temperatures process of the decay is hindered. It should be noted that the formation of ordered periodic antiphase domains (long-period structure) in the interstitial phase is found for the first time. This work was supported by the Center of Science and Technology of the Republic of Uzbekistan (contract No F-2.1.2). (author)

  2. Cracks growth behaviors of commercial pure titanium under nanosecond laser irradiation for formation of nanostructure-covered microstructures (with sub-5-μm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, A. F.; Wang, W. J.; Mei, X. S.; Zheng, B. X.; Yan, Z. X.

    2016-11-01

    This study reported on the formation of sub-5-μm microstructures covered on titanium by cracks growth under 10-ns laser radiation at the wavelength of 532 nm and its induced light modification for production of nanostructures. The electric field intensity and laser power density absorbed by commercial pure titanium were computed to investigate the self-trapping introduced by cracks and the effect of surface morphology on laser propagation characteristics. It is found that nanostructures can form at the surface with the curvature radius below 20 μm. Meanwhile, variable laser fluences were applied to explore the evolution of cracks on commercial pure titanium with or without melt as spot overlap number increased. Experimental study was first performed at the peak laser fluence of 1.063 J/cm2 to investigate the microstructures induced only by cracks growth. The results demonstrated that angular microstructures with size between 1.68 μm and 4.74 μm was obtained and no nanostructure covered. Then, at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm2, there were some nanostructures covered on the melt-induced curved microstructured surface. However, surface molten material submerged in the most of cracks at the spot overlap number of 744, where the old cracks disappeared. The results indicated that there was too much molten material and melting time at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm2, which was not suitable for obtainment of perfect micro-nano structures. On this basis, peak laser fluence was reduced down to 1.595 J/cm2 and the sharp sub-5 μm microstructures with nanostructures covered was obtained at spot overlap number of 3720.

  3. Titanium composite conversion coating formation on CRS In the presence of Mo and Ni ions: Electrochemical and microstructure characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eivaz Mohammadloo, H.; Sarabi, A.A., E-mail: Sarabi@aut.ac.ir

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Eco-friendly protective thin films for covering the CRS substrates were presented. • Comprehensive analyses were performed to evaluate the surface characteristics. • Promising approach for the surface modification of CRS substrate by Ti-based conversion coatings. - Abstract: There have been an increasing interest in finding a replacement for the chromating process due to environmental and health concerns. Hence, in this study Chrome-free chemical conversion coatings were deposited on the surface of cold-rolled steel (CRS) on the basis of Titanium (TiCC), Titanium-Nickel (TiNiCC) and titanium-molybdate (TiMoCC) based conversion coating solutions. The surface characterization was performed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measuring device. Also, the corrosion behavior was assessed by the means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. FESEM and AFM study show that the TiNiCC is denser and more uniform than that TiCC and TiMoCC since, TiMoCC conversion coating presents network feature, and there were abundant micro-cracks on the surface of the coating. XPS results confirmed the precipitation of Ti and Ni oxide/hydroxide, Mn dioxide/trioxide on the surface of different Ti-based conversion coatings. Electrochemical results revealed that all Ti-based conversion coatings have better anti-corrosion properties than bare CRS. Moreover, TiNiCC treatment inhibited the corrosion of CRS to a significant degree (polarization resistance (R{sub p}) = 5510 Ω cm{sup 2}) in comparison with TiCC (R{sub p} = 2705 Ω cm{sup 2}) and TiMoCC (R{sub p} = 805 Ω cm{sup 2}).

  4. Cracks growth behaviors of commercial pure titanium under nanosecond laser irradiation for formation of nanostructure-covered microstructures (with sub-5-μm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, A.F.; Wang, W.J., E-mail: wenjunwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Mei, X.S.; Zheng, B.X.; Yan, Z.X.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • The sub-5-μm microstructures on commercial pure titanium are creatively obtained based on cracks growth under 10 ns laser irradiation. • The distribution modification of laser energy induced by cambered microstructures was theoretically analyzed to produce nanostructures. • The sharp micro-nano structures under combined action of crack growth and hot-melt are obtained. - Abstract: This study reported on the formation of sub-5-μm microstructures covered on titanium by cracks growth under 10-ns laser radiation at the wavelength of 532 nm and its induced light modification for production of nanostructures. The electric field intensity and laser power density absorbed by commercial pure titanium were computed to investigate the self-trapping introduced by cracks and the effect of surface morphology on laser propagation characteristics. It is found that nanostructures can form at the surface with the curvature radius below 20 μm. Meanwhile, variable laser fluences were applied to explore the evolution of cracks on commercial pure titanium with or without melt as spot overlap number increased. Experimental study was first performed at the peak laser fluence of 1.063 J/cm{sup 2} to investigate the microstructures induced only by cracks growth. The results demonstrated that angular microstructures with size between 1.68 μm and 4.74 μm was obtained and no nanostructure covered. Then, at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm{sup 2}, there were some nanostructures covered on the melt-induced curved microstructured surface. However, surface molten material submerged in the most of cracks at the spot overlap number of 744, where the old cracks disappeared. The results indicated that there was too much molten material and melting time at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm{sup 2}, which was not suitable for obtainment of perfect micro-nano structures. On this basis, peak laser fluence was reduced down to 1.595 J/cm{sup 2} and the sharp sub–5

  5. Examination of parameters affecting overload fracture behavior of flaw-tip hydrides in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes in Candu reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, J.; Shek, G.K.; Wang, Z.R.

    2007-01-01

    Service-induced flaws in Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tubes in Candu (Canada Deuterium Uranium Reactors) nuclear reactors are susceptible to a crack initiation and growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), which is a repetitive process that involves hydrogen diffusion, hydride precipitation, growth and fracture of a hydride region at the flaw-tip under a constant load. Crack initiation may also occur under another loading condition when the hydride region is subjected to an overload. An overload occurs when the hydride region at the flaw tip is loaded to a stress higher than that at which this region is formed such as when the reactor experiences a transient pressure higher than the normal operating pressure where the hydride region is formed. Flaw disposition requires justification that the hydride region overload will not fracture the hydride region, and initiate DHC. In this work, monotonically increasing load experiments were performed on unirradiated Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube specimens containing simulated debris frets (V-notch) and bearing pad frets (BPF, U-shape notch) to examine overload fracture behavior of flaw-tip hydrides formed under hydride ratcheting conditions. Hydride cracking in the overload tests was detected by the acoustic emission technique and confirmed by post-test metallurgical examination. Test results indicate that the resistance to overload fracture is affected by a number of parameters including hydride formation stress, flaw shape (V-notch vs. BPF) and flaw radius (0.015 mm vs. 0.1 mm). The notch-tip hydride morphologies were examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) which show that they are affected by the hydride formation conditions, resulting in different overload fracture resistance. Finite element stress analyses were also performed to obtain flaw-tip stress distributions for interpretation of the test results. (authors)

  6. Predicting formation enthalpies of metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.

    2004-01-01

    of elements from the periodic table are yet to beexplored. Since experimental determination of thermodynamic properties of the vast combinations of elements is tedious it may be advantagous to have a predictive tool for this task. In this report different ways of predicting #DELTA#H_f for binary andternary...

  7. Formation mechanism and adhesive strength of a hydroxyapatite/TiO{sub 2} composite coating on a titanium surface prepared by micro-arc oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shimin, E-mail: lshm1216@163.com [Department of Gem and Material Technique, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Li, Baoe; Liang, Chunyong; Wang, Hongshui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Qiao, Zhixia [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite/TiO{sub 2} composite coating was prepared by one-step micro-arc oxidation. • The formation mechanism of composite coating was investigated. • Higher bonding strength between hydroxyapatite and TiO{sub 2} layer was obtained. - Abstract: A hydroxyapatite (HA)/TiO{sub 2} composite coating was prepared on a titanium surface by one-step micro-arc oxidation (MAO). The formation mechanism of the composite coating was investigated and the adhesion of the coating to the substrate was also measured. The results showed that flocculent structures could be obtained during the early stages of treatment. As the treatment period extended, increasing amounts of Ca–P precipitate appeared on the surface, and the flocculent morphology transformed into a plate-like morphology. Then the plate-like calcium and phosphate salt self-assembled to form flower-like apatite. The Ca/P atomic ratio gradually decreased, indicating that the amounts of Ca{sup 2+} ions which diffused into the coating decreased more rapidly than that of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} or HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−}. The adhesive strength between the apatite and TiO{sub 2} coating was improved. This improvement is attributed to the interlocking effect between the apatite and TiO{sub 2} layer which formed simultaneously during the early stages of the one-step MAO. This study shows that it is a promising method to prepare bioactive coating on a titanium surface.

  8. Synthesis, properties, and assimilation methods of aluminium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2013-01-01

    We have discovered a new source of aluminium hydride-conversion of tetrahydrofurane under influence of halogenous alkyls. We have proposed the chlorbenzene method of synthesis of AlH 3 , which excludes adhesion and ensure high quality of the product with respect to its purity, thermal stability, habits of crystals (round shape), and granulometric composition. We determined capability of benzyl chloride to fix AlH 4 -groups by the way of complexes formation. This allows increasing efficient concentration of AlH 3 solutions and their productivity. We have carried out 'direct' crystallization of aluminium hydride in one stage using interaction of binary metal hydride with aluminium chloride in the medium of ether-toluene at 60-100 d ig C a nd using solvent distillation. In the reaction of Li H with AlCl 3 , we achieved output of pure crystal AlH 3 of hexagonal modification, which was close to quantitative. We have discovered the assimilation methods of aluminium hydride in carrying out of solid-phase chemical reactions. (author)

  9. Neutron diffraction study of α-iron titanium cerium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Hong; Niu Shiwen; Gou Cheng

    1987-01-01

    The results of the neutron scattering method shows that the crystal structure of Fe 0.94 TiCe 0.06 H 0.03 is the same as that of the FeTiH 0.02 . However, its diffraction peak intensities drop by 47-58%, the background increased markedly about 2 times and the lattice constant increase by 5%

  10. The Processing of Titanium Hydride Powders into Uniform Hollow Spheres

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hurysz, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    .... Slurry suitability is dictated by the solids loading and degree of dispersion, the influence of polymer additives on rheology and the evaporation of acetone, and the minimization of impurities...

  11. Modeling of kinetics of isothermal idiomorphic ferrite formation in a medium carbon vanadium-titanium microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, C.; Caballer, E. G.; Garcia de Andres, C.

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented in this work to calculate the evolution of isothermal austenite-to-idiomorphic ferrite transformation in a medium carbon vanadium-titanium microalloyed steel. This model has been developed on the basis of the study of the nucleation and growth kinetics of idiomorphic ferrite, considering the influence of the nature, size and distribution of the inclusions, which are responsible of the intragranular nucleation of idiomorphic ferrite. Moreover, the influence of the austenite grain size on the isothermal decomposition of austenite in idiomorphic ferrite has been thoroughly analysed. An excellent agreement (85% in R''2) has been obtained between experimental and predicted values of volume fraction of idiomorphic ferrite. (Author) 32 refs

  12. Probabilistic modeling of material resistance to crack initiation due to hydrided region overloads in CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutkin, L.; Scarth, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes in CANDU nuclear reactors are susceptible to hydride-assisted cracking at the locations of stress concentration, such as in-service flaws. Probabilistic methodology is being developed to evaluate such flaws for crack initiation due to hydrided region overloads, which occur when the applied stress acting on a flaw with an existing hydrided region at its tip exceeds the stress at which the hydrided region is formed. As part of this development, probabilistic modeling of pressure tube material resistance to overload crack initiation has been performed on the basis of a set of test data specifically designed to study the effects of non-ratcheting hydride formation conditions and load reduction prior to hydride formation. In the modeling framework, the overload resistance is represented as a power-law function of the material resistance to initiation of delayed hydride cracking under constant loading, where both the overload crack initiation coefficient and the overload crack initiation exponent vary with the flaw geometry. In addition, the overload crack initiation coefficient varies with the extent of load reduction prior to hydride formation as well as the number of non-ratcheting hydride formation thermal cycles. (author)

  13. Probabilistic modeling of material resistance to crack initiation due to hydrided region overloads in CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutkin, L.; Scarth, D.A. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes in CANDU nuclear reactors are susceptible to hydride-assisted cracking at the locations of stress concentration, such as in-service flaws. Probabilistic methodology is being developed to evaluate such flaws for crack initiation due to hydrided region overloads, which occur when the applied stress acting on a flaw with an existing hydrided region at its tip exceeds the stress at which the hydrided region is formed. As part of this development, probabilistic modeling of pressure tube material resistance to overload crack initiation has been performed on the basis of a set of test data specifically designed to study the effects of non-ratcheting hydride formation conditions and load reduction prior to hydride formation. In the modeling framework, the overload resistance is represented as a power-law function of the material resistance to initiation of delayed hydride cracking under constant loading, where both the overload crack initiation coefficient and the overload crack initiation exponent vary with the flaw geometry. In addition, the overload crack initiation coefficient varies with the extent of load reduction prior to hydride formation as well as the number of non-ratcheting hydride formation thermal cycles. (author)

  14. Effect of nanoporous TiO2 coating and anodized Ca2+ modification of titanium surfaces on early microbial biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennerberg Ann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The soft tissue around dental implants forms a barrier between the oral environment and the peri-implant bone and a crucial factor for long-term success of therapy is development of a good abutment/soft-tissue seal. Sol-gel derived nanoporous TiO2 coatings have been shown to enhance soft-tissue attachment but their effect on adhesion and biofilm formation by oral bacteria is unknown. Methods We have investigated how the properties of surfaces that may be used on abutments: turned titanium, sol-gel nanoporous TiO2 coated surfaces and anodized Ca2+ modified surfaces, affect biofilm formation by two early colonizers of the oral cavity: Streptococcus sanguinis and Actinomyces naeslundii. The bacteria were detected using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization together with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Interferometry and atomic force microscopy revealed all the surfaces to be smooth (Sa ≤ 0.22 μm. Incubation with a consortium of S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii showed no differences in adhesion between the surfaces over 2 hours. After 14 hours, the level of biofilm growth was low and again, no differences between the surfaces were seen. The presence of saliva increased the biofilm biovolume of S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii ten-fold compared to when saliva was absent and this was due to increased adhesion rather than biofilm growth. Conclusions Nano-topographical modification of smooth titanium surfaces had no effect on adhesion or early biofilm formation by S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii as compared to turned surfaces or those treated with anodic oxidation in the presence of Ca2+. The presence of saliva led to a significantly greater biofilm biovolume but no significant differences were seen between the test surfaces. These data thus suggest that modification with sol-gel derived nanoporous TiO2, which has been shown to improve osseointegration and soft-tissue healing in vivo, does not cause greater biofilm

  15. Equilibrium dissociation pressures of lithium hydride and lithium deuteride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.M.; Webb, R.E.

    1977-12-01

    The equilibrium dissociation pressures of plateau composition lithium hydride and lithium deuteride have been measured from 450 to 750 0 C. These data were used to derive the relationship of dissociation pressure with temperature over this range and to calculate several thermodynamic properties of these materials. Thermodynamic properties determined included the enthalpy, entropy, and free energy of formation; the enthalpy and entropy of fusion; and the melting points

  16. Tritium processing using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    E.I. duPont de Nemours and Company is commissioned by the US Department of Energy to operate the Savannah River Plant and Laboratory. The primary purpose of the plant is to produce radioactive materials for national defense. In keeping with current technology, new processes for the production of tritium are being developed. Three main objectives of this new technology are to ease the processing of, ease the storage of, and to reduce the operating costs of the tritium production facility. Research has indicated that the use of metal hydrides offers a viable solution towards satisfying these objectives. The Hydrogen and Fuels Technology Division has the responsibility to conduct research in support of the tritium production process. Metal hydride technology and its use in the storage and transportation of hydrogen will be reviewed

  17. Hydride Molecules towards Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Raquel R.; La, Ngoc; Goldsmith, Paul

    2018-06-01

    Observations carried out by the Herschel Space Observatory revealed strong spectroscopic signatures from light hydride molecules within the Milky Way and nearby active galaxies. To better understand the chemical and physical conditions of the interstellar medium, we conducted the first comprehensive survey of hydrogen fluoride (HF) and water molecular lines observed through the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer. By collecting and analyzing the sub-millimeter spectra of over two hundred sources, we found that the HF J = 1 - 0 rotational transition which occurs at approximately 1232 GHz was detected in a total of 39 nearby galaxies both in absorption and emission. The analysis will determine the main excitation mechanism of HF in nearby galaxies and provide steady templates of the chemistry and physical conditions of the ISM to be used in the early universe, where observations of hydrides are more scarce.

  18. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  19. Influence of damping coefficient from permanent magnets on chatter formation during end milling of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaiman, S A; Amin, A N

    2015-01-01

    In machining operations, chatter is undesirable due to its adverse effects on the product quality, operation cost, machining accuracy and machine tool life. It is also responsible for reducing output. Chatter is a self-excitation phenomenon occurring in machine tools, in which the cutting process tends to lower the damping capacity of the machine structural components ending in an unstable behavior of the system. Chatter arises due to resonance when the vibrations of the instability of chip formation and the natural vibration modes of the machine-system components coincide. This paper focuses on the influence of damping coefficient from permanent magnets on chip serration frequency as an approach of minimizing chatter in end milling of Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). The method consists of two ferrite permanent magnet bars (dimensions: 1' × 6' × 3'), mounted 5mm from the cutting tool using a specially designed fixture which provided a uniform magnetic field of 2500-2700 Gausses. A titanium alloy Ti6Al4V block was then end milled using uncoated WC-Co inserts. A sequence of 15 experimental runs was conducted based on a small Central Composite Design (CCD) model in Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The primary (independent) parameters were: cutting speed, feed, and depth of cut. The data acquisition system comprised a vibration sensor (accelerometer) and a signal conditioning unit was used to measure the vibration data. The resultant vibrations were then analyzed using the DASYLab 5.6 software. Machining tests were conducted for two different conditions - with and without the application of magnets. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was used to measure the chip segmentations. The SEM analysis of chip serrations demonstrated that the chip serration frequency were more stable while cutting under the presence of permanent magnets due to lower intensity of chatter. (paper)

  20. Influence of damping coefficient from permanent magnets on chatter formation during end milling of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, S. A.; Amin, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    In machining operations, chatter is undesirable due to its adverse effects on the product quality, operation cost, machining accuracy and machine tool life. It is also responsible for reducing output. Chatter is a self-excitation phenomenon occurring in machine tools, in which the cutting process tends to lower the damping capacity of the machine structural components ending in an unstable behavior of the system. Chatter arises due to resonance when the vibrations of the instability of chip formation and the natural vibration modes of the machine-system components coincide. This paper focuses on the influence of damping coefficient from permanent magnets on chip serration frequency as an approach of minimizing chatter in end milling of Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). The method consists of two ferrite permanent magnet bars (dimensions: 1" × 6" × 3"), mounted 5mm from the cutting tool using a specially designed fixture which provided a uniform magnetic field of 2500-2700 Gausses. A titanium alloy Ti6Al4V block was then end milled using uncoated WC-Co inserts. A sequence of 15 experimental runs was conducted based on a small Central Composite Design (CCD) model in Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The primary (independent) parameters were: cutting speed, feed, and depth of cut. The data acquisition system comprised a vibration sensor (accelerometer) and a signal conditioning unit was used to measure the vibration data. The resultant vibrations were then analyzed using the DASYLab 5.6 software. Machining tests were conducted for two different conditions - with and without the application of magnets. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was used to measure the chip segmentations. The SEM analysis of chip serrations demonstrated that the chip serration frequency were more stable while cutting under the presence of permanent magnets due to lower intensity of chatter.

  1. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  2. Use of reversible hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darriet, B.; Pezat, M.; Hagenmuller, P.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of metals or alloys whose hydrides have a high dissociation pressure allows a considerable increase in the hydrogenation rate of magnesium. The influence of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the reaction rate were studied. Results concerning the hydriding of magnesium rich alloys such as Mg2Ca, La2Mg17 and CeMg12 are presented. The hydriding mechanism of La2Mg17 and CeMg12 alloys is given.

  3. NMR study of hydride systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, M.

    1980-02-01

    The hydrides of thorium (ThH 2 , Th 4 H 15 and Th 4 D 15 ) and the intermetallic compound system (Zr(Vsub(1-x)Cosub(x)) 2 and its hydrides were investigated using the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. From the results for the thorium hydride samples it was concluded that the density of states at the Fermi level n(Esub(f)) is higher in Th 4 H 15 than in ThH 2 ; there is an indirect reaction between the protons and the d electrons belonging to the Th atoms in Th 4 H 15 ; n(E) has a sharp structure near Esub(f). It was also found that the hydrogen diffusion mechanism changes with temperature. From the results for the intermetallic compound system conclusions were drawn concerning variations in the electronic structure, which explain the behavior of the system. In hydrogen diffusion studies in several samples it was found that Co atoms slow the diffusion rate. Quadrupole spectra obtained at low temperatures show that the H atoms preferably occupy tetrahedral sites formed by three V atoms and one Z atom. (H.K.)

  4. ON THE CHEMISTRY OF HYDRIDES OF N ATOMS AND O{sup +} IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awad, Zainab [Astronomy, Space Science, and Meteorology Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Viti, Serena; Williams, David A., E-mail: zma@sci.cu.edu.eg [Physics and Astronomy Department, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-01

    Previous work by various authors has suggested that the detection by Herschel /HIFI of nitrogen hydrides along the low-density lines of sight toward G10.6-0.4 (W31C) cannot be accounted for by gas-phase chemical models. In this paper we investigate the role of surface reactions on dust grains in diffuse regions, and we find that formation of the hydrides by surface reactions on dust grains with efficiency comparable to that for H{sub 2} formation reconciles models with observations of nitrogen hydrides. However, similar surface reactions do not contribute significantly to the hydrides of O{sup +} ions detected by Herschel /HIFI that are present along many sight lines in the Galaxy. The O{sup +} hydrides can be accounted for by conventional gas-phase chemistry either in diffuse clouds of very low density with normal cosmic-ray fluxes or in somewhat denser diffuse clouds with high cosmic-ray fluxes. Hydride chemistry in dense dark clouds appears to be dominated by gas-phase ion–molecule reactions.

  5. On the Chemistry of Hydrides of N Atoms and O+ Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Zainab; Viti, Serena; Williams, David A.

    2016-08-01

    Previous work by various authors has suggested that the detection by Herschel/HIFI of nitrogen hydrides along the low-density lines of sight toward G10.6-0.4 (W31C) cannot be accounted for by gas-phase chemical models. In this paper we investigate the role of surface reactions on dust grains in diffuse regions, and we find that formation of the hydrides by surface reactions on dust grains with efficiency comparable to that for H2 formation reconciles models with observations of nitrogen hydrides. However, similar surface reactions do not contribute significantly to the hydrides of O+ ions detected by Herschel/HIFI that are present along many sight lines in the Galaxy. The O+ hydrides can be accounted for by conventional gas-phase chemistry either in diffuse clouds of very low density with normal cosmic-ray fluxes or in somewhat denser diffuse clouds with high cosmic-ray fluxes. Hydride chemistry in dense dark clouds appears to be dominated by gas-phase ion-molecule reactions.

  6. Influence of temperature on δ-hydride habit plane in α-Zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R. N.; Stahle, P.; Banerjee, S.; Ristmanaa, Matti; Sauramd, K.

    2008-01-01

    Dilute Zr-alloy with hcp α-Zr as major phase is used as pressure boundary for hot coolant in CANDU, PHWR and RBMK reactors. Hydrogen / deuterium ingress during service makes the pressure boundary components like pressure tubes of the aforementioned reactors susceptible to hydride embrittlement. Hydride acquires plate shaped morphology and the broad face of the hydride plate coincides with certain crystallographic plane of α-Zr crystal, which is called habit plane. Hydride plate oriented normal to tensile stress significantly increases the degree of embrittlement. Thus key to mitigating the damage due to hydride embrittlement is to avoid the formation of hydride plates normal to tensile stress. Two different theoretical approaches are used to determine the habit plane of precipitates viz., geometrical and solid mechanics. For the geometrical approach invariant plane and invariant-line criteria have been applied successfully and for the solid mechanics approach strain energy minimization criteria have been used successfully. Solid mechanics approach using strain energy computed by FEM technique has been applied to hydride precipitation in Zr-alloys, but the emphasis has been to understand the solvus hysteresis. The objective of the present investigation is to predict the habit plane of δ-hydride precipitating in α-Zr at 25, 300, 400 and 450 .deg. C. using strain energy minimization technique. The δ-hydride phase is modeled to undergo isotropic elastic and plastic deformation. The α-Zr phase was modeled to undergo transverse isotropic elastic deformation. Both isotropic plastic and transverse isotropic plastic deformations of α-Zr were considered. Further, both perfect and linear work-hardening plastic behaviors were considered. Accommodation strain energy of δ-hydrides forming in α-Zr crystal was computed using initial strain method as a function of hydride nuclei orientation. Hydride was modeled as disk with circular edge. The simulation was carried out

  7. Activation and discharge kinetics of metal hydride electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Stein Egil

    2003-07-01

    this activation procedure. Studies of the activity of single metal hydride particles show that each particle has different properties after activation, by hot polarisation, in a porous electrode. The differences in activation among single particles may be due to differences in contact resistance between the individual metal hydride particle and the current collector in the porous electrode, which would result in a current distribution. Annealing of the gas atomised AB{sub 5} type alloy increases the discharge capacity but does not otherwise affect the activation. The corrosion and passivation of metal hydride electrodes of AB{sub 5} type alloys was studied. A high depth of discharge (DOD) decreases the discharge rate capability of the metal hydride electrodes and this is explained by passivation. A surface passivation may enhance particle cracking, which would make the electrode more susceptible to corrosion. The passivation of metal hydride electrodes increases for increasing cut-off-potential (COP) during discharging. This can be explained by an increasing corrosion of the particle surfaces. A corrosion phenomenon was measured at high DOD and correlated to the passivation of the metal hydride particle surface. Lowering the COP can reduce the negative effect of this phenomenon. The cycle life of the gas-atomised material is slightly improved by decreasing the COP but is independent of hot-polarisation activation treatment. Annealing this material significantly improves both discharge capacity and cycle life. A change of surface morphology due to the annealing has been identified and may contribute to the decreased electrode degradation. The formation of hydroxides on the particle surfaces is in general regarded to be negative for the electrode kinetics and is probably responsible for the long time degradation of metal hydride electrodes.

  8. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  9. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J.

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  10. Assessment of predictive models for the failure of titanium and ferrous alloys due to hydrogen effects. Report for the period of June 16 to September 15, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archbold, T.F.; Bower, R.B.; Polonis, D.H.

    1982-04-01

    The 1977 version of the Simpson-Puls-Dutton model appears to be the most amenable with respect to utilizing known or readily estimated quantities. The Pardee-Paton model requires extensive calculations involving estimated quantities. Recent observations by Koike and Suzuki on vanadium support the general assumption that crack growth in hydride forming metals is determined by the rate of hydride formation, and their hydrogen atmosphere-displacive transformation model is of potential interest in explaining hydrogen embrittlement in ferrous alloys as well as hydride formers. The discontinuous nature of cracking due to hydrogen embrittlement appears to depend very strongly on localized stress intensities, thereby pointing to the role of microstructure in influencing crack initiation, fracture mode and crack path. The initiation of hydrogen induced failures over relatively short periods of time can be characterized with fair reliability using measurements of the threshold stress intensity. The experimental conditions for determining K/sub Th/ and ΔK/sub Th/ are designed to ensure plane strain conditions in most cases. Plane strain test conditions may be viewed as a conservative basis for predicting delayed failure. The physical configuration of nuclear waste canisters may involve elastic/plastic conditions rather than a state of plane strain, especially with thin-walled vessels. Under these conditions, alternative predictive tests may be considered, including COD and R-curve methods. The double cantilever beam technique employed by Boyer and Spurr on titanium alloys offers advantages for examining hydrogen induced delayed failure over long periods of time. 88 references

  11. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and

  12. Comparative study about hydrogen sorption in sponge and powder titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasut, Felicia; Preda, Anisoara; Zamfirache, Marius; Ducu, Catalin; Malinovschi, Viorel

    2005-01-01

    Currently, hydrogen may be stored as a compressed gas or a cryogenic liquid. Neither method appears to be practical for many applications in which hydrogen use would otherwise be attractive. For example, gaseous storage of stationary fuel is not feasible because of the large volume or weight of the storage vessels. Liquid hydrogen could be use extensively but the liquefaction process is relatively expensive. The hydrogen can be stored for a long term with a high separation factor, as a solid metal hydride. Using hydride-forming metals and intermetallic compounds, for example, recovery, purification and storage of heavy isotopes in tritium containing system, can solve many problems arising in the nuclear-fuel cycle. The paper presents a comparative study about hydrogen sorption on two titanium structures: powder and sponge. Also, it is presented the characterization, by X-Ray diffraction, of two structures, before and after sorption process. From our results, one can conclude that sorption method is efficient for both samples. Kinetic curves indicates that sorption rate for titanium powder is lower than for sponge titanium. This is the effect of reaction surface, which is larger for powder titanium. Sorption capacity for hydrogen is lower in powder titanium for identical experimental conditions. The difference between storage capacities could be explained by activation temperature, which was lower for titanium powder than for sponge. (authors)

  13. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwarno Suwarno

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is reactive toward hydrogen forming metal hydride which has a potential application in      energy storage and conversion. Titanium hydride has been widely studied for hydrogen storage, thermal storage, and battery electrodes applications. A special interest is using titanium for hydrogen production in a hydrogen sorption-enhanced steam reforming of natural gas. In the present work, non-isothermal dehydrogenation kinetics of titanium hydride and kinetics of hydrogenation in gaseous flow at isothermal conditions were investigated. The hydrogen desorption was studied using temperature desorption spectroscopy (TDS while the hydrogen absorption and desorption in gaseous flow were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The present work showed that the path of dehydrogenation of the TiH2 is d®b®a hydride phase with possible overlapping steps occurred. The fast hydrogen desorption rate observed at the TDS main peak temperature were correlated with the fast transformation of the d-TiH1.41 to b-TiH0.59. In the gaseous flow, hydrogen absorption and desorption were related to the transformation of b-TiH0.59 Û d-TiH1.41 with 2 wt.% hydrogen reversible content. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 21st November 2016; Revised: 20th March 2017; Accepted: 9th April 2017; Available online: 27th October 2017; Published regularly: December 2017 How to Cite: Suwarno, S., Yartys, V.A. (2017. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (3: 312-317  (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.810.312-317

  14. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  15. Formation of Sol Gel Dried Droplets of Carbon Doped Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) at Low Temperature via Electrospraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, S. U.; Hashib, S. Abd; Abu Bakar, N. F.; Ismail, S. N.; Nazli Naim, M.; Rahman, N. Abd; Krishnan, J.

    2018-05-01

    The high band gap energy of TiO2 and inconsistency in particles size has imposed a significant drawback on TiO2 applications. Dried droplets of carbon-doped TiO2 fine particles were produced by using electrospraying technique. The C-doped TiO2 particles were prepared by hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide with the addition of carbon precursor followed by electrospraying the suspension in stable Taylor cone-jet mode. Coulomb fission of charged droplets from the electrospraying technique successfully transformed dispersed liquid C-doped TiO2 particles into solid. The deposited C-doped TiO2 droplets were collected on aluminium substrates placed at working distances of 10 to 20 cm from the tip of the electrospray needle. The collected C-doped TiO2 droplets were characterized by using FESEM, UV-Vis, FTIR and XRD. By increasing the working distance, the average droplets size of the deposited C-doped TiO2 was reduced from ±163.2 nm to ±147.56 nm. UV-Vis analysis showed a strong absorption in the visible-light region and about 93 nm red shift of the onset spectrum for C-doped TiO2. The red shift indicates an increase in photocatalytic efficiency by reducing the TiO2 band gap energy from 3.0 eV to 2.46 eV and shifting its activity to the visible-light region. FTIR analysis indicated the presence of Ti-C and C-O chemical bonding in the C-doped TiO2.

  16. Effect of Magnesium Hydride on the Corrosion Behavior of Pure Magnesium in 0.1 M NaCl Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Shanna; Dong, Junhua; Ke, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The effect of magnesium hydride on the corrosion behavior of pure magnesium in 0.1 M NaCl solution was investigated using the gas collection method, potentiostatic current decay test, and in situ Raman spectrum. The formation of magnesium hydride (MgH2, Mg2H4) was observed at the cathodic region. Applying anodic potential leads to decomposition of magnesium hydride. Magnesium hydride plays an important role on the negative difference effect (NDE) in both the cathodic and anodic regions.

  17. Effect of Magnesium Hydride on the Corrosion Behavior of Pure Magnesium in 0.1 M NaCl Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanna Xu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of magnesium hydride on the corrosion behavior of pure magnesium in 0.1 M NaCl solution was investigated using the gas collection method, potentiostatic current decay test, and in situ Raman spectrum. The formation of magnesium hydride (MgH2, Mg2H4 was observed at the cathodic region. Applying anodic potential leads to decomposition of magnesium hydride. Magnesium hydride plays an important role on the negative difference effect (NDE in both the cathodic and anodic regions.

  18. Positronium hydride defects in thermochemically reduced alkaline-Earth oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R.; Gonzalez, R.; Chen, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Thermochemical reduction of both hydrogen-doped MgO and CaO single crystals results in large concentrations of hydride (H - ) ions. In MgO crystals, positron lifetime and Doppler broadening experiments show that positrons are trapped at H - centers forming positronium hydride molecules [e + - H - ]. A value of 640 ps is obtained for the lifetime of the PsH states located in an anion vacancy In MgO positrons are also trapped at H 2- sites at low temperatures. The H 2- ions were induced in the crystals by blue light illumination. The formation of PsH states in CaO could not be conclusively established. (orig.)

  19. Z-H Bond Activation in (Di)hydrogen Bonding as a Way to Proton/Hydride Transfer and H2 Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkova, Natalia V; Filippov, Oleg A; Shubina, Elena S

    2018-02-01

    The ability of neutral transition-metal hydrides to serve as a source of hydride ion H - or proton H + is well appreciated. The hydride ligands possessing a partly negative charge are proton accepting sites, forming a dihydrogen bond, M-H δ- ⋅⋅⋅ δ+ HX (M=transition metal or metalloid). On the other hand, some metal hydrides are able to serve as a proton source and give hydrogen bond of M-H δ+ ⋅⋅⋅X type (X=organic base). In this paper we analyse recent works on transition-metal and boron hydrides showing i) how formation of an intermolecular complex between the reactants changes the Z-H (M-H and X-H) bond polarity and ii) what is the implication of such activation in the mechanisms of hydrides reactions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Incidence of apical crack formation and propagation during removal of root canal filling materials with different engine driven nickel-titanium instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Özyürek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To determine the incidence of crack formation and propagation in apical root dentin after retreatment procedures performed using ProTaper Universal Retreatment (PTR, Mtwo-R, ProTaper Next (PTN, and Twisted File Adaptive (TFA systems. Materials and Methods The study consisted of 120 extracted mandibular premolars. One millimeter from the apex of each tooth was ground perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth, and the apical surface was polished. Twenty teeth served as the negative control group. One hundred teeth were prepared, obturated, and then divided into 5 retreatment groups. The retreatment procedures were performed using the following files: PTR, Mtwo-R, PTN, TFA, and hand files. After filling material removal, apical enlargement was done using apical size 0.50 mm ProTaper Universal (PTU, Mtwo, PTN, TFA, and hand files. Digital images of the apical root surfaces were recorded before preparation, after preparation, after obturation, after filling removal, and after apical enlargement using a stereomicroscope. The images were then inspected for the presence of new apical cracks and crack propagation. Data were analyzed with χ2 tests using SPSS 21.0 software. Results New cracks and crack propagation occurred in all the experimental groups during the retreatment process. Nickel-titanium rotary file systems caused significantly more apical crack formation and propagation than the hand files. The PTU system caused significantly more apical cracks than the other groups after the apical enlargement stage. Conclusions This study showed that retreatment procedures and apical enlargement after the use of retreatment files can cause crack formation and propagation in apical dentin.

  1. Layer-by-layer self-assembly of minocycline-loaded chitosan/alginate multilayer on titanium substrates to inhibit biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongbin; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoping; Cen, Lian; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation are primary causes of implant associated infection. The biofilm makes the bacteria highly resistant to the host defense and antimicrobial treatment. Antibacterial coatings on the surface of titanium implant can prevent biofilm formation effectively, but it is still a challenge to accomplish relatively long lasting antibacterial effects before wound healing or formation of biological seal. The purpose of our work was to construct antibacterial multilayer coatings loaded with minocycline on surface of Ti substrates using chitosan and alginate based on layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique. In this study, the surfaces of Ti substrates were first hydroxylated and then treated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) to obtain amino-functionalized Ti substrates. Next, the precursor layer of chitosan was covalently conjugated to amino-functionalized Ti substrates. The following alternately coating alginate loaded with minocycline and chitosan onto the precursor layer of chitosan was carried out via LbL self-assembly technique to construct the multilayer coatings on Ti substrates. The multilayer coatings loaded more minocycline and improved sustainability of minocycline release to kill planktonic and adherent bacteria. Moreover, surface charge and hydrophilicity of the coatings and antibacterial ability of chitosan itself also played roles in the antibacterial performance, which can keep the antibacterial ability of the multilayer coatings after minocycline release ceases. In conclusion, LbL self-assembly method provides a promising strategy to fabricate long-term antibacterial surfaces, which is especially effective in preventing implant associated infections in the early stage. Loading minocycline on the surface of implants based on LbL self-assembly strategy can endow implants with sustained antibacterial property. This can inhabit the immediate colonization of bacteria onto the surface of implants in the

  2. Kaempferol-immobilized titanium dioxide promotes formation of new bone: effects of loading methods on bone marrow stromal cell differentiation in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Shuhei; Sugimoto, Keisuke; Kamio, Hisanobu; Okabe, Kazuto; Kuroda, Kensuke; Okido, Masazumi; Hibi, Hideharu

    2018-01-01

    Surface modification of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) implants promotes bone formation and shortens the osseointegration period. Kaempferol is a flavonoid that has the capacity to promote osteogenic differentiation in bone marrow stromal cells. The aim of this study was to promote bone formation around kaempferol immobilized on TiO 2 implants. There were four experimental groups. Alkali-treated TiO 2 samples (implants and discs) were used as a control and immersed in Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline (DPBS) (Al-Ti). For the coprecipitation sample (Al-cK), the control samples were immersed in DPBS containing 50 µg kaempferol/100% ethanol. For the adsorption sample (Al-aK), 50 µg kaempferol/100% ethanol was dropped onto control samples. The surface topography of the TiO 2 implants was observed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and a release assay was performed. For in vitro experiments, rat bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) were cultured on each of the TiO 2 samples to analyze cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition, and osteogenic differentiation. For in vivo experiments, TiO 2 implants placed on rat femur bones were analyzed for bone-implant contact by histological methods. Kaempferol was detected on the surface of Al-cK and Al-aK. The results of the in vitro study showed that rBMSCs cultured on Al-cK and Al-aK promoted alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition, and osteogenic differentiation. The in vivo histological analysis revealed that Al-cK and Al-aK stimulated new bone formation around implants. TiO 2 implant-immobilized kaempferol may be an effective tool for bone regeneration around dental implants.

  3. Incidence of apical crack formation and propagation during removal of root canal filling materials with different engine driven nickel-titanium instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyürek, Taha; Tek, Vildan; Yılmaz, Koray; Uslu, Gülşah

    2017-11-01

    To determine the incidence of crack formation and propagation in apical root dentin after retreatment procedures performed using ProTaper Universal Retreatment (PTR), Mtwo-R, ProTaper Next (PTN), and Twisted File Adaptive (TFA) systems. The study consisted of 120 extracted mandibular premolars. One millimeter from the apex of each tooth was ground perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth, and the apical surface was polished. Twenty teeth served as the negative control group. One hundred teeth were prepared, obturated, and then divided into 5 retreatment groups. The retreatment procedures were performed using the following files: PTR, Mtwo-R, PTN, TFA, and hand files. After filling material removal, apical enlargement was done using apical size 0.50 mm ProTaper Universal (PTU), Mtwo, PTN, TFA, and hand files. Digital images of the apical root surfaces were recorded before preparation, after preparation, after obturation, after filling removal, and after apical enlargement using a stereomicroscope. The images were then inspected for the presence of new apical cracks and crack propagation. Data were analyzed with χ 2 tests using SPSS 21.0 software. New cracks and crack propagation occurred in all the experimental groups during the retreatment process. Nickel-titanium rotary file systems caused significantly more apical crack formation and propagation than the hand files. The PTU system caused significantly more apical cracks than the other groups after the apical enlargement stage. This study showed that retreatment procedures and apical enlargement after the use of retreatment files can cause crack formation and propagation in apical dentin.

  4. Computational study of pristine and titanium-doped sodium alanates for hydrogen storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani

    The emphasis of this research is to study and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of reversible hydrogen storage in pristine and Ti-doped sodium aluminum hydrides using molecular modeling techniques. An early breakthrough in using complex metal hydrides as hydrogen storage materials is from the research on sodium alanates by Bogdanovic et al., in 1997 reporting reversible hydrogen storage is possible at moderate temperatures and pressures in transition metal doped sodium alanates. Anton reported titanium salts as the best catalysts compared to all other transition metal salts from his further research on transition metal doped sodium alanates. However, a few questions remained unanswered regarding the role of Ti in reversible hydrogen storage of sodium alanates with improved thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen desorption. The first question is about the position of transition metal dopants in the sodium aluminum hydride lattice. The position is investigated by identifying the possible sites for titanium dopants in NaAlH4 lattice and studying the structure and dynamics of possible compounds resulting from titanium doping in sodium alanates. The second question is the role of titanium dopants in improved thermodynamics of hydrogen desorption in Ti-doped NaAlH4. Though it is accepted in the literature that formation of TiAl alloys (Ti-Al and TiAl3) is favorable, reaction pathways are not clearly established. Furthermore, the source of aluminum for Ti-Al alloy formation is not clearly understood. The third question in this area is the role of titanium dopants in improved kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption in Ti-doped sodium alanates. This study is directed towards addressing the three longstanding questions in this area. Thermodynamic and kinetic pathways for hydrogen desorption in pristine NaAlH4 and formation of Ti-Al alloys in Ti-doped NaAlH 4, are elucidated to understand the underlying mechanisms of hydrogen desorption. Density functional theory

  5. Hydride effect on crack instability of Zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Che-Chung, E-mail: cctseng@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, No. 1000, Wunhua Road, Jiaan Village, Lungtan, Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China); Sun, Ming-Hung [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, No. 1000, Wunhua Road, Jiaan Village, Lungtan, Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China); Chao, Ching-Kong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43 Keelung Road, Section 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Radial hydrides near the crack tip had a significant effect on crack propagation. • For radial hydrides off the crack line vertically, the effect on crack propagation was notably reduced. • The longer hydride platelet resulted in a remarkable effect on crack propagation. • A long split in the radial hydride precipitate would enhance crack propagation. • The presence of circumferential hydride among radial hydrides may play an important role in crack propagation. - Abstract: A methodology was proposed to investigate the effect of hydride on the crack propagation in fuel cladding. The analysis was modeled based on an outside-in crack with radial hydrides located near its crack tip. The finite element method was used in the calculation; both stress intensity factor K{sub I} and J integral were applied to evaluate the crack stability. The parameters employed in the analysis included the location of radial hydride, hydride dimensions, number of hydrides, and the presence of circumferential hydride, etc. According to our study, the effective distance between a radial hydride and the assumed cladding surface crack for the enhancement of crack propagation proved to be no greater than 0.06 mm. For a hydride not on the crack line, it would induce a relatively minor effect on crack propagation if the vertical distance was beyond 0.05 mm. However, a longer hydride precipitate as well as double radial hydrides could have a remarkable effect on crack propagation. A combined effect of radial and circumferential hydrides was also discussed.

  6. Criteria for fracture initiation at hydrides in zirconium alloys. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, S.Q.; Puls, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical framework for the initiation of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium is proposed for two different types of initiating sites, i.e., a sharp crack tip (considered in this part) and a shallow notch (considered in part II). In the present part I, an expression for K IH is derived which shows that K IH depends on the size and shape of the hydride precipitated at the crack tip, the yield stress and elastic moduli of the material and the fracture stress of the hydride. If the hydride at the crack tip extends in length at constant thickness, then K IH increases as the square root of the hydride thickness. Thus a microstructure favouring the formation of thicker hydrides at the crack tip would result in an increased K IH . K IH increases slightly with temperature up to a temperature at which there is a more rapid increase. The temperature at which there is a more rapid increase in K IH will increase as the yield stress increases. The model also predicts that an increase in yield stress due to irradiation will cause an overall slight decrease in K IH compared to unirradiated material. There is good agreement between the overall predictions of the theory and experimental results. It is suggested that more careful evaluations of some key parameters are required to improve on the theoretical estimates. (orig.)

  7. Obtaining zircaloy powder through hydriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupim, Ivaldete da Silva; Moreira, Joao M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are good options for the metal matrix in dispersion fuels for power reactors due to their low thermal neutron absorption cross-section, good corrosion resistance, good mechanical strength and high thermal conductivity. A necessary step for obtaining such fuels is producing Zr alloy powder for the metal matrix composite material. This article presents results from the Zircaloy-4 hydrogenation tests with the purpose to embrittle the alloy as a first step for comminuting. Several hydrogenation tests were performed and studied through thermogravimetric analysis. They included H 2 pressures of 25 and 50 kPa and temperatures ranging between from 20 to 670 deg C. X-ray diffraction analysis showed in the hydrogenated samples the predominant presence of ZrH 2 and some ZrO 2 . Some kinetics parameters for the Zircaloy-4 hydrogenation reaction were obtained: the time required to reach the equilibrium state at the dwell temperature was about 100 minutes; the hydrogenation rate during the heating process from 20 to 670 deg C was about 21 mg/h, and at constant temperature of 670 deg C, the hydride rate was about 1.15 mg/h. The hydrogenation rate is largest during the heating process and most of it occurs during this period. After hydrogenated, the samples could easily be comminuted indicating that this is a possible technology to obtain Zircaloy powder. The results show that only few minutes of hydrogenation are necessary to reach the hydride levels required for comminuting the Zircaloy. The final hydride stoichiometry was between 2.7 and 2.8 H for each Zr atom in the sample (author)

  8. Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

  9. Co-axial heterostructures integrating palladium/titanium dioxide with carbon nanotubes for efficient electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Giovanni; Boni, Alessandro; Melchionna, Michele; Cargnello, Matteo; Nasi, Lucia; Bertoni, Giovanni; Gorte, Raymond J.; Marcaccio, Massimo; Rapino, Stefania; Bonchio, Marcella; Fornasiero, Paolo; Prato, Maurizio; Paolucci, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Considering the depletion of fossil-fuel reserves and their negative environmental impact, new energy schemes must point towards alternative ecological processes. Efficient hydrogen evolution from water is one promising route towards a renewable energy economy and sustainable development. Here we show a tridimensional electrocatalytic interface, featuring a hierarchical, co-axial arrangement of a palladium/titanium dioxide layer on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The resulting morphology leads to a merging of the conductive nanocarbon core with the active inorganic phase. A mechanistic synergy is envisioned by a cascade of catalytic events promoting water dissociation, hydride formation and hydrogen evolution. The nanohybrid exhibits a performance exceeding that of state-of-the-art electrocatalysts (turnover frequency of 15000 H2 per hour at 50 mV overpotential). The Tafel slope of ~130 mV per decade points to a rate-determining step comprised of water dissociation and formation of hydride. Comparative activities of the isolated components or their physical mixtures demonstrate that the good performance evolves from the synergistic hierarchical structure.

  10. Flux Growth of Highly Crystalline Photocatalytic BaTiO3 Particle Layers on Porous Titanium Sponge Substrate and Insights into the Formation Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Li, B.

    2017-09-01

    A unique architecture of idiomorphic and highly crystalline BaTiO3 particle layers directly grown on a porous titanium sponge substrate was successfully achieved for the first time using a facile molten salt method at a relatively low temperature of 700 °C. Specifically, the low-melting KCl-NaCl eutectic salts and barium hydroxide octahydrate were employed as the reaction medium and barium source, respectively. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry were used to characterize the structure, morphology and optical property of the obtained samples. The results revealed that the flux-grown tetragonal BaTiO3 products had well-defined and uniform morphology with an average size of 300 nm and a band gap of ∼3.16 eV. Based on XRD, EDS, SEM, and TEM, the possible formation mechanism responsible for the well-developed architecture of BaTiO3 particle layers was proposed and discussed. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activity of the flux-grown BaTiO3 products for organic pollutant degradation under simulated sunlight irradiation was also investigated.

  11. Acetaldehyde formation from ethanol over titanium dioxide photocatalyst. Nisanka titan hikarishokubai ni yoru ethanol kara no acetaldehyde no seisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iseda, K [Government Industrial Research Institute, Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    1990-02-20

    The suspention of TiO {sub 2} (rutile structure, 99.9%, 300 mesh) photocatalyst in ethanol was irradiated under ultraviolet light in an argon atmosphere at 25 centigrade. Acetaldehyde, methane and hydrogen were detected as products. When the photocatalysis of TiO {sub 2} itself was examined comparing with the result of blank test without using catalyst, the activity of TiO {sub 2} was confirmed only for the formation of acetaldehyde among the products. The yields of acetaldehyde increased with increasing addition of catalyst. The increasing rate of methane yields was rather small and the methane yields were lower than those in the blank tests. The hydrogen yields were almost same as in the blank tests. Acetal was formed in the blank test but was not formed with addition of TiO {sub 2}. It was provided that TiO {sub 2} was an effective catalyst for the formation of acetaldehyde. 6 ref., 5 figs.

  12. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    Rechargeable battery systems are paramount in the power supply of modern electronic and electromechanical equipment. For the time being, the most promising secondary battery systems for the future are the lithium-ion and the nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. In this thesis, metal hydrides and their properties are described with the aim of characterizing and improving those. The thesis has a special focus on the AB{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys, where A is a rare earth metal like lanthanum, or more commonly misch metal, which is a mixture of rare earth metals, mainly lanthanum, cerium, neodymium and praseodymium. B is a transition metal, mainly nickel, commonly with additions of aluminium, cobalt, and manganese. The misch metal composition was found to be very important for the geometry of the unit cell in AB{sub 5} type alloys, and consequently the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in these types of alloys. The A site substitution of lanthanum by misch metal did not decrease the surface catalytic properties of AB{sub 5} type alloys. B-site substitution of nickel with other transition elements, however, substantially reduced the catalytic activity of the alloy. If the internal pressure within the electrochemical test cell was increased using inert argon gas, a considerable increase in the high rate charge/discharge performance of LaNi{sub 5} was observed. An increased internal pressure would enable the utilisation of alloys with a high hydrogen equivalent pressure in batteries. Such alloys often have favourable kinetics and high hydrogen diffusion rates and thus have a potential for improving the high current discharge rates in metal hydride batteries. The kinetic properties of metal hydride electrodes were found to improve throughout their lifetime. The activation properties were found highly dependent on the charge/discharge current. Fewer charge/discharge cycles were needed to activate the electrodes if a small current was used instead of a higher

  13. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sesha S [Tampa, FL; Niemann, Michael U [Venice, FL; Goswami, D Yogi [Tampa, FL; Stefanakos, Elias K [Tampa, FL

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  14. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  15. Hydrogen adsorption on palladium and palladium hydride at 1 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Skulason, Egill; Nielsen, Gunver

    2010-01-01

    strongly to Pd hydride than to Pd. The activation barrier for desorption at a H coverage of one mono layer is slightly lower on Pd hydride, whereas the activation energy for adsorption is similar on Pd and Pd hydride. It is concluded that the higher sticking probability on Pd hydride is most likely caused...

  16. Cyclopentadiene-mediated hydride transfer from rhodium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, C L; Finster, O N L; Miller, A J M

    2016-07-12

    Attempts to generate a proposed rhodium hydride catalytic intermediate instead resulted in isolation of (Cp*H)Rh(bpy)Cl (1), a pentamethylcyclopentadiene complex, formed by C-H bond-forming reductive elimination from the fleeting rhodium hydride. The hydride transfer ability of diene 1 was explored through thermochemistry and hydride transfer reactions, including the reduction of NAD(+).

  17. Novel Approach for Enhanced Scandium and Titanium Leaching Efficiency from Bauxite Residue with Suppressed Silica Gel Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Gözde; Yagmurlu, Bengi; Cakmakoglu, Seckin; Hertel, Tobias; Kaya, Şerif; Gronen, Lars; Stopic, Srecko; Friedrich, Bernd

    2018-04-04

    The need of light weight alloys for future transportation industry puts Sc and Ti under a sudden demand. While these metals can bring unique and desired properties to alloys, lack of reliable sources brought forth a supply problem which can be solved by valorization of the secondary resources. Bauxite residue (red mud), with considerable Ti and Sc content, is a promising resource for secure supply of these metals. Due to drawbacks of the direct leaching route from bauxite residue, such as silica gel formation and low selectivity towards these valuable metals, a novel leaching process based on oxidative leaching conditions, aiming more efficient and selective leaching but also considering environmental aspects via lower acid consumption, was investigated in this study. Combination of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) was utilized as the leaching solution, where various acid concentrations, solid-to-liquid ratios, leaching temperatures and times were examined in a comparative manner. Leaching with 2.5 M H 2 O 2 : 2.5 M H 2 SO 4 mixture at 90 °C for 30 min was observed to be the best leaching conditions with suppressed silica gel formation and the highest reported leaching efficiency with high S/L ratio for Sc and Ti; 68% and 91%; respectively.

  18. Accommodation stresses in hydride precipitates by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J R; Vicente, M A; Vizcaino, P; Banchik, A D; Almer, J

    2012-01-01

    Hydride-forming materials (Zr, Ti, Nb, etc) are affected by a sub-critical crack growth mechanism that involves the diffusion of H to the stressed region ahead of a crack, followed by nucleation and fracture of hydrides at the crack tip [1]. The phenomenon is intermittent, with the crack propagating through the hydride and stopping when it reaches the matrix. By repeating these processes, the crack propagates through a component at a rate that is highly dependent on the temperature history of the component. Most research effort to understand this phenomenon has occurred within the nuclear industry, as it affects the safe operation of pressure tubes (Zr2.5%Nb) and the long-term storage of nuclear fuel (Zircaloy cladding). Stress-induced hydride formation is a consequence of the volume dilatation that accompanies hydride formation (of the order of 15%), which is elastoplastically accommodated by the matrix and precipitate. Compressive stresses are expected within hydride precipitates due to the constraint imposed by the matrix. Such 'accommodation' stresses are essential ingredients in all theoretical models developed to assess the crack growth rate dependence on operational variables such as temperature, applied stress intensity factor, or overall H concentration [2]. Yet little experimental information is available about the magnitude and directionality of such accommodation stresses. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction is the only technique capable of quantifying such stresses. Here we briefly describe the fundaments of the technique, when used through an area detector placed in transmission geometry. The results of the experiments have allowed us to produce a comprehensive picture about the magnitude and origin of accommodation stresses in δ zirconium hydride platelets (author)

  19. Azimuthally anisotropic hydride lens structures in Zircaloy 4 nuclear fuel cladding: High-resolution neutron radiography imaging and BISON finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun-Li; Zhong, Weicheng; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Heuser, Brent J.

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution neutron radiography has been used to image bulk circumferential hydride lens particles in unirradiated Zircaloy 4 tubing cross section specimens. Zircaloy 4 is a common light water nuclear reactor (LWR) fuel cladding; hydrogen pickup, hydride formation, and the concomitant effect on the mechanical response are important for LWR applications. Ring cross section specimens with three hydrogen concentrations (460, 950, and 2830 parts per million by weight) and an as-received reference specimen were imaged. Azimuthally anisotropic hydride lens particles were observed at 950 and 2830 wppm. The BISON finite element analysis nuclear fuel performance code was used to model the system elastic response induced by hydride volumetric dilatation. The compressive hoop stress within the lens structure becomes azimuthally anisotropic at high hydrogen concentrations or high hydride phase fraction. This compressive stress anisotropy matches the observed lens anisotropy, implicating the effect of stress on hydride formation as the cause of the observed lens azimuthal asymmetry. The cause and effect relation between compressive stress and hydride lens anisotropy represents an indirect validation of a key BISON output, the evolved hoop stress associated with hydride formation.

  20. Identification and characterization of a new Zirconium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Z.

    2007-01-01

    In order to control the integrity of the fuel clad, alloy of zirconium, it is necessary to predict the behavior of zirconium hydrides in the environment (temperature, stress...), at a microscopic scale. A characterization study by TEM of hydrides has been realized. It shows little hydrides about 500 nm, in hydride Zircaloy 4. Then a more detailed study identified a new hydride phase presented in this paper. (A.L.B.)

  1. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  2. A procedure for preparing alkali metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemieux, R.U.; Sanford, C.E.; Prescott, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    A plain low cost, procedure for the continuous, low temperature preparation of sodium or potassium hydrides using cheap reagents is presented. Said invention is especially concerned with a process of purifying of a catalytic exchange liquid used for deuterium enrichment, in which an alkali metal hydride is produced as intermediate product. The procedure for producing the sodium and potassium hydrides consists in causing high pressure hydrogen to be absorbed by a mixture of at least a lower monoalkylamine and an alkylamide of an alkali metal from at least one of said amines [fr

  3. Hydride observations using the neutrography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, G.; Baruj, A.; Borzone, E.M.; Cardenas, R.; Szames, E.; Somoza, J.; Rivas, S.; Sanchez, F.A.; Marin, J.

    2012-01-01

    Neutron radiography observations were performed at the RA-6 experimental nuclear facility in Bariloche. Images from a prototype of a hydride-based hydrogen storage device have been obtained. The technique allows visualizing the inner hydride space distribution. The hydride appeared compacted at the lower part of the prototype after several cycles of hydrogen charge and discharge. The technique has also been applied to the study of Zr/ZrH 2 samples. There is a linear relation between the sample width/hydrogen concentration and the photograph grey scale. This information could be useful for the study of nuclear engineering materials and to determine their possible degradation by hydrogen pick up (author)

  4. Decomposition kinetics of plutonium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, J.M.; Stakebake, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetic data for decomposition of PuH/sub 1/ /sub 95/ provides insight into a possible mechanism for the hydriding and dehydriding reactions of plutonium. The fact that the rate of the hydriding reaction, K/sub H/, is proportional to P/sup 1/2/ and the rate of the dehydriding process, K/sub D/, is inversely proportional to P/sup 1/2/ suggests that the forward and reverse reactions proceed by opposite paths of the same mechanism. The P/sup 1/2/ dependence of hydrogen solubility in metals is characteristic of the dissociative absorption of hydrogen; i.e., the reactive species is atomic hydrogen. It is reasonable to assume that the rates of the forward and reverse reactions are controlled by the surface concentration of atomic hydrogen, (H/sub s/), that K/sub H/ = c'(H/sub s/), and that K/sub D/ = c/(H/sub s/), where c' and c are proportionality constants. For this surface model, the pressure dependence of K/sub D/ is related to (H/sub s/) by the reaction (H/sub s/) reversible 1/2H/sub 2/(g) and by its equilibrium constant K/sub e/ = (H/sub 2/)/sup 1/2//(H/sub s/). In the pressure range of ideal gas behavior, (H/sub s/) = K/sub e//sup -1/(RT)/sup -1/2/ and the decomposition rate is given by K/sub D/ = cK/sub e/(RT)/sup -1/2/P/sup 1/2/. For an analogous treatment of the hydriding process with this model, it can be readily shown that K/sub H/ = c'K/sub e//sup -1/(RT)/sup -1/2/P/sup 1/2/. The inverse pressure dependence and direct temperature dependence of the decomposition rate are correctly predicted by this mechanism which is most consistent with the observed behavior of the Pu--H system.

  5. Formation of TiO/Al2O3/C Composite in Thermal Co-decomposition of Aluminium(III) Acetylacetonate and Titanium(IV) Oxyacetylacetonate.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářík, T.; Pokorná, Dana; Urbanová, Markéta; Bezdička, Petr; Bastl, Zdeněk; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Křenek, T.; Pola, M.; Kullová, L.; Pola, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 117, JAN 2016 (2016), s. 182-190 ISSN 0165-2370 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04020860 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : thermal co-decomposition * aluminium(III) acetylacetonate * titanium(IV) oxyacetylacetonate * titanium monoxide * alumina * Carbona Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UACH-T) Impact factor: 3.471, year: 2016

  6. New bone formation and trabecular bone microarchitecture of highly porous tantalum compared to titanium implant threads: A pilot canine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Whan; Wen, Hai Bo; Gubbi, Prabhu; Romanos, Georgios E

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluated new bone formation activities and trabecular bone microarchitecture within the highly porous region of Trabecular Metal™ Dental Implants (TM) and between the threads of Tapered Screw-Vent® Dental Implants (TSV) in fresh canine extraction sockets. Eight partially edentulated dogs received four implants (4.1 mmD × 13 mmL) bilaterally in mandibular fresh extraction sockets (32 TM, 32 TSV implants), and allowed to heal for 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Calcein was administered to label mineralizing bone at 11 and 4 days before euthanasia for dogs undergoing all four healing periods. Biopsies taken at each time interval were examined histologically. Histomorphometric assay was conducted for 64 unstained and 64 stained slides at the region of interest (ROI) (6 mm long × 0.35 mm deep) in the midsections of the implants. Topographical and chemical analyses were also performed. Histomorphometry revealed significantly more new bone in the TM than in the TSV implants at each healing time (p = .0014, .0084, .0218, and .0251). Calcein-labeled data showed more newly mineralized bone in the TM group than in the TSV group at 2, 8, and 12 weeks (p = .045, .028, .002, respectively) but not at 4 weeks (p = .081). Histologically TM implants exhibited more bone growth and dominant new immature woven bone at an earlier time point than TSV implants. The parameters representing trabecular bone microarchitecture corroborated faster new bone formation in the TM implants when compared to the TSV implants. TM exhibited an irregular faceted topography compared to a relatively uniform microtextured surface for TSV. Chemical analysis showed peaks associated with each implant's composition material, and TSV also showed peaks reflecting the elements of the calcium phosphate blasting media. Results suggest that the healing pathway associated with the highly porous midsection of TM dental implant could enable faster and stronger secondary implant stability than

  7. On the hydrogen saturation of titanium alloys during heating billets for plastic working in gas-fired flame furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushakevich, S.A.; Romanova, L.A.; Bullo, P.M.

    1978-01-01

    Presented are the results of comparative investigations into titanium alloy hydridation during billet heating in gasflame and electric furnaces for forging and hot stamping. It is shown, that titanium alloys are slightly saturated with hydrogen at the temperature lower than that of polymorphic transformation. Hydrogen absorption is decelerated by a dense scale up to the moment of its loosening and peeling off. The application of protective vitreous enamels reduces the danger of impermissible hydridation. It is established, that the usage of gas-flame furnaces for billet heating is possible in the case of corresponding temperature and holding restrictions proper machining allowances and the use of protective coatings

  8. The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0075 The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters KIT BOWEN JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MD...2. REPORT TYPE Final Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30-09-2014 to 29-09-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Oxidation Products of Aluminum ...Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1-0324 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) KIT

  9. Tritium removal using vanadium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, F.B.; Wong, Y.W.; Chan, Y.N.

    1978-01-01

    The results of an initial examination of the feasibility of separation of tritium from gaseous protium-tritium mixtures using vanadium hydride in cyclic processes is reported. Interest was drawn to the vanadium-hydrogen system because of the so-called inverse isotope effect exhibited by this system. Thus the tritide is more stable than the protide, a fact which makes the system attractive for removal of tritium from a mixture in which the light isotope predominates. The initial results of three phases of the research program are reported, dealing with studies of the equilibrium and kinetics properties of isotope exchange, development of an equilibrium theory of isotope separation via heatless adsorption, and experiments on the performance of a single heatless adsorption stage. In the equilibrium and kinetics studies, measurements were made of pressure-composition isotherms, the HT--H 2 separation factors and rates of HT--H 2 exchange. This information was used to evaluate constants in the theory and to understand the performance of the heatless adsorption experiments. A recently developed equilibrium theory of heatless adsorption was applied to the HT--H 2 separation using vanadium hydride. Using the theory it was predicted that no separation would occur by pressure cycling wholly within the β phase but that separation would occur by cycling between the β and γ phases and using high purge-to-feed ratios. Heatless adsorption experiments conducted within the β phase led to inverse separations rather than no separation. A kinetic isotope effect may be responsible. Cycling between the β and γ phases led to separation but not to the predicted complete removal of HT from the product stream, possibly because of finite rates of exchange. Further experimental and theoretical work is suggested which may ultimately make possible assessment of the feasibility and practicability of hydrogen isotope separation by this approach

  10. Formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarins, Arturs; Valtenbergs, Oskars; Kizane, Gunta; Supe, Arnis; Knitter, Regina; Kolb, Matthias H. H.; Leys, Oliver; Baumane, Larisa; Conka, Davis

    2016-03-01

    Lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) pebbles with 2.5 wt.% excess of silicon dioxide (SiO2) are the European Union's designated reference tritium breeding ceramics for the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Module (TBM). However, the latest irradiation experiments showed that the reference Li4SiO4 pebbles may crack and form fragments under operation conditions as expected in the HCPB TBM. Therefore, it has been suggested to change the chemical composition of the reference Li4SiO4 pebbles and to add titanium dioxide (TiO2), to obtain lithium metatitanate (Li2TiO3) as a second phase. The aim of this research was to investigate the formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) in the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with different contents of TiO2 for the first time, in order to estimate and compare radiation stability. The reference and the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles were irradiated with accelerated electrons (E = 5 MeV) up to 5000 MGy absorbed dose at 300-990 K in a dry argon atmosphere. By using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy it was determined that in the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles, several paramagnetic RD and RP are formed and accumulated, like, E' centres (SiO33-/TiO33-), HC2 centres (SiO43-/TiO3-) etc. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with TiO2 additions have comparable radiation stability with the reference pebbles.

  11. The addition of organotin hydrides to isocyanates and isothiocyanates: synthesis and structure of some organotin-substituted amides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noltes, J.G.; Janssen, M.J.

    Organotin hydrides add across the carbon---nitrogen double bond of aryl isocyanates (tin---nitrogen bond formation) and hexyl isocyanate (tin---carbon bond formation) and across the carbon---sulfur double bond of phenyl isothiocyanate (tin---sulfur bond formation) to afford in excellent yield 1:1

  12. Disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, A.; Motyka, T.

    1991-01-01

    A plan has been established for disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydrides used in Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium production or Materials Test Facility (MTF) R ampersand D operations. The recommended plan assumes that the first tritium-exposed metal hydrides will be disposed of after startup of the Solid Waste Disposal Facility (SWDF) Expansion Project in 1992, and thus the plan is consistent with the new disposal requiremkents that will be in effect for the SWDF Expansion Project. Process beds containing tritium-exposed metal hydride powder will be disposed of without removal of the powder from the bed; however, disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydride powder that has been removed from its process vessel is also addressed

  13. Method of making alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pruski, Marek; Hlova, Ihor; Castle, Andra

    2017-05-30

    A method is provided for making alkali metal hydrides by mechanochemically reacting alkali metal and hydrogen gas under mild temperature (e.g room temperature) and hydrogen pressure conditions without the need for catalyst, solvent, and intentional heating or cooling.

  14. Friction stir processing of an aluminum-magnesium alloy with pre-placing elemental titanium powder: In-situ formation of an Al{sub 3}Ti-reinforced nanocomposite and materials characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, F., E-mail: farzadkhodabakhshi83@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Zand Boulevard, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Simchi, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gerlich, A.P. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    A fine-grained Al–Mg/Al{sub 3}Ti nanocomposite was fabricated by friction stir processing (FSP) of an aluminum-magnesium (AA5052) alloy with pre-placed titanium powder in the stirred zone. Microstructural evolutions and formation of intermetallic phases were analyzed by optical and electron microscopic techniques across the thickness section of the processed sheets. The microstructure of the nanocomposite consisted of a fine-grained aluminum matrix (1.5 µm), un-reacted titanium particles (<40 µm) and reinforcement particles of Al{sub 3}Ti (<100 nm) and Mg{sub 2}Si (<100 nm). Detailed microstructural analysis indicated solid-state interfacial reactions between the aluminum matrix and micro-sized titanium particles to form Al{sub 3}Ti intermetallic phase. The hard inclusions were then fractured and re-distributed in the metal matrix by the severe thermo-mechanical conditions imposed by FSP. Evaluation of mechanical properties by hardness measurement and uniaxial tensile test determined significant enhancement in the mechanical strength (by 2.5 order of magnetite) with a high ductility (~22%). Based on a dislocation-based model analysis, it was suggested that the strength enhancement was governed by grain refinement and the presence of hard inclusions (4 vol%) in the metal matrix. Fractographic studies also showed a ductile-brittle fracture mode for the nanocomposite compared with fully ductile rupture of the annealed alloy as well as the FSPed specimen without pre-placing titanium particles. - Highlights: • FSP was employed to fabricate in situ nanocomposite. • The AA5052 Al alloy with pre-placed micro-sized Ti particles were utilized. • The structural analysis was revealed that the in situ formation of Al{sub 3}Ti nanophase. • The SZ grain structure was refined by PSN and ZHP mechanisms during DRX. • Hardness and tensile strength were improved up to ~2.5 times with a good ductility.

  15. Influence of hydrides orientation on strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racine, A.

    2005-09-01

    In pressurized water reactors of nuclear power plants, fuel pellets are contained in cladding tubes, made of Zirconium alloy, for instance Zircaloy-4. During their life in the primary water of the reactor (155 bars, 300 C), cladding tubes are oxidized and consequently hydrided. A part of the hydrogen given off precipitates as Zirconium hydrides in the bulk material and embrittles the material. This embrittlement depends on many parameters, among which hydrogen content and orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress. This investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress on strain, damage and failure mechanisms. Macroscopic and SEM in-situ ring tensile tests are performed on cladding tube material (unirradiated cold worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4) hydrided with about 200 and 500 wppm hydrogen, and with different main hydrides orientation: either parallel or perpendicular to the circumferential tensile direction. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. Neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the global and local strain modes are significantly affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are strongly modified. Indeed, only 200 wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fail in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases sample reach at least 750 MPa before necking and final failure, in ductile or brittle mode. To model this particular heterogeneous material behavior, a non-coupled damage approach which takes into account the anisotropic distribution of the hydrides is proposed. Its parameters are identified from the macroscopic strain field measurements and a

  16. Formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarins, Arturs, E-mail: arturs.zarins@lu.lv [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Valtenbergs, Oskars [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Kizane, Gunta; Supe, Arnis [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Knitter, Regina; Kolb, Matthias H.H.; Leys, Oliver [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-KWT), 76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Baumane, Larisa [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis, Aizkraukles Street 21, LV-1006, Riga (Latvia); Conka, Davis [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia)

    2016-03-15

    Lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) pebbles with 2.5 wt.% excess of silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) are the European Union's designated reference tritium breeding ceramics for the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Module (TBM). However, the latest irradiation experiments showed that the reference Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles may crack and form fragments under operation conditions as expected in the HCPB TBM. Therefore, it has been suggested to change the chemical composition of the reference Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles and to add titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), to obtain lithium metatitanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) as a second phase. The aim of this research was to investigate the formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) in the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with different contents of TiO{sub 2} for the first time, in order to estimate and compare radiation stability. The reference and the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles were irradiated with accelerated electrons (E = 5 MeV) up to 5000 MGy absorbed dose at 300–990 K in a dry argon atmosphere. By using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy it was determined that in the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles, several paramagnetic RD and RP are formed and accumulated, like, E' centres (SiO{sub 3}{sup 3−}/TiO{sub 3}{sup 3−}), HC{sub 2} centres (SiO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/TiO{sub 3}{sup −}) etc. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with TiO{sub 2} additions have comparable radiation stability with the reference pebbles. - Highlights: • Formation of RD and RP in modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with additions of TiO{sub 2} is analysed for the first time. • Due to additions of TiO{sub 2}, concentration of paramagnetic RD slightly increased in modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles. • Modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles have good radiation stability compared to

  17. U-8 wt %Mo and 7 wt %Mo alloys powder obtained by an hydride-de hydride process; Obtencion de polvo de aleaciones U-8% Mo y U-7% Mo (en peso) mediante hidruracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balart, Silvia N; Bruzzoni, Pablo; Granovsky, Marta S; Gribaudo, Luis M.J.; Hermida, Jorge D; Ovejero, Jose; Rubiolo, Gerardo H; Vicente, Eduardo E [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Materiales

    2000-07-01

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are been tested as a component in high-density LEU dispersion fuels with very good performances. These alloys need to be transformed to powder due to the manufacturing requirements of the fuels. One method to convert ductile alloys into powder is the hydride-de hydride process, which takes advantage of the ability of the U-{alpha} phase to transform to UH{sub 3}: a brittle and relatively low-density compound. U-Mo alloys around 7 and 8 wt % Mo were melted and heat treated at different temperature ranges in order to partially convert {gamma} -phase to {alpha} -phase. Subsequent hydriding transforms this {alpha} -phase to UH{sub 3}. The volume change associated to the hydride formation embrittled the material which ends up in a powdered alloy. Results of the optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction during different steps of the process are shown. (author)

  18. Hydrogen storage and evolution catalysed by metal hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-07

    The storage and evolution of hydrogen are catalysed by appropriate metal hydride complexes. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide by hydrogen is catalysed by a [C,N] cyclometalated organoiridium complex, [Ir(III)(Cp*)(4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl-κN(2))benzoic acid-κC(3))(OH(2))](2)SO(4) [Ir-OH(2)](2)SO(4), under atmospheric pressure of H(2) and CO(2) in weakly basic water (pH 7.5) at room temperature. The reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from formate, is also catalysed by [Ir-OH(2)](+) in acidic water (pH 2.8) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between hydrogen and formic acid in water at ambient temperature and pressure has been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst in both directions depending on pH. The Ir complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses regioselective hydrogenation of the oxidised form of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to produce the 1,4-reduced form (NADH) under atmospheric pressure of H(2) at room temperature in weakly basic water. In weakly acidic water, the complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses the reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from NADH to produce NAD(+) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between NADH (and H(+)) and NAD(+) (and H(2)) has also been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst and by changing pH. The iridium hydride complex formed by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) by H(2) and NADH is responsible for the hydrogen evolution. Photoirradiation (λ > 330 nm) of an aqueous solution of the Ir-hydride complex produced by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) with alcohols resulted in the quantitative conversion to a unique [C,C] cyclometalated Ir-hydride complex, which can catalyse hydrogen evolution from alcohols in a basic aqueous solution (pH 11.9). The catalytic mechanisms of the hydrogen storage and evolution are discussed by focusing on the reactivity of Ir-hydride complexes.

  19. Investigations of intermetallic alloy hydriding mechanisms. Annual progress report, May 1 1979-April 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesay, B.R.; Larsen, J.W.

    1980-05-01

    Investigations are being conducted on mechanisms involved with the hydrogen-metal interactions which control the absorption and desorption processes in intermetallic compounds. The status of the following investigations is reported: modeling of hydride formation; microbalance investigations; microstructure investigations; flexure experiments; resistivity experiments; and nuclear backscattering measurements. These investigations concern fundamental hydrogen interaction mechanisms involved in storage alloys

  20. Vanadium-based alloy hydrides for heat pumps, compressors, and isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libowitz, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    A series of body-centered cubic (b.c.c.) solid solution alloys have been developed which appears to be unusually suitable for several applications involving metal hydrides. It is normally very difficult to induce the body-centered cubic metals, Nb, V, and Ta, to react with hydrogen; in bulk form the reaction will simply not occur at room temperature. Alloys containing Nb exhibited very large hysteresis effects on hydride formation and thus are not suitable for most applications. However, the V-Ti based alloys showed relatively little hysteresis, and because of their unusual thermodynamic properties offer significant advantages for the specific applications discussed below. (orig./HB)

  1. Obtention of the constitutive equation of hydride blisters in fuel cladding from nanoindentation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Rengel, M.A., E-mail: mamartin.rengel@upm.es [E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, c/ Profesor Aranguren, 3, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, F.J., E-mail: javier.gomez@amsimulation.com [Advanced Material Simulation, AMS, Bilbao (Spain); Rico, A., E-mail: alvaro.rico@urjc.es [DIMME, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Mostoles (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J. [E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, c/ Profesor Aranguren, 3, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J. [DIMME, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Mostoles (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    It is well known that the presence of hydrides in nuclear fuel cladding may reduce its mechanical and fracture properties. This situation may be worsened as a consequence of the formation of hydride blisters. These blisters are zones with an extremely high hydrogen concentration and they are usually associated to the oxide spalling which may occur at the outer surface of the cladding. In this work, a method which allows us to reproduce, in a reliable way, hydride blisters in the laboratory has been devised. Depth-sensing indentation tests with a spherical indenter were conducted on a hydride blister produced in the laboratory with the aim of measuring its mechanical behaviour. The plastic stress-strain curve of the hydride blister was calculated for first time by combining depth-sensing indentation tests results with an iterative algorithm using finite element simulations. The algorithm employed reduces, in each iteration, the differences between the numerical and the experimental results by modifying the stress-strain curve. In this way, an almost perfect adjustment of the experimental data was achieved after several iterations. The calculation of the constitutive equation of the blister from nanoindentation tests, may involve a lack of uniqueness. To evaluate it, a method based on the optimization of parameters of analytical equations has been proposed in this paper. An estimation of the error which involves this method is also provided.

  2. gamma-Zr-Hydride Precipitate in Irradiated Massive delta- Zr-Hydride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, M. R.; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    1975-01-01

    During examination of A Zircaloy-2-clad fuel pin, which had been part of a test fuel assembly in a boiling water reactor, several regions of severe internal hydriding were noticed in the upper-plenum end of the pin. Examination of similar fuel pins has shown that hydride of this type is caused by...... to irradiation-induced swelling....

  3. Determination of the population of octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials in zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V.M.; Gogava, V.V.; Shilo, S.I.; Biryukova, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    Results of neutron investigations of ZrHsub(1.66), ZrHsub(1.75) and ZrHsub(1.98) zirconium hydrides are presented. Investigations were conducted using plane polycrystal samples by multidetector system of scattered neutron detection. Neutron diffraction method was used to determine the number of interstitial hydrogen atoms in interstitials of the lattice cell in the case of statistic atom distribution. The numbers of interstitial atoms in octahedral interstitials for zirconium hydrides were determined experimentally; the difference of potential energies of hydrogen atoms in octa- and tetrahedral interstitials was determined as well. It is shown that experimentally determined difference of potential energies of hydrogen atoms, occupying octa- and tetrahedral positions in investigated zirconium hydrides results at room temperature in the pretailing occupation of tetrahedral interstitials by hydrogen atoms (85-90%); the occupation number grows with temperature decrease and the ordering of interstitial vacancies with formation of hydrogen superstructure takes place at low temperatures

  4. Effects of gas phase impurities on the topochemical-kinetic behaviour of uranium hydride development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, J.; Brami, D.; Kremner, A.; Mintz, M.H.; Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba

    1988-01-01

    The hydriding kinetics of bulk uranium and U-0.1 wt.% Cr, in the presence of oxidizing gaseous impurities (oxygen and CO), were studied by combined rate measurements and metallographic examinations of partially reacted samples. The effect of the gaseous impurity (type and concentration) was examined metallographically, and the kinetic data were discussed in relation to these examinations. Below about 100 0 C the reaction of uranium with pure hydrogen consists of the following sequence of steps: (i) Surface nucleation; (ii) homogeneous growth (pitting); (iii) relatively fast lateral growth leading to the formation of a reaction front which penetrates into the sample at a constant rate. The effects of oxygen and CO on the hydriding kinetics were related to their abilities to block hydrogen penetration into the uranium. Thus, it was found that oxygen affects only the penetration through the oxide layer, whereas CO affects the penetration through both the oxide and hydride layers. (orig.)

  5. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, M; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; A Iglič; Mazare, A; Schmuki, P; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Mozetič, M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO 2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO 2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO 2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties. (topical review)

  6. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, M.; Mazare, A.; Gongadze, E.; Perutkova, Š.; Kralj-Iglič, V.; Milošev, I.; Schmuki, P.; Iglič, A.; Mozetič, M.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  7. The Effect of Hydrogen and Hydrides on the Integrity of Zirconium Alloy Components Delayed Hydride Cracking

    CERN Document Server

    Puls, Manfred P

    2012-01-01

    By drawing together the current theoretical and experimental understanding of the phenomena of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys, The Effect of Hydrogen and Hydrides on the Integrity of Zirconium Alloy Components: Delayed Hydride Cracking provides a detailed explanation focusing on the properties of hydrogen and hydrides in these alloys. Whilst the focus lies on zirconium alloys, the combination of both the empirical and mechanistic approaches creates a solid understanding that can also be applied to other hydride forming metals.   This up-to-date reference focuses on documented research surrounding DHC, including current methodologies for design and assessment of the results of periodic in-service inspections of pressure tubes in nuclear reactors. Emphasis is placed on showing that our understanding of DHC is supported by progress across a broad range of fields. These include hysteresis associated with first-order phase transformations; phase relationships in coherent crystalline metallic...

  8. Influence of hydride orientation on fracture toughness of CWSR Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube material between RT and 300 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rishi K. [Engineering Directorate, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Mumbai 400094 (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Sunil, Saurav; Kumawat, B.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Singh, R.N., E-mail: rnsingh@barc.gov.in [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tewari, Asim [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Kashyap, B.P. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2017-05-15

    An experimental setup was designed, fabricated and used to form radial hydrides in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy pressure tube spool. The design of setup was based on ensuring a hoop stress in the spool greater than threshold stress for reorientation of hydrides in this alloy, which was achieved by manipulating the thermal expansion coefficient of the plunger and pressure tube material and diametral interference between them. The experimental setup was loaded on a universal testing machine (UTM) fitted with an environmental chamber and subjected to a temperature cycle for the stress reorientation treatment. The metallographic examination of the hydrogen charged spools subjected to stress re-orientation treatment using this set up revealed formation of predominantly radial hydrides. The variation of fracture toughness of material containing radial hydride with test temperature showed typical ‘S’ curve behavior with transition temperatures more than that of the material containing circumferential hydride.

  9. Lactobacillusassisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Anal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn eco-friendlylactobacillussp. (microbe assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40–60 nm are found.

  10. A study of fundamental reaction pathways for transition metal alkyl complexes. I. The reaction of a nickel methyl complex with alkynes. Ii. The mechanism of aldehyde formation in the reaction of a molybdenum hydride with molybdenum alkyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggins, John Mitchell [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1980-06-12

    it was possible to show that the mixed dimers MeCpMo(CO)3-(CO)3MoCp (3b) and MeCpMo(CO)2≡(CO)2 MoCp (4b) are the predominant kinetic products of the reaction. Additionally labeling the carbonyl ligands of 1a with 13CO led to the conclusion that all three of the carbonyl ligands in 1a end up in the tetracarbonyl dimers 4a if the reaction is carried out under a continuous purge of argon Trapping studies failed to find any evidence for the intermediacy of either [CpMo(CO)3] - or [CpMo(CO)3] + in this reaction. A mechanism is proposed that involves the initial migration of the alkyl ligand in 2 to CO forming an unsaturated acyl complex which reacts with 1a to give a binuclear complex containing a three center-two electron Mo-H-Mo bond. This complex then selectively looses a carbonyl from the acyl molybdenum, migrates the hydride to that same metal, and forms a metal-metal bond. This binuclear complex with the hydride and acyl ligands on one metal reductively eliminates aldehyde, and migrates a carbonyl ligand, to give 4a directly. The other product 3a is formed by addition of two molecules of free CO to 4a.

  11. Draft of M2 Report on Integration of the Hybrid Hydride Model into INL's MBM Framework for Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikare, Veena; Weck, Philippe F.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Clark, Blythe; Glazoff, Michael V.; Homer, Eric R.

    2014-07-01

    This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding. While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. This document demonstrates a basic hydride precipitation model that is built on a recently developed hybrid Potts-phase field model that combines elements of Potts-Monte Carlo and the phase-field models. The model capabilities are demonstrated along with the incorporation of the starting microstructure, thermodynamics of the Zr-H system and the hydride formation mechanism.

  12. Fiscal 2000 project of inviting proposals for international joint research - invitation for international proposal (Novel No.2). Achievement report on development of high-strength ultralight biocompatible implant material using porous titanium; 2000 nendo kokusai kyodo kenkyu teian kobo jigyo - kokusai teian kobo (shinki No.2). Takoshitsu chitan ni yoru seitai shinwasei kokyodo chokeiryo implant zai no kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An implant material manufacturing technology is developed for which a titanium based metal material is made porous and osteoblasts are allowed into holes in the material surface for the establishment of fixation and mechanical similarity between the material and bones. Activities are conducted in the six fields of (1) the establishment of material adjusting technology, (2) establishment of high-porosity sintering technology, (3) research and development of hydrogen-aided technology of pore formation, (4) improvement on mechanical characteristics/dimensions evaluation technology, (5) establishment and implementation of biocompatibility evaluation technology, and (6) the development of technology for commercializing high-porosity implant materials. In field (3), pure titanium and titanium hydride are pulverized and classified, and very fine powders only are mixed and sealed into a capsule made of pure iron, which is subjected to extrusion into bulk and then heated to a high temperature for the generation of hydrogen gas for the formation of a limitless number of pores. Pure titanium and a Ti-Al-V-Mo-Fe alloy easy to treat in a low-temperature superplastic process are used for the study of the process. In field (6), in the wake of element technology development, commercialization of implant materials is considered, technical tasks to discharge before new industry creation are made clear, and measures in this connection are studied. (NEDO)

  13. Bio-activated titanium surface utilizable for mimetic bone implantation in dentistry – Part III: Surface characteristics an bone-implant contact formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strnad, J.; Strnad, Z.; Šesták, Jaroslav; Urban, K.; Povýšil, C.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 68, - (2007), s. 841-843 ISSN 0022-3697 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100639 Grant - others:GAMPO(CZ) FT-TA/087 Program:FT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : implants * surface * titanium * bioactivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.899, year: 2007

  14. Synthesis of Nano-Light Magnesium Hydride for Hydrogen Storage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Nano-light magnesium hydride that has the capability for hydrogen storage was synthesized from treatment of magnesium ribbon with hydrogen peroxide. The optimum time for complete hydrogenation of the magnesium hydride was 5 hours.

  15. High H⁻ ionic conductivity in barium hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T S

    2015-01-01

    With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H(-)) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm(-1) at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on.

  16. Economic analysis of hydride fueled BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganda, F.; Shuffler, C.; Greenspan, E.; Todreas, N.

    2009-01-01

    The economic implications of designing BWR cores with hydride fuels instead of conventional oxide fuels are analyzed. The economic analysis methodology adopted is based on the lifetime levelized cost of electricity (COE). Bracketing values (1970 and 3010 $/kWe) are used for the overnight construction costs and for the power scaling factors (0.4 and 0.8) that correlate between a change in the capital cost to a change in the power level. It is concluded that a newly constructed BWR reactor could substantially benefit from the use of 10 x 10 hydride fuel bundles instead of 10 x 10 oxide fuel bundles design presently in use. The cost saving would depend on the core pressure drop constraint that can be implemented in newly constructed BWRs - it is between 2% and 3% for a core pressure drop constraint as of the reference BWR, between 9% and 15% for a 50% higher core pressure drop, and between 12% and 21% higher for close to 100% core pressure. The attainable cost reduction was found insensitive to the specific construction cost but strongly dependent on the power scaling factor. The cost advantage of hydride fuelled cores as compared to that of the oxide reference core depends only weakly on the uranium and SWU prices, on the 'per volume base' fabrication cost of hydride fuels, and on the discount rate used. To be economically competitive, the uranium enrichment required for the hydride fuelled core needs to be around 10%.

  17. Prediction of long term crevice corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement behavior of ASTM grade-12 titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.M.; Jain, H.

    1984-01-01

    Crevice corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are potential failure modes of Grade-12 titanium high-level nuclear waste containers emplaced in rock salt repositories. A method is presented to estimate the environment domains for which immunity to these failure modes will exist for periods of hundreds of years. The estimation is based on the identification and quantification of mechanisms involved. Macroscopic concentration cell formation is responsible for crevice corrosion. The cell formation is accompanied by oxygen depletion, potential drop, anion accumulation and acidification inside the crevice. This process is quantified by simple mass balance equations which show that the immunity domain is a function of the time the container is exposed to the corrosion environment. Strain induced hydride formation is responsible for hydrogen assisted crack initiation. A simple model for slow crack growth is developed using data on growth rates measured at various temperatures. The parameters obtained in the model are used to estimate the threshold stress intensity and hydrogen solubility limit in the alloy at infinite container service time. This value gives a crack size below which container failure will not occur for a given applied stress and hydrogen concentration, and a hydrogen concentration limit at a given stress intensity. 37 references, 5 figures, 4 tables

  18. Experimental investigation of strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4 with various hydride orientations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racine, A; Catherine, C.S.; Cappelaere, C.; Bornert, M.; Caldemaison, D.

    2005-01-01

    This experimental investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides on the mechanical response of Zircaloy-4. Ring tensile tests are performed on unirradiated CWSR Zircaloy-4, charged with about 200 or 500wppm hydrogen. Hydrides are oriented either parallel ('tangential'), or perpendicular ('radial') to the circumferential tensile direction. Tangential hydrides are usually observed in cladding tubes, however, hydrides can be reoriented after cooling under stress to become radial and then trigger brittle behavior. In this investigation, we perform, 'macroscopic' or SEM in-situ tensile tests on smooth rings, at room temperature. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. The results lead to the following conclusions: neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the strain modes are affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are. Indeed, only 200wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fails in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases samples reach at least 750 MPa before failure, with ductile or brittle mode. (authors)

  19. Hydrogen storage in complex hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupu, D.; Biris, A. R.; Misan, I.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell power technologies in mobile and stationary applications. A relevant role of the fuel cell powered vehicles on the market of the transportation systems will be achieved only if the research and development of on-board vehicular hydrogen storage are able to allow a driving range of at least 500 km. The on-board hydrogen storage systems are more challenging due to the space, weight and cost limitations. This range of autonomy between refueling requires materials able to store at least 6.5% weight hydrogen, available at moderate pressures, at the working temperature of the fuel cells and with acceptable cycling stability. The intensive research on the hydrogen storage in alloys and intermetallic of the LaNi 5 , FeTi or Laves phase type compounds, which started more than three decades ago did not resulted in materials of more than about 3% H storage capacities. The 7.5% H content of the Mg hydride is still of attracting interest but though the absorption has been achieved at lower temperatures by ball milling magnesium with various amounts of nickel, the desorption can not be attained at 1 bar H 2 below 280 deg. C and the kinetics of the process is too slow. In the last decade, the attention is focused on another class of compounds, the complex hydrides of aluminum with alkali metals (alanates), due to their high hydrogen content. It was found that doping with Ti-based catalysts improve the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation conditions of NaAlH 4 . Later on, it was shown that ball milling with solid state catalysts greatly improve the hydrogen desorption kinetics of NaAlH 4 , and this also helps to the rehydriding process. The hydrogen desorption from NaAlH 4 occurs in three steps, it shows a reversible storage capacity of 5.5% H and this led to further research work for a better knowledge of its application relating properties. In this work, ball milling experiments on Na

  20. The influence of surface morphology and oxide microstructure on the nucleation and growth of uranium hydride on alpha uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Hawley, M.E.; Brown, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    While the bulk kinetics of the uranium-hydrogen reaction are well understood, the mechanisms underlying the initial nucleation of uranium hydride on uranium remain controversial. In this study, the authors have employed environmental cell optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy, (AFM) in an attempt to relate the structure of the surface and the microstructure of the substrate with the susceptibility and site of hydride nucleation. Samples have been investigated with varying grain size, inclusion (carbide) concentration, and thermal history. There is a clear correlation to heat treatment immediately prior to hydrogen exposure. Susceptibility to hydride formation also appears to be related to impurities in the uranium. The oxidized surface is very complex, exhibiting wide variations in thickness and topography between samples, between grains in the same sample, and within individual grains. It is, however, very difficult to relate this fine scale variability to the relatively sparse hydride initiation sites. Therefore, the surface oxide layer itself does not appear to control the sites where hydride attack is initiated, although it must play a role in the induction period prior to hydride initiation

  1. The influence of surface morphology and oxide microstructure on the nucleation and growth of uranium hydride on alpha uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Hawley, M.E.; Brown, G.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1998-12-31

    While the bulk kinetics of the uranium-hydrogen reaction are well understood, the mechanisms underlying the initial nucleation of uranium hydride on uranium remain controversial. In this study the authors have employed environmental cell optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy, (AFM) in an attempt to relate the structure of the surface and the microstructure of the substrate with the susceptibility and site of hydride nucleation. Samples have been investigated with varying grain size, inclusion (carbide) concentration, and thermal history. There is a clear correlation to heat treatment immediately prior to hydrogen exposure. Susceptibility to hydride formation also appears to be related to impurities in the uranium. The oxidized surface is very complex, exhibiting wide variations in thickness and topography between samples, between grains in the same sample, and within individual grains. It is, however, very difficult to relate this fine scale variability to the relatively sparse hydride initiation sites. Therefore, the surface oxide layer itself does not appear to control the sites where hydride attack is initiated, although it must play a role in the induction period prior to hydride initiation.

  2. The influence of surface morphology and oxide microstructure on the nucleation and growth of uranium hydride on alpha uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Hawley, M.E.; Brown, G.W.

    1998-12-31

    While the bulk kinetics of the uranium-hydrogen reaction are well understood, the mechanisms underlying the initial nucleation of uranium hydride on uranium remain controversial. In this study, the authors have employed environmental cell optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy, (AFM) in an attempt to relate the structure of the surface and the microstructure of the substrate with the susceptibility and site of hydride nucleation. Samples have been investigated with varying grain size, inclusion (carbide) concentration, and thermal history. There is a clear correlation to heat treatment immediately prior to hydrogen exposure. Susceptibility to hydride formation also appears to be related to impurities in the uranium. The oxidized surface is very complex, exhibiting wide variations in thickness and topography between samples, between grains in the same sample, and within individual grains. It is, however, very difficult to relate this fine scale variability to the relatively sparse hydride initiation sites. Therefore, the surface oxide layer itself does not appear to control the sites where hydride attack is initiated, although it must play a role in the induction period prior to hydride initiation.

  3. Stress induced reorientation of vanadium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beardsley, M.B.

    1977-10-01

    The critical stress for the reorientation of vanadium hydride was determined for the temperature range 180 0 to 280 0 K using flat tensile samples containing 50 to 500 ppM hydrogen by weight. The critical stress was observed to vary from a half to a third of the macroscopic yield stress of pure vanadium over the temperature range. The vanadium hydride could not be stress induced to precipitate above its stress-free precipitation temperature by uniaxial tensile stresses or triaxial tensile stresses induced by a notch

  4. Technique for production of calibrated metal hydride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.; Browning, J.F.; Balsley, S.D.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.; Wampler, W.R.; Beavis, L.C.

    1999-01-01

    A technique has been developed for producing calibrated metal hydride films for use in the measurement of high-energy (5--15 MeV) particle reaction cross sections for hydrogen and helium isotopes on hydrogen isotopes. Absolute concentrations of various hydrogen isotopes in the film is expected to be determined to better than ±2% leading to the capacity of accurately measuring various reaction cross sections. Hydrogen isotope concentrations from near 100% to 5% can be made accurately and reproducibly. This is accomplished with the use of high accuracy pressure measurements coupled with high accuracy mass spectrometric measurements of each constituent partial pressure of the gas mixture during loading of the metal occluder films. Various techniques are used to verify the amount of metal present as well as the amount of hydrogen isotopes; high energy ion scattering analysis, PV measurements before, during and after loading, and thermal desorption/mass spectrometry measurements. The most appropriate metal to use for the occluder film appears to be titanium but other occluder metals are also being considered. Calibrated gas ratio samples, previously prepared, are used for the loading gas. Deviations from this calibrated gas ratio are measured using mass spectrometry during and after the loading process thereby determining the loading of the various hydrogen isotopes. These techniques are discussed and pertinent issues presented

  5. Electronic structure of the palladium hydride studied by compton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mizusaki, S; Yamaguchi, M; Hiraoka, N; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen-induced changes in the electronic structure of Pd have been investigated by Compton scattering experiments associated with theoretical calculations. Compton profiles (CPs) of single crystal of Pd and beta phase hydride PdH sub x (x=0.62-0.74) have been measured along the [100], [110] and [111] directions with a momentum resolution of 0.14-0.17 atomic units using 115 keV x-rays. The theoretical Compton profiles have been calculated from the wavefunctions obtained utilizing the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the local density approximation for Pd and stoichiometric PdH. The experimental and the theoretical results agreed well with respect to the difference in the CPs between PdH sub x and Pd, and the anisotropy in the CPs of Pd or PdH sub x. This study provides lines of evidence that upon hydride formation the lowest valance band of Pd is largely modified due to hybridization with H 1s-orbitals and the Fermi energy is raised into the sp-band. (author)

  6. Microchip power compensated calorimetry applied to metal hydride characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepulveda, A.; Lopeandia, A.F.; Domenech-Ferrer, R.; Garcia, G.; Pi, F.; Rodriguez-Viejo, J. [Nanomaterials and Microsystems Group, Physics Department, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Munoz, F.J. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    In this work, we show the suitability of the thin film membrane-based calorimetric technique to measure kinetically limited phase transitions such as the dehydrogenation of metallic hydrides. Different compounds such as Mg, Mg/Al and Mg{sub 80}Ti{sub 20} have been deposited over the active area of the microchip by electron beam evaporation. After several hydrogenation treatments at different temperatures to induce the hydride formation, calorimetric measurements on the dehydrogenation process of those thin films, either in vacuum or in air, are performed at a heating rate of 10 C/min. We observe a significant reduction in the onset of dehydrogenation for Mg{sub 80}Ti{sub 20} compared with pure Mg or Mg/Al layers, which confirms the beneficial effect of Ti on dehydrogenation. We also show the suitability of the membrane-based nanocalorimeters to be used in parallel with optical methods. Quantification of the energy released during hydrogen desorption remains elusive due to the semi-insulating to metallic transition of the film which affects the calorimetric trace. (author)

  7. Effects of δ-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, T., E-mail: kubo@nfd.co.jp [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [M.O.X. Co., Ltd., 1828-520 Hirasu-cho, Mito, Ibaraki 311-0853 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Steady state crack velocity of delayed hydride cracking in Zircaloy-2 was analyzed. • A large stress peak is induced at an end of hydride by volume expansion of hydride. • Hydrogen diffuses to the stress peak, thereby accelerating steady hydride growth. • Crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the stress peak. • There was good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. -- Abstract: Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of δ-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data.

  8. Metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, H.F.; Badcock, C.C.; Quinzio, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    Metal hydride hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen (Ni/H 2 ) batteries has been shown to increase battery energy density and improve battery heat management capabilities. However the properties of metal hydrides in a Ni/H 2 battery environment, which contains water vapor and oxygen in addition to the hydrogen, have not been well characterized. This work evaluates the use of hydrides in Ni/H 2 batteries by fundamental characterization of metal hydride properties in a Ni/H 2 cell environment. Hydrogen sorption properties of various hydrides have been measured in a Ni/H 2 cell environment. Results of detailed thermodynamic and kinetic studies of hydrogen sorption in LaNi 5 in a Ni/H 2 cell environment are presented. Long-term cycling studies indicate that degradation of the hydride can be minimized by cycling between certain pressure limits. A model describing the mechanism of hydride degradation is presented

  9. A Study on the Radial Hydride Assisted Delayed Hydride Cracking of Zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin-Ho; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Yong-Soo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Extensive studies have been done on understanding of DHC(Delayed hydride cracking) phenomenon since several zirconium alloy pressure tubes failed in nuclear reactor in the 1970s. Recently, long-term dry storage strategy has been considered seriously in order to manage spent nuclear fuel in Korea and other countries around the world. Consequentially, many researches have been investigated the degradation mechanisms which will threaten the spent fuel integrity during dry storage and showed that hydrogen related phenomenon such as hydride reorientation and DHC are the critical factors. Especially, DHC is the direct cracking mechanism which can cause not only a through-wall defect but also a radiation leak to the environment. In addition, DHC can be enhanced by radial hydride as reported by Kim who demonstrate that radial hydrides clearly act as crack linkage path. This phenomenon is known as the radial hydride assisted DHC (RHA-DHC). Therefore, study on DHC is essential to ensure the safety of spent fuel. Finite element analysis will be carried out for the stress gradient evaluation around notch tip. A variation in thermal cycle which leads to change in hydrogen solid solution trajectory may be required. If the radial hydride precipitates at notch tip, we will investigate what conditions should be met. Ultimately, we will suggest the regulation criteria for long-term dry storage of spent nuclear fuel.

  10. Method for preparation of uranium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorski, M.S.; Goncalves, Miriam; Mirage, A.; Lima, W. de.

    1985-01-01

    A method for preparation of Uranium Hydride starting from Hidrogen and Uranium is described. In the temperature range of 250 0 up to 350 0 C, and pressures above 10torr, Hydrogen reacts smoothly with Uranium turnings forming a fine black or dark gray powder (UH 3 ). Samples containing a significant amount of oxides show a delay before the reaction begging. (Author) [pt

  11. Hydrogen isotope exchange in metal hydride columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiswall, R.; Reilly, J.; Bloch, F.; Wirsing, E.

    1977-01-01

    Several metal hydrides were shown to act as chromatographic media for hydrogen isotopes. The procedure was to equilibrate a column of hydride with flowing hydrogen, inject a small quantity of tritium tracer, and observe its elution behavior. Characteristic retention times were found. From these and the extent of widening of the tritium band, the heights equivalent to a theoretical plate could be calculated. Values of around 1 cm were obtained. The following are the metals whose hydrides were studied, together with the temperature ranges in which chromatographic behavior was observed: vanadium, 0 to 70 0 C; zirconium, 500 to 600 0 C; LaNi 5 , -78 to +30 0 C; Mg 2 Ni, 300 to 375 0 C; palladium, 0 to 70 0 C. A dual-temperature isotope separation process based on hydride chromatography was demonstrated. In this, a column was caused to cycle between two temperatures while being supplied with a constant stream of tritium-traced hydrogen. Each half-cycle was continued until ''breakthrough,'' i.e., until the tritium concentration in the effluent was the same as that in the feed. Up to that point, the effluent was enriched or depleted in tritium, by up to 20%

  12. Magnesium hydrides and their phase transitions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paidar, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 23 (2016), s. 9769-9773 ISSN 0360-3199 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13069 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hydrogen * magnesium and transition metal hydrides * crystal structure stability * displacive phase transformations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.582, year: 2016

  13. Are RENiAl hydrides metallic?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eichinger, K.; Havela, L.; Prokleška, J.; Stelmakhovych, O.; Daniš, S.; Šantavá, Eva; Miliyanchuk, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2009), s. 1200-1202 ISSN 1862-5282 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA202/07/0418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : rare earth metals * magnetism * hydrides Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2009

  14. Lithium hydride hydrolysis: experimental and kinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charton, S.; Maupoix, C.; Brevet, A.; Delaunay, F.; Heintz, O.; Saviot, L.

    2006-01-01

    In this work has been studied the contribution of various analyses techniques in the framework, on the one hand of revealing the mechanisms implied in lithium hydride hydrolysis, and on the other hand of studying the kinetics of hydrogen production. Among the methods recently investigated, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and SIMS seem to be particularly attractive. (O.M.)

  15. Friction Welding of Titanium and Carbon Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi, HASUI; Yoichi, KIRA; Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University; Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd.

    1985-01-01

    Titanium-steel is a combination of dissimilar materials, which are difficult to weld in general, owing to inevitable formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. A prominent feature of friction welding process is ability to weld dissimilar materials in many kinds of combinations. This report deals with friction weldabilily of pure titanium and S25C steel, which are 12 mm in diameter. Main results are summarized as follows; (1) Suitable welding conditions to obtain a sound weld, which has a j...

  16. In-situ study of hydriding kinetics in Pd-based thin film systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmelle, Renaud; Proost, Joris [Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Div. of Materials and Process Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The hydriding kinetics of Pd thin films has been investigated in detail. The key experimental technique used in this work consists of a high resolution curvature measurement setup, which continuously monitors the reflections of multiple laser beams coming off a cantilevered sample. After mounting the sample inside a vacuum chamber, a H-containing gas mixture is introduced to instantaneously generate a given hydrogen partial pressure (p{sub H2}) inside the chamber. The resulting interaction of H with the Pd layer then leads to a volume expansion of the thin film system. This induces in turn changes in the sample curvature as a result of internal stresses developing in the Pd film during a hydriding cycle. Based on such curvature date obtained in-situ at different p{sub H2}, a two-step model for the kinetics of Pd-hydride formation has been proposed and expressions for the hydrogen adsorption and absorption velocities have been derived. The rate-limiting steps have been identified by studying the p{sub H2}-dependence of these velocities. Furthermore, from our in-situ experimental data, relevant kinetic parameters have been calculated. The effect of dry air exposure of the Pd films on the hydriding kinetics has been considered as well. (orig.)

  17. Direct hydride shift mechanism and stereoselectivity of P450nor confirmed by QM/MM calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krámos, Balázs; Menyhárd, Dóra K; Oláh, Julianna

    2012-01-19

    Nitric oxide reductase (P450(nor)) found in Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the reduction of nitric oxide to N(2)O in a multistep process. The reducing agent, NADH, is bound in the distal pocket of the enzyme, and direct hydride transfer occurs from NADH to the nitric oxide bound heme enzyme, forming intermediate I. Here we studied the possibility of hydride transfer from NADH to both the nitrogen and oxygen of the heme-bound nitric oxide, using quantum chemical and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, on two different protein models, representing both possible stereochemistries, a syn- and an anti-NADH arrangement. All calculations clearly favor hydride transfer to the nitrogen of nitric oxide, and the QM-only barrier and kinetic isotope effects are good agreement with the experimental values of intermediate I formation. We obtained higher barriers in the QM/MM calculations for both pathways, but hydride transfer to the nitrogen of nitric oxide is still clearly favored. The barriers obtained for the syn, Pro-R conformation of NADH are lower and show significantly less variation than the barriers obtained in the case of anti conformation. The effect of basis set and wide range of functionals on the obtained results are also discussed.

  18. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, J.G.; Geremias, T.C.; Montero, J.F.D. [Center for Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), School of Dentistry (ODT), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-900 (Brazil); Vahey, B.R. [Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC, 925 W 34 St, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Benfatti, C.A.M.; Souza, J.C.M.; Magini, R.S. [Center for Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), School of Dentistry (ODT), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-900 (Brazil); Pimenta, A.L., E-mail: andrea@intelab.ufsc.br [Department of Biologia, ERRMECe, Université de Cergy Pontoise, 2, Av. Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy, Pontoise (France); Integrated Laboratories Technologies (InteLab), Dept. Chemical and Food Engineering (EQA), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-970 (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48 h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml{sup −1}), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5 × 10{sup 2} CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4 × 10{sup 2} CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. - Highlights: • A novel synthetic compound is tested on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces • Biofilm inhibition has been achieved on titanium surfaces containing the novel compound. • Planktonic growth of S. mutans was not affected by the presence of lactams on titanium.

  19. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, J.G.; Geremias, T.C.; Montero, J.F.D.; Vahey, B.R.; Benfatti, C.A.M.; Souza, J.C.M.; Magini, R.S.; Pimenta, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48 h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml −1 ), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5 × 10 2 CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4 × 10 2 CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. - Highlights: • A novel synthetic compound is tested on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces • Biofilm inhibition has been achieved on titanium surfaces containing the novel compound. • Planktonic growth of S. mutans was not affected by the presence of lactams on titanium.

  20. A novel pre-surgical maxillary orthodontic device using β-titanium wire for wide unilateral cleft lip and palate patients: preliminary study of its efficacy and impact for the maxillary formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Maki; Oyama, Tomoki; Kiya, Koichiro; Sone, Yumiko; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Hosokawa, Ko

    2014-02-01

    For patients with a wide, complete, unilateral cleft lip and palate, pre-surgical maxillary orthodontic treatments have been used to reduce the alveolar gap before cheiloplasty. However, most of these treatments are complicated and laborious for patients and for medical professionals. Thus, we developed an original pre-surgical orthodontic device made with two separate acrylic resin plates connected with a spring-shaped β-titanium wire (β-TW). When the device was applied on the palate, each segment of the maxilla was automatically aligned for our target formation with the elastic force of β-titanium alloy. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the new device and the size of the maxilla in comparison with the conventional Hotz procedures. A total of 47 patients with a wide unilateral cleft lip and palate were retrospectively evaluated; 33 patients were treated with our new device (β-TW plate group) and 14 were treated with a Hotz plate (HP group). We evaluated the alveolar gap reduction and the size of the maxilla between the two groups, obtaining intraoral maxillary impressions at birth, at 3 months and 1 year. The width of the alveolar gap in the β-TW plate group was significantly reduced compared with that in the HP group 1 month after the treatment (p pre-surgical orthodontic treatments. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Storage characteristics of hydrogen by titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. H.; Kang, H. S.; Back, S. W.; Choi, H. J.; Kim, K. R.; An, D. H.; Lee, H. S.; Jung, H. S.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen absorption experiments were performed by the sponge, strip and rod types of titanium(Ti) for investigating the absorption characteristics of hydrogen. From experimental results, Ti sponge showed the high hydrogen absorption capacity inspite of low reaction temperature(25 .deg. C), the H/M, which mean the capacity of hydrogen absorption was measured 2.0 for Ti sponge at 25 .deg. C. However, in case of strip and rod type of Ti, the hydrogen absorption capacities were very low in the experimental condition of 25 .deg. C. The pulverizing phenomena after metal hydriding reaction was observed in both Ti strip and Ti rod. However, the pulverizing phenomena was not observed in the Ti sponges because of high surface area

  2. Point defect dynamics in sodium aluminum hydrides - a combined quasielastic neutron scattering and density functional theory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qing; Voss, Johannes; Jacobsen, H.S.

    2007-01-01

    we study hydrogen dynamics in undoped and TiCl3-doped samples of NaAlH4 and Na3AlH6 using a combination of density functional theory calculations and quasielastic neutron scattering. Hydrogen dynamics is found to be limited and mediated by hydrogen vacancies in both alanate phases, requiring......Understanding the catalytic role of titanium-based additives on the reversible hydrogenation of complex metal hydrides is an essential step towards developing hydrogen storage materials for the transport sector. Improved bulk diffusion of hydrogen is one of the proposed catalytic effects, and here...

  3. Modeling of hydride precipitation and re-orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weck, Philippe F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mitchell, John Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-18

    In this report, we present a thermodynamic-­based model of hydride precipitation in Zr-based claddings. The model considers the state of the cladding immediately following drying, after removal from cooling-pools, and presents the evolution of precipitate formation upon cooling as follows: The pilgering process used to form Zr-based cladding imparts strong crystallographic and grain shape texture, with the basal plane of the hexagonal α-Zr grains being strongly aligned in the rolling-­direction and the grains are elongated with grain size being approximately twice as long parallel to the rolling direction, which is also the long axis of the tubular cladding, as it is in the orthogonal directions.

  4. Density of trapped gas in heavily-irradiated lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, R.C. Jr.; Attalla, A.; Souers, P.C.; Folkers, C.L.; McCreary, T.; Snider, G.D.; Vanderhoofven, F.; Tsugawa, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    We review old gamma-irradiated lithium hydride data and also display much new bulk and gas-displacement density and nuclear magnetic resonance data on Li(D, T) and LiT at 296 to 373 K. We find that: (1) Li(D, T) swells because of the formation of internal D-T and 3 He gas bubbles, but probably not because of the precipitation of lithium metal; (2) the gas bubbles are at densities of at least 3 to 4x10 4 mol/m 3 , i.e. thousands of atmospheres; (3) outgassing may be largely the result of bubbles rupturing, although diffusion of 3 He as atoms may occur at long times. (orig.)

  5. Terminal solid solubility of hydrogen in titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroldi, J.P.; Vizcaino, Pablo; Banchik, Abraham David

    2003-01-01

    A Research and Development program to build a data base is currently under progress to support the local titanium fabrication. In the present work the temperature of the Terminal Solid Solubility on dissolution (TSSd) and precipitation (TSSp) of titanium hydrides in the Ti α-phase were both measured in the same thermal cycle with a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The local titanium producer (FAESA) provided ASTM grade 1 pure Ti bars of about 2,5 cm in diameter. Samples weighting between 50 to 200 mg were cut with a diamond disc and the parallelepiped faces were all carefully ground with SiC papers, then picked in a HNO 3 plus HF aqueous solution and finally dried out with ethanol and hot air. Pairs of (TSSd, TSSp) values for α + δ → α and α → α + δ transformation temperatures in titanium were determined with the same calorimetric procedure already used to calculate the TSS values in zirconium. Data were taken from the same sample during the heating up and cooling down cycle of the second calorimeter run made with the same rate of 20 C degrees / minute. The Cathodic Charging technique was used to charge the samples at different hydrogen concentrations between the 'as fabricated' value and the concentration corresponding to the eutectoid temperature. A mixture of glycerin and phosphoric acid in a 2:1 ratio and a current density of 0,05 to 0,1 Amp/cm 2 were applied to different samples during 24 to 96 hours to get a wide range of hydrogen concentrations. A homogenization heat treatment at 400 C degrees for 45 minutes -made at open air in an electric furnace- was applied to each sample to dissolve the massive hydrides at the sample surfaces and diffuse them into the bulk of the sample. The hydrogen concentration of each sample was measured after the final calorimetric run using the Extraction Method in Liquid State under an inert atmosphere using a Leco RH-404 model Hydrogen Determinator. The experimental data follows a linear relationship -with a

  6. Titanium and titanium alloys: fundamentals and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leyens, C; Peters, M

    2003-01-01

    ... number of titanium alloys have paved the way for light metals to vastly expand into many industrial applications. Titanium and its alloys stand out primarily due to their high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance, at just half the weight of steels and Ni-based superalloys. This explains their early success in the aerospace and the...

  7. Quantifying the properties of low-cost powder metallurgy titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzoni, L.; Ruiz-Navas, E.M.; Gordo, E.

    2017-01-01

    The extensive industrial employment of titanium is hindered by its high production costs where reduction of these costs can be achieved using cheap alloying elements and appropriate alternative processing techniques. In this work the feasibility of the production of low-cost titanium alloys is addressed by adding steel to pure titanium and processing the alloys by powder metallurgy. In particular, a spherical 4140 LCH steel powder commonly used in metal injection moulding is blended with irregular hydride-dehydride Ti. The new low-cost alloys are cold uniaxially pressed and sintered under high vacuum and show comparable properties to other wrought-equivalent and powder metallurgy titanium alloys. Differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction analyses confirm that Ti can tolerate the employment of iron as primary alloying element without forming detrimental TiFe-based intermetallic phases. Thus, the newly designed α+β alloys could be used for cheaper non-critical components.

  8. Quantifying the properties of low-cost powder metallurgy titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzoni, L., E-mail: bolzoni.leandro@gmail.com [WaiCAM (Waikato Centre for Advanced Materials), The University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, 3240 Hamilton (New Zealand); Ruiz-Navas, E.M.; Gordo, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Carlos III of Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-27

    The extensive industrial employment of titanium is hindered by its high production costs where reduction of these costs can be achieved using cheap alloying elements and appropriate alternative processing techniques. In this work the feasibility of the production of low-cost titanium alloys is addressed by adding steel to pure titanium and processing the alloys by powder metallurgy. In particular, a spherical 4140 LCH steel powder commonly used in metal injection moulding is blended with irregular hydride-dehydride Ti. The new low-cost alloys are cold uniaxially pressed and sintered under high vacuum and show comparable properties to other wrought-equivalent and powder metallurgy titanium alloys. Differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction analyses confirm that Ti can tolerate the employment of iron as primary alloying element without forming detrimental TiFe-based intermetallic phases. Thus, the newly designed α+β alloys could be used for cheaper non-critical components.

  9. Hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: the hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.P. da.

    1981-01-01

    The massive and common use of hydrogen as an energy carrier requires an adequate solution to the problem of storing it. High pressure or low temperatures are not entirely satisfactory, having each a limited range of applications. Reversible metal hydrides cover a range of applications intermediate to high pressure gas and low temperature liquid hydrogen, retaining very favorable safety and energy density characteristics, both for mobile and stationary applications. This work demonstrates the technical viability of storing hydrogen in metal hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys. Also, it shows that technology, a product of science, can be generated within an academic environment, of the goal is clear, the demand outstanding and the means available. We review briefly theoretical models relating to metal hydride properties, specially the thermodynamics properties relevant to this work. We report our experimental results on hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys of various compositions including data on structure, hydrogen storage capacities, reaction kinetics, pressure-composition isotherms. We selected a promising alloy for mass production, built and tested a modular storage tank based on the hydrides of the alloy, with a capacity for storing 10 Nm sup(3) of hydrogen of 1 atm and 20 sup(0)C. The tank weighs 46,3 Kg and has a volume of 21 l. (author)

  10. Failure of Titanium Condenser Tubes after 24 Years Power Plant Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Enemark, Allan; Hangaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The titanium condenser has been in operation for 24 years at Amager unit 3 power plant. In February 2012, the plant was contaminated by seawater due to a failed condenser tube and some tubes were plugged. A month later, the plant tripped again. Small leaks were found again and finally approx. 200...... a plant trip. In addition, small amounts of titanium hydride were revealed to be present in the tubes within the tubesheet indicating that the carbon steel tubesheet was corroding due to ingress of salt water. Although this was not the reason for the failure, it indicated the need for repair of the epoxy...

  11. Performance evaluation and characterisation of EIGA produced titanium alloy powder for additive manufacturing processes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Arthur, Nana KK

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available affect powder quality, and hinder processing. In an investigation by Goso and Kale [3], Ti-6Al-4V alloy powder was produced by the hydride-dehydride (HDH) process in order to make titanium components by blended elemental approach. Chemical analysis.... 2016. Additive manufacturing of metals, Acta Materialia, 117, pp 371-392. 3 [3] Goso, X. and Kale, A. 2010. Production of titanium metal powder by the HDH process, (Paper presented at the South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy Light...

  12. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction. To approximate the experimental data, equations describing the current distribution in porous electrodes were needed. Indications of one or more parallel reduction/oxidation processes competing with the electrochemical hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction were...

  13. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak; Zhou, Chengshang; Fan, Peng; Udell, Kent S.; Bowman, Robert C.; Vajo, John J.; Purewal, Justin J.; Kekelia, Bidzina

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH 2 and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH 2 to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH 2 as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV 0.62 Mn 1.5 alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles

  14. Hydride Transfer versus Deprotonation Kinetics in the Isobutane–Propene Alkylation Reaction: A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with light alkenes plays an essential role in modern petrochemical processes for the production of high-octane gasoline. In this study we have employed periodic DFT calculations combined with microkinetic simulations to investigate the complex reaction mechanism of isobutane–propene alkylation catalyzed by zeolitic solid acids. Particular emphasis was given to addressing the selectivity of the alkylate formation versus alkene formation, which requires a high rate of hydride transfer in comparison to the competitive oligomerization and deprotonation reactions resulting in catalyst deactivation. Our calculations reveal that hydride transfer from isobutane to a carbenium ion occurs via a concerted C–C bond formation between a tert-butyl fragment and an additional olefin, or via deprotonation of the tert-butyl fragment to generate isobutene. A combination of high isobutane concentration and low propene concentration at the reaction center favor the selective alkylation. The key reaction step that has to be suppressed to increase the catalyst lifetime is the deprotonation of carbenium intermediates that are part of the hydride transfer reaction cycle. PMID:29226012

  15. Hydride Transfer versus Deprotonation Kinetics in the Isobutane-Propene Alkylation Reaction: A Computational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong; van Santen, Rutger A; Poursaeidesfahani, Ali; Vlugt, Thijs J H; Pidko, Evgeny A; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2017-12-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with light alkenes plays an essential role in modern petrochemical processes for the production of high-octane gasoline. In this study we have employed periodic DFT calculations combined with microkinetic simulations to investigate the complex reaction mechanism of isobutane-propene alkylation catalyzed by zeolitic solid acids. Particular emphasis was given to addressing the selectivity of the alkylate formation versus alkene formation, which requires a high rate of hydride transfer in comparison to the competitive oligomerization and deprotonation reactions resulting in catalyst deactivation. Our calculations reveal that hydride transfer from isobutane to a carbenium ion occurs via a concerted C-C bond formation between a tert -butyl fragment and an additional olefin, or via deprotonation of the tert -butyl fragment to generate isobutene. A combination of high isobutane concentration and low propene concentration at the reaction center favor the selective alkylation. The key reaction step that has to be suppressed to increase the catalyst lifetime is the deprotonation of carbenium intermediates that are part of the hydride transfer reaction cycle.

  16. Hydrides and Borohydrides of Light Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1947-12-04

    Troy, Attn: Inst. of Naval Science (30) Solar Aircraft Cu,, San Diego, Attn: Dr. M. A. Williamson " (31) INSMAT. N. J. for Itandard Oil Co., Esso Lab...with the other# iLD F.Re p. 8 ilt -ms" #61ggSotod that.. ir addition to thc impurity in the t~y..thr, an impurkty, prosumably aluminum hydride, in

  17. Facile Synthesis of Permethyl Yttrocene Hydride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, Klaas H. den; Teuben, Jan H.

    1984-01-01

    A convenient three step synthesis of (Cp*2YH)n (Cp* = C5Me5) is described starting with YCl3.3thf, in which Cp*2YCl.thf and Cp*2YCH(SiMe3)2 are intermediates, which could be isolated and characterized. The hydride is active in the activation of sp2 and sp3 C-H bonds as was demonstrated by the H-D

  18. Spontaneous Formation of Titanium Nitride on the Surface of a Ti Rod Induced by Electro-Discharge-Heat-Treatment in an N2 Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee W.H.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A single pulse of 2.0 to 3.5 kJ of input energy from a 450 mF capacitor was applied to a commercially pure Ti rod in a N2 atmosphere. The surface of the Ti rod transformed from TiO2 into titanium nitride in times as short as 159 msec, providing a bimodal morphology of the cross-section. A much higher value of hardness that was observed at the edge of the cross-section was attributed to nitrogen-induced solid-solution hardening that occurred during the electrical discharge process. The activation energy (Ea for the diffusion process was estimated to be approximately 86.9 kJ/mol. Results show that the electrical discharge process is a possible potential method for the nitriding of Ti; advantages include a short processing time and control of the nitrided layer without dimensional changes.

  19. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation

  20. Investigations of titamium and zirconium hydrides to determine suitability of recoverable tritium immobilization for the Pickering tritium removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noga, J.O.

    1981-11-01

    A tritium removal system will be constructed at Pickering Nuclear Generating station to reduce the adverse effects of this radioactive hydrogen isotope. This report summarizes various properties of titanium and zirconium sponge hydrides which have been selected as suitable candidates for tritium product immobilization. Equilibrium pressure-composition-temperature data indicates that both materials behave suitably to provide a safe, solid form of tritium storage. Titanium tritide is recommended as the best choice due to higher dissociation pressures which can be achieved at equivalent temperatures when compared to zirconium tritide. Higher dissociation pressures would result in faster and more efficient recovery of tritium gas from the immobilized state. It is evident from the stability of these compounds that their utilization as tritides will greatly enhance the integrity of tritium storage

  1. Spectrophotometric determination of volautile inorganic hydrides in binary gaseous mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezchikov, V.G.; Skachkova, I.N.; Kuznetsova, T.S.; Khrushcheva, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on possibility of single and continuons analysis of binary mixtures (hydride-gas) for the content of volatile inorganic hydrides (VIH) from absorption spectra in the 185-280 nm band. Dependences of the percentage of VIH transmission on the wavelength are presented. It is shown that the maximum of their absorption depends on the element-hydrogen the bond length and binding energy. Detection limit for boron hydride was established to be n x 10 -3 % vol at 185-190 nm wavelength. Technique for spectrophotometric hydride determination in binary mixtures with hydrogen, argon, helium was developed. The technique provides the continuous control of gaseous mixture composition

  2. Identification of the zirconium hydrides metallography in zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Gonzalez, F.

    1968-01-01

    Technique for the Identification of the zirconium hydrides in metallographic specimens have been developed. Microhardness, quantitative estimation and relative orientation of the present hydrides as well as grain size determination of the different Zircaloy-2 tube specimens have also been made. The specimens used were corrosion- tested in water during various periods of time at 300 degree castrating, prior to the metallographic examination. Reference specimens, as received, and heavily hydride specimens in a hydrogen atmosphere at 800 degree centigrees, have been used in the previous stages of the work. No difficulties have been met in this early stage of acquaintanceship with the zirconium hydrides. (Author) 5 refs

  3. Effect of liquid environment on the titanium surface modification by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Nisar, E-mail: chnisarali@gmail.com [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Department of Basic Science and Humanities, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Faisalabad Campus, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Physics, GC University, Kachehri Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia [Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Umm-i-Kalsoom [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Physics, GC University, Kachehri Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Basic Science and Humanities, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Kala Shah Kaku Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Begum, Narjis [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore (Pakistan); Husinsky, Wolfgang [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Liquid assisted ablation effects on the titanium under varying number of laser pulses is investigated. • SEM analysis reveals the growth of various features like ripples, dendritic structures, pores, grains and craters. • Raman and XRD analyses shows the presence of TiO{sub 2} & TiH in both media whereas, TiC, TiCxOy are only identified in propanol. • Hardness of ablated Ti explored by Nano indentation is found to decrease with increasing number of pulses in both media. • Relationship between surface, structural and mechanical modifications is established. - Abstract: The effect of liquid environment (de-ionized water and propanol) on surface, structural and mechanical properties of femtosecond laser ablated titanium has been investigated. For this purpose, Ti: sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs, 1 kHz) has been employed, at a fluence of 3.6 J/cm{sup 2} in ambient environments of de-ionized water, and propanol for various number of laser pulses i.e. 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000. The surface features, chemical composition, structural analysis and mechanical properties of irradiated targets have been evaluated by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X -ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy and Nano-hardness tester. Various features like dendritic structures, globules, porous granular morphology, cones, crater, circular ripples and thermal stress cracking are observed at the ablated area after irradiation. These features are instigated by various thermal and chemical phenomena induced by laser heating at the solid–liquid interface. Decrease in nano-hardness observed in both ambient environments is attributable to the formation of hydrides after irradiation in both media.

  4. Initiation of delayed hydride cracking in zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalabi, A.F.; Meneley, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys is caused by the repeated precipitation and cracking of brittle hydrides. The growth kinetic of the hydrides have been measured to evaluate the critical hydride length for crack initiation. Hydride growth leading to crack initiation follows an approximate (time) 1/3 law on the average; crack propagation proceeds in a stepwise fashion. The critical length of hydride for crack initiation increases with stress and temperature. The fracture criterion for crack initiation predicts the critical hydride length at a give stress level and temperature. The fracture initiation mechanism of the hydride confirms the temperature effects for heating and cooling cycles under services loads. (orig.)

  5. Surface modification of porous titanium with rice husk as space holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinsheng; Hou, Junjian; Liu, Yanpei

    2018-06-01

    Porous titanium was characterized after its surface modification by acid and alkali solution immersion. The results show that the acid surface treatment caused the emergence of flocculent sodium titanate and induced apatite formation. The surface modification of porous titanium promotes biological activation, and the application of porous titanium is also improved as an implant material because of the existence of C and Si.

  6. Characterization of the whiskerlike products formed by hydriding magnesium metal powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herley, P. J.; Jones, W.; Vigeholm, Bjørn

    1985-01-01

    The structure of filamentary crystals produced during the hydriding of magnesium powder has been studies in detail. The needles of small dimensions (typically 0.5 μm in diameter) have been identified by electron analytical techniques to be oriented microcrystals of metallic magnesium. Their forma......The structure of filamentary crystals produced during the hydriding of magnesium powder has been studies in detail. The needles of small dimensions (typically 0.5 μm in diameter) have been identified by electron analytical techniques to be oriented microcrystals of metallic magnesium....... Their formation has been ascribed to the melting of localized aluminum impurities within the bulk magnesium to form a liquid eutectic. In the presence of sublimed magnesium vapor and hydrogen (as a carrier gas) a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism operates to produce a rapid unidirectional extension followed...

  7. Photoluminescence in the characterization and early detection of biomimetic bone-like apatite formation on the surface of alkaline-treated titanium implant: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepahvandi, Azadeh; Moztarzadeh, Fathollah; Mozafari, Masoud; Ghaffari, Maryam; Raee, Nahid

    2011-09-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) property is particularly important in the characterization of materials that contain significant proportions of noncrystalline components, multiple phases, or low concentrations of mineral phases. In this research, the ability of biomimetic bone-like apatite deposition on the surface of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) substrates in simulated body fluid (SBF) right after alkaline-treatment and subsequent heat-treatment was studied by the inherent luminescence properties of apatite. For this purpose, the metallic substrates were treated in 5 M NaOH solution at 60 °C. Subsequently, the substrates were heat-treated at 600 °C for 1 h for consolidation of the sodium titanate hydrogel layer. Then, they were soaked in SBF for different periods of time. Finally, the possibility to use of PL monitoring as an effective method and early detection tool is discussed. According to the obtained results, it was concluded that the PL emission peak did not have any significant shift to the shorter or higher wavelengths, and the PL intensity increased as the exposure time increased. This research proved that the observed inherent PL of the newly formed apatite coatings might be of specific interest for histological probing and bone remodelling monitoring. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. On the formation of an ultrafine-duplex structure facilitated by severe shear deformation in a Ti–20Mo β-type titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; Wu, X.; Stoica, M.; Calin, M.; Kühn, U.; Eckert, J.; Xia, K.

    2012-01-01

    Severe plastic deformation in the form of equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) has been adopted to introduce severe shear strain into a Ti–20 wt.% Mo β-type titanium alloy to elucidate the aging response of the severely deformed β matrix. Upon isothermal aging in the (α + β) phase field, selective heterogeneous α nucleation and growth resulted in a mixed precipitation microstructure. An ultrafine-duplex (α + β) structure composed of equiaxed α precipitates formed inside the shear bands (SBs) created during ECAP, whereas acicular α precipitates were favoured outside the SBs. This distinct precipitation structure has been correlated to the structural characteristics of the SBs: high disorder with dislocation cells characteristic of low-angle boundaries and enhanced atomic diffusivity. The highly disordered structure results in a weak variant selection and thereby promotes randomly orientated α precipitation without obeying the Burgers orientation relationship. Furthermore, the enhanced atomic diffusivity facilitates rapid growth of the α nuclei to form the ultrafine-duplex (α + β) structure.

  9. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyutina, Yu. N., E-mail: iuliiamaliutina@gmail.com; Bataev, A. A., E-mail: bataev@adm.nstu.ru; Shevtsova, L. I., E-mail: edeliya2010@mail.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation); Mali, V. I., E-mail: vmali@mail.ru; Anisimov, A. G., E-mail: anis@hydro.nsc.ru [Lavrentyev Institute of Hydrodynamics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

  10. Cathodic arc sputtering of functional titanium oxide thin films, demonstrating resistive switching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvets, Petr, E-mail: pshvets@innopark.kantiana.ru; Maksimova, Ksenia; Demin, Maxim; Dikaya, Olga; Goikhman, Alexander

    2017-05-15

    The formation of thin films of the different stable and metastable titanium oxide phases is demonstrated by cathode arc sputtering of a titanium target in an oxygen atmosphere. We also show that sputtering of titanium in vacuum yields the formation of titanium silicides on the silicon substrate. The crystal structure of the produced samples was investigated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. We conclude that cathode arc sputtering is a flexible method suitable for producing the functional films for electronic applications. The functionality is verified by the memory effect demonstration, based on the resistive switching in the titanium oxide thin film structure.

  11. Pyrophoric behaviour of uranium hydride and uranium powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guyadec, F.; Génin, X.; Bayle, J. P.; Dugne, O.; Duhart-Barone, A.; Ablitzer, C.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal stability and spontaneous ignition conditions of uranium hydride and uranium metal fine powders have been studied and observed in an original and dedicated experimental device placed inside a glove box under flowing pure argon. Pure uranium hydride powder with low amount of oxide (Oxidation mechanisms are proposed.

  12. Electrocatalytic hydride-forming compounds for rechageable batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, P.H.L.; Einerhand, R.E.F.

    1991-01-01

    Non-toxic intermetallic hydride-forming compounds are attractive alternatives to cadmium as the negative electrode materials in the new generation of Ni/metal hydride rechargeable batteries. High exchange currents and discharge efficiencies even at low temperatures can be achieved using highly

  13. Ultra-sonic observation in niobium hydride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florencio, O.; Pinatti, Dyonisio G.

    1982-01-01

    The hidrogen embrittlement of exothermic ocluders, had been considered as due to applied stress induced hydride precipitates leading to brittle fracture. The results of simultaneous measurements of macroscopic deformation and elastic change due to hydride precipitation, using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique are showed. THen it was tested the possibility of kinectis precipitation parameters evoluation. (Author) [pt

  14. Growth and decomposition of Lithium and Lithium hydride on Nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Nielsen, Gunver; Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the deposition, structure and decomposition of lithium and lithium-hydride films on a nickel substrate. Using surface sensitive techniques it was possible to quantify the deposited Li amount, and to optimize the deposition procedure for synthesizing lithium......-hydride films. By only making thin films of LiH it is possible to study the stability of these hydride layers and compare it directly with the stability of pure Li without having any transport phenomena or adsorbed oxygen to obscure the results. The desorption of metallic lithium takes place at a lower...... temperature than the decomposition of the lithium-hydride, confirming the high stability and sintering problems of lithium-hydride making the storage potential a challenge. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. Minimizing hydride cracking in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Cheadle, B.A.; Ambler, J.F.R.; Eadie, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Zirconium alloy components can fail by hydride cracking if they contain large flaws and are highly stressed. If cracking in such components is suspected, crack growth can be minimized by following two simple operating rules: components should be heated up from at least 30K below any operating temperature above 450K, and when the component requires cooling to room temperature from a high temperature, any tensile stress should be reduced as much and as quickly as is practical during cooling. This paper describes the physical basis for these rules

  16. Low-frequency excitations in zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulescu, A.; Padureanu, I.; Rapeanu, S.N.; Beldiman, A.; Kozlov, Zh.A.; Semenov, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    The slow inelastic neutron scattering (INS) on ZrH x systems (x = 0.38, 0.52) revealed new excitations located within the energy range 2-10 MeV. Besides the acoustic vibrations specific to α-HCP Zr and γ-FCO Zr hydride the fine structure of these excitations is clearly observed. The origin of the new observed peaks is not very clear but a proton tunneling or a resonance effect in α-Zr lattice could be taken into account

  17. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rico, A.; Martin-Rengel, M.A.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Gomez-Sanchez, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found

  18. Application of acoustic emission to hydride cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagat, S.; Ambler, J.F.R.; Coleman, C.E.

    1986-07-01

    Acoustic emission has been used for over a decade to study delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys. At first acoustic emission was used primarily to detect the onset of DHC. This was possible because DHC was accompanied by very little plastic deformation of the material and furthermore the amplitudes of the acoustic pulses produced during cracking of the brittle hydride phase were much larger than those from dislocation motion and twinning. Acoustic emission was also used for measuring crack growth when it was found that for a suitable amplitude threshold, the total number of acoustic emission counts was linearly related to the cracked area. Once the proportionality constant was established, the acoustic counts could be converted to the crack length. Now the proportionality between the count rate and the crack growth rate is used to provide feedback between the crack length and the applied load, using computer technology. In such a system, the stress at the crack tip can be maintained constant during the test by adjusting the applied load as the crack progresses, or it can be changed in a predetermined manner, for example, to measure the threshold stress for cracking

  19. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    In the last five years, the study of metal hydrides has ex­ panded enormously due to the potential technological importance of this class of materials in hydrogen based energy conversion schemes. The scope of this activity has been worldwide among the industrially advanced nations. There has been a consensus among researchers in both fundamental and applied areas that a more basic understanding of the properties of metal/hydrogen syster;,s is required in order to provide a rational basis for the selection of materials for specific applications. The current worldwide need for and interest in research in metal hydrides indicated the timeliness of an Advanced Study Insti­ tute to provide an in-depth view of the field for those active in its various aspects. The inclusion of speakers from non-NATO coun­ tries provided the opportunity for cross-fertilization of ideas for future research. While the emphasis of the Institute was on basic properties, there was a conscious effort to stimulate interest in the applic...

  20. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  1. Classification of titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.; Garcia C, R.M.; Maya M, M.E.; Ita T, A. De; Palacios G, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) and the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy techniques are used with the purpose to achieve a complete identification of phases and mixture of phases of a crystalline material as titanium dioxide. The problem for solving consists of being able to distinguish a sample of titanium dioxide being different than a titanium dioxide pigment. A standard sample of titanium dioxide with NIST certificate is used, which indicates a purity of 99.74% for the TiO 2 . The following way is recommended to proceed: a)To make an analysis by means of X-ray diffraction technique to the sample of titanium dioxide pigment and on the standard of titanium dioxide waiting not find differences. b) To make a chemical analysis by the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy via in a microscope, taking advantage of the high vacuum since it is oxygen which is analysed and if it is concluded that the aluminium oxide appears in a greater proportion to 1% it is established that is a titanium dioxide pigment, but if it is lesser then it will be only titanium dioxide. This type of analysis is an application of the nuclear techniques useful for the tariff classification of merchandise which is considered as of difficult recognition. (Author)

  2. Investigation of the thermodynamics governing metal hydride synthesis in the molten state process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Berseth, Polly A.; Farrell, Thomas P.; Laughlin, Laura; Anton, Donald; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2008-01-01

    This work is aimed at utilizing a new synthetic technique to form novel complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. This technique is based on fusing different complex hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures to form new species with improved hydrogen storage properties. Under conditions of elevated hydrogen overpressures and temperatures the starting materials can reach melting or near-melting point without decomposing (molten state processing), allowing for enhanced diffusion and exchange of elements among the starting materials. The formation and stabilization of these compounds, using the molten state process, is driven by the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the starting and resulting compounds. Complex hydrides (e.g. NaK 2 AlH 6 , Mg(AlH 4 ) 2 ) were formed, structurally characterized and their hydrogen desorption properties were tested. In this paper we report on investigations of the thermodynamic aspects governing the process and products. We also report on the role of molar ratio in determining the final products. The effectiveness of the molten state process is compared with chemomechanical synthetic methods (ball milling)

  3. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Buffleben, George M.; Johnson, Terry A.; Robinson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  4. A study of stress reorientation of hydrides in zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yourong, Jiang; Bangxin, Zhou [Nuclear Power Inst. of China, Chengdu, SC (China)

    1994-10-01

    Under the conditions of circumferential tensile stress from 70 to 180 MPa for Zircaloy tubes or the tensile stress from 55 to 180 MPa for Zircaloy-4 plates and temperature cycling between 150 and 400 degree C, the effects of stress and the number of temperature cycling on hydride reorientation in Zircaloy-4 tubes and plates and Zircaloy-2 tubes containing about 220 {mu}g/g hydrogen have been investigated. With the increase of stress and/or the number of temperature cycling, the level of hydride reorientation increases. When hydride reorientation takes place, there is a threshold stress concerned with the number of temperature cycling. Below the threshold stress, hydride reorientation is not obvious. When applied stress is higher than the threshold stress, the level of hydride reorientation increases with the increase of stress and the number of temperature cycling. Hydride reorientation in Zircaloy-4 tubes develops gradually from the outer surface to inner surface. It might be related to the difference of texture between outer surface and inner surface. The threshold stress is affected by both the texture and the value of B. So controlling texture could still restrict hydride reorientation under tensile stress.

  5. Electrowinning molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in it quest for global competitiveness CSIR Manufacturing and Materials Technology 3 Rationale – Titanium Cost Build-up Material Cost Ilmenite $0.27/kg Ti sponge Titanium slag $0.75/kg Ti Sponge TiCl4 and TiO2 $3....10/kg Ti Sponge Ti Sponge raw materials costs $5.50/kg Ti Sponge Total Ti Sponge cost $9-$11/kg Ti Sponge Ti ingot $15-17/kg Ti Aluminium $1.7/kg Al Supporting the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in its quest for global competitivenessorting...

  6. Nickel and titanium nanoboride composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimova, K A; Galevsky, G V; Rudneva, V V; Kozyrev, N A; Orshanskaya, E G

    2015-01-01

    Electrodeposition conditions, structural-physical and mechanical properties (microhardness, cohesion with a base, wear resistance, corrosion currents) of electroplated composite coatings on the base of nickel with nano and micro-powders of titanium boride are investigated. It has been found out that electro-crystallization of nickel with boride nanoparticles is the cause of coating formation with structural fragments of small sizes, low porosity and improved physical and mechanical properties. Titanium nano-boride is a component of composite coating, as well as an effective modifier of nickel matrix. Nano-boride of the electrolyte improves efficiency of the latter due to increased permissible upper limit of the cathodic current density. (paper)

  7. Hydrogen storage in metal hydrides and complex hydrides; Wasserstoffspeicherung in Metall- und komplexen Hydriden - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, M.; Zuettel, A.

    2007-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), reports on work done in 2007 at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology EMPA on the storage of hydrogen in metal hydrides and complex hydrides. In particular, the use of tetrahydroborates is noted. The potential of this class of materials is stressed. The structures at room-temperature were examined using neutron and X-ray diffraction methods. Thermodynamic methods helped determine the thermodynamic stability of the materials. Also, a complete energy diagram for the materials was developed. The use of silicon oxide to reduce activation energy and its catalytic effects are discussed. The challenges placed by desorption mechanisms are noted. The authors note that reversibility is basically proven.

  8. Hydride precipitation, fracture and plasticity mechanisms in pure zirconium and Zircaloy-4 at temperatures typical for the postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pshenichnikov, Anton; Stuckert, Juri; Walter, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • All δ-hydrides in Zr and Zircaloy-4 have basal or pyramidal types of habit planes. • Seven orientation relationships for δ-hydrides in Zr matrix were detected. • Decohesion fracture mechanism of hydrogenated Zr was investigated by fractography. - Abstract: The results of investigations of samples of zirconium and its alloy Zircaloy-4, hydrogenated at temperatures 900–1200 K (typical temperatures for loss-of-coolant accidents) are presented. The analyses, based on a range of complementary techniques (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction) reveals the direct interrelation of internal structure transformation and hydride distribution with the degradation of mechanical properties. Formation of small-scale zirconium hydrides and their bulk distribution in zirconium and Zircaloy-4 were investigated. Fractographical analysis was performed on the ruptured samples tested in a tensile machine at room temperature. The already-known hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms based on hydride formation and hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and the applicability of them in the case of zirconium and its alloys is discussed.

  9. Complex metal hydrides for hydrogen, thermal and electrochemical energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kasper T.; Sheppard, Drew; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B.

    2017-01-01

    field. This review illustrates that complex metal hydrides may store hydrogen in the solid state, act as novel battery materials, both as electrolytes and electrode materials, or store solar heat in a more efficient manner as compared to traditional heat storage materials. Furthermore, it is highlighted...... how complex metal hydrides may act in an integrated setup with a fuel cell. This review focuses on the unique properties of light element complex metal hydrides mainly based on boron, nitrogen and aluminum, e.g., metal borohydrides and metal alanates. Our hope is that this review can provide new...

  10. Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis

  11. Investigation process of alcoholysis of hydride aluminium-adobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numanov, M.I.; Normatov, I.Sh.; Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2001-01-01

    Considering of that process of acid treatment of aluminium-adobe hydride realizes in the ethyl alcohol media it was necessary study the process of alcoholysis of AlH 3 and aluminium additives. In the end of article authors became to conclusion that deficiency of spontaneous alcoholysis of AlH 3 in adobe caused by protective action of fiber; solvate ability of LiCl and alkoxy aluminium hydride of lithium-LiCl·CO 2 H 5 OH, Li Al(OC 2 H 5 ) 4 ·nC 2 H 5 OH decreasing the expectancy of responding of alcohol with aluminium hydride

  12. Determination of hydrogen in zirconium hydride and uranium-zirconium hydride by inert gas exraction-gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Akira; Iso, Shuichi

    1976-01-01

    An inert gas extraction-gravimetric method has been applied to the determination of hydrogen in zirconium hydride and uranium-zirconium hydride which are used as neutron moderator and fuel of nuclear safety research reactor (NSRR), respectively. The sample in a graphite-enclosed quartz crucible is heated inductively to 1200 0 C for 20 min in a helium stream. Hydrogen liberated from the sample is oxidized to water by copper(I) oxide-copper(II) oxide at 400 0 C, and the water is determined gravimetrically by absorption in anhydrone. The extraction curves of hydrogen for zirconium hydride and uranium-zirconium hydride samples are shown in Figs. 2 and 3. Hydrogen in the samples is extracted quantitatively by heating at (1000 -- 1250) 0 C for (10 -- 40) min. Recoveries of hydrogen in the case of zirconium hydride were examined as follows: a weighed zirconium rod (5 phi x 6 mm, hydrogen -5 Torr. After the chamber was filled with purified hydrogen to 200 Torr, the rod was heated to 400 0 C for 15 h, and again weighed to determine the increase in weight. Hydrogen in the rod was then determined by the proposed method. The results are in excellent agreement with the increase in weight as shown in Table 1. Analytical results of hydrogen in zirconium hydride samples and an uranium-zirconium hydride sample are shown in Table 2. (auth.)

  13. Titanium nitride deposition in titanium implant alloys produced by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, V.A.R.; Cairo, C.A.A.; Faria, J.; Lemos, T.G.; Galvani, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is an extremely hard material, often used as a coating on titanium alloy, steel, carbide, and aluminum components to improve wear resistance. Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) is a form of deposition in which a target anode is bombarded with an electron beam given off by a charged tungsten filament under high vacuum, producing a thin film in a substrate. In this work are presented results of TiN deposition in targets and substrates of Ti (C.P.) and Ti- 13 Nb- 13 Zr obtained by powder metallurgy. Samples were produced by mixing of hydride metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering between 900°C up to 1400 °C, in vacuum. The deposition was carried out under nitrogen atmosphere. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively. It was shown that the samples were sintered to high densities and presented homogeneous microstructure, with ideal characteristics for an adequate deposition and adherence. The film layer presented a continuous structure with 15μm. (author)

  14. Iron-titanium oxide minerals and magnetic susceptibility anomalies in the Mariano Lake-Lake Valley cores - Constraints on conditions of uranium mineralization in the Morrison Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, R.L.; Fishman, N.S.; Scott, J.H.; Hudson, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Petrographic study of the Mariano Lake-Lake Valley cores reveals three distinct zones of postdepositional alteration of detrital Fe-Ti (iron-titanium) oxide minerals in the Westwater Canyon Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrisson Formation. In the uranium-bearing and adjacent portions of the Westwater Canyon, these detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals have been thoroughly altered by leaching of iron. Stratigraphically lower parts of the Westwater Canyon and the underlying Recapture Member are characterized by preservation of Fe-Ti oxide grains, primarily magnetite and ilmenite, and of hematite, and by an absence or uranium concentrations. Partly destroyed Fe-Ti oxide minerals occupy an interval between the zones of destruction and preservation. Alteration patterns of the Fe-Ti oxide minerals are reflected in bore-hole magnetic susceptibility logs. Magnetic susceptibility response in the upper parts of the Westwater Canyon Member is flat and uniformly <500 μSI units, but at greater depths it fluctuates sharply, from <1,000 to nearly 8,000 μSI units. The boundary between uniformly low and high magnetic susceptibility response corresponds closely to the interval that divides the zone of completely altered from the zone of preserved detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals. The alteration pattern suggests that solutions responsible for destruction of the Fe-ti oxide minerals originated in the overlying Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation. Previous studies indicate that these solutions were rich in soluble organic matter and perhaps in uranium. Uranium precipitation may have been controlled by a vertically fluctuation interface between organic-rich solutions and geochemically different fluids in which the detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals were preserved

  15. Boron hydride analogues of the fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quong, A.A.; Pederson, M.R.; Broughton, J.Q.

    1994-01-01

    The BH moiety is isoelectronic with C. We have studied the stability of the (BH) 60 analogue of the C 60 fullerene as well as the dual-structure (BH) 32 icosahedron, both of them being putative structures, by performing local-density-functional electronic calculations. To aid in our analysis, we have also studied other homologues of these systems. We find that the latter, i.e., the dual structure, is the more stable although the former is as stable as one of the latter's lower homologues. Boron hydrides, it seems, naturally form the dual structures used in algorithmic optimization of complex fullerene systems. Fully relaxed geometries are reported as well as electron affinities and effective Hubbard U parameters. These systems form very stable anions and we conclude that a search for BH analogues of the C 60 alkali-metal supeconductors might prove very fruitful

  16. Hydrogen storage properties of metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latroche, M.; Percheron-Guegan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, energy needs are mainly covered by fossil energies leading to pollutant emissions mostly responsible for global warming. Among the different possible solutions for greenhouse effect reduction, hydrogen has been proposed for energy transportation. Indeed, H 2 can be seen as a clean and efficient energy carrier. However, beside the difficulties related to hydrogen production, efficient high capacity storage means are still to be developed. Many metals and alloys are able to store large amounts of hydrogen. This latter solution is of interest in terms of safety, global yield and long term storage. However, to be suitable for applications, such compounds must present high capacity, good reversibility, fast reactivity and sustainability. In this paper, we will review the structural and thermodynamic properties of metallic hydrides. (authors)

  17. Chitosan patterning on titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Gilabert Chirivella, Eduardo; Pérez Feito, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Clarisse; Ribeiro, Sylvie; Correia, Daniela; González Martin, María Luisa; Manero Planella, José María; Lanceros Méndez, Senentxu; Gallego Ferrer, Gloria; Gómez Ribelles, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used in medical implants because of their excellent properties. However, bacterial infection is a frequent cause of titanium-based implant failure and also compromises its osseointegration. In this study, we report a new simple method of providing titanium surfaces with antibacterial properties by alternating antibacterial chitosan domains with titanium domains in the micrometric scale. Surface microgrooves were etched on pure titanium disks at i...

  18. Titanium Isotopes Provide Clues to Lunar Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2012-05-01

    The idea that the Moon formed as the result of the giant impact of a Mars-sized impactor with the still-growing Earth explains two central facts about the Earth-Moon system: its total angular momentum (Earth's spin and the Moon's orbital motion), and the sizes of the metallic cores of the Earth (large) and Moon (tiny). This gives cosmochemists some confidence in the hypothesis, but they would greatly appreciate additional compositional tests. One undisputed point is the identical abundance of the three oxygen isotopes in Earth and Moon. Junjun Zhang and colleagues at the University of Chicago (USA) and the University of Bern (Switzerland) have added another isotopic system to the cosmochemical testing tool kit, titanium isotopes. They find that the ratio of titanium-50 to titanium-47 is identical in Earth and Moon to within four parts per million. In contrast, other solar system materials, such as carbonaceous chondrites, vary by considerably more than this-- up to 150 times as much. The identical oxygen and titanium isotopic compositions in Earth and Moon are surprising in light of what we think we know about planet formation and formation of the Moon after a giant impact. The variations in oxygen and titanium isotopes among meteorite types suggest that it is unlikely that the Moon-forming giant impactor would have had the same isotopic composition as the Earth. Simulations show that the Moon ends up constructed mostly (40-75%) from the impactor materials. Thus, the Moon ought to have different isotopic composition than does Earth. The isotopes might have exchanged in the complicated, messy proto-lunar disk (as has been suggested for oxygen isotopes), making them the same. However, Zhang and colleagues suggest that this exchange is unlikely for a refractory element like titanium. Could the impact simulations be greatly overestimating the contributions from the impactor? Was the mixing of building-block materials throughout the inner solar system much less than

  19. Production of titanium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Botbol, O.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a summary of results from theoperation of a laboratory scale for the production in batches of approximately 100 gs of titanium tetrachloride by chlorination with chloroform and carbon tetrachloride between 340 deg C and 540 deg C. Chlorination agent vapors were passed through a quartz column reacting with titanium oxide powder agglomerated in little spheres. Obtained titanium tetrachloride was condensed in a condenser, taken in a ballon and then purified by fractional distillation. Optimun temperature for chloroform was 400 deg C with 74 % yield and for carbon tetrachloride was 500 deg C with 69 % yield. (Author) [es

  20. Unloading Effect on Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo

    2010-01-01

    It is well-known that a tensile overload retards not only the crack growth rate (CGR) in zirconium alloys during the delayed hydride cracking (DHC) tests but also the fatigue crack growth rate in metals, the cause of which is unclear to date. A considerable decrease in the fatigue crack growth rate due to overload is suggested to occur due either to the crack closure or to compressive stresses or strains arising from unloading of the overload. However, the role of the crack closure or the compressive stress in the crack growth rate remains yet to be understood because of incomplete understanding of crack growth kinetics. The aim of this study is to resolve the effect of unloading on the CGR of zirconium alloys, which comes in last among the unresolved issues as listed above. To this end, the CGRs of the Zr-2.5Nb tubes were determined at a constant temperature under the cyclic load with the load ratio, R changing from 0.13 to 0.66 where the extent of unloading became higher at the lower R. More direct evidence for the effect of unloading after an overload is provided using Simpson's experiment investigating the effect on the CGR of a Zr-2.5Nb tube of the stress states of the prefatigue crack tip by unloading or annealing after the formation of a pre-fatigue crack

  1. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bedard, Stephane

    2007-01-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  2. Ductile zirconium powder by hydride-dehydride process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, T S [BHABHA ATOMIC RESEARCH CENTRE, BOMBAY (INDIA); CHAUDHARY, S [NUCLEAR FUEL COMPLEX, HYDERABAD (INDIA)

    1976-09-01

    The preparation of ductile zirconium powder by the hydride-dehydride process has been described. In this process massive zirconium obtained from Kroll reduction of ZrCl/sub 4/ is first rendered brittle by hydrogenation and the hydride crushed and ground in a ball mill to the required particle size. Hydrogen is then hot vacuum extracted to yield the metal powder. The process has been successfully employed for the production of zirconium powders with low oxygen content and having hardness values in the range of 115-130 BHN, starting from a zirconium sponge of 100-120 BHN hardness. Influence of surface characteristics of the starting metal on its hydriding behaviour has been studied and the optimum hydriding-dehydriding conditions established.

  3. Electrochemical modeling of hydrogen storage in hydride-forming electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledovskikh, A.; Danilov, D.; Vermeulen, P.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2009-01-01

    An electrochemical kinetic model (EKM) is developed, describing the electrochemical hydrogen storage in hydride-forming materials under equilibrium conditions. This model is based on first principles of electrochemical reaction kinetics and statistical thermodynamics and describes the complex,

  4. Development of zirconium hydride highly effective moderator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Changgeng

    2005-10-01

    The zirconium hydride with highly content of hydrogen and low density is new efficient moderator material for space nuclear power reactor. Russia has researched it to use as new highly moderator and radiation protection materials. Japanese has located it between the top of pressure vessel and the main protection as a shelter, the work temperature is rach to 220 degree C. The zirconium hydride moderator blocks are main parts of space nuclear power reactor. Development of zirconium hydride moderator materials have strength research and apply value. Nuclear Power Research and Design Instituteoh China (NPIC) has sep up the hydrogenation device and inspect systems, and accumurate a large of experience about zirconium hydride, also set up a strict system of QA and QC. (authors)

  5. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  6. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  7. Reactions of zinc hydride and magnesium hydride with pyridine; synthesis and characterization of 1,4-dihydro-1-pyridylzinc and -magnesium complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, A.J. de; Boersma, J.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of 1,4-dihydro-1-pyridylzinc and -magnesium complexes are described. Zinc hydride and magnesium hydride dissolve in and react with pyridine, and the reaction has been studied in detail in the case of zinc hydride. Evaporation of the solvent after 1–2 hours at 0°C

  8. Carbon Dioxide Induced Alkene Extrusion from Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)titanium(III) Alkyls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luinstra, Gerrit A.; Teuben, Jan H.

    1987-01-01

    Reaction of titanium(III) alkyls, (η5-C5Me5)2TiR (R = Et or Prn), in toluene solution with CO2 proceeds at room temperature with formation of the titanium formate (η5-C5Me5)2TiO2CH, and the corresponding alkene (ethene or propene).

  9. Electronic structure of ternary hydrides based on light elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgaz, E. [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: orgaz@eros.pquim.unam.mx; Membrillo, A. [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Castaneda, R. [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Aburto, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-12-08

    Ternary hydrides based on light elements are interesting owing to the high available energy density. In this work we focused into the electronic structure of a series of known systems having the general formula AMH{sub 4}(A=Li,Na,M=B,Al). We computed the energy bands and the total and partial density of states using the linear-augmented plane waves method. In this report, we discuss the chemical bonding in this series of complex hydrides.

  10. Spectroscopy of helium hydride and triatomic hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketterle, W.

    1986-07-01

    Helium hydride and triatomic hydrogen has been produced by charge exchange between fast mass selected beams of molecular ions and alkali vapor. Using this method, the first discrete spectra of helium hydride were obtained. Fine electronic transitions with resolved rotational structure were observed in the visible and near infrared. Four isotopic mixtures were studied. Furthermore the first lifetime measurement of triatomic hydrogen states were performed and compared to theoretical predictions. (orig.)

  11. Proton location in metal hydrides using electron spin resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) of dilute paramagnetic ions establishes the site symmetry of these ions. In the case of metal hydrides the site symmetry is determined by the number and location of neighboring protons. Typical ESR spectra for trivalent erbium in scandium and yttrium hydrides are presented and analyzed, and this technique is shown to be a versatile microscopic probe of the location, net charge and occupation probability of nearby protons

  12. The Production of Uranium Metal by Metal Hydrides Incorporated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, P. P.

    1943-01-01

    Metal Hydrides Incorporated was a pioneer in the production of uranium metal on a commercial scale and supplied it to all the laboratories interested in the original research, before other methods for its production were developed. Metal Hydrides Inc. supplied the major part of the metal for the construction of the first experimental pile which, on December 2, 1942, demonstrated the feasibility of the self-sustaining chain reaction and the release of atomic energy.

  13. Microwave assisted scalable synthesis of titanium ferrite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Abhishek; Bhardwaj, Abhishek K.; Singh, S. C.; Uttam, K. N.; Gautam, Nisha; Himanshu, A. K.; Shah, Jyoti; Kotnala, R. K.; Gopal, R.

    2018-04-01

    Titanium ferrite magnetic nanomaterials are synthesized by one-step, one pot, and scalable method assisted by microwave radiation. Effects of titanium content and microwave exposure time on size, shape, morphology, yield, bonding nature, crystalline structure, and magnetic properties of titanium ferrite nanomaterials are studied. As-synthesized nanomaterials are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and vibrating sample magnetometer measurements. XRD measurements depict the presence of two phases of titanium ferrite into the same sample, where crystallite size increases from ˜33 nm to 37 nm with the increase in titanium concentration. UV-Vis measurement showed broad spectrum in the spectral range of 250-600 nm which reveals that its characteristic peaks lie between ultraviolet and visible region; ATR-FTIR and Raman measurements predict iron-titanium oxide structures that are consistent with XRD results. The micrographs of TEM and selected area electron diffraction patterns show formation of hexagonal shaped particles with a high degree of crystallinity and presence of multi-phase. Energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements confirm that Ti:Fe compositional mass ratio can be controlled by tuning synthesis conditions. Increase of Ti defects into titanium ferrite lattice, either by increasing titanium precursor or by increasing exposure time, enhances its magnetic properties.

  14. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  15. Electronic structure, bonding and chemisorption in metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Problems that can arise during the cycling steps for a hydride storage system usually involve events at surfaces. Chemisorption and reaction processes can be affected by small amounts of contaminants that may act as catalytic poisons. The nature of the poisoning process can vary greatly for the different metals and alloys that form hydrides. A unifying concept is offered, which satisfactorily correlates many of the properties of transition-metal, rare-earth and actinide hydrides. The metallic hydrides can be differentiated on the basis of electronegativity, metallic radius (valence) and electronic structure. For those systems where there are d (transition metals) or f (early actinides) electrons near the Fermi level a broad range of chemical and catalytic behaviors are found, depending on bandwidth and energy. The more electropositive metals (rare-earths, actinides, transition metals with d > 5) dissolve hydrogen and form hydrides by an electronically somewhat different process, and as a class tend to adsorb electrophobic molecules. The net charge-transfer in either situation is subtle; however, the small differences are responsible for many of the observed structural, chemical, and catalytic properties in these hydride systems

  16. The use of metal hydrides in fuel cell applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo V. Lototskyy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews state-of-the-art developments in hydrogen energy systems which integrate fuel cells with metal hydride-based hydrogen storage. The 187 reference papers included in this review provide an overview of all major publications in the field, as well as recent work by several of the authors of the review. The review contains four parts. The first part gives an overview of the existing types of fuel cells and outlines the potential of using metal hydride stores as a source of hydrogen fuel. The second part of the review considers the suitability and optimisation of different metal hydrides based on their energy efficient thermal integration with fuel cells. The performances of metal hydrides are considered from the viewpoint of the reversible heat driven interaction of the metal hydrides with gaseous H2. Efficiencies of hydrogen and heat exchange in hydrogen stores to control H2 charge/discharge flow rates are the focus of the third section of the review and are considered together with metal hydride – fuel cell system integration issues and the corresponding engineering solutions. Finally, the last section of the review describes specific hydrogen-fuelled systems presented in the available reference data.

  17. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak, E-mail: zak.fang@utah.edu [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Zhou, Chengshang; Fan, Peng [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Udell, Kent S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Bowman, Robert C. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Vajo, John J.; Purewal, Justin J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, 3011 Malibu Canyon Road, Malibu, CA 90265 (United States); Kekelia, Bidzina [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH{sub 2} and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH{sub 2} to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH{sub 2} as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV{sub 0.62}Mn{sub 1.5} alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles.

  18. Titanium oxide fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jonge, D.; Visser, J.

    2012-01-01

    One measure to improve air quality is to apply photo-catalytic substances that capture NOx onto the road surface or onto baffle boards alongside the roads. The effect of titanium oxide containing clinkers with coating was discussed in the report 'Demonstration project of air-purifying pavement in Hengelo, The Netherlands' that was published in May 2011. This article examines the way in which the effectiveness of this study was determined. Can titanium oxide containing clinkers and coatings indeed capture NOx?. [nl

  19. Machining of titanium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  20. Titanium oxide nanocoating on a titanium thin film deposited on a glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cummings, F.R. [University of the Western Cape, Electron Microscopy Unit, Physics Department, Bellville 7535, Cape Town (South Africa); Turco, S. Lo; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M. [Center for Nano Science and Technology, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Milano, Italy Via Giovanni Pascoli, 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ramponi, R. [Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN)-CNR, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2016-03-31

    Thin films of titanium were deposited on a glass substrate using electron beam evaporator. Femtosecond laser pulses were focused on the surface of the films, and the samples were scanned while mounted on the motorized computer-controlled motion stage to produce an areal modification of the films. X-ray diffraction of the laser-patterned samples showed evidence of the formation of a γ-Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5} with a monoclinic phase. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry simulation showed that there is an increase in the oxygen concentration as the average laser fluence is increased. Time of flight secondary ions mass spectrometry analysis showed an even distribution of the titanium and oxygen ions on the sample and also ionized molecules of the oxides of titanium were observed. The formation of the oxide of titanium was further supported using the UV–Vis-NIR spectroscopy, which showed that for 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} fluence, the laser-exposed film showed the electron transfer band and the d–d transition peak of titanium was observed at lower wavelengths. - Highlights: • γ-Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5} formed using femtosecond laser. • Fluence and oxygen relation were studied. • Nanoflakes of γ-Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5} were observed under HRSEM.

  1. Conductance Studies on Complex Formation between c-Methylcalix[4]resorcinarene and Titanium (III in Acetonitrile-H2O Binary Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Saadati

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Calixresorcinarenes have proved to be unique molecules for molecular recognition via hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic and ionic interactions with suitable substrates such as cations. The study of the interactions involved in the complexation of different cations with calixresorcinarenes in solvent mixtures is important for a better understanding of the mechanism of biological transport, molecular recognition, and other analytical applications. This article summarizes different aspects of the complexes of the Ti3+ metal cation with c-methylcalix[4]resorcinarene (CMCR as studied by conductometry in acetonitrile (AN–water (H2O binary mixtures at different temperatures. Conductance data show that the metal cation/ligand (ML stoichiometry of the complexes in solution is 1:1 in all cases. Non-linear behaviour was observed for the variation of logKf of the complexes vs. the composition of the binary solvent mixtures. Selectivity of CMCR for the Ti3+ cation is sensitive to solvent composition; in some cases and at certain compositions of the mixed solvent systems, the selectivity order is changed. Values of thermodynamic parameters (, for formation of the CMCR–Ti3+ complexes in AN–H2O binary systems were obtained from the temperature dependence of stability constants, and the results show that the thermodynamics of complexation reactions are affected by the nature and composition of the mixed solvents.

  2. Formation Mechanism and Dispersion of Pseudo-Tetragonal BaTiO3-PVP Nanoparticles from Different Titanium Precursors: TiCl4 and TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nano-sized tetragonal BaTiO3 (BT particles that are well dispersed in solution are essential for the dielectric layer in multilayer ceramic capacitor technology. A hydrothermal process using TiCl4 and BaCl2, as source of Ti and Ba, respectively, or the precursor TiO2 as seed for the formation of BT, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone (PVP as a surfactant, was employed in this study to enhance both the dispersibility and tetragonality (c/a simultaneously in a single reaction process. The process parameters, i.e., the ratio of TiO2 substitution of TiCl4, the reaction time, and PVP content were systematically studied, and the growth mechanism and relation between the tetragonality and the particle size are discussed. Dynamic light scattering (DLS analysis was used to show that truncated pseudo-tetragonal BT-PVP particles with an average size of 100 nm, having a narrow size distribution and a coefficient of variation (CV as low as 20% and being mono-dispersed in water, were produced. The narrow particle size distribution is attributed to the ability of PVP to inhibit the growth of BT particles, and the high c/a of BT-PVP to heterogeneous particle growth using TiO2 seeds.

  3. Effect of hydridation on structure of amorphous and amorphous-crystalline Fe40Ni40B20 and Co70Fe5Si15B10 bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'inskij, A.G.; Brovko, A.P.; Zelinskaya, G.M.; Kosenko, N.S.; Khristenko, T.M.; Kobzenko, G.F.; Shkola, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The structure of amorphous and amorphous-crystaliline Fe 40 Ni 40 B 20 and Co 70 Fe 5 Si-1 5 B 10 alloys, exposed to hydridation at different temperatures, is studied by X-ray diffraction technique. The presence of crystalline constituent in amorphous bands was determined on DRON-3 device and by method of small-angle scattering. The experimental data obtained verify, that hydridation does not only prevent the formation of crystalline phases at annealing, but leads, as well, to disappearance of band crystalline constituent in case of its presence

  4. Dehydriding and re-hydriding properties of high-energy ball milled LiBH{sub 4}+MgH{sub 2} mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Kyle; Shaw, Leon L. [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, 97 North Eagleville Road, U-3136, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Here we report the first investigation of the dehydriding and re-hydriding properties of 2LiBH{sub 4} + MgH{sub 2} mixtures in the solid state. Such a study is made possible by high-energy ball milling of 2LiBH{sub 4}+MgH{sub 2} mixtures at liquid nitrogen temperature with the addition of graphite. The 2LiBH{sub 4}+MgH{sub 2} mixture ball milled under this condition exhibits a 5-fold increase in the released hydrogen at 265 C when compared with ineffectively ball milled counterparts. Furthermore, both LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2} contribute to hydrogen release in the solid state. The isothermal dehydriding/re-hydriding cycles at 265 C reveal that re-hydriding is dominated by re-hydriding of Mg. These unusual phenomena are explained based on the formation of nanocrystalline and amorphous phases, the increased defect concentration in crystalline compounds, and possible catalytic effects of Mg,MgH{sub 2} and LiBH{sub 4} on their dehydriding and re-hydriding properties. (author)

  5. Nonmetal effect on ordering structures in titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.; Ehm, V.T.; Savenko, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of oxygen and nitrogen atoms on formation of intermediate, cubic and trigonal ordering structures in the titanium carbide is studied through the roentgenography and neutron radiography methods. Metal atoms in the TiC 0.545 O 0.08 , TiC 0.545 N 0.09 samples under study are shifted from ideal positions in the direction from vacancies to metalloid atoms. In the intermediate cubic phase the values of the titanium atoms free parameter in both samples are identical, but they differ from analogous values in the titanium carbide

  6. A non-local thermodynamical equilibrium line formation for neutral and singly ionized titanium in model atmospheres of reference A-K stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnova, T. M.; Mashonkina, L. I.; Ryabchikova, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    We construct a model atom for Ti I-II using more than 3600 measured and predicted energy levels of Ti I and 1800 energy levels of Ti II, and quantum mechanical photoionization cross-sections. Non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for Ti I and Ti II is treated through a wide range of spectral types from A to K, including metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] down to -2.6 dex. NLTE leads to weakened Ti I lines and positive abundance corrections. The magnitude of NLTE corrections is smaller compared to the literature data for FGK atmospheres. NLTE leads to strengthened Ti II lines and negative NLTE abundance corrections. For the first time, we have performed NLTE calculations for Ti I-II in the 6500 ≤ Teff ≤ 13 000 K range. For four A-type stars, we derived in LTE an abundance discrepancy of up to 0.22 dex between Ti I and Ti II, which vanishes in NLTE. For four other A-B stars, with only Ti II lines observed, NLTE leads to a decrease of line-to-line scatter. An efficiency of inelastic Ti I + H I collisions was estimated from an analysis of Ti I and Ti II lines in 17 cool stars with -2.6 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0.0. Consistent NLTE abundances from Ti I and Ti II were obtained by applying classical Drawinian rates for the stars with log g ≥ 4.1, and neglecting inelastic collisions with H I for the very metal-poor (VMP) giant HD 122563. For the VMP turn-off stars ([Fe/H] ≤ -2 and log g ≤ 4.1), we obtained the positive abundance difference Ti I-II already in LTE, which increases in NLTE. Accurate collisional data for Ti I and Ti II are necessary to help solve this problem.

  7. Titanium by design: TRIP titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jamie

    Motivated by the prospect of lower cost Ti production processes, new directions in Ti alloy design were explored for naval and automotive applications. Building on the experience of the Steel Research Group at Northwestern University, an analogous design process was taken with titanium. As a new project, essential kinetic databases and models were developed for the design process and used to create a prototype design. Diffusion kinetic models were developed to predict the change in phase compositions and microstructure during heat treatment. Combining a mobility database created in this research with a licensed thermodynamic database, ThermoCalc and DICTRA software was used to model kinetic compositional changes in titanium alloys. Experimental diffusion couples were created and compared to DICTRA simulations to refine mobility parameters in the titanium mobility database. The software and database were able to predict homogenization times and the beta→alpha plate thickening kinetics during cooling in the near-alpha Ti5111 alloy. The results of these models were compared to LEAP microanalysis and found to be in reasonable agreement. Powder metallurgy was explored using SPS at GM R&D to reduce the cost of titanium alloys. Fully dense Ti5111 alloys were produced and achieved similar microstructures to wrought Ti5111. High levels of oxygen in these alloys increased the strength while reducing the ductility. Preliminary Ti5111+Y alloys were created, where yttrium additions successfully gettered excess oxygen to create oxides. However, undesirable large oxides formed, indicating more research is needed into the homogeneous distribution of the yttrium powder to create finer oxides. Principles established in steels were used to optimize the beta phase transformation stability for martensite transformation toughening in titanium alloys. The Olson-Cohen kinetic model is calibrated to shear strains in titanium. A frictional work database is established for common alloying

  8. Optical hydrogen sensors based on metal-hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaman, M.; Westerwaal, R.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.

    2012-06-01

    For many hydrogen related applications it is preferred to use optical hydrogen sensors above electrical systems. Optical sensors reduce the risk of ignition by spark formation and are less sensitive to electrical interference. Currently palladium and palladium alloys are used for most hydrogen sensors since they are well known for their hydrogen dissociation and absorption properties at relatively low temperatures. The disadvantages of palladium in sensors are the low optical response upon hydrogen loading, the cross sensitivity for oxygen and carbon, the limited detection range and the formation of micro-cracks after some hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles. In contrast to Pd, we find that the use of magnesium or rear earth bases metal-hydrides in optical hydrogen sensors allow tuning of the detection levels over a broad pressure range, while maintaining a high optical response. We demonstrate a stable detection layer for detecting hydrogen below 10% of the lower explosion limit in an oxygen rich environment. This detection layer is deposited at the bare end of a glass fiber as a micro-mirror and is covered with a thin layer of palladium. The palladium layer promotes the hydrogen uptake at room temperature and acts as a hydrogen selective membrane. To protect the sensor for a long time in air a final layer of a hydrophobic fluorine based coating is applied. Such a sensor can be used for example as safety detector in automotive applications. We find that this type of fiber optic hydrogen sensor is also suitable for hydrogen detection in liquids. As example we demonstrate a sensor for detecting a broad range of concentrations in transformer oil. Such a sensor can signal a warning when sparks inside a high voltage power transformer decompose the transformer oil over a long period.

  9. Fullerene hydride - A potential hydrogen storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nai Xing Wang; Jun Ping Zhang; An Guang Yu; Yun Xu Yang; Wu Wei Wang; Rui long Sheng; Jia Zhao

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen, as a clean, convenient, versatile fuel source, is considered to be an ideal energy carrier in the foreseeable future. Hydrogen storage must be solved in using of hydrogen energy. To date, much effort has been put into storage of hydrogen including physical storage via compression or liquefaction, chemical storage in hydrogen carriers, metal hydrides and gas-on-solid adsorption. But no one satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. C 60 H 36 , firstly synthesized by the method of the Birch reduction, was loaded with 4.8 wt% hydrogen indicating [60]fullerene might be as a potential hydrogen storage material. If a 100% conversion of C 60 H 36 is achieved, 18 moles of H 2 gas would be liberated from each mole of fullerene hydride. Pure C 60 H 36 is very stable below 500 C under nitrogen atmosphere and it releases hydrogen accompanying by other hydrocarbons under high temperature. But C 60 H 36 can be decomposed to generate H 2 under effective catalyst. We have reported that hydrogen can be produced catalytically from C 60 H 36 by Vasks's compound (IrCl(CO)(PPh 3 ) 2 ) under mild conditions. (RhCl(CO)(PPh 3 ) 2 ) having similar structure to (IrCl(CO)(PPh 3 ) 2 ), was also examined for thermal dehydrogenation of C 60 H 36 ; but it showed low catalytic activity. To search better catalyst, palladium carbon (Pd/C) and platinum carbon (Pt/C) catalysts, which were known for catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic compounds, were tried and good results were obtained. A very big peak of hydrogen appeared at δ=5.2 ppm in 1 H NMR spectrum based on Evans'work (fig 1) at 100 C over a Pd/C catalyst for 16 hours. It is shown that hydrogen can be produced from C 60 H 36 using a catalytic amount of Pd/C. Comparing with Pd/C, Pt/C catalyst showed lower activity. The high cost and limited availability of Vaska's compounds, Pd and Pt make it advantageous to develop less expensive catalysts for our process based on

  10. Manganese Silylene Hydride Complexes: Synthesis and Reactivity with Ethylene to Afford Silene Hydride Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jeffrey S; Emslie, David J H; Britten, James F

    2017-05-22

    Reaction of the ethylene hydride complex trans-[(dmpe) 2 MnH(C 2 H 4 )] (1) with Et 2 SiH 2 at 20 °C afforded the silylene hydride [(dmpe) 2 MnH(=SiEt 2 )] (2 a) as the trans-isomer. By contrast, reaction of 1 with Ph 2 SiH 2 at 60 °C afforded [(dmpe) 2 MnH(=SiPh 2 )] (2 b) as a mixture of the cis (major) and trans (minor) isomers, featuring a Mn-H-Si interaction in the former. The reaction to form 2 b also yielded [(dmpe) 2 MnH 2 (SiHPh 2 )] (3 b); [(dmpe) 2 MnH 2 (SiHR 2 )] (R=Et (3 a) and Ph (3 b)) were accessed cleanly by reaction of 2 a and 2 b with H 2 , and the analogous reactions with D 2 afforded [(dmpe) 2 MnD 2 (SiHR 2 )] exclusively. Both 2 a and 2 b engaged in unique reactivity with ethylene, generating the silene hydride complexes cis-[(dmpe) 2 MnH(R 2 Si=CHMe)] (R=Et (4 a), Ph (4 b)). Compounds trans-2 a, cis-2 b, 3 b, and 4 b were crystallographically characterized, and bonding in 2 a, 2 b, 4 a, and 4 b was probed computationally. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Leak-before-break assessment of RBMK-1500 fuel channel in case of delayed hydride cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimasauskas, A.; Grybenas, A.; Makarevicius, V.; Nedzinskas, L.; Levinskas, R.; Kiselev, V.

    2003-01-01

    One of the factors determining remaining lifetime of Zr-2.5% Nb fuel channel (FC) is the amount of hydrogen dissolved during corrosion process. When the concentration of hydrogen exceeds the terminal solid solubility limit zirconium hydrides are precipitated. As a result form necessary conditions for delayed hydride cracking (DHC). Data from the RBMK-1500 fuel channel tubes (removed from service) shows that hydrogen in some cases distributes unevenly and hydrogen concentration can differ several times between individual FC tubes or separate zones of the same tube and possibly, can reach dangerous levels in the future. Consequently, lacking statistical research data, it is difficult to forecast increase of hydrogen concentration and formation of DHC. So it is important to verify if under the most unfavorable situation leak before break condition will be satisfied in the case of DHC. To estimate possible DHC rates in RBMK 1500 FC pressure tubes experiments were done in the following order: hydriding of the Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material to the required hydrogen concentration; hydrogen analysis; machining of specimens, fatigue crack formation in the axial direction, DHC testing; average crack length measurement and DHC velocity calculation. During the tests in average DHC values were determined at 283, 250 and 144 degC (with hydrogen concentrations correspondingly 76, 54 and 27 ppm). The fracture resistance dependence from hydrogen concentration was measured at 20 degC. To calculate leak through the postulated flaw, statistical distribution of DHC surface irregularity was determined. Leak before break analysis was carried out according to requirements of RBMK 1500 regulatory documents. J integral and crack opening were calculated using finite element method. Loading of the FC was determined using RELAP5 code. Critical crack length was calculated using R6 and J-integral methods. Coolant flow rate through the postulated crack was estimated using SQUIRT software

  12. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  13. Corrosion stability of cermets on the base of titanium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdash, O.N.; Marinich, M.A.; Kuzenkova, M.A.; Manzheleev, I.V.

    1991-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of titanium nitride and its cermets in 5% of HCl, 7% of HNO 3 , 10% of H 2 SO 4 is studied. It is established that alloys TiN-Ni-Mo alloyed with chromium (from 10 to 15%) possess the highest corrosion resistance. Cermet TiN-Cr has the higher stability than titanium nitride due to formation of binary nitride (Ti, Cr)N

  14. Ultrasonic Surface Treatment of Titanium Alloys. The Submicrocrystalline State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenov, V. A.; Vlasov, V. A.; Borozna, V. Y.; Klopotov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the results of the research on improvement of physical-and- mechanical properties of titanium alloys VT1-0 and VT6 by modification of surfaces using ultrasonic treatment, and a comprehensive study of the microstructure and mechanical properties of modified surface layers. It has been established that exposure to ultrasonic treatment leads to formation in the surface layer of a structure with an average size of elements 50 - 100 nm, depending on the brand of titanium alloy.

  15. Phase equilibria and thermodynamic studies in the titanium-nickel and titanium-nickel-oxygen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, G.; Kleykamp, H.; Laumer, W.

    1983-01-01

    The isothermal section of the Ti-Ni-O system was examined at 1200 K in the regions between the Ni(Ti) solid solution and the binary oxides of titanium. The relative partial Gibbs energies of oxygen over the Ti 2 O 3 -Ti 3 O 5 region and of titanium in the Ni(Ti) solid solution as well as the Gibbs energies of formation of NiTiO 3 , Ti 3 O 5 and TiNi 3 were determined between 1100 and 1300 K by use of solid electrolyte galvanic cells. (orig.) [de

  16. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  17. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  18. Developments in delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puls, Manfred P.

    2008-01-01

    Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) is a process of diffusion assisted localized hydride embrittlement at flaws or regions of high stress. Models of DHC propagation and initiation have been developed that capture the essential elements of this phenomenon in terms of parameters describing processes occurring at the micro-scale. The models and their predictions of experimental results applied to Zr alloys are assessed. The propagation model allows rationalization of the effect of direction of approach to temperature and of the effect of the state and morphology of the beta phase in Zr-2.5Nb on DHC velocity. The K I dependence of the DHC velocity can only be approximately rationalized by the propagation models. This is thought to be because these models approximate the DHC velocity by a constant and shape-invariant rate of growth of the hydride at the flaw and have not incorporated a coupling between the applied stress field due to the flaw alone and the precipitated hydrides that would result in a variation of the shape and density of the hydrided region with K I . Separately, models have been developed for DHC initiation at cracks and blunt flaws. Expressions are obtained for the threshold stress intensity factor, K IH , for DHC initiation at a crack. A model for K IH has been used to rationalize the experimental result that DHC initiation is not possible above a certain temperature, even when hydrides can form at the crack tip. For blunt flaws with root radii in the μm range, and engineering process zone procedure has been derived to determine the initiation conditions requiring that both a critical stress and a critical flaw tip displacement must be achieved for hydride fracture. The engineering process zone procedure takes account of the dependence of DHC initiation on the flaw's root radius. Although all of the foregoing models are capable of describing the essential features of DHC, they are highly idealized and in need of further refinement. (author)

  19. Permeation rates for RTF metal hydride vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Contamination rates have been estimated for the RTF nitrogen heating and cooling system (NH and CS) due to tritium permeation through the walls of metal hydride vessels. Tritium contamination of the NH and CS will be seen shortly after start-up of the RTF with the majority of it coming from the TCAP units. Contamination rates of the NH and CS are estimated to exceed 400 Ci/year after three years of operation and will elevate tritium concentrations in the NH and CS above 6 x 10 -3 μCi/cc. To reduce tritium activity in the NH and CS, a stripper or ''getter'' bed may need to be installed in the NH and CS. Increasing the purge rate of nitrogen from the NH and CS is shown to be an impractical method for reducing tritium activity due to the high purge rates required. Stripping of the NH and CS nitrogen in the glove box stripper system will give a temporary lowering of tritium activity in the NH and CS, but tritium activity will return to its previous level in approximately two weeks

  20. Hydriding and neutron irradiation in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Ruben Fortunato; Martin, Juan Ezequiel; Orellano, Pablo; Dorao, Carlos; Analia Soldati; Ghilarducci, Ada Albertina; Corso, Hugo Luis; Peretti, Hernan Americo; Bolcich, Juan Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The composition of Zircaloy-4 for nuclear applications is specified by the ASTM B350 Standard, that fixes the amount of alloying elements (Sn, Fe, Cr) and impurities (Ni, Hf, O, N, C, among others) to optimize good corrosion and mechanical behavior.The recycling of zircaloy-4 scrap and chips resulting from cladding tube fabrication is an interesting issue.However, changes in the final composition of the recycled material may occur due to contamination with tool pieces, stainless steel chips, turnings, etc. while scrap is stored and handled. Since the main components of the possible contaminants are Fe, Cr and Ni, it arises the interest in studying up to what limit the Fe, Ni and Cr contents could be exceeded beyond the standard specification without affecting significantly the alloy properties.Zircaloy-4 alloys elaborated with Fe, Cr and Ni additions and others of standard composition in use in nuclear plants are studied by tensile tests, SEM observations and EDS microanalysis.Some samples are tested in the initial condition and others after hydriding treatments and neutron irradiation in the RA6

  1. Optical and photoemission studies of lanthanum hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, D.J.; Peterson, D.T.; Weaver, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    The results of optical absorptivity and photoemission measurements on lanthanum hydrides, LaH/sub x/ (1.98 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 2.89) are reported. The low energy (hν less than or equal to 0.5 eV) optical features in LaH/sub x/ are attributed to the filling of octahedral sites. Higher energy interband absorption involves states within the d-band complex, analogous to other dihydrides. As x increases above 2.0, the optical features change rapidly due to the increase in the number of occupied octahedral sites. Various band structure studies suggest that LaH 3 might be a semiconductor. Photoemission results show that as x increases, the d-derived states at E/sub F/ are drawn down and that for LaH 2 89 only very weak valence band emission is observed. The hydrogen-derived bonding bands are shown centered approx. 5 eV below E/sub F/. Observed chemical shifts in the La 5p/sub 1/2 3/2/ cores are discussed for 1.98 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 2.89

  2. The relation of double peaks, observed in quartz hydride atomizers, to the fate of free analyte atoms in the determination of arsenic and selenium by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Dedina, Jiri

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism at the origin of double peaks formation in quartz hydride atomizers were investigated by continuous flow hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Arsenic and selenium were used as model analytes. The effect of atomization mode (flame-in-gas-shield (FIGS), miniature diffusion flame and double flame (DF)) and some experimental parameters as oxygen supply rate for microflame and the distance from atomization to free atoms detection point, were investigated on the shape of both analytical signals and calibration graphs. Rollover of calibration graphs and double peak formation are strictly related each to the other and could be observed only in FIGS atomizer mode under some particular conditions. A mechanism based on incomplete atomization of hydrides cannot explain the collected experimental evidences because the microflame of FIGS is able to produce quantitative atomization of large amount of hydrides even at supply rate of oxygen close to extinction threshold of microflame. The heterogeneous gas-solid reactions between finely dispersed particles, formed by free atom recombination, and the free atoms in the gaseous phase are at the origin of double peak formation

  3. Biofunctionalization of titanium for dental implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Hanawa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification is an important and predominant technique for obtaining biofunction in metals for biomedical use including dentistry. One surface modification technique is a process that changes the surface composition, structure, and morphology of a material, leaving the bulk mechanical properties intact. A tremendous number of surface modification techniques to improve the hard tissue compatibility of titanium have been developed. Hydroxyapatite layer, titanium oxide layer, and calcium titanate layer with various morphologies are deposited using electrochemical treatment including micro-arc oxidation. Also, surface modification layers without hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate are chemically formed that accelerate bone formation. Other approach is the immobilization of biofunctional molecules such as poly(ethylene glycol to the metal surface to control the adsorption of proteins and adhesion of cells, platelets, and bacteria. In the case of immobilization of biomolecules such as collagen and peptide, bone formation and soft tissue adhesion are improved.

  4. Positronium hydride in hydrogen-laden thermochemically reduced MgO single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareja, R.; la Cruz, R.M. de; Pedrosa, M.A.; Gonzalez, R.; Chen, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Thermochemical reduction of hydrogen-laden MgO single crystals at T∼2400 K results in a large concentration of both hydride (H - ) ions and anion vacancies (>10 24 m -3 ). Positron-lifetime experiments of these crystals provide evidence for bound positronium hydride states also referred to as [e + -H - ] or PsH states. The presence of the anion vacancies was found to inhibit the formation of these states. After thermally annealing out these vacancies, such that H - concentration remains intact, two long-lived components appear in the lifetime spectrum. Furthermore, these two components correlate with the presence of the H - ions. These results suggest the existence of bound [e + -H - ] states when positrons are trapped by the H - ions, and the subsequent formation of positronium (Ps) states by the dissociation of the [e + -H - ] states. From the values of the intermediate lifetime component, a value of (570±50) ps is obtained for the lifetime of the PsH state located in an anion vacancy in MgO. The longest lifetime component ∼(1--3) ns is attributed to pick-off annihilation of ortho-Ps states

  5. Positronium hydride in hydrogen-laden thermochemically reduced MgO single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, R.; de La Cruz, R. M.; Pedrosa, M. A.; González, R.; Chen, Y.

    1990-04-01

    Thermochemical reduction of hydrogen-laden MgO single crystals at T~2400 K results in a large concentration of both hydride (H-) ions and anion vacancies (>1024 m-3). Positron-lifetime experiments of these crystals provide evidence for bound positronium hydride states also referred to as [e+-H-] or PsH states. The presence of the anion vacancies was found to inhibit the formation of these states. After thermally annealing out these vacancies, such that H- concentration remains intact, two long-lived components appear in the lifetime spectrum. Furthermore, these two components correlate with the presence of the H-ions. These results suggest the existence of bound [e+-H-] states when positrons are trapped by the H- ions, and the subsequent formation of positronium (Ps) states by the dissociation of the [e+-H-] states. From the values of the intermediate lifetime component, a value of (570+/-50) ps is obtained for the lifetime of the PsH state located in an anion vacancy in MgO. The longest lifetime component ~(1-3) ns is attributed to pick-off annihilation of ortho-Ps states.

  6. The effect of stress state on zirconium hydride reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut Nedim

    Prior to storage in a dry-cask facility, spent nuclear fuel must undergo a vacuum drying cycle during which the spent fuel rods are heated up to elevated temperatures of ≤ 400°C to remove moisture the canisters within the cask. As temperature increases during heating, some of the hydride particles within the cladding dissolve while the internal gas pressure in fuel rods increases generating multi-axial hoop and axial stresses in the closed-end thin-walled cladding tubes. As cool-down starts, the hydrogen in solid solution precipitates as hydride platelets, and if the multiaxial stresses are sufficiently large, the precipitating hydrides reorient from their initial circumferential orientation to radial orientation. Radial hydrides can severely embrittle the spent nuclear fuel cladding at low temperature in response to hoop stress loading. Because the cladding can experience a range of stress states during the thermo-mechanical treatment induced during vacuum drying, this study has investigated the effect of stress state on the process of hydride reorientation during controlled thermo-mechanical treatments utilizing the combination of in situ X-ray diffraction and novel mechanical testing analyzed by the combination of metallography and finite element analysis. The study used cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet containing approx. 180 wt. ppm hydrogen as its material basis. The failure behavior of this material containing radial hydrides was also studied over a range of temperatures. Finally, samples from reactor-irradiated cladding tubes were examined by X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. To reveal the stress state effect on hydride reorientation, the critical threshold stress to reorient hydrides was determined by designing novel mechanical test samples which produce a range of stress states from uniaxial to "near-equibiaxial" tension when a load is applied. The threshold stress was determined after thermo-mechanical treatments by

  7. Precipitation of γ-zirconium hydride in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, G.J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A mechanism for the precipitation of γ-zirconium hydride in zirconium is presented which does not require the diffusion of zirconium. The transformation is completed by shears caused by 1/3 (10 anti 10) Shockley partial dislocations on alternate zirconium basal planes, either by homogeneous nucleation or at lattice imperfections. Homogeneous nucleation is considered least likely in view of the large nucleation barrier involved. Hydrides may form at dislocations by the generation of partials by means of either a pole or ratchet mechanism. The former requires dislocations with a component of Burgers vector along the c-axis, but contrast experiments show that these are not normally observed in annealed zirconium. It is therefore most likely that intragranular hydrides form at the regular 1/3 (11 anti 20) dislocations, possibly by means of a ratchet mechanism. Contrast experiments in the electron microscope show that the precipitates have a shear character consistent with the mechanism suggested. The possibility that the shear dislocations associated with the hydrides are emissary dislocations is considered and a model suggested in which this function is satisfied together with the partial relief of misfit stresses. The large shear strains associated with the precipitation mechanism may play an important role in the preferential orientation of hydrides under stress

  8. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  9. Mechanisms of hydrogen induced delayed cracking in hydride forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.; Nuttall, K.; Puls, M.P.; Simpson, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanisms which have been formulated to describe delayed hydrogen cracking in hydride-forming metals are reviewed and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the commercial alloy Zr--2.5% Nb (Cb) which is extensively used in nuclear reactor core components. A quantitative model for hydrogen cracking in this material is presented and compared with available experimental data. The kinetics of crack propagation are controlled by the growth of hydrides at the stressed crack tip by the diffusive ingress of hydrogen into this region. The driving force for the diffusion flux is provided by the local stress gradient which interacts with both hydrogen atoms in solution and hydrogen atoms being dissolved and reprecipitated at the crack tip. The model is developed using concepts of elastoplastic fracture mechanics. Stage I crack growth is controlled by hydrides growing in the elastic stress gradient, while Stage II is controlled by hydride growth in the plastic zone at the crack tip. Recent experimental observations are presented which indicate that the process occurs in an intermittent fashion; hydride clusters accumulate at the crack tip followed by unstable crack advance and subsequent crack arrest in repeated cycles

  10. Mechanisms of hydrogen induced delayed cracking in hydride forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.; Nuttall, K.; Puls, M.P.; Simpson, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanisms which have been formulated to describe delayed hydrogen cracking in hydride-forming metals are reviewed and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the commercial alloy Zr-2.5 pct Nb which is extensively used in nuclear reactor core components. A quantitative model for hydrogen cracking in this material is presented and compared with available experimental data. The kinetics of crack propagation are controlled by the growth of hydrides at the stressed crack tip by the diffusive ingress of hydrogen into this region. The driving force for the diffusion flux is provided by the local stress gradient which interacts with both hydrogen atoms in solution and hydrogen atoms being dissolved and reprecipitated at the crack tip. The model is developed using concepts of elastoplastic fracture mechanics. Stage I crack growth is controlled by hydrides growing in the elastic stress gradient, while Stage II is controlled by hydride growth in the plastic zone at the crack tip. Recent experimental observations are presented which indicate that the process occurs in an intermittent fashion; hydride clusters accumulate at the crack tip followed by unstable crack advance and subsequent crack arrest in repeated cycles. 55 refs., 6 figs

  11. Effect of dry and wet ambient environment on the pulsed laser ablation of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Nisar; Bashir, Shazia; Umm-i-Kalsoom,; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq

    2013-01-01

    Surface and structural properties of the laser irradiated titanium targets have been investigated under dry and wet ambient environments. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser of wavelength 248 nm, pulse duration of 20 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. The targets were exposed for various number of laser pulses ranging from 500 to 2000 in the ambient environment of air, de-ionized water and propanol at a fluence of 3.6 J/cm 2 . The surface morphology, chemical composition and crystallographical analysis were performed by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD), respectively. For both central and peripheral ablated areas, significant difference in surface morphology has been observed in case of dry and wet ambient conditions. Large sized and diffused grains are observed in case of dry ablation. Whereas, in case of wet ablation, small sized, and well defined grains with distinct grain boundaries and significantly enhanced density are revealed. This difference is ascribed to the confinement effects of the liquid. The peripheral ablated area shows redeposition in case of dry ablation whereas small sized grain like structures are formed in case of wet ablation. EDS analysis exhibits variation in chemical composition under both ambient conditions. When the targets are treated in air environment, enhancement of the oxygen as well as nitrogen content is observed while in case of de-ionized water and propanol only increase in content of oxygen is observed. X-ray diffraction analysis exhibits formation of oxides and nitrides in case of air, whereas, in case of de-ionized water and propanol only oxides along with hydrides are formed. For various number of laser pulses the variation in the peak intensity, crystallinity and d-spacing is observed under both ambient conditions.

  12. A Modified Porous Titanium Sheet Prepared by Plasma-Activated Sintering for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukimichi Tamaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a contamination-free porous titanium scaffold by a plasma-activated sintering within an originally developed TiN-coated graphite mold. The surface of porous titanium sheet with or without a coated graphite mold was characterized. The cell adhesion property of porous titanium sheet was also evaluated in this study. The peak of TiC was detected on the titanium sheet processed with the graphite mold without a TiN coating. Since the titanium fiber elements were directly in contact with the carbon graphite mold during processing, surface contamination was unavoidable event in this condition. The TiC peak was not detectable on the titanium sheet processed within the TiN-coated carbon graphite mold. This modified plasma-activated sintering with the TiN-coated graphite mold would be useful to fabricate a contamination-free titanium sheet. The number of adherent cells on the modified titanium sheet was greater than that of the bare titanium plate. Stress fiber formation and the extension of the cells were observed on the titanium sheets. This modified titanium sheet is expected to be a new tissue engineering material in orthopedic bone repair.

  13. Kinetics of hydrogen evolution in the thermal dissociation of the hydride ZrNiH /SUB 2.8/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernavskii, P.A.; Lunin, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen evolution in the thermal decomposition of ZrNiH /SUB 2.8/ has been studied. The kinetic curve has two rate maxima. It is presumed that the second maximum is related to the phenomenon of critical inhibition that accompanies the phase transition. Apparent activation energies were determined for hydrogen evolution in argon and argon-ethylene atmospheres. The apparent energy increases in the argon-ethylene mixture. On the basis of the activation energy measurements it is presumed that the rate-determining step in hydrogen evolution is either the formation of hydrogen molecules from atoms on the surface of the lateral diffusion of atomic hydrogen. In the region of hydrogen concentration in the hydride corresponding to the phase transition, the rate-determining step is hydrogen diffusion in the hydride

  14. A study on preparation and hydriding of β-Mg2Al3 and γ-Mg17Al12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi Suwarno

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of the synthetic formation of β-Mg 2 Al 3 and γ-Mg 17 Al 12 has been studied. Mechanical alloying of Mg and Al powders with the atomic ratio of Mg:Al = 2:3 in toluene solution yields β-Mg 2 Al 3 compound after milling for 30 h. The γ-Mg 17 Al 12 can be formed by heating the β-Mg 2 Al 3 at 430°C under high vacuum. The measured hydrogen capacities of β-Mg 2 Al 3 and γ-Mg 17 Al 12 as hydride at 300°C are 3.2 and 4.9 wt%, respectively. Microstructure of the Mg-Al specimen shows that on hydriding at 300°C the polygonal shape of the γ-Mg 17 Al 12 changes into irregular shapes which are composed of γ-MgH 2 and Al. (author)

  15. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  16. Industrial experience with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author)

  17. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Simultaneous determination of hydride and non-hydride forming elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzo, Z. [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Altos de Pipe, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Matos-Reyes, M.N.; Cervera, M.L.; Guardia, M. de la, E-mail: m.luisa.cervera@uv.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    The operating characteristics of a dual nebulization system were studied including instrumental and chemical conditions for the hydride generation and analytical figures of merit for both, hydride and non hydride forming elements. Analytical performance of the nebulization system was characterized by detection limits from 0.002 to 0.0026 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for the hydride forming elements and between 0.0034 and 0.0121 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for the non-hydride forming elements, relative standard deviation for 10 replicate measurements at 0.25 mg L{sup -1} level and recovery percentages between 97 and 103%. The feasibility of the system was demonstrated in the simultaneous determination of Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Zn, As, Bi, Sb, Se, and Te in the NIST 1549 (non-fat milk powder), NIST 1570a (spinach leaves), DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) and TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas) certified samples for trace elements. Results found were in good agreement with the certified ones. (author)

  19. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy of lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, C.; Hirota, E.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental and hot bands of the vibration--rotation transitions of 6 LiH, 7 LiH, 6 LiD, and 7 LiD were observed by infrared diode laser spectroscopy at Doppler-limited resolution. Lithium hydride molecules were produced by the reaction of the Li vapor with hydrogen at elevated temperatures. Some 40 transitions were observed and, after combined with submillimeter-wave spectra reported by G. M. Plummer et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 4893 (1984)], were analyzed to yield Dunham-type constants with accuracies more than an order of magnitude higher than those published in the literature. It was clearly demonstrated that the Born--Oppenheimer approximation did not hold, and some parameters representing the breakdown were evaluated. The Born--Oppenheimer internuclear distance r/sup BO//sub e/ was derived to be 1.594 914 26 (59) A, where a new value of Planck's constant recommended by CODATA was employed. The relative intensity of absorption lines was measured to determine the ratio of the permanent dipole moment to its first derivative with respect to the internuclear distance: μ/sub e/ [(partialμpartialr)/sub e/ r/sub e/ ] = 1.743(86). The pressure broadening parameter Δν/sub p/ P was determined to be 6.40 (22) MHzTorr by measuring the linewidth dependence on the pressure of hydrogen, which was about four times larger than the value for the dipole--quadrupole interaction estimated by Kiefer and Bushkovitch's theory

  20. A fractographic distinction between hydride cracking and stress corrosion cracking in zircaloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1978-06-01

    The fractographic details of SCC and delayed hydride failures are compared by scanning and replica electron microscopy. It is shown that there are distinct features ascribable to the fracture of hydride platelets which are absent from SCC fractures and which distinguish them from fractures produced by delayed hydride cracking. (author)

  1. Use of triammonium salt of aurin tricarboxylic acid as risk mitigant for aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2017-08-08

    A process and a resulting product by process of an aluminum hydride which is modified with by physically combining in a ball milling process an aluminum hydride with a triammonium salt of aurin tricarboxylic acid. The resulting product is an aluminum hydride which is resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while maintaining useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  2. A computer model for hydride blister growth in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.J.; Sawatzky, A.; Woo, C.H.

    1985-06-01

    The failure of a Zircaloy-2 pressure tube in the Pickering unit 2 reactor started at a series of zirconium hydride blisters on the outside of the pressure tube. These blisters resulted from the thermal diffusion of hydrogen to the cooler regions of the pressure tube. In this report the physics of thermal diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium is reviewed and a computer model for blister growth in two-dimensional Cartesian geometry is described. The model is used to show that the blister-growth rate in a two-phase zirconium/zirconium-hydride region does not depend on the initial hydrogen concentration nor on the hydrogen pick-up rate, and that for a fixed far-field temperature there is an optimum pressure-type/calandria-tube contact temperature for growing blisters. The model described here can also be used to study large-scale effects, such as hydrogen-depletion zones around hydride blisters

  3. Hydrides and deuterides of lithium and sodium. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, E.

    1990-01-01

    An interionic potential model is developed for lighter and heavier alkali hydrides and deuterides. The method uses a combination of theoretical techniques, empirical fit, and a few plausible assumptions. An assessment of the derived potentials is made by calculating the lattice statics and dynamics of the crystals and by comparing both with experiment (where available) and with other calculations. The potentials are found to describe the elastic and dielectric properties reasonably well. The phonon dispersion curves of hydride and deuteride of sodium are compared with the calculations of Dyck and Jex based on force constant model approach and the results are discussed. The need for further experiments on heavier hydrides and deuterides is stressed. (author)

  4. Research in Nickel/Metal Hydride Batteries 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwo-Hsiung Young

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Continuing from a special issue in Batteries in 2016, nineteen new papers focusing on recent research activities in the field of nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH batteries have been selected for the 2017 Special Issue of Ni/MH Batteries. These papers summarize the international joint-efforts in Ni/MH battery research from BASF, Wayne State University, Michigan State University, FDK Corp. (Japan, Institute for Energy Technology (Norway, Central South University (China, University of Science and Technology Beijing (China, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry (China, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology (China, Shenzhen Highpower (China, and University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa from 2016–2017 through reviews of AB2 metal hydride alloys, Chinese and EU Patent Applications, as well as descriptions of research results in metal hydride alloys, nickel hydroxide, electrolyte, and new cell type, comparison work, and projections of future works.

  5. Intrinsic Osteoinductivity of Porous Titanium Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Tamaddon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Large bone defects and nonunions are serious complications that are caused by extensive trauma or tumour. As traditional therapies fail to repair these critical-sized defects, tissue engineering scaffolds can be used to regenerate the damaged tissue. Highly porous titanium scaffolds, produced by selective laser sintering with mechanical properties in range of trabecular bone (compressive strength 35 MPa and modulus 73 MPa, can be used in these orthopaedic applications, if a stable mechanical fixation is provided. Hydroxyapatite coatings are generally considered essential and/or beneficial for bone formation; however, debonding of the coatings is one of the main concerns. We hypothesised that the titanium scaffolds have an intrinsic potential to induce bone formation without the need for a hydroxyapatite coating. In this paper, titanium scaffolds coated with hydroxyapatite using electrochemical method were fabricated and osteoinductivity of coated and noncoated scaffolds was compared in vitro. Alizarin Red quantification confirmed osteogenesis independent of coating. Bone formation and ingrowth into the titanium scaffolds were evaluated in sheep stifle joints. The examinations after 3 months revealed 70% bone ingrowth into the scaffold confirming its osteoinductive capacity. It is shown that the developed titanium scaffold has an intrinsic capacity for bone formation and is a suitable scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

  6. Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen, Thermal and Electrochemical Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Kasper T.; Sheppard, Drew; Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen has a very diverse chemistry and reacts with most other elements to form compounds, which have fascinating structures, compositions and properties. Complex metal hydrides are a rapidly expanding class of materials, approaching multi-functionality, in particular within the energy storage...... inspiration to solve the great challenge of our time: efficient conversion and large-scale storage of renewable energy....... field. This review illustrates that complex metal hydrides may store hydrogen in the solid state, act as novel battery materials, both as electrolytes and electrode materials, or store solar heat in a more efficient manner as compared to traditional heat storage materials. Furthermore, it is highlighted...

  7. Microcapsulated rare earth - nickel hydride-forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Oguro, K.; Kato, A.; Suzuki, H.; Ishii, E.

    1985-01-01

    Fine particles of hydride-forming alloys such as LaNi/sub 5/ and MmNi/sub 4.5/Mn/sub 0.5/ (MM : mischmetal) were coated with metallic copper thin layer by chemical plating method. Hydrogen storage capacities of alloys were not appreciably affected by the plating treatment. The capsulated alloy powders were easily pressed into pellets. The pellets obtained had high thermal conductivity and porosity enough to permeate hydrogen, leading to fast reaction kinetics. These were able to withstand more than 5,000 repeated hydriding-dehydriding cycles without disintegrating

  8. Hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masakazu; Ohba, Nobuko; Noritake, Tatsuo; Towata, Shin-ichi

    2005-01-01

    The hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. First-principles calculations suggested that CaSiH n is thermodynamically stable. Experimentally, the p -c isotherms clearly demonstrated plateau pressures in a temperature range of 473-573 K and the maximum hydrogen content was 1.9 weight % (wt.%) under a hydrogen pressure of 9 MPa at 473 K. The structure of CaSiH n is different from those of ZrNi hydrides, although CaSi has the CrB-type structure as well as ZrNi

  9. Thermophysical properties of solid lithium hydride and its isotopic modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mel'nikova, T.N.

    1981-01-01

    The theory of the anharmonic lattice is used to calculate the thermophysical properties (thermal expansivity, lattice constant, compressibility, and elastic moduli) of all the isotopic modifications of solid lithium hydride sup(6,7)Li(H,D,T) at temperatures up to the melting point. A general analysis of isotopic effects is carried out; in particular the reverse isotopic effect in the lattice constant is explained and the isotopic effect in melting is discussed. The results of the calculations agree with available experimental data and can be used for those isotopic modifications of lithium hydride for which there exist no experimental results. (author)

  10. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Baranowski

    Full Text Available Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES, and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants

  11. Titanium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium pure and base alloys are protected by an oxide film with anionic vacancies which gives a very good resistance to corrosion in oxidizing medium, in some ph ranges. Results of pitting and crevice corrosion are given for Cl - , Br - , I - ions concentration with temperature and ph dependence, also with oxygenated ions effect. (A.B.). 32 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Observations on Hydride Structures at the Tip of Arrested Cracks Grown under Conditions of Delayed Hydride Cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Kjell; Oskarsson, Magnus; Bergqvist, Hans

    2003-04-01

    One sample of Zr2.5%Nb and one sample of cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 which have been tested for hydrogen induced crack growth have been examined in the crack tip region with the aim of determining the mechanism behind the growth of cracks. The proposed mechanisms are brittle failure of a crack tip hydride and hydrogen enhanced localized shear. The examinations were done by TEM and SEM. However attempts to produce a TEM specimen with a thinned region at the tip of the crack were unsuccessful in both samples. One feature observed in the Zr2.5%Nb material may however be an indication of intense shear deformation at the tip of the crack. On the other hand all observations on the Zircaloy-4 sample indicate precipitation of hydrides ahead of the crack tip and the presence of hydrides on the crack flanks

  13. A comparison of the smeared-dislocation and super-dislocation description of a hydrided region in the context of modelling delayed hydride cracking initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1994-01-01

    In quantifying the stress distribution within a hydrided region in the context of modelling delayed hydride cracking (DHC) initiation in zirconium alloys, this paper highlights the desirability of accounting for image effects, i.e. the interaction between the hydrided region and any free surface, for example a sharp crack, blunt notch or planar surface. The super-dislocation representation of a finite thickness hydrided region is ideal for accounting for image effects. It also adequately accounts for the finite thickness, t, of a hydrided region provided, as is the case in practice, we are concerned with the stress value within the hydride at distances ≥ 0.25 t from an end of the region. (Author)

  14. Osseointegration is improved by coating titanium implants with a nanostructured thin film with titanium carbide and titanium oxides clustered around graphitic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronesi, Francesca [Laboratory of Preclinical and Surgical Studies, Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, Bologna 40136 (Italy); Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena [Laboratory of Preclinical and Surgical Studies, Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, Bologna 40136 (Italy); Laboratory of Biocompatibility, Innovative Technologies and Advanced Therapies, Department Rizzoli RIT, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, Bologna 40136 (Italy); Longo, Giovanni [CNR Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ioannidu, Caterina Alexandra; Scotto d' Abusco, Anna [Dept. of Biochemical Sciences, Sapienza University of Roma, Ple A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Superti, Fabiana; Panzini, Gianluca [Dept. of Technologies and Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena, 299 Roma (Italy); Misiano, Carlo [Romana Film Sottili, Anzio, Roma (Italy); Palattella, Alberto [Dept. of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Selleri, Paolo; Di Girolamo, Nicola [Exotic Animals Clinic, Via S. Giovannini 53, 00137 Roma (Italy); Garbarino, Viola [Dept. of Radiology, S.M. Goretti Hospital, Via G. Reni 2, 04100 Latina (Italy); Politi, Laura [Dept. of Biochemical Sciences, Sapienza University of Roma, Ple A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Scandurra, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.scandurra@uniroma1.it [Dept. of Biochemical Sciences, Sapienza University of Roma, Ple A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2017-01-01

    Titanium implants coated with a 500 nm nanostructured layer, deposited by the Ion Plating Plasma Assisted (IPPA) technology, composed of 60% graphitic carbon, 25% titanium oxides and 15% titanium carbide were implanted into rabbit femurs whilst into the controlateral femurs uncoated titanium implants were inserted as control. At four time points the animals were injected with calcein green, xylenol orange, oxytetracycline and alizarin. After 2, 4 and 8 weeks femurs were removed and processed for histology and static and dynamic histomorphometry for undecalcified bone processing into methylmethacrylate, sectioned, thinned, polished and stained with Toluidine blue and Fast green. The overall bone-implant contacts rate (percentage of bone-implant contacts/weeks) of the TiC coated implant was 1.6 fold than that of the uncoated titanium implant. The histomorphometric analyses confirmed the histological evaluations. More precisely, higher Mineral Apposition Rate (MAR, μm/day) (p < 0.005) and Bone Formation Rate (BFR, μm{sup 2}/μm/day) (p < 0.0005) as well as Bone Implant Contact (Bic) and Bone Ingrowth values (p < 0.0005) were observed for the TiC coated implants compared to uncoated implants. In conclusion the hard nanostructured TiC layer protects the bulk titanium implant against the harsh conditions of biological tissues and in the same time, stimulating adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts, induces a better bone-implant contacts of the implant compared to the uncoated titanium implant. - Highlights: • Ti implants were coated with a nanostructured film composed of C{sub gr}, TiC and TiO{sub x}. • The TiC layer stimulates adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts. • Uncoated and TiC coated titanium implants were implanted in rabbit femurs. • Bone-implant contacts of TiC coated implants were higher than that of uncoated. • Mineral Apposition Rate of TiC coated implants were higher than that of uncoated.

  15. Osseointegration is improved by coating titanium implants with a nanostructured thin film with titanium carbide and titanium oxides clustered around graphitic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronesi, Francesca; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Longo, Giovanni; Ioannidu, Caterina Alexandra; Scotto d'Abusco, Anna; Superti, Fabiana; Panzini, Gianluca; Misiano, Carlo; Palattella, Alberto; Selleri, Paolo; Di Girolamo, Nicola; Garbarino, Viola; Politi, Laura; Scandurra, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Titanium implants coated with a 500 nm nanostructured layer, deposited by the Ion Plating Plasma Assisted (IPPA) technology, composed of 60% graphitic carbon, 25% titanium oxides and 15% titanium carbide were implanted into rabbit femurs whilst into the controlateral femurs uncoated titanium implants were inserted as control. At four time points the animals were injected with calcein green, xylenol orange, oxytetracycline and alizarin. After 2, 4 and 8 weeks femurs were removed and processed for histology and static and dynamic histomorphometry for undecalcified bone processing into methylmethacrylate, sectioned, thinned, polished and stained with Toluidine blue and Fast green. The overall bone-implant contacts rate (percentage of bone-implant contacts/weeks) of the TiC coated implant was 1.6 fold than that of the uncoated titanium implant. The histomorphometric analyses confirmed the histological evaluations. More precisely, higher Mineral Apposition Rate (MAR, μm/day) (p < 0.005) and Bone Formation Rate (BFR, μm 2 /μm/day) (p < 0.0005) as well as Bone Implant Contact (Bic) and Bone Ingrowth values (p < 0.0005) were observed for the TiC coated implants compared to uncoated implants. In conclusion the hard nanostructured TiC layer protects the bulk titanium implant against the harsh conditions of biological tissues and in the same time, stimulating adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts, induces a better bone-implant contacts of the implant compared to the uncoated titanium implant. - Highlights: • Ti implants were coated with a nanostructured film composed of C gr , TiC and TiO x . • The TiC layer stimulates adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts. • Uncoated and TiC coated titanium implants were implanted in rabbit femurs. • Bone-implant contacts of TiC coated implants were higher than that of uncoated. • Mineral Apposition Rate of TiC coated implants were higher than that of uncoated.

  16. Utilization of titanium sponge in H. T. G. R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tone, H [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki. Oarai Research Establishment

    1977-10-01

    The high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (H.T.G.R.) uses helium as a coolant and graphite as both the moderator and the fuel tube material. At first sight, there should not be any problem concerning the compatibility of these materials in the H.T.G.R. core region where temperature exceeds 700/sup 0/C, however, it is possible that the graphite core and other structural materials are oxidized by traces of impurities in the coolant. In large-power H.T.G.R., water inleakage from both heat exchangers and coolant circulation pumps will probably be the major source of impurity which will react with the graphite-producing H/sub 2/, CO and CO/sub 2/. In the near future, the nuclear heat of H.T.G.R. will be used as a major heat source for steel production and the chemical industry. For these purposes, it will be necessary to construct a reactor using a helium coolant of greater than 1000/sup 0/C. Therefore, not only the development of refractory metals as structural materials but also an effective helium coolant purification system are the keys for H.T.G.R. construction. Recently, in the helium coolant purification system of H.T.G. Reactors, which have been developed in the several nations advanced in atomic reactors, titanium sponge is used very frequently to remove hydrogen gas as an impurity in helium coolant. Titanium sponge can absorb very large quantities of hydrogen and its absorption-capacity can be very easily controlled by controlling the temperature of the titanium sponge-since titanium hydride is formed by endothermic reaction. The titanium sponge trap is used also in OGL-1 (Oarai Gas Loop-1), helium coolant purification system for large scale irradiation apparatus which is used for nuclear fuels of H.T.G.R. This apparatus has been installed in the Japan Material Testing Reactor. In this report, the coolant purification system of H.T.G.R., OGL-1 and the experimental results of the titanium sponge trap are explained briefly.

  17. Hybrid functional calculations of potential hydrogen storage material: Complex dimagnesium iron hydride

    KAUST Repository

    Ul Haq, Bakhtiar

    2014-06-01

    By employing the state of art first principles approaches, comprehensive investigations of a very promising hydrogen storage material, Mg 2FeH6 hydride, is presented. To expose its hydrogen storage capabilities, detailed structural, elastic, electronic, optical and dielectric aspects have been deeply analysed. The electronic band structure calculations demonstrate that Mg2FeH6 is semiconducting material. The obtained results of the optical bandgap (4.19 eV) also indicate that it is a transparent material for ultraviolet light, thus demonstrating its potential for optoelectronics application. The calculated elastic properties reveal that Mg2FeH6 is highly stiff and stable hydride. Finally, the calculated hydrogen (H2) storage capacity (5.47 wt.%) within a reasonable formation energy of -78 kJ mol-1, at room temperature, can be easily achievable, thus making Mg2FeH6 as potential material for practical H2 storage applications. Copyright © 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  19. Reversible dihydrogen activation and hydride transfer by a uranium nitride complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcone, Marta; Poon, Lok Nga; Fadaei Tirani, Farzaneh; Mazzanti, Marinella [Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2018-03-26

    Cleavage of dihydrogen is an important step in the industrial and enzymatic transformation of N{sub 2} into ammonia. The reversible cleavage of dihydrogen was achieved under mild conditions (room temperature and 1 atmosphere of H{sub 2}) by the molecular uranium nitride complex, [Cs{U(OSi(O"tBu)_3)_3}{sub 2}(μ-N)], leading to a rare hydride-imide bridged diuranium(IV) complex, [Cs{U(OSi(O"tBu)_3)_3}{sub 2}(μ-H)(μ-NH)], that slowly releases H{sub 2} under vacuum. This complex is highly reactive and quickly transfers hydride to acetonitrile and carbon dioxide at room temperature, affording the ketimide- and formate-bridged U{sup IV} species [Cs{U(OSi(O"tBu)_3)_3}{sub 2}(μ-NH)(μ-CH{sub 3}CHN)] and [Cs{U(OSi(O"tBu)_3)_3}{sub 2}(μ-HCOO)(μ-NHCOO)]. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Fracture properties of hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding in recrystallization and stress-relief anneal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung, E-mail: hhhsu@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County 325, Taiwan (China); Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China); Tsay, Leu-Wen [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    In this work, the stress-relieved (SRA) and recrystallized (RXA) Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens were hydrogen-charged to the target concentration of 300 wppm and then manufactured into X-specimens for fracture toughness test. The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens in both SRA and RXA conditions were investigated. At the hydrogen concentration level of 300 wppm, J-integral values for RXA cladding were higher than those for SRA cladding at both 25 Degree-Sign C and 300 Degree-Sign C. The formation of brittle zirconium hydrides had a significant impact on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding in both SRA and RXA states, especially at 25 Degree-Sign C. Among all the tests, SRA cladding tested at 25 Degree-Sign C exhibited a great loss of the fracture toughness. The micrographic and fractographic observations further demonstrated that the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding would be improved by the coarse grains in RXA cladding, but degraded by zirconium hydrides precipitated along the grain boundary.

  1. Development of advanced neutron radiography for inspection on irradiated fuels and materials (2). Observation of hydride and oxide film on zircaloy cladding by using neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Ryou; Nakata, Masahito; Mastubayashi, Masahito; Harada, Katsuya

    2001-02-01

    Neutron radiography has been used as available diagnosis method of integrity on irradiated fuels, and has not been employed for estimating hydride and oxide film, which are influenced on integrity of Zircaloy cladding. Preliminary tests for PIE were carried out to assess possibility of neutron radiography as evaluation tool for hydrided and oxide film on the cladding. In these experiments, Zircaloy claddings with controlled amount of hydrogen absorption (200, 500, and 1000ppm) and thickness of oxide film were radiographed in center axis and in side directions of cladding tube by neutron imaging plate method. It is noted that thickness of oxide film was formed range from 7 μ m to 70 μ m at various temperatures (973, 1173, and 1323K) under steam atmosphere on the Zircaloy claddings. CT (Computed Tomography) restructure calculation was carried out to obtain cross section image of the claddings non-destructively. The Radiographs were qualitatively investigated about structure formation area and dependence of hydrogen absorption amount on PSL (Photo Simulated Luminescence) and CT values using by image analysis processor. At the results of imaging plate test, obvious difference was not found out between hydride formation (except for 1000ppm cladding) and standard claddings in side direction image. However, on the center axis direction image, outer circumference in the cladding cross-section that corresponded with hydride segregation area became blacker. In the case of oxide film formed cladding images, although oxide film could not find out on all speciments in the radiographs taken at the center axis and side directions, cross-section of claddings heat-processed at 973K showed appreciable blackness increasing with oxide film thickness on the radiographs. On the other hand, there is no effective difference between images of oxide film formed claddings processed at 1173K and 1323K and that of standard cladding. In CT image of 1000ppm hydrogen absorbed cladding, it is

  2. Insight into destabilization mechanism of Mg-based hydrides interstitially co-doped with nonmetals: a DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen; Zhu, Luying; Yang, Fusheng; Zhang, Zaoxiao; Nyamsi, Serge N.

    2018-04-01

    Mg-based metal hydride is one of the most promising materials for hydrogen energy storage. However, the high thermal stability due to strong bonding effects between the atoms limits its practical application. In order to reduce the thermal stability, a method of doping double nonmetals into Mg-based system was proposed in this study. The density functional theory (DFT) calculation results showed that the thermal stabilities of both the B-N co-doped Mg-based alloy and its hydride are reduced compared with pure Mg-based system. The relative formation enthalpies of the alloy and its hydride are 0.323 and 0.595 eV atom-1, respectively. The values are much higher than those for either singly B- or N-doped Mg-based system. The more significant destabilization by doping double nonmetal elements than single element is mainly attributed to a dual effect in weakening Mg-Ni/NiH4 bonds, caused by criss-cross interactions between B-Ni and N-Mg bonds.

  3. Determination of total inorganic arsenic in potable water through spectroscopy of atomic absorption with generation of hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Roman, S.

    1997-01-01

    This study developed a method for the cuantitative analysis of arsenic in potable water , through the spectrophotometric technique of atomic absorption. It used an automatic system of injection of flux for the generation of hydrides. It studied the effect produced by reducer agents, in the prereduction of arsenic in water, obtaining the best result with the use of potasium iodide 1.5% and ascorbic acid 0.25% in hydrochloric acid 3.7%, for the direct determination of total inorganic arsenic. It observed the effect produced by cadmium and selenium to the half of the concentration of arsenic, chromium, lead and silver at the same concentration, and barium at a ten times higher concentration, in the recuperation of total inorganic arsenic. It also used sodium borohydride 0.3% in sodium hydroxide 0.05% (5mL/min), for the formation of the volatile hydrides. It used hydrochloric acid 3.7% (12 mL/min) as disolution of transport; argon as inert gas, and a flame air-acetylene, for the atomization of the hydrides. This method was applied to 19 samples of potable water, and the result was no detectable for all of them. (S. Grainger)

  4. CO Reduction to CH3OSiMe3: Electrophile-Promoted Hydride Migration at a Single Fe Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Meaghan M; Peters, Jonas C

    2017-02-22

    One of the major challenges associated with developing molecular Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is the design of systems that promote the formation of C-H bonds from H 2 and CO while also facilitating the release of the resulting CO-derived organic products. To this end, we describe the synthesis of reduced iron-hydride/carbonyl complexes that enable an electrophile-promoted hydride migration process, resulting in the reduction of coordinated CO to a siloxymethyl (L n Fe-CH 2 OSiMe 3 ) group. Intramolecular hydride-to-CO migrations are extremely rare, and to our knowledge the system described herein is the first example where such a process can be accessed from a thermally stable M(CO)(H) complex. Further addition of H 2 to L n Fe-CH 2 OSiMe 3 releases CH 3 OSiMe 3 , demonstrating net four-electron reduction of CO to CH 3 OSiMe 3 at a single Fe site.

  5. Characteristics of hydride precipitation and reorientation in spent-fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Daum, R.S.; Hiller, J.M.; Billone, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine Zircaloy fuel cladding, either discharged from several PWRs and a BWR after irradiation to fluence levels of 3.3 to 8.6 X 10 21 n cm -2 (E > 1 MeV) or hydrogen-charged and heat-treated under stress to produce radial hydrides; the goal was to determine the microstructural and crystallographic characteristics of hydride precipitation. Morphologies, distributions, and habit planes of various types of hydrides were determined by stereo-TEM. In addition to the normal macroscopic hydrides commonly observed by optical microscopy, small 'microscopic' hydrides are present in spent-fuel cladding in number densities at least a few orders of magnitude greater than that of macroscopic hydrides. The microscopic hydrides, observed to be stable at least up to 333 deg C, precipitate in association with -type dislocations. While the habit plane of macroscopic tangential hydrides in the spent-fuel cladding is essentially the same as that of unirradiated unstressed Zircaloys, i.e., the [107] Zr plane, the habit plane of tangential hydrides that precipitate under high tangential stress is the [104] Zr plane. The habit plane of radial hydrides that precipitate under tangential stress is the [011] Zr pyramidal plane, a naturally preferred plane for a cladding that has 30 basal-pole texture. Effects of texture on the habit plane and the threshold stress for hydride reorientation are also discussed. (authors)

  6. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of hydrides in Zircaloy-4 during thermomechanical cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N., E-mail: cinbizmn@ornl.gov [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Koss, Donald A., E-mail: koss@ems.psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Motta, Arthur T., E-mail: atm2@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Park, Jun-Sang, E-mail: parkjs@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States); Almer, Jonathan D., E-mail: almer@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    The d-spacing evolution of both in-plane and out-of-plane hydrides has been studied using in situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction during thermo-mechanical cycling of cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4. The structure of the hydride precipitates is such that the δ{111} d-spacing of the planes aligned with the hydride platelet face is greater than the d-spacing of the 111 planes aligned with the platelet edges. Upon heating from room temperature, the δ{111} planes aligned with hydride plate edges exhibit bi-linear thermally-induced expansion. In contrast, the d-spacing of the (111) plane aligned with the hydride plate face initially contracts upon heating. These experimental results can be understood in terms of a reversal of stress state associated with precipitating or dissolving hydride platelets within the α-zirconium matrix. - Highlights: •The δ{111} d-spacings aligned with the hydride plate edges exhibit a bi-linear thermal expansion. •Stress state reversal is predicted with the onset of hydride dissolution. •During dissolution, the δ{111} planes oriented parallel to the hydride plate face initially contract upon heating. •Hydride d-spacings indicate that both in-plane (circumferential) and out-of-plane (radial) hydrides are in the same strain-state and likely in the same stress state as well.

  7. The influence of hydride on fracture toughness of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung, E-mail: 175877@mail.csc.com.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); China Steel Corporation, Hsiao Kang District, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiang, Ming-Feng [China Steel Corporation, Hsiao Kang District, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Yen-Chen [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-04-01

    In this work, RXA cladding tubes were hydrogen-charged to target hydrogen content levels between 150 and 800 wppm (part per million by weight). The strings of zirconium hydrides observed in the cross sections are mostly oriented in the circumferential direction. The fracture toughness of hydrided RXA Zircaloy-4 cladding was measured to evaluate its hydride embrittlement susceptibility. With increasing hydrogen content, the fracture toughness of hydrided RXA cladding decreases at both 25 °C and 300 °C. Moreover, highly localized hydrides (forming a hydride rim) aggravate the degradation of the fracture properties of RXA Zircaloy-4 cladding at both 25 °C and 300 °C. Brittle features in the form of quasi-cleavages and secondary cracks were observed on the fracture surface of the hydride rim, even for RXA cladding tested at 300 °C.

  8. Internal friction study of hydrides in zirconium at low hydrogen contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretti, H.A.; Corso, H.L.; Gonzalez, O.A.; Fernandez, L.; Ghilarducci, A.A.; Salva, H.R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Internal friction and shear modulus measurements were carried out on crystal bar zirconium in the as received and hydride conditions using an inverted forced pendulum. Hydriding was achieved in two ways: inside and out of the pendulum. The final hydrogen content determined by fusion analysis in the 'in situ' hydride sample was of 36 ppm. Another sample was hydride by the cathodic charge method with 25 ppm. The thermal solid solubility (TSS) phase boundary presents hysteresis between the precipitation (TSSP) and the dissolution (TSSD) temperatures for the zirconium hydrides. During the first thermal cycling the anelastic effects could be attributed to the δ, ε and metastable γ zirconium hydrides. After 'in situ' annealing at 490 K, these peaks completely disappear in the electrolytically charged sample, while in the 'in situ' hydride, the peaks remain with decreasing intensity. This effect can be understood in terms of the different surface conditions of the samples. (author)

  9. Microstructure evolution of titanium after tensile test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronski, S.; Wierzbanowski, K.; Jędrychowski, M.; Tarasiuk, J; Wronski, M.; Baczmanski, A.; Bacroix, B.

    2016-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative behavior of titanium T40 during tensile loading with a special emphasis on the presence of deformation twins in the observed microstructures is described. The samples for tensile tests were cut out from the rolled titanium sheet along the rolling and transverse directions. Several microstructure maps were determined using Electron Backscatter Diffraction technique (EBSD). These data were used to obtain crystallographic textures, misorientation distributions, grain size, twin boundary length, grain orientation spread, low and high angle boundary fractions and Schmid and Taylor factors. The deformation mechanisms and microstructure characteristics are different in the samples stretched along rolling and transverse directions. A strong appearance of tensile twins was observed in the samples deformed along transverse direction. On the other hand, more frequent subgrain formation and higher orientation spread was observed in the sample deformed along rolling direction, which caused’‘orientation blurring’ leading to an increase of grain size with deformation, as determined from OIM analysis.

  10. Dislocation/hydrogen interaction mechanisms in hydrided nanocrystalline palladium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin-Ahmadi, Behnam; Connétable, Damien; Fivel, Marc; Tanguy, Döme; Delmelle, Renaud; Turner, Stuart; Malet, Loic; Godet, Stephane; Pardoen, Thomas; Proost, Joris; Schryvers, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale plasticity mechanisms activated during hydriding cycles in sputtered nanocrystalline Pd films have been investigated ex-situ using advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques. The internal stress developing within the films during hydriding has been monitored in-situ. Results showed that in Pd films hydrided to β-phase, local plasticity was mainly controlled by dislocation activity in spite of the small grain size. Changes of the grain size distribution and the crystallographic texture have not been observed. In contrast, significant microstructural changes were not observed in Pd films hydrided to α-phase. Moreover, the effect of hydrogen loading on the nature and density of dislocations has been investigated using aberration-corrected TEM. Surprisingly, a high density of shear type stacking faults has been observed after dehydriding, indicating a significant effect of hydrogen on the nucleation energy barriers of Shockley partial dislocations. Ab-initio calculations of the effect of hydrogen on the intrinsic stable and unstable stacking fault energies of palladium confirm the experimental observations.

  11. A system of hydrogen powered vehicles with liquid organic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taube, M.

    1981-07-01

    A motor car system based on the hydrogen produced by nuclear power stations during the night in the summer, and coupled with organic liquid hydride seems to be a feasible system in the near future. Such a system is discussed and the cost is compared with gasoline. (Auth.)

  12. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, James W [Aiken, SC

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  13. Hydrogen storage alloys for nickel/metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, Nobuhiro; Sakai, Tetsuo; Myamura, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Uehara, Itsuki [Osaka National Research Inst. (Japan)

    1996-06-01

    Efforts to improve performance of metal hydride electrodes such as substitution of alloy components, heat treatment, and surface treatment intended to change surface and bulk structure of hydrogen storage alloys, mainly LaNi{sub 5} based alloys, are reviewed. The importance of control of morphology is emphasized. (author)

  14. Cascades for hydrogen isotope separation using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, F.B.; Grzetic, V.

    1982-01-01

    Designs are presented for continuous countercurrent hydrogen isotope separation cascades based on the use of metal hydrides. The cascades are made up of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or temperature swing adsorption (TSA) stages. The designs were evolved from consideration of previously conducted studies of the separation performance of four types of PSA and TSA processes

  15. Deiodination reactions using tributyltin hydride for potential labelling experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zippi, E.M.; Plourde, G.W. II; Satyamurthy, N.

    1995-01-01

    2,6-Dinitro-1-iodobenzene and 2,4-dinitro-1-iodobenzene were deiodinated with tributylin hydride at different temperatures using various addition modes. The product ratios of 1,3-dinitrobenzene and the corresponding tributylstannyldinitrobenzene compounds were determined by NMR in order to evaluate the optimum conditions for impending tritiation experiments. (Author)

  16. Modeling of electrochemical hydrogen storage in metal hydride electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledovskikh, A.; Danilov, D.; Vermeulen, P.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2010-01-01

    The recently presented Electrochemical Kinetic Model (EKM), describing the electrochemical hydrogen storage in hydride-forming materials, has been extended by the description of the solid/electrolyte interface, i.e. the charge transfer kinetics and electrical double layer charging. A complete set of

  17. Modeling of electrochemical hydrogen storage in metal hydride electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledovskikh, A.; Danilov, D.; Vermeulen, P.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2010-01-01

    The recently presented electrochemical kinetic model, describing the electrochemical hydrogen storage in hydride-forming materials, was extended by the description of the solid/electrolyte interface, i.e., the charge-transfer kinetics and electrical double-layer charging. A complete set of equations

  18. Metal Hydride assited contamination on Ru/Si surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pachecka, Malgorzata; Lee, Christopher James; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) residual tin, in the form of particles, ions, and atoms, can be deposited on nearby EUV optics. During the EUV pulse, a reactive hydrogen plasma is formed, which may be able to react with metal contaminants, creating volatile and unstable metal hydrides that

  19. Design and integration of a hydrogen storage on metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botzung, M.

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a hydrogen storage system using metal hydrides for a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. Hydride storage technology has been chosen due to project specifications: high volumetric capacity, low pressures (≤ 3.5 bar) and low temperatures (≤ 75 C: fuel cell temperature). During absorption, heat from hydride generation is dissipated by fluid circulation. An integrated plate-fin type heat exchanger has been designed to obtain good compactness and to reach high absorption/desorption rates. At first, the storage system has been tested in accordance with project specifications (absorption 3.5 bar, desorption 1.5 bar). Then, the hydrogen charge/discharge times have been decreased to reach system limits. System design has been used to simulate thermal and mass comportment of the storage tank. The model is based on the software Fluent. We take in consideration heat and mass transfers in the porous media during absorption/desorption. The hydride thermal and mass behaviour has been integrated in the software. The heat and mass transfers experimentally obtained have been compared to results calculated by the model. The influence of experimental and numerical parameters on the model behaviour has also been explored. (author) [fr

  20. Diastereoselectivity in the reduction of bicyclic enones with hindered hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Camozzato, Andreza C.; Tenius, Beatriz S. M.; Oliveira, Eduardo R. de; Viegas Jr., Cláudio; Victor, Maurício M.; Silveira, Leandro G. da

    2008-01-01

    Reduction of five substituted octalones employing lithium tri-sec-butylborohydride (L-selectride®) in THF and ethyl ether led to allylic alcohols with moderate diastereoselectivity. The stereoselectivity of addition of bulky hydrides showed to be different from most examples in the literature and was strongly influenced by substitution on the octalone ring.

  1. Diastereoselectivity in the reduction of bicyclic enones with hindered hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camozzato, Andreza C.; Tenius, Beatriz S. M.; Oliveira, Eduardo R. de; Viegas Junior, Claudio; Victor, Mauricio M.; Silveira, Leandro G. da

    2008-01-01

    Reduction of five substituted octalones employing lithium tri-sec-butylborohydride (L-selectride R ) in THF and ethyl ether led to allylic alcohols with moderate diastereoselectivity. The stereoselectivity of addition of bulky hydrides showed to be different from most examples in the literature and was strongly influenced by substitution on the octalone ring. (author)

  2. Fractal analysis of electrolytically-deposited palladium hydride dendrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.; Julin, Peng; Xudong, Fan.

    1990-01-01

    The fractal scaling characteristics of the surface profile of electrolytically-deposited palladium hydride dendritic structures have been obtained using conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results are in remarkable agreement with the modified diffusion-limited aggregation model. 19 refs., 3 tabs., 13 figs

  3. Development of transmutation technologies of radioactive waste by actinoid hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konashi, Kenji; Matsui, Hideki; Yamawaki, Michio

    2001-01-01

    Two waste treatment methods, geological disposal and transmutation, have been studied. The transmutation method changes long-lived radioactive nuclides to short-lived one or stabilizes them by nuclear transformation. The transmutation by actinoid hydride is exactly alike that transformation method from actinoid disposal waste to Pu fuel. For this object, OMEGA project is processing now. The transmutation is difficult by two causes such as large amount of long-lived radioactive nuclides and not enough development of control technologies of nuclear reaction except atomic reactor. The transmutation using actinoid hydride has merits that the amount of actinoid charged in the target increases and the effect of thermal neutrons on fuel decreases depending on homogeneous transmutation velocity in the target. Development of stable actinoid hydride under the conditions of reactor temperature and irradiation environment is important. The experimental results of U-ZrH 1.6 are shown in this paper. The irradiation experiment using Th hydride has been proceeding. (S.Y.)

  4. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO) 2 NO(PH 3 ) 2 and a small proton donor H 2 O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H...H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions

  5. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2008-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO) 2NO(PH 3) 2 and a small proton donor H 2O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H⋯H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions.

  6. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Heiko [KemKom, Libellenweg 2, 25917 Leck, Nordfriesland (Germany)], E-mail: jacobsen@kemkom.com

    2008-04-03

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO){sub 2}NO(PH{sub 3}){sub 2} and a small proton donor H{sub 2}O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H...H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions.

  7. Cascades for hydrogen isotope separation using metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, F B; Grzetic, V [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)

    1983-02-01

    Designs are presented for continuous countercurrent hydrogen isotope separation cascades based on the use of metal hydrides. The cascades are made up of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or temperature swing adsorption (TSA) stages. The designs were evolved from consideration of previously conducted studies of the separation performance of four types of PSA and TSA processes.

  8. Diffusion model of delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shmakov, AA; Kalin, BA; Matvienko, YG; Singh, RN; De, PK

    2004-01-01

    We develop a method for the evaluation of the rate of delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys. The model is based on the stationary solution of the phenomenological diffusion equation and the detailed analysis of the distribution of hydrostatic stresses in the plane of a sharp tensile crack.

  9. Hydrogen Storage in Porous Materials and Magnesium Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzech, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis representatives of two different types of materials for potential hydrogen storage application are presented. Usage of either nanoporous materials or metal hydrides has both operational advantages and disadvantages. A main objective of this thesis is to characterize the hydrogen

  10. The Properties of Some Simple Covalent Hydrides: An Ab Initio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some properties of the monomeric binary hydrides of the elements of the first two rows of the periodic table have been determined using ab initio molecular orbital theory. The properties in question are the energetic, structural, electronic, topological and vibrational characteristics. In general, a gradual convergence towards ...

  11. The processing of aluminum gasarites via thermal decomposition of interstitial hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licavoli, Joseph J.

    Gasarite structures are a unique type of metallic foam containing tubular pores. The original methods for their production limited them to laboratory study despite appealing foam properties. Thermal decomposition processing of gasarites holds the potential to increase the application of gasarite foams in engineering design by removing several barriers to their industrial scale production. The following study characterized thermal decomposition gasarite processing both experimentally and theoretically. It was found that significant variation was inherent to this process therefore several modifications were necessary to produce gasarites using this method. Conventional means to increase porosity and enhance pore morphology were studied. Pore morphology was determined to be more easily replicated if pores were stabilized by alumina additions and powders were dispersed evenly. In order to better characterize processing, high temperature and high ramp rate thermal decomposition data were gathered. It was found that the high ramp rate thermal decomposition behavior of several hydrides was more rapid than hydride kinetics at low ramp rates. This data was then used to estimate the contribution of several pore formation mechanisms to the development of pore structure. It was found that gas-metal eutectic growth can only be a viable pore formation mode if non-equilibrium conditions persist. Bubble capture cannot be a dominant pore growth mode due to high bubble terminal velocities. Direct gas evolution appears to be the most likely pore formation mode due to high gas evolution rate from the decomposing particulate and microstructural pore growth trends. The overall process was evaluated for its economic viability. It was found that thermal decomposition has potential for industrialization, but further refinements are necessary in order for the process to be viable.

  12. Mechanochemistry of titanium oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljković Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanochemistry represents an alternative route in synthesis of nanomaterials. Mechanochemical routes are attractive because of their simplicity, flexibility, and ability to prepare materials by solid state reactions at room temperature. The aim of this work is the mechanochemical synthesis of nanostructured titanium oxides of different composition starting from mixtures of Ti and TiO2, TiO and TiO2 or Ti2O3 and TiO2. Emphasis is on the Magneli phases Ti4O7 and Ti5O9 because their mixture is commercially known as EBONEX material. The materials prepared were characterized by XRPD, TG/DTA analysis, SEM and optical microscopy. Titanium monoxide and several Magneli oxides, Ti4O7, Ti5O9 and Ti6O11, are successfully prepared. The results are very interesting because the EBONEX materials were prepared at lower than usual temperature, which would decrease the effective cost of production.

  13. Industrial experience with titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, B M; Shoesmith, D W

    1997-09-01

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author) 83 refs., 17 tabs., 3 figs.

  14. Advances in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagle, S.R.; Wood, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    As described above, new developments in the aerospace market are focusing on higher temperature alloys for jet engine components and higher strength/toughness alloys for airframe applications. Conventional alloys for engines have reached their maximum useful temperature of about 1000 F (540 C) because of oxidation resistance requirements. IMI 834 and Ti-1100 advanced alloys show some improvement, however, the major improvement appears to be in gamma titanium aluminides which could extend the maximum usage temperature to about 1500 F (815 C). This puts titanium alloys in a competitive position to replace nickel-base superalloys. Advanced airframe alloys such as Ti-6-22-22S, Beta C TM , Ti-15-333 and Ti-10-2-3 with higher strength than conventional Ti-6-4 are being utilized in significantly greater quantities, both in military and commercial applications. These alloys offer improved strength with little or no sacrifice in toughness and improved formability, in some cases. Advanced industrial alloys are being developed for improved corrosion resistance in more reducing and higher temperature environments such as those encountered in sour gas wells. Efforts are focused on small precious metal additions to optimize corrosion performance for specific applications at a modest increase in cost. As these applications develop, the usage of titanium alloys for industrial markets should steadily increase to approach that for aerospace applications. (orig.)

  15. Effect of hydrogen on the behavior of metals II - Hydrogen embrittlement of titanium alloy TV13CA - effect of oxygen - comparison with non-alloyed titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arditty, Jean-Pierre

    1973-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on the hydrogen embrittlement of non-alloyed titanium and the metastable β titanium alloy, TV13 CA, was studied during dynamic mechanical tests, the concentrations considered varying from 1000 to 5000 ppm (oxygen) and from 0 to 5000 ppm (hydrogen) respectively. TV13 CA alloy has a very high solubility for hydrogen. The establishment of a temperature range and a rate of deformation region in which the embrittlement of the alloy is maximum leads to the conclusion that an embrittlement mechanism occurs involving the dragging and accumulation of hydrogen by dislocations. This is the case for all annealings effected in the medium temperature range, which, by favoring the re-establishment of the stable two-phase α + β state of the alloy, produce hardening. The same is true for oxygen which, in addition to hardening the alloy by the solid solution effect, tends to increase its instability and, in consequence, favors the decomposition of the β phase. Nevertheless oxygen concentrations of up to 1500 ppm contribute to increasing the mechanical resistance without catastrophically reducing the deformation capacity. In the case of non-alloyed titanium, the hardening effect also leads to an increase in E 0.2p c and R, and to a reduction in the deformation capacity. Nevertheless, hydrogen is only very slightly soluble at room temperature and a distribution of the hydride phase linked to the thermal history of the sample predominates. Thus a fine acicular structure obtained from the β phase by quenching, enables an alloy having a good mechanical resistance to be conserved even when large quantities of hydrogen are present; the deformation capacity remains small. On the other hand, when the hydride phase separates the metallic phase into large grains, a very small elongation leads to a breakdown in mechanical resistance. (author) [fr

  16. Antibacterial iodine-supported titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, T; Shimizu, T; Ohtani, K; Zen, Y; Takaya, M; Tsuchiya, H

    2011-04-01

    Deep infection remains a serious complication in orthopedic implant surgery. In order to reduce the incidence of implant-associated infections, several biomaterial surface treatments have been proposed. This study focused on evaluating the antibacterial activity of iodine-supported titanium (Ti-I(2)) and its impact on post-implant infection, as well as determining the potential suitability of Ti-I(2) as a biomaterial. External fixation pins were used in this experiment as trial implants because of the ease of making the septic models. The antibacterial activity of the metal was measured using a modification of the Japanese Industrial Standards method. Activity was evaluated by exposing the implants to Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli and comparing reaction of pathogens to Ti-I(2) vs. stainless steel and titanium controls. Ti-I(2) clearly inhibited bacterial colonization more than the control metals. In addition, cytocompatibility was assessed by counting the number of colonies that formed on the metals. The three metals showed the same amount of fibroblast colony formation. Japanese white rabbits were used as an in vivo model. Three pins were inserted into both femora of six rabbits for histological analysis. Pin sites were inspected and graded for infection and inflammation. Fewer signs of infection and inflammatory changes were observed in conjunction with the Ti-I(2) pins. Furthermore, osteoconductivity of the implant was evaluated with osteoid formation surface of the pin. Consecutive bone formation was observed around the Ti-I(2) and titanium pins, while little osteoid formation was found around the stainless steel pins. These findings suggest that Ti-I(2) has antimicrobial activity and exhibits cytocompatibility. Therefore, Ti-I(2) substantially reduces the incidence of implant infection and shows particular promise as a biomaterial. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Titanium fasteners. [for aircraft industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Titanium fasteners are used in large quantities throughout the aircraft industry. Most of this usage is in aluminum structure; where titanium structure exists, titanium fasteners are logically used as well. Titanium fasteners offer potential weight savings to the designer at a cost of approximately $30 per pound of weight saved. Proper and least cost usage must take into consideration type of fastener per application, galvanic couples and installation characteristics of protective coatings, cosmetic appearance, paint adhesion, installation forces and methods available and fatigue performance required.

  18. Joining of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baeslack, William

    2002-01-01

    .... Although organized and presented by joining process, many of the observations made and relationships developed, particularly those regarding the weldability and welding metallurgy of gamma titanium...

  19. Candida albicans biofilm on titanium: effect of peroxidase precoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahariz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Ahariz1, Philippe Courtois1,21Laboratory of Experimental Hormonology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, 2UER de Biologie Médicale, Haute Ecole Francisco Ferrer, Brussels, BelgiumAbstract: The present study aimed to document Candida albicans biofilm development on titanium and its modulation by a peroxidase-precoated material which can generate antimicrobials, such as hypoiodite or hypothiocyanite, from hydrogen peroxide, iodide, or thiocyanate. For this purpose, titanium (powder or foil was suspended in Sabouraud liquid medium inoculated with C. albicans ATCC10231. After continuous stirring for 2–21 days at room temperature, the supernatant was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm and titanium washed three times in sterile Sabouraud broth. Using the tetrazolium salt MTT-formazan assay, the titanium-adherent fungal biomass was measured as 7.50 ± 0.60 × 106 blastoconidia per gram of titanium powder (n = 30 and 0.50 ± 0.04 × 106 blastoconidia per cm² of titanium foil (n = 12. The presence of yeast on the surface of titanium was confirmed by microscopy both on fresh preparations and after calcofluor white staining. However, in the presence of peroxidase systems (lactoperoxidase with substrates such as hydrogen peroxide donor, iodide, or thiocyanate, Candida growth in both planktonic and attached phases appeared to be inhibited. Moreover, this study demonstrates the possible partition of peroxidase systems between titanium material (peroxidase-precoated and liquid environment (containing peroxidase substrates to limit C. albicans biofilm formation.Keywords: adhesion, material, oral, yeast

  20. Hydride redistribution and crack growth in Zr-2.5 wt.% Nb stressed in torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puls, M.P.; Rogowski, A.J.

    1980-11-01

    The effect of applied shear stresses on zirconium hydride solubility in a zirconium alloy was investigated. Recent studies have shown that zirconium hydride precipiates probably nucleate and grow by means of a shear transformation mechanism. It is postulated that these transformation shear strains can interact with applied shear stress gradients in the same way that the dilatational strains can interact with a dilatational stress gradient, providing a driving force for hydride accumulation, hydride embrittlement and crack propagation. To test this proposition, crack growth experiments were carried out under torsional loading conditions on hydrided, round notched bar specimens of cold-worked Zr-2.5 wt.% Nb cut from Pickering-type pressure tube material. Postmortem metallographic examination of the hydride distribution in these samples showed that, in many cases, the hydrides appeared to have reoriented in response to the applied shear stress and that hydride accumulation at the notch tip had occurred. However, except in a few cases, the rate of accumulation of reoriented hydrides at the notch tip due to applied shear stresses was much less than the rate due to corresponding applied uniaxial stresss. Moreover, the process in shear appears to be more sensitive to the inital hydride size. Attempts to elucidate the fracture mechanism by fractographic examination using scanning and replica transmission electron microscopy proved to be inconclusive because of smearing of the fracture face. (auth)