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Sample records for tissue sections prepared

  1. Improved resolution by mounting of tissue sections for laser microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, M C R F; Rombout, P D M; Dijkman, H B P M; Ruiter, D J; Bernsen, M R

    2003-08-01

    Laser microbeam microdissection has greatly facilitated the procurement of specific cell populations from tissue sections. However, the fact that a coverslip is not used means that the morphology of the tissue sections is often poor. To develop a mounting method that greatly improves the morphological quality of tissue sections for laser microbeam microdissection purposes so that the identification of target cells can be facilitated. Fresh frozen tissue and formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue specimens were used to test the morphological quality of mounted and unmounted tissue. The mounting solution consisted of an adhesive gum and blue ink diluted in water. Interference of the mounting solution with DNA quality was analysed by the polymerase chain reaction using 10-2000 cells isolated by microdissection from mounted and unmounted tissue. The mounting solution greatly improved the morphology of tissue sections for laser microdissection purposes and had no detrimental effects on the isolation and efficiency of amplification of DNA. One disadvantage was that the mounting solution reduced the cutting efficiency of the ultraviolet laser. To minimise this effect, the mounting solution should be diluted as much as possible. Furthermore, the addition of blue ink to the mounting medium restores the cutting efficiency of the laser. The mounting solution is easy to prepare and apply and can be combined with various staining methods without compromising the quality of the DNA extracted.

  2. Tissue culture of surgically prepared temporalis fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walby, A P; Kerr, A G; Nevin, N C; Woods, G

    1982-10-01

    Temporalis fascia which is used to graft the tympanic membrane has been shown to be viable in tissue culture by a previous pilot study. This present study reports the effect on the viability of the fascia by scraping loose connective tissue from it and allowing it to dry. Pieces of fascia from 30 patients were each divided in 4 and prepared to give explants, fresh, fresh and scraped, dried, and dried and scraped. The fascia grew from 17 patients when cultured fresh, 5 when fresh and scraped, 1 when dried, and none when dried and scraped. These results are significantly different and show that the fascia is devitilized when prepared by the normal method for use in tympanoplasty.

  3. Glycomic profiling of tissue sections by LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yunli; Zhou, Shiyue; Khalil, Sarah I; Renteria, Calvin L; Mechref, Yehia

    2013-04-16

    Because routine preparation of glycan samples involves multiple reaction and cleaning steps at which sample loss occurs, glycan analysis is typically performed using large tissue samples. This type of analysis yields no detailed molecular spatial information and requires special care to maintain proper storage and shipping conditions. We describe here a new glycan sample preparation protocol using minimized sample preparation steps and optimized procedures. Tissue sections and spotted samples first undergo on-surface enzymatic digestion to release N-glycans. The released glycans are then reduced and permethylated prior to online purification and LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS analysis. The efficiency of this protocol was initially evaluated using model glycoproteins and human blood serum (HBS) spotted on glass or Teflon slides. The new protocol permitted the detection of permethylated N-glycans derived from 10 ng RNase B. On the other hand, 66 N-glycans were identified when injecting the equivalent of permethylated glycans derived from a 0.1-μL aliquot of HBS. On-tissue enzymatic digestion of nude mouse brain tissue permitted the detection of 43 N-glycans. The relative peak areas of these 43 glycans were comparable to those from a C57BL/6 mouse reported by the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG). However, the sample size analyzed in the protocol described here was substantially smaller than for the routine method (submicrogram vs mg). The on-tissue N-glycan profiling method permits high sensitivity and reproducibility and can be widely applied to assess the spatial distribution of glycans associated with tissue sections, and may be correlated with immunoflourescence imaging when adjacent tissue sections are analyzed.

  4. Preparation of tissue samples for X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chwiej, Joanna; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena; Lankosz, Marek; Wojcik, Slawomir; Falkenberg, Gerald; Stegowski, Zdzislaw; Setkowicz, Zuzanna

    2005-01-01

    As is well-known, trace elements, especially metals, play an important role in the pathogenesis of many disorders. The topographic and quantitative elemental analysis of pathologically changed tissues may shed some new light on processes leading to the degeneration of cells in the case of selected diseases. An ideal and powerful tool for such purpose is the Synchrotron Microbeam X-ray Fluorescence technique. It enables the carrying out of investigations of the elemental composition of tissues even at the single cell level. The tissue samples for histopathological investigations are routinely fixed and embedded in paraffin. The authors try to verify the usefulness of such prepared tissue sections for elemental analysis with the use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Studies were performed on rat brain samples. Changes in elemental composition caused by fixation in formalin or paraformaldehyde and embedding in paraffin were examined. Measurements were carried out at the bending magnet beamline L of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB in Hamburg. The decrease in mass per unit area of K, Br and the increase in P, S, Fe, Cu and Zn in the tissue were observed as a result of the fixation. For the samples embedded in paraffin, a lower level of most elements was observed. Additionally, for these samples, changes in the composition of some elements were not uniform for different analyzed areas of rat brain

  5. Preparation of tissue samples for X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwiej, Joanna [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: jchwiej@novell.ftj.agh.edu.pl; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Lankosz, Marek [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Wojcik, Slawomir [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Falkenberg, Gerald [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestr. 85, Hamburg (Germany); Stegowski, Zdzislaw [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Setkowicz, Zuzanna [Department of Neuroanatomy, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 6, 30-060 Cracow (Poland)

    2005-12-15

    As is well-known, trace elements, especially metals, play an important role in the pathogenesis of many disorders. The topographic and quantitative elemental analysis of pathologically changed tissues may shed some new light on processes leading to the degeneration of cells in the case of selected diseases. An ideal and powerful tool for such purpose is the Synchrotron Microbeam X-ray Fluorescence technique. It enables the carrying out of investigations of the elemental composition of tissues even at the single cell level. The tissue samples for histopathological investigations are routinely fixed and embedded in paraffin. The authors try to verify the usefulness of such prepared tissue sections for elemental analysis with the use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Studies were performed on rat brain samples. Changes in elemental composition caused by fixation in formalin or paraformaldehyde and embedding in paraffin were examined. Measurements were carried out at the bending magnet beamline L of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB in Hamburg. The decrease in mass per unit area of K, Br and the increase in P, S, Fe, Cu and Zn in the tissue were observed as a result of the fixation. For the samples embedded in paraffin, a lower level of most elements was observed. Additionally, for these samples, changes in the composition of some elements were not uniform for different analyzed areas of rat brain.

  6. Cardiac tissue slices: preparation, handling, and successful optical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ken; Lee, Peter; Mirams, Gary R; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Borg, Thomas K; Gavaghan, David J; Kohl, Peter; Bollensdorff, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac tissue slices are becoming increasingly popular as a model system for cardiac electrophysiology and pharmacology research and development. Here, we describe in detail the preparation, handling, and optical mapping of transmembrane potential and intracellular free calcium concentration transients (CaT) in ventricular tissue slices from guinea pigs and rabbits. Slices cut in the epicardium-tangential plane contained well-aligned in-slice myocardial cell strands ("fibers") in subepicardial and midmyocardial sections. Cut with a high-precision slow-advancing microtome at a thickness of 350 to 400 μm, tissue slices preserved essential action potential (AP) properties of the precutting Langendorff-perfused heart. We identified the need for a postcutting recovery period of 36 min (guinea pig) and 63 min (rabbit) to reach 97.5% of final steady-state values for AP duration (APD) (identified by exponential fitting). There was no significant difference between the postcutting recovery dynamics in slices obtained using 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime or blebistatin as electromechanical uncouplers during the cutting process. A rapid increase in APD, seen after cutting, was caused by exposure to ice-cold solution during the slicing procedure, not by tissue injury, differences in uncouplers, or pH-buffers (bicarbonate; HEPES). To characterize intrinsic patterns of CaT, AP, and conduction, a combination of multipoint and field stimulation should be used to avoid misinterpretation based on source-sink effects. In summary, we describe in detail the preparation, mapping, and data analysis approaches for reproducible cardiac tissue slice-based investigations into AP and CaT dynamics. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Imaging of tissue sections with very slow electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, L., E-mail: ludek@isibrno.cz [Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Nebesářová, J.; Vancová, M. [Biology Centre AS CR, v.v.i., Branišovská 31, 37005 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Paták, A.; Müllerová, I. [Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    The examination of thin sections of tissues with electron microscopes is an indispensable tool. Being composed of light elements, samples of living matter illuminated with electrons at the usual high energies of tens or even hundreds of kiloelectronvolts provide very low image contrasts in transmission or scanning transmission electron microscopes. Therefore, heavy metal salts are added to the specimen during preparation procedures (post-fixation with osmium tetroxide or staining). However, these procedures can modify or obscure the ultrastructural details of cells. Here we show that the energy of electrons used for the scanned transmission imaging of tissue sections can be reduced to mere hundreds or even tens of electronvolts and can produce extremely high contrast even for samples free of any metal salts. We found that when biasing a sufficiently thin tissue section sample to a high negative potential in a scanning transmission electron microscope, thereby reducing the energy of the electrons landing on the sample, and collecting the transmitted electrons with a grounded detector, we obtain a high contrast revealing structure details not enhanced by heavy atoms. Moreover, bombardment with slow electrons sensitively depolymerises the resin in which the tissue is embedded, thereby enhancing the transmitted signal with no observable loss of structure details. The use of low-energy electrons requires ultrathin sections of a thickness of less than 10 nm, but their preparation is now possible. Ultralow energy STEM provides a tool enabling the observation of very thin biological samples without any staining. This method should also be advantageous for examination of 2D crystals, thin films of polymers, polymer blends, etc. - Highlights: • Sections of a thickness below 10 nm were imaged in STEM at hundreds and tens of eV. • Image contrast grows steeply with decreasing electron energy in the STEM. • Very slow electrons provide high contrast for samples free of

  8. Improved resolution by mounting of tissue sections for laser microdissection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M.C.R.F. van; Rombout, P.D.M.; Dijkman, H.B.P.M.; Ruiter, D.J.; Bernsen, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laser microbeam microdissection has greatly facilitated the procurement of specific cell populations from tissue sections. However, the fact that a coverslip is not used means that the morphology of the tissue sections is often poor. AIMS: To develop a mounting method that greatly

  9. Rapid in vivo vertical tissue sectioning by multiphoton tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten

    2018-02-01

    A conventional tool in the pathological field is histology which involves the analysis of thin sections of tissue in which specific cellular structures are stained with different dyes. The process to obtain these stained tissue sections is time consuming and invasive as it requires tissue removal, fixation, sectioning, and staining. Moreover, imaging of live tissue is not possible. We demonstrate that multiphoton tomography can provide within seconds, non-invasive, label-free, vertical images of live tissue which are in quality similar to conventional light micrographs of histologic stained specimen. In contrast to conventional setups based on laser scanning which image horizontally sections, the vertical in vivo images are directly recorded by combined line scanning and timed adjustments of the height of the focusing optics. In addition, multiphoton tomography provides autofluorescence lifetimes which can be used to determine the metabolic states of cells.

  10. Sample Preparation of Corn Seed Tissue to Prevent Analyte Relocations for Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Jeongkwon; Lee, Young Jin; Lee, Tae Geol; Yoon, Sohee

    2017-08-01

    Corn seed tissue sections were prepared by the tape support method using an adhesive tape, and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was performed. The effect of heat generated during sample preparation was investigated by time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging of corn seed tissue prepared by the tape support and the thaw-mounted methods. Unlike thaw-mounted sample preparation, the tape support method does not cause imaging distortion because of the absence of heat, which can cause migration of the analytes on the sample. By applying the tape-support method, the corn seed tissue was prepared without structural damage and MSI with accurate spatial information of analytes was successfully performed. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Sample Preparation of Corn Seed Tissue to Prevent Analyte Relocations for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Jeongkwon; Lee, Young Jin; Lee, Tae Geol; Yoon, Sohee

    2017-08-01

    Corn seed tissue sections were prepared by the tape support method using an adhesive tape, and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was performed. The effect of heat generated during sample preparation was investigated by time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging of corn seed tissue prepared by the tape support and the thaw-mounted methods. Unlike thaw-mounted sample preparation, the tape support method does not cause imaging distortion because of the absence of heat, which can cause migration of the analytes on the sample. By applying the tape-support method, the corn seed tissue was prepared without structural damage and MSI with accurate spatial information of analytes was successfully performed.

  12. Aspects of Quantitation in Mass Spectrometry Imaging Investigated on Cryo-Sections of Spiked Tissue Homogenates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heidi Toft; Janfelt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    for differences in tissue types in, for example, whole-body imaging, a set of tissue homogenates of different tissue types (lung, liver, kidney, heart, and brain) from rabbit was spiked to the same concentration with the drug amitriptyline and imaged in the same experiment using isotope labeled amitriptyline...... for these results range approximately within a factor of 3 (but for other compounds in other tissues could be higher), underscore the importance of preparing the standard curve in the same matrix as the unknown sample whenever possible. In, for example, whole-body imaging where a diversity of tissue types...... are present, this variation across tissue types will therefore add to the overall uncertainty in quantitation. The tissue homogenates were also used in a characterization of various phenomena in quantitative MSI, such as to study how the signal depends of the thickness of the cryo-section, and to assess...

  13. Preparation and Observation of Fresh-frozen Sections of the Green Fluorescent Protein Transgenic Mouse Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Masahito; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Kato, Ichiro; Hiraga, Koichi; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Demura, Makoto; Mori, Yoshihiro; Shinoda, Hiroyuki; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Kawano, Keiichi

    2006-01-01

    Hard tissue decalcification can cause variation in the constituent protein characteristics. This paper describes a method of preparating of frozen mouse head sections so as to clearly observe the nature of the constituent proteins. Frozen sections of various green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mouse heads were prepared using the film method developed by Kawamoto and Shimizu. This method made specimen dissection without decalcification possible, wherein GFP was clearly observed in an undamaged state. Conversely, using the same method with decalcification made GFP observation in the transgenic mouse head difficult. This new method is suitable for observing GFP marked cells, enabling us to follow the transplanted GFP marked cells within frozen head sections

  14. Evaporation process in histological tissue sections for neutron autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espector, Natalia M; Portu, Agustina; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A; Saint Martin, Gisela

    2018-05-01

    The analysis of the distribution and density of nuclear tracks forming an autoradiography in a nuclear track detector (NTD) allows the determination of 10 B atoms concentration and location in tissue samples from Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) protocols. This knowledge is of great importance for BNCT dosimetry and treatment planning. Tissue sections studied with this technique are obtained by cryosectioning frozen tissue specimens. After the slicing procedure, the tissue section is put on the NTD and the sample starts drying. The thickness varies from its original value allowing more particles to reach the detector and, as the mass of the sample decreases, the boron concentration in the sample increases. So in order to determine the concentration present in the hydrated tissue, the application of corrective coefficients is required. Evaporation mechanisms as well as various factors that could affect the process of mass variation are outlined in this work. Mass evolution for tissue samples coming from BDIX rats was registered with a semimicro analytical scale and measurements were analyzed with software developed to that end. Ambient conditions were simultaneously recorded, obtaining reproducible evaporation curves. Mathematical models found in the literature were applied for the first time to this type of samples and the best fit of the experimental data was determined. The correlation coefficients and the variability of the parameters were evaluated, pointing to Page's model as the one that best represented the evaporation curves. These studies will contribute to a more precise assessment of boron concentration in tissue samples by the Neutron Autoradiography technique.

  15. Preparation of next generation set of group cross sections. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kunio

    2002-03-01

    This fiscal year, based on the examination result about the evaluation energy range of heavy element unresolved resonance cross sections, the upper energy limit of the energy range, where ultra-fine group cross sections are produced, was raised to 50 keV, and an improvement of the group cross section processing system was promoted. At the same time, reflecting the result of studies carried out till now, a function producing delayed neutron data was added to the general-purpose group cross section processing system , thus the preparation of general purpose group cross section processing system has been completed. On the other hand, the energy structure, data constitution and data contents of next generation group cross section set were determined, and the specification of a 151 groups next generation group cross section set was defined. Based on the above specification, a concrete library format of the next generation cross section set has been determined. After having carried out the above-described work, using the general-purpose group cross section processing system , which was complete in this study, with use of the JENDL-3. 2 evaluated nuclear data, the 151 groups next generation group cross section of 92 nuclides and the ultra fine group resonance cross section library for 29 nuclides have been prepared. Utilizing the 151 groups next generation group cross section set and the ultra-fine group resonance cross-section library, a bench mark test calculation of fast reactors has been performed by using an advanced lattice calculation code. It was confirmed, by comparing the calculation result with a calculation result of continuous energy Monte Carlo code, that the 151 groups next generation cross section set has sufficient accuracy. (author)

  16. Raman molecular imaging of brain frozen tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Rachel E; Auner, Gregory W; Rosenblum, Mark L; Mikkelsen, Tom; Yurgelevic, Sally M; Raghunathan, Aditya; Poisson, Laila M; Kalkanis, Steven N

    2014-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides a molecular signature of the region being studied. It is ideal for neurosurgical applications because it is non-destructive, label-free, not impacted by water concentration, and can map an entire region of tissue. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the meaningful spatial molecular information provided by Raman spectroscopy for identification of regions of normal brain, necrosis, diffusely infiltrating glioma and solid glioblastoma (GBM). Five frozen section tissues (1 normal, 1 necrotic, 1 GBM, and 2 infiltrating glioma) were mapped in their entirety using a 300-µm-square step size. Smaller regions of interest were also mapped using a 25-µm step size. The relative concentrations of relevant biomolecules were mapped across all tissues and compared with adjacent hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, allowing identification of normal, GBM, and necrotic regions. Raman peaks and peak ratios mapped included 1003, 1313, 1431, 1585, and 1659 cm(-1). Tissue maps identified boundaries of grey and white matter, necrosis, GBM, and infiltrating tumor. Complementary information, including relative concentration of lipids, protein, nucleic acid, and hemoglobin, was presented in a manner which can be easily adapted for in vivo tissue mapping. Raman spectroscopy can successfully provide label-free imaging of tissue characteristics with high accuracy. It can be translated to a surgical or laboratory tool for rapid, non-destructive imaging of tumor margins.

  17. New methods for multimodal MS imaging of histological tissue sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amstalden Van Hove, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    The insights derived from spatial localization of molecules in tissue sections are of great value for understanding and treating cancer and other diseases. These insights can relate to molecules linked to a disease as well as to drug molecules distributed across organs of interest. Mass spectrometry

  18. Imaging of tissue sections with very slow electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Nebesářová, Jana; Vancová, Marie; Paták, Aleš; Müllerová, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 148, JAN 2015 (2015), s. 146-150 ISSN 0304-3991 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : Biological STEM * Ultralow energy STEM * Tissue sections * Cathode lens * Depolymerisation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.874, year: 2015

  19. STEM mode in the SEM for the analysis of cellular sections prepared by ultramicrotome sectioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondow, N; Harrington, J; Brydson, R; Brown, A

    2012-01-01

    The use of the dual imaging capabilities of a scanning electron microscope fitted with a transmitted electron detector is highlighted in the analysis of samples with importance in the field of nanotoxicology. Cellular uptake of nanomaterials is often examined by transmission electron microscopy of thin sections prepared by ultramicrotome sectioning. Examination by SEM allows for the detection of artefacts caused by sample preparation (eg. nanomaterial pull-out) and the complementary STEM mode permits study of the interaction between nanomaterials and cells. Thin sections of two nanomaterials of importance in nanotoxicology (cadmium selenide quantum dots and single walled carbon nanotubes) are examined using STEM mode in the SEM.

  20. Aspects of Quantitation in Mass Spectrometry Imaging Investigated on Cryo-Sections of Spiked Tissue Homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Heidi Toft; Janfelt, Christian

    2016-12-06

    Internal standards have been introduced in quantitative mass spectrometry imaging in order to compensate for differences in intensities throughout an image caused by, for example, difference in ion suppression or analyte extraction efficiency. To test how well the internal standards compensate for differences in tissue types in, for example, whole-body imaging, a set of tissue homogenates of different tissue types (lung, liver, kidney, heart, and brain) from rabbit was spiked to the same concentration with the drug amitriptyline and imaged in the same experiment using isotope labeled amitriptyline as internal standard. The results showed, even after correction with internal standard, significantly lower intensities from brain and to some extent also lung tissue, differences which may be ascribed to binding of the drug to proteins or lipids as known from traditional bioanalysis. The differences, which for these results range approximately within a factor of 3 (but for other compounds in other tissues could be higher), underscore the importance of preparing the standard curve in the same matrix as the unknown sample whenever possible. In, for example, whole-body imaging where a diversity of tissue types are present, this variation across tissue types will therefore add to the overall uncertainty in quantitation. The tissue homogenates were also used in a characterization of various phenomena in quantitative MSI, such as to study how the signal depends of the thickness of the cryo-section, and to assess the accuracy of calibration by droplet deposition. For experiments on liver tissue, calibration by spiked tissue homogenates and droplet deposition was found to provide highly similar results and in both cases linearity with R 2 values of 0.99. In the process, a new method was developed for preparation of standard curves of spiked tissue homogenates, based on the drilling of holes in a block of frozen liver homogenate, providing easy cryo-slicing and good quantitative

  1. Grinding and polishing instead of sectioning for the tissue samples with a graft: Implications for light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A; Sevostyanova, Victoria V; Shishkova, Daria K; Nokhrin, Andrey V; Sidorova, Olga D; Kutikhin, Anton G

    2016-06-01

    A broad use of the graft replacement requires a detailed investigation of the host-graft interaction, including both histological examination and electron microscopy. A high quality sectioning of the host tissue with a graft seems to be complicated; in addition, it is difficult to examine the same tissue area by both of the mentioned microscopy techniques. To solve these problems, we developed a new technique of epoxy resin embedding with the further grinding, polishing, and staining. Graft-containing tissues prepared by grinding and polishing preserved their structure; however, sectioning frequently required the explantation of the graft and led to tissue disintegration. Moreover, stained samples prepared by grinding and polishing may then be assessed by both light microscopy and backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, grinding and polishing outperform sectioning when applied to the tissues with a graft. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of substrate choice and tissue type on tissue preparation for spectral histopathology by Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullwood, Leanne M; Griffiths, Dave; Ashton, Katherine; Dawson, Timothy; Lea, Robert W; Davis, Charles; Bonnier, Franck; Byrne, Hugh J; Baker, Matthew J

    2014-01-21

    Raman spectroscopy is a non-destructive, non-invasive, rapid and economical technique which has the potential to be an excellent method for the diagnosis of cancer and understanding disease progression through retrospective studies of archived tissue samples. Historically, biobanks are generally comprised of formalin fixed paraffin preserved tissue and as a result these specimens are often used in spectroscopic research. Tissue in this state has to be dewaxed prior to Raman analysis to reduce paraffin contributions in the spectra. However, although the procedures are derived from histopathological clinical practice, the efficacy of the dewaxing procedures that are currently employed is questionable. Ineffective removal of paraffin results in corruption of the spectra and previous experiments have shown that the efficacy can depend on the dewaxing medium and processing time. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of commonly used spectroscopic substrates (CaF2, Spectrosil quartz and low-E slides) and the influence of different histological tissue types (normal, cancerous and metastatic) on tissue preparation and to assess their use for spectral histopathology. Results show that CaF2 followed by Spectrosil contribute the least to the spectral background. However, both substrates retain paraffin after dewaxing. Low-E substrates, which exhibit the most intense spectral background, do not retain wax and resulting spectra are not affected by paraffin peaks. We also show a disparity in paraffin retention depending upon the histological identity of the tissue with abnormal tissue retaining more paraffin than normal.

  3. Preparation of higher-actinide burnup and cross section samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, H.L.; Kobisk, E.H.; Quinby, T.C.; Thomas, D.K.; Dailey, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    A joint research program involving the United States and the United Kingdom was instigated about four years ago for the purpose of studying burnup of higher actinides using in-core irradiation in the fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Simultaneously, determination of cross sections of a wide variety of higher actinide isotopes was proposed. Coincidental neutron flux and energy spectral measurements were to be made using vanadium encapsulated dosimetry materials in the immediate region of the burnup and cross section samples. The higher actinide samples chosen for the burnup study were 241 Am and 244 Cm in the forms of Am 2 O 3 , Cm 2 O 3 , and Am 6 Cm(RE) 7 O 21 , where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanide sesquioxides. It is the purpose of this paper to describe technology development and its application in the preparation of the fuel specimens and the cross section specimens that are being used in this cooperative program

  4. Preparation of Laponite Bioceramics for Potential Bone Tissue Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Ju, Yaping; Li, Jipeng; Zhang, Yongxing; Li, Jinhua; Liu, Xuanyong; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    We report a facile approach to preparing laponite (LAP) bioceramics via sintering LAP powder compacts for bone tissue engineering applications. The sintering behavior and mechanical properties of LAP compacts under different temperatures, heating rates, and soaking times were investigated. We show that LAP bioceramic with a smooth and porous surface can be formed at 800°C with a heating rate of 5°C/h for 6 h under air. The formed LAP bioceramic was systematically characterized via different methods. Our results reveal that the LAP bioceramic possesses an excellent surface hydrophilicity and serum absorption capacity, and good cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility as demonstrated by resazurin reduction assay of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) and hemolytic assay of pig red blood cells, respectively. The potential bone tissue engineering applicability of LAP bioceramic was explored by studying the surface mineralization behavior via soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF), as well as the surface cellular response of rMSCs. Our results suggest that LAP bioceramic is able to induce hydroxyapatite deposition on its surface when soaked in SBF and rMSCs can proliferate well on the LAP bioceramic surface. Most strikingly, alkaline phosphatase activity together with alizarin red staining results reveal that the produced LAP bioceramic is able to induce osteoblast differentiation of rMSCs in growth medium without any inducing factors. Finally, in vivo animal implantation, acute systemic toxicity test and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-staining data demonstrate that the prepared LAP bioceramic displays an excellent biosafety and is able to heal the bone defect. Findings from this study suggest that the developed LAP bioceramic holds a great promise for treating bone defects in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24955961

  5. DNA Measurement of Overlapping Cell Nuclei in Thick Tissue Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ji

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an improved image analysis procedure for measuring the DNA content of cell nuclei in thick sections of liver tissue by absorption densitometry. Whereas previous methods only permitted the analysis of isolated nuclei, the new technique enables both isolated and overlapping nuclei to be measured. A 3D segmentation procedure determines whether each object is an isolated nucleus or a pair of overlapping nuclei; in the latter case the combined optical density is redistributed to the individual nuclei. A selection procedure ensures that only complete nuclei are measured.

  6. Sample preparation procedure for PIXE elemental analysis on soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubica, B.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Dutkiewicz, E.M.; Lekka, M.

    1997-01-01

    Trace element analysis is one of the most important field in analytical chemistry. There are several instrumental techniques which are applied for determinations of microscopic elemental content. The PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) technique is one of the nuclear techniques that is commonly applied for such purpose due to its multielemental analysis possibilities. The aim of this study was to establish the optimal conditions for target preparation procedure. In this paper two different approaches to the topic are presented and widely discussed. The first approach was the traditional pellet technique and the second one was mineralization procedure. For the analysis soft tissue such as liver was used. Some results are also presented on water samples. (author)

  7. Preparation of hybrid biomaterials for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Conceição Costa

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering has evolved from the use of biomaterials for bone substitution that fulfill the clinical demands of biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-immunogeneity, structural strength and porosity. Porous scaffolds have been developed in many forms and materials, but few reached the need of adequate physical, biological and mechanical properties. In the present paper we report the preparation of hybrid porous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/bioactive glass through the sol-gel route, using partially and fully hydrolyzed polyvinyl alcohol, and perform structural characterization. Hybrids containing PVA and bioactive glass with composition 58SiO2-33CaO-9P2O5 were synthesized by foaming a mixture of polymer solution and bioactive glass sol-gel precursor solution. Sol-gel solution was prepared from mixing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS, triethylphosphate (TEP, and calcium chloride as chemical precursors. The hybrid composites obtained after aging and drying at low temperature were chemically and morphologically characterized through infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The degree of hydrolysis of PVA, concentration of PVA solution and different PVA-bioglass composition ratios affect the synthesis procedure. Synthesis parameters must be very well combined in order to allow foaming and gelation. The hybrid scaffolds obtained exhibited macroporous structure with pore size varying from 50 to 600 µm.

  8. Chitosan-Based Matrices Prepared by Gamma Irradiation for Tissue Regeneration: Structural Properties vs. Preparation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimiro, Maria Helena; Lancastre, Joana J H; Rodrigues, Alexandra P; Gomes, Susana R; Rodrigues, Gabriela; Ferreira, Luís M

    2017-02-01

    In the last decade, new generations of biopolymer-based materials have attracted attention, aiming its application as scaffolds for tissue engineering. These engineered three-dimensional scaffolds are designed to improve or replace damaged, missing, or otherwise compromised tissues or organs. Despite the number of promising methods that can be used to generate 3D cell-instructive matrices, the innovative nature of the present work relies on the application of ionizing radiation technology to form and modify surfaces and matrices with advantage over more conventional technologies (room temperature reaction, absence of harmful initiators or solvents, high penetration through the bulk materials, etc.), and the possibility of preparation and sterilization in one single step. The current chapter summarizes the work done by the authors in the gamma radiation processing of biocompatible and biodegradable chitosan-based matrices for skin regeneration. Particular attention is given to the correlation between the different preparation conditions and the final polymeric matrices' properties. We therefore expect to demonstrate that instructive matrices produced and improved by radiation technology bring to the field of skin regenerative medicine a supplemental advantage over more conservative techniques.

  9. Direct molecular analysis of whole-body animal tissue sections by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyzer, Michelle L; Chaurand, Pierre; Angel, Peggi M; Caprioli, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    The determination of the localization of various compounds in a whole animal is valuable for many applications, including pharmaceutical absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) studies and biomarker discovery. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for localizing compounds of biological interest with molecular specificity and relatively high resolution. Utilizing imaging mass spectrometry for whole-body animal sections offers considerable analytical advantages compared to traditional methods, such as whole-body autoradiography, but the experiment is not straightforward. This chapter addresses the advantages and unique challenges that the application of imaging mass spectrometry to whole-body animal sections entails, including discussions of sample preparation, matrix application, signal normalization, and image generation. Lipid and protein images obtained from whole-body tissue sections of mouse pups are presented along with detailed protocols for the experiments.

  10. Preparation of TEM specimen by cross-section technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Shozo

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is applied to the direct observation of the depth dependent damage structure in ion-irradiated stainless steel by using the cross-section technique; obtaining the TEM specimen from a slice of the irradiated stainless steel with thick Ni plating. Here has been developed the specimen preparation method of cross-section technique without heat treatment, which was necessary in the conventional method to strengthen the bonding between Ni and stainless steel. Nickel plating with good bonding to stainless steel is enabled by the following manner. First, the irradiated stainless steel is immersed in the Wood's nickel solution at room temperature for 60s to activate the surface, followed by the stricking for 300s at a current density of 300 A/m 2 in the solution to make fine and homogeneous nucleation of Ni on the stainless steel. Then, the sample is plated with Ni in the Watt's nickel plating solution at 333 K with current density of 900 ∼ 1,000 A/m 2 . The TEM disc is obtained by mechanical slicing from the specimen with Ni plating of more than 3 mm thickness. Electropolishing is accomplished by using both Ballmann method and jet electropolishing to perforate the disc accurately at the aimed point for the observation of the damage structure. (author)

  11. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  12. Preparation of A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saion, E.B.; Shaari, A.H.; Watt, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic is widely used as a wall material for tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCS) used in experimental microdosimetry. The objective of this note is to give a technical account of how A-150 TE plastic film can be fabricated in the laboratory from commercially available A-150 TE plastic. (author)

  13. Tissue microarrays and their use for preparation of reference slides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Use of Tissue array was first applied in 1998, and has received a significant amount of attention from the research community ever since. In this technique, a large number (up to 1000) of cylindrical tissue core extracted from \\"donor\\" paraffin block are deposited into \\"recipient\\" block. The aim was modification of the ...

  14. 76 FR 63574 - Tax Return Preparer Penalties Under Section 6695; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Tax Return Preparer Penalties Under Section 6695; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... to the tax return preparer penalties under section 6695 of the Internal Revenue Code. The proposed regulations are necessary to monitor and to improve compliance with the tax return preparer due to diligence...

  15. A simplified procedure for preparation of undecalcified human bone sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, J A; Tkocz, I; Levinsen, J

    1985-01-01

    -type diamond cut-off wheel and a slowly advancing table carrying the specimen held in a rotating mount. Sections may be cut at a thickness of 80 micron +/- 1%. After cleaning in an ultrasonic bath, these can be mounted on slides for quantitative microscopic examination with transmitted light. Grinding...

  16. Structural characterization of pharmaceutical heparins prepared from different animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li; Li, Guoyun; Yang, Bo; Onishi, Akihiro; Li, Lingyun; Sun, Peilong; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    Although most pharmaceutical heparin used today is obtained from porcine intestine, heparin has historically been prepared from bovine lung and ovine intestine. There is some regulatory concern about establishing the species origin of heparin. This concern began with the outbreak of mad cow disease in the 1990s and was exacerbated during the heparin shortage in the 2000s and the heparin contamination crisis of 2007-2008. Three heparins from porcine, ovine, and bovine were characterized through state-of-the-art carbohydrate analysis methods with a view profiling their physicochemical properties. Differences in molecular weight, monosaccharide and disaccharide composition, oligosaccharide sequence, and antithrombin III-binding affinity were observed. These data provide some insight into the variability of heparins obtained from these three species and suggest some analytical approaches that may be useful in confirming the species origin of a heparin active pharmaceutical ingredient. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [PREPARATION OF HUMAN TISSUE PROTEIN EXTRACTS ENRICHED WITH THE SPHINGOMYELIN SYNTHASE 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarkina, O Yu; Dergunova, L V

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SMS 1) catalyzes sphingomyelin biosynthesis in eukaryotic cells. We previously studied the structure of the human SGMS1 gene, which encodes the enzyme and its numerous transcripts. The tissue-specific expression of the transcripts was also described. Analysis of the SMS1 protein expression in human tissues using immunoblotting of tissue extracts prepared in the RIPA (Radio Immuno-Precipitation Assay) buffer revealed a weak signal in renal cortex, testis, lung, and no signal in placenta and lymphatic node. In this work, a new method of preparation of the tissue protein extracts enriched with SMS1 was suggested. The method based on the consecutive extraction with a buffer containing 0.05 and 1 mg/ml of the Quillaja saponaria saponin allowed SMS1 to be detected in all tissues tested. The SMS1 content in the saponin extract of kidney cortex is about 12-fold higher compared to the RIPA extraction procedure.

  18. Raman spectroscopic analysis of human skin tissue sections ex-vivo: evaluation of the effects of tissue processing and dewaxing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed M.; Bonnier, Franck; Tfayli, Ali; Lambkin, Helen; Flynn, Kathleen; McDonagh, Vincent; Healy, Claragh; Clive Lee, T.; Lyng, Fiona M.; Byrne, Hugh J.

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy coupled with K-means clustering analysis (KMCA) is employed to elucidate the biochemical structure of human skin tissue sections and the effects of tissue processing. Both hand and thigh sections of human cadavers were analyzed in their unprocessed and formalin-fixed, paraffin-processed (FFPP), and subsequently dewaxed forms. In unprocessed sections, KMCA reveals clear differentiation of the stratum corneum (SC), intermediate underlying epithelium, and dermal layers for sections from both anatomical sites. The SC is seen to be relatively rich in lipidic content; the spectrum of the subjacent layers is strongly influenced by the presence of melanin, while that of the dermis is dominated by the characteristics of collagen. For a given anatomical site, little difference in layer structure and biochemistry is observed between samples from different cadavers. However, the hand and thigh sections are consistently differentiated for all cadavers, largely based on lipidic profiles. In dewaxed FFPP samples, while the SC, intermediate, and dermal layers are clearly differentiated by KMCA of Raman maps of tissue sections, the lipidic contributions to the spectra are significantly reduced, with the result that respective skin layers from different anatomical sites become indistinguishable. While efficient at removing the fixing wax, the tissue processing also efficiently removes the structurally similar lipidic components of the skin layers. In studies of dermatological processes in which lipids play an important role, such as wound healing, dewaxed samples are therefore not appropriate. Removal of the lipids does however accentuate the spectral features of the cellular and protein components, which may be more appropriate for retrospective analysis of disease progression and biochemical analysis using tissue banks.

  19. GeLC-MS: A Sample Preparation Method for Proteomics Analysis of Minimal Amount of Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makridakis, Manousos; Vlahou, Antonia

    2017-10-10

    Application of various proteomics methodologies have been implemented for the global and targeted proteome analysis of many different types of biological samples such as tissue, urine, plasma, serum, blood, and cell lines. Among the aforementioned biological samples, tissue has an exceptional role into clinical research and practice. Disease initiation and progression is usually located at the tissue level of different organs, making the analysis of this material very important for the understanding of the disease pathophysiology. Despite the significant advances in the mass spectrometry instrumentation, tissue proteomics still faces several challenges mainly due to increased sample complexity and heterogeneity. However, the most prominent challenge is attributed to the invasive procedure of tissue sampling which restricts the availability of fresh frozen tissue to minimal amounts and limited number of samples. Application of GeLC-MS sample preparation protocol for tissue proteomics analysis can greatly facilitate making up for these difficulties. In this chapter, a step by step guide for the proteomics analysis of minute amounts of tissue samples using the GeLC-MS sample preparation protocol, as applied by our group in the analysis of multiple different types of tissues (vessels, kidney, bladder, prostate, heart) is provided.

  20. Research on terahertz properties of rat brain tissue sections during dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Gangqiang; Liang, Jianfeng; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhao, Xianghui; Chang, Chao

    2018-01-01

    Biological tissue sections are always kept in a system purged with dry nitrogen for the measurement of terahertz spectrum. However, the injected nitrogen will cause dehydration of tissue sections, which will affect the accuracy of spectrum measurement. In this paper, terahertz time-domain spectrometer is used to measure the terahertz spectra of rat brain tissue sections during dehydration. The changes of terahertz properties, including terahertz transmittance, refractive index and extinction coefficient during dehydration are also analyzed. The amplitudes of terahertz time-domain spectra increase gradually during the dehydration process. Besides, the terahertz properties show obvious changes during the dehydration process. All the results indicate that the injected dry nitrogen has a significant effect on the terahertz spectra and properties of tissue sections. This study contributes to further research and application of terahertz technology in biomedical field.

  1. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites.

  2. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites. PMID:26904042

  3. Confocal microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D visualizaiton of rat kidney glomeruli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  4. Confocal Microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D Visualization of rat kidney glomeruli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  5. Challenges of sample preparation for cross sectional EBSD analysis of electrodeposited nickel films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; Pantleon, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Thorough microstructure and crystallographic orientation analysis of thin films by means of electron backscatter diffraction requires cross section preparation of the film-substrate compound. During careful preparation, changes of the rather non-stable as-deposited microstructure must be avoided....... Different procedures for sample preparation including mechanical grinding and polishing, electropolishing and focused ion beam milling have been applied to a nickel film electrodeposited on top of an amorphous Ni-P layer on a Cu-substrate. Reliable EBSD analysis of the whole cross section can be obtained...

  6. Preparation of transmission electron microscopy cross-section specimens using focused ion beam milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langford, R.M.; Petford-Long, A.K.

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of transmission electron microscopy cross-section specimens using focused ion beam milling is outlined. The 'liftout' and 'trench' techniques are both described in detail, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Artifacts such as ion damage to the top surface and sidewalls of the cross-section specimens, and methods of reducing them, are addressed

  7. Mandibular Bone and Soft Tissues Necrosis Caused by an Arsenical Endodontic Preparation Treated with Piezoelectric Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Giudice

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of wide mandibular bone necrosis associated with significant soft tissues injury after using an arsenical endodontic preparation in the right lower second molar for endodontic purpose. Authors debate about the hazardous effects of the arsenic paste and the usefulness of piezosurgery for treatment of this drug related bone necrosis.

  8. Micro-Raman spectroscopy a powerful technique to identify crocidolite and erionite fibers in tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaudo, C.; Croce, A.; Allegrina, M.; Baris, I. Y.; Dogan, A.; Powers, A.; Rivera, Z.; Bertino, P.; Yang, H.; Gaudino, G.; Carbone, M.

    2013-05-01

    Exposure to mineral fibers such asbestos and erionite is widely associated with the development of lung cancer and pleural malignant mesothelioma (MM). Pedigree and mineralogical studies indicated that genetics may influence mineral fiber carcinogenesis. Although dimensions strongly impact on the fiber carcinogenic potential, also the chemical composition and the fiber is relevant. By using micro-Raman spectroscopy we show here persistence and identification of different mineral phases, directly on histopathological specimens of mice and humans. Fibers of crocidolite asbestos and erionite of different geographic areas (Oregon, US and Cappadocia, Turkey) were injected in mice intra peritoneum. MM developed in 10/15 asbestos-treated mice after 5 months, and in 8-10/15 erionite-treated mice after 14 months. The persistence of the injected fibers was investigated in pancreas, liver, spleen and in the peritoneal tissue. The chemical identification of the different phases occurred in the peritoneal cavity or at the organ borders, while only rarely fibers were localized in the parenchyma. Raman patterns allow easily to recognize crocidolite and erionite fibers. Microscopic analysis revealed that crocidolite fibers were frequently coated by ferruginous material ("asbestos bodies"), whereas erionite fibers were always free from coatings. We also analyzed by micro-Raman spectroscopy lung tissues, both from MM patients of the Cappadocia, where a MM epidemic developed because of environmental exposure to erionite, and from Italian MM patients with occupational exposure to asbestos. Our findings demonstrate that micro-Raman spectroscopy is technique able to identify mineral phases directly on histopathology specimens, as routine tissue sections prepared for diagnostic purpose. REFERENCES A.U. Dogan, M. Dogan. Environ. Geochem. Health 2008, 30(4), 355. M. Carbone, S. Emri, A.U. Dogan, I. Steele, M. Tuncer, HI. Pass, et al. Nat. Rev. Cancer. 2007, 7 (2),147. M. Carbone, Y

  9. A study on preparation of cross sectional anatomy specimen of cadaver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, C. K.; Choi, B. I.; Park, J. H.; Chang, K. H.; Yeon, K. M.; Han, M. C.; Kim, C. W.

    1984-01-01

    With the advent of cross sectional image of CT, ultrasound and magnetic resonance, the need for knowledge of cross sectional anatomy is stranger than ever. To meet this need, preparation of cross sectional anatomy specimen using cadaver is indispensable, not only because it tis the real cut surface anatomy but also because overt limitations of radiographic image in both contrast and special resolution. Authors prepared cross sectional anatomy specimen using a male cadaver, comprising photographs and slides of the 60 cross cut slices from the head to the pelvis. After photography, each slices was embedded using transparent resin allowing permanent preservation of specimen without altering its original architecture. Author's unique method of preparation is presented and 4 representative specimens are illustrated comparing cadaver's CT image, cross cut surface photography, and photography of resin embedded slice of the same cut surface.

  10. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Yan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  11. A reliable Differentiation of Mucor from Aspergillus in Tissue Sections with Ultraviolet Illumination

    OpenAIRE

    Senba, Masachika; Toda, Takayoshi; Toda, Yumiko; Hokama, Seitetsu

    1989-01-01

    In tissue, hyphae of mucor are characteristically broad and infrequently septate. However, it may be difficult to distinguish mucor from aspergillus in tissue sections occasionally, because sometimes aspergillus septa are not detected with hematoxylin-eosin (HE), periodic acid Schiff (PAS ), and Grocott's methenamine silver (GMS). In a case, aspergillus septa can be seen under ultraviolet light. Specifically, structures of these septum were clear cut differences in the histological finding be...

  12. Preparation of High-quality Hematoxylin and Eosin-stained Sections from Rodent Mammary Gland Whole Mounts for Histopathologic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Deirdre K; Foley, Julie F; Hayes-Bouknight, Schantel A; Fenton, Suzanne E

    2016-10-01

    Identifying environmental exposures that cause adverse mammary gland outcomes in rodents is a first step in disease prevention in humans and domestic pets. "Whole mounts" are an easy and inexpensive tissue preparation method that can elucidate typical or abnormal mammary gland morphology in rodent studies. Here, we propose procedures to facilitate the use of whole mounts for histological identification of grossly noted tissue alterations. We noted lesions in mammary whole mounts from 14-month-old CD-1 mice that were not found in the contralateral gland hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained section. Whole mounts were removed from the slide and carefully processed to produce high-quality histological sections that mirrored the quality of the original H&E-stained section in order to properly diagnose the unidentified gross abnormalities. Incorporation of this method into testing protocols that focus on human relevant chemical and endocrine disruptors exposure will increase the chances of identifying lesions in the gland and reduce the risk of false negative findings. This method can be especially invaluable when lesions are not always palpable during the course of the study or visible at necropsy, or when a single cross section of the mammary gland is otherwise used for detecting lesions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Preparation and characterization of alginate microspheres for sustained protein delivery within tissue scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Peng; Chen, X B; Schreyer, David J

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds are designed not only to provide structural support for the repair of damaged tissue, but can also serve the function of bioactive protein delivery. Here we present a study on the preparation and characterization of protein-loaded microspheres, either alone or incorporated into mock tissue scaffolds, for sustained protein delivery. Alginate microspheres were prepared by a novel, small-scale water-in-oil emulsion technique and loaded with fluorescently labeled immunoglobulin G (IgG). Microsphere size appears to be influenced by the magnitude and distribution of force generated by mechanical stirring during emulsion. Protein release studies show that sustained IgG release from microspheres could be achieved and that application of a secondary coating of chitosan could further slow the rate of protein release. Preservation of bioactivity of released IgG protein was confirmed using an immunohistochemical assay. When IgG-loaded microspheres were incorporated into mock scaffolds, initial protein release was diminished and the overall time course of release was extended. The present study demonstrates that protein-loaded microspheres can be prepared with a controlled release profile and preserved biological activity, and can be incorporated into scaffolds to achieve sustained and prolonged protein delivery in a tissue engineering application. (paper)

  14. Preparation of rock samples for measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czubek, J.A.; Burda, J.; Drozdowicz, K.; Igielski, A.; Kowalik, W.; Krynicka-Drozdowicz, E.; Woznicka, U.

    1986-03-01

    Preparation of rock samples for the measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section in small cylindrical two-region systems by a pulsed technique is presented. Requirements which should be fulfilled during the preparation of the samples due to physical assumptions of the method are given. A cylindrical vessel is filled with crushed rock and saturated with a medium strongly absorbing thermal neutrons. Water solutions of boric acid of well-known macroscopic absorption cross-section are used. Mass contributions of the components in the sample are specified. This is necessary for the calculation of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section of the rock matrix. The conditions necessary for assuring the required accuracy of the measurement are given and the detailed procedure of preparation of the rock sample is described. (author)

  15. Hard dental tissue minimal-invasive preparation using contemporary polymer rotating instruments and laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beloica Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of contemporary dentistry is to decrease the patient’s discomfort during treatment. Dentists aim to achieve maximum with the newly developed dental materials as well as with new cavity preparation techniques in the shortest time span. Since the development of the first constructed borer (drilling machine for caries removal, the preparation techniques have considerably changed. The progress of dental materials as well as the cavity preparation techniques has led us to contemporary carbide tungsten and diamond borers that are used with obligatory water cooling. The innovation within this field represents newly developed polymer borers that can detect the difference between carious lesions and healthy tooth structure. In this way the cavity preparation may be performed without damaging dental healthy tissue. This is possible owing to their hardness which is lower than the hardness of intact dentin. Polymer borer preparation is painless with less vibration, while the increase in temperature is negligible. Lasers have been used in clinical dentistry since 1980s so it can be said that they represent a new technology. The function of lasers is based on ablation which requires water. Erbium lasers have shown the highest potential with their ability to produce effective ablation of hard dental tissues. Laser application in dentistry requires special training as well as some protective measures. Laser advantages, compared to traditional preparation techniques, involve the absence of vibration, painless preparation, possibility of preparation without anesthetic and easier patient’s adjustment to dental intervention which is of importance, especially in pediatric dentistry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 46009

  16. New Tools to Prepare ACE Cross-section Files for MCNP Analytic Test Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations using one-group cross sections, multigroup cross sections, or simple continuous energy cross sections are often used to: (1) verify production codes against known analytical solutions, (2) verify new methods and algorithms that do not involve detailed collision physics, (3) compare Monte Carlo calculation methods with deterministic methods, and (4) teach fundamentals to students. In this work we describe 2 new tools for preparing the ACE cross-section files to be used by MCNP ® for these analytic test problems, simple a ce.pl and simple a ce m g.pl.

  17. Conductive carbon tape used for support and mounting of both whole animal and fragile heat-treated tissue sections for MALDI MS imaging and quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Richard J A; Nilsson, Anna; Borg, Daniel; Langridge-Smith, Pat R R; Harrison, David J; Mackay, C Logan; Iverson, Suzanne L; Andrén, Per E

    2012-08-30

    Analysis of whole animal tissue sections by MALDI MS imaging (MSI) requires effective sample collection and transfer methods to allow the highest quality of in situ analysis of small or hard to dissect tissues. We report on the use of double-sided adhesive conductive carbon tape during whole adult rat tissue sectioning of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) embedded animals, with samples mounted onto large format conductive glass and conductive plastic MALDI targets, enabling MSI analysis to be performed on both TOF and FT-ICR MALDI mass spectrometers. We show that mounting does not unduly affect small molecule MSI detection by analyzing tiotropium abundance and distribution in rat lung tissues, with direct on-tissue quantitation achieved. Significantly, we use the adhesive tape to provide support to embedded delicate heat-stabilized tissues, enabling sectioning and mounting to be performed that maintained tissue integrity on samples that had previously been impossible to adequately prepare section for MSI analysis. The mapping of larger peptidomic molecules was not hindered by tape mounting samples and we demonstrate this by mapping the distribution of PEP-19 in both native and heat-stabilized rat brains. Furthermore, we show that without heat stabilization PEP-19 degradation fragments can detected and identified directly by MALDI MSI analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Optimization of specimen preparation of thin cell section for AFM observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xinhui [Nanobiology Laboratory, Bio-X Life Science Research Center, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ji Tong [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Affiliated Ninth People' s Hospital, Medical School, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200011 (China); Hu Jun [Nanobiology Laboratory, Bio-X Life Science Research Center, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Sun Jielin [Nanobiology Laboratory, Bio-X Life Science Research Center, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: jlsun@sjtu.edu.cn

    2008-08-15

    High resolution imaging of intracellular structures of ultrathin cell section samples is critical to the performance of precise manipulation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Here, we test the effect of multiple factors during section sample preparation on the quality of the AFM image. These factors include the embedding materials, the annealing process of the specimen block, section thickness, and section side. We found that neither the embedding materials nor the temperature and speed of the annealing process has any effect on AFM image resolution. However, the section thickness and section side significantly affect the surface topography and AFM image resolution. By systematically testing the image quality of both sides of cell sections over a wide range of thickness (40-1000 nm), we found that the best resolution was obtained with upper-side sections approximately 50-100 nm thick. With these samples, we could observe precise structure details of the cell, including its membrane, nucleoli, and other organelles. Similar results were obtained for other cell types, including Tca8113, C6, and ECV-304. In brief, by optimizing the condition of ultrathin cell section preparation, we were able to obtain high resolution intracellular AFM images, which provide an essential basis for further AFM manipulation.

  19. Analysis of Chloroquine and Metabolites Directly from Whole-body Animal Tissue Sections by Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis (LESA) and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parson, Whitney B [ORNL; Koeniger, Stormy L [Abbott Laboratories; Johnson, Robert W [Abbott Laboratories; Erickson, Jamie [Abbott Laboratories; Tian, Yu [Abbott Laboratories; Stedman, Christopher A. [Abbott Laboratories; Schwartz, Annette [Abbott Laboratories; Tarcsa, Edit [Abbott Laboratories; Cole, Roderic [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The rapid and direct analysis of the amount and spatial distribution of exogenous chloroquine and chloroquine metabolites from tissue sections by liquid extraction surface sampling analysis coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LESA-MS) was demonstrated. LESA-MS results compared well with previously published chloroquine quantification data collected by organ excision, extraction and fluorescent detection. The ability to directly sample and analyze spatially-resolved exogenous molecules from tissue sections with minimal sample preparation and analytical method development has the potential to facilitate the assessment of target tissue penetration of pharmaceutical compounds, to establish pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships, and to complement established pharmacokinetic methods used in the drug discovery process during tissue distribution assessment.

  20. Estimation of induced secondary metabolites in chickpea tissues in response to elicitor preparation of seaweeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, F.; Iqbal, S.

    2000-01-01

    Disease response of plants in terms of induced browning and phytoalexin (induced secondary metabolites) production were recorded in the tissues of Cicer arietinum (Chick pea) treated with the High Molecular Crude Elicitor Preparations, HMWCEP 'Polysaccharides' of Hypnea musciformis (red algae), Padina tetrastromatica (brown algae) and Ulva lactulus (green algae). A UV-visible spectrophotometric method has been developed for the quantification of induced secondary metabolites with time. (author)

  1. A comparison of tissue preparation methods for protein extraction of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L. pod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Martínez-Márquez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa, Theobroma cacao L. is one of the main tropical industrial crops. Cocoa has a very high level of interfering substances, such as polysaccharides and phenolic compounds that could prevent the isolation of suitable protein. Efficient methods of protein extraction are a priority to successfully apply proteomic analyses. We compared and evaluated two methods (A and B of tissue preparation for total protein extract by phenol/SDS extraction protocol. The difference in the application of the two methods was that extensively washed dry powder of pod tissue were made in Method A, whereas that crude extract were prepared Method B. Extracted proteins were examined using one-dimensional electrophoresis (1-D. Results show that each extraction method isolated a unique subset of cocoa pod proteome. Principal component analysis showed little variation in the data obtained using Method A, while that in Methods B showed no low reproducibility, thus demonstrating that Method A is a reliable for preparing cocoa pod proteins. The protocol is expected to be applicable to other recalcitrant plant tissues and to be of interest to laboratories involved in plant proteomics analyses. A combination of extraction approaches is recommended for increasing proteome coverage when using gel-based isolation techniques.

  2. Preparation and Properties of 3D Printed Alginate–Chitosan Polyion Complex Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiongqiong Liu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D printing holds great potential for preparing sophisticated scaffolds for tissue engineering. As a result of the shear thinning properties of an alginate solution, it is often used as 3D printing ink. However, it is difficult to prepare scaffolds with complexity structure and high fidelity, because the alginate solution has a low viscosity and alginate hydrogels prepared with Ca2+ crosslinking are mechanically weak. In this work, chitosan powders were dispersed and swelled in an alginate solution, which could effectively improve the viscosity of an alginate solution by 1.5–4 times. With the increase of chitosan content, the shape fidelity of the 3D printed alginate–chitosan polyion complex (AlCh PIC hydrogels were improved. Scanning electron microscope (SEM photographs showed that the lateral pore structure of 3D printed hydrogels was becoming more obvious. As a result of the increased reaction ion pairs in comparison to the alginate hydrogels that were prepared with Ca2+ crosslinking, AlCh PIC hydrogels were mechanically strong, and the compression stress of hydrogels at a 90% strain could achieve 1.4 MPa without breaking. In addition, human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs adhered to the 3D printed AlCh PIC hydrogels and proliferated with time, which indicated that the obtained hydrogels were biocompatible and could potentially be used as scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  3. 3D prostate histology image reconstruction: Quantifying the impact of tissue deformation and histology section location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Gibson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Guidelines for localizing prostate cancer on imaging are ideally informed by registered post-prostatectomy histology. 3D histology reconstruction methods can support this by reintroducing 3D spatial information lost during histology processing. The need to register small, high-grade foci drives a need for high accuracy. Accurate 3D reconstruction method design is impacted by the answers to the following central questions of this work. (1 How does prostate tissue deform during histology processing? (2 What spatial misalignment of the tissue sections is induced by microtome cutting? (3 How does the choice of reconstruction model affect histology reconstruction accuracy? Materials and Methods: Histology, paraffin block face and magnetic resonance images were acquired for 18 whole mid-gland tissue slices from six prostates. 7-15 homologous landmarks were identified on each image. Tissue deformation due to histology processing was characterized using the target registration error (TRE after landmark-based registration under four deformation models (rigid, similarity, affine and thin-plate-spline [TPS]. The misalignment of histology sections from the front faces of tissue slices was quantified using manually identified landmarks. The impact of reconstruction models on the TRE after landmark-based reconstruction was measured under eight reconstruction models comprising one of four deformation models with and without constraining histology images to the tissue slice front faces. Results: Isotropic scaling improved the mean TRE by 0.8-1.0 mm (all results reported as 95% confidence intervals, while skew or TPS deformation improved the mean TRE by <0.1 mm. The mean misalignment was 1.1-1.9΀ (angle and 0.9-1.3 mm (depth. Using isotropic scaling, the front face constraint raised the mean TRE by 0.6-0.8 mm. Conclusions: For sub-millimeter accuracy, 3D reconstruction models should not constrain histology images to the tissue slice front faces and

  4. The importance of fast neutron scattering cross sections for neutron dosimetry in soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahr, R.; Brede, H.J.

    1979-05-01

    Tissue equivalent plastic materials are used for the construction of accurate neutron dosemeters. As compared to real tissue, in materials most of the oxygen content is replaced by carbon. In order to determine the dose to human tissue a kerma correction factor has to be used. It is shown that the uncertainty (corresponding to 1 delta) of the correction factor at E = 14.5 MeV amounts to at least 5.2%. An important contribution to the uncertainties results from the lack of experimental data of the 12 C(n, n' 3α), 16 O(n,n'p) and 16 O(n,n'α)-cross-sections. These data are to be calculated by subtracting all other cross sections from the total cross section of ( 16 O + n) and ( 12 C + n). It is shown that the uncertainties of the kerma correction factor can be considerably reduced by an accurate measurement of the scattering cross sections of carbon and oxygen. (orig.) [de

  5. Simple preparation of plant epidermal tissue for laser microdissection and downstream quantitative proteome and carbohydrate analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eFalter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The outwardly directed cell wall and associated plasma membrane of epidermal cells represent the first layers of plant defense against intruding pathogens. Cell wall modifications and the formation of defense structures at sites of attempted pathogen penetration are decisive for plant defense. A precise isolation of these stress-induced structures would allow a specific analysis of regulatory mechanism and cell wall adaption. However, methods for large-scale epidermal tissue preparation from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which would allow proteome and cell wall analysis of complete, laser-microdissected epidermal defense structures, have not been provided. We developed the adhesive tape – liquid cover glass technique for simple leaf epidermis preparation from A. thaliana, which is also applicable on grass leaves. This method is compatible with subsequent staining techniques to visualize stress-related cell wall structures, which were precisely isolated from the epidermal tissue layer by laser microdissection coupled to laser pressure catapulting. We successfully demonstrated that these specific epidermal tissue samples could be used for quantitative downstream proteome and cell wall analysis. The development of the adhesive tape – liquid cover glass technique for simple leaf epidermis preparation and the compatibility to laser microdissection and downstream quantitative analysis opens new possibilities in the precise examination of stress- and pathogen-related cell wall structures in epidermal cells. Because the developed tissue processing is also applicable on A. thaliana, well-established, model pathosystems that include the interaction with powdery mildews can be studied to determine principal regulatory mechanisms in plant-microbe interaction with their potential outreach into crop breeding.

  6. In situ hybridization for the detection of rust fungi in paraffin embedded plant tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Mitchell A; McMahon, Michael B; Bonde, Morris R; Palmer, Cristi L; Luster, Douglas G

    2016-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate pathogens with multiple life stages often including different spore types and multiple plant hosts. While individual rust pathogens are often associated with specific plants, a wide range of plant species are infected with rust fungi. To study the interactions between these important pathogenic fungi and their host plants, one must be able to differentiate fungal tissue from plant tissue. This can be accomplished using the In situ hybridization (ISH) protocol described here. To validate reproducibility using the ISH protocol, samples of Chrysanthemum × morifolium infected with Puccinia horiana, Gladiolus × hortulanus infected with Uromyces transversalis and Glycine max infected with Phakopsora pachyrhizi were tested alongside uninfected leaf tissue samples. The results of these tests show that this technique clearly distinguishes between rust pathogens and their respective host plant tissues. This ISH protocol is applicable to rust fungi and potentially other plant pathogenic fungi as well. It has been shown here that this protocol can be applied to pathogens from different genera of rust fungi with no background staining of plant tissue. We encourage the use of this protocol for the study of plant pathogenic fungi in paraffin embedded sections of host plant tissue.

  7. Automatic registration of multi-modal microscopy images for integrative analysis of prostate tissue sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippolis, Giuseppe; Edsjö, Anders; Helczynski, Leszek; Bjartell, Anders; Overgaard, Niels Chr

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths. For diagnosis, predicting the outcome of the disease, and for assessing potential new biomarkers, pathologists and researchers routinely analyze histological samples. Morphological and molecular information may be integrated by aligning microscopic histological images in a multiplex fashion. This process is usually time-consuming and results in intra- and inter-user variability. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using modern image analysis methods for automated alignment of microscopic images from differently stained adjacent paraffin sections from prostatic tissue specimens. Tissue samples, obtained from biopsy or radical prostatectomy, were sectioned and stained with either hematoxylin & eosin (H&E), immunohistochemistry for p63 and AMACR or Time Resolved Fluorescence (TRF) for androgen receptor (AR). Image pairs were aligned allowing for translation, rotation and scaling. The registration was performed automatically by first detecting landmarks in both images, using the scale invariant image transform (SIFT), followed by the well-known RANSAC protocol for finding point correspondences and finally aligned by Procrustes fit. The Registration results were evaluated using both visual and quantitative criteria as defined in the text. Three experiments were carried out. First, images of consecutive tissue sections stained with H&E and p63/AMACR were successfully aligned in 85 of 88 cases (96.6%). The failures occurred in 3 out of 13 cores with highly aggressive cancer (Gleason score ≥ 8). Second, TRF and H&E image pairs were aligned correctly in 103 out of 106 cases (97%). The third experiment considered the alignment of image pairs with the same staining (H&E) coming from a stack of 4 sections. The success rate for alignment dropped from 93.8% in adjacent sections to 22% for sections furthest away. The proposed method is both reliable and fast and therefore well suited

  8. Experimental investigations into sample preparation of Alzheimer tissue specimens for nuclear microprobe analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, T [CEC-JRC, Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Tapper, U A.S. [Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Lund Inst. of Science and Tech. (Sweden); Sturesson, K; Brun, A [Div. of Neuropathology, Dept. of Pathology, Lund University Hospital (Sweden)

    1991-03-01

    Nuclear microprobe analysis was applied to the study of elemental distribution in brains sections of patients with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Stained and nonstained cryosections were studied. The work carried out shows that serious elemental losses follow the sample staining procedure. Major losses occurred in a simple rinse of the tissue section, probably reducing most of the in-vivo gradients, which show that generally very little information can be gained from stained sections. However, in many cases stained sections are compulsory because of the requirement to recognize the area which is to be studied. All the elemental maps obtained for the neurofibrillary deposits indicate a localized concentration for Si and probably also Al, associated with the senile plaque core. Neither of these elements were found in the staining solutions used. The validity of the results is discussed as well as the possible link of Al and/or Si in the development of Alzheimer's desease. (orig.).

  9. Immunocytochemistry of formalin-fixed human brain tissues: microwave irradiation of free-floating sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiurba, R A; Spooner, E T; Ishiguro, K; Takahashi, M; Yoshida, R; Wheelock, T R; Imahori, K; Cataldo, A M; Nixon, R A

    1998-01-01

    Formalin fixation, the chemical process in which formaldehyde binds to cells and tissues, is widely used to preserve human brain specimens from autolytic decomposition. Ultrastructure of cellular and mitochondrial membranes is markedly altered by vesiculation, but this does not interfere with diagnostic evaluation of neurohistology by light microscopy. Serious difficulties are encountered, however, when immunocytochemical staining is attempted. Antigens that are immunoreactive in unfixed frozen sections and protein extracts appear to be concealed or destroyed in formalin-fixed tissues. In dilute aqueous solution, formaldehyde is in equilibrium with methylene glycol and its polymeric hydrates, the balance by far in favor of methylene glyco. Carbonylic formaldehyde is a reactive electrophilic species well known for crosslinking functional groups in tissue proteins, nucleic acids, and polysaccharides. Some of its methylene crosslinks are readily hydrolyzed. Others are stable and irreversible. During immunostaining reactions, intra- and inter-molecular links between macromolecules limit antibody permeation of tissue sections, alter protein secondary structure, and reduce accessibility of antigenic determinants . Accordingly, immunoreactivity is diminished for many antigens. Tissues are rapidly penetrated by methylene glycol, but formaldehyde binding to cellular constituents is relatively slow, increasing progressively until equilibrium is reached. In addition, prolonged storage in formalin may result in acidification of human brain specimens. Low pH favors dissociation of methylene glycol into formaldehyde, further reducing both classical staining and antigen detectability. Various procedures have been devised to counter the antigen masking effects of formaldehyde. Examples include pretreatment of tissue sections with proteases, formic acid, or ultrasound. Recently, heating of mounted sections in ionic salt solution by microwave energy was found to restore many

  10. Effects of tissue-preparation-induced callose synthesis on estimates of plasmodesma size exclusion limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, J E; White, R G

    2001-01-01

    Plasmodesmata are often characterised by their size exclusion limit (SEL), which is the molecular weight of the largest dye, introduced by microinjection, that will move from cell to cell. In this study, we investigated whether commonly used techniques for isolation and manipulation of tissues, and microinjection of fluorescent dyes, affected the SEL, and whether any such effects could be ameliorated by inhibiting callose deposition. We examined young root epidermal cells of Arabidopsis thaliana and staminal hair cells of Tradescantia virginiana, two tissues often used in experiments on symplastic transport. Transport in root tips dissected from the main plant body and in stamen hairs removed from the base of the stamen filament was compared with transport in undissected roots and stamen hairs attached to the base of the filament, respectively. Tissues were microinjected with fluorescent dyes (457 Da to > 3 kDa) with or without prior incubation in the callose deposition inhibitors 2-deoxy-D-glucose or aniline blue fluorochrome. In both tissues, dissection reduced the SEL, which was largely prevented by prior incubation in 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by incubation in aniline blue fluorochrome. Thus, standard methods for tissue preparation can cause sufficient callose deposition to reduce cell-to-cell transport, and this needs to be considered in studies employing microinjection. Introduction of the dyes by pressure injection rather than iontophoresis decreased the SEL in A. thaliana but increased it in T. virginiana, showing that these two injection techniques do not necessarily give identical results and that plasmodesmata in different tissues may respond differently to similar experimental procedures.

  11. Optical histology: a method to visualize microvasculature in thick tissue sections of mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin J Moy

    Full Text Available The microvasculature is the network of blood vessels involved in delivering nutrients and gases necessary for tissue survival. Study of the microvasculature often involves immunohistological methods. While useful for visualizing microvasculature at the µm scale in specific regions of interest, immunohistology is not well suited to visualize the global microvascular architecture in an organ. Hence, use of immunohistology precludes visualization of the entire microvasculature of an organ, and thus impedes study of global changes in the microvasculature that occur in concert with changes in tissue due to various disease states. Therefore, there is a critical need for a simple, relatively rapid technique that will facilitate visualization of the microvascular network of an entire tissue.The systemic vasculature of a mouse is stained with the fluorescent lipophilic dye DiI using a method called "vessel painting". The brain, or other organ of interest, is harvested and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. The organ is then sliced into 1 mm sections and optically cleared, or made transparent, using FocusClear, a proprietary optical clearing agent. After optical clearing, the DiI-labeled tissue microvasculature is imaged using confocal fluorescence microscopy and adjacent image stacks tiled together to produce a depth-encoded map of the microvasculature in the tissue slice. We demonstrated that the use of optical clearing enhances both the tissue imaging depth and the estimate of the vascular density. Using our "optical histology" technique, we visualized microvasculature in the mouse brain to a depth of 850 µm.Presented here are maps of the microvasculature in 1 mm thick slices of mouse brain. Using combined optical clearing and optical imaging techniques, we devised a methodology to enhance the visualization of the microvasculature in thick tissues. We believe this technique could potentially be used to generate a three-dimensional map of the

  12. Porous starch/cellulose nanofibers composite prepared by salt leaching technique for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri-Nasrabadi, Bijan; Mehrasa, Mohammad; Rafienia, Mohammad; Bonakdar, Shahin; Behzad, Tayebeh; Gavanji, Shahin

    2014-08-08

    Starch/cellulose nanofibers composites with proper porosity pore size, mechanical strength, and biodegradability for cartilage tissue engineering have been reported in this study. The porous thermoplastic starch-based composites were prepared by combining film casting, salt leaching, and freeze drying methods. The diameter of 70% nanofibers was in the range of 40-90 nm. All samples had interconnected porous morphology; however an increase in pore interconnectivity was observed when the sodium chloride ratio was increased in the salt leaching. Scaffolds with the total porogen content of 70 wt% exhibited adequate mechanical properties for cartilage tissue engineering applications. The water uptake ratio of nanocomposites was remarkably enhanced by adding 10% cellulose nanofibers. The scaffolds were partially destroyed due to low in vitro degradation rate after more than 20 weeks. Cultivation of isolated rabbit chondrocytes on the fabricated scaffold proved that the incorporation of nanofibers in starch structure improves cell attachment and proliferation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Time-lapse cinematography in living Drosophila tissues: preparation of material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ilan; Parton, Richard M

    2006-11-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been an extraordinarily successful model organism for studying the genetic basis of development and evolution. It is arguably the best-understood complex multicellular model system, owing its success to many factors. Recent developments in imaging techniques, in particular sophisticated fluorescence microscopy methods and equipment, now allow cellular events to be studied at high resolution in living material. This ability has enabled the study of features that tend to be lost or damaged by fixation, such as transient or dynamic events. Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila are shared with the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties in keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick hazy cytoplasm. This protocol outlines the preparation of major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping them alive.

  14. Use of Calcium and Alendronic Acid Preparations in Correction of Structural and Functional Disorders of Bone Tissue in Thyrotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.B. Oliynyk

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Impact of calcium and alendronic acid preparations on disorders of structural and functional state of bone tissue in experimental animals at exogenic thyrotoxicosis was studied. It was defined that introduction of calcium preparations reduces bone mineral density loss in female rats with drug thyrotoxicosis, and combined use of calcium and alendronic acid prevents bone tissue loss regardless of thyrotoxicosis duration and presence of ovariectomy.

  15. HistoStitcher© : An Interactive Program for Accurate and Rapid Reconstruction of Digitized Whole Histological Sections from Tissue Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelow, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Feldman, Michael; Shih, Natalie; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-01-01

    We present an interactive program called HistoStitcher© for accurate and rapid reassembly of histology fragments into a pseudo-whole digitized histological section. HistoStitcher© provides both an intuitive graphical interface to assist the operator in performing the stitch of adjacent histology fragments by selecting pairs of anatomical landmarks, and a set of computational routines for determining and applying an optimal linear transformation to generate the stitched image. Reconstruction of whole histological sections from images of slides containing smaller fragments is required in applications where preparation of whole sections of large tissue specimens is not feasible or efficient, and such whole mounts are required to facilitate (a) disease annotation and (b) image registration with radiological images. Unlike manual reassembly of image fragments in a general purpose image editing program (such as Photoshop), HistoStitcher© provides memory efficient operation on high resolution digitized histology images and a highly flexible stitching process capable of producing more accurate results in less time. Further, by parameterizing the series of transformations determined by the stitching process, the stitching parameters can be saved, loaded at a later time, refined, or reapplied to multi-resolution scans, or quickly transmitted to another site. In this paper, we describe in detail the design of HistoStitcher© and the mathematical routines used for calculating the optimal image transformation, and demonstrate its operation for stitching high resolution histology quadrants of a prostate specimen to form a digitally reassembled whole histology section, for 8 different patient studies. To evaluate stitching quality, a 6 point scoring scheme, which assesses the alignment and continuity of anatomical structures important for disease annotation, is employed by three independent expert pathologists. For 6 studies compared with this scheme, reconstructed sections

  16. Preparation of collagen/polyurethane/knitted silk as a composite scaffold for tendon tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Aghdam, Maryam; Faridi-Majidi, Reza; Derakhshan, Mohammad Ali; Chegeni, Arash; Azami, Mahmoud

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to prepare a hybrid three-dimensional scaffold that mimics natural tendon tissues. It has been found that a knitted silk shows good mechanical strength; however, cell growth on the bare silk is not desirable. Hence, electrospun collagen/polyurethane combination was used to cover knitted silk. A series of collagen and polyurethane solutions (4%-7% w/v) in aqueous acetic acid were prepared and electrospun. According to obtained scanning electron microscopy images from pure collagen and polyurethane nanofibers, concentration was set constant at 5% (w/v) for blend solutions of collagen/polyurethane. Afterward, blend solutions with the weight ratios of 75/25, 50/50 and 25/75 were electrospun. Scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated the smooth and uniform morphology for the optimized nanofibers. The least fibers diameter among three weight ratios was found for collagen/polyurethane (25/75) which was 100.86 ± 40 nm and therefore was selected to be electrospun on the knitted silk. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectra confirmed the chemical composition of obtained electrospun nanofibers on the knitted silk. Tensile test of the specimens including blend nanofiber, knitted silk and commercial tendon substitute examined and indicated that collagen/polyurethane-coated knitted silk has appropriate mechanical properties as a scaffold for tendon tissue engineering. Then, Alamar Blue assay of the L929 fibroblast cell line seeded on the prepared scaffolds demonstrated appropriate viability of the cells with a significant proliferation on the scaffold containing more collagen content. The results illustrate that the designed structure would be promising for being used as a temporary substitute for tendon repair.

  17. Raising an Antibody Specific to Breast Cancer Subpopulations Using Phage Display on Tissue Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla Jael Rubner

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Primary tumors display a great level of intra-tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer. The current lack of prognostic and predictive biomarkers limits accurate stratification and the ability to predict response to therapy. The aim of the present study was to select recombinant antibody...... fragments specific against breast cancer subpopulations, aiding the discovery of novel biomarkers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Recombinant antibody fragments were selected by phage display. A novel shadowstick technology enabled the direct selection using tissue sections of antibody fragments specific against...

  18. Gold internal standard correction for elemental imaging of soft tissue sections by LA-ICP-MS: element distribution in eye microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konz, Ioana; Fernández, Beatriz; Fernández, M Luisa; Pereiro, Rosario; González, Héctor; Alvarez, Lydia; Coca-Prados, Miguel; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2013-04-01

    Laser ablation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been developed for the elemental imaging of Mg, Fe and Cu distribution in histological tissue sections of fixed eyes, embedded in paraffin, from human donors (cadavers). This work presents the development of a novel internal standard correction methodology based on the deposition of a homogeneous thin gold film on the tissue surface and the use of the (197)Au(+) signal as internal standard. Sample preparation (tissue section thickness) and laser conditions were carefully optimized, and internal normalisation using (197)Au(+) was compared with (13)C(+) correction for imaging applications. (24)Mg(+), (56)Fe(+) and (63)Cu(+) distributions were investigated in histological sections of the anterior segment of the eye (including the iris, ciliary body, cornea and trabecular meshwork) and were shown to be heterogeneously distributed along those tissue structures. Reproducibility was assessed by imaging different human eye sections from the same donor and from ten different eyes from adult normal donors, which showed that similar spatial maps were obtained and therefore demonstrate the analytical potential of using (197)Au(+) as internal standard. The proposed analytical approach could offer a robust tool with great practical interest for clinical studies, e.g. to investigate trace element distribution of metals and their alterations in ocular diseases.

  19. Electrochemical removal of metallic implants from Technovit 9100 New embedded hard and soft tissues prior to histological sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willbold, Elmar; Reebmann, Mattias; Jeffries, Richard; Witte, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Solid metallic implants in soft or hard tissues are serious challenges for histological processing. However, metallic implants are more frequently used in e.g. cardiovascular or orthopaedic therapies. Before clinical use, these devices need to be tested thoroughly in a biological environment and histological analysis of their biocompatibility is a major requirement. To allow the histological analysis of metallic implants in tissues especially in calcified hard tissues, we describe a method for embedding these tissues in the resin Technovit 9100 New and removing the metallic implants by electrochemical dissolution. With the combination of these two processes, we are able to achieve 5 μm thick sections from soft or hard tissues with a superior preservation of tissue architecture and especially the implant-tissue interface. These sections can be stained by classical stainings, immunohistochemical and enzymehistochemical as well as DNA-based staining methods.

  20. Direct investigation of (sub-) surface preparation artifacts in GaAs based materials by FIB sectioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Torunski, Torsten; Stolz, Wolfgang; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-04-15

    The introduction of preparation artifacts is almost inevitable when producing samples for (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). These artifacts can be divided in extrinsic artifacts like damage processes and intrinsic artifacts caused by the deviations from the volume strain state in thin elastically strained material systems. The reduction and estimation of those effects is of great importance for the quantitative analysis of (S)TEM images. Thus, optimized ion beam preparation conditions are investigated for high quality samples. Therefore, the surface topology is investigated directly with atomic force microscopy (AFM) on the actual TEM samples. Additionally, the sectioning of those samples by a focused ion beam (FIB) is used to investigate the damage depth profile directly in the TEM. The AFM measurements show good quantitative agreement of sample height modulation due to strain relaxation to finite elements simulations. Strong indications of (sub-) surface damage by ion beams are observed. Their influence on high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging is estimated with focus on thickness determination by absolute intensity methods. Data consolidation of AFM and TEM measurements reveals a 3.5 nm surface amorphization, negligible surface roughness on the scale of angstroms and a sub-surface damage profile in the range of up to 8.0 nm in crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs) and GaAs-based ternary alloys. A correction scheme for thickness evaluation of absolute HAADF intensities is proposed and applied for GaAs based materials. - Highlights: • The damage by Ar-ion milling during TEM sample preparation is investigated directly. • After FIB sectioning damage and deep disorder of c-GaAs is seen in cross-section. • The influence of such disorder on conventional ADF measurements is estimated. • A correction for HAADF measurements is proposed with focus on thickness estimations.

  1. Correlative light and immuno-electron microscopy of retinal tissue cryostat sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Lane, Amelia; Laughlin, William E.; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2018-01-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy (CLEM) is a powerful technique allowing localisation of specific macromolecules within fluorescence microscopy (FM) images to be mapped onto corresponding high-resolution electron microscopy (EM) images. Existing methods are applicable to limited sample types and are technically challenging. Here we describe novel methods to perform CLEM and immuno-electron microscopy (iEM) on cryostat sections utilising the popular FM embedding solution, optimal cutting temperature (OCT) compound. Utilising these approaches, we have (i) identified the same phagosomes by FM and EM in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of retinal tissue (ii) shown the correct localisation of rhodopsin on photoreceptor outer segment disc like-structures in iPSC derived optic cups and (iii) identified a novel interaction between peroxisomes and melanosomes as well as phagosomes in the RPE. These data show that cryostat sections allow easy characterisation of target macromolecule localisation within tissue samples, thus providing a substantial improvement over many conventional methods that are limited to cultured cells. As OCT embedding is routinely used for FM this provides an easily accessible and robust method for further analysis of existing samples by high resolution EM. PMID:29315318

  2. An automated segmentation methodology for quantifying immunoreactive puncta number and fluorescence intensity in tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Kenneth N; Sweet, Robert A; Deo, Anthony J; Lewis, David A

    2008-11-13

    A number of human brain diseases have been associated with disturbances in the structure and function of cortical synapses. Answering fundamental questions about the synaptic machinery in these disease states requires the ability to image and quantify small synaptic structures in tissue sections and to evaluate protein levels at these major sites of function. We developed a new automated segmentation imaging method specifically to answer such fundamental questions. The method takes advantage of advances in spinning disk confocal microscopy, and combines information from multiple iterations of a fluorescence intensity/morphological segmentation protocol to construct three-dimensional object masks of immunoreactive (IR) puncta. This new methodology is unique in that high- and low-fluorescing IR puncta are equally masked, allowing for quantification of the number of fluorescently-labeled puncta in tissue sections. In addition, the shape of the final object masks highly represents their corresponding original data. Thus, the object masks can be used to extract information about the IR puncta (e.g., average fluorescence intensity of proteins of interest). Importantly, the segmentation method presented can be easily adapted for use with most existing microscopy analysis packages.

  3. Diagnosis of filamentous fungi on tissue sections by immunohistochemistry using anti-aspergillus antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, Sundaram; Uppin, Shantveer G; Uppin, Megha S; Pamidimukkala, Umabala; Vemu, Lakshmi

    2015-06-01

    Identification based on histology alone has limitations as Aspergillus species share morphology with other filamentous fungi. Differentiation of Aspergillus species from hyalohyphomycetes and dematiaceous fungi is important as the antifungal susceptibility varies among different species and genera. Given these problems, ancillary techniques are needed to increase specificity. Our aim was to study the utility of immunohistochemistry (IHC) with anti-Aspergillus antibody in the identification of Aspergillus species and to differentiate them from other filamentous fungi. Fifty formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections including 47 from cases of culture proven filamentous fungi, 3 from colonies of cultures of hyalohyphomycetes, and 11 smears from cultures were subjected to IHC studies using polyclonal rabbit anti-Aspergillus antibody (Abcam, UK) after antigen retrieval. The IHC on tissue sections was positive in 88% cases involving culture proven Aspergillus species. There was no cross reactivity with Mucorales species, Candida species, dematiaceous fungi and hyalohyphomycetes. Hence immunohistochemistry can be used as an ancillary technique for the diagnosis of Aspergillus species. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A novel monoclonal antibody for detection of galectin-9 in tissue sections: application to human tissues infected by oncogenic viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barjon Clément

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Galectin-9 is a mammalian lectin which possesses immunosuppressive properties. Excessive production of galectin-9 has been reported in two types of human virus-associated diseases chronic hepatitis C and nasopharyngeal carcinoma associated to the Epstein-Barr virus. The objective of this study was to produce new monoclonal antibodies targeting galectin-9 in order to improve its detection in clinical samples, especially on tissue sections analysed by immunohistochemistry. Methods Hybridomas were produced through immunization of mice with the recombinant c-terminus part of galectin-9 (residues 191 to 355 of the long isoform and semi-solid fusion of spleen cells with Sp2/0 cells. Monoclonal antibodies were characterized using ELISA, epitope mapping, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results We selected seven hybridomas producing antibodies reacting with our recombinant c-terminus galectin-9 in ELISA. Five of them reacted with the epitope “TPAIPPMMYPHPA” (common to all isoforms, residues 210 to 222 of the long isoform and stained all three isoforms of galectin-9 analysed by western blot. One of them, 1G3,demonstrated very good sensitivity and specificity when used for immunohistochemistry. Using 1G3, we could confirm the intense and constant expression of galectin-9 by Epstein-Barr virus positive malignant cells from nasopharyngeal carcinomas. In most samples, specific staining was detected in both cytoplasm and nuclei. Galectin-9 was also detected in liver biopsies from patients infected by the human hepatitis C or B viruses with expression not only in inflammatory leucocytes and Kupffer cells, but also in hepatocytes. In contrast, galectin-9 was virtually absent in non-infected liver specimens. Conclusion The 1G3 monoclonal antibody will be a powerful tool to assess galectin-9 expression and distribution especially in diseases related to oncogenic viruses.

  5. Production, separation and target preparation of 171Tm an 147Pm for neutron cross section measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Heinitz, S; Schumann, D; Dressler, R; Kivel, N; Guerrero, C; Köster, U; Tessler, M; Paul, M; Halfon, S

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the neutron capture cross sections of s-process branching point isotopes represents a basic requirement for the understanding of star evolution. Since such branching point isotopes are by definition radioactive, the measurement of their cross sections from thermal to stellar energies becomes a challenging task. Considerable amounts of material have to be produced, representing a significant radioactive hazard. We report here on the production and separation of 3.5 mg 171Tm from 240 mg 170Er2O3 and 72 µg 147Pm from 100 mg 146Nd2O3 irradiated at the ILL high flux reactor. Thin targets were prepared with high chemical and radioisotopic purity suitable for neutron capture measurements at n_TOF CERN and the SARAF-LiLiT facility.

  6. Preparation of acellular scaffold for corneal tissue engineering by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Hsun; Tseng, Fan-Wei; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Peng, I-Chen; Hsieh, Dar-Jen; Wu, Shu-Wei; Yeh, Ming-Long

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we developed a novel method using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO 2 ) to prepare acellular porcine cornea (APC). Under gentle extraction conditions using SCCO 2 technology, hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that cells were completely lysed, and cell debris, including nuclei, was efficiently removed from the porcine cornea. The SCCO 2 -treated corneas exhibited intact stromal structures and appropriate mechanical properties. Moreover, no immunological reactions and neovascularization were observed after lamellar keratoplasty in rabbits. All transplanted grafts and animals survived without complications. The transplanted APCs were opaque after the operation but became transparent within 2weeks. Complete re-epithelialization of the transplanted APCs was observed within 4weeks. In conclusion, APCs produced by SCCO 2 extraction technology could be an ideal and useful scaffold for corneal tissue engineering. We decellularized the porcine cornea using SCCO 2 extraction technology and investigated the characteristics, mechanical properties, and biocompatibility of the decellularized porcine cornea by lamellar keratoplasty in rabbits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the use of SCCO 2 extraction technology for preparation of acellular corneal scaffold. We proved that the cellular components of porcine corneas had been efficiently removed, and the biomechanical properties of the scaffold were well preserved by SCCO 2 extraction technology. SCCO 2 -treated corneas maintained optical transparency and exhibited appropriate strength to withstand surgical procedures. In vivo, the transplanted corneas showed no evidence of immunological reactions and exhibited good biocompatibility and long-term stability. Our results suggested that the APCs developed by SCCO 2 extraction technology could be an ideal and useful scaffold for corneal replacement and corneal tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by

  7. Technical advances in the sectioning of dental tissue and of on-section cross-linked collagen detection in mineralized teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhrao, Sim K; Sloan, Alastair J; Smith, Emma L; Archer, Charles W

    2010-08-01

    Immunohistochemical detection of cross-linked fibrillar collagens in mineralized tissues is much desired for exploring the mechanisms of biomineralization in health and disease. Mineralized teeth are impossible to section when embedded in conventional media, thus limiting on-section characterization of matrix proteins by immunohistochemistry. We hypothesized that by using an especially formulated acrylic resin suitable for mineralized dental tissues, not only sectioning of teeth would be possible, but also our recently developed immunofluorescence labeling technique would be amenable to fully calcified tissues for characterization of dentinal fibrillar collagens, which remains elusive. The hypothesis was tested on fixed rodent teeth embedded in Technovit 9100 New. It was possible to cut thin (1 mum) sections of mineralized teeth, and immunofluorescence characterization of cross-linked type I fibrillar collagen was selected due to its abundance in dentine. Decalcified samples of teeth embedded in paraffin wax were also used to compare immunolabeling from either method using the same immunoreagents in equivalent concentrations. In the decalcified tissue sections, type I collagen labeling in the dentine along the tubules was "patchy" and the signal in the predentine was very weak. However, enhanced signal in mineralized samples with type I collagen was detected not only in the predentine but also at the limit between intertubular dentine, within the elements of the enamel organ and subgingival stroma. This report offers advances in sectioning mineralized dental tissues and allows the application of immunofluorescence not only for on-section protein detection but importantly for detecting cross-linked fibrous collagens in both soft and mineralized tissue sections.

  8. Staining of E-selectin ligands on paraffin-embedded sections of tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascal, Mylène A; Talina, Catarina; Borralho, Paula; Gonçalo Mineiro, A; Henriques, Ana Raquel; Pen, Cláudia; Martins, Manuela; Braga, Sofia; Sackstein, Robert; Videira, Paula A

    2018-05-02

    The E-selectin ligands expressed by cancer cells mediate adhesion of circulating cancer cells to endothelial cells, as well as within tissue microenvironments important for tumor progression and metastasis. The identification of E-selectin ligands within cancer tissue could yield new biomarkers for patient stratification and aid in identifying novel therapeutic targets. The determinants of selectin ligands consist of sialylated tetrasaccharides, the sialyl Lewis X and A (sLe X and sLe A ), displayed on protein or lipid scaffolds. Standardized procedures for immunohistochemistry make use of the antibodies against sLe X and/or sLe A . However, antibody binding does not define E-selectin binding activity. In this study, we developed an immunohistochemical staining technique, using E-selectin-human Ig Fc chimera (E-Ig) to characterize the expression and localization of E-selectin binding sites on paraffin-embedded sections of different cancer tissue. E-Ig successfully stained cancer cells with high specificity. The E-Ig staining show high reactivity scores in colon and lung adenocarcinoma and moderate reactivity in triple negative breast cancer. Compared with reactivity of antibody against sLe X/A , the E-Ig staining presented higher specificity to cancer tissue with better defined borders and less background. The E-Ig staining technique allows the qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of E-selectin binding activity on cancer cells. The development of accurate techniques for detection of selectin ligands may contribute to better diagnostic and better understanding of the molecular basis of tumor progression and metastasis.

  9. A compact and versatile microfluidic probe for local processing of tissue sections and biological specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cors, J. F.; Lovchik, R. D.; Delamarche, E.; Kaigala, G. V.

    2014-03-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) is a non-contact, scanning microfluidic technology for local (bio)chemical processing of surfaces based on hydrodynamically confining nanoliter volumes of liquids over tens of micrometers. We present here a compact MFP (cMFP) that can be used on a standard inverted microscope and assist in the local processing of tissue sections and biological specimens. The cMFP has a footprint of 175 × 100 × 140 mm3 and can scan an area of 45 × 45 mm2 on a surface with an accuracy of ±15 μm. The cMFP is compatible with standard surfaces used in life science laboratories such as microscope slides and Petri dishes. For ease of use, we developed self-aligned mounted MFP heads with standardized "chip-to-world" and "chip-to-platform" interfaces. Switching the processing liquid in the flow confinement is performed within 90 s using a selector valve with a dead-volume of approximately 5 μl. We further implemented height-compensation that allows a cMFP head to follow non-planar surfaces common in tissue and cellular ensembles. This was shown by patterning different macroscopic copper-coated topographies with height differences up to 750 μm. To illustrate the applicability to tissue processing, 5 μm thick M000921 BRAF V600E+ melanoma cell blocks were stained with hematoxylin to create contours, lines, spots, gradients of the chemicals, and multiple spots over larger areas. The local staining was performed in an interactive manner using a joystick and a scripting module. The compactness, user-friendliness, and functionality of the cMFP will enable it to be adapted as a standard tool in research, development and diagnostic laboratories, particularly for the interaction with tissues and cells.

  10. Preparation and evaluation of enrofloxacin microspheres and tissue distribution in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kang, Jijun; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Zhensheng; Kong, Tao; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    New enrofloxacin microspheres were formulated, and their physical properties, lung-targeting ability, and tissue distribution in rats were examined. The microspheres had a regular and round shape. The mean diameter was 10.06 µm, and the diameter of 89.93% of all microspheres ranged from 7.0 µm to 30.0 µm. Tissue distribution of the microspheres was evaluated along with a conventional enrofloxacin preparation after a single intravenous injection (7.5 mg of enrofloxacin/kg bw). The results showed that the elimination half-life (t1/2β) of enrofloxacin from lung was prolonged from 7.94 h for the conventional enrofloxacin to 13.28 h for the microspheres. Area under the lung concentration versus time curve from 0 h to ∞ (AUC00∞) was increased from 11.66 h·µg/g to 508.00 h·µg/g. The peak concentration (Cmax) in lung was increased from 5.95 µg/g to 93.36 µg/g. Three lung-targeting parameters were further assessed and showed that the microspheres had remarkable lung-targeting capabilities.

  11. Preparation and properties of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxylapatite (HA) hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F; Ma, M; Lu, L; Pan, Z; Zhou, W; Cai, J; Luo, S; Zeng, W; Yin, F

    2017-05-20

    A novel bioactive hydrogel for cartilage tissue based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxylapatite (HA) were prepared, the effects of its component contents on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the hydrogel were investigated. The important properties of the scaffold composites, such as density, porosity, compressive modulus and microstructure were studied and analyzed through various measurements and methods. The biodegradability of hydrogel was evaluated by soaking the samples into artificial degradation solution at body temperature (36 - 37 oC) in vitro. Experimental results showed that the PVA/HA hydrogels had a density of 0.572 - 0.683 g/cm3, a porosity of 63.25 - 96.14% and a compressive modulus of 5.62 - 8.24 MP. The HA compound in the hydrogels enhanced the biodegradation significantly and linearly increased the rate of biodegradation by 2.3 - 8.5 %. The compressive modulus of PVA/HA exhibited a linear reduce to 0.86 - 1.53 MP with the time of degradation. The scaffold composites PVA/HA possess a high porosity, decent compressive modulus and good biodegradability. After further optimizing the structure and properties, this composite might be considered as novel hydrogel biomaterials to be applied in the field of cartilage tissue engineering.

  12. Evaluation of sample preparation methods and optimization of nickel determination in vegetable tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fernando dos Santos Salazar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nickel, although essential to plants, may be toxic to plants and animals. It is mainly assimilated by food ingestion. However, information about the average levels of elements (including Ni in edible vegetables from different regions is still scarce in Brazil. The objectives of this study were to: (a evaluate and optimize a method for preparation of vegetable tissue samples for Ni determination; (b optimize the analytical procedures for determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS and by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption (ETAAS in vegetable samples and (c determine the Ni concentration in vegetables consumed in the cities of Lorena and Taubaté in the Vale do Paraíba, State of São Paulo, Brazil. By means of the analytical technique for determination by ETAAS or FAAS, the results were validated by the test of analyte addition and recovery. The most viable method tested for quantification of this element was HClO4-HNO3 wet digestion. All samples but carrot tissue collected in Lorena contained Ni levels above the permitted by the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The most disturbing results, requiring more detailed studies, were the Ni concentrations measured in carrot samples from Taubaté, where levels were five times higher than permitted by Brazilian regulations.

  13. Preparation and Evaluation of Gelatin-Chitosan-Nanobioglass 3D Porous Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchan Maji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to prepare and characterize bioglass-natural biopolymer based composite scaffold and evaluate its bone regeneration ability. Bioactive glass nanoparticles (58S in the size range of 20–30 nm were synthesized using sol-gel method. Porous scaffolds with varying bioglass composition from 10 to 30 wt% in chitosan, gelatin matrix were fabricated using the method of freeze drying of its slurry at 40 wt% solids loading. Samples were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde to obtain interconnected porous 3D microstructure with improved mechanical strength. The prepared scaffolds exhibited >80% porosity with a mean pore size range between 100 and 300 microns. Scaffold containing 30 wt% bioglass (GCB 30 showed a maximum compressive strength of 2.2±0.1 MPa. Swelling and degradation studies showed that the scaffold had excellent properties of hydrophilicity and biodegradability. GCB 30 scaffold was shown to be noncytotoxic and supported mesenchymal stem cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation as indicated by MTT assay and RUNX-2 expression. Higher cellular activity was observed in GCB 30 scaffold as compared to GCB 0 scaffold suggesting the fact that 58S bioglass nanoparticles addition into the scaffold promoted better cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Thus, the study showed that the developed composite scaffolds are potential candidates for regenerating damaged bone tissue.

  14. Affinity imaging mass spectrometry (AIMS): high-throughput screening for specific small molecule interactions with frozen tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, T; Kawabata, S; Taira, S; Okuno, A; Mikawa, R; Murayama, S; Tanaka, K; Takikawa, O

    2015-11-07

    A novel screening system, using affinity imaging mass spectrometry (AIMS), has been developed to identify protein aggregates or organ structures in unfixed human tissue. Frozen tissue sections are positioned on small (millimetre-scale) stainless steel chips and incubated with an extensive library of small molecules. Candidate molecules showing specific affinity for the tissue section are identified by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). As an example application, we screened over a thousand compounds against Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue and identified several compounds with high affinity for AD brain sections containing tau deposits compared to age-matched controls. It should also be possible to use AIMS to isolate chemical compounds with affinity for tissue structures or components that have been extensively modified by events such as oxidation, phosphorylation, acetylation, aggregation, racemization or truncation, for example, due to aging. It may also be applicable to biomarker screening programs.

  15. Human brain receptor autoradiography using whole hemisphere sections: a general method that minimizes tissue artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirion, R.; Robitaille, Y.; Martial, J.; Chabot, J.G.; Lemoine, P.; Pilapil, C.; Dalpe, M.

    1987-01-01

    A general method for the preparation of high-quality, mostly ice-crystal-artefact-free whole human brain hemisphere sections is described. Upon receipt, hemispheres are divided; one is then fixed in buffered 10% formalin for neuropathological analysis while the other is cut in 8-10-mm-thick coronal slices that are then rapidly frozen in 2-methylbutane at -40 degrees C (10-15 sec) before being placed in the brain bank at -80 degrees C. Such rapid freezing markedly decreases the formation of ice-crystal artefacts. Whole-hemisphere 20-micron thick sections are then cut and mounted onto lantern-type gelatin-coated slides. These sections are subsequently used for both qualitative and quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. Examples of data obtained are given by using various radioligands labelling classical neutrotransmitter, neuropeptide, enzyme, and ion channel receptor binding sites. This method should be useful for the obtention of various receptor maps in human brain. Such information could be most useful for in vivo receptor visualization studies using positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. It could also indicate if a given receptor population is specifically and selectively altered in certain brain diseases, eventually leading to the development of new therapeutic approaches

  16. Antigen retrieval prior to on-tissue digestion of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour tissue sections yields oxidation of proline residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djidja, Marie-Claude; Claude, Emmanuelle; Scriven, Peter; Allen, David W; Carolan, Vikki A; Clench, Malcolm R

    2017-07-01

    MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has been shown to allow the study of protein distribution and identification directly within formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. However, direct protein identification from tissue sections remains challenging due to signal interferences and/or existing post-translational or other chemical modifications. The use of antigen retrieval (AR) has been demonstrated for unlocking proteins prior to in situ enzymatic digestion and MALDI-MSI analysis of FFPE tissue sections. In the work reported here, the identification of proline oxidation, which may occur when performing the AR protocol, is described. This facilitated and considerably increased the number of identified peptides when adding proline oxidation as a variable modification to the MASCOT search criteria. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Choice of Illumination System & Fluorophore for Multiplex Immunofluorescence on FFPE Tissue Sections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Prost

    Full Text Available The recent availability of novel dyes and alternative light sources to facilitate complex tissue immunofluorescence studies such as multiplex labelling has not been matched by reports critically evaluating the considerations and relative benefits of these new tools, particularly in combination. Product information is often limited to wavelengths used for older fluorophores (FITC, TRITC & corresponding Alexa dyes family. Consequently, novel agents such as Quantum dots are not widely appreciated or used, despite highly favourable properties including extremely bright emission, stability and potentially reduced tissue autofluorescence at the excitation wavelength. Using spectral analysis, we report here a detailed critical appraisal and comparative evaluation of different light sources and fluorophores in multiplex immunofluorescence of clinical biopsy sections. The comparison includes mercury light, metal halide and 3 different LED-based systems, using 7 Qdots (525, 565, 585, 605, 625, 705, Cy3 and Cy5. We discuss the considerations relevant to achieving the best combination of light source and fluorophore for accurate multiplex fluorescence quantitation. We highlight practical limitations and confounders to quantitation with filter-based approaches.

  18. 75 FR 48 - Amendments to the Section 7216 Regulations-Disclosure or Use of Information by Preparers of Returns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... business; the disclosure or use of statistical compilations of data under section 7216 of the Internal... return preparation businesses to always produce a statistical compilation that meets the 25 tax return... statistical compilation in conjunction with the sale or disposition of a tax return preparation business only...

  19. Evaluation tissue dissolution property of 2.5 % Sodium Hypochlorite Prepared by Hydrochloric Acid and Sodium Bicarbonate: An in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Razavian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Successful endodontic treatment requires chemical preparation in addition to mechanical preparation. The most common material for chemical preparations is sodium hypochlorite. One way to reduce the effects of pH adjustment is the use of sodium hypochlorite. The present paper was conducted to examine the effect of dilution with hydrochloric acid and sodium bicarbonate and reduce pH on ability of tissue solubility of sodium hypochlorite. The present study was conducted in vitro on bovine muscle tissue. Ability of tissue solubility was conducted in four groups respectively with active ingredient including 1 sodium hypochlorite diluted with distilled water 2 sodium hypochlorite diluted with sodium bicarbonate 3 sodium hypochlorite diluted with hydrochloric acid and finally 4 distilled water (control group. Each sample was firstly weighed and then placed in contact with 10 m/L solution for 60 minutes (five 12 -minute intervals. The sample was weighted every five minutes and solution was renewed. The results were analyzed using SPSS-21 Software based on variance analysis, Tukey and T-test (α=0.05. The findings showed that there was significant difference between first, second and third groups in terms of ability of tissue solubility. However, the tissue solubility in second and third groups was lower than first group and it was similar in second and third groups (P Value <0.001. Reduction of sodium bicarbonate PH using sodium hypochlorite and hydrochloric acid reduces ability of tissue solubility in sodium hypochlorite.

  20. Preparation and characterization of chitosan-natural nano hydroxyapatite-fucoidan nanocomposites for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Baboucarr; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Anil, Sukumaran; Shim, Min Suk; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2016-12-01

    Solid three dimensional (3D) composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering were prepared using the freeze-drying method. The scaffolds were composed of chitosan, natural nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) and fucoidan in the following combinations: chitosan, chitosan-fucoidan, chitosan-nHA, and chitosan-nHA-fucoidan. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and optical microscopy (OM) were used to determine the physiochemical constituents and the morphology of the scaffolds. The addition of nHA into the chitosan-fucoidan composite scaffold reduced the water uptake and water retention. FT-IR analysis confirmed the presence of a phosphate group in the chitosan-nHA-fucoidan scaffold. This group is present because of the presence of nHA (isolated via alkaline hydrolysis from salmon fish bones). Microscopic results indicated that the dispersion of nHA and fucoidan in the chitosan matrix was uniform with a pore size of 10-400μm. The composite demonstrated a suitable micro architecture for cell growth and nutrient supplementation. This compatibility was further elucidated in vitro using periosteum-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs). The cells demonstrated high biocompatibility and excellent mineralization for the chitosan-nHA-fucoidan scaffold. We believe that a chitosan-nHA-fucoidan composite is a promising biomaterial for the scaffold that can be used for bone tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparation of thermosensitive magnetic liposome encapsulated recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for targeted thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hao-Lung [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jyh-Ping, E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Health Industry and Technology, Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Tai-Shan, New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) was encapsulated in thermosensitive magnetic liposome (TML) prepared from 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, distearolyphosphatidyl ethanolamine-N-poly(ethylene glycol) 2000, cholesterol and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles by solvent evaporation/sonication and freeze-thaw cycles method. Response surface methodology was proved to be a powerful tool to predict the drug encapsulation efficiency and temperature-sensitive drug release. Validation experiments verified the accuracy of the model that provides a simple and effective method for fabricating TML with controllable encapsulation efficiency and predictable temperature-sensitive drug release behavior. The prepared samples were characterized for physico-chemical properties by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Temperature-sensitive release of rtPA could be confirmed from in vitro thrombolysis experiments. A thrombolytic drug delivery system using TML could be proposed for magnetic targeted delivery of rtPA to the site of thrombus followed by temperature-triggered controlled drug release in an alternating magnetic field. - Highlights: • rtPA and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} MNP were encapsulated in thermosensitive magnetic liposome (TML). • RSM could predict the drug encapsulation efficiency and temperature-sensitive drug release from TML. • Temperature-sensitive release of rtPA was confirmed from in vitro thrombolysis experiments. • TML-rtPA will be useful as a magnetic targeted nanodrug to improve clinical thrombolytic therapy.

  2. A comparison of sample preparation strategies for biological tissues and subsequent trace element analysis using LA-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonta, Maximilian; Török, Szilvia; Hegedus, Balazs; Döme, Balazs; Limbeck, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is one of the most commonly applied methods for lateral trace element distribution analysis in medical studies. Many improvements of the technique regarding quantification and achievable lateral resolution have been achieved in the last years. Nevertheless, sample preparation is also of major importance and the optimal sample preparation strategy still has not been defined. While conventional histology knows a number of sample pre-treatment strategies, little is known about the effect of these approaches on the lateral distributions of elements and/or their quantities in tissues. The technique of formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE) has emerged as the gold standard in tissue preparation. However, the potential use for elemental distribution studies is questionable due to a large number of sample preparation steps. In this work, LA-ICP-MS was used to examine the applicability of the FFPE sample preparation approach for elemental distribution studies. Qualitative elemental distributions as well as quantitative concentrations in cryo-cut tissues as well as FFPE samples were compared. Results showed that some metals (especially Na and K) are severely affected by the FFPE process, whereas others (e.g., Mn, Ni) are less influenced. Based on these results, a general recommendation can be given: FFPE samples are completely unsuitable for the analysis of alkaline metals. When analyzing transition metals, FFPE samples can give comparable results to snap-frozen tissues. Graphical abstract Sample preparation strategies for biological tissues are compared with regard to the elemental distributions and average trace element concentrations.

  3. Porous PEOT/PBT scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: preparation, characterization, and in vitro bone marrow cell culturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claase, M.B.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Mendes, S.C.; Mendes, Sandra C.; de Bruijn, Joost Dick; Feijen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    The preparation, characterization, and in vitro bone marrow cell culturing on porous PEOT/PBT copolymer scaffolds are described. These scaffolds are meant for use in bone tissue engineering. Previous research has shown that PEOT/PBT copolymers showed in vivo degradation, calcification, and bone

  4. Diagnostic utility of melanin production by fungi: Study on tissue sections and culture smears with Masson-Fontana stain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Challa Sundaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dematiaceous fungi appear brown in tissue section due to melanin in their cell walls. When the brown color is not seen on routine H and E and culture is not available, differentiation of dematiaceous fungi from other fungi is difficult on morphology alone. Aims and Objective: To study if melanin production by dematiaceous fungi can help differentiate them from other types of fungi. Materials and Methods: Fifty tissue sections of various fungal infections and 13 smears from cultures of different species of fungi were stained with Masson Fontana stain to assess melanin production. The tissue sections included biopsies from 26 culture-proven fungi and 24 biopsies of filamentous fungi diagnosed on morphology alone with no culture confirmation. Results: All culture-proven dematiaceous fungi and Zygomycetes showed strong positivity in sections and culture smears. Aspergillus sp showed variable positivity and intensity. Cryptococcus neoformans showed strong positivity in tissue sections and culture smears. Tissue sections of septate filamentous fungi (9/15, Zygomycetes (4/5, and fungi with both hyphal and yeast morphology (4/4 showed positivity for melanin. The septate filamentous fungi negative for melanin were from biopsy samples of fungal sinusitis including both allergic and invasive fungal sinusitis and colonizing fungal balls. Conclusion: Melanin is produced by both dematiaceous and non-dematiaceous fungi. Masson-Fontana stain cannot reliably differentiate dematiaceous fungi from other filamentous fungi like Aspergillus sp; however, absence of melanin in the hyphae may be used to rule out dematiaceous fungi from other filamentous fungi. In the differential diagnosis of yeast fungi, Cryptococcus sp can be differentiated from Candida sp by Masson-Fontana stain in tissue sections.

  5. Histone deacetylase 3 prepares brown adipose tissue for acute thermogenic challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmett, Matthew J.; Lim, Hee-Woong; Jager, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue is a thermogenic organ that dissipates chemical energy as heat to protect animals against hypothermia and to counteract metabolic disease1. However, the transcriptional mechanisms that determine the thermogenic capacity of brown adipose tissue before environmental cold...

  6. On the influence of spatial discretization on cross section preparation with HELIOS 1.9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.; Koch, R.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of many reactor calculations is the determination of the neutron flux and the nuclear power distribution. These distributions are in general calculated by solving the space and energy dependent static transport equation. Thus, a reliable computation of the neutron flux distribution within the reactor core would require the solution of the space-, energy- and angle-dependent neutron transport equation for the full nuclear reactor core. It is not yet feasible to solve exactly the neutron transport equation for realistic reactor core geometries in detail in practical use. Thus deterministic reactor calculations are split into the cell and lattice calculation based on static transport and the core simulation based on nodal codes. The cell and lattice calculations are mostly based on multi group transport calculations within two dimensions considering unstructured meshes. The resulting neutron flux is used for the preparation of few group cross sections like they are used in the nodal 3D full core simulation codes. One commercial standard product is the Studsvik Scandpower code system HELIOS 1.9. ''The transport method of HELIOS is called the CCCP method, because it is based on current coupling and collision probabilities (first-flight probabilities).. the system to be calculated consists of space elements that are coupled with each other and with the boundaries by interface currents, while the properties of each space element - its responses to sources and in-currents - are obtained from collision probabilities'' [ 1]. The applied collision probabilities method is based on the flat flux approximation. ''We assume that particles are emitted isotropically and uniformly within each discrete volume. This is known as the flat flux approximation. The flat flux approximation places a restriction on the mesh: if the flux varies rapidly within a region, the mesh should be refined sufficiently to ensure that the flux is well approximated by a piecewise - constant

  7. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Histone Deacetylases in Kidney Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ververis, Katherine; Marzully, Selly; Samuel, Chrishan S; Hewitson, Tim D; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent microscope imaging technologies are increasing in their applications and are being used on a wide scale. However methods used to quantify the level of fluorescence intensity are often not utilized-perhaps given the result may be immediately seen, quantification of the data may not seem necessary. However there are a number of reasons given to quantify fluorescent images including the importance of removing potential bias in the data upon observation as well as quantification of large numbers of images gives statistical power to detect subtle changes in experiments. In addition discreet localization of a protein could be detected without selection bias that may not be detectable by eye. Such data will be deemed useful when detecting the levels of HDAC enzymes within cells in order to develop more effective HDAC inhibitor compounds for use against multiple diseased states. Hence, we discuss a methodology devised to analyze fluorescent images using Image J to detect the mean fluorescence intensity of the 11 metal-dependent HDAC enzymes using murine kidney tissue sections as an example.

  8. Peripheral laser iridoplasty opens angle in plateau iris by thinning the cross-sectional tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ji Liu,1,2 Tania Lamba,1 David A Belyea1 1Department of Ophthalmology, The George Washington University, Washington DC, USA; 2Yale Eye Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Plateau iris syndrome has been described as persistent angle narrowing or occlusion with intraocular pressure elevation after peripheral iridotomy due to the abnormal plateau iris configuration. Argon laser peripheral iridoplasty (ALPI is an effective adjunct procedure to treat plateau iris syndrome. Classic theory suggests that the laser causes the contraction of the far peripheral iris stroma, "pulls" the iris away from the angle, and relieves the iris-angle apposition. We report a case of plateau iris syndrome that was successfully treated with ALPI. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography confirmed the angle was open at areas with laser treatment but remained appositionally closed at untreated areas. Further analysis suggested significant cross-sectional thinning of the iris at laser-treated areas in comparison with untreated areas. The findings indicate that APLI opens the angle, not only by contracting the iris stroma, but also by thinning the iris tissue at the crowded angle. This is consistent with the ALPI technique to aim at the iris as far peripheral as possible. This case also suggests that spectral domain optical coherence tomography is a useful adjunct imaging tool to gonioscopy in assessing the angle condition. Keywords: plateau iris, optic coherence tomography, argon laser peripheral iridoplasty, angle-closure glaucoma

  9. Spatial accuracy of 3D reconstructed radioluminographs of serial tissue sections and resultant absorbed dose estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, I.A.; Flynn, A.A.; Pedley, R.B.; Green, A.J.; El-Emir, E.; Dearling, J.L.J.; Boxer, G.M.; Boden, R.; Begent, R.H.J. [Cancer Research UK Targeting and Imaging Group, Department of Oncology, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Royal Free Campus, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-21

    Many agents using tumour-associated characteristics are deposited heterogeneously within tumour tissue. Consequently, tumour heterogeneity should be addressed when obtaining information on tumour biology or relating absorbed radiation dose to biological effect. We present a technique that enables radioluminographs of serial tumour sections to be reconstructed using automated computerized techniques, resulting in a three-dimensional map of the dose-rate distribution of a radiolabelled antibody. The purpose of this study is to assess the reconstruction accuracy. Furthermore, we estimate the potential error resulting from registration misalignment, for a range of beta-emitting radionuclides. We compare the actual dose-rate distribution with that obtained from the same activity distribution but with manually defined translational and rotational shifts. As expected, the error produced with the short-range {sup 14}C is much larger than that for the longer range {sup 90}Y; similarly values for the medium range {sup 131}I are between the two. Thus, the impact of registration inaccuracies is greater for short-range sources. (author)

  10. ToF-SIMS Parallel Imaging MS/MS of Lipid Species in Thin Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinen, Anne Lisa; Fisher, Gregory L; Heeren, Ron M A

    2017-01-01

    Unambiguous identification of detected species is essential in complex biomedical samples. To date, there are not many mass spectrometry imaging techniques that can provide both high spatial resolution and identification capabilities. A new and patented imaging tandem mass spectrometer, exploiting the unique characteristics of the nanoTOF II (Physical Electronics, USA) TOF-SIMS TRIFT instrument, was developed to address this.Tandem mass spectrometry is based on the selection of precursor ions from the full secondary ion spectrum (MS 1 ), followed by energetic activation and fragmentation, and collection of the fragment ions to obtain a tandem MS spectrum (MS 2 ). The PHI NanoTOF II mass spectrometer is equipped with a high-energy collision induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation cell as well as a second time-of-flight analyzer developed for simultaneous ToF-SIMS and tandem MS imaging experiments.We describe here the results of a ToF-SIMS imaging experiment on a thin tissue section of an infected zebrafish as a model organism for tuberculosis. The focus is on the obtained ion distribution plot of a fatty acid as well as its identification by tandem mass spectrometry.

  11. Preparation and characterization of gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres for hard tissue repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Shao Ching; Wang, Ming-Jia; Pai, Nai-Su; Yen, Shiow-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres composed of 21% gelatin (G) and 79% hydroxyapatite (HA) with uniform morphology and controllable size were synthesized from a mixed solution of Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , NH 4 H 2 PO 4 and gelatin by a wet-chemical method. Material analyses such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning/transmission electron microscopy examination (SEM/TEM) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) were used to characterize G–HA microspheres by analyzing their crystalline phase, microstructure, morphology and composition. HA crystals precipitate along G fibers to form nano-rods with diameters of 6–10 nm and tangle into porous microspheres after blending. The cell culture indicates that G–HA composite microspheres without any toxicity could enhance the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like cells. In a rat calvarial defect model, G–HA bioactive scaffolds were compared with fibrin glue (F) and Osteoset® Bone Graft Substitute (OS) for their capacity of regenerating bone. Four weeks post-implantation, new bone, mineralization, and expanded blood vessel area were found in G–HA scaffolds, indicating greater osteoconductivity and bioactivity than F and OS. - Highlights: • G–HA composite microspheres were prepared by hydroxyapatite and gelatin. • In vitro tests indicated that the G–HA microspheres were biocompatible and bioactive. • In in vitro tests, G–HA microspheres could be applied in hard tissue engineering. • G–HA had healed the bone defect and provides a high proportion of surface area to open space

  12. Preparation and characterization of gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres for hard tissue repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Shao Ching [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Minimally Invasive Skull Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 1650 Taiwan Boulevard, Sect. 4, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurosurgery, ChangHua Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, 80 Chung Cheng Road, Sect. 2 Chiu Kuan Village, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Wang, Ming-Jia; Pai, Nai-Su [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Yen, Shiow-Kang, E-mail: skyen@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-01

    Gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres composed of 21% gelatin (G) and 79% hydroxyapatite (HA) with uniform morphology and controllable size were synthesized from a mixed solution of Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and gelatin by a wet-chemical method. Material analyses such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning/transmission electron microscopy examination (SEM/TEM) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) were used to characterize G–HA microspheres by analyzing their crystalline phase, microstructure, morphology and composition. HA crystals precipitate along G fibers to form nano-rods with diameters of 6–10 nm and tangle into porous microspheres after blending. The cell culture indicates that G–HA composite microspheres without any toxicity could enhance the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like cells. In a rat calvarial defect model, G–HA bioactive scaffolds were compared with fibrin glue (F) and Osteoset® Bone Graft Substitute (OS) for their capacity of regenerating bone. Four weeks post-implantation, new bone, mineralization, and expanded blood vessel area were found in G–HA scaffolds, indicating greater osteoconductivity and bioactivity than F and OS. - Highlights: • G–HA composite microspheres were prepared by hydroxyapatite and gelatin. • In vitro tests indicated that the G–HA microspheres were biocompatible and bioactive. • In in vitro tests, G–HA microspheres could be applied in hard tissue engineering. • G–HA had healed the bone defect and provides a high proportion of surface area to open space.

  13. A high-resolution optical imaging system for obtaining the serial transverse section images of biologic tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Zhang, Bin; Wu, Ping; Liu, Qian; Gong, Hui

    2007-05-01

    A high-resolution optical imaging system was designed and developed to obtain the serial transverse section images of the biologic tissue, such as the mouse brain, in which new knife-edge imaging technology, high-speed and high-sensitive line-scan CCD and linear air bearing stages were adopted and incorporated with an OLYMPUS microscope. The section images on the tip of the knife-edge were synchronously captured by the reflection imaging in the microscope while cutting the biologic tissue. The biologic tissue can be sectioned at interval of 250 nm with the same resolution of the transverse section images obtained in x and y plane. And the cutting job can be automatically finished based on the control program wrote specially in advance, so we save the mass labor of the registration of the vast images data. In addition, by using this system a larger sample can be cut than conventional ultramicrotome so as to avoid the loss of the tissue structure information because of splitting the tissue sample to meet the size request of the ultramicrotome.

  14. Study of sample preparation in the measurement of 36Ar(n, p)36Cl reaction cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Songsheng; Hemick, T.K.

    1992-01-01

    The preparation of enriched 36 Ar gas samples and 36 Cl samples for the use in the AMS measurement of 36 Ar(n, p) 36 Cl reaction cross section was described. The 36 Ar samples prepared had the volumes of about 0.4 ml and the weights of about 0.5 mg. The uncertainty in atomic numbers of 36 Ar was (0.3∼0.4)%. The reaction product, 36 Cl, in the 36 Ar was collected and the AgCl samples were prepared

  15. A Method for Preparing Spaceflight RNAlater-Fixed Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae Tissue for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R. Schultz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: In spaceflight experiments, tissues for morphologic study are fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, while tissues for molecular study are fixed in RNAlater; thus, an experiment containing both study components requires multiple fixation strategies. The possibility of using RNAlater-fixed materials for standard SEM-based morphometric investigation was explored to expand the library of tissues available for analysis and maximize usage of samples returned from spaceflight, but these technologies have wide application to any situation where recovery of biological resources is limited. Methods and Results: RNAlater-fixed samples were desalinated in distilled water, dehydrated through graded methanol, plunged into liquid ethane, and transferred to cryovials for freeze-substitution. Sample tissues were critical point dried, mounted, sputter-coated, and imaged. Conclusions: The protocol resulted in acceptable SEM images from RNAlater-fixed Arabidopsis thaliana tissue. The majority of the tissues remained intact, including general morphology and finer details such as root hairs and trichomes.

  16. Genetic evidence reveals improvement opportunities for tissue preparation in forensic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Rosa Elena; Sandoval, Alejandro; Arango, Juliana; Camargo, Martha Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Paraffin embedded tissues are an excellent alternative to obtain dna, especially when it is not possible to have fresh samples or when the tissue storage and preservation is not feasible; therefore, this sample is the only item available for matching purposes. The success in any genetic analysis implies having adequate tissue fixation and suitable dna extraction methods that allow to obtain good quality and quantity molecules, free of biological, chemical and microbiological con...

  17. Biocompatible, biodegradable polymer-based, lighter than or light as water scaffolds for tissue engineering and methods for preparation and use thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed Yusuf (Inventor); Laurencin, Cato T. (Inventor); Lu, Helen H. (Inventor); Botchwey, Edward (Inventor); Pollack, Solomon R. (Inventor); Levine, Elliot (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering prepared from biocompatible, biodegradable polymer-based, lighter than or light as water microcarriers and designed for cell culturing in vitro in a rotating bioreactor are provided. Methods for preparation and use of these scaffolds as tissue engineering devices are also provided.

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite-Resorbable Polymer Composites for Hard Tissue Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebner, Kristopher Robert

    Autografts are the orthopedic "gold standard" for repairing bone voids. Autografts are osteoconductive and do not elicit an immune response, but they are in short supply and require a second surgery to harvest the bone graft. Allografts are currently the most common materials used for the repair of segmental defects in hard tissue. Unlike autografts, allografts can cause an undesirable immune response and the possibility of disease transmission is a major concern. As an alternative to the above approaches, recent research efforts have focused on the use of composite materials made from hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioresorbable polymers, such as poly-L-lactide (PLLA). Recent results have shown that the surface hydroxides on HA can initiate the ring opening polymerization (ROP) of L-lactide and other lactones creating a composite with superior interfacial strength. This thesis demonstrates that the surface of porous biologically derived HA substrates, such as coralline HA and trabecular bone, can be used to initiate the ROP of L-lactide and other lactones from the vapor phase. This process increases the strength of the porous scaffold through the deposition of a thin, uniform polymer coating, while maintaining the porous structure. The kinetics of the chemical vapor deposition polymerization (CVDP) are described using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The reaction temperature and monomer vapor pressure are found to affect the rate of the polymerization. Also described in this thesis is the preparation of a porous polymer scaffold that mimics the structure of demineralized bone matrix (DBM). This demineralized bone matrix simulant (DBMS) is created using anorganic bovine bone as a template to initiate the polymerization of various lactones, followed by the removal of the HA scaffold. This material retained its shape and exhibits mechanical properties superior to DBM. Finally it is shown that HA can be used to initiate the ROP of a-caprolactam and the biocompatibility

  19. Hard dental tissue minimal-invasive preparation using contemporary polymer rotating instruments and laser

    OpenAIRE

    Beloica Miloš; Vulićević Zoran R.; Mandinić Zoran; Radović Ivana; Jovičić Olivera; Carević Momir; Tekić Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    Goal of contemporary dentistry is to decrease the patient’s discomfort during treatment. Dentists aim to achieve maximum with the newly developed dental materials as well as with new cavity preparation techniques in the shortest time span. Since the development of the first constructed borer (drilling machine) for caries removal, the preparation techniques have considerably changed. The progress of dental materials as well as the cavity preparation techniqu...

  20. In Situ Blotting : A Novel Method for Direct Transfer of Native Proteins from Sectioned Tissue to Blotting Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okabe, Masashi; Nyakas, Csaba; Buwalda, Bauke; Luiten, Paul G.M.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a novel technique for direct transfer of native proteins from unfixed frozen tissue sections to an immobilizing matrix, e.g., nitrocellulose, polyvinyliden difluoride, or positively charged nylon membranes. Proteins are directly blotted onto the membrane, providing optimal accessibility

  1. In situ hybridization for the detection of rust fungi in paraffin embedded plant tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust fungi infect a wide range of plant species making them of particular interest to plant pathologists. In order to study the interactions between these important pathogenic fungi and their host plants it is useful to be able to differentiate fungal tissue from plant tissue. This can be accomplish...

  2. A new laser reflectance system capable of measuring changing cross-sectional area of soft tissues during tensile testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhai, Gabriel G; Oliver, Michele L; Gordon, Karen D

    2009-09-01

    Determination of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues such as tendons and ligaments is dependent on the accurate measurement of their cross-sectional area (CSA). Measurement methods, which involve contact with the specimen, are problematic because soft tissues are easily deformed. Noncontact measurement methods are preferable in this regard, but may experience difficulty in dealing with the complex cross-sectional shapes and glistening surfaces seen in soft tissues. Additionally, existing CSA measurement systems are separated from the materials testing machine, resulting in the inability to measure CSA during testing. Furthermore, CSA measurements are usually made in a different orientation, and with a different preload, prior to testing. To overcome these problems, a noncontact laser reflectance system (LRS) was developed. Designed to fit in an Instron 8872 servohydraulic test machine, the system measures CSA by orbiting a laser transducer in a circular path around a soft tissue specimen held by tissue clamps. CSA measurements can be conducted before and during tensile testing. The system was validated using machined metallic specimens of various shapes and sizes, as well as different sizes of bovine tendons. The metallic specimens could be measured to within 4% accuracy, and the tendons to within an average error of 4.3%. Statistical analyses showed no significant differences between the measurements of the LRS and those of the casting method, an established measurement technique. The LRS was successfully used to measure the changing CSA of bovine tendons during uniaxial tensile testing. The LRS developed in this work represents a simple, quick, and accurate way of reconstructing complex cross-sectional profiles and calculating cross-sectional areas. In addition, the LRS represents the first system capable of automatically measuring changing CSA of soft tissues during tensile testing, facilitating the calculation of more accurate biomechanical properties.

  3. The use of allodermis prepared from Euro skin bank to prepare autologous tissue engineered skin for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, P; Ralston, D R; MacNeil, S

    2013-09-01

    Over the past two decades a range of 3D models for human skin have been described. Some include native collagen and intrinsic basement membrane proteins and fibroblasts, others are based on xenogeneic collagen or synthetic supports often without fibroblasts. The aim of this study was to look at the influence of media calcium, basement membrane and fibroblasts on the quality of 3D tissue engineered skin produced using human de-epidermized acellular dermis. In this study we deliberately used Euro skin as the source of the donor dermis to examine to what extent this could provide an effective dermal substrate for producing 3D skin for clinical use. Keratinocytes were cultured in the presence and absence of fibroblasts and both with and without basement membrane on decellularized dermis at calcium concentrations ranging from 250μM to 1.6mM over a period of 14 days. Results showed the formation of a well attached epithelium with many of the features of normal skin in the presence of a basement membrane. This was largely independent of the presence of fibroblasts and not greatly influenced by the concentration of calcium in the media. However there was a clear requirement for physiological levels of calcium in the formation of a stratified epithelium in the absence of a basement membrane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-dimensional reconstruction of colorectal tumors from serial tissue sections by computer graphics: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, S; Matsuzaki, H; Kondo, K; Ohtani, Y; Ihara, A; Hiki, Y; Kakita, A; Kuwao, S

    2000-01-01

    We present herein the three-dimensional reconstruction of colorectal tumors, with particular reference to growth pattern into each layer of the colorectal wall, and measurement of tumor volume and surface area. Conventional tissue section images of colorectal tumors were analyzed using a computer graphics analysis program. The two-dimensional extent of invasion by each tumor into each layer of intestinal wall were determined from the images of each section. Based on data from multiple sections, tumor and surrounding normal tissue layers were reconstructed three-dimensionally, and volume and surface area of the tumors were determined. Using this technique, three-dimensional morphology of tumor and tumor progression into colorectal wall could be determined. Volume and surface area of the colon tumor were 4871 mm3 and 1741 mm2, respectively. Volume and surface area of the rectal tumor were 1090 mm3 and 877 mm2, respectively. This technique may provide a new approach for pathological analysis of colorectal carcinoma.

  5. Fieldcrest Cannon, Inc. Advanced Technical Preparation. Statistical Process Control (SPC). Safety Section: Modules 1-3. Instructor Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averitt, Sallie D.

    These three modules, which were developed for use by instructors in a manufacturing firm's advanced technical preparation program, contain the materials required to present the safety section of the plant's adult-oriented, job-specific competency-based training program. The 3 modules contain 12 lessons on the following topics: lockout/tagout…

  6. Preparation of 235mU targets for 235U(n,n')235mU cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, E.M.; Vieira, D.J.; Rundberg, R.S.; Glover, S.; Hynek, D.; Jansen, Y.; Becker, J.; Macri, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the preparation of samples for an experiment to measure the cross-section for 235 U(n,n') 235m U in a fast fission spectrum of neutrons provided by a fast pulsed reactor/critical assembly. Samples of 235m U have been prepared for the calibration of the internal conversion electron detector that is used for the 235m U measurement. Two methods are described for the preparation of 235 mU. The first method used a U-Pu chemical separation based on anion-exchange chromatography and the second method used an alpha recoil collection method. Thin, uniform samples of 235m U+ 235 U were prepared for the experiment using electrodeposition. (author)

  7. Separating spectral mixtures in hyperspectral image data using independent component analysis: validation with oral cancer tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duann, Jeng-Ren; Jan, Chia-Ing; Ou-Yang, Mang; Lin, Chia-Yi; Mo, Jen-Feng; Lin, Yung-Jiun; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiou, Jin-Chern

    2013-12-01

    Recently, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems, which can provide 100 or more wavelengths of emission autofluorescence measures, have been used to delineate more complete spectral patterns associated with certain molecules relevant to cancerization. Such a spectral fingerprint may reliably correspond to a certain type of molecule and thus can be treated as a biomarker for the presence of that molecule. However, the outcomes of HSI systems can be a complex mixture of characteristic spectra of a variety of molecules as well as optical interferences due to reflection, scattering, and refraction. As a result, the mixed nature of raw HSI data might obscure the extraction of consistent spectral fingerprints. Here we present the extraction of the characteristic spectra associated with keratinized tissues from the HSI data of tissue sections from 30 oral cancer patients (31 tissue samples in total), excited at two different wavelength ranges (330 to 385 and 470 to 490 nm), using independent and principal component analysis (ICA and PCA) methods. The results showed that for both excitation wavelength ranges, ICA was able to resolve much more reliable spectral fingerprints associated with the keratinized tissues for all the oral cancer tissue sections with significantly higher mean correlation coefficients as compared to PCA (p<0.001).

  8. Effective melanin depigmentation of human and murine ocular tissues: an improved method for paraffin and frozen sections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Manicam

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The removal of excessive melanin pigments that obscure ocular tissue morphology is important to address scientific questions and for differential diagnosis of ocular tumours based on histology. Thus, the goal of the present study was to establish an effective and fast melanin bleaching method for paraffin and frozen mouse and human ocular tissues. METHODS: Paraffin-embedded and frozen ocular specimens from mice and human donors were subjected to bleaching employing two methods. The first employed potassium permanganate (KMnO4 with oxalic acid, and the second 10% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. To determine optimal bleaching conditions, depigmentation was carried out at various incubation times. The effect of diluents used for 10% H2O2 was assessed using phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, and deionized water. Three different slide types and two fixatives, which were ice-cold acetone with 80% methanol, and 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA were used to determine the optimal conditions for better tissue adherence during bleaching. All tissues were stained in hematoxylin and eosin for histological evaluation. RESULTS: Optimal bleaching was achieved using warm 10% H2O2 diluted in PBS at 65°C for 120 minutes. Chromium-gelatin-coated slides prevented tissue detachment. Adherence of cryosections was also improved with post-fixation using 4% PFA and overnight air-drying at RT after cryosectioning. Tissue morphology was preserved under these conditions. Conversely, tissues bleached in KMnO4/oxalic acid demonstrated poor depigmentation with extensive tissue damage. CONCLUSIONS: Warm dilute H2O2 at 65°C for 120 minutes rapidly and effectively bleached both cryo- and paraffin sections of murine and human ocular tissues.

  9. Effective melanin depigmentation of human and murine ocular tissues: an improved method for paraffin and frozen sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicam, Caroline; Pitz, Susanne; Brochhausen, Christoph; Grus, Franz H; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Gericke, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The removal of excessive melanin pigments that obscure ocular tissue morphology is important to address scientific questions and for differential diagnosis of ocular tumours based on histology. Thus, the goal of the present study was to establish an effective and fast melanin bleaching method for paraffin and frozen mouse and human ocular tissues. Paraffin-embedded and frozen ocular specimens from mice and human donors were subjected to bleaching employing two methods. The first employed potassium permanganate (KMnO4) with oxalic acid, and the second 10% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). To determine optimal bleaching conditions, depigmentation was carried out at various incubation times. The effect of diluents used for 10% H2O2 was assessed using phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and deionized water. Three different slide types and two fixatives, which were ice-cold acetone with 80% methanol, and 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA) were used to determine the optimal conditions for better tissue adherence during bleaching. All tissues were stained in hematoxylin and eosin for histological evaluation. Optimal bleaching was achieved using warm 10% H2O2 diluted in PBS at 65°C for 120 minutes. Chromium-gelatin-coated slides prevented tissue detachment. Adherence of cryosections was also improved with post-fixation using 4% PFA and overnight air-drying at RT after cryosectioning. Tissue morphology was preserved under these conditions. Conversely, tissues bleached in KMnO4/oxalic acid demonstrated poor depigmentation with extensive tissue damage. Warm dilute H2O2 at 65°C for 120 minutes rapidly and effectively bleached both cryo- and paraffin sections of murine and human ocular tissues.

  10. Proteoglycan and proteome profiling of central human pulmonary fibrotic tissue utilizing miniaturized sample preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Johan; Larsen, Kristoffer; Hansson, Lennart

    2002-01-01

    -dimensional electrophoresis was interfaced to miniaturized sample preparation techniques using microcapillary extraction. Four protein groups were identified; cytoskeletal, adhesion, scavenger and metabolic proteins. These patient's proteomes showed a high degree of heterogeneity between patients but larger homogeneity...

  11. Hair cell counts in a rat model of sound damage: Effects of tissue preparation & identification of regions of hair cell loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christopher; Kennon-McGill, Stefanie; Freemyer, Andrea; Shum, Axel; Staecker, Hinrich; Durham, Dianne

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to intense sound can damage or kill cochlear hair cells (HC). This loss of input typically manifests as noise induced hearing loss, but it can also be involved in the initiation of other auditory disorders such as tinnitus or hyperacusis. In this study we quantify changes in HC number following exposure to one of four sound damage paradigms. We exposed adult, anesthetized Long-Evans rats to a unilateral 16 kHz pure tone that varied in intensity (114 dB or 118 dB) and duration (1, 2, or 4 h) and sacrificed animals 2-4 weeks later. We compared two different methods of tissue preparation, plastic embedding/sectioning and whole mount dissection, for quantifying hair cell loss as a function of frequency. We found that the two methods of tissue preparation produced largely comparable cochleograms, with whole mount dissections allowing a more rapid evaluation of hair cell number. Both inner and outer hair cell loss was observed throughout the length of the cochlea irrespective of sound damage paradigm. Inner HC loss was either equal to or greater than outer HC loss. Increasing the duration of sound exposures resulted in more severe HC loss, which included all HC lesions observed in an analogous shorter duration exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Morrissey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In vivo gene therapy directed at tissues of mesenchymal origin could potentially augment healing. We aimed to assess the duration and magnitude of transene expression in vivo in mice and ex vivo in human tissues. Methods. Using bioluminescence imaging, plasmid and adenoviral vector-based transgene expression in murine quadriceps in vivo was examined. Temporal control was assessed using a doxycycline-inducible system. An ex vivo model was developed and optimised using murine tissue, and applied in ex vivo human tissue. Results. In vivo plasmid-based transgene expression did not silence in murine muscle, unlike in liver. Although maximum luciferase expression was higher in muscle with adenoviral delivery compared with plasmid, expression reduced over time. The inducible promoter cassette successfully regulated gene expression with maximum levels a factor of 11 greater than baseline. Expression was re-induced to a similar level on a temporal basis. Luciferase expression was readily detected ex vivo in human muscle and tendon. Conclusions. Plasmid constructs resulted in long-term in vivo gene expression in skeletal muscle, in a controllable fashion utilising an inducible promoter in combination with oral agents. Successful plasmid gene transfection in human ex vivo mesenchymal tissue was demonstrated for the first time.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Polycaprolactone / Layered Double Hydroxide Nanocomposite for Hard Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Baradaran

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the use of nanomaterials in bone tissue engineering scaffold has been considered due to its imitating the structure of natural bone tissue which contains a nanocomposite structure mixed with a three-dimensional matrix. In the meantime, Polycaprol actone has been used as a bio-polymer in bone tissue engineering applications as a scaffold. The aim of this study is to develop porous scaffolds made of polycaprol actone/layered double hydroxide biocomposite, with appropriate mechanical, bioactive and biological properties, for bone tissue engineering application. The nanocomposite scaffolds were fabricated by the particulate leaching method and freeze-drying method. In this study, MG63 cells (osteosarcoma was investigated for cellular study. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed uniform distribution of ceramic phase in polycaprol actone matrix. The results of mechanical tests showed the increase in young’s modulus after addition of ceramic phase. The microscopic investigations demonstrated that the pores generated after addition of ceramic phase and the average size of pores was as large as 100-600μm. Also by the addition of LDH, the hydrophilicity of PCL increased but the rate of hydroxyapatite formation was delayed due to presence of magnesium ions. The cell culture experiments confirmed the attachment and proliferation of cells on the scaffolds. The results showed that the fabricated scaffolds have the potential to be used in cancellous bone tissue engineering.

  14. Preparation of dexamethasone-loaded biphasic calcium phosphate nanoparticles/collagen porous composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2018-02-01

    Although bone is regenerative, its regeneration capacity is limited. For bone defects beyond a critical size, further intervention is required. As an attractive strategy, bone tissue engineering (bone TE) has been widely investigated to repair bone defects. However, the rapid and effective bone regeneration of large non-healing defects is still a great challenge. Multifunctional scaffolds having osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity are desirable to fasten functional bone tissue regeneration. In the present study, biomimetic composite scaffolds of collagen and biphasic calcium phosphate nanoparticles (BCP NPs) with a controlled release of dexamethasone (DEX) and the controlled pore structures were prepared for bone TE. DEX was introduced in the BCP NPs during preparation of the BCP NPs and hybridized with collagen scaffolds, which pore structures were controlled by using pre-prepared ice particulates as a porogen material. The composite scaffolds had well controlled and interconnected pore structures, high mechanical strength and a sustained release of DEX. The composite scaffolds showed good biocompatibility and promoted osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs when used for three-dimensional culture of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Subcutaneous implantation of the composite scaffolds at the dorsa of athymic nude mice demonstrated that they facilitated the ectopic bone tissue regeneration. The results indicated the DEX-loaded BCP NPs/collagen composite scaffolds had high potential for bone TE. Scaffolds play a crucial role for regeneration of large bone defects. Biomimetic scaffolds having the same composition of natural bone and a controlled release of osteoinductive factors are desirable for promotion of bone regeneration. In this study, composite scaffolds of collagen and biphasic CaP nanoparticles (BCP NPs) with a controlled release nature of dexamethasone (DEX) were prepared and their porous structures were controlled by using ice particulates

  15. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J; Grune, Tilman

    2015-08-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples. © 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Preparation of a Carbon Doped Tissue-Mimicking Material with High Dielectric Properties for Microwave Imaging Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siang-Wen Lan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the oil-in-gelatin based tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs doped with carbon based materials including carbon nanotube, graphene ink or lignin were prepared. The volume percent for gelatin based mixtures and oil based mixtures were both around 50%, and the doping amounts were 2 wt %, 4 wt %, and 6 wt %. The effect of doping material and amount on the microwave dielectric properties including dielectric constant and conductivity were investigated over an ultra-wide frequency range from 2 GHz to 20 GHz. The coaxial open-ended reflection technology was used to evaluate the microwave dielectric properties. Six measured values in different locations of each sample were averaged and the standard deviations of all the measured dielectric properties, including dielectric constant and conductivity, were less than one, indicating a good uniformity of the prepared samples. Without doping, the dielectric constant was equal to 23 ± 2 approximately. Results showed with doping of carbon based materials that the dielectric constant and conductivity both increased about 5% to 20%, and the increment was dependent on the doping amount. By proper selection of doping amount of the carbon based materials, the prepared material could map the required dielectric properties of special tissues. The proposed materials were suitable for the phantom used in the microwave medical imaging system.

  17. Is chronic fatigue syndrome a connective tissue disorder? A cross-sectional study in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Putte, E. M.; Uiterwaal, C. S. P. M.; Bots, M. L.; Kuis, W.; Kimpen, J. L. L.; Engelbert, R. H. H.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate whether constitutional laxity of the connective tissues is more frequently present in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) than in healthy controls. Increased joint hypermobility in patients with CFS has been previously described, as has lower blood pressure in fatigued

  18. Combined in situ zymography, immunofluorescence, and staining of iron oxide particles in paraffin-embedded, zinc-fixed tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeckel, Akvile; Schoenzart, Lena; Appler, Franziska; Schnorr, Joerg; Taupitz, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Schellenberger, Eyk

    2012-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles are used as potent contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. In histology, these particles are frequently visualized by Prussian blue iron staining of aldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Recently, zinc salt-based fixative was shown to preserve enzyme activity in paraffin-embedded tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that zinc fixation allows combining in situ zymography with fluorescence immunohistochemistry (IHC) and iron staining for advanced biologic investigation of iron oxide particle accumulation. Very small iron oxide particles, developed for magnetic resonance angiography, were applied intravenously to BALB/c nude mice. After 3 hours, spleens were explanted and subjected to zinc fixation and paraffin embedding. Cut tissue sections were further processed to in situ zymography, IHC, and Prussian blue staining procedures. The combination of in situ zymography as well as IHC with subsequent Prussian blue iron staining on zinc-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues resulted in excellent histologic images of enzyme activity, protease distribution, and iron oxide particle accumulation. The combination of all three stains on a single section allowed direct comparison with only moderate degradation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled substrate. This protocol is useful for investigating the biologic environment of accumulating iron oxide particles, with excellent preservation of morphology.

  19. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Infrared Microscopy for Label-Free and Automated Cancer Classification in Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuepper, Claus; Kallenbach-Thieltges, Angela; Juette, Hendrik; Tannapfel, Andrea; Großerueschkamp, Frederik; Gerwert, Klaus

    2018-05-16

    A feasibility study using a quantum cascade laser-based infrared microscope for the rapid and label-free classification of colorectal cancer tissues is presented. Infrared imaging is a reliable, robust, automated, and operator-independent tissue classification method that has been used for differential classification of tissue thin sections identifying tumorous regions. However, long acquisition time by the so far used FT-IR-based microscopes hampered the clinical translation of this technique. Here, the used quantum cascade laser-based microscope provides now infrared images for precise tissue classification within few minutes. We analyzed 110 patients with UICC-Stage II and III colorectal cancer, showing 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity of this label-free method as compared to histopathology, the gold standard in routine clinical diagnostics. The main hurdle for the clinical translation of IR-Imaging is overcome now by the short acquisition time for high quality diagnostic images, which is in the same time range as frozen sections by pathologists.

  20. Simple and high yielding method for preparing tissue specific extracellular matrix coatings for cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeQuach, Jessica A; Mezzano, Valeria; Miglani, Amar; Lange, Stephan; Keller, Gordon M; Sheikh, Farah; Christman, Karen L

    2010-09-27

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of a highly complex, tissue-specific network of proteins and polysaccharides, which help regulate many cellular functions. Despite the complex nature of the ECM, in vitro cell-based studies traditionally assess cell behavior on single ECM component substrates, which do not adequately mimic the in vivo extracellular milieu. We present a simple approach for developing naturally derived ECM coatings for cell culture that provide important tissue-specific cues unlike traditional cell culture coatings, thereby enabling the maturation of committed C2C12 skeletal myoblast progenitors and human embryonic stem cells differentiated into cardiomyocytes. Here we show that natural muscle-specific coatings can (i) be derived from decellularized, solubilized adult porcine muscle, (ii) contain a complex mixture of ECM components including polysaccharides, (iii) adsorb onto tissue culture plastic and (iv) promote cell maturation of committed muscle progenitor and stem cells. This versatile method can create tissue-specific ECM coatings, which offer a promising platform for cell culture to more closely mimic the mature in vivo ECM microenvironment.

  1. Preparation of biodegradable PLA/PLGA membranes with PGA mesh and their application for periodontal guided tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jin; Kang, Inn-Kyu [Department of Polymer Science, Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sankyuk-dong, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Suk Joon [Department of Biology, Sookmyung Women' s University, Hyochangwongil 52, Yongsan-gu, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Guw-Dong; Pai, Chaul-Min, E-mail: ikkang@knu.ac.k [Samyang Central R and D Center, 63-2 Hwaam-dong, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA)/poly(glycolide-co-lactide) copolymer (PLGA) membrane with polyglycolic acid (PGA) mesh was prepared to aid the effective regeneration of defective periodontal tissues. The microporous membrane used in this study consists of biodegradable polymers, and seems to have a structure to provide appropriate properties for periodontal tissue regeneration. Based on the albumin permeation test, it is known that the biodegradable membrane exhibits the suitable permeability of nutrients. The membrane maintained its physical integrity for 6-8 weeks, which could be sufficient to retain space in the periodontal pocket. Cell attachment and cytotoxicity tests were performed with respect to the evaluation of biocompatibility of the membrane. As a result, the membrane did not show any cytotoxicity. The safety and therapeutic efficacies of the biodegradable membranes were confirmed in animal tests.

  2. Author Contribution to the Pu Handbook II: Chapter 37 LLNL Integrated Sample Preparation Glovebox (TEM) Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of our Integrated Actinide Sample Preparation Laboratory (IASPL) commenced in 1998 driven by the need to perform transmission electron microscopy studies on naturally aged plutonium and its alloys looking for the microstructural effects of the radiological decay process (1). Remodeling and construction of a laboratory within the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate facilities at LLNL was required to turn a standard radiological laboratory into a Radiological Materials Area (RMA) and Radiological Buffer Area (RBA) containing type I, II and III workplaces. Two inert atmosphere dry-train glove boxes with antechambers and entry/exit fumehoods (Figure 1), having a baseline atmosphere of 1 ppm oxygen and 1 ppm water vapor, a utility fumehood and a portable, and a third double-walled enclosure have been installed and commissioned. These capabilities, along with highly trained technical staff, facilitate the safe operation of sample preparation processes and instrumentation, and sample handling while minimizing oxidation or corrosion of the plutonium. In addition, we are currently developing the capability to safely transfer small metallographically prepared samples to a mini-SEM for microstructural imaging and chemical analysis. The gloveboxes continue to be the most crucial element of the laboratory allowing nearly oxide-free sample preparation for a wide variety of LLNL-based characterization experiments, which includes transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, optical microscopy, electrical resistivity, ion implantation, X-ray diffraction and absorption, magnetometry, metrological surface measurements, high-pressure diamond anvil cell equation-of-state, phonon dispersion measurements, X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The sample preparation and materials processing capabilities in the IASPL have also facilitated experimentation at world-class facilities such as the

  3. Author Contribution to the Pu Handbook II: Chapter 37 LLNL Integrated Sample Preparation Glovebox (TEM) Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Mark A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-25

    The development of our Integrated Actinide Sample Preparation Laboratory (IASPL) commenced in 1998 driven by the need to perform transmission electron microscopy studies on naturally aged plutonium and its alloys looking for the microstructural effects of the radiological decay process (1). Remodeling and construction of a laboratory within the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate facilities at LLNL was required to turn a standard radiological laboratory into a Radiological Materials Area (RMA) and Radiological Buffer Area (RBA) containing type I, II and III workplaces. Two inert atmosphere dry-train glove boxes with antechambers and entry/exit fumehoods (Figure 1), having a baseline atmosphere of 1 ppm oxygen and 1 ppm water vapor, a utility fumehood and a portable, and a third double-walled enclosure have been installed and commissioned. These capabilities, along with highly trained technical staff, facilitate the safe operation of sample preparation processes and instrumentation, and sample handling while minimizing oxidation or corrosion of the plutonium. In addition, we are currently developing the capability to safely transfer small metallographically prepared samples to a mini-SEM for microstructural imaging and chemical analysis. The gloveboxes continue to be the most crucial element of the laboratory allowing nearly oxide-free sample preparation for a wide variety of LLNL-based characterization experiments, which includes transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, optical microscopy, electrical resistivity, ion implantation, X-ray diffraction and absorption, magnetometry, metrological surface measurements, high-pressure diamond anvil cell equation-of-state, phonon dispersion measurements, X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The sample preparation and materials processing capabilities in the IASPL have also facilitated experimentation at world-class facilities such as the

  4. Preparation of multigroup lumped fission product cross-sections from ENDF/B-VI for FBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devan, K.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Sridharan, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Multigroup pseudo fission product cross-sections were computed from the American evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VI, corresponding to various burnups of the proposed 500 MWe prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR), in India. The data were derived from the cross-sections of 111 selected fission products that account for almost complete capture of fission products in an FBR. The dependence of burnup on the pseudo fission product cross-sections, and comparison with other data sets, viz. JNDC, ENDF/B-IV and ABBN, are discussed. (author)

  5. Preparation of lumped fission product (FP) cross sections for a multigroup library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, S.; Corcuera, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    A method for the calculation of lumped Fission Product (FP) cross sections has been developed. The group constants fo each nuclide are generated by NJOY code, based on ENDF/B-V data. In this first version, cross section of 28 nuclides are lumped for typical characteristics of Binary Breeder Reactor (BBR). One energy group calculations are made for a 1000 MWe fast reactor to verify the influence of burnup, number of FP and fuel composition on the lumped fission product cross sections. (Author) [pt

  6. Hamstrings tendon graft preparation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the WhipKnotTM soft tissue cinch technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Masoumiganjgah

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAppropriate graft tension and secure graft incorporation inbone tunnels are essential for successful anterior cruciateligament (ACL reconstruction using hamstrings tendonautografts. The WhipKnot™ soft tissue cinch, introduced bySmith and Nephew in 2004, is an alternative option to thecommonly used whipstitch technique during preparation ofthe hamstring autograft in ACL reconstruction.AimsTo investigate the effectiveness of the WhipKnot™ softtissue cinch and technique during the preparation of thetendon graft for ACL reconstruction.MethodA total of 33 ACL reconstruction operations performedbetween February 2011 and December 2011 were includedin this study. These were performed by a single seniorsurgeon who used the Whipknot™ technique for thepreparation of each graft. Four were used for eachoperation; two for each end of the harvested hamstringstendons, including semitendinosus and gracilis tendonsrespectively.ResultsIn total, 132 WhipKnots were used during the kneeoperations. Use of the WhipKnot™ technique resulted insuccessful graft preparations, tensioning and effective graftplacement in the tibial and femoral tunnels in almost allinstances. Only one case of WhipKnot™ failure (slippagewas recorded.ConclusionThese results indicate that the Whipknot™ technique is asafe, reliable and practical option for the preparation of thehamstrings autografts.

  7. Preparation and characterization of chitosan-heparin composite matrices for blood contacting tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Qing; Gong Kai; Gong Yandao; Zhang Xiufang; Ao Qiang; Zhang Lihai; Hu Min

    2010-01-01

    Chitosan has been widely used for biomaterial scaffolds in tissue engineering because of its good mechanical properties and cytocompatibility. However, the poor blood compatibility of chitosan has greatly limited its biomedical utilization, especially for blood contacting tissue engineering. In this study, we exploited a polymer blending procedure to heparinize the chitosan material under simple and mild conditions to improve its antithrombogenic property. By an optimized procedure, a macroscopically homogeneous chitosan-heparin (Chi-Hep) blended suspension was obtained, with which Chi-Hep composite films and porous scaffolds were fabricated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and sulfur elemental analysis confirmed the successful immobilization of heparin in the composite matrices (i.e. films and porous scaffolds). Toluidine blue staining indicated that heparin was distributed homogeneously in the composite matrices. Only a small amount of heparin was released from the matrices during incubation in normal saline for 10 days. The composite matrices showed improved blood compatibility, as well as good mechanical properties and endothelial cell compatibility. These results suggest that the Chi-Hep composite matrices are promising candidates for blood contacting tissue engineering.

  8. Complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types prepared by inkjet printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Zhao, Weixin; Zhu, Jian-Ming; Albanna, Mohammad Z; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a versatile method for fabricating complex and heterogeneous three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs using simultaneous ink-jetting of multiple cell types. Human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs), canine smooth muscle cells (dSMCs), and bovine aortic endothelial cells (bECs), were separately mixed with ionic cross-linker calcium chloride (CaCl(2)), loaded into separate ink cartridges and printed using a modified thermal inkjet printer. The three cell types were delivered layer-by-layer to pre-determined locations in a sodium alginate-collagen composite located in a chamber under the printer. The reaction between CaCl(2) and sodium alginate resulted in a rapid formation of a solid composite gel and the printed cells were anchored in designated areas within the gel. The printing process was repeated for several cycles leading to a complex 3D multi-cell hybrid construct. The biological functions of the 3D printed constructs were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Each of the printed cell types maintained their viability and normal proliferation rates, phenotypic expression, and physiological functions within the heterogeneous constructs. The bioprinted constructs were able to survive and mature into functional tissues with adequate vascularization in vivo. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types using inkjet printing technology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Immunohistochemical Analysis in the Rat Central Nervous System and Peripheral Lymph Node Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzemovic, Milena Z; Zeitelhofer, Manuel; Leisser, Marianne; Köck, Ulricke; Kury, Angela; Olsson, Tomas

    2016-11-14

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) provides highly specific, reliable and attractive protein visualization. Correct performance and interpretation of an IHC-based multicolor labeling is challenging, especially when utilized for assessing interrelations between target proteins in the tissue with a high fat content such as the central nervous system (CNS). Our protocol represents a refinement of the standard immunolabeling technique particularly adjusted for detection of both structural and soluble proteins in the rat CNS and peripheral lymph nodes (LN) affected by neuroinflammation. Nonetheless, with or without further modifications, our protocol could likely be used for detection of other related protein targets, even in other organs and species than here presented.

  10. Preparation of scaffolds from human hair proteins for tissue-engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Vipin; Verma, Poonam; Ray, Alok R; Ray, Pratima

    2008-01-01

    Human hair proteins were isolated and purified for the fabrication of tissue-engineering scaffolds. Their cellular compatibility was studied using NIH3T3 mice fibroblast cells. The proteins were characterized using FTIR spectroscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for molecular weights and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for their isoelectric points (pIs). The molecular weights of keratins were in the range of 40-60 kilo-Daltons (kDa) and of matrix proteins were in the range of 15-30 kDa. The pIs of keratins were found to be in the range of 4.5-5.3. Sponges of the proteins were formed by lyophilization. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to examine the surface. Swelling studies were carried out in phosphate buffer saline at physiological pH 7.4. The hydrophilic character of the protein surface was studied by determining an average contact angle, which came to be 37 0 . The wells of tissue culture plates were coated with these proteins for studying the attachment and morphology of the cells. The protein detachment study was done to ensure the adsorption of proteins on the wells until the completion of the experiments. The cellular growth on a protein-coated surface showed three-dimensional 'bulged' morphology due to cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. The sponges of human hair proteins supported more cells for a longer period than control. The morphology and cell proliferation studies exhibited by NIH3T3 cells on these proteins have shown their potential to be used as tissue-engineering scaffolds with better cell-cell contacts and leucine-aspartic acid-valine (LDV)-mediated cell-matrix interactions

  11. Prepared to practice? Perception of career preparation and guidance of recent medical graduates at two campuses of a transnational medical school: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Sameer S; McGowan, Yvonne; McGee, Hannah; Whitford, David L

    2016-02-09

    Graduating medical students enter the workforce with substantial medical knowledge and experience, yet little is known about how well they are prepared for the transition to medical practice in diverse settings. We set out to compare perceptions of medical school graduates' career guidance with their perceptions of preparedness to practice as interns. We also set out to compare perceptions of preparedness for hospital practice between graduates from two transnational medical schools. This was a cross-sectional study. A Preparedness for Hospital Practice (PHPQ) survey and career guidance questionnaire was sent to recent medical graduates, incorporating additional free text responses on career preparation. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and tests of association including Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests. Forty three percent (240/555) of graduates responded to the survey: 39 % of respondents were domestic (Dublin, Ireland or Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain) and interning locally; 15 % were overseas students interning locally; 42 % were overseas students interning internationally and 4 % had not started internship. Two variables explained 13 % of the variation in preparedness for hospital practice score: having planned postgraduate education prior to entering medical school and having helpful career guidance in medical school. Overseas graduates interning internationally were more likely to have planned their postgraduate career path prior to entering medical school. Dublin graduates found their career guidance more helpful than Bahrain counterparts. The most cited shortcomings were lack of structured career advice and lack of advice on the Irish and Bahraini postgraduate systems. This study has demonstrated that early consideration of postgraduate career preparation and helpful medical school career guidance has a strong association with perceptions of preparedness of medical graduates for hospital practice. In an era of increasing

  12. Automation of 3D reconstruction of neural tissue from large volume of conventional serial section transmission electron micrographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2009-01-30

    We describe an approach for automation of the process of reconstruction of neural tissue from serial section transmission electron micrographs. Such reconstructions require 3D segmentation of individual neuronal processes (axons and dendrites) performed in densely packed neuropil. We first detect neuronal cell profiles in each image in a stack of serial micrographs with multi-scale ridge detector. Short breaks in detected boundaries are interpolated using anisotropic contour completion formulated in fuzzy-logic framework. Detected profiles from adjacent sections are linked together based on cues such as shape similarity and image texture. Thus obtained 3D segmentation is validated by human operators in computer-guided proofreading process. Our approach makes possible reconstructions of neural tissue at final rate of about 5 microm3/manh, as determined primarily by the speed of proofreading. To date we have applied this approach to reconstruct few blocks of neural tissue from different regions of rat brain totaling over 1000microm3, and used these to evaluate reconstruction speed, quality, error rates, and presence of ambiguous locations in neuropil ssTEM imaging data.

  13. Preparation and Evaluation of Gelatin-Chitosan-Nanobioglass 3D Porous Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Maji, Kanchan; Dasgupta, Sudip; Pramanik, Krishna; Bissoyi, Akalabya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and characterize bioglass-natural biopolymer based composite scaffold and evaluate its bone regeneration ability. Bioactive glass nanoparticles (58S) in the size range of 20?30?nm were synthesized using sol-gel method. Porous scaffolds with varying bioglass composition from 10 to 30?wt% in chitosan, gelatin matrix were fabricated using the method of freeze drying of its slurry at 40?wt% solids loading. Samples were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde t...

  14. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Decellularized Fibrocartilage "Book" Scaffold for Use in Tissue Engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyun Guo

    Full Text Available At the tendon-to-bone insertion, there is a unique transitional structure: tendon, non-calcified fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage, and bone. The reconstruction of this special graded structure after defects or damage is an important but challenging task in orthopedics. In particular, reconstruction of the fibrocartilage zone has yet to be successfully achieved. In this study, the development of a novel book-shape scaffold derived from the extracellular matrix of fibrocartilage was reported. Specifically, fibrocartilage from the pubic symphysis was obtained from rabbits and sliced into the shape of a book (dimensions: 10 mm × 3 mm × 1 mm with 10 layers, each layer (akin to a page of a book with a thickness of 100-μm. These fibrocartilage "book" scaffolds were decellularized using sequentially 3 freeze-thaw cycles, 0.1% Triton X-100 with 1.5 M KCl, 0.25% trypsin, and a nuclease. Histology and DNA quantification analysis confirmed substantial removal of cells from the fibrocartilage scaffolds. Furthermore, the quantities of DNA, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan in the fibrocartilage were markedly reduced following decellularization. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the intrinsic ultrastructure of the fibrocartilage tissue was well preserved. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that the novel "book" fibrocartilage scaffold could have potential applications in tissue engineering.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Decellularized Fibrocartilage "Book" Scaffold for Use in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liyun; Qu, Jin; Zheng, Cheng; Cao, Yong; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Hongbin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    At the tendon-to-bone insertion, there is a unique transitional structure: tendon, non-calcified fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage, and bone. The reconstruction of this special graded structure after defects or damage is an important but challenging task in orthopedics. In particular, reconstruction of the fibrocartilage zone has yet to be successfully achieved. In this study, the development of a novel book-shape scaffold derived from the extracellular matrix of fibrocartilage was reported. Specifically, fibrocartilage from the pubic symphysis was obtained from rabbits and sliced into the shape of a book (dimensions: 10 mm × 3 mm × 1 mm) with 10 layers, each layer (akin to a page of a book) with a thickness of 100-μm. These fibrocartilage "book" scaffolds were decellularized using sequentially 3 freeze-thaw cycles, 0.1% Triton X-100 with 1.5 M KCl, 0.25% trypsin, and a nuclease. Histology and DNA quantification analysis confirmed substantial removal of cells from the fibrocartilage scaffolds. Furthermore, the quantities of DNA, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan in the fibrocartilage were markedly reduced following decellularization. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the intrinsic ultrastructure of the fibrocartilage tissue was well preserved. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that the novel "book" fibrocartilage scaffold could have potential applications in tissue engineering.

  16. Preparation and characterization of carbon nanofibrous/hydroxyapatite sheets for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Aziz, A M; El Backly, Rania M; Taha, Nahla A; El-Maghraby, Azza; Kandil, Sherif H

    2017-07-01

    Critical size bone defects are orthopedic defects that will not heal without intervention or that will not completely heal over the natural life time of the animal. Although bone generally has the ability to regenerate completely however, critical defects require some sort of scaffold to do so. In the current study we proposed a method to obtain a carbon nanofibrous/Hydroxyapatite (HA) bioactive scaffold. The carbon nanofibrous (CNF) nonwoven fabrics were obtained by the use of the electrospinning process of the polymeric solution of poly acrylonitrile "PAN" and subsequent stabilization and carbonization processes. The CNFs sheets were functionalized by both hydroxyapatite (HA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The HA was added to the electrospun solution, but in case of (BSA), it was adsorbed after the carbonization process. The changes in the properties taking place in the precursor sheets were investigated using the characterization methods (SEM, FT-IR, TGA and EDX). The prepared materials were tested for biocompatibility via subcutaneous implantation in New Zealand white rabbits. We successfully prepared biocompatible functionalized sheets, which have been modified with HA or HA and BSA. The sheets that were functionalized by both HA and BSA are more biocompatible with fewer inflammatory cells of (neutrophils and lymphocytes) than ones with only HA over the period of 3weeks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparation and application of an innovative thrombocyte/leukocyte-enriched plasma to promote tissue repair in chelonians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Di Ianni

    Full Text Available Platelet concentrates are widely used in mammalian regenerative medicine to improve tissue healing. Chelonians (Testudines would benefit from the application of thrombocyte preparations to regenerate damaged tissues, since traumatic injuries are leading causes of morbidity and mortality for both wild-living and domesticated animals. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol that optimized the recovery of the thrombocytes from blood samples and to show the efficacy of thrombocyte-enriched plasma in chelonians. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from Testudo spp. (n = 12 and Trachemys scripta elegans (n = 10. Blood cells were fractionated by sodium diatrizoate-sodium polysucrose density gradient using a two-step centrifugation protocol. Thrombocytes and leukocytes were isolated and resuspended to obtain thrombocyte-leucocyte rich plasma (TLRP. The mean recovery of leukocytes and thrombocytes was 48.9% (±4.0 SEM, n = 22 of the whole blood cell content. No statistically significant difference was observed between blood samples collected from different turtle species. The ability of TLRP to form a gel was evaluated by adding variable concentrations of calcium gluconate at room temperature and at 37°C. A reliable and consistent clotting of the TLRP was obtained in glass tubes and dishes by adding 5-20% v/v of a 100 mg/ml solution of calcium gluconate. Furthermore, in order to test the clinical efficacy of TLRP, a preliminary evaluation was performed on four turtles (Testudo spp. with traumatic injuries. In all the four animals, a successful clinical outcome was observed. The results demonstrated that a thrombocyte-enriched plasma, comparable to mammalian platelet rich plasma, can be prepared from chelonian blood samples. Furthermore, although the low number of cases presented does not allow definitive conclusions from a clinical point of view, their outcome suggests that TLRP application could be further investigated to improve the

  18. Preparation and Application of an Innovative Thrombocyte/Leukocyte-Enriched Plasma to Promote Tissue Repair in Chelonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Francesco; Merli, Elisa; Burtini, Francesca; Conti, Virna; Pelizzone, Igor; Di Lecce, Rosanna; Parmigiani, Enrico; Squassino, Gian Paolo; Del Bue, Maurizio; Lucarelli, Enrico; Ramoni, Roberto; Grolli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are widely used in mammalian regenerative medicine to improve tissue healing. Chelonians (Testudines) would benefit from the application of thrombocyte preparations to regenerate damaged tissues, since traumatic injuries are leading causes of morbidity and mortality for both wild-living and domesticated animals. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol that optimized the recovery of the thrombocytes from blood samples and to show the efficacy of thrombocyte-enriched plasma in chelonians. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from Testudo spp. (n = 12) and Trachemys scripta elegans (n = 10). Blood cells were fractionated by sodium diatrizoate-sodium polysucrose density gradient using a two-step centrifugation protocol. Thrombocytes and leukocytes were isolated and resuspended to obtain thrombocyte-leucocyte rich plasma (TLRP). The mean recovery of leukocytes and thrombocytes was 48.9% (±4.0 SEM, n = 22) of the whole blood cell content. No statistically significant difference was observed between blood samples collected from different turtle species. The ability of TLRP to form a gel was evaluated by adding variable concentrations of calcium gluconate at room temperature and at 37°C. A reliable and consistent clotting of the TLRP was obtained in glass tubes and dishes by adding 5-20% v/v of a 100 mg/ml solution of calcium gluconate. Furthermore, in order to test the clinical efficacy of TLRP, a preliminary evaluation was performed on four turtles (Testudo spp.) with traumatic injuries. In all the four animals, a successful clinical outcome was observed. The results demonstrated that a thrombocyte-enriched plasma, comparable to mammalian platelet rich plasma, can be prepared from chelonian blood samples. Furthermore, although the low number of cases presented does not allow definitive conclusions from a clinical point of view, their outcome suggests that TLRP application could be further investigated to improve the healing process of

  19. Preparation of degradable porous structures based on 1,3-trimethylene carbonate and D,L-lactide (co)polymers for heart tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pego, AP; Siebum, B; Van Luyn, MJA; Van Seijen, XJGY; Poot, AA; Grijpma, DW; Feijen, J

    2003-01-01

    Biodegradable porous scaffolds for heart tissue engineering were prepared from amorphous elastomeric (co)polymers of 1,3-trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and D,L-lactide (DLLA). Leaching of salt from compression-molded polymer-salt composites allowed the preparation of highly porous structures in a

  20. SEM evaluation of the morphological changes in hard dental tissues prepared by Er: YAG laser and rotary instruments

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    Tomov Georgi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective ablation of dental hard tissues by means of the erbium:yttrium-aluminum garnet (Er: YAG laser has been reported recently, and its application to caries removal and cavity preparation has been expected. However, few studies have investigated the morphological changes in hard dental tissues after Er: YAG laser caries treatment. In the present study the morphological changes in hard dental tissues after Er: YAG laser caries ablation in vitro was compared with that of conventional mechanical treatment. Thirty extracted human teeth with caries were used. Ten tooth was treated with the Er: YAG laser, and the other was treated with a conventional steel and diamond burs. Laser treatment was performed by means of a non-contact irradiation modes with cooling water spray, with a new Er: YAG laser (LiteTouch. Conventional bur treatment was conducted by means of a low-speed micromotor and air turbine with water cooling. Scanning electron microscope (SEM observations were performed for each treatment. The Er: YAG laser ablated carious dentin effectively with minimal thermal damage to the surrounding intact dentin, and removed infected and softened carious dentin to the same degree as the burtreatment. In addition, a lower degree of vibration was noted with the Er: YAG laser treatment. The SEM examination revealed characteristic micro-irregularities of the lased dentin and enamel surfaces with potential benefits for adhesive restorations. Our results show that the Er: YAG laser is promising as a new technical modality for caries treatment

  1. Bioimaging of metallothioneins in ocular tissue sections by laser ablation-ICP-MS using bioconjugated gold nanoclusters as specific tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Alonso, María; Fernandez, Beatriz; Álvarez, Lydia; González-Iglesias, Héctor; Traub, Heike; Jakubowski, Norbert; Pereiro, Rosario

    2017-12-18

    An immunohistochemical method is described to visualize the distribution of metallothioneins 1/2 (MT 1/2) and metallothionein 3 (MT 3) in human ocular tissue. It is making use of (a) antibodies conjugated to gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) acting as labels, and (b) laser ablation (LA) coupled to inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Water-soluble fluorescent AuNCs (with an average size of 2.7 nm) were synthesized and then conjugated to antibody by carbodiimide coupling. The surface of the modified AuNCs was then blocked with hydroxylamine to avoid nonspecific interactions with biological tissue. Immunoassays for MT 1/2 and MT 3 in ocular tissue sections (5 μm thick) from two post mortem human donors were performed. Imaging studies were then performed by fluorescence using confocal microscopy, and LA-ICP-MS was performed in the retina to measure the signal for gold. Signal amplification by the >500 gold atoms in each nanocluster allowed the antigens (MT 1/2 and MT 3) to be imaged by LA-ICP-MS using a laser spot size as small as 4 μm. The image patterns found in retina are in good agreement with those obtained by conventional fluorescence immunohistochemistry which was used as an established reference method. Graphical abstract Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) conjugated to a primary specific antibody serve as a label for amplified bioimaging of metallothioneins (MTs) by laser ablation coupled to inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in human ocular tissue sections.

  2. Distribution of basic fibroblast growth factor binding sites in various tissue membrane preparations from adult guinea pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledoux, D.; Mereau, A.; Dauchel, M.C.; Barritault, D.; Courty, J.

    1989-01-01

    In order to localize a rich source of basic FGF receptor, we examined the distribution of basic FGF binding sites in brain, stomach, lung, spleen, kidney, liver and intestine membrane preparations from adult guinea pig. Comparative binding studies using iodinated basic FGF showed that a specific binding was detected in all the membrane preparations tested. Scatchard plots from iodinated basic FGF competition experiment with native basic FGF in various membrane preparations, suggested the presence of one class of binding sites in some tissues such as liver, kidney, spleen, lung, stomach, and intestine with an apparent dissociation constant (appKD) value ranging from 4 to 7.5 nM and the existence of a second class of higher affinity sites in brain membranes with appKD value of 15 pM. Characterization of these basic FGF high affinity interaction sites was performed using a cross-linking reagent. These results show for the first time that specific interaction sites for basic FGF are widely distributed, suggesting that this growth factor might play a role in the physiological functions of a number of adult organs

  3. A novel pungency biosensor prepared with fixing taste-bud tissue of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lixin; Jiao, Lihua; Pang, Guangchang; Xie, Junbo

    2015-06-15

    A novel taste biosensor based on ligand-receptor interaction was developed through fixing taste-bud tissues of SD rats to a glassy carbon electrode. Using the sodium alginate-starch gel as a fixing agent, taste-bud tissues of SD rats were fixed between two nuclear microporous membranes to make a sandwich-type sensing membrane. With the taste biosensor, the response current induced by capsaicin and gingerol stimulating the corresponding receptors was measured. The results showed that the lowest limit of detection of this biosensor to capsaicin was 1×10(-13) mol/L and the change rate of response current was the highest at the concentration of 9×10(-13) mol/L, indicating that the capsaicin receptor was saturated at this point. The lowest limit of detection of this biosensor to gingerol was 1×10(-12) mol/L, and the gingerol receptor was saturated when the concentration of gingerol was 3×10(-11) mol/L. It was demonstrated that the interaction curves of capsaicin and gingerol with their respective receptors exhibited high correlation (R(2): 0.9841 and 0.9904). The binding constant and dissociation constant of gingerol with its receptor were 1.564×10(-11) and 1.815×10(-11) respectively, which were all higher than those of capsaicin with its receptor (1.249×10(-12) and 2.078×10(-12)). This study, for the first time, made it possible to quantitatively determine the interaction of the taste receptor and pungent substances with a new biosensor, thus providing a simple approach for monitoring pungent substances and investigating the mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation and benchmarking of ANSL-V cross sections for advanced neutron source reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arwood, J.W.; Ford, W.E. III; Greene, N.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Primm, R.T. III; Waddell, M.W.; Webster, C.C.; Westfall, R.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Research and development for the advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor is being funded by the US Dept. of Energy. This reactor is to provide the world's most intense steady-state source of low-energy neutrons for a national experimental user facility. Pseudo-problem-independent, multigroup cross-section libraries were generated to support ANS design work. The libraries, designated ANSL-V, are data bases in AMPX master format for subsequent generation of problem-dependent cross sections for use with codes such as KENO, ANISN, XSDRNPM, VENTURE, DOT, and MORSE. Included in ANSL-V are 123-material P 3 neutron, 46-material P 0 or P 6 secondary gamma-ray production (SGRP), and 34-material P 6 gamma-ray interaction (GRI) libraries

  5. Comparative facile methods for preparing graphene oxide-hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raucci, M G; Giugliano, D; Longo, A; Zeppetelli, S; Carotenuto, G; Ambrosio, L

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by the success of using graphene oxide (GO) as a nanofiller of composites, there is a drive to search for this new kind of carbon material as a bioactive component in ceramic materials. In the present study, biomineralized GO was prepared by two different approaches, represented by in situ sol-gel synthesis and biomimetic treatment. It was found that in the biocomposites obtained by the sol-gel approach, the spindle-like hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, with a diameter of ca. 5 ± 0.37 nm and a length of ca. 70 ± 2.5 nm, were presented randomly and strongly on the surface. The oxygen-containing functional groups, such as hydroxyl and carbonyl, present on the basal plane and edges of the GO sheets, play an important role in anchoring calcium ions, as demonstrated by FT-IR and TEM investigations. A different result was obtained for biocomposites after biomimetic treatment: an amorphous calcium phosphate on GO sheet was observed after 5 days of treatment. These different approaches resulted in a diverse effect on the proliferation and differentiation of osteogenic mesenchymal stem cells. In fact, in biocomposites prepared by the sol-gel approach the expression of an early marker of osteogenic differentiation, ALP, increases with the amount of GO in the first days of cell culture. Meanwhile, biomimetic materials sustain cell viability and proliferation, even if the expression of alkaline phosphatase activity in a basal medium is delayed. These findings may provide new prospects for utilizing GO-based hydroxyapatite biocomposites in bone repair, bone augmentation and coating of biomedical implants and broaden the application of GO sheets in biological areas. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Nano-Sized TiO2@Chitosan for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei JIANG

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the development of genetic engineering, it is urgent to find a vector with high transfection efficiency and good biocompatibility for genes. We considered combining nano-TiO2 with chitosan (CTS in order to tap their respective advantages to make a better new nanoparticle as gene vector.Methods: TiO2@CTS was prepared using microemulsion method. The physicochemical property of TiO2@CTS was measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and zeta potential. The safety and influence on MC3T3-E1 cells were detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT, blood compatibility assay and flow cytometry.Results: TiO2@CTS was well prepared and it was safe to cells under concentration tests. TiO2@CTS particles had a fuzzy boundary with a particle size remaining in 20-30 nm. Besides, the results also showed that TiO2@CTS did better in cellular uptake than TiO2 at 2 h and 24 h, and had good biocompatibility. MTT assay proved that the MC3T3 cells remained good growth when treated with different concentrations of TiO2@CTS (2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 μg/mL. Moreover, transfection assay in vitro and electrophoretic mobility shift assay illustrated the high transfection efficiency of TiO2@CTS.Conclusion: TiO2@CTS is a good choice to gene transfection, with good biocompatibility, and it also provides a new thought for the application of nanotechnology in the field of aveolar bone graft material.

  7. Factors Affecting Result in Chinese Proficiency Test (HSK Level 6: Reading Section and Preparation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Haryanti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Chinese Proficiency Test (HSK is an internationally standardized exam which tests and rates Chinese language proficiency. The highest level in this test is level 6. The writing part of the test consists of 3 (three parts, namely, (1 listening, (2 reading, (3 writing. Furthermore, the reading part is made of 4 components. Level 6 of this test implies a high degree of difficulty. This paper specifically looked on how to prepare effectively for participants to be able to work on the reading part in order to achieve best result. This article used the methods of literature review and observational study as well as field research and would also incorporate the author’s personal experience in taking the test into recommending strategies for doing the reading part in a level 6 HSK test. Finally, research suggested several techniques and tips that might assist participants in achieving maximum scores in handling the reading part of level 6 HSK test.

  8. SOFT TISSUE SARCOMAS – A CROS S SECTIONAL STUDY AT MNJIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sarcomas are an uncommon group of cancers with a wide distribution in the various anatomical regions of the body and even wider and confusing range of histopathological diagnosis. AIMS: To study the mode of presentation, histology, treatment modalities use d and outcomes both in terms of function and disease free survivals of all patients treated in the Department of surgical oncology in our Institute. MATERIALS & METHODS: All patients of soft tissue sarcoma presenting to out department were studied and data collected in a proforma. Histology was established by Trucut/open biopsy. Patients after clinical examination were evaluated f or distant disease in lungs by x - ray chest followed by CT scan . RESULTS: Symptomatology and anatomical location in our study was similar to world literature but stage of presentation and tumour size is advanced in our study. CONCLUSIONS: Patients in our study presented late, probably due to lack of access to medical care, delay in diagnosis and delay in referral. Hence higher incidence of amputations and also higher incidence of need for reconstruction. Successful utilization of multi - modality treatment and availability of good reconstruction ensured good functional outcome.

  9. Three-Dimensional Human Cardiac Tissue Engineered by Centrifugation of Stacked Cell Sheets and Cross-Sectional Observation of Its Synchronous Beatings by Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Kobayashi, Mari; Iwana, Shin-Ichi; Kabetani, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissues are engineered by stacking cell sheets, and these tissues have been applied in clinical regenerative therapies. The optimal fabrication technique of 3D human tissues and the real-time observation system for these tissues are important in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, cardiac physiology, and the safety testing of candidate chemicals. In this study, for aiming the clinical application, 3D human cardiac tissues were rapidly fabricated by human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiac cell sheets with centrifugation, and the structures and beatings in the cardiac tissues were observed cross-sectionally and noninvasively by two optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. The fabrication time was reduced to approximately one-quarter by centrifugation. The cross-sectional observation showed that multilayered cardiac cell sheets adhered tightly just after centrifugation. Additionally, the cross-sectional transmissions of beatings within multilayered human cardiac tissues were clearly detected by OCT. The observation showed the synchronous beatings of the thicker 3D human cardiac tissues, which were fabricated rapidly by cell sheet technology and centrifugation. The rapid tissue-fabrication technique and OCT technology will show a powerful potential in cardiac tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery research.

  10. Vaginal preparation with antiseptic solution before cesarean section for preventing postoperative infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, David M; Morgan, Sarah; Contreras, Karenrose

    2014-09-09

    Cesarean delivery is one of the most common surgical procedures performed by obstetricians. Infectious morbidity after cesarean delivery can have a tremendous impact on the postpartum woman's return to normal function and her ability to care for her baby. Despite the widespread use of prophylactic antibiotics, postoperative infectious morbidity still complicates cesarean deliveries. To determine if cleansing the vagina with an antiseptic solution before a cesarean delivery decreases the risk of maternal infectious morbidities, including endometritis and wound complications. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (21 July 2014). We included randomized and quasi-randomized trials assessing the impact of vaginal cleansing immediately before cesarean delivery with any type of antiseptic solution versus a placebo solution/standard of care on post-cesarean infectious morbidity. We independently assessed eligibility and quality of the studies. Five trials randomizing 1946 women (1766 analyzed) evaluated the effects of vaginal cleansing (all with povidone-iodine) on post-cesarean infectious morbidity. The risk of bias was generally low, with the quality of most of the studies being high. Vaginal preparation immediately before cesarean delivery significantly reduced the incidence of post-cesarean endometritis from 7.2% in control groups to 3.6% in vaginal cleansing groups (average risk ratio (RR) 0.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 0.97, five trials, 1766 women). The risk reduction was particularly strong for women with ruptured membranes (1.4% in the vaginal cleansing group versus 15.4% in the control group; RR 0.13, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.66, two trials, 148 women). No other outcomes realized statistically significant differences between the vaginal cleansing and control groups. No adverse effects were reported with the povidone-iodine vaginal cleansing.The quality of the evidence using GRADE was low for post-cesarean endometritis

  11. Pointwise mutual information quantifies intratumor heterogeneity in tissue sections labeled with multiple fluorescent biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Spagnolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Measures of spatial intratumor heterogeneity are potentially important diagnostic biomarkers for cancer progression, proliferation, and response to therapy. Spatial relationships among cells including cancer and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME are key contributors to heterogeneity. Methods: We demonstrate how to quantify spatial heterogeneity from immunofluorescence pathology samples, using a set of 3 basic breast cancer biomarkers as a test case. We learn a set of dominant biomarker intensity patterns and map the spatial distribution of the biomarker patterns with a network. We then describe the pairwise association statistics for each pattern within the network using pointwise mutual information (PMI and visually represent heterogeneity with a two-dimensional map. Results: We found a salient set of 8 biomarker patterns to describe cellular phenotypes from a tissue microarray cohort containing 4 different breast cancer subtypes. After computing PMI for each pair of biomarker patterns in each patient and tumor replicate, we visualize the interactions that contribute to the resulting association statistics. Then, we demonstrate the potential for using PMI as a diagnostic biomarker, by comparing PMI maps and heterogeneity scores from patients across the 4 different cancer subtypes. Estrogen receptor positive invasive lobular carcinoma patient, AL13-6, exhibited the highest heterogeneity score among those tested, while estrogen receptor negative invasive ductal carcinoma patient, AL13-14, exhibited the lowest heterogeneity score. Conclusions: This paper presents an approach for describing intratumor heterogeneity, in a quantitative fashion (via PMI, which departs from the purely qualitative approaches currently used in the clinic. PMI is generalizable to highly multiplexed/hyperplexed immunofluorescence images, as well as spatial data from complementary in situ methods including FISSEQ and CyTOF, sampling many different

  12. Quantitative Time-Resolved Fluorescence Imaging of Androgen Receptor and Prostate-Specific Antigen in Prostate Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Agnieszka; Lippolis, Giuseppe; Helczynski, Leszek; Anand, Aseem; Peltola, Mari; Pettersson, Kim; Lilja, Hans; Bjartell, Anders

    2016-05-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are expressed in the prostate and are involved in prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this study was to develop reliable protocols for reproducible quantification of AR and PSA in benign and malignant prostate tissue using time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) imaging techniques. AR and PSA were detected with TRF in tissue microarrays from 91 PCa patients. p63/ alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) staining on consecutive sections was used to categorize tissue areas as benign or cancerous. Automated image analysis was used to quantify staining intensity. AR intensity was significantly higher in AMACR+ and lower in AMACR- cancer areas as compared with benign epithelium. The PSA intensity was significantly lower in cancer areas, particularly in AMACR- glands. The AR/PSA ratio varied significantly in the AMACR+ tumor cells as compared with benign glands. There was a trend of more rapid disease progression in patients with higher AR/PSA ratios in the AMACR- areas. This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing reproducible protocols for TRF imaging and automated image analysis to study the expression of AR and PSA in benign and malignant prostate. It also highlighted the differences in AR and PSA protein expression within AMACR- and AMACR+ cancer regions. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  13. Preparing a cost analysis for the section of medical physics-guidelines and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, M D; Spanos, W J; Jose, B O; Kelly, B A; Brill, J P

    2000-01-01

    Radiation oncology is a highly complex medical specialty, involving many varied routine and special procedures. To assure cost-effectiveness and maintain support for the medical physics program, managers are obligated to analyze and defend all aspects of an institutional billing and cost-reporting program. Present standards of practice require that each patient's radiation treatments be customized to fit his/her particular condition. Since the use of personnel time and other resources is highly variable among patients, graduated levels of charges have been established to allow for more precise billing. Some radiation oncology special procedures have no specific code descriptors; so existing codes are modified or additional information attached in order to avoid payment denial. Recent publications have explored the manpower needs, salaries, and other resources required to perform radiation oncology "physics" procedures. This information is used to construct a model cost-based resource use profile for a radiation oncology center. This profile can be used to help the financial officer prepare a cost report for the institution. Both civil and criminal penalties for Medicare fraud and abuse (intentional or unintentional) are included in the False Claims Act and other statutes. Compliance guidelines require managers to train all personnel in correct billing procedures and to review continually billing performance.

  14. [Application of Immunohistochemistry and Immunofluorescence Staining in Detection of Phospholipase A2 Receptor on Paraffin Section of Renal Biopsy Tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hong-rui; Wang, Yan-yan; Wang, Guo-qin; Sun, Li-jun; Cheng, Hong; Chen, Yi-pu

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the application of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence staining method in the detection of phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) on paraffin section of renal biopsy tissue,and to find an accurate and fast method for the detection of PLA2R in renal tissue. The PLA2R of 193 cases were detected by immunohistochemical staining,and the antigen was repaired by the method of high pressure cooker (HPC) hot repair plus trypsin repair. The 193 samples including 139 cases of idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN), 15 cases of membranous lupus nephritis, 8 cases of hepatitis B virus associated membranous nephropathy, 18 cases of IgA nephropathy, and 13 cases of minimal change diseases. To compare the dyeing effects, 22 paraffin sections of renal biopsy tissue of IMN cases with positive PLA2R were stained by using 4 different. of antigen repairing,which included HPC hot repair, HPC hot repair plus trypsin repair, water bath heat repair, and water bath heat repair plus trypsin repair. To compare the dyeing effects, 15 paraffin sections of renal biopsy tissue of IMN cases with positive PLA2R were stained by using 3 different. of antigen repairing,which included water bath heat repair plus trypsin repair, protease K digestion repair, and pepsin digestion repair. In 193 cases, the positive rate of PLA2R in IMN cases was 90.6% (126/139), and the other 54 patients without IMN were negative. Twenty-two IMN patients were positive for PLA2R by using the HPC heat repair plus trypsin repaire or the water bath heat repair plus trypsin repair;while only a few cases of 22 IMN cases were positive by using the HPC hot repair alone or water bath heat repair alone. Fifteen IMN patients were positive for PLA2R by using water bath heat repair plus trypsin repair,protease K digestion repair,and pepsin digestion repair, but the distribution of positive deposits and the background were different. PLA2R immunohistochemical staining can effectively identify IMN and secondary MN. For

  15. RootAnalyzer: A Cross-Section Image Analysis Tool for Automated Characterization of Root Cells and Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Chopin

    Full Text Available The morphology of plant root anatomical features is a key factor in effective water and nutrient uptake. Existing techniques for phenotyping root anatomical traits are often based on manual or semi-automatic segmentation and annotation of microscopic images of root cross sections. In this article, we propose a fully automated tool, hereinafter referred to as RootAnalyzer, for efficiently extracting and analyzing anatomical traits from root-cross section images. Using a range of image processing techniques such as local thresholding and nearest neighbor identification, RootAnalyzer segments the plant root from the image's background, classifies and characterizes the cortex, stele, endodermis and epidermis, and subsequently produces statistics about the morphological properties of the root cells and tissues. We use RootAnalyzer to analyze 15 images of wheat plants and one maize plant image and evaluate its performance against manually-obtained ground truth data. The comparison shows that RootAnalyzer can fully characterize most root tissue regions with over 90% accuracy.

  16. Production, separation and target preparation of {sup 171}Tm and {sup 147}Pm for neutron cross section measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinitz, Stephan; Maugeri, Emilio A.; Schumann, Dorothea; Dressler, Rugard; Kivel, Niko [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Guerrero, Carlos [Sevilla Univ. (Spain); Koester, Ullrich [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Tessler, Moshe; Paul, Michael [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel); Halfon, Shlomi [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel); Collaboration: nTOF Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The knowledge of the neutron capture cross sections of s-process branching point isotopes represents a basic requirement for the understanding of star evolution. Since such branching point isotopes are by definition radioactive, the measurement of their cross sections from thermal to stellar energies becomes a challenging task. Considerable amounts of material have to be produced, representing a significant radioactive hazard. We report here on the production and separation of 3.5 mg {sup 171}Tm from 240 mg {sup 170}Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 72 μg {sup 147}Pm from 100 mg {sup 146}Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} irradiated at the ILL high flux reactor. Thin targets were prepared with high chemical and radioisotopic purity suitable for neutron capture measurements at nTOF CERN and the SARAF-LiLiT facility.

  17. Preparation of 3D fibroin/chitosan blend porous scaffold for tissue engineering via a simplified method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yuhui; Lin, Hong; Yao, Jinrong; Chen, Zhengrong; Shao, Zhengzhong

    2011-03-10

    In this work, we developed a simple and flexible method to manufacture a 3D porous scaffold based on the blend of regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) and chitosan (CS). No crosslinker or other toxic reagents were used in this method. The pores of resulted 3D scaffolds were connected with each other, and their sizes could be easily controlled by the concentration of the mixed solution. Compared with pure RSF scaffolds, the water absorptivities of these RSF/CS blend scaffolds with significantly enhanced mechanical properties were greatly increased. The results of MTT and RT-PCR tests indicated that the chondrocytes grew very well in these blend RSF/CS porous scaffolds. This suggested that the RSF/CS blend scaffold prepared by this new method could be a promising candidate for applications in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Preparation and characterization of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels crosslinked by biodegradable polyurethane for tissue engineering of cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonakdar, Shahin; Emami, Shahriar Hojjati; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Farhadi, Afshin; Ahmadi, Seyed Amir Hoshiar; Amanzadeh, Amir

    2010-01-01

    Polyurethane was prepared from hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) and polycaprolactone diol (PCL) with stoichiometry ratio of two in a reactor to form prepolymer. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at PVA/prepolymer ratios of 8, 4, 2 and 1 was crosslinked with the former degradable polyester polyurethane. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) was employed to confirm polyurethane formation during the course of reactions. FTIR spectrum revealed bands at 1729-1733 cm -1 and 3347-3340 cm -1 which indicates carbonyl and NH of amine groups, respectively. Polyurethane formation was also confirmed by the absence of the isocyanate peaks (NCO) at 2270 cm -1 . Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) showed that by increasing prepolymer concentration glass transition temperature decreases from 26 deg. C for PVA to 19 deg. C for sample with PVA/prepolymer ratio of 4 and then it rises up to 31 deg. C. Water uptake measurements illustrated about four fold reduction in swelling ratio of PVA after crosslinking and the sample with equal amounts of PVA and PPU had water uptake of 100%, close to that of a natural cartilage and much less than PVA (425%). All samples had compressive modulus in the range of the articular cartilage (1.9-14.4 MPa). The morphology of the isolated cells on the samples was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and revealed cell attachment and proliferation. The cell viability (3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, MTT) and GAG expression (dimethylmethylene blue, DMMB) assays with human chondrocytes on the sample with PVA/prepolymer ratio of one showed about 14 and 33% increase in cell viability and GAG expression after 14 days of culture compare to the PVA, respectively.

  19. Preparation and characterization of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels crosslinked by biodegradable polyurethane for tissue engineering of cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonakdar, Shahin [Biomedical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Emami, Shahriar Hojjati, E-mail: shahriar16@yahoo.com [Biomedical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, 13164 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farhadi, Afshin [Tehran Azad University of Medical Science, Amiralmomenin Hospital (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Seyed Amir Hoshiar [Biomedical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amanzadeh, Amir [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, 13164 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-10

    Polyurethane was prepared from hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) and polycaprolactone diol (PCL) with stoichiometry ratio of two in a reactor to form prepolymer. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at PVA/prepolymer ratios of 8, 4, 2 and 1 was crosslinked with the former degradable polyester polyurethane. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) was employed to confirm polyurethane formation during the course of reactions. FTIR spectrum revealed bands at 1729-1733 cm{sup -1} and 3347-3340 cm{sup -1} which indicates carbonyl and NH of amine groups, respectively. Polyurethane formation was also confirmed by the absence of the isocyanate peaks (NCO) at 2270 cm{sup -1}. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) showed that by increasing prepolymer concentration glass transition temperature decreases from 26 deg. C for PVA to 19 deg. C for sample with PVA/prepolymer ratio of 4 and then it rises up to 31 deg. C. Water uptake measurements illustrated about four fold reduction in swelling ratio of PVA after crosslinking and the sample with equal amounts of PVA and PPU had water uptake of 100%, close to that of a natural cartilage and much less than PVA (425%). All samples had compressive modulus in the range of the articular cartilage (1.9-14.4 MPa). The morphology of the isolated cells on the samples was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and revealed cell attachment and proliferation. The cell viability (3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, MTT) and GAG expression (dimethylmethylene blue, DMMB) assays with human chondrocytes on the sample with PVA/prepolymer ratio of one showed about 14 and 33% increase in cell viability and GAG expression after 14 days of culture compare to the PVA, respectively.

  20. Discrimination between basal cell carcinoma and hair follicles in skin tissue sections by Raman micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraona-Puy, M.; Ghita, A.; Zoladek, A.; Perkins, W.; Varma, S.; Leach, I. H.; Koloydenko, A. A.; Williams, H.; Notingher, I.

    2011-05-01

    Skin cancer is the most common human malignancy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represents approximately 80% of the non-melanoma cases. Current methods of treatment require histopathological evaluation of the tissues by qualified personnel. However, this method is subjective and in some cases BCC can be confused with other structures in healthy skin, including hair follicles. In this preliminary study, we investigated the potential of Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) to discriminate between hair follicles and BCC in skin tissue sections excised during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). Imaging and diagnosis of skin sections was automatically generated using ' a priori'-built spectral model based on LDA. This model had 90 ± 9% sensitivity and 85 ± 9% specificity for discrimination of BCC from dermis and epidermis. The model used selected Raman bands corresponding to the largest spectral differences between the Raman spectra of BCC and the normal skin regions, associated mainly with nucleic acids and collagen type I. Raman spectra corresponding to the epidermis regions of the hair follicles were found to be closer to those of healthy epidermis rather than BCC. Comparison between Raman spectral images and the gold standard haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology diagnosis showed good agreement. Some hair follicle regions were misclassified as BCC; regions corresponded mainly to the outermost layer of hair follicle (basal cells) which are expected to have higher nucleic acid concentration. This preliminary study shows the ability of RMS to distinguish between BCC and other tissue structures associated to healthy skin which can be confused with BCC due to their similar morphology.

  1. Pathology in a tube step 2: simple rapid fabrication of curved circular cross section millifluidic channels for biopsy preparation/3D imaging towards pancreatic cancer detection and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ronnie; Burfeind, Chris W.; Lim, Saniel D.; Patle, Shubham; Seibel, Eric J.

    2018-02-01

    3D pathology is intrinsically dependent on 3D microscopy, or the whole tissue imaging of patient tissue biopsies (TBs). Consequently, unsectioned needle specimens must be processed whole: a procedure which cannot necessarily be accomplished through manual methods, or by retasking automated pathology machines. Thus "millifluidic" devices (for millimeter-scale biopsies) are an ideal solution for tissue handling/preparation. TBs are large, messy and a solid-liquid mixture; they vary in material, geometry and structure based on the organ biopsied, the clinician skill and the needle type used. As a result, traditional microfluidic devices are insufficient to handle such mm-sized samples and their associated fabrication techniques are impractical and costly with respect to time/efficiency. Our research group has devised a simple, rapid fabrication process for millifluidic devices using jointed skeletal molds composed of machined, reusable metal rods, segmented rods and stranded wire as structural cores; these cores are surrounded by Teflon outer housing. We can therefore produce curving, circular-cross-section (CCCS) millifluidic channels in rapid fashion that cannot normally be achieved by microfabrication, micro-/CNC-machining, or 3D printing. The approach has several advantages. CLINICAL: round channels interface coring needles. PROCESSING: CCCS channels permit multi-layer device designs for additional (processing, monitoring, testing) stages. REUSABILITY: for a biopsy/needle diameter, molding (interchangeable) components may be produced one-time then reused for other designs. RAPID: structural cores can be quickly removed due to Teflon®'s ultra-low friction; housing may be released with ethanol; PDMS volumes cure faster since metal skeleton molds conduct additional heat from within the curing elastomer.

  2. Preparation, characterization and use of a reference material to proficiency testing for determination of metals in fish tissue in natura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, Luciana Vieira de

    2013-01-01

    The proficiency tests are widely used to evaluate the analytical capacity of laboratories and also as part of the accreditation process. For this reason, are important tools for the control of the quality of the analytical results obtained in the laboratories that work directly with seafood companies. In Brazil there are no providers of proficiency testing for metals potentially toxic in fish tissues. In this work will be described all steps used for the production of reference materials to be used in a proficiency testing pilot study for As, Cd, Pb and Hg in fish tissue following the recommendations of the ISO Guide 35. He preparation scheme consisted in selecting the individuals, cleaning, grinding, homogenization and fortification with As, Cd and Pb in two concentration levels. The preparation resulted in 164 sachets of 10 g each. In order to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation in the samples conservation 52 sachets were irradiated with 60 Co (10.00 ± 1.05 kGy) in a gamma cell. This material with others non irradiated 52 sachets were used for the homogeneity and stability studies. The remaining 60 were used for the proficiency testing. The results demonstrated that both materials were homogeneous and presented good stability (during a period of 45 days). However, the irradiated material present better integrity, concerning biological degradation, when stored in ambient temperature. For this reason they were used to the proficiency testing pilot program. Ten laboratories participated in the proficiency testing pilot study and the results were evaluated using the following tests: z-score, confidence ellipse and En numbers. This work demonstrates the capability of the laboratory to produce reference materials as well as to organize and conduct proficiency testing. (author)

  3. Multiple double cross-section transmission electron microscope sample preparation of specific sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Lynne M; Mittal, Surbhi; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Cohen, Guy M; Sleight, Jeffrey W

    2011-12-01

    The ability to prepare multiple cross-section transmission electron microscope (XTEM) samples from one XTEM sample of specific sub-10 nm features was demonstrated. Sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire (NW) devices were initially cross-sectioned using a dual-beam focused ion beam system in a direction running parallel to the device channel. From this XTEM sample, both low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were obtained from six separate, specific site Si NW devices. The XTEM sample was then re-sectioned in four separate locations in a direction perpendicular to the device channel: 90° from the original XTEM sample direction. Three of the four XTEM samples were successfully sectioned in the gate region of the device. From these three samples, low- and high-resolution TEM images of the Si NW were taken and measurements of the NW diameters were obtained. This technique demonstrated the ability to obtain high-resolution TEM images in directions 90° from one another of multiple, specific sub-10 nm features that were spaced 1.1 μm apart.

  4. Preparation of a biomimetic composite scaffold from gelatin/collagen and bioactive glass fibers for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, Esmaeel; Azami, Mahmoud [Department of Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad [Department of Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pediatric Urology Research Center, Section of Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Therapy, Department of Pediatric Urology, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Tehran, Iran (IRI) (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moztarzadeh, Fatollah [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridi-Majidi, Reza [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamousi, Atefeh; Karimi, Roya [Department of Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ai, Jafar, E-mail: jafar_ai@tums.ac.ir [Department of Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Brain and Spinal Injury Research Center (BASIR), Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-01

    Bone tissue is a composite material made of organic and inorganic components. Bone tissue engineering requires scaffolds that mimic bone nature in chemical and mechanical properties. This study proposes a novel method for preparing composite scaffolds that uses sub-micron bioglass fibers as the organic phase and gelatin/collagen as the inorganic phase. The scaffolds were constructed by using freeze drying and electro spinning methods and their mechanical properties were enhanced by using genipin crosslinking agent. Electron microscopy micrographs showed that the structure of composite scaffolds were porous with pore diameters of approximately 70–200 μm, this was again confirmed by mercury porosimetery. These pores are suitable for osteoblast growth. The diameters of the fibers were approximately 150–450 nm. Structural analysis confirmed the formation of desirable phases of sub-micron bioglass fibers. Cellular biocompatibility tests illustrated that scaffolds containing copper ion in the bioglass structure had more cell growth and osteoblast attachment in comparison to copper-free scaffolds. - Highlights: • Fabrication of 45S5 sub-micron bioglass fiber using electrospinning method. • Production of copper doped submicron bioglass fibers on 45S5 bioglass base by electrospinning sol gel route method. • Incorporation of bioglass/Cu-bioglass sub-micron fibers into gelatin/collagen matrix to form biomimetic composite scaffold which were non-cytotoxic according to MTT assay. • Discovering that copper can decrease the glass transition temperatures and enhance osteoblast cell adhesion and viability.

  5. Preparation of a biomimetic composite scaffold from gelatin/collagen and bioactive glass fibers for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifi, Esmaeel; Azami, Mahmoud; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Moztarzadeh, Fatollah; Faridi-Majidi, Reza; Shamousi, Atefeh; Karimi, Roya; Ai, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue is a composite material made of organic and inorganic components. Bone tissue engineering requires scaffolds that mimic bone nature in chemical and mechanical properties. This study proposes a novel method for preparing composite scaffolds that uses sub-micron bioglass fibers as the organic phase and gelatin/collagen as the inorganic phase. The scaffolds were constructed by using freeze drying and electro spinning methods and their mechanical properties were enhanced by using genipin crosslinking agent. Electron microscopy micrographs showed that the structure of composite scaffolds were porous with pore diameters of approximately 70–200 μm, this was again confirmed by mercury porosimetery. These pores are suitable for osteoblast growth. The diameters of the fibers were approximately 150–450 nm. Structural analysis confirmed the formation of desirable phases of sub-micron bioglass fibers. Cellular biocompatibility tests illustrated that scaffolds containing copper ion in the bioglass structure had more cell growth and osteoblast attachment in comparison to copper-free scaffolds. - Highlights: • Fabrication of 45S5 sub-micron bioglass fiber using electrospinning method. • Production of copper doped submicron bioglass fibers on 45S5 bioglass base by electrospinning sol gel route method. • Incorporation of bioglass/Cu-bioglass sub-micron fibers into gelatin/collagen matrix to form biomimetic composite scaffold which were non-cytotoxic according to MTT assay. • Discovering that copper can decrease the glass transition temperatures and enhance osteoblast cell adhesion and viability.

  6. Preparation and biological properties of a novel composite scaffold of nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan/carboxymethyl cellulose for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengdong Xiong

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, we report the physico-chemical and biological properties of a novel biodegradable composite scaffold made of nano-hydroxyapatite and natural derived polymers of chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose, namely, n-HA/CS/CMC, which was prepared by freeze-drying method. The physico-chemical properties of n-HA/CS/CMC scaffold were tested by infrared absorption spectra (IR, transmission electron microscope(TEM, scanning electron microscope(SEM, universal material testing machine and phosphate buffer solution (PBS soaking experiment. Besides, the biological properties were evaluated by MG63 cells and Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs culture experiment in vitro and a short period implantation study in vivo. The results show that the composite scaffold is mainly formed through the ionic crossing-linking of the two polyions between CS and CMC, and n-HA is incorporated into the polyelectrolyte matrix of CS-CMC without agglomeration, which endows the scaffold with good physico-chemical properties such as highly interconnected porous structure, high compressive strength and good structural stability and degradation. More important, the results of cells attached, proliferated on the scaffold indicate that the scaffold is non-toxic and has good cell biocompatibility, and the results of implantation experiment in vivo further confirm that the scaffold has good tissue biocompatibility. All the above results suggest that the novel degradable n-HA/CS/CMC composite scaffold has a great potential to be used as bone tissue engineering material.

  7. Preparation and biological properties of a novel composite scaffold of nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan/carboxymethyl cellulose for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuyun, Jiang; Yubao, Li; Chengdong, Xiong

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we report the physico-chemical and biological properties of a novel biodegradable composite scaffold made of nano-hydroxyapatite and natural derived polymers of chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose, namely, n-HA/CS/CMC, which was prepared by freeze-drying method. The physico-chemical properties of n-HA/CS/CMC scaffold were tested by infrared absorption spectra (IR), transmission electron microscope(TEM), scanning electron microscope(SEM), universal material testing machine and phosphate buffer solution (PBS) soaking experiment. Besides, the biological properties were evaluated by MG63 cells and Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) culture experiment in vitro and a short period implantation study in vivo. The results show that the composite scaffold is mainly formed through the ionic crossing-linking of the two polyions between CS and CMC, and n-HA is incorporated into the polyelectrolyte matrix of CS-CMC without agglomeration, which endows the scaffold with good physico-chemical properties such as highly interconnected porous structure, high compressive strength and good structural stability and degradation. More important, the results of cells attached, proliferated on the scaffold indicate that the scaffold is non-toxic and has good cell biocompatibility, and the results of implantation experiment in vivo further confirm that the scaffold has good tissue biocompatibility. All the above results suggest that the novel degradable n-HA/CS/CMC composite scaffold has a great potential to be used as bone tissue engineering material. PMID:19594953

  8. Preparation and comparative characterization of keratin–chitosan and keratin–gelatin composite scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaji, S.; Kumar, Ramadhar; Sripriya, R.; Kakkar, Prachi; Ramesh, D. Vijaya; Reddy, P. Neela Kanta; Sehgal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    We report fabrication of three dimensional scaffolds with well interconnected matrix of high porosity using keratin, chitosan and gelatin for tissue engineering and other biomedical applications. Scaffolds were fabricated using porous Keratin–Gelatin (KG), Keratin–Chitosan (KC) composites. The morphology of both KG and KC was investigated using SEM. The scaffolds showed high porosity with interconnected pores in the range of 20–100 μm. They were further tested by FTIR, DSC, CD, tensile strength measurement, water uptake and swelling behavior. In vitro cell adhesion and cell proliferation tests were carried out to study the biocompatibility behavior and their application as an artificial skin substitute. Both KG and KC composite scaffolds showed similar properties and patterns for cell proliferation. Due to rapid degradation of gelatin in KG, we found that it has limited application as compared to KC scaffold. We conclude that KC scaffold owing to its slow degradation and antibacterial properties would be a better substrate for tissue engineering and other biomedical application. Highlights: ► Extraction of reduced keratin from horn meal. ► Preparation of keratin–gelatin and keratin–chitosan composite scaffolds. ► Characterizations of the composite scaffolds. ► Comparative cytotoxicity analysis on NIH3T3 fibroblasts.

  9. THE USE OF A NOVEL ALDEHYDE-FUNCTIONALIZED CHITOSAN HYDROGEL TO PREPARE POROUS TUBULAR SCAFFOLDS FOR VASCULAR TISSUE ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo P. Azevedo

    Full Text Available In this work, porous tubular scaffolds were prepared from a novel water soluble aldehyde-functionalized chitosan (ALDCHIT hydrogel, which was obtained by dissolving this chitosan derivative in water and using oxidized dextrose (OXDEXT as the crosslinking agent at different ALDCHIT:OXDEXT mole ratios (10:1, 10:2 and 10:4. By increasing the amount of OXDEXT in respect to ALDCHIT the hydrogels became more rigid and could absorb more than 200% of its weight in water. Since the ALDCHIT:OXDEXT 10:4 was the most stable hydrogel, its ability to form porous tubular scaffolds was investigated. The tubular scaffolds were prepared by the lyophilization method, where the orientation of the pores was controlled by exposing either the internal or the external surface of the frozen hydrogel during the sublimation step. When only the inner surface of the frozen hydrogel was exposed, tubular scaffolds with a highly porous lumen and a sealed outer surface were obtained, where the orientation of the pores, their sizes and interconnectivity seem to be optimum for vascular tissue engineering application.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Soluble Eggshell Membrane Protein/PLGA Electro spun Nano fibers for Guided Tissue Regeneration Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, J.; Liu, G.; Duan, Y.; Guo, Z.; Yu, J.

    2012-01-01

    Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) is a widely used method in periodontal therapy, which involves the placement of a barrier membrane to exclude migration of epithelium and ensure repopulation of periodontal ligament cells. The objective of this study is to prepare and evaluate a new type of soluble eggshell membrane protein (SEP)/poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nano fibers using electro spinning method for GTR membrane application. SEP/PLGA nano fibers were successfully prepared with various blending ratios. The morphology, chemical composition, surface wettability, and mechanical properties of the nano fibers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), contact angle measurement, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and a universal testing machine. L-929 fibroblast cells were used to evaluate the biocompatibility of SEP/PLGA nano fibers and investigate the interaction between cells and nano fibers. Results showed that the SEP/PLGA electro spun membrane was composed of uniform, bead-free nano fibers, which formed an interconnected porous network structure. Mechanical property of SEP has been greatly improved by the addition of PLGA. The biological study results showed that SEP/PLGA nano fibers could enhance cell attachment, spreading, and proliferation. The study indicated the potential of SEP/PLGA nano fibers for GTR application and provided a basis for future optimization

  11. A Novel Hybrid Ultramicrotomy/FIB-SEM Technique: Preparation of Serial Electron-Transparent Thin Sections of a Hayabusa Grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese space agency's (JAXA) Hayabusa mission returned the first particulate samples (typically grain surfaces and interiors. Using this method, we increase the number of FIB-prepared sections that can be recovered from a particle with dimensions on the order of tens of microns. These sections can be subsequently analyzed using a variety of analytical techniques. Particle RA-QD02-0211 is a approx. 40×40×20 micron particle from Itokawa containing olivine and Fe sulfides. It was embedded in low viscosity epoxy and partly sectioned to a depth of approx 10 micron; sections are placed on Cu grids with thin amorphous films for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analyses. With the sample surface partly exposed, the epoxy bullet is trimmed to a height of approx. 5mm to accommodate the allowable dimensions for FIB work (FEI Quanta 600 3D dual beam FIB-SEM). Using a diamond trim knife, the epoxy surrounding the grain is removed on 3 sides (to within a few microns of the grain); the depth of material removed extends well below the bottom of the particle. The sample is attached to an SEM pin mount, the epoxy coated with conductive paint, and the entire assembly coated with approx. 40nm of carbon to eliminate sample charging during FIB work. A protective carbon cap is placed according to the plan for the 15 FIB sections. The central 'spine' of the cap runs perpendicular to the front of the sample, and the 'ribs' protruding from either side run parallel. Each rib indicates the location of a planned FIB section, and the spine contains the final two planned sections. We use a cap with a 4 micron-wide spine and 2micron-wide ribs that have ?3.5 micron of space between them (narrower cuts result in too much re-deposition of material inside the trenches). Using a 30kV, 3nA ion-beam we expose the front surface of the grain and commence milling trenches between sections. Rather than using the typical C-cut to prepare the sample for lift-out, an L-cut is used instead, leaving

  12. Preparation of next generation set of group cross sections. A task report to the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kunio

    2000-03-01

    The SLAROM code, performing fast reactor cell calculation based on a deterministic methodology, has been revised by adding the universal module PEACO of generating Ultra-fine group neutron spectra. The revised SLAROM, then, was utilized for evaluating reaction rate distributions in ZPPR-13A simulated by a 2-dim RZ homogeneous model, although actually ZPPR-13A composed of radially heterogeneous cells. The reaction rate distributions of ZPPR-13A were also calculated by the code MVP, that is a continuous energy Monte Carlo calculation code based on a probabilistic methodology. By comparing both results, it was concluded that the module PEACO has excellent capability for evaluating highly accurate effective cross sections. Also it was proved that the use of a new fine group cross section library set (next generation set), reflecting behavior of cross sections of structural materials, such as Fe and 0, in the fast neutron energy region, is indispensable for attaining a better agreement within 1% between both calculation methods. Also, for production of a next generation set of group cross sections, the code NJOY97.V107 was added to the group cross section production system and both front and end processing parts were prepared. This system was utilized to produce the new 70 group JFS-3 library using the evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-3.2. Furthermore, to confirm the capability of this new group cross section production system, the above new JFS-3 library was applied to core performance analysis of ZPPR-9 core with a 2-dim RZ homogeneous model and analysis of heterogeneous cells of ZPPR-9 core by using the deterministic method. Also the analysis using the code MVP was performed. By comparison of both results the following conclusion has been derived; the deterministic method, with the PEACO module for resonance cross sections, contributes to improve accuracy of predicting reaction rate distributions and Na void reactivity in fast reactor cores. And it becomes clear

  13. Comparison of ultramicrotomy and focused-ion-beam for the preparation of TEM and STEM cross section of organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corazza, Michael, E-mail: michael.corazza@gmail.com [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Simonsen, Søren B. [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Gnaegi, Helmut [Diatome Ltd., Biel-Bienne (Switzerland); Thydén, Karl T.S.; Krebs, Frederik C.; Gevorgyan, Suren A. [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of flexible solar cell sections prepared by ultramicrotomy and by FIB. • Energy filtered TEM analysis of phase separation in the P3HT:PCBM active layer. • Imaging of aging effects on solar cell cross section prepared by ultramicrotomy. • Ultramicrotomy provides great details while FIB better preserves the structure. - Abstract: The challenge of preparing cross sections of organic photovoltaics (OPV) suitable for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) is addressed. The samples were polymer solar cells fabricated using roll-to-roll (R2R) processing methods on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Focused ion beam (FIB) and ultramicrotomy were used to prepare the cross sections. The differences between the samples prepared by ultramicrotomy and FIB are addressed, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of each technique. The sample prepared by ultramicrotomy yielded good resolution, enabling further studies of phase separation of P3HT:PCBM by means of energy filtered TEM (EFTEM). The sample prepared by FIB shows good structure preservation, but reduced resolution due to non-optimal thicknesses achieved after treatment. Degradation studies of samples prepared by ultramicrotomy are further discussed, which reveal particular effects of the ISOS-L-3 aging test (85 °C, 50% R.H., 0.7 Sun) onto the sample, especially pronounced in the silver layer.

  14. Preparation of gelatin based porous biocomposite for bone tissue engineering and evaluation of gamma irradiation effect on its properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Md. Minhajul [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Khan, Mubarak A. [Institute of Radiation and Polymer Technology (IRPT), Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE), P. O. Box No. 3787, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur, E-mail: mizanur.rahman@du.ac.bd [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh)

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradable porous hybrid polymer composites were prepared by using gelatin as base polymer matrix, β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and calcium sulfate (CS) as cementing materials, chitosan as an antimicrobial agent, and glutaraldehyde and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as crosslinkers at different mass ratios. Thereafter, the composites were subjected to γ-radiation sterilization. The structure and properties of these composite scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mechanical properties testing (compressive, bending, tensile and impact), thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), and physical stability test in simulated body fluid (SBF). We found that TCP rich composites showed enhanced mechanical properties among all the crosslinked composites. γ-Radiation sterilization triggered further cross linking in polymer matrix resulting a decrease in pore size of the composites and an increase in pore wall thickness with improved mechanical and thermal properties. The chemically crosslinked composite with 40% TCP followed by γ-radiation sterilization showed the smallest pore size distribution with a mean pore diameter of 159.22 μm, which falls in the range of 100–350 μm — known to be suitable for osteoconduction. Considering its improved mechanical and thermal properties along with osteoconduction ability without cytotoxicity, we propose this biocomposite as a viable candidate for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Composite scaffolds were prepared from biopolymers (gelatin and chitosan). • β-TCP and CS were used as bioactive cementing materials at different ratios. • γ-Sterilization improved the mechanical properties of the biocomposites. • γ-Sterilization reduced the cytotoxicity and induced high antimicrobial properties. • Composite having 40% TCP has the proper pore size distribution for osteoconduction.

  15. Three-dimensional immersive virtual reality for studying cellular compartments in 3D models from EM preparations of neural tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Cali, Corrado

    2015-07-14

    Advances for application of electron microscopy to serial imaging are opening doors to new ways of analyzing cellular structure. New and improved algorithms and workflows for manual and semiautomated segmentation allow to observe the spatial arrangement of the smallest cellular features with unprecedented detail in full three-dimensions (3D). From larger samples, higher complexity models can be generated; however, they pose new challenges to data management and analysis. Here, we review some currently available solutions and present our approach in detail. We use the fully immersive virtual reality (VR) environment CAVE (cave automatic virtual environment), a room where we are able to project a cellular reconstruction and visualize in 3D, to step into a world created with Blender, a free, fully customizable 3D modeling software with NeuroMorph plug-ins for visualization and analysis of electron microscopy (EM) preparations of brain tissue. Our workflow allows for full and fast reconstructions of volumes of brain neuropil using ilastik, a software tool for semiautomated segmentation of EM stacks. With this visualization environment, we can walk into the model containing neuronal and astrocytic processes to study the spatial distribution of glycogen granules, a major energy source that is selectively stored in astrocytes. The use of CAVE was key to observe a nonrandom distribution of glycogen, and led us to develop tools to quantitatively analyze glycogen clustering and proximity to other subcellular features. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling and optimization of gelatin-chitosan micro-carriers preparation for soft tissue engineering: Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaei, Payam; Mashayekhan, Shohreh; Vakilian, Saeid

    2017-06-01

    Electrospray ionization is a wide spread technique for producing polymeric microcarriers (MCs) by applying electrostatic force and ionic cross-linker, simultaneously. In this study, fabrication process of gelatin-chitosan MCs and its optimization using the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is reported. Gelatin/chitosan (G/C) blend ratio, applied voltage and feeding flow rate, their individual and interaction effects on the diameter and mechanical strength of the MCs were investigated. The obtained models for diameter and mechanical strength of MCs have a quadratic relationship with G/C blend ratio, applied voltage and feeding flow rate. Using the desirability curve, optimized G/C blend ratios that are introduced, include the desirable quantities for MCs diameter and mechanical strength. MCs of the same desirable diameter (350μm) and different G/C blend ratio (1, 2, and 3) were fabricated and their elasticity was investigated via Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The biocompatibility of the MCs was evaluated using MTT assay. The results showed that human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hUCMSCs) could attach and proliferate on fabricated MCs during 7days of culturing especially on those prepared with G/C blend ratios of 1 and 2. Such gelatin-chitosan MCs may be considered as a promising candidate for injectable tissue engineering scaffolds, supporting attachment and proliferation of hUCMSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of morphologic identification of filamentous fungi in paraffin embedded tissue sections: Correlation of histological and culture diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaram Challa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim was to investigate the correlation between histological and culture diagnosis of filamentous fungi. Materials and Methods: Tissue sections from biopsy samples stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin and special stains from samples of chronic invasive/noninvasive sinusitis and intracranial space occupying lesions during 2005-2011 diagnosed to have infection due to filamentous fungi were reviewed. The histopathology and culture diagnoses were analyzed for correlation and discrepancy. Results: There were 125 samples positive for filamentous fungi on biopsy. Of these 76 (60.8% were submitted for culture and fungi grew in 30 (39.97% samples. There was a positive correlation between histological and culture diagnosis in 25 (83.33% samples that included Aspergillus species (16/19, Zygomycetes species (8/10 and dematiaceous fungi (1/1. The negative yield of fungi was more in Zygomycetes species (20/30 when compared to Aspergillus species (25/44. There was a discrepancy in diagnosis in 5/30 (16.67% samples which included probable dual infection in two, and dematiaceous fungi being interpreted as Aspergillus species in three samples. Conclusion: Histopathology plays a major role in the diagnosis of infection due to filamentous fungi, especially when cultures are not submitted or negative. The discrepancy between histological and culture diagnosis was either due to dematiaceous fungi being interpreted as Aspergillus species or probable dual infection.

  18. Identification of 5-hydroxytryptamine-producing cells by detection of fluorescence in paraffin-embedded tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kaneko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT produced by enterochromaffin (EC cells is an important enteric mucosal signaling ligand and has been implicated in several gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and functional disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. The present study reports a new, simple and rapid visualization method of 5-HT-producing EC cells utilizing detection of autofluorescence in paraffin-embedded tissue sections after formalin fixation. In human samples, there was a high incidence of autofluorescence+ cells in the 5-HT+ cells in the pyloric, small intestinal and colonic glands, while co-localization was lacking between autofluorescence+ and gastrin+ cells in the pyloric and small intestinal glands. Autofluorescence+ EC cells were detected in the colon of mice and rats. Autofluorescence+ cells were also observed in 5-HT+ β cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans in pregnant mice, while non-pregnant mouse pancreatic islet cells showed no 5-HT immunoreactivity or autofluorescence. These results suggest that autofluorescence+ cells are identical to 5-HT+ cells, and the source of autofluorescence may be 5-HT itself or molecules related to its synthesis or degradation. This autofluorescence signal detection method may be applicable for monitoring of inflammatory status of inflammatory bowel diseases in both the experimental and clinical settings.

  19. Modeling and optimization of gelatin-chitosan micro-carriers preparation for soft tissue engineering: Using Response Surface Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radaei, Payam [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11365-8639 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mashayekhan, Shohreh, E-mail: mashayekhan@sharif.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11365-8639 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vakilian, Saeid [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11365-8639 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Stem Cell Technology Research Center, Tehran 1997775555 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-01

    Electrospray ionization is a wide spread technique for producing polymeric microcarriers (MCs) by applying electrostatic force and ionic cross-linker, simultaneously. In this study, fabrication process of gelatin-chitosan MCs and its optimization using the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is reported. Gelatin/chitosan (G/C) blend ratio, applied voltage and feeding flow rate, their individual and interaction effects on the diameter and mechanical strength of the MCs were investigated. The obtained models for diameter and mechanical strength of MCs have a quadratic relationship with G/C blend ratio, applied voltage and feeding flow rate. Using the desirability curve, optimized G/C blend ratios that are introduced, include the desirable quantities for MCs diameter and mechanical strength. MCs of the same desirable diameter (350 μm) and different G/C blend ratio (1, 2, and 3) were fabricated and their elasticity was investigated via Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The biocompatibility of the MCs was evaluated using MTT assay. The results showed that human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hUCMSCs) could attach and proliferate on fabricated MCs during 7 days of culturing especially on those prepared with G/C blend ratios of 1 and 2. Such gelatin-chitosan MCs may be considered as a promising candidate for injectable tissue engineering scaffolds, supporting attachment and proliferation of hUCMSCs. - Highlights: • Gelatin-chitosan Micro-carriers fabricated by electrospray ionization method. • The effects of blend ratio, the syringe feeding rate, and voltage on micro-carrier optimization were investigated via RSM. • Both diameter and mechanical strength of Micro-carriers have a quadratic relationship with selected parameters. • The optimum conditions with fixed diameter of 350μm and maximized strength in different blend ratios were achieved. • The elasticity and biocompatibility of desirable fabricated micro-carriers characterized.

  20. Optically Sectioned Imaging of Microvasculature of In-Vivo and Ex-Vivo Thick Tissue Models with Speckle-illumination HiLo Microscopy and HiLo Image Processing Implementation in MATLAB Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Ricky Wai

    The work described in this thesis covers the conversion of HiLo image processing into MATLAB architecture and the use of speckle-illumination HiLo microscopy for use of ex-vivo and in-vivo imaging of thick tissue models. HiLo microscopy is a wide-field fluorescence imaging technique and has been demonstrated to produce optically sectioned images comparable to confocal in thin samples. The imaging technique was developed by Jerome Mertz and the Boston University Biomicroscopy Lab and has been implemented in our lab as a stand-alone optical setup and a modification to a conventional fluorescence microscope. Speckle-illumination HiLo microscopy combines two images taken under speckle-illumination and standard uniform-illumination to generate an optically sectioned image that reject out-of-focus fluorescence. The evaluated speckle contrast in the images is used as a weighting function where elements that move out-of-focus have a speckle contrast that decays to zero. The experiments shown here demonstrate the capability of our HiLo microscopes to produce optically-sectioned images of the microvasculature of ex-vivo and in-vivo thick tissue models. The HiLo microscope were used to image the microvasculature of ex-vivo mouse heart sections prepared for optical histology and the microvasculature of in-vivo rodent dorsal window chamber models. Studies in label-free surface profiling with HiLo microscopy is also presented.

  1. In situ hybridisation for identification and differentiation of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis in formalin-fixed porcine tissue sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Mette; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Ahrens, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S ribosomal RNA were designed for species-specific identification of the porcine mycoplasmas Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae using a fluorescent in situ hybridisation assay. The specificity of the probes was evaluated...... using pure cultures as well as porcine tissue sections with artificial presence of mycoplasma, and the probes were found specific for the target organisms. The assay was applied on sections of 28 tissue samples from pigs infected with one or more of the three Mycoplasma species as determined...

  2. Comparison of ultramicrotomy and focused-ion-beam for the preparation of TEM and STEM cross section of organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corazza, Michael; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Gnaegi, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of preparing cross sections of organic photovoltaics (OPV) suitable for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) is addressed. The samples were polymer solar cells fabricated using roll-to-roll (R2R) processing methods on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate...... resolution, enabling further studies of phase separation of P3HT:PCBM by means of energy filtered TEM (EFTEM). The sample prepared by FIB shows good structure preservation, but reduced resolution due to non-optimal thicknesses achieved after treatment. Degradation studies of samples prepared...

  3. Quantitation of repaglinide and metabolites in mouse whole-body thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiqi; Wang, Lifei; Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos; Gan, Jinping

    2016-03-25

    Herein, quantitation aspects of a fully automated autosampler/HPLC-MS/MS system applied for unattended droplet-based surface sampling of repaglinide dosed thin tissue sections with subsequent HPLC separation and mass spectrometric analysis of parent drug and various drug metabolites were studied. Major organs (brain, lung, liver, kidney and muscle) from whole-body thin tissue sections and corresponding organ homogenates prepared from repaglinide dosed mice were sampled by surface sampling and by bulk extraction, respectively, and analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS. A semi-quantitative agreement between data obtained by surface sampling and that by employing organ homogenate extraction was observed. Drug concentrations obtained by the two methods followed the same patterns for post-dose time points (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 h). Drug amounts determined in the specific tissues was typically higher when analyzing extracts from the organ homogenates. In addition, relative comparison of the levels of individual metabolites between the two analytical methods also revealed good semi-quantitative agreement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of drug distribution images from whole-body thin tissue sections obtained using desorption electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J; Vavrek, Marissa; Koeplinger, Kenneth A; Schneider, Bradley B; Covey, Thomas R

    2008-07-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (DESI-MS/MS) and whole-body autoradiography (WBA) were used for chemical imaging of whole-body thin tissue sections of mice intravenously dosed with propranolol (7.5 mg/kg). DESI-MS/MS imaging utilized selected reaction monitoring detection performed on an AB/MDS SCIEX 4000 QTRAP mass spectrometer equipped with a prototype extended length particle discriminator interface. Propranolol images of the tissue sections using DESI-MS/MS were obtained at surface scan rates of 0.1, 0.5, 2, and 7 mm/s. Although signal decreased with increasing scan rate, useful whole-body images for propranolol were obtained from the tissues even at 7 mm/s, which required just 79 min of analysis time. Attempts to detect and image the distribution of the known propranolol metabolites were unsuccessful. Regions of the tissue sections showing the most radioactivity from WBA sections were excised and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with radiochemical detection to determine relative levels of propranolol and metabolites present. Comparison of the DESI-MS/MS signal for propranolol and the radioactivity attributed to propranolol from WBA sections indicated nominal agreement between the two techniques for the amount of propranolol in the brain, lung, and liver. Data from the kidney showed an unexplained disparity between the two techniques. The results of this study show the feasibility of using DESI-MS/MS to obtain useful chemical images of a drug in whole-body thin tissue sections following drug administration at a pharmacologically relevant level. Further optimization to improve sensitivity and enable detection of the drug metabolites will be among the requirements necessary to move DESI-MS/MS chemical imaging forward as a practical tool in drug discovery.

  5. European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Pathobiology Group standard operating procedure for the preparation of human tumour tissue extracts suited for the quantitative analysis of tissue-associated biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Manfred; Mengele, Karin; Schueren, Elisabeth; Sweep, Fred C G J; Foekens, John A; Brünner, Nils; Laabs, Juliane; Malik, Abha; Harbeck, Nadia

    2007-03-01

    With the new concept of 'individualized treatment and targeted therapies', tumour tissue-associated biomarkers have been given a new role in selection of cancer patients for treatment and in cancer patient management. Tumour biomarkers can give support to cancer patient stratification and risk assessment, treatment response identification, or to identifying those patients who are expected to respond to certain anticancer drugs. As the field of tumour-associated biomarkers has expanded rapidly over the last years, it has become increasingly apparent that a strong need exists to establish guidelines on how to easily disintegrate the tumour tissue for assessment of the presence of tumour tissue-associated biomarkers. Several mechanical tissue (cell) disruption techniques exist, ranging from bead mill homogenisation and freeze-fracturing through to blade or pestle-type homogenisation, to grinding and ultrasonics. Still, only a few directives have been given on how fresh-frozen tumour tissues should be processed for the extraction and determination of tumour biomarkers. The PathoBiology Group of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer therefore has devised a standard operating procedure for the standardised preparation of human tumour tissue extracts which is designed for the quantitative analysis of tumour tissue-associated biomarkers. The easy to follow technical steps involved require 50-300 mg of deep-frozen cancer tissue placed into small size (1.2 ml) cryogenic tubes. These are placed into the shaking flask of a Mikro-Dismembrator S machine (bead mill) to pulverise the tumour tissue in the capped tubes in the deep-frozen state by use of a stainless steel ball, all within 30 s of exposure. RNA is isolated from the pulverised tissue following standard procedures. Proteins are extracted from the still frozen pulverised tissue by addition of Tris-buffered saline to obtain the cytosol fraction of the tumour or by the Tris buffer supplemented with

  6. Detection of microRNAs in frozen tissue sections by fluorescence in situ hybridization using locked nucleic acid probes and tyramide signal amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silahtaroglu, Asli; Nolting, Dorrit; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt

    2007-01-01

    been shown to increase detection sensitivity in FISH, combining these techniques into one protocol significantly decreases the time needed for miRNA detection in cryosections, while simultaneously retaining high detection sensitivity. Starting with fixation of the tissue sections, this miRNA FISH...

  7. INSITU BLOTTING - A NOVEL METHOD FOR DIRECT TRANSFER OF NATIVE PROTEINS FROM SECTIONED TISSUE TO BLOTTING MEMBRANE - PROCEDURE AND SOME APPLICATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OKABE, M; NYAKAS, C; BUWALDA, B; LUITEN, PGM

    We describe a novel technique for direct transfer of native proteins from unfixed frozen tissue sections to an immobilizing matrix, e.g., nitrocellulose, polyvinyliden difluoride, or positively charged nylon membranes. Proteins are directly blotted onto the membrane, providing optimal accessibility

  8. Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) lymphoma of the lung showing mosaic pattern of inhomogeneous attenuation on thin-section CT: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Jae; Kim, Sung Hwan; Koo, Soo Hyun; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Jang, Kee Taek; Kim, Duck Hwan

    2000-01-01

    The authors present a case of histologically proven bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) lymphoma of the lung in a patient with primary Sjogren's syndrome that manifested on thin-section CT scan as a mosaic pattern of inhomogeneous attenuation due to mixed small airway and infiltrative abnormalities

  9. Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) lymphoma of the lung showing mosaic pattern of inhomogeneous attenuation on thin-section CT: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Jae; Kim, Sung Hwan; Koo, Soo Hyun; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Jang, Kee Taek; Kim, Duck Hwan [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    The authors present a case of histologically proven bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) lymphoma of the lung in a patient with primary Sjogren's syndrome that manifested on thin-section CT scan as a mosaic pattern of inhomogeneous attenuation due to mixed small airway and infiltrative abnormalities.

  10. Detection of Streptococcus suis by in situ hybridization, indirect immunofluorescence, and peroxidase-antiperoxidase assays in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Mette; Feenstra, Anne Avlund; Tegtmeier, Conny

    2000-01-01

    and the immunohistochemical methods were used for detection of S. suis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of brain, endocardium, and lung from pigs infected with S. suis. The methods developed were able to detect single cells of S. suis in situ in the respective samples, whereas no signal was observed from...

  11. Fast and Simple Protocols for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics of Small Fresh Frozen Uterine Tissue Sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dapic, I.; Uwugiaren, N.; Jansen, P.J.; Corthals, G.L.

    2017-01-01

    Human tissues are an important link between organ-specific spatial molecular information, patient pathology, and patient treatment options. However, patient tissues are uniquely obtained by time and location, and limited in their availability and size. Currently, little knowledge exists about

  12. Preparing Soups. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.10b. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with preparing and serving soups. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these areas: thin soups, thick soups, convenience soups,…

  13. 46,XY,DUP(10Q) IN DIRECT CVS PREPARATION AND MOSAIC 48,XXXY,DUP(10Q) IN CVS LONG-TERM CULTURE AND FETAL TISSUE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIJMONS, RH; SIKKEMARADDATZ, B; KLOOSTERMAN, MD; BRIET, JW; DEJONG, B; LESCHOT, NJ

    Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) was performed on a 40-year-old woman at 9 1/2 menstrual weeks because of advanced maternal age. The direct preparation showed 46,XY,dup(10)(q11.2q23.2). CVS long-term culture and fetal tissue revealed a rare additional abnormality: 48,XXXY,dup(10)(q11.2q23.2). This

  14. Differential N-glycan patterns identified in lung adenocarcinoma by N-glycan profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Deng, Zaian; Huang, Chuncui; Zhu, Tong; Lou, Jiatao; Wang, Lin; Li, Yan

    2018-02-10

    N-glycan profiling is a powerful approach for analyzing the functional relationship between N-glycosylation and cancer. Current methods rely on either serum or fresh tissue samples; however, N-glycan patterns may differ between serum and tissue, as the proteins of serum originate from a variety of tissues. Furthermore, fresh tissue samples are difficult to ship and store. Here, we used a profiling method based on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections from lung adenocarcinoma patients. We found that our method was highly reproducible. We identified 58 N-glycan compositions from lung adenocarcinoma FFPE samples, 51 of which were further used for MS n -based structure prediction. We show that high mannose type N-glycans are upregulated, while sialylated N-glycans are downregulated in our FFPE lung adenocarcinoma samples, compared to the control samples. Our receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis shows that high mannose type and sialylated N-glycans are useful discriminators to distinguish between lung adenocarcinoma and control tissue. Together, our results indicate that expression levels of specific N-glycans correlate well with lung adenocarcinoma, and strongly suggest that our FFPE-based method will be useful for N-glycan profiling of cancer tissues. Glycosylation is one of the most important post-translational protein modifications, and is associated with several physiopathological processes, including carcinogenesis. In this study, we tested the feasibility of using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections to identify changes in N-glycan patterns and identified the differentially expressed N-glycans of lung adenocarcinoma. Our study shows that the FFPE-based N-glycan profiling method is useful for clinical diagnosis as well as identification of potential biomarkers, and our data expand current knowledge of differential N-glycan patterns of lung adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An integrated sample preparation to determine coccidiostats and emerging Fusarium-mycotoxins in various poultry tissues with LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestoi, Marika; Rokka, Mervi; Peltonen, Kimmo

    2007-05-01

    The usefulness of an existing sample preparation technique used for ionophoric coccidiostats (lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin and narasin) was applied in the analysis of emerging Fusarium-mycotoxins beauvericin (BEA) and enniatins (ENNs) in poultry tissues (liver and meat). Also, maduramicin and liver as a new sample matrix was introduced. The developed methods were validated and applied for the determination of coccidiostats and BEA/ENNs in Finnish poultry tissues in 2004-2005. The validation parameters demonstrated that the integrated sample preparation technique is applicable to the parallel determination of these contaminants in poultry tissues. Of the samples analysed (276 meat and 43 liver), only trace levels of LAS, MON, SAL, NAR and MAD were detected in 7, 3, 5, 6 and 4% of the samples, respectively. Interestingly, for the first time, traces of BEA and ENNs could also be detected in animal tissues. BEA and ENNs A, A1, B and B1 were found in 2, 0.3, 0.6, 4 and 3% of the samples, respectively. The simultaneous presence of coccidiostats and mycotoxins was detected in three turkey samples in 2004.

  16. Comparison of commercial DNA preparation kits for the detection of Brucellae in tissue using quantitative real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straube Eberhard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of Brucellae in tissue specimens using PCR assays is difficult because the amount of bacteria is usually low. Therefore, optimised DNA extraction methods are critical. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of commercial kits for the extraction of Brucella DNA. Methods Five kits were evaluated using clinical specimens: QIAamp™ DNA Mini Kit (QIAGEN, peqGold™ Tissue DNA Mini Kit (PeqLab, UltraClean™ Tissue and Cells DNA Isolation Kit (MoBio, DNA Isolation Kit for Cells and Tissues (Roche, and NucleoSpin™ Tissue (Macherey-Nagel. DNA yield was determined using a quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting IS711 that included an internal amplification control. Results Kits of QIAGEN and Roche provided the highest amount of DNA, Macherey-Nagel and Peqlab products were intermediate whereas MoBio yielded the lowest amount of DNA. Differences were significant (p Conclusions We observed differences in DNA yield as high as two orders of magnitude for some samples between the best and the worst DNA extraction kits and inhibition was observed occasionally. This indicates that DNA purification may be more relevant than expected when the amount of DNA in tissue is very low.

  17. A texture based pattern recognition approach to distinguish melanoma from non-melanoma cells in histopathological tissue microarray sections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton Rexhepaj

    Full Text Available AIMS: Immunohistochemistry is a routine practice in clinical cancer diagnostics and also an established technology for tissue-based research regarding biomarker discovery efforts. Tedious manual assessment of immunohistochemically stained tissue needs to be fully automated to take full advantage of the potential for high throughput analyses enabled by tissue microarrays and digital pathology. Such automated tools also need to be reproducible for different experimental conditions and biomarker targets. In this study we present a novel supervised melanoma specific pattern recognition approach that is fully automated and quantitative. METHODS AND RESULTS: Melanoma samples were immunostained for the melanocyte specific target, Melan-A. Images representing immunostained melanoma tissue were then digitally processed to segment regions of interest, highlighting Melan-A positive and negative areas. Color deconvolution was applied to each region of interest to separate the channel containing the immunohistochemistry signal from the hematoxylin counterstaining channel. A support vector machine melanoma classification model was learned from a discovery melanoma patient cohort (n = 264 and subsequently validated on an independent cohort of melanoma patient tissue sample images (n = 157. CONCLUSION: Here we propose a novel method that takes advantage of utilizing an immuhistochemical marker highlighting melanocytes to fully automate the learning of a general melanoma cell classification model. The presented method can be applied on any protein of interest and thus provides a tool for quantification of immunohistochemistry-based protein expression in melanoma.

  18. Brain tissues atrophy is not always the best structural biomarker of physiological aging: A multimodal cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Andrea; Caligiuri, Maria Eugenia; Péran, Patrice; Sabatini, Umberto; Cosentino, Carlo; Amato, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a voxel-based multiple regression analysis of different magnetic resonance image modalities, including anatomical T1-weighted, T2* relaxometry, and diffusion tensor imaging. Quantitative parameters sensitive to complementary brain tissue alterations, including morphometric atrophy, mineralization, microstructural damage, and anisotropy loss, were compared in a linear physiological aging model in 140 healthy subjects (range 20-74 years). The performance of different predictors and the identification of the best biomarker of age-induced structural variation were compared without a priori anatomical knowledge. The best quantitative predictors in several brain regions were iron deposition and microstructural damage, rather than macroscopic tissue atrophy. Age variations were best resolved with a combination of markers, suggesting that multiple predictors better capture age-induced tissue alterations. These findings highlight the importance of a combined evaluation of multimodal biomarkers for the study of aging and point to a number of novel applications for the method described.

  19. Methods for histochemical demonstration of vascular structures at the muscle-bone interface from cryostate sections of demineralized tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S

    1981-01-01

    In tissue decalcified with MgNa2EDTA at a neutral pH activity for ATPase can used be for demonstration of the vascular structures at the muscle-bone interface. The GOMORI method for alkaline phosphatase is only of value, when fresh unfixed tissue is to be examined. The azo-dye method for alkaline...... phosphatase failed to give satisfactory results, and so did the alpha-amylase PAS method. 5'-nucleotidase activity is present in both capillaries and in cells lining the surfaces of bones, while larger blood vessels are poorly stained....

  20. Fabrication and design of bioactive agent coated, highly-aligned electrospun matrices for nerve tissue engineering: Preparation, characterization and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Heo, Min; Lee, Donghyun; Heo, Dong Nyoung; Lim, Ho-Nam; Kwon, Il Keun

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we designed highly-aligned thermoplastic polycarbonate urethane (PCU) fibrous scaffolds coated with bioactive compounds, such as Poly-L-Lysine (PLL) and Poly-L-Ornithine (PLO), to enhance cellular adhesion and directivity. These products were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis which demonstrated that highly aligned fiber strands were formed without beads when coated onto a mandrel rotating at 1800 rpm. During in vitro cell test, PLO-coated, aligned PCU scaffolds were found to have significantly higher proliferation rates than PLL coated and bare PCU scaffolds. Interestingly, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were observed to stretch along the longitudinal axis parallel to the cell direction on highly aligned scaffolds. These results clearly confirm that our strategy may suggest a useful paradigm by inducing neural tissue repair as a means to remodeling and healing of tissue for restorative procedures in neural tissue engineering.

  1. Serial section scanning electron microscopy (S3EM) on silicon wafers for ultra-structural volume imaging of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Heinz; Körber, Christoph; Sätzler, Kurt; Aydin, Daniel; Kuner, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High resolution, three-dimensional (3D) representations of cellular ultrastructure are essential for structure function studies in all areas of cell biology. While limited subcellular volumes have been routinely examined using serial section transmission electron microscopy (ssTEM), complete ultrastructural reconstructions of large volumes, entire cells or even tissue are difficult to achieve using ssTEM. Here, we introduce a novel approach combining serial sectioning of tissue with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using a conductive silicon wafer as a support. Ribbons containing hundreds of 35 nm thick sections can be generated and imaged on the wafer at a lateral pixel resolution of 3.7 nm by recording the backscattered electrons with the in-lens detector of the SEM. The resulting electron micrographs are qualitatively comparable to those obtained by conventional TEM. S(3)EM images of the same region of interest in consecutive sections can be used for 3D reconstructions of large structures. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by reconstructing a 31.7 µm(3) volume of a calyx of Held presynaptic terminal. The approach introduced here, Serial Section SEM (S(3)EM), for the first time provides the possibility to obtain 3D ultrastructure of large volumes with high resolution and to selectively and repetitively home in on structures of interest. S(3)EM accelerates process duration, is amenable to full automation and can be implemented with standard instrumentation.

  2. Serial section scanning electron microscopy (S3EM on silicon wafers for ultra-structural volume imaging of cells and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Horstmann

    Full Text Available High resolution, three-dimensional (3D representations of cellular ultrastructure are essential for structure function studies in all areas of cell biology. While limited subcellular volumes have been routinely examined using serial section transmission electron microscopy (ssTEM, complete ultrastructural reconstructions of large volumes, entire cells or even tissue are difficult to achieve using ssTEM. Here, we introduce a novel approach combining serial sectioning of tissue with scanning electron microscopy (SEM using a conductive silicon wafer as a support. Ribbons containing hundreds of 35 nm thick sections can be generated and imaged on the wafer at a lateral pixel resolution of 3.7 nm by recording the backscattered electrons with the in-lens detector of the SEM. The resulting electron micrographs are qualitatively comparable to those obtained by conventional TEM. S(3EM images of the same region of interest in consecutive sections can be used for 3D reconstructions of large structures. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by reconstructing a 31.7 µm(3 volume of a calyx of Held presynaptic terminal. The approach introduced here, Serial Section SEM (S(3EM, for the first time provides the possibility to obtain 3D ultrastructure of large volumes with high resolution and to selectively and repetitively home in on structures of interest. S(3EM accelerates process duration, is amenable to full automation and can be implemented with standard instrumentation.

  3. High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopic Imaging of Human Tissue Sections towards Improving Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Peter L.; Davidson, Bennett; Akkina, Sanjeev; Guzman, Grace; Setty, Suman; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Walsh, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging approach to obtain detailed images that have associated biochemical information. FT-IR imaging of tissue is based on the principle that different regions of the mid-infrared are absorbed by different chemical bonds (e.g., C=O, C-H, N-H) within cells or tissue that can then be related to the presence and composition of biomolecules (e.g., lipids, DNA, glycogen, protein, collagen). In an FT-IR image, every pixel within the image comprises an entire Infrared (IR) spectrum that can give information on the biochemical status of the cells that can then be exploited for cell-type or disease-type classification. In this paper, we show: how to obtain IR images from human tissues using an FT-IR system, how to modify existing instrumentation to allow for high-definition imaging capabilities, and how to visualize FT-IR images. We then present some applications of FT-IR for pathology using the liver and kidney as examples. FT-IR imaging holds exciting applications in providing a novel route to obtain biochemical information from cells and tissue in an entirely label-free non-perturbing route towards giving new insight into biomolecular changes as part of disease processes. Additionally, this biochemical information can potentially allow for objective and automated analysis of certain aspects of disease diagnosis. PMID:25650759

  4. Registration for deceased organ and tissue donation among Ontario immigrants: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alvin Ho-Ting; Lam, Ngan N; Dhanani, Sonny; Weir, Matthew; Prakash, Versha; Kim, Joseph; Knoll, Greg; Garg, Amit X

    2016-01-01

    Canada has low rates of deceased organ and tissue donation. Immigrants to Canada may differ in their registered support for deceased organ donation based on their country of origin. We used linked administrative databases in Ontario (about 11 million residents aged ≥ 16 yr) to study the proportion of immigrants and long-term residents registered for deceased organ and tissue donation as of October 2013. We used modified Poisson regression to identify and quantify predictors of donor registration. Compared with long-term residents ( n = 9 244 570), immigrants ( n = 1 947 646) were much less likely to register for deceased organ and tissue donation (11.9% v. 26.5%). Immigrants from the United States, Australia and New Zealand had the highest registration rate (40.0%), whereas immigrants with the lowest registration rates were from Eastern Europe and Central Asia (9.4%), East Asia and Pacific (8.4%) and sub-Saharan Africa (7.9%). The largest numbers of unregistered immigrants were from India ( n = 202 548), China ( n = 186 678) and the Philippines ( n = 125 686). Characteristics among the immigrant population associated with a higher likelihood of registration included economic immigrant status, living in a rural area (population speak English and French, and more years residing in Canada. Immigrants in Ontario were less likely to register for deceased organ and tissue donation than long-term residents. There is a need to better understand reasons for lower registration rates among Canadian immigrants and to create culture-sensitive materials to build support for deceased organ and tissue donation.

  5. Favorable Effects of the Detergent and Enzyme Extraction Method for Preparing Decellularized Bovine Pericardium Scaffold for Tissue Engineered Heart Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Min; Chen, Chang-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Ning; Zhu, Ya-Bin; Gu, Y. John

    2009-01-01

    Bovine pericardium has been extensively applied as the biomaterial for artificial heart valves and may potentially be used as a scaffold for tissue-engineered heart valves after decellularization. Although various methods of decellularization are currently available, it is unknown which method is

  6. Preparation and characterization of hydroxyapatite reinforced with hardystonite as a novel bio-nanocomposite for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Gheisari

    2015-04-01

    Results: According to XRD results, the sample milled for 10 h just indicated the hardystonite phase, while the sample milled for 5 h illustrate hardystonite phase along with several phases. Conclusion: In fact, our study indicated that hardystonite powder was composed of nano-crystalline structure, about 40 nm, can be prepared by mechanical activation to use as a new biomaterials for orthopedic applications.

  7. Analyses of the eustachian tube and its surrounding tissues with cross sectional images by high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Haruo; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Takasaki, Kenji; Kanda, Yukihiko; Nakao, Yoshiaki; Morikawa, Minoru; Ishimaru, Hideki; Hayashi, Kuniaki

    2000-01-01

    We attempted to image the eustachian tube (ET) and its surrounding tissues by high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT). Twenty-two normal subjects (44 ears) without middle ear problems were studied, and a patient with severe patulous ET was also studied as an abnormal case. In our device of multiplanar reconstruction technique, we were able to obtain the clear reconstructed images of the ET lumen as well as of its surrounding tissues (bone, ET cartilage, tensor veli palatini muscle, levator veli palatini muscle, Ostmann's fat tissue, tensor tympani muscle, internal carotid artery) at any desired portion, either parallel or perpendicular to the long axis of the ET. However, the exact borders between the ET cartilage and the muscles, Ostmann's fat tissue and the tubal gland were not clearly identified. In the severe case of patulous ET, the ET lumen was widely opened at each cross-sectional image from the pharyngeal orifice to the tympanic orifice, in contrast with its being closed at the cartilaginous portion in the normal cases. In addition, the fat tissue and glands around the ET lumen were not clearly identified in this case. We suggest that this method will lead to better understanding of the ET-related diseases such as patulous ET. (author)

  8. Analyses of the eustachian tube and its surrounding tissues with cross sectional images by high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Haruo; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Takasaki, Kenji; Kanda, Yukihiko; Nakao, Yoshiaki; Morikawa, Minoru; Ishimaru, Hideki; Hayashi, Kuniaki [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-07-01

    We attempted to image the eustachian tube (ET) and its surrounding tissues by high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT). Twenty-two normal subjects (44 ears) without middle ear problems were studied, and a patient with severe patulous ET was also studied as an abnormal case. In our device of multiplanar reconstruction technique, we were able to obtain the clear reconstructed images of the ET lumen as well as of its surrounding tissues (bone, ET cartilage, tensor veli palatini muscle, levator veli palatini muscle, Ostmann's fat tissue, tensor tympani muscle, internal carotid artery) at any desired portion, either parallel or perpendicular to the long axis of the ET. However, the exact borders between the ET cartilage and the muscles, Ostmann's fat tissue and the tubal gland were not clearly identified. In the severe case of patulous ET, the ET lumen was widely opened at each cross-sectional image from the pharyngeal orifice to the tympanic orifice, in contrast with its being closed at the cartilaginous portion in the normal cases. In addition, the fat tissue and glands around the ET lumen were not clearly identified in this case. We suggest that this method will lead to better understanding of the ET-related diseases such as patulous ET. (author)

  9. Detection of EGFR and COX-2 Expression by Immunohistochemical Method on a Tissue Microarray Section in Lung Cancer and Biological Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyun WANG

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, which can regulate growth, invasion and metastasis of tumor through relevant signaling pathway, have been detected in a variety of solid tumors. The aim of this study is to investigate the biological significance of EGFR and COX-2 expression in lung cancer and the relationship between them. Methods The expression of EGFR and COX-2 was detected in 89 primary lung cancer tissues, 12 premaliganant lesions, 12 lymph node metastases, and 10 normal lung tissues as the control by immunohistochemical method on a tissue microarray section. Results EGFR protein was detectable in 59.6%, 41.7%, and 66.7% of primary lung cancer tissues, premalignant lesions and lymph node metastases, respectively; COX-2 protein was detectable in 52.8%, 41.7%, and 66.7% of primary lung cancer tissues, premalignant lesions and lymph node metastases, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of the control (P 0.05. COX-2 expression was related to gross type (P < 0.05. A highly positive correlation was observed between EGFR and COX-2 expression (P < 0.01. Conclusion Overexpression of EGFR and COX-2 may play an important role in the tumorgenesis, progression and malignancy of lung cancer. Detection of EGFR and COX-2 expression might be helpful to diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer.

  10. Analysis of human tissue management models for medical research: preparation for implementation of the 2012 revision of the Bioethics and Safety Act of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Young-Joon; Kim, Hankyeom; Jang, Sejin; Koo, Young-Mo

    2013-06-01

    Efficient management of human tissue samples is a critical issue; the supply of samples is unable to satisfy the current demands for research. Lack of informed consent is also an ethical problem. One of the goals of the 2012 revision of Korea's Bioethics and Safety Act was to implement regulations that govern the management of human tissue samples. To remain competitive, medical institutions must prepare for these future changes. In this report, we review two tissue management models that are currently in use; model 1 is the most common system utilized by hospitals in Korea and model 2 is implemented by some of the larger institutions. We also propose three alternative models that offer advantages over the systems currently in use. Model 3 is a multi-bank model that protects the independence of physicians and pathologists. Model 4 utilizes a comprehensive single bioresource bank; although in this case, the pathologists gain control of the samples, which may make it difficult to implement. Model 5, which employs a bioresource utilization steering committee (BUSC), is viable to implement and still maintains the advantages of Model 4. To comply with the upcoming law, we suggest that physicians and pathologists in an institution should collaborate to choose one of the improved models of tissue management system that best fits for their situation.

  11. Effect of sample preparation techniques on the concentrations and distributions of elements in biological tissues using µSRXRF: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ebraheem, A; Dao, E; Desouza, E; McNeill, F E; Farquharson, M J; Li, C; Wainman, B C

    2015-01-01

    Routine tissue sample preparation using chemical fixatives is known to preserve the morphology of the tissue being studied. A competitive method, cryofixation followed by freeze drying, involves no chemical agents and maintains the biological function of the tissue. The possible effects of both sample preparation techniques in terms of the distribution of bio-metals (calcium (Ca), copper (Cu) zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) specifically) in human skin tissue samples was investigated. Micro synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (μSRXRF) was used to map bio-metal distribution in epidermal and dermal layers of human skin samples from various locations of the body that have been prepared using both techniques. For Ca, Cu and Zn, there were statistically significant differences between the epidermis and dermis using the freeze drying technique (p = 0.02, p < 0.01, and p < 0.01, respectively). Also using the formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique the levels of Ca, Cu and Zn, were significantly different between the epidermis and dermis layers (p = 0.03, p < 0.01, and p < 0.01, respectively). However, the difference in levels of Fe between the epidermis and dermis was unclear and further analysis was required. The epidermis was further divided into two sub-layers, one mainly composed of the stratum corneum and the other deeper layer, the stratum basale. It was found that the difference between the distribution of Fe in the two epidermal layers using the freeze drying technique resulted in a statistically significant difference (p = 0.012). This same region also showed a difference in Fe using the formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique (p < 0.01). The formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique also showed a difference between the deeper epidermal layer and the dermis (p < 0.01). It can be concluded that studies involving Ca, Cu and Zn might show similar results using both sample preparation techniques, however studies involving Fe would need more

  12. Preparation of a Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Imaging H2O2 in Lysosomes in Living Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Mingguang; Deng, Beibei; Kong, Xiuqi; Tang, Yonghe; Lin, Weiying

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) plays important roles in many physiological and pathological processes. At the cellular organelle level, the abnormal concentrations of H 2 O 2 in the lysosomes may cause redox imbalance and the loss of the critical functions of the lysosomes. Herein, we describe the preparation of a potent lysosome-targeted two-photon fluorescent probe (Lyso-HP) for the detection of H 2 O 2 in the lysosomes in the living cells. This unique fluorescent probe can also be employed to effectively detect H 2 O 2 in the living tissues using two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

  13. Enablers of the implementation of tissue plasminogen activator in acute stroke care: a cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Grady

    Full Text Available To assess emergency physicians' perceptions of individual and system enablers to the use of tissue Plasminogen Activator in acute stroke.Australian fellows and trainees of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine completed a 57-item online survey assessing enablers to implementation of evidence-based practice across six domains: knowledge, skills, modelling, monitoring, feedback, and maintenance. Demographic and workplace characteristics were obtained. Descriptive statistics were calculated to describe demographic and workplace characteristics of responders, and survey responses. Each domain received an overall score (% based on the number of responders agreeing with all items within the domain.A total of 429 (13% Australasian College for Emergency Medicine members responded. 17.7% of respondents reported they and/or their workplace met all knowledge-related enablers, however only 2.3% had all skill-related enablers in place. Of respondents who decide which patients receive tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment, 18.1% agreed that all maintenance-related enablers are in place at their hospital, compared to 6.6% for those who do not decide which patients receive tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment. None of the respondents had all items in place cross all domains.Even when allowing for the low response rate, it seems likely there is a lack of individual and system enablers supporting the implementation of best-practice stroke care in a number of Australian hospitals. Quality improvement programs could target all domains, particularly the skills-training and feedback emergency physicians receive, to aid implementation of tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment for acute stroke.

  14. No-cost manual method for preparation of tissue microarrays having high quality comparable to semiautomated methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad

    2013-05-01

    Manual tissue microarray (TMA) construction had been introduced to avoid the high cost of automated and semiautomated techniques. The cheapest and simplest technique for constructing manual TMA was that of using mechanical pencil tips. This study was carried out to modify this method, aiming to raise its quality to reach that of expensive ones. Some modifications were introduced to Shebl's technique. Two conventional mechanical pencil tips of different diameters were used to construct the recipient blocks. A source of mild heat was used, and blocks were incubated at 38°C overnight. With our modifications, 3 high-density TMA blocks were constructed. We successfully performed immunostaining without substantial tissue loss. Our modifications increased the number of cores per block and improved the stability of the cores within the paraffin block. This new, modified technique is a good alternative for expensive machines in many laboratories.

  15. Sections prepared for inclusion in an IAEA technical document handbook on Designing and Implementing a Physical Protection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, Mark K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Two major sections were drafted (each with several subsections) for the IAEA dealing with designing and implementing a Physical Protection System (PPS). Areas addressed were Search Systems and the evaluation of PPS effectiveness.

  16. The distribution of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) in tissues of animals polluted with the labeled preparate 23P (DF32P)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, T.; Mierzejewski, J.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) in organs and tissues of pigs and guinea-pigs with the acute alimentary intoxication with DF 32 P was determined by the use of a scintillic registration method. Radioactivity revealed all the samples studied. The most pronounced radioactivity was noted in lymph nodes, spleen and liver of guinea-pigs, and in kidneys, liver and spleen of pigs. (author)

  17. Preparation and characterization of a three-dimensional printed scaffold based on a functionalized polyester for bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyednejad, Hajar; Gawlitta, Debby; Dhert, Wouter J A; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Vermonden, Tina; Hennink, Wim E

    2011-05-01

    At present there is a strong need for suitable scaffolds that meet the requirements for bone tissue engineering applications. The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of porous scaffolds based on a hydroxyl functionalized polymer, poly(hydroxymethylglycolide-co-ε-caprolactone) (pHMGCL), for tissue engineering. In a recent study this polymer was shown to be a promising material for bone regeneration. The scaffolds consisting of pHMGCL or poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) were produced by means of a rapid prototyping technique (three-dimensional plotting) and were shown to have a high porosity and an interconnected pore structure. The thermal and mechanical properties of both scaffolds were investigated and human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto the scaffolds to evaluate the cell attachment properties, as well as cell viability and differentiation. It was shown that the cells filled the pores of the pHMGCL scaffold within 7 days and displayed increased metabolic activity when compared with cells cultured in PCL scaffolds. Importantly, pHMGCL scaffolds supported osteogenic differentiation. Therefore, scaffolds based on pHMGCL are promising templates for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synovial fluid white cell count and histopathological examination of periprosthetic tissue samples (frozen and permanent sections in the diagnosis of prosthetic knee infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obada B.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine prospectively the importance of synovial fluid white cell count and intraoperative frozen and permanent sections analysis (number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high-power field in the diagnosis of septic total knee arthroplasty. There were studied prospectively 72 patients who needed a revision total knee arthroplasty between 2013-2015. 30 patients were diagnosed with prosthetic joint infection due to high rates of ESR (93% and CRP (90% and preoperative positive culture from aspirated synovial fluid and 42 patients were considered to have aseptic failure according to negative preoperative culture from joint aspirate. For all the patients was analysed synovial fluid white cell count and histopathological aspect of intraoperative frozen and permanent sections of periprosthetic tissue. The results showed a median value of 13800 of sinovial white cells count for infected knee and 92 for noninfected knee. 90% of the patients with joint infection had more than 5 polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high power field on intraoperative frozen sections and 83% on permanent sections. None of the patients from aseptic group had more than 5 polymorphonuclear leukocytes per field on permanent sections. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level can be supplemented with cultures of aspirated joint fluid and fluid white cell count to confirm the diagnosis of periprosthetic infection. When the preoperative diagnosis remain unclear, the histological examination of frozen or permanent sections of periprosthetic tissue with at least 5 polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high power field, is predictive for the presence of infection.

  19. Protective effects of a preparation(hemoHIM) of herb mixture on self-renewal tissues and immune system in whole body irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae-Ran; Oh, Heon; Jo, Sung-Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Ho [Chonnam National Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yee, Sung-Tae [Sunchon National Univ., Sunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    A preparation (HemoHIM) of herb mixture was designed to protect the gastrointestine and hematopoietic organs and to promote recovery of the immune system against radiation damage. The mixture of 3 edible medicinal herbs (Angelica gagantis Radix, etc.) was decocted with hot water and the extract was fractionated with ethanol. The preparation HemoHIM was made up with addition of ethanol- insoluble fraction yielded from one half of the total water extract to the other half of the total water extract. In vitro, lymphocytes were protected by HemoHIM, its polysaccharide and ethanol fractions against radiation. The proliferation of lymphocytes and bone marrow cells by HemoHIM was due to its polysaccharide fraction. In mice administered with the preparation (HemoHIM) before gamma- irradiation, the jejunal crypt survival was increased and the apoptosis of crypt cells was decreased. HemoHIM administration increased the survival of bone marrow stem cells and promoted the repopulation of blood cells following irradiation. In the analysis of the repopulated lymphocyte subsets, B cells were firstly regenerated and then T cells were recovered in mice administrated with HemoHIM. The antibody production against T-dependent antigen DNP-KLH was augmented by HemoHIM in irradiated mice. These results indicated that HemoHIM, a preparation of the herb mixture, protected the stem cells of self-renewal tissues and hematopoietic organs and promoted recovery of the immune system against radiation damage. Since the preparation of herb mixture is a relatively nontoxic natural product, it might be a useful modifier for prevention and control of radiation damages.

  20. Radioprotective effects of a preparation (HemoHIM) of herb mixture on self-renewal tissues and immune system in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Park, Hae Ran; Jung, Uhee; Oh, Heon [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ho [Chonnam National Univ. Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yee, Sung Tae [Sunchon National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    A preparation (HemoHIM) of herb mixture was designed to protect the gastrointestine and hematopoietic organs and to promote recovery of the immune system against radiation damage. The mixture of 3 edible medicinal herbs was decocted with hot water and the extract was fractionated with ethanol. The preparation HemoHIM was made up with addition of ethanol-insoluble fraction to the total water extract. In vitro, HemoHIM, its polysaccharide and ethanol fractions protected lymphocytes against radiation and scavenged hydroxyl radicals. The proliferation of lymphocytes and bone marrow cells by HemoHIM was due to its polysaccharide fraction. In mice administered with the preparation (HemoHIM) before gamma-irradiation the jejunal crypt survival was increased and the apoptosis of crypt cells was decreased. HemoHIM administration increased the survival of bone marrow stem cells and promoted the repopulation of blood cells following irradiation. In the analysis of the repopulated lymphocyte subsets, B cells were firstly regenerated and then T cells were recovered in mice administrated with HemoHIM. The antibody production against T-dependent antigen DNP-KLH was augmented by HemoHIM in irradiated mice. Finally, oral or intraperitoneal administration of HemoHIM augmented the 30 day survival rate after irradiation. These results indicated that HemoHIM, a preparation of the herb mixture, protected the stem cells of self-renewal tissues and hematopoietic organs and promoted recovery of the immune system against radiation damage, thus increasing the survival following lethal irradiation. Since the preparation of herb mixture is a relatively nontoxic natural product, it might be a useful modifier for prevention and control of radiation damages.

  1. Molecular genotyping of Echinococcus granulosus using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded preparations from human isolates in unusual tissue sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizem, A; M'rad, S; Oudni-M'rad, M; Mestiri, S; Hammedi, F; Mezhoud, H; Zakhama, A; Mokni, M; Babba, H

    2016-07-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus remains a serious problem worldwide for issues relating to public health and the economy. The most predominantly affected sites are the liver and the lungs, but other organs such as the heart, the spleen and the peritoneum can also be infected. Access to cysts from uncommon sites has limited genomic and molecular investigations. In the present study, genotypes of E. granulosus sensu lato were identified from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues (FF-PETs) implicated in human CE. Tissue samples were obtained from 57 patients with histologically confirmed CE. DNA samples were analysed using Egss 1 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) specific to the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene of E. granulosus sensu stricto. All cysts were typed as E. granulosus sensu stricto with up to 35% of the liver and 16.6% of lungs being the most frequently infected, and up to 48.4% of samples being from rare sites. No correlation was found between cyst site and either the gender or the age of patients. This study demonstrates the possibility of exploiting atypical cysts using FF-PET samples and highlights the predominance of E. granulosus sensu stricto species in the Tunisian population, even in unusual infection sites.

  2. Engineered carbon (biochar) prepared by direct pyrolysis of Mg-accumulated tomato tissues: characterization and phosphate removal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ying; Gao, Bin; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Ming; Inyang, Mandu; Li, Yuncong; Alva, Ashok; Yang, Liuyan

    2013-06-01

    An innovative method was developed to produce engineered biochar from magnesium (Mg) enriched tomato tissues through slow pyrolysis in a N2 environment. Tomato plants treated with 25mM Mg accumulated much higher level of Mg in tissue, indicating Mg can be substantially enriched in tomato plants, and pyrolysis process further concentrated Mg in the engineered biochar (8.8% Mg). The resulting Mg-biochar composites (MgEC) showed better sorption ability to phosphate (P) in aqueous solutions compared to the other four tomato leaves biochars. Statistical analysis showed a strong and significant correlation between P removal rate and biochar Mg content (R(2)=0.78, and p<0.001), indicating the enriched Mg in the engineered biochar is the main factor controlling its P removal ability. SEM-EDX, XRD and XPS analyses showed that nanoscale Mg(OH)2 and MgO particles were presented on the surface of MgEC, which serve as the main adsorption sites for aqueous P. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A soft tissue adhesive based on aldehyde-sodium alginate and amino-carboxymethyl chitosan preparation through the Schiff reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Yuan, Liu; Sheng, Nai-an; Gu, Zi-qi; Feng, Wen-hao; Yin, Hai-yue; Morsi, Yosry; Mo, Xiu-mei

    2017-09-01

    Sodium alginate and carboxymethyl chitosan have been extensively applied in tissue engineering and other relative fields due to their low price and excellent biocompatibility. In this paper, we oxidized sodium alginate with sodium periodate to convert 1,2-hydroxyl groups into aldehyde groups to get aldehyde-sodium alginate (ASA). Carboxymethyl chitosan was modified with ethylenediamine (ED) in the presence of water-soluble N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) to introduce additional amino groups to get amino-carboxymethyl chitosan (A-CS). Upon mixing the A-SA and A-CS aqueous solutions together, a gel rapidly formed based on the Schiff's base reaction between aldehyde groups in A-SA and amino groups in A-CS. FTIR analysis confirmed the characteristic peak of Schiff's base group in the hydrogel. It was confirmed that the gelation time be dependent on the aldehyde group content in A-SA and amino group content in A-CS. The fasted hydrogel formation takes place within 10 min. The data of bonding strength and cytotoxicity measurement also showed that the hydrogel had good adhesion and biocompatibility. All these results support that this gel has the potential as soft tissue adhesive.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Decellularized Fibrocartilage “Book” Scaffold for Use in Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liyun; Qu, Jin; Zheng, Cheng; Cao, Yong; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Hongbin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    At the tendon-to-bone insertion, there is a unique transitional structure: tendon, non-calcified fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage, and bone. The reconstruction of this special graded structure after defects or damage is an important but challenging task in orthopedics. In particular, reconstruction of the fibrocartilage zone has yet to be successfully achieved. In this study, the development of a novel book-shape scaffold derived from the extracellular matrix of fibrocartilage was reported. Specifically, fibrocartilage from the pubic symphysis was obtained from rabbits and sliced into the shape of a book (dimensions: 10 mm × 3 mm × 1 mm) with 10 layers, each layer (akin to a page of a book) with a thickness of 100-μm. These fibrocartilage “book” scaffolds were decellularized using sequentially 3 freeze-thaw cycles, 0.1% Triton X-100 with 1.5 M KCl, 0.25% trypsin, and a nuclease. Histology and DNA quantification analysis confirmed substantial removal of cells from the fibrocartilage scaffolds. Furthermore, the quantities of DNA, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan in the fibrocartilage were markedly reduced following decellularization. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the intrinsic ultrastructure of the fibrocartilage tissue was well preserved. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that the novel “book” fibrocartilage scaffold could have potential applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26636672

  5. Preparation, characteristics and assessment of a novel gelatin-chitosan sponge scaffold as skin tissue engineering material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Dong, Yang; Su, Zhen; Yin, Ran; Song, Aihua; Li, Sanming

    2014-12-10

    In order to develop a skin tissue engineering material for wound dressing application, a novel gelatin-chitosan sponge scaffold was designed and studied. The effect of chitosan and gelatin ratio on the morphology, pore size, porosity, water uptake capacity, water retention capacity and the degradation behavior were evaluated. Biocompatibility was investigated by both MTT method and AO/EB staining method. Antibacterial assessment and in vivo pharmacodynamic was also studied to evaluate the potential for wound healing. Results showed the sponge scaffold have uniform porous structure with pore size range between 120 and 140 μm, high porosity (>90%), high water uptake capacity (>1500%), high water retention capacity (>400%), and degradation percent in 28 days between 38.3 and 53.9%. Biocompatibility results showed that the activity of cells could not be affected by the nature of the sponge and it was suitable for cell adhesion and proliferation for 21 days. In vivo evaluation indicated that the sponge scaffold could offer effective support and attachment to cells for skin wound healing. In conclusion, the developed sponge scaffold was a potential skin tissue engineering material with appropriate physical properties and good biocompatibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identify function methyl cellulose glue of rehabilitation and activation in preparation Tissues used in restoration paper works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kobra dadmohammadi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to facilitate the use of methyl cellulose adhesive to repair paper works that its ink is sensitive to water. This research is conducted by analytical comparisons method and samples is collected by experiments related to research topics such as pH measurement, Calorimetric, infrared spectroscopy with total attenuated reflection (FTIR- ATR, the measurement of tensile strength as well measurement of The adhesive strength of the samples. The stages of this study is conducted so that the adhesive methyl cellulose at a concentration of 7% in methanol was prepared. The prepared specimens is treated under Temperature-humidity accelerated aging in accordance with standard ASTM D4714-96 no for 384 hours and under light in accordance with ASTM D6789-02 for 360 hours and Changes of color, pH, tensile strength and adhesion is investigated for them. Results showed that the samples pH is changed from 6.91 to 6.39 after light aging and to 6.06 after temperature-humidity aging. Also, Tensile strength of Samples is reduced from 0.31 to 0.23 kN per meter after light aging and to 0.24 kN per meter after the temperature-humidity aging. Also, the adhesive strength of the samples is decreased from 1.43 to 0.97 Newton after light aging and to 1.51 Newton after temperature-humidity aging.

  7. Preparation, characterization and biological test of 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan, fibroin and hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Paulo Autran Leite; Resende, Cristiane Xavier; Dulce de Almeida Soares, Glória; Anselme, Karine; Almeida, Luís Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of porous 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan (CHI), chitosan/silk fibroin (CHI/SF) and chitosan/silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite (CHI/SF/HA) by freeze drying. The biomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. In addition, studies of porosity, pore size, contact angle and biological response of SaOs-2osteoblastic cells were performed. The CHI scaffolds have a porosity of 94.2 ± 0.9%, which is statistically higher than the one presented by CHI/SF/HA scaffolds, 89.7 ± 2.6%. Although all scaffolds were able to promote adhesion, growth and maintenance of osteogenic differentiation of SaOs-2 cells, the new 3D-scaffold based on CHI/SF/HA showed a significantly higher cell growth at 7 days and 21 days and the level of alkaline phosphatase at 14 and 21 days was statistically superior compared to other tested materials. - Highlights: • Preparation of 3D-scaffolds based on CHI, with or without addition of SF and HA. • Scaffolds exhibited interconnected porous structure (pore size superior to 50 μm). • The tripolyphosphate did not induce any significant cytotoxic response. • The CHI/SF/HA composite showed a higher cell growth and ALP activity

  8. "In situ preparation": new surgical procedure indicated for soft-tissue sarcoma of a lower limb in close proximity to major neurovascular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Seiichi; Kawaguchi, Noriyoshi; Manabe, Jun; Matsushita, Yasushi

    2002-02-01

    When soft-tissue sarcomas occur near neurovascular structures, preoperative images cannot always reveal the accurate relationship between the tumor and these structures. Therefore, in some patients, neurovascular structures are sacrificed unnecessarily. In other patients, neurovascular structures are preserved with an inappropriate margin, followed by local recurrence. The objective of this study was to evaluate a new surgical method, "in situ preparation" (ISP), which enables the preparation of neurovascular bundles and the intraoperative evaluation of the surgical margin without contamination by tumor cells. With this method, additional procedures, including pasteurization, alcohol soaking, and distilled water soaking of the preserved neurovascular bundle can also be performed to preserve the continuity of vessels. Between April 1992 and December 1998, 18 patients with soft-tissue sarcoma were operated on using ISP. The tumor and neurovascular structure were lifted en bloc from the surgical bed and separated from the field by the use of a vinyl sheet. The consistency of the neurovascular structures was preserved. The tissue block could be freely turned around and the neurovascular structure was separated from the block through the nearest approach. The margin between the tumor and neurovascular structure was evaluated, and an additional procedure, such as pasteurization, alcohol soaking or distilled water soaking, was performed, according to the safety of the surgical margin. Only one patient showed recurrence after ISP. Complications after ISP were arterial occlusion in two patients and nerve palsy in three patients. The main cause of these complications was the long period of pasteurization; modified additional procedures could prevent such complications. ISP is a useful method with which to ensure a safe surgical margin and good functional results.

  9. Comparison of two methods of preparation of tissue to study the internal anatomy of the delphacid Togosodes orizicolus with microscopy of electronic light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macaya-Lizano, A.V.; Pereira, R.; Espinoza, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    Two methods of embedding, sectioning and staining were developed to study the internal anatomy of delphacid plant hopper Tagosodes orizicolus, one of the most important plagues of rice in Latin America and the only vector of the white leaf tenuivirus (RHBV), using both light and electron microscopy. The paraffines-hematoxyline-eosin Y method allows color identification of tissues, for example purple for fat tissue, pink for muscles, yellow-brown for exocutile, while the resin-toluidine-blue method preserves better the ultrastructure but do not permit color identification. The information obtained by these procedures is complementary and the material can also be used for in situ studies by immuno microscopy, to assess the changes in cell ultrastructure and the localization and replication of the RHBV during its infection cycle in the insect vector. (author) [es

  10. An optimised protocol for isolation of RNA from small sections of laser-capture microdissected FFPE tissue amenable for next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Parisa; Ettlin, Julia; Opitz, Lennart; Clementi, Elena; Malbon, Alexandra; Markkanen, Enni

    2017-08-23

    Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue constitutes a vast treasury of samples for biomedical research. Thus far however, extraction of RNA from FFPE tissue has proved challenging due to chemical RNA-protein crosslinking and RNA fragmentation, both of which heavily impact on RNA quantity and quality for downstream analysis. With very small sample sizes, e.g. when performing Laser-capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate specific subpopulations of cells, recovery of sufficient RNA for analysis with reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) or next-generation sequencing (NGS) becomes very cumbersome and difficult. We excised matched cancer-associated stroma (CAS) and normal stroma from clinical specimen of FFPE canine mammary tumours using LCM, and compared the commonly used protease-based RNA isolation procedure with an adapted novel technique that additionally incorporates a focused ultrasonication step. We successfully adapted a protocol that uses focused ultrasonication to isolate RNA from small amounts of deparaffinised, stained, clinical LCM samples. Using this approach, we found that total RNA yields could be increased by 8- to 12-fold compared to a commonly used protease-based extraction technique. Surprisingly, RNA extracted using this new approach was qualitatively at least equal if not superior compared to the old approach, as Cq values in RT-qPCR were on average 2.3-fold lower using the new method. Finally, we demonstrate that RNA extracted using the new method performs comparably in NGS as well. We present a successful isolation protocol for extraction of RNA from difficult and limiting FFPE tissue samples that enables successful analysis of small sections of clinically relevant specimen. The possibility to study gene expression signatures in specific small sections of archival FFPE tissue, which often entail large amounts of highly relevant clinical follow-up data, unlocks a new dimension of hitherto difficult-to-analyse samples which now

  11. Preparation of 3-7 MeV neutron source and preliminary results of activation cross section measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, T.; Masuda, T.; Tsurita, Y.; Hashimoto, A.; Miyajima, N. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Sakane, H.; Shibata, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Kawade, K.

    1999-03-01

    A d-D gas target producing monoenergetic neutrons has been constructed for measurement of activation cross sections in the energy region of 3 to 7 MeV at Van de Graaff accelerator of Nagoya University. Neutron spectra and neutron fluxes were measured as a function of the incident deuteron energy. Preliminary results of activation cross sections were obtained for reactions {sup 27}Al(n, p){sup 27}Mg, {sup 27}Al(n, {alpha}){sup 24}Na, {sup 47}Ti(n, p){sup 47}Sc, {sup 56}Fe(n, p){sup 56}Mn, {sup 58}Ni(n, p){sup 58}Co and {sup 64}Zn(n, p){sup 64}Cu. The results are compared with the evaluated values of JENDL-3.2. A well-type HPGe detector was used for highly efficient detection. (author)

  12. Preparation of biological samples for transmission X-ray microanalysis: a review of alternative procedures to the use of sectioned material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigee, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Although transmission X-ray microanalysis of biological material has traditionally been carried out mainly on sectioned preparations, a number of alternative procedures exist. These are considered under three major headings - whole cell preparations, analysis of cell homogenates and biological fluids, and applications of the technique to microsamples of purified biochemicals. These three aspects provide a continuous range of investigative level - from the cellular to the molecular. The use of X-ray microanalysis with whole cell preparations is considered in reference to eukaryote (animal) cells and prokaryotes - where it has particular potential in environmental studies on bacteria. In the case of cell homogenates and biological fluids, the technique has been used mainly with microdroplets of animal material. The use of X-ray microanalysis with purified biochemicals is considered in relation to both particulate and non-particulate samples. In the latter category, the application of this technique for analysis of thin films of metalloprotein is particularly emphasised. It is concluded that wider use could be made of the range of preparative techniques available - both within a particular investigation, and in diverse fields of study. Transmission X-ray microanalysis has implications for environmental, physiological and molecular biology as well as cell biology

  13. Determination of the swelling velocity of different wood species and tissues depending on the cutting direction on microtome section level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckenberg, Peter; Wenderdel, Christoph; Zauer, Mario

    2018-06-01

    Swelling velocity in dependence on the anatomical cutting direction of yew [Taxus baccata L.] and boxwood [Buxus sempervirens L.] was determined at temperature of 20 °C and at relative humidity of 10% and 100%. The investigations, conducted on a microtome section level, showed a similar behaviour for specimens of both wood species. It was possible to determine that the swelling velocity for yew and boxwood increases in its anatomical cutting directions. The longitudinal direction showed the lowest value, the tangential direction, by distinction, the highest value. Furthermore, a significant influence of early wood and late wood content on the swelling velocity for yew was detected.

  14. A three-dimensional soft tissue analysis of Class III malocclusion: a case-controlled cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johal, Ama; Chaggar, Amrit; Zou, Li Fong

    2018-03-01

    The present study used the optical surface laser scanning technique to compare the facial features of patients aged 8-18 years presenting with Class I and Class III incisor relationship in a case-control design. Subjects with a Class III incisor relationship, aged 8-18 years, were age and gender matched with Class I control and underwent a 3-dimensional (3-D) optical surface scan of the facial soft tissues. Landmark analysis revealed Class III subjects displayed greater mean dimensions compared to the control group most notably between the ages of 8-10 and 17-18 years in both males and females, in respect of antero-posterior (P = 0.01) and vertical (P = 0.006) facial dimensions. Surface-based analysis, revealed the greatest difference in the lower facial region, followed by the mid-face, whilst the upper face remained fairly consistent. Significant detectable differences were found in the surface facial features of developing Class III subjects.

  15. Plant DNA Detection from Grasshopper Guts: A Step-by-Step Protocol, from Tissue Preparation to Obtaining Plant DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Avanesyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. Methods and Results: The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA gene and was tested in several feeding experiments. Plant DNA was obtained at seven time points post-ingestion from whole guts and separate gut sections, and was detectable up to 12 h post-ingestion in nymphs and 22 h post-ingestion in adult grasshoppers. Conclusions: The proposed protocol is an effective, relatively quick, and low-cost method of detecting plant DNA from the grasshopper gut and its different sections. This has important applications, from exploring plant “movement” during food consumption, to detecting plant–insect interactions.

  16. Effects of Chitosan Alkali Pretreatment on the Preparation of Electrospun PCL/Chitosan Blend Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Roozbahani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, nanofibrous scaffolds have been used in the field of biomedical engineering as wound dressings, tissue engineering scaffolds, and drug delivery applications. The electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds can be used as carriers for several types of drugs, genes, and growth factors. PCL is one of the most commonly applied synthetic polymers for medical use because of its biocompatibility and slow biodegradability. PCL is hydrophobic and has no cell recognition sites on its structure. Electrospinning of chitosan and PCL blend was investigated in formic acid/acetic acid as the solvent with different PCL/chitosan ratios. High viscosity of chitosan solutions makes difficulties in the electrospinning process. Strong hydrogen bonds in a 3D network in acidic condition prevent the movement of polymeric chains exposed to the electrical field. Consequently, the amount of chitosan in PCL/chitosan blend was limited and more challenging when the concentration of PCL increases. The treatment of chitosan in alkali condition under high temperature reduced its molecular weight. Longer treatment time further decreased the molecular weight of chitosan and hence its viscosity. Electrospinning of PCL/chitosan blend was possible at higher chitosan ratio, and SEM images showed a decrease in fiber diameter and narrower distribution with increase in the chitosan ratio.

  17. Preparing and Analyzing Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs Library for the Mammary Tissue of Local Turkish Kivircik Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehir Ozdemir Ozgenturk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kivircik sheep is an important local Turkish sheep according to its meat quality and milk productivity. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression profiles of both prenatal and postnatal stages for the Kivircik sheep. Therefore, two different cDNA libraries, which were taken from the same Kivircik sheep mammary gland tissue at prenatal and postnatal stages, were constructed. Total 3072 colonies which were randomly selected from the two libraries were sequenced for developing a sheep ESTs collection. We used Phred/Phrap computer programs for analysis of the raw EST and readable EST sequences were assembled with the CAP3 software. Putative functions of all unique sequences and statistical analysis were determined by Geneious software. Total 422 ESTs have over 80% similarity to known sequences of other organisms in NCBI classified by Panther database for the Gene Ontology (GO category. By comparing gene expression profiles, we observed some putative genes that may be relative to reproductive performance or play important roles in milk synthesis and secretion. A total of 2414 ESTs have been deposited to the NCBI GenBank database (GW996847–GW999260. EST data in this study have provided a new source of information to functional genome studies of sheep.

  18. Preparation, characterization and biological test of 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan, fibroin and hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paulo Autran Leite; Resende, Cristiane Xavier; Soares, Glória Dulce de Almeida; Anselme, Karine; Almeida, Luís Eduardo

    2013-08-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of porous 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan (CHI), chitosan/silk fibroin (CHI/SF) and chitosan/silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite (CHI/SF/HA) by freeze drying. The biomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. In addition, studies of porosity, pore size, contact angle and biological response of SaOs-2osteoblastic cells were performed. The CHI scaffolds have a porosity of 94.2±0.9%, which is statistically higher than the one presented by CHI/SF/HA scaffolds, 89.7±2.6%. Although all scaffolds were able to promote adhesion, growth and maintenance of osteogenic differentiation of SaOs-2 cells, the new 3D-scaffold based on CHI/SF/HA showed a significantly higher cell growth at 7 days and 21 days and the level of alkaline phosphatase at 14 and 21 days was statistically superior compared to other tested materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Macroporous modified poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogels with charged groups for tissue engineering: Preparation and in vitro evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdova, Maria G., E-mail: drozdovamg@gmail.com [Polymers for Biology Laboratory, Shemyakin & Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Zaytseva-Zotova, Daria S. [Polymers for Biology Laboratory, Shemyakin & Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Akasov, Roman A. [Polymers for Biology Laboratory, Shemyakin & Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Trubetskaya str., 8/2, Moscow 119048 (Russian Federation); Golunova, Anna S.; Artyukhov, Alexander A. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Miusskaya Square 9, Moscow 125047 (Russian Federation); Udartseva, Olga O.; Andreeva, Elena R. [Institute of Biomedical Problems of Russian Academy of Sciences, Khoroshevskoe Shosse 76a, Moscow 123007 (Russian Federation); Lisovyy, Denis E.; Shtilman, Michael I. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Miusskaya Square 9, Moscow 125047 (Russian Federation); Markvicheva, Elena A. [Polymers for Biology Laboratory, Shemyakin & Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels are widely employed for various biomedical applications, including tissue engineering, due to their biocompatibility, high water solubility, low protein adsorption, and chemical stability. However, non-charged surface of PVA-based hydrogels is not optimal for cell adhesion and spreading. Here, cross-linked macroporous hydrogels based on low molecular weight acrylated PVA (Acr-PVA) was synthesized by modification of the pendant alcohol groups on the PVA with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). To enhance cell affinity, charged groups were introduced to the hydrogel composition. For this purpose, Acr-PVA was copolymerized with either negatively charged acrylic acid (AA) or positively charged 2-(diethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) monomers. A surface charge of the obtained hydrogels was found to be in function of the co-monomer type and content. Confocal microscopy observations confirmed that adhesion and spreading of both mouse fibroblasts (L929) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) on the modified Acr-PVA-AA and Acr-PVA-DEAEMA hydrogels were better than those on the non-modified Acr-PVA hydrogel. The increase of DEAEMA monomer content from 5 to 15 mol% resulted in the enhancement of cell viability which was 1.5-fold higher for Acr-PVA-DEAEMA-15 hydrogel than that of the non-modified Acr-PVA hydrogel sample. - Highlights: • To enhance cell affinity, acrylated PVA hydrogel was modified with AA or DEAEMA monomers. • Cell adhesion and spreading were found to depend on the co-monomer type and content. • Proliferation of L929 fibroblasts and stem cells increased on the modified hydrogels.

  20. Macroporous modified poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogels with charged groups for tissue engineering: Preparation and in vitro evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdova, Maria G.; Zaytseva-Zotova, Daria S.; Akasov, Roman A.; Golunova, Anna S.; Artyukhov, Alexander A.; Udartseva, Olga O.; Andreeva, Elena R.; Lisovyy, Denis E.; Shtilman, Michael I.; Markvicheva, Elena A.

    2017-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels are widely employed for various biomedical applications, including tissue engineering, due to their biocompatibility, high water solubility, low protein adsorption, and chemical stability. However, non-charged surface of PVA-based hydrogels is not optimal for cell adhesion and spreading. Here, cross-linked macroporous hydrogels based on low molecular weight acrylated PVA (Acr-PVA) was synthesized by modification of the pendant alcohol groups on the PVA with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). To enhance cell affinity, charged groups were introduced to the hydrogel composition. For this purpose, Acr-PVA was copolymerized with either negatively charged acrylic acid (AA) or positively charged 2-(diethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) monomers. A surface charge of the obtained hydrogels was found to be in function of the co-monomer type and content. Confocal microscopy observations confirmed that adhesion and spreading of both mouse fibroblasts (L929) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) on the modified Acr-PVA-AA and Acr-PVA-DEAEMA hydrogels were better than those on the non-modified Acr-PVA hydrogel. The increase of DEAEMA monomer content from 5 to 15 mol% resulted in the enhancement of cell viability which was 1.5-fold higher for Acr-PVA-DEAEMA-15 hydrogel than that of the non-modified Acr-PVA hydrogel sample. - Highlights: • To enhance cell affinity, acrylated PVA hydrogel was modified with AA or DEAEMA monomers. • Cell adhesion and spreading were found to depend on the co-monomer type and content. • Proliferation of L929 fibroblasts and stem cells increased on the modified hydrogels.

  1. Preparation and characterization of anti-HIV nanodrug targeted to microfold cell of gut-associated lymphoid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Upal; Ding, Hong; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Raymond, Andrea D; Atluri, Venkata; Yndart, Adriana; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Batrakova, Elena; Agudelo, Marisela; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) still remains one of the leading life-threatening diseases in the world. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy has significantly reduced disease morbidity and mortality. However, most of the drugs have variable penetrance into viral reservoir sites, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Being the largest lymphoid organ, GALT plays a key role in early HIV infection and host-pathogen interaction. Many different treatment options have been proposed to eradicate the virus from GALT. However, it becomes difficult to deliver traditional drugs to the GALT because of its complex physiology. In this regard, we developed a polymer-based Pluronic nanocarrier containing anti-HIV drug called efavirenz (EFV) targeting Microfold cells (M-cells) in the GALT. M-cells are specialized epithelial cells that are predominantly present in the GALT. In this work, we have exploited this paracellular transport property of M-cells for targeted delivery of Pluronic nanocarrier tagged EFV, bioconjugated with anti-M-cell-specific antibodies to the GALT (nanodrug). Preliminary characterization showed that the nanodrug (EFV-F12-COOH) is of 140 nm size with 0.3 polydispersion index, and the zeta potential of the particles was -19.38±2.2 mV. Further, drug dissolution study has shown a significantly improved sustained release over free drugs. Binding potential of nanodrug with M-cell was also confirmed with fluorescence microscopy and in vitro uptake and release studies. The anti-HIV activity of the nanodrug was also significantly higher compared to that of free drug. This novel formulation was able to show sustained release of EFV and inhibit the HIV-1 infection in the GALT compared to the free drug. The present study has potential for our in vivo targeted nanodrug delivery system by combining traditional enteric-coated capsule technique via oral administration.

  2. Food Allergy Emergencies in Children – To what extent are Early Years Services Prepared? A cross-sectional survey

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    MacGiobuin, S

    2017-08-01

    Food allergies are common in preschool children. This study’s aims are to establish prevalence, to clarify management practices, levels of preparedness and the perceived role of General Practitioners amongst Early Years Services providers. This study is an anonymous, quantitative, cross sectional study. An online questionnaire was distributed to 282 Early Years Service providers. Data were analysed using SPSS. Response rate was 35% (n=98). Prevalence of food allergy was 3% (n=119). Allergic reactions to food had occurred on site in 16% (n=15). Written emergency action plans were available in 47% of facilities (n=46). Medications were not kept on site in 63% (n=62) of facilities. General practitioners were felt to have an important role in the management of food allergies by 76% of respondents (n=61). This study identifies significant areas for improvement in the management of food allergic child in Early Years Services

  3. CpG Methylation Analysis of HPV16 in Laser Capture Microdissected Archival Tissue and Whole Tissue Sections from High Grade Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions: A Potential Disease Biomarker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Molano

    Full Text Available Incidence and mortality rates of anal cancer are increasing globally. More than 90% of anal squamous cell carcinomas (ASCC are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV. Studies on HPV-related anogenital lesions have shown that patterns of methylation of viral and cellular DNA targets could potentially be developed as disease biomarkers. Lesion-specific DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues from existing or prospective patient cohorts may constitute a valuable resource for methylation analysis. However, low concentrations of DNA make these samples technically challenging to analyse using existing methods. We therefore set out to develop a sensitive and reproducible nested PCR-pyrosequencing based method to accurately quantify methylation at 10 CpG sites within the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in the viral upstream regulatory region of HPV16 genome. Methylation analyses using primary and nested PCR-pyrosequencing on 52 FFPE tissue [26 paired whole tissue sections (WTS and laser capture microdissected (LCM tissues] from patients with anal squamous intraepithelial lesions was performed. Using nested PCR, methylation results were obtained for the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in 86.4% of the WTS and 81.8% of the LCM samples. Methylation patterns were strongly correlated within median values of matched pairs of WTS and LCM sections, but overall methylation was higher in LCM samples at different CpG sites. High grade lesions showed low methylation levels in the E2BS1 and E2BS2 regions, with increased methylation detected in the E2BS,3,4/Sp1 regions, showing the highest methylation at CpG site 37. The method developed is highly sensitive in samples with low amounts of DNA and demonstrated to be suitable for archival samples. Our data shows a possible role of specific methylation in the HPV16 URR for detection of HSIL.

  4. Training practitioners in preparing systematic reviews: a cross-sectional survey of participants in the Australasian Cochrane Centre training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silagy Chris

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although systematic reviews of health care interventions are an invaluable tool for health care providers and researchers, many potential authors never publish reviews. This study attempts to determine why some people with interest in performing systematic reviews do not subsequently publish a review; and what steps could possibly increase review completion. Methods Cross-sectional survey by email and facsimile of the 179 participants in Australasian Cochrane Centre training events between 1998 and 2000. Results Ninety-two participants responded to the survey (51 percent. Response rate of deliverable surveys was 82 percent (92/112. The remainder of the participants had invalid or no contact information on file. More than 75 percent of respondents felt that the current workshops met their needs for training. The most critical barriers to completion of a Cochrane review were: lack of time (80 percent, lack of financial support (36 percent, methodological problems (23 percent and problems with group dynamics (10 percent. Conclusions Strategies to protect reviewer time and increase the efficiency of the review process may increase the numbers of trained reviewers completing a systematic review.

  5. Microteaching as a self-learning tool. Students' perceptions in the preparation and exposition of a microlesson in a tissue engineering course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Campos-Sánchez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Microteaching is a didactic tool of recent application to undergraduate and postgraduate students as a way to promote self-learning. In this work we compared the perceptions of the students who provide instruction in tissue engineering using microteaching and the perceptions of the same students when they receive such instructions. Two similar questionnaires with items related to the preparation and exposition of a microlesson were used to investigate the perception of 56 students before and after the microteaching session. In our results, students significantly prefer to use specific objectives, textbooks and Internet information when they are preparing a microlesson as compared to the situation when they receive it. On the other hand, the use of a pre-programmed index during the exposition and the reduction of the use of PowerPoint software are significantly more preferred by the students after receiving the microlesson. No statistical differences were found for the rest of the options analyzed. These results show that the self-assessment generated in the microteaching session, which is linked to the feedback related to the self-learning process, makes microteaching a technique not only useful for self-learning but also an important tool to promote self-regulation across the curriculum.

  6. Tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, John P; Bronzino, Joseph D

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly viewed as the future of medicine, the field of tissue engineering is still in its infancy. As evidenced in both the scientific and popular press, there exists considerable excitement surrounding the strategy of regenerative medicine. To achieve its highest potential, a series of technological advances must be made. Putting the numerous breakthroughs made in this field into a broad context, Tissue Engineering disseminates current thinking on the development of engineered tissues. Divided into three sections, the book covers the fundamentals of tissue engineering, enabling technologies, and tissue engineering applications. It examines the properties of stem cells, primary cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix as well as their impact on the development of tissue engineered devices. Contributions focus on those strategies typically incorporated into tissue engineered devices or utilized in their development, including scaffolds, nanocomposites, bioreactors, drug delivery systems, and gene t...

  7. A novel method for sample preparation of fresh lung cancer tissue for proteomics analysis by tumor cell enrichment and removal of blood contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orre Lotta

    2010-02-01

    was an effective removal of contaminants from red blood cells and plasma proteins resulting in larger proteome coverage compared to the direct lysis of frozen samples. This sample preparation method may be successfully implemented for the discovery of lung cancer biomarkers on tissue samples using mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

  8. [Current status of medical accident prevention in our pathology section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Honda, Takayuki

    2010-08-01

    Preventive measures against medical accident should be addressed in the pathology section. Medical accidents occur while preparing tissue specimens and making pathological diagnoses. For the preparation of tissue specimens, we have developed a work manual in consultation with past incident reports and update this manual regularly. We can reduce medical accidents by including a check system for each task. For pathological diagnosis, we perform some of the same checks as for tissue specimen preparation and can make more correct diagnoses by conferring with other departments. It is also important to check each other's work to prevent medical accidents.

  9. Oxygen-enhanced MRI for patients with connective tissue diseases: Comparison with thin-section CT of capability for pulmonary functional and disease severity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nishio, Mizuho [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Seki, Shinichiro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Tsubakimoto, Maho [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nakagami-Gun, Okinawa (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To prospectively and directly compare oxygen-enhanced (O{sub 2}-enhanced) MRI with thin-section CT for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment in connective tissue disease (CTD) patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and methods: Thin-section CT, O{sub 2}-enhanced MRI, pulmonary function test and serum KL-6 were administered to 36 CTD patients with ILD (23 men, 13 women; mean age: 63.9 years) and nine CTD patients without ILD (six men, and three women; mean age: 62.0 years). A relative-enhancement ratio (RER) map was generated from O{sub 2}-enhanced MRI and mean relative enhancement ratio (MRER) for each subject was calculated from all ROI measurements. CT-assessed disease severity was evaluated with a visual scoring system from each of the thin-section CT data. MRER and CT-assessed disease severities of CTD patients with and without ILD were then statistically compared. To assess capability for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment in CTD patients, correlations of MRER and CT-assessed disease severity with pulmonary functional parameters and serum KL-6 in all subjects were statistically determined. Results: MRER and CT-assessed disease severity showed significant differences between CTD patients with (MRER: 0.15 ± 0.08, CT-assessed disease severity: 13.0 ± 7.4%) and without ILD (MRER: 0.25 ± 0.06, p = 0.0011; CT-assessed disease severity: 1.6 ± 1.6%, p < 0.0001). MRER and CT-assessed disease severity correlated significantly with pulmonary functional parameters and serum KL-6 in all subjects (0.61 ≤ r ≤ 0.79, p < 0.05). Conclusion: O{sub 2}-enhanced MRI was found to be as useful as thin-section CT for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment of CTD patients with ILD.

  10. Oxygen-enhanced MRI for patients with connective tissue diseases: Comparison with thin-section CT of capability for pulmonary functional and disease severity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishio, Mizuho; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Seki, Shinichiro; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively and directly compare oxygen-enhanced (O 2 -enhanced) MRI with thin-section CT for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment in connective tissue disease (CTD) patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and methods: Thin-section CT, O 2 -enhanced MRI, pulmonary function test and serum KL-6 were administered to 36 CTD patients with ILD (23 men, 13 women; mean age: 63.9 years) and nine CTD patients without ILD (six men, and three women; mean age: 62.0 years). A relative-enhancement ratio (RER) map was generated from O 2 -enhanced MRI and mean relative enhancement ratio (MRER) for each subject was calculated from all ROI measurements. CT-assessed disease severity was evaluated with a visual scoring system from each of the thin-section CT data. MRER and CT-assessed disease severities of CTD patients with and without ILD were then statistically compared. To assess capability for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment in CTD patients, correlations of MRER and CT-assessed disease severity with pulmonary functional parameters and serum KL-6 in all subjects were statistically determined. Results: MRER and CT-assessed disease severity showed significant differences between CTD patients with (MRER: 0.15 ± 0.08, CT-assessed disease severity: 13.0 ± 7.4%) and without ILD (MRER: 0.25 ± 0.06, p = 0.0011; CT-assessed disease severity: 1.6 ± 1.6%, p < 0.0001). MRER and CT-assessed disease severity correlated significantly with pulmonary functional parameters and serum KL-6 in all subjects (0.61 ≤ r ≤ 0.79, p < 0.05). Conclusion: O 2 -enhanced MRI was found to be as useful as thin-section CT for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment of CTD patients with ILD

  11. Personnel Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, George, Ed.; Stodden, Robert, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Three articles comprise a section on personnel preparation in vocational education. Articles deal with two inservice programs in career/vocational education for the handicapped and a project to train paraprofessionals to assist special educators in vocational education. (CL)

  12. Fluorescence excitation analysis by two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy: a new method to identify fluorescent nanoparticles on histological tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Edmond Kahn,1 Nicolas Tissot,3 Perrine Frere,3 Aurélien Dauphin,3 Mohamed Boumhras,2,4 Claude-Marie Bachelet,3 Frédérique Frouin,1 Gérard Lizard21Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM U678/UMR-S UPMC, CHU Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France; 2Equipe Biochimie du Peroxysome, Inflammation et Métabolisme Lipidique EA7270, Faculté des Sciences Gabriel, Université de Bourgogne-INSERM Dijon, France; 3Plateforme d'Imagerie cellulaire, UPMC, Paris, France; 4Laboratory of Biochemistry and Neuroscience, Applied Toxicology Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, Settat, MoroccoAbstract: In the present study, we make use of the ability of two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSMs equipped with tunable lasers to produce spectral excitation image sequences. Furthermore, unmixing, which is usually performed on emission image sequences, is performed on these excitation image sequences. We use factor analysis of medical image sequences (FAMIS, which produces factor images, to unmix spectral image sequences of stained structures in tissue sections to provide images of characterized stained cellular structures. This new approach is applied to histological tissue sections of mouse aorta containing labeled iron nanoparticles stained with Texas Red and counterstained with SYTO13, to obtain visual information about the accumulation of these nanoparticles in the arterial wall. The possible presence of Texas Red is determined using a two-photon CLSM associated with FAMIS via the excitation spectra. Texas Red and SYTO13 are thus differentiated, and corresponding factor images specify their possible presence and cellular localization. In conclusion, the designed protocol shows that sequences of images obtained by excitation in a two-photon CLSM enables characterization of Texas Red-stained nanoparticles and other markers. This methodology offers an alternative and complementary solution to the conventional use of emission

  13. Nanoscale Chemical Characterization of Solid-State Microbattery Stacks by Means of Auger Spectroscopy and Ion-Milling Cross Section Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhart, A; Ledeuil, J B; Pecquenard, B; Le Cras, F; Proust, M; Martinez, H

    2017-09-27

    The current sustained demand for "smart" and connected devices has created a need for more miniaturized power sources, hence for microbatteries. Lithium-ion or "lithium-free" all-solid-state thin-film batteries are adapted solutions to this issue. The capability to carry out spatially resolved chemical analysis is fundamental for the understanding of the operation in an all-solid-state microbattery. Classically cumbersome and not straightforward techniques as TEM/STEM/EELS and FIB preparation methods could be used to address this issue. The challenge in this work is to make the characterization of Li-based material possible by coupling ion-milling cross section preparation method and AES techniques to characterize the behavior of a LiCoO 2 positive electrode in an all solid state microbattery. The surface chemistry of LiCoO 2 has been studied before and after LiPON deposition. Modifications of the chemical environments characteristic of the positive electrode have been reported at different steps of the electrochemical process. An original qualitative and a semiquantitative analysis has been used in this work with the peak deconvolution method based on real, certified reference spectra to better understand the lithiation/delithiation process. This original coupling has demonstrated that a full study of the pristine, cycled, and post mortem positive electrode in a microbattery is also possible. The ion-milling preparation method allows access to a large area, and the resolution of Auger analysis is highly resolved in energy to separate the lithium and the cobalt signals in an accurate way.

  14. Anticholinergic, antihistaminic, and antiserotonergic activity of n-hexane extract of Zanthoxylum alatum seeds on isolated tissue preparations: An ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Beenita; Barua, Chandana Choudhury; Haloi, Prakash; Patowary, Pompy

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate anticholinergic, antihistaminic, and antiserotonergic activity of the n-hexane extract of the seeds of Zanthoxylum alatum (ZAHE) on isolated ileum of rat and guinea pig and fundus of rat. ZAHE was prepared using soxhlet extraction and cumulative concentration response curves were constructed using various doses on the tissues for acetylcholine (ACh), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and histamine with or without n-hexane extract. Atropine, ketanserin, and pheniramine maleate were used as antagonists for ACh, serotonin, and histamine, respectively. ZAHE-induced concentration-dependent inhibition of isolated ileum and fundus in rat and ileum of guinea pig. The half maximal effective concentration (EC 50 ) of ACh in the presence of atropine (10 -6 M; P pheniramine maleate (10 -6 M; P < 0.01) and ZAHE (300 μg/ml; P < 0.01 and 1000 μg/ml; P < 0.05) was also significantly higher than EC 50 of histamine alone. From the study, it was observed that ZAHE shows significant anticholinergic, antiserotonergic, and antihistaminic activity. The study provides sufficient evidence that the seeds can be used in gastric disorders, cough, chest infection, etc., as per folklore claims.

  15. Utilization of Cell-Transfer Technique for Molecular Testing on Hematoxylin-Eosin-Stained Sections: A Viable Option for Small Biopsies That Lack Tumor Tissues in Paraffin Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Howard H; Jovonovich, Stephen M; Randolph, Melissa; Post, Kristin M; Sen, Joyashree D; Curless, Kendra; Cheng, Liang

    2016-12-01

    - In some instances the standard method of doing molecular testing from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded block is not possible because of limited tissue. Tumor cell-enriched cell-transfer technique has been proven useful for performing immunocytochemistry and molecular testing on cytologic smears. - To establish the cell-transfer technique as a viable option for isolating tumor cells from hematoxylin-eosin (H&E)-stained slides. - Molecular testing was performed by using the cell-transfer technique on 97 archived H&E-stained slides from a variety of different tumors. Results were compared to the conventional method of molecular testing. - Polymerase chain reaction-based molecular testing via the cell-transfer technique was successfully performed on 82 of 97 samples (85%). This included 39 of 47 cases for EGFR, 10 of 11 cases for BRAF, and 33 of 39 cases for KRAS mutations. Eighty-one of 82 cell-transfer technique samples (99%) showed agreement with previous standard method results, including 4 mutations and 35 wild-type alleles for EGFR, 4 mutations and 6 wild-type alleles for BRAF, and 11 mutations and 21 wild-type alleles for KRAS. There was only 1 discrepancy: a cell-transfer technique with a false-negative >KRAS result (wild type versus G12C). - Molecular testing performed on H&E-stained sections via cell-transfer technique is useful when tissue from cell blocks and small surgical biopsy samples is exhausted and the only available material for testing is on H&E-stained slides.

  16. Automated Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling-HPLC-MS/MS Analysis of Drugs and Metabolites in Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A fully automated liquid extraction-based surface sampling system utilizing a commercially available autosampler coupled to high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) detection is reported. Discrete spots selected for droplet-based sampling and automated sample queue generation for both the autosampler and MS were enabled by using in-house developed software. In addition, co-registration of spatially resolved sampling position and HPLC-MS information to generate heatmaps of compounds monitored for subsequent data analysis was also available in the software. The system was evaluated with whole-body thin tissue sections from propranolol dosed rat. The hands-free operation of the system was demonstrated by creating heatmaps of the parent drug and its hydroxypropranolol glucuronide metabolites with 1 mm resolution in the areas of interest. The sample throughput was approximately 5 min/sample defined by the time needed for chromatographic separation. The spatial distributions of both the drug and its metabolites were consistent with previous studies employing other liquid extraction-based surface sampling methodologies.

  17. Phytochemical screening, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of extracts prepared from different tissues of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi that occurs in the coast of Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Sousa' Costa, Cinara Oliveira; Ribeiro, Paulo Roberto; Loureiro, Marta Bruno; Simões, Rafael Conceição; de Castro, Renato Delmondez; Fernandez, Luzimar Gonzaga

    2015-01-01

    Schinus terebinthifolius is widely used in traditional medicine by Brazilian quilombola and indigenous communities for treatment of several diseases. Extracts from different tissues are being used to produce creams to treat cervicitis and cervicovaginitis. However, most studies are limited to the assessment of the essential oils and extracts obtained from the leaves. The aim was to evaluate antioxidant and antibacterial activities, to assess the phytochemical profile and to quantify total phenolic compounds of various extracts prepared from S. terebinthifolius grown in the coast of Bahia, Brazil. Extracts were obtained by hot continuous extraction (soxhlet) and by maceration. Quantification of phenolic compounds was performed using the Folin-Ciocalteu method and antioxidant properties were assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay. Phytochemical screening was performed as described by in the literature and antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212) was determined by the microdilution broth assay. Extraction method greatly affected the metabolite profile of the extracts. Antioxidant activity varied between 21.92% and 85.76%, while total phenols ranged between 5.44 and 309.03 mg EAG/g of extract. Leaf extract obtained with soxhlet showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 15.62 μg/mL, while stem extract obtained by maceration was able to inhibit the growth of E. faecalis at 62.5 μg/mL. Stem bark extracts showed a MIC of 500 μg/mL for both extraction methods, while no inhibition was observed for fruit extracts. In general, total phenolic content, antioxidant and antibacterial activities were higher in samples obtained by soxhlet. Our results provide important clues in order to identify alternative sources of bioactive compounds that can be used to develop new drugs.

  18. Effect of adhesive system application for cavities prepared with erbium, chromium: yttrium scandium gallium garnet laser on rat dental pulp tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Mayo; Suzuki, Masaya; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Shinkai, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    We examined the effects of adhesive systems under study applied for a laser-cut cavity using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser on rat dental pulp at 24 h and 14 days postoperatively. Group 1, laser-cut cavities were treated with a self-etching-primer and bonding agent; group 2, pretreated with a phosphoric-acid, and then treated with a self-etching-primer and bonding agent; group 3, pretreated with a phosphoric-acid and sodium-hypochlorite, and then treated with a self-etching-primer and bonding agent; and group 4, treated with an all-in-one adhesive. A flowable resin composite was used as filling material for each cavity treated with each group. A glass-ionomer-cement was used as a control. The following items were evaluated: pulp-tissue-disorganization (PTD), inflammatory-cell-infiltration (ICI), tertiary-dentin-formation (TDF), and bacterial-penetration (BP). The results were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. No significant differences were observed among the experimental groups for all parameters after 24 h and 14 days (P > 0.05). The majority of the specimens showed PTD with edema formation after 24 h; however, all the specimens demonstrated pulpal healing with TDF after 14 days. On the parameter of TDF, all groups showed significant differences between the two postoperative periods (P < 0.01). On the parameter of ICI, a significant difference was found between the two postoperative periods in group 4 (P < 0.05). No specimens showed BP. The pretreatment on the cavity prepared with the laser using phosphoric-acid or sodium-hypochlorite did not affect the dental pulp healing of rat tooth.

  19. Phytochemical screening, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of extracts prepared from different tissues of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi that occurs in the coast of Bahia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Sousa’ Costa, Cinara Oliveira; Ribeiro, Paulo Roberto; Loureiro, Marta Bruno; Simões, Rafael Conceição; de Castro, Renato Delmondez; Fernandez, Luzimar Gonzaga

    2015-01-01

    Background: Schinus terebinthifolius is widely used in traditional medicine by Brazilian quilombola and indigenous communities for treatment of several diseases. Extracts from different tissues are being used to produce creams to treat cervicitis and cervicovaginitis. However, most studies are limited to the assessment of the essential oils and extracts obtained from the leaves. Objective: The aim was to evaluate antioxidant and antibacterial activities, to assess the phytochemical profile and to quantify total phenolic compounds of various extracts prepared from S. terebinthifolius grown in the coast of Bahia, Brazil. Materials and Methods: Extracts were obtained by hot continuous extraction (soxhlet) and by maceration. Quantification of phenolic compounds was performed using the Folin-Ciocalteu method and antioxidant properties were assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay. Phytochemical screening was performed as described by in the literature and antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212) was determined by the microdilution broth assay. Results: Extraction method greatly affected the metabolite profile of the extracts. Antioxidant activity varied between 21.92% and 85.76%, while total phenols ranged between 5.44 and 309.03 mg EAG/g of extract. Leaf extract obtained with soxhlet showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 15.62 μg/mL, while stem extract obtained by maceration was able to inhibit the growth of E. faecalis at 62.5 μg/mL. Stem bark extracts showed a MIC of 500 μg/mL for both extraction methods, while no inhibition was observed for fruit extracts. Conclusion: In general, total phenolic content, antioxidant and antibacterial activities were higher in samples obtained by soxhlet. Our results provide important clues in order to identify alternative sources of bioactive compounds that can be used to develop new drugs. PMID:26246739

  20. Groping for Quantitative Digital 3-D Image Analysis: An Approach to Quantitative Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in Thick Tissue Sections of Prostate Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Rodenacker

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In molecular pathology numerical chromosome aberrations have been found to be decisive for the prognosis of malignancy in tumours. The existence of such aberrations can be detected by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. The gain or loss of certain base sequences in the desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA can be estimated by counting the number of FISH signals per cell nucleus. The quantitative evaluation of such events is a necessary condition for a prospective use in diagnostic pathology. To avoid occlusions of signals, the cell nucleus has to be analyzed in three dimensions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is the means to obtain series of optical thin sections from fluorescence stained or marked material to fulfill the conditions mentioned above. A graphical user interface (GUI to a software package for display, inspection, count and (semi‐automatic analysis of 3‐D images for pathologists is outlined including the underlying methods of 3‐D image interaction and segmentation developed. The preparative methods are briefly described. Main emphasis is given to the methodical questions of computer‐aided analysis of large 3‐D image data sets for pathologists. Several automated analysis steps can be performed for segmentation and succeeding quantification. However tumour material is in contrast to isolated or cultured cells even for visual inspection, a difficult material. For the present a fully automated digital image analysis of 3‐D data is not in sight. A semi‐automatic segmentation method is thus presented here.

  1. Opportunities for Energy Development in Water Conduits: A Report Prepared in Response to Section 7 of the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, Michael J. [BCS, Incorporated, Laurel, MD (United States); Bishop, Norman A. [Knight Piesold, Chicago, IL (United States); Reiser, Sonya L. [Knight Piesold, Chicago, IL (United States); Johnson, Kurt [Telluride Energy LLC, Grand Junction, CO (United States); Bailey, Andrea C. [BCS, Incorporated, Laurel, MD (United States); Frank, Anthony [BCS, Incorporated, Laurel, MD (United States); Smith, Brennan T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    2014-09-01

    In Section 7 of the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act (HREA) of 2013 (P.L. 113-23), Congress directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare an analysis of conduit hydropower opportunities available in the United States and to present case studies that describe the potential energy generation from these types of hydropower projects. Those analyses have been included in a new DOE report to Congress, and this ORNL/TM provides additional technical details supporting that report. Conduit hydropower offers important new ways to enhance renewable energy portfolios in the United States, as well as to increase the energy efficiency of water delivery systems. Conduit hydropower projects are constructed on existing water-conveyance structures, such as irrigation canals or pressurized pipelines that deliver water to municipalities, industry, or agricultural water users. Although water conveyance infrastructures are usually designed for non-power purposes, new renewable energy can often be harvested from them without affecting their original purpose and without the need to construct new dams or diversions. Conduit hydropower differs from more conventional hydropower development in that it is generally not located on natural rivers or waterways and therefore does not involve the types of environmental impacts that are associated with hydropower. The addition of hydropower to existing water conduits can provide valuable new revenue sources from clean, renewable energy. The new energy can be used within the existing water distribution systems to offset other energy demands, or it can be sold into regional transmission systems.

  2. The autologus graft of epithelial tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minaee B

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available With the intention of research about culture and autologus graft of epithelial tissue we used 4 french Albino Rabbits with an average age of 2 months. After reproduction on the support in EMEM (Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium we used this for graft after 4 weeks. This region which grafted total replaced. After fixation of this sample and passing them through various process, histological sections were prepared. These sections were stained with H & E and masson's trichrome and studied by light microscope. We succeeded in graft. We hope in the near future by using the method of epithelium tissue culture improving to treat burned patients.

  3. US Transuranium Registry report of the 241Am content of a whole body. Part IV: Preparation and analysis of the tissues and bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInroy, J.F.; Boyd, H.A.; Eutsler, B.C.; Romero, D.

    1985-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has analyzed autopsy tissue for the USTR, as a part of its study of the uptake, distribution and retention of Pu and other transuranic elements in occupationally exposed workers since 1978. In April 1979, Los Alamos received the internal organs and bone samples from the first whole-body donation to the USTR. The donor was known to have an internal deposition of 241 Am. All soft tissue, the bones from the right half of the skeleton, and the odd-numbered vertebrae were received at Los Alamos in February 1980. The bones were subdivided along anatomical areas of interest. All soft tissues and bone specimens were analyzed for their 241 Am content. A total deposition of 147.4 nCi 241 Am was measured. Approximately 18% of the 241 Am remaining in the body (disregarding that in the left hand), was found in the soft tissues, and 82% was in the bones and teeth. The soft tissues and organs containing the largest amounts of 241 Am were the combined soft tissue (striated muscle, connective tissue and skin) 8.8%; liver, 6.4% and respiratory tract, 1.5%. The remaining organs accounted for 0.9% of the systemic burden

  4. Ligamentous Injuries and the Risk of Associated Tissue Damage in Acute Ankle Sprains in Athletes: A Cross-sectional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Frank W; Jomaah, Nabil; Niu, Jingbo; Almusa, Emad; Roger, Bernard; D'Hooghe, Pieter; Geertsema, Celeste; Tol, Johannes L; Khan, Karim; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-07-01

    Ankle joint injuries are extremely common sports injuries, with the anterior talofibular ligament involved in the majority of ankle sprains. There have been only a few large magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on associated structural injuries after ankle sprains. To describe the injury pattern in athletes who were referred to MRI for the assessment of an acute ankle sprain and to assess the risk of associated traumatic tissue damage including lateral and syndesmotic ligament involvement. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 261 ankle MRI scans of athletes with acute ankle sprains were evaluated for: lateral and syndesmotic ligament injury; concomitant injuries to the deltoid and spring ligaments and sinus tarsi; peroneal, flexor, and extensor retinacula and tendons; traumatic and nontraumatic osteochondral and osseous changes; and joint effusion. Patients were on average 22.5 years old, and the average time from injury to MRI was 5.7 days. Six exclusive injury patterns were defined based on lateral and syndesmotic ligament involvement. The risk for associated injuries was assessed by logistic regression using ankles with no or only low-grade lateral ligament injuries and no syndesmotic ligament damage as the reference. With regard to the injury pattern, there were 103 ankles (39.5%) with complete anterior talofibular ligament disruption and no syndesmotic injury, and 53 ankles (20.3%) had a syndesmotic injury with or without lateral ligament damage. Acute osteochondral lesions of the lateral talar dome were seen in 20 ankles (7.7%). The percentage of chronic lateral osteochondral lesions was 1.1%. The risk for talar bone contusions increased more than 3-fold for ankles with complete lateral ligament ruptures (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.43; 95% CI, 1.72-6.85) but not for ankles with syndesmotic involvement. The risk for associated deltoid ligament injuries increased for ankles with complete lateral ligament injuries (aOR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1

  5. A water soluble fraction capable of regulating the immunity reactions of a host against allogenic cells or tissues, the pharmaceutical preparations which contain this fraction and a procedure for the preparation of the latter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The preparation is described of non-toxic bone marrow cell suspensions containing a marrow-regulating factor, which are suitable for intravenous injection in patients with serious hematopoietic disturbances or radiation syndrome. The marrow-regulating factor conditions the bone marrow in a manner which enhances the success of bone marrow transplantation in donor-incompatible or semicompatible hosts. The extensive testing of this pharmaceutical preparation in irradiated mice is described and a toxicity study reported. (Auth.)

  6. European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Pathobiology Group standard operating procedure for the preparation of human tumour tissue extracts suited for the quantitative analysis of tissue-associated biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, M.; Mengele, K.; Schueren, E. van der; Sweep, C.G.J.; Foekens, J.A.; Brunner, N.; Laabs, J.; Malik, A.; Harbeck, N.

    2007-01-01

    With the new concept of 'individualized treatment and targeted therapies', tumour tissue-associated biomarkers have been given a new role in selection of cancer patients for treatment and in cancer patient management. Tumour biomarkers can give support to cancer patient stratification and risk

  7. In-vivo behavior of tin-117m(2+ and 4+)-labeled DTPA and MDP. Preparation, tissue distribution in mice, and imaging in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.; Meinken, G.E.; Som, P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Butler, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Tissue distribution in mice of stannous chloride (pH 2), and of stannous as well as stannic chelates of MDP and DTPA is described. The bone-to-tissue ratios of these compounds are evaluated. High bone uptake of all these compounds point out the high affinity of tin for bone despite the chemically diverse ligands. Whole body autoradiographs of mice injected with tin-117m(IV)-DTPA demonstrate the almost exclusive localization of tin-117m activity in bone. Clarity of bone images in a dog, obtained up to 15 days following the injection of tin-117m(IV)-DTPA is demonstrated

  8. Buying, Preparing, and Cooking Shellfish. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.13c. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the various market forms of shellfish and how to clean, prepare, and cook them. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these…

  9. Using Herbs and Spices/Preparing Sauces and Gravies. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.11. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with herbs and spices and the selection and preparation of sauces and gravies. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these areas:…

  10. Multiple-level porous polymer monoliths with interconnected cellular topology prepared by combining hard sphere and emulsion templating for use in bone tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paljevac, M.; Gradišnik, L.; Lipovšek, S.; Maver, U.; Kotek, Jiří; Krajnc, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2018), s. 1-8, č. článku 1700306. ISSN 1616-5187 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : bone tissue engineering * hierarchical materials * polymer scaffolds Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.238, year: 2016

  11. Preparation and in vivo evaluation of radioiodinated closo-decaborate(2-) derivatives to identify structural components that provide low retention in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbur, D. Scott; Chyan, M.-K.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Perry, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: In vivo deastatination of 211 At-labeled biomolecules can severely limit their use in endoradiotherapy. Our studies have shown that the use of closo-decaborate(2-) moiety for 211 At-labeling of biomolecules provides high in vivo stability towards deastatination. However, data from those studies have also been suggestive that some astatinated closo-decaborate(2-) catabolites may be retained in tissues. In this study, we investigated the in vivo distributions of several structurally simple closo-decaborate(2-) derivatives to gain information on the effects of functional groups if catabolites are released into the blood system from the carrier biomolecule. Methods: Thirteen closo-decaborate(2-) derivatives were synthesized and radioiodinated for evaluation. Tissue concentrations of the radioiodinated compounds were obtained in groups of five mice at 1 and 4 h postinjection (pi). Dual-label ( 125 I and 131 I) experiments permitted evaluation of two compounds in each set of mice. Results: All of the target compounds were readily synthesized. Radioiodination reactions were conducted with chloramine-T and Na[ 125/131 I]I in water to give high yields (75-96%) of the desired compounds. Biodistribution data at 1 and 4 h pi (representing catabolites released into the blood system) showed small differences in tissue concentrations for some compounds, but large differences for others. The results indicate that formal (overall) charge on the compounds could not be used as a predictor of tissue localization or retention. However, derivatives containing carboxylate groups generally had lower tissue concentrations. Acid cleavable hydrazone functionalities appeared to be the best candidates for further study. Conclusions: Further studies incorporating hydrazone functionalities into pendant groups for biomolecule radiohalogenation are warranted.

  12. First steps towards tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels: preparation of flat scaffolds of collagen and elastin by means of freeze drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttafoco, L.; Engbers-Buijtenhuijs, P.; Poot, Andreas A.; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Daamen, W.F.; van Kuppevelt, T.H.; Vermes, I.; Feijen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Porous scaffolds composed of collagen or collagen and elastin were prepared by freeze drying at temperatures between -18 and -196°C. All scaffolds had a porosity of 90-98% and a homogeneous distribution of pores. Freeze drying at -18°C afforded collagen and collagen/elastin matrices with average

  13. Effects of Two Different Exogenous Surfactant Preparations on Serial Peripheral Perfusion Index and Tissue Carbon Monoxide Measurements in Preterm Infants with Severe Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Terek

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Patients with RDS had poor perfusion, and PI improved with both surfactant preparations only following a short decline in the 1st minute. The expected improvement of PI occurred earlier in the beractant subgroup. TCO declined in both groups, showing lung improvement and decreased oxidative/inflammatory stress, and it was normalized earlier with poractant alfa.

  14. The effects of crosslinkers on physical, mechanical, and cytotoxic properties of gelatin sponge prepared via in-situ gas foaming method as a tissue engineering scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poursamar, S Ali; Lehner, Alexander N; Azami, Mahmoud; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Antunes, A P M

    2016-06-01

    In this study porous gelatin scaffolds were prepared using in-situ gas foaming, and four crosslinking agents were used to determine a biocompatible and effective crosslinker that is suitable for such a method. Crosslinkers used in this study included: hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI), poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (epoxy), glutaraldehyde (GTA), and genipin. The prepared porous structures were analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal and mechanical analysis as well as water absorption analysis. The microstructures of the prepared samples were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The effects of the crosslinking agents were studied on the cytotoxicity of the porous structure indirectly using MTT analysis. The affinity of L929 mouse fibroblast cells for attachment on the scaffold surfaces was investigated by direct cell seeding and DAPI-staining technique. It was shown that while all of the studied crosslinking agents were capable of stabilizing prepared gelatin scaffolds, there are noticeable differences among physical and mechanical properties of samples based on the crosslinker type. Epoxy-crosslinked scaffolds showed a higher capacity for water absorption and more uniform microstructures than the rest of crosslinked samples, whereas genipin and GTA-crosslinked scaffolds demonstrated higher mechanical strength. Cytotoxicity analysis showed the superior biocompatibility of the naturally occurring genipin in comparison with other synthetic crosslinking agents, in particular relative to GTA-crosslinked samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Histopathological study of the effects of low-intensity laser irradiation ({lambda}=650 nm) on dental pulp tissue after cavity preparation; Estudo histopatologico dos efeitos da irradiacao laser em baixa intensidade ({lambda}=650nm) em tecido pulpar apos preparo cavitario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertella, Claudio

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate (in vivo) the effects of low-intensity Arsenide Gallium Aluminium laser application post-cavity preparation class 1. Six patients with bilateral pre-molars and molars indicated to extraction for orthodontics aim were selected. Four samples of these teeth underwent cavity preparation with deep from medium to high and two samples underwent cavity preparation from high to pulp expositions. The samples were constituted of two teeth of the same patient and received different treatments. One of the teeth underwent laser exposition and the other one was maintained as control, before restorative procedure with polycarboxylate cement. A diode laser ({lambda}=650 nm), output power 30 mW and fluencies of 1,8 J/cm{sup 2} and 2,7 J/cm{sup 2} in pre-molars and molars, respectively, was used for irradiation with repetition rate of 18 Hz in interrupted continuous wave mode. After seven days, the teeth were extracted and processed histologically with HE to verify morphological changes in the pulpy tissue. The four samples, which cavity preparation and restorative material were not in contact with the pulp, did not show histological differences between irradiated and non-irradiated teeth. Both of them presented the same characteristics of normality. The two samples with exposed pulpy tissue showed different results. The irradiated teeth presented no or slight inflammatory signs when compared to the control samples, which showed abscess in the coronary pulp interior and intense inflammatory infiltrated. These results suggest that the laser irradiation can be used as a therapeutic modality in clinical trials, in the conditions employed in this study. (author)

  16. Phytochemical screening, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of extracts prepared from different tissues of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi that occurs in the coast of Bahia, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    D?Sousa? Costa, Cinara Oliveira; Ribeiro, Paulo Roberto; Loureiro, Marta Bruno; Sim?es, Rafael Concei??o; de Castro, Renato Delmondez; Fernandez, Luzimar Gonzaga

    2015-01-01

    Background: Schinus terebinthifolius is widely used in traditional medicine by Brazilian quilombola and indigenous communities for treatment of several diseases. Extracts from different tissues are being used to produce creams to treat cervicitis and cervicovaginitis. However, most studies are limited to the assessment of the essential oils and extracts obtained from the leaves. Objective: The aim was to evaluate antioxidant and antibacterial activities, to assess the phytochemical profile an...

  17. The effects of crosslinkers on physical, mechanical, and cytotoxic properties of gelatin sponge prepared via in-situ gas foaming method as a tissue engineering scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poursamar, S. Ali [Institute for Creative Leather Technologies, Park Campus, The University of Northampton, Boughton Green Road, Northampton NN2 7AL (United Kingdom); Lehner, Alexander N. [Centre for Physical Activity and Chronic Disease and the Aging Research Centre, Institute for Health and Wellbeing, School of Health, Park Campus, The University of Northampton, Boughton Green Road, Northampton NN2 7AL (United Kingdom); Azami, Mahmoud; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh [Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali [Cellular and Molecular Research Centre, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine, Faculty of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Antunes, A.P.M., E-mail: Paula.Antunes@northampton.ac.uk [Institute for Creative Leather Technologies, Park Campus, The University of Northampton, Boughton Green Road, Northampton NN2 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    In this study porous gelatin scaffolds were prepared using in-situ gas foaming, and four crosslinking agents were used to determine a biocompatible and effective crosslinker that is suitable for such a method. Crosslinkers used in this study included: hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI), poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (epoxy), glutaraldehyde (GTA), and genipin. The prepared porous structures were analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal and mechanical analysis as well as water absorption analysis. The microstructures of the prepared samples were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The effects of the crosslinking agents were studied on the cytotoxicity of the porous structure indirectly using MTT analysis. The affinity of L929 mouse fibroblast cells for attachment on the scaffold surfaces was investigated by direct cell seeding and DAPI-staining technique. It was shown that while all of the studied crosslinking agents were capable of stabilizing prepared gelatin scaffolds, there are noticeable differences among physical and mechanical properties of samples based on the crosslinker type. Epoxy-crosslinked scaffolds showed a higher capacity for water absorption and more uniform microstructures than the rest of crosslinked samples, whereas genipin and GTA-crosslinked scaffolds demonstrated higher mechanical strength. Cytotoxicity analysis showed the superior biocompatibility of the naturally occurring genipin in comparison with other synthetic crosslinking agents, in particular relative to GTA-crosslinked samples. - Highlights: • In-situ gas foaming application in the production of sponge-like gelatin structures • The crosslinkers molecular length impacts on the physical and mechanical properties of the structure. • The effect of crosslinkers on the biocompatibility of gelatin scaffolds.

  18. The effects of crosslinkers on physical, mechanical, and cytotoxic properties of gelatin sponge prepared via in-situ gas foaming method as a tissue engineering scaffold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poursamar, S. Ali; Lehner, Alexander N.; Azami, Mahmoud; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Antunes, A.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study porous gelatin scaffolds were prepared using in-situ gas foaming, and four crosslinking agents were used to determine a biocompatible and effective crosslinker that is suitable for such a method. Crosslinkers used in this study included: hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI), poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (epoxy), glutaraldehyde (GTA), and genipin. The prepared porous structures were analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal and mechanical analysis as well as water absorption analysis. The microstructures of the prepared samples were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The effects of the crosslinking agents were studied on the cytotoxicity of the porous structure indirectly using MTT analysis. The affinity of L929 mouse fibroblast cells for attachment on the scaffold surfaces was investigated by direct cell seeding and DAPI-staining technique. It was shown that while all of the studied crosslinking agents were capable of stabilizing prepared gelatin scaffolds, there are noticeable differences among physical and mechanical properties of samples based on the crosslinker type. Epoxy-crosslinked scaffolds showed a higher capacity for water absorption and more uniform microstructures than the rest of crosslinked samples, whereas genipin and GTA-crosslinked scaffolds demonstrated higher mechanical strength. Cytotoxicity analysis showed the superior biocompatibility of the naturally occurring genipin in comparison with other synthetic crosslinking agents, in particular relative to GTA-crosslinked samples. - Highlights: • In-situ gas foaming application in the production of sponge-like gelatin structures • The crosslinkers molecular length impacts on the physical and mechanical properties of the structure. • The effect of crosslinkers on the biocompatibility of gelatin scaffolds

  19. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2015-08-01

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections, using a fully automated droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS-MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectrometric detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this method and data obtained with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland. AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis), and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH-secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH-secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared with non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis, as expected. This work reveals that a fully automated droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS-MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, including AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity, and specificity of this method support the potential of this basic technology, with further advancement, for assisting surgical decision-making. Graphical Abstract Mass spectrometry based profiling of hormones in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections.

  20. Association of serum KL-6 levels with interstitial lung disease in patients with connective tissue disease: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Ekin Oktay; Kucuksahin, Orhan; Turgay, Murat; Yildizgoren, Mustafa Turgut; Ates, Askin; Demir, Nalan; Kumbasar, Ozlem Ozdemir; Kinikli, Gulay; Duzgun, Nursen

    2016-03-01

    It was aimed to evaluate KL-6 glycoprotein levels to determine if it may be a diagnostic marker for the connective tissue diseases (CTDs) predicting CTD-related interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) (CTD-ILD) development and to examine if there was a difference between patients and healthy controls. The study included 113 patients with CTD (45 CTD without lung involvement, 68 CTD-ILD) and 45 healthy control subjects. KL-6 glycoprotein levels were analyzed with ELISA in patients and the control group. The relationship between KL-6 glycoprotein levels and CTD-ILD was assessed. In the comparison of all the groups in the study, significantly higher levels of KL-6 were determined in the CTD-ILD group than in either the CTD without pulmonary involvement group or the healthy control group (p connective tissue diseases in the diagnostic groups (systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, mixed connective tissue disease, scleroderma, polymyositis/ dermatomyositis). In the healthy control group, there was a statistically significant difference between KL-6 levels in smokers and non-smokers. Smokers had significantly higher serum KL-6 levels compared with non-smokers (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between smoking status (pack-year) and serum KL-6 levels. There was no statistically significant correlation between serum KL-6 levels and time since diagnosis of CTD and CTD-ILD. The level of KL-6 as a predictive factor could be used to identify the clinical development of ILD before it is detected on imaging modality. Further prospective clinical studies are needed to define whether levels of KL-6 might have prognostic value or might predict progressive ILD.

  1. Are specific gene expressions of extracellular matrix and nucleus pulposus affected by primary cell cultures prepared from intact or degenerative intervertebral disc tissues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaarslan, Numan; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Ozbek, Hanefi; Sirin Yasar, Duygu; Kaplan, Necati; Akyuva, Yener; Gonultas, Aylin; Ates, Ozkan

    2018-01-22

    In this scientific research project, the researchers aimed to determine the gene expression patterns of nucleus pulposus (NP) in cell cultures obtained from degenerated or intact tissues. Whereas 12 of the cases were diagnosed with lumbar disc hernia and had undergone lumbar microdiscectomy, 12 cases had undergone traumatic intervertebral discectomy and corpectomy, along with discectomy after spinal trauma. NP-specific markers and gene expressions of the reagents of the extracellular matrix in the experimental setup were tested at the 0th, 24th, and 48th hours by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Visual evaluations were simultaneously made in all samples using invert and fluorescence microscopy. Vitality and proliferation analyses were evaluated by UV spectrophotometer. As a method of statistical evaluation, Spearman was used for categorical variants, and the Pearson correlation was used for variants with numerical and plain distribution. No association was found either between the tissue type and times (r=0.000; p=1.000) or between the region that the tissue was obtained from and hypoxia transcription factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) gene expression (r=0.098; p=0.245). There was no correlation between cell proliferation and chondroadherin (CHAD) expression or between type II collagen (COL2A1) and CHAD gene expressions. It was found that CHAD and HIF-1α gene expressions and HIF-1α and COL2A1 gene expressions affected cell proliferation. Cell culture setups are of paramount importance because they may influence the pattern of changes in the gene expressions of the cells used in these setups.

  2. Preparation and characterization of collagen/PLA, chitosan/PLA, and collagen/chitosan/PLA hybrid scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Cengiz, Ibrahim Fatih; Ellä, Ville; Kokkonen, Harri T; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Kellomäki, Minna

    2014-04-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds were developed for the repair of articular cartilage defects. Novel collagen/polylactide (PLA), chitosan/PLA, and collagen/chitosan/PLA hybrid scaffolds were fabricated by combining freeze-dried natural components and synthetic PLA mesh, where the 3D PLA mesh gives mechanical strength, and the natural polymers, collagen and/or chitosan, mimic the natural cartilage tissue environment of chondrocytes. In total, eight scaffold types were studied: four hybrid structures containing collagen and/or chitosan with PLA, and four parallel plain scaffolds with only collagen and/or chitosan. The potential of these types of scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering applications were determined by the analysis of the microstructure, water uptake, mechanical strength, and the viability and attachment of adult bovine chondrocytes to the scaffolds. The manufacturing method used was found to be applicable for the manufacturing of hybrid scaffolds with highly porous 3D structures. All the hybrid scaffolds showed a highly porous structure with open pores throughout the scaffold. Collagen was found to bind water inside the structure in all collagen-containing scaffolds better than the chitosan-containing scaffolds, and the plain collagen scaffolds had the highest water absorption. The stiffness of the scaffold was improved by the hybrid structure compared to plain scaffolds. The cell viability and attachment was good in all scaffolds, however, the collagen hybrid scaffolds showed the best penetration of cells into the scaffold. Our results show that from the studied scaffolds the collagen/PLA hybrids are the most promising scaffolds from this group for cartilage tissue engineering.

  3. Preparation and characterization of photocured poly (ε-caprolactone) diacrylate/poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate/chitosan for photopolymerization-type 3D printing tissue engineering scaffold application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yih-Lin; Chen, Freeman

    2017-12-01

    Because of its biocompatible, biodegradable and antimicrobial properties, chitosan is an attractive biomaterial for use in tissue engineering scaffolds. This work builds on previous research by incorporating 95% DD chitosan into a visible-light curable resin which is compatible with a digital light processing (DLP™) projection additive manufacturing (3D printing) system. Different concentrations of chitosan were added to a poly (ε-caprolactone)-diacrylate/poly (ethylene glycol)-diacrylate baseline resin and the samples were extensively characterized. Thermal and mechanical analysis conformed to established scaffold requirements. L929 cells were cultured on the photo-crosslinked films and MTT assays were performed at 1, 3, and 5days to assess cytocompatibility of the resins. Data and SEM images verified a correlation between the concentration of chitosan in the photocurable resin and the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of cell cultures. Finally, the processability of the resins with the dynamic masking DLP system was demonstrated by constructing multi-layer scaffolds with actual measurements that were consistent with the CAD models. These findings encourage the use of chitosan as an additive in visible-light curable resins to improve desired properties in tissue engineering scaffolds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. One-pot preparation of a mixed-mode organic-silica hybrid monolithic capillary column and its application in determination of endogenous gibberellins in plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Hao, Yan-Hong; Ding, Jun; Xu, Sheng-Nan; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-10-16

    A newly improved one-pot method, based on "thiol-ene" click chemistry and sol-gel approach in microemulsion system, was developed for the preparation of C8/PO(OH)2-silica hybrid monolithic capillary column. The prepared monolith possesses large specific surface area, narrow mesopore size distribution and high column efficiency. The monolithic column was demonstrated to have cation exchange/reversed-phase (CX/RP) mixed-mode retention for analytes on nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC). On the basis of the developed nano-LC system with MS detector coupled to pipette tip solid phase extraction (PT-SPE) and derivatization process, we then realized simultaneous determination of 10 gibberellins (GAs) with low limits of detection (LODs, 0.003-0.025 ng/mL). Furthermore, 6 endogenous GAs in only 5mg rice leaves (fresh weight) were successfully detected and quantified. The developed PT-SPE-nano-LC-MS strategy may offer promising applications in the determination of low abundant bioactive molecules from complex matrix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The hospital preparation of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; preparation ((general - sterilization), production areas (laboratories), working methods for injections, working methods for oral preparations and iodination procedures); analytical testing (general, standards common to injections and oral preparations, standards for injections, standards for oral preparations); reliable methods of preparing sup(99m)Tc-radiopharmaceuticals and 51 Cr-red cells; commercial radiopharmaceutical kits. (U.K.)

  6. Association between home food preparation skills and behaviour, and consumption of ultra-processed foods: Cross-sectional analysis of the UK National Diet and nutrition survey (2008-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Matthew Chak Leung; Adams, Jean

    2017-05-23

    'Ultra-processed foods' (UPF) have been industrially processed and tend to be higher in saturated fat, sodium and sugar than other foods. There is some evidence that consumption of UPF is associated with overweight, obesity and related diseases. In developed countries more than half of dietary energy is attributed to UPF. One reason for reliance on UPF may be poor home food preparation skills or infrequent use of these. This relationship has been previously proposed but not tested. We examined the relationship between home food preparation skills and behaviour and consumption of UPF. We used data from adults in the UK National Diet & Nutrition Survey 2008-09. Home food preparation skills and behaviours of adults (n = 509) were assessed using questions on confidence using eight cooking techniques, confidence cooking 10 foods, ability to prepare a cake or biscuits without help, and whether or not participants prepared a main meal five or more days per week. Individuals' UPF consumption was determined from four-day estimated diet diaries. Associations were adjusted for age, gender, occupational social class and household composition. In fully adjusted models, individuals who were confident with all 10 foods (adjusted beta (95% CI) = -3.76 (-6.02 to -1.50)), able to bake cakes or biscuits without help (-3.87 (-6.62 to -1.12)), and cooked a main meal at least five days a week (-2.84 (-5.43 to -0.24)) consumed a lower percentage of dietary energy from UPF. In UK adults better home food preparation skills and more frequent use of these skills tended to be cross-sectionally associated with lower UPF consumption. Greater encouragement of these skills may help reduce reliance on UPF.

  7. Development and validation of a numerical model for cross-section optimization of a multi-part probe for soft tissue intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, L; Neubert, J; Reina, S; Oldfield, M; Davies, B L; Rodriguez Y Baena, F

    2010-01-01

    The popularity of minimally invasive surgical procedures is driving the development of novel, safer and more accurate surgical tools. In this context a multi-part probe for soft tissue surgery is being developed in the Mechatronics in Medicine Laboratory at Imperial College, London. This study reports an optimization procedure using finite element methods, for the identification of an interlock geometry able to limit the separation of the segments composing the multi-part probe. An optimal geometry was obtained and the corresponding three-dimensional finite element model validated experimentally. Simulation results are shown to be consistent with the physical experiments. The outcome of this study is an important step in the provision of a novel miniature steerable probe for surgery.

  8. Predictors of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in absence of radiologic honeycombing: A cross sectional analysis in ILD patients undergoing lung tissue sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Margaret L; Xia, Meng; Murray, Susan; Bartholmai, Brian J; Kazerooni, Ella A; Meldrum, Catherine A; Martinez, Fernando J; Flaherty, Kevin R

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) can be diagnosed confidently and non-invasively when clinical and computed tomography (CT) criteria are met. Many do not meet these criteria due to absence of CT honeycombing. We investigated predictors of IPF and combinations allowing accurate diagnosis in individuals without honeycombing. We utilized prospectively collected clinical and CT data from patients enrolled in the Lung Tissue Research Consortium. Included patients had no honeycombing, no connective tissue disease, underwent diagnostic lung biopsy, and had CT pattern consistent with fibrosing ILD (n = 200). Logistic regression identified clinical and CT variables predictive of IPF. The probability of IPF was assessed at various cut-points of important clinical and CT variables. A multivariable model adjusted for age and gender found increasingly extensive reticular densities (OR 2.93, CI 95% 1.55-5.56, p = 0.001) predicted IPF, while increasing ground glass densities predicted a diagnosis other than IPF (OR 0.55, CI 95% 0.34-0.89, p = 0.02). The model-based probability of IPF was 80% or greater in patients with age at least 60 years and extent of reticular density one-third or more of total lung volume; for patients meeting or exceeding these clinical thresholds the specificity for IPF is 96% (CI 95% 91-100%) with 21 of 134 (16%) biopsies avoided. In patients with suspected fibrotic ILD and absence of CT honeycombing, extent of reticular and ground glass densities predict a diagnosis of IPF. The probability of IPF exceeds 80% in subjects over age 60 years with one-third of total lung having reticular densities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Policy on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) and adherence to food preparation guidelines: a cross sectional survey of stakeholders in food service in Kumasi, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyei-Baffour, Peter; Sekyere, Kofi Boateng; Addy, Ernestine Akosua

    2013-11-04

    Food borne diseases claim more lives and are growing public health concerns. Simple preventive techniques such as adoption and adherence to hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) policy can significantly reduce this disease burden. Though food screening and inspection are done, the ultimate regulation, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point, which is known and accepted worldwide, appears not to be popular among food operators in Ghana. This paper examines the level of awareness of the existence of policy on hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) and its adherence to food preparation guidelines among food service providers in Ghana. The results revealed the mean age of food providers as 33.1 years with a standard deviation of 7.5, range of 18-55 years, more females, in full time employment and with basic education. Of the fifty institutional managers, 42 (84%) were senior officers and had worked for more than five years. Education and type of food operator had strong statistically significant relationship with the implementation of HCCP policy and adherence with food preparation guidelines. The enforcement of HACCP policy and adherence with food safety guidelines was led by the Ghana Tourist Board, Public Health officers, and KMA, respectively. While a majority of food operators 373/450 (83.3%) did not know HACCP policy is part of food safety guidelines, staff of food safety law enforcement 44/50 (88%) confirmed knowing that food operators were not aware of the HACCP policy. The study documents evidence on the practice of food safety principles or HACCP policy or adherence to food preparation guidelines. Existing food safety guidelines incorporate varying principles of HACCP, however, awareness is low among food operators. The implication is that food production is likely to fall short of acceptable standards and not be wholesome putting consumers at health risk. Repeating this study in rural and urban areas in Ghana is necessary to

  10. Preparations for Measurement of Electroweak Boson Production Cross-Sections using the Electron Decay Modes, with the Compact Muon Solenoid Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wardrope, D R

    2009-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid was designed to make discoveries at the TeV scale : to elucidate the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking and to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. For any such discovery to be credible, it must first be demonstrated that the CMS detector is understood. One mechanism to make this demonstration is to measure “standard candle” processes, such as W and Z production. This thesis describes preparations undertaken to make these measurements using the electron decay modes, with an integrated luminosity of 10 inverse picobarns of collision data. The energy resolution of the electromagnetic calorimeter was measured in test beam data. An improved method of deriving the optimised weights necessary for amplitude reconstruction is described. The measurement of electron charge using tracks is impaired by the electron showering in the tracker material. A novel charge measurement technique that is complementary to the existing method was assessed. Missing transverse energy is a pow...

  11. A new technique for Gram staining paraffin-embedded tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbaek, K; Johansen, K S; Jensen, M E

    1979-01-01

    Five techniques for Gram staining bacteria in paraffin sections were compared on serial sections of pulmonary tissues from eight bacteriological necropsies. Brown and Hopp's method was the most satisfactory for distinguishing Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. However, this method cannot be recommended as the preparations were frequently overstained, and the Gram-negative bacteria were stained indistinctly. A modification of Brown and Hopps' method was developed which stains larger numbers of Gram-negative bacteria and differentiates well between different cell types and connective tissue, and there is no risk of overstaining. PMID:86548

  12. Are joint and soft tissue injections painful? Results of a national French cross-sectional study of procedural pain in rheumatological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poncet Coralie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Joint, spinal and soft tissue injections are commonly performed by rheumatologists in their daily practice. Contrary to other procedures, e.g. performed in pediatric care, little is known about the frequency, the intensity and the management of procedural pain observed in osteo-articular injections in daily practice. Methods This observational, prospective, national study was carried out among a French national representative database of primary rheumatologists to evaluate the prevalence and intensity of pain caused by intra-and peri-articular injections, synovial fluid aspirations, soft tissue injections, and spinal injections. For each physician, data were collected over 1 month, for up to 40 consecutive patients (>18-years-old for whom a synovial fluid aspiration, an intra or peri-articular injection or a spinal injection were carried out during consultations. Statistical analysis was carried out in order to compare patients who had suffered from pain whilst undergoing the procedure to those who had not. Explanatory analyses were conducted by stepwise logistic regression with the characteristics of the patients to explain the existence of pain. Results Data were analysed for 8446 patients (64% female, mean age 62 ± 14 years recruited by 240 physicians. The predominant sites injected were the knee (45.5% and spine (19.1%. Over 80% of patients experienced procedural pain which was most common in the small joints (42% and spine (32% Pain was severe in 5.3% of patients, moderate in 26.6%, mild in 49.8%, and absent in 18.3%. Pain was significantly more intense in patients with severe pain linked to their underlying pathology and for procedures performed in small joints. Preventative or post-procedure analgesia was rarely given, only to 5.7% and 36.3% of patients, respectively. Preventative analgesia was more frequently prescribed in patients with more severe procedural pain. Conclusion Most patients undergoing intra-or peri

  13. Micromechanical finite element modeling and experimental characterization of the compressive mechanical properties of polycaprolactone:hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds prepared by selective laser sintering for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Shaun; Das, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) by selective laser sintering (SLS) and modeled by finite element analysis (FEA). Both solid gage parts and scaffolds having 1-D, 2-D and 3-D orthogonal, periodic porous architectures were made with 0, 10, 20 and 30% HA by volume. PCL:HA scaffolds manufactured by SLS had nearly full density (99%) in the designed solid regions and had excellent geometric and dimensional control. Through optimization of the SLS process, the compressive moduli for our solid gage parts and scaffolds are the highest reported in the literature for additive manufacturing. The compressive moduli of solid gage parts were 299.3, 311.2, 415.5 and 498.3 MPa for PCL:HA loading at 100:0, 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30 respectively. The compressive effective stiffness tended to increase as the loading of HA was increased and the designed porosity was lowered. In the case of the most 3-D porous scaffold, the compressive modulus more than doubled from 14.9 MPa to 36.2 MPa when changing the material from 100:0 to 70:30 PCL:HA. A micromechanical finite element analysis (FEA) model was developed to investigate the reinforcement effect of HA loading on the compressive modulus of the bulk material. Using a first-principles based approach, the random distribution of HA particles in a solidified PCL matrix was modeled for any loading of HA to predict the bulk mechanical properties of the composites. The bulk mechanical properties were also used for FEA of the scaffold geometries. Results of the FEA were found to be in good agreement with experimental mechanical testing. The development of patient and site-specific composite tissue engineering constructs with tailored properties can be seen as a direct extension of this work on computational design, a priori modeling of mechanical properties and direct digital manufacturing. PMID:22522129

  14. Micromechanical finite-element modeling and experimental characterization of the compressive mechanical properties of polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds prepared by selective laser sintering for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Shaun; Das, Suman

    2012-08-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) by selective laser sintering (SLS) and modeled by finite-element analysis (FEA). Both solid gage parts and scaffolds having 1-D, 2-D and 3-D orthogonal, periodic porous architectures were made with 0, 10, 20 and 30 vol.% HA. PCL:HA scaffolds manufactured by SLS had nearly full density (99%) in the designed solid regions and had excellent geometric and dimensional control. Through optimization of the SLS process, the compressive moduli for our solid gage parts and scaffolds are the highest reported in the literature for additive manufacturing. The compressive moduli of solid gage parts were 299.3, 311.2, 415.5 and 498.3 MPa for PCL:HA loading at 100:0, 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30, respectively. The compressive effective stiffness tended to increase as the loading of HA was increased and the designed porosity was lowered. In the case of the most 3-D porous scaffold, the compressive modulus more than doubled from 14.9 to 36.2 MPa when changing the material from 100:0 to 70:30 PCL:HA. A micromechanical FEA model was developed to investigate the reinforcement effect of HA loading on the compressive modulus of the bulk material. Using a first-principles based approach, the random distribution of HA particles in a solidified PCL matrix was modeled for any HA loading to predict the bulk mechanical properties of the composites. The bulk mechanical properties were also used for FEA of the scaffold geometries. The results of the FEA were found to be in good agreement with experimental mechanical testing. The development of patient- and site-specific composite tissue-engineering constructs with tailored properties can be seen as a direct extension of this work on computational design, a priori modeling of mechanical properties and direct digital manufacturing. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  15. Quantitative method for the detection and localization of quantum-limited events from radionuclides in cells and tissue sections by computer-enhanced video microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressman, N.J.; Frost, J.K.; Gupta, P.K.; Showers, R.L.; Gill, G.W.; Cook, D.L.; Frost, J.K. Jr.; Traub, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Cellular dynamics often involve extremely low concentrations of biologically active substances, which can be radiolabeled and detected, localized and quantitated by autoradiography. The latter may require exposures from a few days to many months. The objective of this research was to demonstrate the feasibility of reducing this long period of data collection by one to two orders of magnitude, while maintaining or improving the spatial resolution and localization in tissues and the quantitative characteristics inherent in autoradiography. A mathematical model describing the complete system was generated using energy partition calculations to estimate photon production via scintillant per H3 beta particle emission and to estimate the subsequent photon capture based upon imaging system parameters and microscope geometry. Calculations showed that, typically, a single tritium beta particle produces a maximum of 5.8 X 10(3) photons. A photon-limited camera and microscope imaging system were selected and optimized in conjunction with a specially developed physical scintillation model. Results showed that the number of detected photoevents increases monotonically with both signal integration time and, independently, with the concentration of the radionuclide. Consequently, this work demonstrates that video microscopy imaging methods can spatially and temporally quantify very low concentrations of radiolabeled substances and can reduce data acquisition times

  16. Plant DNA detection from grasshopper guts: A step-by-step protocol, from tissue preparation to obtaining plant DNA sequences1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanesyan, Alina

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. • Methods and Results: The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA) gene and was tested in several feeding experiments. Plant DNA was obtained at seven time points post-ingestion from whole guts and separate gut sections, and was detectable up to 12 h post-ingestion in nymphs and 22 h post-ingestion in adult grasshoppers. • Conclusions: The proposed protocol is an effective, relatively quick, and low-cost method of detecting plant DNA from the grasshopper gut and its different sections. This has important applications, from exploring plant “movement” during food consumption, to detecting plant–insect interactions. PMID:25202604

  17. Mounting ground sections of teeth: Cyanoacrylate adhesive versus Canada balsam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangala, Manogna Rl; Rudraraju, Amrutha; Subramanyam, R V

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues can be studied by either decalcification or by preparing ground sections. Various mounting media have been tried and used for ground sections of teeth. However, there are very few studies on the use of cyanoacrylate adhesive as a mounting medium. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of cyanoacrylate adhesive (Fevikwik™) as a mounting medium for ground sections of teeth and to compare these ground sections with those mounted with Canada balsam. Ground sections were prepared from twenty extracted teeth. Each section was divided into two halves and mounted on one slide, one with cyanoacrylate adhesive (Fevikwik™) and the other with Canada balsam. Scoring for various features in the ground sections was done by two independent observers. Statistical analysis using Student's t-test (unpaired) of average scores was performed for each feature observed. No statistically significant difference was found between the two for most of the features. However, cyanoacrylate was found to be better than Canada balsam for observing striae of Retzius (P < 0.0205), enamel lamellae (P < 0.036), dentinal tubules (P < 0.0057), interglobular dentin (P < 0.0001), sclerotic dentin - transmitted light (P < 0.00001), sclerotic dentin - polarized light (P < 0.0002) and Sharpey's fibers (P < 0.0004). This initial study shows that cyanoacrylate is better than Canada balsam for observing certain features of ground sections of teeth. However, it remains to be seen whether it will be useful for studying undecalcified sections of carious teeth and for soft tissue sections.

  18. Three-dimensional assessment of brain tissue morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bert; Germann, Marco; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Morel, Anne

    2006-08-01

    The microstructure of brain tissues becomes visible using different types of optical microscopy after the tissue sectioning. This preparation procedure introduces stress and strain in the anisotropic and inhomogeneous soft tissue slices, which are several 10 μm thick. Consequently, the three-dimensional dataset, generated out of the two-dimensional images with lateral submicrometer resolution, needs algorithms to correct the deformations, which can be significant for mellow tissue such as brain segments. The spatial resolution perpendicular to the slices is much worse with respect to the lateral sub-micrometer resolution. Therefore, we propose as complementary method the synchrotron-radiation-based micro computed tomography (SRμCT), which avoids any kind of preparation artifacts due to sectioning and histological processing and yields true micrometer resolution in the three orthogonal directions. The visualization of soft matter by the use of SRμCT, however, is often based on elaborate staining protocols, since the tissue exhibits (almost) the same x-ray absorption as the surrounding medium. Therefore, it is unexpected that human tissue from the pons and the medulla oblongata in phosphate buffer show several features such as the blood vessels and the inferior olivary nucleus without staining. The value of these tomograms lies especially in the precise non-rigid registration of the different sets of histological slices. Applications of this method to larger pieces of brain tissue, such as the human thalamus are planned in the context of stereotactic functional neurosurgery.

  19. Fibrous guided tissue regeneration membrane loaded with anti-inflammatory agent prepared by coaxial electrospinning for the purpose of controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Min; Xue, Jiajia [Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Geng, Huan; Gu, Hao [State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen, Dafu [Laboratory of Bone Tissue Engineering of Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Beijing 100035 (China); Shi, Rui, E-mail: sharell@126.com [Laboratory of Bone Tissue Engineering of Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Beijing 100035 (China); Zhang, Liqun, E-mail: zhanglq@mail.buct.edu.cn [Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2015-04-30

    Graphical abstract: The metronidazole released from PCL/gelatin core/sheath nanofiber membranes can effectively inhibit the colonization of anerobic bacteria. - Highlights: • Core/sheath PCL/gelatin nanofiber membrane loaded with metronidazole in a wide range of drug loading (5–35 wt.%) were successfully fabricated in good quality. • The encapsulation of gelatin can effectively alleviate the initial burst release of drugs. • The membrane can inhibit the growth of bacteria as the drug content reaches 10% (w/w), and the bacterial inhibition ability can effectively last at least 4 weeks. • The encapsulation of gelatin can overcome the disadvantage of PCL's hydrophobicity, which can effectively promote the adhesion and proliferation of cells. - Abstract: Here, with the aim of inhibiting inflammation during guided tissue regeneration membrane (GTRM) implant surgery, coaxial electrospinning was used to fabricate drug-loaded core/sheath nanofiber GTRMs capable of controlled drug release. Various amounts of the anti-inflammatory agent metronidazole (MNA) were encapsulated into the core/sheath nanofibers (where PCL was the core, gelatin the sheath, and the gelatin shell was crosslinked with genipin) in order to establish the minimal drug content necessary to achieve the appropriate anti-inflammatory effect. By using TEM and SEM, the core/sheath structure was confirmed. In vitro drug disolution results showed that the core/sheath nanofibers exhibited sustained release profiles that were superior to those nanofibers produced by blending electrospinning. Additionally, the membrane significantly inhibited the colonization of anaerobic bacteria. Furthermore, with gelatin as a shell, the core/shell nanofiber membranes showed improved hydrophilicity, which resulted in better cell adhesion and proliferation without cytotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, a simple and effective coaxial electrospinning approach was demonstrated for the fabrication of anti

  20. Triethyl orthoformate mediated a novel crosslinking method for the preparation of hydrogels for tissue engineering applications: characterization and in vitro cytocompatibility analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yar, Muhammad, E-mail: drmyar@ciitlahore.edu.pk [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shahzad, Sohail [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Chemistry, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100 (Pakistan); Siddiqi, Saadat Anwar [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, Nasir [Department of Allied Health Sciences and Chemical Pathology, Department of Human Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of Health Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Rauf, Abdul [Department of Chemistry, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100 (Pakistan); Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh [Department of Physics, Syed Babar Ali School of Science and Engineering, Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS), Opposite Sector U, D.H.A., Lahore 54792 (Pakistan); Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rehman, Ihtesham ur [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Kroto Research Institute, The University of Sheffield, North Campus, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a new crosslinking method for the synthesis of novel hydrogel films from chitosan and PVA for potential use in various biomedical applications. These hydrogel membranes were synthesized by blending different ratios of chitosan (CS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) solutions and were crosslinked with 2.5% (w/v) triethyl orthoformate (TEOF) in the presence of 17% (w/v) sulfuric acid. The physical/chemical interactions and the presence of specific functional groups in the synthesized materials were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The morphology, structure and pore size of the materials were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) proved that these crosslinked hydrogel films have good thermal stability which was decreased as the CS ratio was increased. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) exhibited that CS and PVA were present in the amorphous form. The solution absorption properties were performed in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution of pH 7.4. The 20% PVA–80% CS crosslinked hydrogel films showed a greater degree of solution absorption (183%) as compared to other compositions. The hydrogels with greater CS concentration (60% and 80%) demonstrated relatively more porous structure, better cell viability and proliferation and also revealed good blood clotting ability even after crosslinking. Based on the observed facts these hydrogels can be tailored for their potential utilization in wound healing and skin tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • A new method for covalently crosslinking of chitosan and PVA. • Triethyl orthoformate (TEOF) a new polymer–polymer crosslinking agent. • Hydrogels displayed a good solution absorption capacity. • Hydrogels demonstrated good cytocompatibility. • Good blood clotting potential was shown by these scaffolds.

  1. Triethyl orthoformate mediated a novel crosslinking method for the preparation of hydrogels for tissue engineering applications: characterization and in vitro cytocompatibility analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yar, Muhammad; Shahzad, Sohail; Siddiqi, Saadat Anwar; Mahmood, Nasir; Rauf, Abdul; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham ur

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a new crosslinking method for the synthesis of novel hydrogel films from chitosan and PVA for potential use in various biomedical applications. These hydrogel membranes were synthesized by blending different ratios of chitosan (CS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) solutions and were crosslinked with 2.5% (w/v) triethyl orthoformate (TEOF) in the presence of 17% (w/v) sulfuric acid. The physical/chemical interactions and the presence of specific functional groups in the synthesized materials were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The morphology, structure and pore size of the materials were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) proved that these crosslinked hydrogel films have good thermal stability which was decreased as the CS ratio was increased. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) exhibited that CS and PVA were present in the amorphous form. The solution absorption properties were performed in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution of pH 7.4. The 20% PVA–80% CS crosslinked hydrogel films showed a greater degree of solution absorption (183%) as compared to other compositions. The hydrogels with greater CS concentration (60% and 80%) demonstrated relatively more porous structure, better cell viability and proliferation and also revealed good blood clotting ability even after crosslinking. Based on the observed facts these hydrogels can be tailored for their potential utilization in wound healing and skin tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • A new method for covalently crosslinking of chitosan and PVA. • Triethyl orthoformate (TEOF) a new polymer–polymer crosslinking agent. • Hydrogels displayed a good solution absorption capacity. • Hydrogels demonstrated good cytocompatibility. • Good blood clotting potential was shown by these scaffolds

  2. Preparation and characterization of 33S samples for 33S(n, α)30Si cross-section measurements at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praena, J.; Ferrer, F. J.; Vollenberg, W.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Fernández, B.; García-López, J.; Porras, I.; Quesada, J. M.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Barbagallo, M.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Dietz, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Durán, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Furman, V.; Göbel, K.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Heftrich, T.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Katabuchi, T.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Losito, R.; Mallick, A.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondelaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.; n TOF Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    Thin 33S samples for the study of the 33S(n, α)30Si cross-section at the n_TOF facility at CERN were made by thermal evaporation of 33S powder onto a dedicated substrate made of kapton covered with thin layers of copper, chromium and titanium. This method has provided for the first time bare sulfur samples a few centimeters in diameter. The samples have shown an excellent adherence with no mass loss after few years and no sublimation in vacuum at room temperature. The determination of the mass thickness of 33S has been performed by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The samples have been successfully tested under neutron irradiation.

  3. Measurement of the inclusive prompt photon cross section and preparation of the search of the Higgs boson decaying into 2 photons with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, H.

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the measurements with the ATLAS experiment of the cross section for inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √s=7 TeV. The first results are based on an integrated luminosity of 880 nb -1 and the later results are based on 36 pb -1 , collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurements performed with 880 nb -1 and 36 pb -1 cover the transverse energy range 15 GeV ≤ E T γ ≤ 100 GeV and 45 GeV ≤ E T γ -1 data collected by the ATLAS experiment in 2010 (and more recently with 210 pb -1 collected in 2011). Observed exclusion limits are quoted as a function of the Higgs mass in the range 110-140 GeV. (author)

  4. MRI before and after external beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer: The feasibility of monitoring of radiation-induced tissue changes using a dynamic contrast-enhanced inversion-prepared dual-contrast gradient echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franiel, Tobias; Luedemann, Lutz; Taupitz, Matthias; Boehmer, Dirk; Beyersdorff, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To identify and quantify suitable pharmacokinetic MRI parameters for monitoring tissue changes after external beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Material and methods: Six patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer (initial PSA, 6.0-81.4 ng/ml) underwent MRI at 1.5 T using a combined endorectal/body phased-array coil and a dynamic contrast-enhanced inversion-prepared dual-contrast gradient echo sequence (T1/T2*w; 1.65 s temporal resolution). MRI was performed before and immediately after radiotherapy, at 3 months and at 1 year. Perfusion, blood volume, mean transit time, delay, dispersion, interstitial volume, and extraction coefficient were calculated in prostate cancer and normal prostate for all four time points using a sequential 3-compartment model. Results: Prostate cancer and normal prostate tissue showed a statistically significant decrease in perfusion (p = 0.006, p = 0.001) and increase in extraction coefficient (p = 0.004, p 3 min, p = 0.028) and a smaller extraction coefficient (0.42 vs. 0.64, p = 0.028). Conclusions: Two pharmacokinetic parameters, perfusion and extraction coefficient, appear to be suitable candidates for monitoring the response to percutaneous intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

  5. Preparation of Preproinsulin Gene Construct Containing the Metallothionein2A (pBINDMTChIns and Its Expression in NIH3T3 Cell Line and Muscle Tissue of Alloxan Diabetic Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes mellitus type 1, formerly called insulin-dependent diabetes, is one of the autoimmune diseases where insulin-producing cells are destroyed by autoimmune response via T cells. The new approaches in treatment of diabetes are using the stem cells, cell transplantation of islet β cell, gene transfer by virus based plasmids, and non-viral gene constructs. Objectives The purpose of this study was to construct glucose inducible insulin gene plasmid and use it in the muscle tissue of the rabbit. Materials and Methods To achieve this goal, the preproinsulin, metallothionein2A promoter and the response element to carbohydrate genes were cloned into pBIND plasmid by standard cloning methods, to construct pBINDMTChIns. The gene cloning products were confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction enzyme digestion template. The recombinant plasmid, containing the preproinsulin gene, was transferred into NIH3T3 cells and insulin gene expression was evaluated by reverse transcriptase PCR and western blotting techniques. Plasmid naked DNA containing the preproinsulin gene was injected into the rabbits’ thigh muscles, and its expression was confirmed by western blotting method. Results This study shows the prepared gene construct is inducible by glucose. Gene expression of preproinsulin was observed in muscle tissue of rabbits. Conclusions These finding indicated that research in diabetes mellitus gene therapy could be performed on larger animals.

  6. Is the anesthesiologist actually prepared for loss of airway or respiratory function? A cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Vasconcelos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To identify compliance with the procedures for securing the airway of patients submitted to anesthesia, defined as highly recommended in the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist. Methods A prospective, cross-sectional, observational study was conducted with 87 patients aged 18 to 60 years, classified as ASA grade 1 or 2 according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Physical Status Classification. The study variables consisted of: whether the Mallampati test had been performed, whether equipment was readily available for orotracheal intubation, whether the correct placement of the endotracheal tube was verified, whether patient ventilation was monitored and whether fasting was confirmed. Prevalence ratios and their respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated as measures of relative risk. Statistical significance was defined at 5%. Results It was found that in 87.4% of patients, the airway was not evaluated using the Mallampati classification and in 51.7% of cases, preoperative fasting was not confirmed. In 29.9% of cases, the ready availability of equipment for orotracheal intubation was not verified. In all of the cases in which the availability of this equipment was not checked, the patient was submitted to regional anesthesia, with a statistically significant difference compared to the cases in which the patient was submitted to general anesthesia. Conclusion Measures considered essential for the safety of the patient during surgery are still being ignored.

  7. How prepared are young, rural women in India to address their sexual and reproductive health needs? a cross-sectional assessment of youth in Jharkhand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sushanta K; Andersen, Kathryn L; Warvadekar, Janardan; Aich, Paramita; Rawat, Amit; Upadhyay, Bimla

    2015-10-17

    Young, rural Indian women lack sexual and reproductive health (SRH) information and agency and are at risk of negative sexual and reproductive health outcomes. Youth-focused interventions have been shown to improve agency and self-efficacy of young women to make decisions regarding their sexual and reproductive health. The objectives of this study were to assess young women's sexual and reproductive health knowledge; describe their health-seeking behaviors; describe young women's experiences with sexual and reproductive health issues, including unwanted pregnancy and abortion; and identify sources of information, including media sources. A cross-sectional survey with a representative sample of 1381 married and unmarried women young women (15-24 years) from three rural community development blocks in Jharkhand, India was conducted in 2012. Participants were asked a series of questions related to their SRH knowledge and behavior, as well as questions related to their agency in several domains related to self-efficacy and decision-making. Linear regression was used to assess factors associated with greater or less individual agency and to determine differences in SRH knowledge and behavior between married and unmarried women. Despite national policies, participants married young (mean 15.7 years) and bore children early (53 % with first birth by 17 years). Women achieved low composite scores on knowledge around sex and pregnancy, contraception, and abortion knowledge. Around 3 % of married young women reported experiencing induced abortion; 92 % of these women used private or illegal providers. Married and unmarried women also had limited agency in decision-making, freedom of mobility, self-efficacy, and financial resources. Most of the women in the sample received SRH information by word of mouth. Lack of knowledge about sexual and reproductive health in this context indicates that young rural Indian women would benefit from a youth-friendly SRH intervention to

  8. Preparation of a non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric with partially embedded apatite surface for bone tissue engineering applications by partial surface melting of poly(ε-caprolactone) fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Ae; Rhee, Sang-Hoon

    2017-07-01

    This article describes a novel method for the preparation of a biodegradable non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric with a partially embedded apatite surface designed for application as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. The non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric was generated by the electro-spinning technique and then apatite was coated in simulated body fluid after coating the PVA solution containing CaCl 2 ·2H 2 O. The apatite crystals were partially embedded or fully embedded into the thermoplastic poly(ε-caprolactone) fibers by controlling the degree of poly(ε-caprolactone) fiber surface melting in a convection oven. Identical apatite-coated poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric that did not undergo heat-treatment was used as a control. The features of the embedded apatite crystals were evaluated by FE-SEM, AFM, EDS, and XRD. The adhesion strengths of the coated apatite layers and the tensile strengths of the apatite coated fabrics with and without heat-treatment were assessed by the tape-test and a universal testing machine, respectively. The degree of water absorbance was assessed by adding a DMEM droplet onto the fabrics. Moreover, cell penetrability was assessed by seeding preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells onto the fabrics and observing the degrees of cell penetration after 1 and 4 weeks by staining nuclei with DAPI. The non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric with a partially embedded apatite surface showed good water absorbance, cell penetrability, higher apatite adhesion strength, and higher tensile strength compared with the control fabric. These results show that the non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric with a partially embedded apatite surface is a potential candidate scaffold for bone tissue engineering due to its strong apatite adhesion strength and excellent cell penetrability. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1973-1983, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Stratum corneum lipid liposome-encapsulated panomycocin: preparation, characterization, and the determination of antimycotic efficacy against Candida spp. isolated from patients with vulvovaginitis in an in vitro human vaginal epithelium tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İzgü, Fatih; Bayram, Günce; Tosun, Kübra; İzgü, Demet

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a liposomal lyophilized powder formulation of panomycocin was developed for therapeutic purposes against vulvovaginal candidiasis which affects 80% of women worldwide. Panomycocin is a potent antimycotic protein secreted by the yeast Wickerhamomyces anomalus NCYC 434. This study involved the preparation of panomycocin-loaded stratum corneum lipid liposomes (SCLLs), characterization of the SCLLs, and determination of antimycotic efficacy of the formulation against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata clinical vaginal isolates in a human vaginal epithelium tissue model. The encapsulation and loading efficiencies of SCLLs were 73% and 76.8%, respectively. In transmission electron microscopy images, the SCLLs appeared in the submicron size range. Dynamic light scattering analyses showed that the SCLLs had uniform size distribution. Zeta potential measurements revealed stable and positively charged SCLLs. In Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses, no irreversible interactions between the encapsulated panomycocin and the SCLLs were detected. The SCLLs retained >98% of encapsulated panomycocin in aqueous solution up to 12 hours. The formulation was fungicidal at the same minimum fungicidal concentration values for non-formulated pure panomycocin when tested on an in vitro model of vaginal candidiasis. This is the first study in which SCLLs and a protein as an active ingredient have been utilized together in a formulation. The results obtained in this study led us to conduct further preclinical trials of this formulation for the development of an effective topical anti-candidal drug with improved safety.

  10. From whole-body sections down to cellular level, multiscale imaging of phospholipids by MALDI mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurand, Pierre; Cornett, Dale S; Angel, Peggi M; Caprioli, Richard M

    2011-02-01

    Significant progress in instrumentation and sample preparation approaches have recently expanded the potential of MALDI imaging mass spectrometry to the analysis of phospholipids and other endogenous metabolites naturally occurring in tissue specimens. Here we explore some of the requirements necessary for the successful analysis and imaging of phospholipids from thin tissue sections of various dimensions by MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We address methodology issues relative to the imaging of whole-body sections such as those cut from model laboratory animals, sections of intermediate dimensions typically prepared from individual organs, as well as the requirements for imaging areas of interests from these sections at a cellular scale spatial resolution. We also review existing limitations of MALDI imaging MS technology relative to compound identification. Finally, we conclude with a perspective on important issues relative to data exploitation and management that need to be solved to maximize biological understanding of the tissue specimen investigated.

  11. Técnicas de coloração para detecção de Encephalitozoon cuniculi em cortes histológicos Stain techniques for detection of Encephalitozoon cuniculi in tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Anete Lallo

    2010-11-01

    embedded in plastic resin. Gram-Chromotrope, Brown-Hopps and Ziehl-Neelsen staining techniques permitted the best visualization of the spores for the diagnosis of E. cuniculi in histological paraffin embedded sections, since they allowed the clear differentiation of the spores among other tissue structures. In tissues embedded in plastic resin, toluidine blue-fuchsin and toluidine blue stainings also facilitate the finding of the agent. On the other hand, the trichrome technique showed great variability on results, therefore, allowing the identification of the parasite in tissue. The other techniques, H-E, calcofluor, Grocott, Giemsa and PAS did not permited the easy identification of the E. cuniculi spores.

  12. Tumor tissue slice cultures as a platform for analyzing tissue-penetration and biological activities of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Lea; Höbel, Sabrina; Kallendrusch, Sonja; Ewe, Alexander; Bechmann, Ingo; Franke, Heike; Merz, Felicitas; Aigner, Achim

    2017-03-01

    The success of therapeutic nanoparticles depends, among others, on their ability to penetrate a tissue for actually reaching the target cells, and their efficient cellular uptake in the context of intact tissue and stroma. Various nanoparticle modifications have been implemented for altering physicochemical and biological properties. Their analysis, however, so far mainly relies on cell culture experiments which only poorly reflect the in vivo situation, or is based on in vivo experiments that are often complicated by whole-body pharmacokinetics and are rather tedious especially when analyzing larger nanoparticle sets. For the more precise analysis of nanoparticle properties at their desired site of action, efficient ex vivo systems closely mimicking in vivo tissue properties are needed. In this paper, we describe the setup of organotypic tumor tissue slice cultures for the analysis of tissue-penetrating properties and biological activities of nanoparticles. As a model system, we employ 350μm thick slice cultures from different tumor xenograft tissues, and analyze modified or non-modified polyethylenimine (PEI) complexes as well as their lipopolyplex derivatives for siRNA delivery. The described conditions for tissue slice preparation and culture ensure excellent tissue preservation for at least 14days, thus allowing for prolonged experimentation and analysis. When using fluorescently labeled siRNA for complex visualization, fluorescence microscopy of cryo-sectioned tissue slices reveals different degrees of nanoparticle tissue penetration, dependent on their surface charge. More importantly, the determination of siRNA-mediated knockdown efficacies of an endogenous target gene, the oncogenic survival factor Survivin, reveals the possibility to accurately assess biological nanoparticle activities in situ, i.e. in living cells in their original environment. Taken together, we establish tumor (xenograft) tissue slices for the accurate and facile ex vivo assessment of

  13. Improved histopathological evaluation of gliomas using tissue fragments obtained by ultrasonic aspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neckelmann, K; Kristensen, B W; Schrøder, H D

    2004-01-01

    included in the biopsy removed for peroperative frozen section investigation. When the slides with Sonocut tissue fragments were analyzed, the probability of making the most malignant diagnosis increased from 81.3% - 99.1%, when slides from 1 - 5 paraffin blocks were analyzed, respectively. When subgroups...... of small, medium and big tumors were analyzed, it was found that only 2 paraffin blocks from small tumors need to be prepared to reach 98.3% probability of making the most malignant diagnosis, whereas 5 paraffin blocks from big tumors need to be prepared to reach a 96.8% probability. In conclusion......, the study shows that a limited amount of Sonocut ultrasonic tissue fragments improve the diagnostic evaluation of gliomas. These tissue fragments therefore must not be discarded. Only few paraffin blocks need to be prepared to reach close to 100% probability of making the most malignant diagnosis, reducing...

  14. Complete solubilization of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue may improve proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Taylor, Clive R; Fowler, Carol B; Mason, Jeffrey T

    2013-04-01

    Tissue-based proteomic approaches (tissue proteomics) are essential for discovering and evaluating biomarkers for personalized medicine. In any proteomics study, the most critical issue is sample extraction and preparation. This problem is especially difficult when recovering proteins from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. However, improving and standardizing protein extraction from FFPE tissue is a critical need because of the millions of archival FFPE tissues available in tissue banks worldwide. Recent progress in the application of heat-induced antigen retrieval principles for protein extraction from FFPE tissue has resulted in a number of published FFPE tissue proteomics studies. However, there is currently no consensus on the optimal protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue or accepted standards for quantitative evaluation of the extracts. Standardization is critical to ensure the accurate evaluation of FFPE protein extracts by proteomic methods such as reverse phase protein arrays, which is now in clinical use. In our view, complete solubilization of FFPE tissue samples is the best way to achieve the goal of standardizing the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues. However, further studies are recommended to develop standardized protein extraction methods to ensure quantitative and qualitative reproducibility in the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Cesarean Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... birth after a C-section, called a VBAC ) Emergency C-Sections Some C-sections are unexpected emergency ... side to nurse or using the clutch (or football) hold can take the pressure off your abdomen. ...

  16. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, Alister J; Sandison, Ann; Quinn, Paul; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Sampson, Barry; Atkinson, Kirk D; Skinner, John A; Goode, Angela; Powell, Jonathan J

    2009-01-01

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  17. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Alister J [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Sandison, Ann [Department of Histopathology, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Quinn, Paul; Mosselmans, J Frederick W [Science Division, Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Sampson, Barry [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Atkinson, Kirk D [8 Nuclear Department Defence Academy College of Management and Technology HMS Sultan Military Road Gosport PO12 3BY (United Kingdom); Skinner, John A [Department of Orthopaedics, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Goode, Angela [Dept of Materials, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Powell, Jonathan J, E-mail: Paul.Quinn@diamond.ac.u [Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research Centre, Cambridge CB1 9NL (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  18. Tissue types (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  19. Tissue Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Leemput, Koen; Puonti, Oula

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for automatically segmenting magnetic resonance images of the brain have seen tremendous advances in recent years. So-called tissue classification techniques, aimed at extracting the three main brain tissue classes (white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid), are now...... well established. In their simplest form, these methods classify voxels independently based on their intensity alone, although much more sophisticated models are typically used in practice. This article aims to give an overview of often-used computational techniques for brain tissue classification...

  20. 3D on-chip microscopy of optically cleared tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Shin, Yoonjung; Sung, Kevin; Yang, Sam; Chen, Harrison; Wang, Hongda; Teng, Da; Rivenson, Yair; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2018-02-01

    Traditional pathology relies on tissue biopsy, micro-sectioning, immunohistochemistry and microscopic imaging, which are relatively expensive and labor-intensive, and therefore are less accessible in resource-limited areas. Low-cost tissue clearing techniques, such as the simplified CLARITY method (SCM), are promising to potentially reduce the cost of disease diagnosis by providing 3D imaging and phenotyping of thicker tissue samples with simpler preparation steps. However, the mainstream imaging approach for cleared tissue, fluorescence microscopy, suffers from high-cost, photobleaching and signal fading. As an alternative approach to fluorescence, here we demonstrate 3D imaging of SCMcleared tissue using on-chip holography, which is based on pixel-super-resolution and multi-height phase recovery algorithms to digitally compute the sample's amplitude and phase images at various z-slices/depths through the sample. The tissue clearing procedures and the lens-free imaging system were jointly optimized to find the best illumination wavelength, tissue thickness, staining solution pH, and the number of hologram heights to maximize the imaged tissue volume, minimize the amount of acquired data, while maintaining a high contrast-to-noise ratio for the imaged cells. After this optimization, we achieved 3D imaging of a 200-μm thick cleared mouse brain tissue over a field-of-view of based microscope (20× 0.75NA). Moreover, the lens-free microscope achieves an order-of-magnitude better data efficiency compared to its lens-based counterparts for volumetric imaging of samples. The presented low-cost and high-throughput lens-free tissue imaging technique enabled by CLARITY can be used in various biomedical applications in low-resource-settings.

  1. Stented Vessels: A Challenge for Histological Preparation and Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nolte

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The first procedure to treat blocked coronary arteries was coronary artery bypass graft surgery. In 1977, Andreas Gruntzig introduced percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA. Today, several stent systems exist ranging from bare metal stents to various drug-eluting stents. Unfortunately, our understanding of the arterial reaction to stent implantation is incomplete – primarily due to technical limitations in the histological study of stented vascular tissue. Methods: In our study, we examined different histological preparation methods based on the embedding material methacrylate. The procedure of embedding and sectioning stented porcine arteries was optimized for the specific requirements, like histochemistry, immunohistochemistry or pre-stained fluorescence. Furthermore, we used a microscopical technique described as fluorescence intensity decay shape analysis microscopy (FIDSAM to eliminate auto-fluorescence from fluorescently labeled tissue. Results: The sections were suitable for histochemical and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, pre-labeled fluorescence in the porcine tissue was not lost by the embedding process. The evaluation of arterial cross sections with FIDSAM technology gave new, very important insights into the examination possibilities of fluorescently labeled tissue. Conclusions: Future studies of the vascular response to a variety of new stent materials will provide important clues to the pathogenesis resulting in restenosis and occlusion of stents. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2013; 1(3.000: 104-112

  2. Application of SEM and EDX in studying biomineralization in plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Honghua; Kirilak, Yaowanuj

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes protocols using formalin-acetic acid-alcohol (FAA) to fix plant tissues for studying biomineralization by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and qualitative energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). Specimen preparation protocols for SEM and EDX mainly include fixation, dehydration, critical point drying (CPD), mounting, and coating. Gold-coated specimens are used for SEM imaging, while gold- and carbon-coated specimens are prepared for qualitative X-ray microanalyses separately to obtain complementary information on the elemental compositions of biominerals. During the specimen preparation procedure for SEM, some biominerals may be dislodged or scattered, making it difficult to determine their accurate locations, and light microscopy is used to complement SEM studies. Specimen preparation protocols for light microscopy generally include fixation, dehydration, infiltration and embedding with resin, microtome sectioning, and staining. In addition, microwave processing methods are adopted here to speed up the specimen preparation process for both SEM and light microscopy.

  3. Solution preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reviewed in this statement are methods of preparing solutions to be used in laboratory experiments to examine technical issues related to the safe disposal of nuclear waste from power generation. Each approach currently used to prepare solutions has advantages and any one approach may be preferred over the others in particular situations, depending upon the goals of the experimental program. These advantages are highlighted herein for three approaches to solution preparation that are currently used most in studies of nuclear waste disposal. Discussion of the disadvantages of each approach is presented to help a user select a preparation method for his particular studies. Also presented in this statement are general observations regarding solution preparation. These observations are used as examples of the types of concerns that need to be addressed regarding solution preparation. As shown by these examples, prior to experimentation or chemical analyses, laboratory techniques based on scientific knowledge of solutions can be applied to solutions, often resulting in great improvement in the usefulness of results

  4. ACVP-14: Next-Generation Multiplex vRNA and vDNA Lineage Specific In Situ Hybridization Detection With Immunohisto-Fluorescence or Chromogen in the Same Tissue Section with Quantitative Image Analysis in Fixed Tissues from Virally Infected Specimens | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tissue Analysis Core within the AIDS and Cancer Virus Program will process, embed and perform microtomy on fixed tissue samples presented in ethanol. HIV/SIVin situhybridization for detection of vRNA and vDNA will be performed using the next-gene

  5. Digital quantification of fibrosis in liver biopsy sections: description of a new method by Photoshop software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahab, Gamal M; Kheriza, Mohamed M; El-Beltagi, Hussien M; Fouda, Abdel-Motaal M; El-Din, Osama A Sharaf

    2004-01-01

    The precise quantification of fibrous tissue in liver biopsy sections is extremely important in the classification, diagnosis and grading of chronic liver disease, as well as in evaluating the response to antifibrotic therapy. Because the recently described methods of digital image analysis of fibrosis in liver biopsy sections have major flaws, including the use of out-dated techniques in image processing, inadequate precision and inability to detect and quantify perisinusoidal fibrosis, we developed a new technique in computerized image analysis of liver biopsy sections based on Adobe Photoshop software. We prepared an experimental model of liver fibrosis involving treatment of rats with oral CCl4 for 6 weeks. After staining liver sections with Masson's trichrome, a series of computer operations were performed including (i) reconstitution of seamless widefield images from a number of acquired fields of liver sections; (ii) image size and solution adjustment; (iii) color correction; (iv) digital selection of a specified color range representing all fibrous tissue in the image and; (v) extraction and calculation. This technique is fully computerized with no manual interference at any step, and thus could be very reliable for objectively quantifying any pattern of fibrosis in liver biopsy sections and in assessing the response to antifibrotic therapy. It could also be a valuable tool in the precise assessment of antifibrotic therapy to other tissue regardless of the pattern of tissue or fibrosis.

  6. Detailed sectional anatomy of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschning, W.

    1985-01-01

    Morphologic studies on the human spine constitute a special challenge because of the spine's complex topographic anatomy and the intimate relationship between the supporting skeleton and the contiguous soft tissues (muscles, discs, joint capsules) as well as the neurovascular contents of the spinal canal and intervertebral foramina. The improving resolution and multiplanar image reformatting capabilities of modern CT scanners call for accurate anatomic reference material. Such anatomic images should be available without distortion, in natural colors, and in considerable detail. The images should present the anatomy in the correct axial, sagittal, and coronal planes and should also be sufficiently closely spaced so as to follow the thin cuts of modern CT scanners. This chapter details one of several recent attempts to correlate gross anatomy with the images depicted by high-resolution CT. The methods of specimen preparation, sectioning, and photographing have been documented elsewhere

  7. Brain Slice Staining and Preparation for Three-Dimensional Super-Resolution Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Christopher L.; Gudheti, Manasa V.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2018-01-01

    Localization microscopy techniques – such as photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), fluorescent PALM (FPALM), ground state depletion (GSD), and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) – provide the highest precision for single molecule localization currently available. However, localization microscopy has been largely limited to cell cultures due to the difficulties that arise in imaging thicker tissue sections. Sample fixation and antibody staining, background fluorescence, fluorophore photoinstability, light scattering in thick sections, and sample movement create significant challenges for imaging intact tissue. We have developed a sample preparation and image acquisition protocol to address these challenges in rat brain slices. The sample preparation combined multiple fixation steps, saponin permeabilization, and tissue clarification. Together, these preserve intracellular structures, promote antibody penetration, reduce background fluorescence and light scattering, and allow acquisition of images deep in a 30 μm thick slice. Image acquisition challenges were resolved by overlaying samples with a permeable agarose pad and custom-built stainless steel imaging adapter, and sealing the imaging chamber. This approach kept slices flat, immobile, bathed in imaging buffer, and prevented buffer oxidation during imaging. Using this protocol, we consistently obtained single molecule localizations of synaptic vesicle and active zone proteins in three-dimensions within individual synaptic terminals of the striatum in rat brain slices. These techniques may be easily adapted to the preparation and imaging of other tissues, substantially broadening the application of super-resolution imaging. PMID:28924666

  8. Sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Sample preparation prior to HPLC analysis is certainly one of the most important steps to consider in trace or ultratrace analysis. For many years scientists have tried to simplify the sample preparation process. It is rarely possible to inject a neat liquid sample or a sample where preparation may not be any more complex than dissolution of the sample in a given solvent. The last process alone can remove insoluble materials, which is especially helpful with the samples in complex matrices if other interactions do not affect extraction. Here, it is very likely a large number of components will not dissolve and are, therefore, eliminated by a simple filtration process. In most cases, the process of sample preparation is not as simple as dissolution of the component interest. At times, enrichment is necessary, that is, the component of interest is present in very large volume or mass of material. It needs to be concentrated in some manner so a small volume of the concentrated or enriched sample can be injected into HPLC. 88 refs

  9. Preparing Engineers for Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvoort, H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I introduce the contributions to a special section of the journal: one devoted to the question of how engineering curricula can or should contribute to the preparation of graduates for socially responsible decision making and conduct. The special section is motivated by the circumstance that, although there is broad agreement that…

  10. Study on fluorouracil–chitosan nanoparticle preparation and its antitumor effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaimin Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To successfully prepare fluorouracil–chitosan nanoparticles, and further analyze its anti-tumor activity mechanism, this paper makes a comprehensive study of existing preparation prescription and makes a detailed analysis of fluorouracil–chitosan in vitro release and pharmacodynamic behavior of animals. Two-step synthesis method is adopted to prepare 5-FU–CS–mPEG prodrugs, and infrared, 1H NMR and differential thermal analysis are adopted to analyze characterization synthetic products of prepared drugs. To ensure clinical efficacy of prepared drugs, UV spectrophotometry is adopted for determination of drug loading capacity of prepared drugs, transmission electron microscopy is adopted to observe the appearance, dynamic dialysis method is used to observe in vitro drug release of prepared drugs and fitting of various release models is done. Anti-tumor effect is studied via level of animal pharmacodynamics. After the end of the experiment, tumor inhibition rate, spleen index and thymus index of drugs are calculated. Experimental results show that the prepared drugs are qualified in terms of regular shape, dispersion, drug content, etc. Animal pharmacodynamics experiments have shown that concentration level of drug loading capacity of prepared drugs has a direct impact on anti-tumor rate. The higher the concentration, the higher the anti-tumor rate. Results of pathological tissue sections of mice show that the prepared drugs cause varying degrees of damage to receptor cells, resulting in cell necrosis or apoptosis problem. It can thus be concluded that ion gel method is an effective method to prepare drug-loading nanoparticles, with prepared nanoparticles evenly distributed in regular shape which demonstrate good slow-release characteristics in receptor vitro and vivo. At the same time, after completion of drug preparation, relatively strong anti-tumor activity can be generated for the receptor, so this mode of preparation enjoys broad

  11. The IAEA co-ordinated research programme on improvement of measurements, theoretical computations and evaluations of neutron induced helium production cross sections. Status report. Prepared at the final CRP meeting in Sendai, Japan 25-29 September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.

    1996-12-01

    The present report describes the results of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Improvements of Measurements, Theoretical Computation and Evaluations of Neutron Induced Helium Production Cross Sections''. Summarized is the progress achieved under the CRP in the following areas: measurements of α-production cross sections for structural materials, theoretical computations at (nα) cross sections; measurements of activation cross sections; and improvement of experimental methods for (n,α) investigations. The status report gives also short summaries on the work of each laboratory which contributed to the results of the CRP. Attached is the list of program members and participants of CRP meetings. (author). Refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  12. Preparation and characterization of three 7Be targets for the measurement of the 7Be(n, p)7Li and 7Be(n, α)7Li reaction cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, E. A.; Heinitz, S.; Dressler, R.; Barbagallo, M.; Ulrich, J.; Schumann, D.; Colonna, N.; Köster, U.; Ayranov, M.; Vontobel, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Schell, J.; Correia, J. Martins; Stora, T.; n TOF Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    This manuscript describes the production of three targets obtained by implantation of different activities of 7Be into thin aluminium disks. Two of the produced targets were used to measure the 7Be(n, p)7Li cross section in the energy range of interest for the Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis. A third target was used to measure the cross sections of 7Be(n, p)7Li and 7Be(n, α)7Li nuclear reactions with cold and thermal neutrons, respectively. This paper describes also the characterization of the first two targets, performed after the neutron irradiation, in terms of implanted 7Be activities and spatial distributions.

  13. Evaluation of a fluorescence-labelled oligonucleotide tide probe targeting 23S rRNA for in situ detection of Salmonella serovars in paraffin-embedded tissue sections and their rapid identification in bacterial smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Steen; Christensen, H.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1997-01-01

    with the probe. The probe did not hybridize to serovars from subspecies IIIa (S. arizonae) or to S. bongori. No cross-reaction to 64 other strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae or 18 other bacterial strains outside this family was observed. The probe was tested with sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin...

  14. Tissue irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in-vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood-carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170

  15. A comparative study of the effectiveness of early and delayed loading of short tissue-level dental implants with hydrophilic surfaces placed in the posterior section of the mandible-A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiecki, Arkadiusz; Botzenhart, Ute; Seeliger, Julia; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Biocev, Peter; Dominiak, Marzena

    2017-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the primary and secondary stability of tissue-level short dental titanium implants with polished necks and hydrophilic surfaces of two different designs and manufacturers. The first implant system used (SPI ® ELEMENT RC INICELL titanium implants, Thommen Medical AG, Grenchen, Switzerland), allowed functional loading 6 weeks after its placement, whereas the second implant system (RN SLActiv ® tissue-level titanium implants, Straumann GmbH, Fribourg, Germany), was loaded after 15 weeks. The degree of primary and secondary stability was determined using an Osstell ISQ measuring device. Marginal bone loss (MBL) was evaluated radiographically 12 and 24 weeks after implantation and the Wachtel's healing index as well as the patient's satisfaction with the treatment was registered on a VAS scale. The intergroup comparison revealed significant differences in terms of primary stability as well as differences in MBL 3 months after the procedure, but no significant differences could be found after 6 months and for secondary stability. The primary stability was significantly higher for Thommen ® compared to Straumann ® implants. Insertion of short dental implants with a hydrophilic conditioned surface significantly shortens patient treatment time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Embedding, serial sectioning and staining of zebrafish embryos using JB-4 resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Brown, Jessica; Bisher, Margaret E; Burdine, Rebecca D

    2011-01-01

    Histological techniques are critical for observing tissue and cellular morphology. In this paper, we outline our protocol for embedding, serial sectioning, staining and visualizing zebrafish embryos embedded in JB-4 plastic resin-a glycol methacrylate-based medium that results in excellent preservation of tissue morphology. In addition, we describe our procedures for staining plastic sections with toluidine blue or hematoxylin and eosin, and show how to couple these stains with whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization. We also describe how to maintain and visualize immunofluorescence and EGFP signals in JB-4 resin. The protocol we outline-from embryo preparation, embedding, sectioning and staining to visualization-can be accomplished in 3 d. Overall, we reinforce that plastic embedding can provide higher resolution of cellular details and is a valuable tool for cellular and morphological studies in zebrafish.

  17. 40 CFR 761.323 - Sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample preparation. 761.323 Section... Remediation Waste Samples § 761.323 Sample preparation. (a) The comparison study requires analysis of a... concentrations by dilution. Any excess material resulting from the preparation of these samples, which is not...

  18. Radioprotective preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, D.; Frattadochi, A.; Gattavecchia, E.; Ferri, E.; Tonnelli, D.

    1988-01-01

    The invention is intended for radiation injuries prophylaxis in mammals. It has an well expressed radioprotective effect against acute gamma irradiation on cellular level as well as a prolonged action when applied up to 48 hours before the acute irradiation. The preparation is a coprecipitate of the natural tripeptide glutathione (reduced form) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (pvp) in ratio 30-60/70-40. It is obtained by incubation method with subsequent lyophilization from water solution of the initial components. The molecular mass of the pvp is 20 till 360.10 3 . 2 claims

  19. Target preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinn, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    A few of the more interesting of the 210 targets prepared in the Laboratory last year are listed. In addition the author continues to use powdered silver mixed with /sup 9,10/BeO to produce sources for accelerator radio dating of Alaskan and South Polar snow. Currently, he is trying to increase production by multiple sample processing. Also the author routinely makes 3 μg/cm 2 cracked slacked carbon stripper foils and is continuing research with some degree of success in making enriched 28 Si targets starting with the oxide

  20. [Immunocytochemical demonstration of astrocytes in brain sections combined with Nissl staining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhevskiĭ, D E; Otellin, V A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop an easy and reliable protocol of combined preparation staining, which would unite the advantages of immunocytochemical demonstration of astrocytes with the availability to evaluate functional state of neurons provided by Nissl technique. The presented protocol of paraffin sections processing allows to retain high quality of tissue structure and provides for selective demonstration of astrocytes using the monoclonal antibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein and contrast Nissl staining of cells. The protocol can be used without any changes for processing of brain sections obtained from the humans and other mammals with the exception of mice and rabbits.

  1. High-Throughput Method of Whole-Brain Sectioning, Using the Tape-Transfer Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinskiy, Vadim; Jones, Jamie; Tolpygo, Alexander S; Franciotti, Neil; Weber, Kevin; Mitra, Partha P

    2015-01-01

    Cryostat sectioning is a popular but labor-intensive method for preparing histological brain sections. We have developed a modification of the commercially available CryoJane tape collection method that significantly improves the ease of collection and the final quality of the tissue sections. The key modification involves an array of UVLEDs to achieve uniform polymerization of the glass slide and robust adhesion between the section and slide. This report presents system components and detailed procedural steps, and provides examples of end results; that is, 20 μm mouse brain sections that have been successfully processed for routine Nissl, myelin staining, DAB histochemistry, and fluorescence. The method is also suitable for larger brains, such as rat and monkey.

  2. Inhibition of proliferative activity in tissue culture in vivo of esophagus and stomach tumour cells under preoperative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinchenko, V.A.; Okulov, L.V.; Gol'dshmid, B.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of proliferative activity of tumor cells as a result of radiation effect. Tumor tissue taken from patiets with preoperative tumor irradiation by 30 Gy cumulative dose (5 Gy per a session) and from patients whose tumors were not subjected to irradiation (control) was used. The tumor tissue was cultivated in the diffusion chamber and then implanted to the abdominal cavity of the non-inbred male rats. On preparations in the growth area pathomorphological changes were evaluated, the share of mitotically dividing and DNA-synthesizing cells was determined. The absence of growth area around the explant, obvious reduction of mitotic activity and DNA-synthesizing function of cells in preparations of irradiated tumors in 88 % of cases testify to the inhibition of the stomach cardial section and esophagus tumor tissue repopulation after radiation effect. The investigation results confirm the advisability of preoperative irradiation of patients with tumors of the given localization

  3. Tritium-labelled leukotriene B4 binding to the guinea-pig spleen membrane preparation: a rich tissue source for a high-affinity leukotriene B4 receptor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, J.B.; Cheng, E.I.; Kohi, F.; Townley, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    Intact human granulocytes contain a leukotriene (LT) B4 receptor binding site, but the limited supply of these cells could adversely affect further progress of the study of this receptor. To select a tissue homogenate rich for this site, we have characterized the binding of highly specific [ 3 H]LTB4 to guinea-pig spleen membranes and we have determined the ability of LTB4 to compete with [ 3 H]LTB4 for binding sites in the membranes of 10 nonspleen tissues. In the spleen membrane, MgCl2 and CaCl2 enhanced [ 3 H]LTB4 binding, but NaCl and KCl decreased it. Spleen [ 3 H] LTB4 binding was a function of protein concentration and was rapid, reversible, stereoselective and saturable. Kinetic analyses showed that the rate constant for association and dissociation at 25 0 C was 0.47 nM-1 min-1 and 0.099 min-1, respectively. A Scatchard plot of the data of the equilibrium experiment resulted a straight line with a dissociation constant of 1.8 nM and a density of 274 fmol/mg of protein. Moreover, the LTB4/[ 3 H]LTB4 competition study performed at 4 or 25 0 C revealed the inhibitory constant (Ki) of LTB4 to be in the nanomolar range. The rank order of agents competing for spleen [ 3 H]LTB4 binding was: LTB4 (Ki = 2.8 nM) greater than 20-hydroxy-LTB4 (23 nM) greater than LTA4 (48 nM) greater than LTA4 methyl ester (0.13 microM) greater than 20-carboxy-LTB4 (greater than 6.6 microM) greater than or equal to arachidonic acid (0.15mM) = FPL-55,712 and FPL-57,231 (0.1-0.2 mM). Competition studies further indicated that felodipine, a 1,4-dihyropyridine Ca++ channel blocker, exhibited micromolar inhibition of spleen [ 3 H]LTB4 binding

  4. Tissue grown in space in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. Final samples from Mir and Earth appeared histologically cartilaginous throughout their entire cross sections (5-8 mm thick), with the exception of fibrous outer capsules. Constructs grown on Earth (A) appeared to have a more organized extracellular matrix with more uniform collagen orientation as compared with constructs grown on Mir (B), but the average collagen fiber diameter was similar in the two groups (22 +- 2 nm) and comparable to that previously reported for developing articular cartilage. Randomly oriented collagen in Mir samples would be consistent with previous reports that microgravity disrupts fibrillogenesis. These are transmission electron micrographs of constructs from Mir (A) and Earth (B) groups at magnifications of x3,500 and x120,000 (Inset). The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  5. Implementation of immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus in persistently infected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedeković Tomislav

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea is a contagious disease of domestic and wild ruminants and one of the most economically important diseases in cattle. Bovine viral diarrhea virus belongs to the genus Pestivirus, within the family Flaviviridae. The identification and elimination of the persistently infected animals from herds is the initial step in the control and eradication programs. It is therefore necessary to have reliable methods for diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus. One of those methods is immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue is a routine technique in diagnosis of persistently infected cattle from ear notch tissue samples. However, such technique is inappropriate due to complicated tissue fixation process and it requires more days for preparation. On the contrary, immunohistochemistry on frozen tissue was usually applied on organs from dead animals. In this paper, for the first time, the imunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples was described. Findings Seventeen ear notch tissue samples were obtained during the period 2008-2009 from persistently infected cattle. Samples were fixed in liquid nitrogen and stored on -20°C until testing. Ear notch tissue samples from all persistently infected cattle showed positive results with good section quality and possibility to determinate type of infected cells. Conclusions Although the number of samples was limited, this study indicated that immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue can be successfully replaced with immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of persistently infected cattle.

  6. [Tissue-specific nucleoprotein complexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riadnova, I Iu; Shataeva, L K; Khavinson, V Kh

    2000-01-01

    A method of isolation of native nucleorprotein complexes from cattle cerebral cortex, thymus, and liver was developed. Compositions of these complexes were studied by means of gel-chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography. These preparations were shown to consist of several fractions of proteins and their complexes differ by molecular mass and electro-chemical properties. Native nucleoprotein complexes revealed high tissue specific activity, which was not species-specific.

  7. Preparation, characterization and use of a reference material to proficiency testing for determination of metals in fish tissue in natura; Preparo, caracterizacao e uso de um material de referencia para ensaios de proficiencia para determinacao de metais em tecido de peixe in natura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Luciana Vieira de

    2013-07-01

    The proficiency tests are widely used to evaluate the analytical capacity of laboratories and also as part of the accreditation process. For this reason, are important tools for the control of the quality of the analytical results obtained in the laboratories that work directly with seafood companies. In Brazil there are no providers of proficiency testing for metals potentially toxic in fish tissues. In this work will be described all steps used for the production of reference materials to be used in a proficiency testing pilot study for As, Cd, Pb and Hg in fish tissue following the recommendations of the ISO Guide 35. He preparation scheme consisted in selecting the individuals, cleaning, grinding, homogenization and fortification with As, Cd and Pb in two concentration levels. The preparation resulted in 164 sachets of 10 g each. In order to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation in the samples conservation 52 sachets were irradiated with {sup 60}Co (10.00 {+-} 1.05 kGy) in a gamma cell. This material with others non irradiated 52 sachets were used for the homogeneity and stability studies. The remaining 60 were used for the proficiency testing. The results demonstrated that both materials were homogeneous and presented good stability (during a period of 45 days). However, the irradiated material present better integrity, concerning biological degradation, when stored in ambient temperature. For this reason they were used to the proficiency testing pilot program. Ten laboratories participated in the proficiency testing pilot study and the results were evaluated using the following tests: z-score, confidence ellipse and En numbers. This work demonstrates the capability of the laboratory to produce reference materials as well as to organize and conduct proficiency testing. (author)

  8. Environmental Impact Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Section is concerned with preparation of environmental statements and assessments and development of assessment methodologies for energy technologies. During 1976, activities involved nuclear, fossil, and geothermal energy; this work was supported by the U.S.Army, HUD, US ERDA, and US NRC. Two special studies--one on the effects of power plant intake structures on fish impingement and another on multiple uses of cooling lakes--were completed and should serve as references for future analyses. Two research projects sponsored by NRC--the Unified Transport Approach (UTA) to Power Plant Assessment and the Environmental Monitoring Data Evaluation Study--were continued. The purpose of the UA program is to develop fast-transient, one- and two-dimensional transport models for estimating thermal, radiological, chemical, and biological impacts in complicated water bodies. The impact of public use of various products that contain radioactive isotope is being evaluated. The Environmental Impact Sections assistance to NRC expanded to include assessments of fuel-fabrication facilities being considered for relicensing and two uranium in-situ solution mining facility proposals. The work for HUD comprises an assessment of the first application of MIUS in a new town development. A generic environmental statement was prepared and an environmental monitoring program for the facility was designed

  9. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  10. Avaliação de combinações de técnicas alternativas de construção e montagem de blocos de tissue microarray Evaluation of alternative technique combinations of building and preparation of tissue microarrays blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Tiburtino dos Santos Junior

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO E OBJETIVOS: O objetivo deste estudo foi pesquisar diferentes métodos alternativos de tissue microarray (TMA à técnica original e conduzir adaptações desses, combinando diferentes métodos de punção das amostras teciduais e de montagem dos blocos de TMA, de modo a introduzir no Laboratório de Patologia Bucal da Faculdade de Odontologia de Pernambuco da Universidade de Pernambuco (LPBFOP/UPE técnicas de TMA facilmente operáveis, reproduzíveis e de baixo custo. RESULTADOS: Foram reproduzidas quatro técnicas de punção dos blocos doadores e duas de montagem dos blocos de TMA, resultando em oito combinações possíveis. Para cada combinação, foram confeccionados três blocos de TMA, contendo nove, 16 e 32 amostras, respectivamente, e avaliadas quanto a perda de amostras, custo, tempo de confecção e dificuldade. Para blocos com nove amostras, a combinação 2 mostrou-se a mais adequada; para blocos com 16, a combinação 6 foi constatada como a mais eficiente; e para blocos com 32, a combinação 1 apresentou o melhor custo-benefício. CONCLUSÃO: Foi concluído que a escolha da combinação a ser utilizada depende do número de amostras a serem colocadas nos blocos de TMA.INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate different alternative tissue microarray (TMA techniques and to make adaptations, combining different tissue punch and TMA block construction techniques in order to introduce easily reproducible, operational and cost effective TMA techniques in the Oral Pathology Laboratory of Pernambuco College of Dentistry, State University of Pernambuco. METHODS: Four donor punch techniques and two TMA block construction techniques were performed, resulting in a total of eight possible combinations. For each combination three TMA blocks were made, containing 9, 16 and 32 samples, respectively. They were evaluated as to sample loss, cost effectiveness, construction time and difficulty. RESULTS: For

  11. Diagnostic Value of Processing Cytologic Aspirates of Renal Tumors in Agar Cell (Tissue) Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedts, F.; Schrik, M.; Horn, T.

    2010-01-01

    smears were prepared after each aspiration for conventional cytology and the remaining aspirate was processed for the improved agar microbiopsy (AM) method. Conventional cytology slides, AM slides and surgical specimens were diagnosed separately, after which the diagnoses were compared....... Immunohistochemistry was performed as required on the AM sections. Surgical specimens served as the gold standard. Results In 53% of conventional cytologic smears, the cellular yield was sufficient to render a correct diagnosis. In 12% the diagnosis was incorrect, in 21% only a differential diagnosis could be fin......-initiated, and in 14% too few diagnostic cells were present in the conventional smears for cytologic diagnosis. It was, however, possible to correctly diagnose histologic sections from 97% of AM tissue blocks. In 11 cases this was facilitated with immunochemistry. In only 1 case did the AM tissue block contain too few...

  12. 7 CFR 27.21 - Preparation of samples of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preparation of samples of cotton. 27.21 Section 27.21... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.21 Preparation of samples of cotton. The samples from each bale shall be prepared as specified in this section...

  13. Spatial cluster analysis of nanoscopically mapped serotonin receptors for classification of fixed brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Michael; Silye, Rene; Göhring, Janett; Muresan, Leila; Schilcher, Kurt; Jacak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    We present a cluster spatial analysis method using nanoscopic dSTORM images to determine changes in protein cluster distributions within brain tissue. Such methods are suitable to investigate human brain tissue and will help to achieve a deeper understanding of brain disease along with aiding drug development. Human brain tissue samples are usually treated postmortem via standard fixation protocols, which are established in clinical laboratories. Therefore, our localization microscopy-based method was adapted to characterize protein density and protein cluster localization in samples fixed using different protocols followed by common fluorescent immunohistochemistry techniques. The localization microscopy allows nanoscopic mapping of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor groups within a two-dimensional image of a brain tissue slice. These nanoscopically mapped proteins can be confined to clusters by applying the proposed statistical spatial analysis. Selected features of such clusters were subsequently used to characterize and classify the tissue. Samples were obtained from different types of patients, fixed with different preparation methods, and finally stored in a human tissue bank. To verify the proposed method, samples of a cryopreserved healthy brain have been compared with epitope-retrieved and paraffin-fixed tissues. Furthermore, samples of healthy brain tissues were compared with data obtained from patients suffering from mental illnesses (e.g., major depressive disorder). Our work demonstrates the applicability of localization microscopy and image analysis methods for comparison and classification of human brain tissues at a nanoscopic level. Furthermore, the presented workflow marks a unique technological advance in the characterization of protein distributions in brain tissue sections.

  14. Comparison between thaw-mounting and use of conductive tape for sample preparation in ToF-SIMS imaging of lipids in Drosophila microRNA-14 model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Minh Uyen Thi; Son, Jin Gyeong; Shon, Hyun Kyoung; Park, Jeong Hyang; Lee, Sung Bae; Lee, Tae Geol

    2018-03-30

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) imaging elucidates molecular distributions in tissue sections, providing useful information about the metabolic pathways linked to diseases. However, delocalization of the analytes and inadequate tissue adherence during sample preparation are among some of the unfortunate phenomena associated with this technique due to their role in the reduction of the quality, reliability, and spatial resolution of the ToF-SIMS images. For these reasons, ToF-SIMS imaging requires a more rigorous sample preparation method in order to preserve the natural state of the tissues. The traditional thaw-mounting method is particularly vulnerable to altered distributions of the analytes due to thermal effects, as well as to tissue shrinkage. In the present study, the authors made comparisons of different tissue mounting methods, including the thaw-mounting method. The authors used conductive tape as the tissue-mounting material on the substrate because it does not require heat from the finger for the tissue section to adhere to the substrate and can reduce charge accumulation during data acquisition. With the conductive-tape sampling method, they were able to acquire reproducible tissue sections and high-quality images without redistribution of the molecules. Also, the authors were successful in preserving the natural states and chemical distributions of the different components of fat metabolites such as diacylglycerol and fatty acids by using the tape-supported sampling in microRNA-14 (miR-14) deleted Drosophila models. The method highlighted here shows an improvement in the accuracy of mass spectrometric imaging of tissue samples.

  15. Local tissue distribution of fissile nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Conventional tissue-section autoradiography of alpha-emitting actinide elements may require prohibitively long exposure times. Neutron-induced or fission-track autoradiography can be used for fissile nuclides such as 233 U, 235 U, and 239 Pu to circumvent this difficulty. The detection limit for these nuclides is about 4 x 10 -13 (weight fraction). This paper describes a specific technique for determining their microdistribution with histologically stained tissue sections

  16. Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed connective tissue disease Overview Mixed connective tissue disease has signs and symptoms of a combination of disorders — primarily lupus, scleroderma and polymyositis. For this reason, mixed connective tissue disease ...

  17. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... by Barbara Goldstein, MD (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  18. Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscles, tendons, fat, and blood vessels. Soft tissue sarcoma is a cancer of these soft tissues. There ... have certain genetic diseases. Doctors diagnose soft tissue sarcomas with a biopsy. Treatments include surgery to remove ...

  19. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavpetič, P., E-mail: primoz.vavpetic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, K. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeromel, L. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potočnik, N. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pongrac, P. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Plant Physiology, University of Bayreuth, Universitätstr. 30, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pelicon, P. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on–off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm{sup 2} and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  20. Application of infrared spectroscopy for diagnosis of kidney tumor tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Bandzevičiūtė, Rimantė

    2016-01-01

    Application of Infrared Spectroscopy for Diagnosis of Kidney Tumor Tissue It is possible to apply the technique of an attenuated total reflection of infrared radiation (ATR IR) for the characterisation of the removed tissues during the surgery. Application of this method for interstitium of the removed tissue does not require any specific sample preparation. For this reason ATR IR technique applied for the interstitium allows to get information about tissues immediately after surgical operati...

  1. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  2. Introduction to tissue engineering applications and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Birla, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Covering a progressive medical field, Tissue Engineering describes the innovative process of regenerating human cells to restore or establish normal function in defective organs. As pioneering individuals look ahead to the possibility of generating entire organ systems, students may turn to this textbook for a comprehensive understanding and preparation for the future of regenerative medicine. This book explains chemical stimulations, the bioengineering of specific organs, and treatment plans for chronic diseases. It is a must-read for tissue engineering students and practitioners.

  3. 21 CFR 113.81 - Product preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Blanching by heat, when required in the preparation of food for canning, should be effected by heating the... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Product preparation. 113.81 Section 113.81 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  4. 21 CFR 864.4400 - Enzyme preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enzyme preparations. 864.4400 Section 864.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Specimen Preparation Reagents § 864.4400 Enzyme...

  5. 12 CFR 917.8 - Budget preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget preparation. 917.8 Section 917.8 Banks... POWERS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF BANK BOARDS OF DIRECTORS AND SENIOR MANAGEMENT § 917.8 Budget preparation. (a) Adoption of budgets. Each Bank's board of directors shall be responsible for the adoption of an...

  6. 7 CFR 160.89 - Medicinal preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Medicinal preparations. 160.89 Section 160.89... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Sales and Shipments § 160.89 Medicinal preparations. A compound or mixture containing spirits of turpentine or rosin, or both, with other drugs, when sold for medicinal purposes, is...

  7. Histomorphological Evaluation of Fresh Ovarian Tissue Transplanted Into Back Muscles of Balb/C Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Amiri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available & objectives: Today, different methods for maintaining reproductive capability in young women with cancer are being considered. One of the most prominent of these methods is ovarian tissue transplant. Despite the relative success of this method, the appropriate location and methods of transplantation is still a matter of discussion. The present study evaluated the histomorphology of fresh ovarian tissue transplantation by two methods, inter muscular and intra muscular, in Balb/C mice. Methods & Materials: The study was conducted at Hamedan University of Medical Sciences in 2009. Fresh ovarian tissues from 12-14 day old Balb/C mice were transplanted into back muscles of ovarectomized 6 week old Balb/C mice both intermuscularly and intramuscularly. All transplanted mice received intra-peritoneal injections of a unit of rFSH for 4 weeks, every other day. At the end of the tenth week, all transplant recipient mice were killed and the transplanted ovarian tissues were removed. All samples were assessed for the angiogenesis and viability of follicles. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, using independent t- test. Results: In intermuscular transplanted group, the transplanted tissues were rejected in two cases. In the sections prepared from the other cases, in spite of the presence of some small necrotic areas, the majority of ovarian tissues had a healthy appearance within the primordial, primary, secondary and antral follicles. Apart from a significant reduction in the number of follicles and smaller size of follicles in the transplanted tissue in comparison with control group, no other major differences in morphology, histology, and the process of maturation of ovarian follicles were observed between the transplanted and control groups. Conclusion: Fresh ovarian tissue transplantation into muscles of the back area without basic vascular pedicle has new angiogenesis capabilities, appropriate survival and development of primordial follicles and

  8. Dental histology of Coelophysis bauri and the evolution of tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Raymond K M; LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Berman, David S; Reisz, Robert R

    2016-07-01

    Studies of dinosaur teeth have focused primarily on external crown morphology and thus, use shed or in situ tooth crowns, and are limited to the enamel and dentine dental tissues. As a result, the full suites of periodontal tissues that attach teeth to the jaws remain poorly documented, particularly in early dinosaurs. These tissues are an integral part of the tooth and thus essential to a more complete understanding of dental anatomy, development, and evolution in dinosaurs. To identify the tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs, histological thin sections were prepared from the maxilla and dentary of a partial skull of the early theropod Coelophysis bauri from the Upper Triassic (Rhaetian- 209-201 Ma) Whitaker Quarry, New Mexico, USA. As one of the phylogenetically and geologically oldest dinosaurs, it is an ideal candidate for examining dental tissues near the base of the dinosaurian clade. The teeth of C. bauri exhibited a fibrous tooth attachment in which the teeth possessed five tissues: enamel, dentine, cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and alveolar bone. Our findings, coupled with those of more recent studies of ornithischian teeth, indicate that a tripartite periodontium, similar to that of crocodilians and mammals, is the plesiomorphic condition for dinosaurs. The occurrence of a tripartite periodontium in dinosaurs adds to the growing consensus that the presence of these tissues is the plesiomorphic condition for the major amniote clades. Furthermore, this study establishes the relative timing of tissue development and growth directions of periodontal tissues and provides the first comparative framework for future studies of dinosaur periodontal development, tooth replacement, and histology. J. Morphol. 277:916-924, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Optimizing Frozen Sample Preparation for Laser Microdissection: Assessment of CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena G Golubeva

    Full Text Available Laser microdissection is an invaluable tool in medical research that facilitates collecting specific cell populations for molecular analysis. Diversity of research targets (e.g., cancerous and precancerous lesions in clinical and animal research, cell pellets, rodent embryos, etc. and varied scientific objectives, however, present challenges toward establishing standard laser microdissection protocols. Sample preparation is crucial for quality RNA, DNA and protein retrieval, where it often determines the feasibility of a laser microdissection project. The majority of microdissection studies in clinical and animal model research are conducted on frozen tissues containing native nucleic acids, unmodified by fixation. However, the variable morphological quality of frozen sections from tissues containing fat, collagen or delicate cell structures can limit or prevent successful harvest of the desired cell population via laser dissection. The CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®, a commercial device that improves cryosectioning outcomes on glass slides has been reported superior for slide preparation and isolation of high quality osteocyte RNA (frozen bone during laser dissection. Considering the reported advantages of CryoJane for laser dissection on glass slides, we asked whether the system could also work with the plastic membrane slides used by UV laser based microdissection instruments, as these are better suited for collection of larger target areas. In an attempt to optimize laser microdissection slide preparation for tissues of different RNA stability and cryosectioning difficulty, we evaluated the CryoJane system for use with both glass (laser capture microdissection and membrane (laser cutting microdissection slides. We have established a sample preparation protocol for glass and membrane slides including manual coating of membrane slides with CryoJane solutions, cryosectioning, slide staining and dissection procedure, lysis and RNA extraction

  10. Automated MALDI Matrix Coating System for Multiple Tissue Samples for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounfield, William P.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2012-03-01

    Uniform matrix deposition on tissue samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is key for reproducible analyte ion signals. Current methods often result in nonhomogenous matrix deposition, and take time and effort to produce acceptable ion signals. Here we describe a fully-automated method for matrix deposition using an enclosed spray chamber and spray nozzle for matrix solution delivery. A commercial air-atomizing spray nozzle was modified and combined with solenoid controlled valves and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control and deliver the matrix solution. A spray chamber was employed to contain the nozzle, sample, and atomized matrix solution stream, and to prevent any interference from outside conditions as well as allow complete control of the sample environment. A gravity cup was filled with MALDI matrix solutions, including DHB in chloroform/methanol (50:50) at concentrations up to 60 mg/mL. Various samples (including rat brain tissue sections) were prepared using two deposition methods (spray chamber, inkjet). A linear ion trap equipped with an intermediate-pressure MALDI source was used for analyses. Optical microscopic examination showed a uniform coating of matrix crystals across the sample. Overall, the mass spectral images gathered from tissues coated using the spray chamber system were of better quality and more reproducible than from tissue specimens prepared by the inkjet deposition method.

  11. Preparing for Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preparing for Surgery Home For Patients Search FAQs Preparing for Surgery ... Surgery FAQ080, August 2011 PDF Format Preparing for Surgery Gynecologic Problems What is the difference between outpatient ...

  12. Action of nitric oxide on healthy and inflamed human dental pulp tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Leopoldo Penteado Nucci; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Del Bel, Elaine Aparecida

    2008-10-01

    Irreversible pulpitis has been associated with pain and an increase in the number of pulp inflammatory cells. Based on the action of nitric oxide (NO) elsewhere, NO may possibly participate in the sensory and autonomic innervation of the dental pulp, and may influence local inflammatory responses. The purpose of this study was to analyze normal and inflamed human dental pulp for the presence of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), as an index of NO system activity. Six non-carious second premolar pulp tissue samples were obtained from young patients who required extractions for orthodontic reasons and six inflamed samples were obtained from symptomatic carious second premolars clinically diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis. Pulp tissue was carefully removed, fixed by immersion in a cold 4% PFA buffered solution for 120 min, rinsed in cold phosphate buffer, and quickly-frozen for cryostat sectioning. Pulp tissue was sectioned perpendicularly to the vertical axis of the tooth at 20 microm and processed for histochemistry. Sections of each specimen were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and other sections were subjected to histochemical NADPH-d detection. Results indicated the presence of NADPH reactivity within the pulps of both normal and carious teeth. In the normal teeth NADPH-d activity was detected in a small number of vascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The inflammatory response of the pulp from carious premolars was detected in connective tissue by the presence of an increased number of fibroblasts, angioblasts and collagen fibers. It was possible to determine the extent of odontoblast reactivity since the odontoblast layer was usually absent in these split-peel preparations. There were no obvious signs of stained pulpal nerve fibers. Overall NADPH-d staining was significantly more intense within inflamed pulp tissues compared to normal healthy samples (Mann-Whitney test, pfunctions of NO in human dental pulp in pathophysiological situations.

  13. Three-dimensional reconstructions from non-deparaffinized tissue sections

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirkovská, M.; Holejšovská, Iva; Janáček, Jiří; Kučera, T.; Macášek, J.; Karen, Petr; Kubínová, Lucie

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 210, - (2005), s. 163-173 ISSN 0340-2061 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/05/0153; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB5039302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : confocal * eosin * fluorescence Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.255, year: 2005

  14. Histopathology of Tilapia tissues harbouring Clinostomum tilapiae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tissues obtained from infected Oreochromis niloticus were processed sectioned and stained with haemotoxylin and eosin. Good sections were selected, studied and photographed. The histopathology revealed a proliferation of eosinophiles at the secondary lamellar of the gills. The site of attachment on the fish skin ...

  15. Comparison of a new hydro-surgical technique to traditional methods for the preparation of full-thickness skin grafts from canine cadaveric skin and report of a single clinical case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, F I; Ralphs, S C; Coronado, G; Sweet, D C; Ward, J; Bloch, C P

    2012-01-01

    To compare the hydro-surgical technique to traditional techniques for removal of subcutaneous tissue in the preparation of full-thickness skin grafts. Ex vivo experimental study and a single clinical case report. Four canine cadavers and a single clinical case. Four sections of skin were harvested from the lateral flank of recently euthanatized dogs. Traditional preparation methods used included both a blade or scissors technique, each of which were compared to the hydro-surgical technique individually. Preparation methods were compared based on length of time for removal of the subcutaneous tissue from the graft, histologic grading, and measurable thickness as compared to an untreated sample. The hydro-surgical technique had the shortest skin graft preparation time as compared to traditional techniques (p = 0.002). There was no significant difference in the histological grading or measurable subcutaneous thickness between skin specimens. The hydro-surgical technique provides a rapid, effective debridement of subcutaneous tissue in the preparation of full-thickness skin grafts. There were not any significant changes in histological grade and subcutaneous tissue remaining among all treatment types. Additionally the hydro-surgical technique was successfully used to prepare a full-thickness meshed free skin graft in the reconstruction of a traumatic medial tarsal wound in a dog.

  16. How does tissue preparation affect skeletal muscle transverse isotropy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Benjamin B.; Odegard, Gregory M.; Kaufman, Kenton R.; Haut Donahue, Tammy L.

    2016-01-01

    The passive tensile properties of skeletal muscle play a key role in its physiological function. Previous research has identified conflicting reports of muscle transverse isotropy, with some data suggesting the longitudinal direction is stiffest, while others show the transverse direction is stiffest. Accurate constitutive models of skeletal muscle must be employed to provide correct recommendations for and observations of clinical methods. The goal of this work was to identify transversely isotropic tensile muscle properties as a function of post mortem handling. Six pairs of tibialis anterior muscles were harvested from Giant Flemish rabbits and split into two groups: fresh testing (within four hours post mortem), and non-fresh testing (subject to delayed testing and a freeze/thaw cycle). Longitudinal and transverse samples were removed from each muscle and tested to identify tensile modulus and relaxation behavior. Longitudinal non-fresh samples exhibited a higher initial modulus value and faster relaxation than longitudinal fresh, transverse fresh, and transverse rigor samples (p<0.05), while longitudinal fresh samples were less stiff at lower strain levels than longitudinal non-fresh, transverse fresh, and transverse non-fresh samples (p<0.05), but exhibited more nonlinear behavior. While fresh skeletal muscle exhibits a higher transverse modulus than longitudinal modulus, discrepancies in previously published data may be the result of a number of differences in experimental protocol. Constitutive modeling of fresh muscle should reflect these data by identifying the material as truly transversely isotropic and not as an isotropic matrix reinforced with fibers. PMID:27425557

  17. A punched-card library of neutron cross-sections and its use in the mechanized preparation of group cross-sections for use in Monte Carlo, Carlson S{sub n} and other multi-group neutronics calculations on high-speed computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, K [Atomic Weapons Research Establishment, Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

    1962-03-15

    The AWRE punched-card library of neutron cross-sections is described together with associated IBM-7090 programmes which process this data to give group-averaged cross-sections for use in Monte Carlo, Carlson S{sub n} and other multi-group neutronics calculations. The methods developed to deal with both isotropic and anisotropic elastic scattering are described. These include the multi-group transport approximation and the full treatment of anisotropic scattering using the Legendre polynomial moments of the scattering transfer matrix. The principles of group-constant formation are considered and illustrated by describing systems of group constants suitable for fast-reactor calculations. Practical problems such as the empirical adjustment of group constants to reproduce integral results and the collapsing of a many-group set of constants to give a few-group set are discussed. (author) [French] L'auteur decrit le fichier de cartes perforees sur lesquelles on enregistre a l'Atomic Weapons Research Establishment (AWRE) les sections efficaces neutroniques ainsi que les programmes IBM-7090 associes qui sont employes pour le traitement de ces informations, en vue d'obtenir des sections efficaces moyennes par groupe pouvant servir aux calculs de neutroniques a plusieurs groupes, effectues a l'aide des methodes de Monte-Carlo, S{sub n} de Carlson et autres methodes. L'auteur expose ensuite les methodes mises au point roda etudier la diffusion elastique, tant isotrope qu'anisotrope. Elles comprennent l'approximation de transport a plusieurs groupes, ainsi que le traitement complet de la diffusion anisotrope par les moments polynomiaux de Legendre de la matrice de transfert de la diffusion. L'auteur examine les principes de la formation des constantes de groupes; a titre d'illustration, il decrit les systemes de constantes de groupes qui se pretent aux calculs de reacteurs a neutrons rapides. Il expose quelques problemes pratiques, tels que l'ajustement empirique des

  18. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, David W [Bone and Joint Research Group, Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, General Hospital, University of Southampton, SO16 6YD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Hindoostuart@googlemail.com

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  19. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, David W

    2008-01-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic

  20. 76 FR 78816 - Tax Return Preparer Penalties Under Section 6695

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ...) unless one of the following three conditions is satisfied: (1) A member of the principal management of... only if-- (1) One or more members of the principal management (or principal officers) of the firm or a... contained in the final regulations was previously reviewed and approved by the Office of Management and...

  1. 76 FR 62689 - Tax Return Preparer Penalties Under Section 6695

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... the penalty if a member of its principal management or the principal management of a branch office... members of the principal management (or principal officers) of the firm or a branch office participated in... Office of Management and Budget in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3507(d...

  2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laub Petersen, Bodil; Zeuthen, Mette Christa; Pedersen, Sanni

    2004-01-01

    , such as quantitation of signals as in triploidy, it is possible to isolate nuclei from paraffin-embedded tissue. However, using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, either in thin sections or as isolated nuclei, one encounters a range of technical problems, paralleling those met in immunohistochemistry. Variations...... nuclei and tissue sections from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue....

  3. Tissue and Organ 3D Bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zengmin; Jin, Sha; Ye, Kaiming

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting enables the creation of tissue constructs with heterogeneous compositions and complex architectures. It was initially used for preparing scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. It has recently been adopted to create living tissues, such as cartilage, skin, and heart valve. To facilitate vascularization, hollow channels have been created in the hydrogels by 3D bioprinting. This review discusses the state of the art of the technology, along with a broad range of biomaterials used for 3D bioprinting. It provides an update on recent developments in bioprinting and its applications. 3D bioprinting has profound impacts on biomedical research and industry. It offers a new way to industrialize tissue biofabrication. It has great potential for regenerating tissues and organs to overcome the shortage of organ transplantation.

  4. Scalable robotic biofabrication of tissue spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehesz, A Nagy; Hajdu, Z; Visconti, R P; Markwald, R R; Mironov, V; Brown, J; Beaver, W; Da Silva, J V L

    2011-01-01

    Development of methods for scalable biofabrication of uniformly sized tissue spheroids is essential for tissue spheroid-based bioprinting of large size tissue and organ constructs. The most recent scalable technique for tissue spheroid fabrication employs a micromolded recessed template prepared in a non-adhesive hydrogel, wherein the cells loaded into the template self-assemble into tissue spheroids due to gravitational force. In this study, we present an improved version of this technique. A new mold was designed to enable generation of 61 microrecessions in each well of a 96-well plate. The microrecessions were seeded with cells using an EpMotion 5070 automated pipetting machine. After 48 h of incubation, tissue spheroids formed at the bottom of each microrecession. To assess the quality of constructs generated using this technology, 600 tissue spheroids made by this method were compared with 600 spheroids generated by the conventional hanging drop method. These analyses showed that tissue spheroids fabricated by the micromolded method are more uniform in diameter. Thus, use of micromolded recessions in a non-adhesive hydrogel, combined with automated cell seeding, is a reliable method for scalable robotic fabrication of uniform-sized tissue spheroids.

  5. Scalable robotic biofabrication of tissue spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehesz, A Nagy; Hajdu, Z; Visconti, R P; Markwald, R R; Mironov, V [Advanced Tissue Biofabrication Center, Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Brown, J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Beaver, W [York Technical College, Rock Hill, SC (United States); Da Silva, J V L, E-mail: mironovv@musc.edu [Renato Archer Information Technology Center-CTI, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-06-15

    Development of methods for scalable biofabrication of uniformly sized tissue spheroids is essential for tissue spheroid-based bioprinting of large size tissue and organ constructs. The most recent scalable technique for tissue spheroid fabrication employs a micromolded recessed template prepared in a non-adhesive hydrogel, wherein the cells loaded into the template self-assemble into tissue spheroids due to gravitational force. In this study, we present an improved version of this technique. A new mold was designed to enable generation of 61 microrecessions in each well of a 96-well plate. The microrecessions were seeded with cells using an EpMotion 5070 automated pipetting machine. After 48 h of incubation, tissue spheroids formed at the bottom of each microrecession. To assess the quality of constructs generated using this technology, 600 tissue spheroids made by this method were compared with 600 spheroids generated by the conventional hanging drop method. These analyses showed that tissue spheroids fabricated by the micromolded method are more uniform in diameter. Thus, use of micromolded recessions in a non-adhesive hydrogel, combined with automated cell seeding, is a reliable method for scalable robotic fabrication of uniform-sized tissue spheroids.

  6. Rapid intra-operative diagnosis of kidney cancer by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy of tissue smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucetaite, Milda; Velicka, Martynas; Urboniene, Vidita; Ceponkus, Justinas; Bandzeviciute, Rimante; Jankevicius, Feliksas; Zelvys, Arunas; Sablinskas, Valdas; Steiner, Gerald

    2018-01-09

    Herein, a technique to analyze air-dried kidney tissue impression smears by means of attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy is presented. Spectral tumor markers-absorption bands of glycogen-are identified in the ATR-IR spectra of the kidney tissue smear samples. Thin kidney tissue cryo-sections currently used for IR spectroscopic analysis lack such spectral markers as the sample preparation causes irreversible molecular changes in the tissue. In particular, freeze-thaw cycle results in degradation of the glycogen and reduction or complete dissolution of its content. Supervised spectral classification was applied to the recorded spectra of the smears and the test spectra were classified with a high accuracy of 92% for normal tissue and 94% for tumor tissue, respectively. For further development, we propose that combination of the method with optical fiber ATR probes could potentially be used for rapid real-time intra-operative tissue analysis without interfering with either the established protocols of pathological examination or the ordinary workflow of operating surgeon. Such approach could ensure easier transition of the method to clinical applications where it may complement the results of gold standard histopathology examination and aid in more precise resection of kidney tumors. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Proceedings. Feedstock preparation and quality 1997 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Jan Erik [ed.

    1998-06-01

    The IEA Bioenergy Feedstock Preparation and Quality 1997 Workshop dealt with fuel feedstock quality improvement and methods to determine feedstock properties. It was arranged by the Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences on behalf of the IEA Bioenergy Task XII Activity 4.1 Feedstock Preparation and Quality. This Activity is a 3-year cooperation 1995-1997 between Denmark, Sweden and the USA, mainly based on information exchange. The workshop had two sections: presentations by invited experts, and country reports on recent development in feedstock preparation and quality in the three participating countries. Separate abstracts have been prepared for four of the six papers presented

  8. Biodegradable elastomeric scaffolds for soft tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pêgo, A.P.; Poot, Andreas A.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Elastomeric copolymers of 1,3-trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and ε-caprolactone (CL) and copolymers of TMC and D,L-lactide (DLLA) have been evaluated as candidate materials for the preparation of biodegradable scaffolds for soft tissue engineering. TMC-DLLA copolymers are amorphous and degrade more

  9. Tissue engineered tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M; Techy, G B; Ward, B R; Imam, S A; Atkinson, R; Ho, H; Taylor, C R

    2010-08-01

    Many research programs use well-characterized tumor cell lines as tumor models for in vitro studies. Because tumor cells grown as three-dimensional (3-D) structures have been shown to behave more like tumors in vivo than do cells growing in monolayer culture, a growing number of investigators now use tumor cell spheroids as models. Single cell type spheroids, however, do not model the stromal-epithelial interactions that have an important role in controlling tumor growth and development in vivo. We describe here a method for generating, reproducibly, more realistic 3-D tumor models that contain both stromal and malignant epithelial cells with an architecture that closely resembles that of tumor microlesions in vivo. Because they are so tissue-like we refer to them as tumor histoids. They can be generated reproducibly in substantial quantities. The bioreactor developed to generate histoid constructs is described and illustrated. It accommodates disposable culture chambers that have filled volumes of either 10 or 64 ml, each culture yielding on the order of 100 or 600 histoid particles, respectively. Each particle is a few tenths of a millimeter in diameter. Examples of histological sections of tumor histoids representing cancers of breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and urinary bladder are presented. Potential applications of tumor histoids include, but are not limited to, use as surrogate tumors for pre-screening anti-solid tumor pharmaceutical agents, as reference specimens for immunostaining in the surgical pathology laboratory and use in studies of invasive properties of cells or other aspects of tumor development and progression. Histoids containing nonmalignant cells also may have potential as "seeds" in tissue engineering. For drug testing, histoids probably will have to meet certain criteria of size and tumor cell content. Using a COPAS Plus flow cytometer, histoids containing fluorescent tumor cells were analyzed successfully and sorted using such criteria.

  10. Quantitative images of metals in plant tissues measured by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.S.; Dietrich, R.C.; Matusch, A.; Pozebon, D.; Dressler, V.L.

    2008-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used for quantitative imaging of toxic and essential elements in thin sections (thickness of 30 or 40 μm) of tobacco plant tissues. Two-dimensional images of Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd, Rh, Pt and Pb in leaves, shoots and roots of tobacco were produced. Sections of the plant tissues (fixed onto glass slides) were scanned by a focused beam of a Nd:YAG laser in a laser ablation chamber. The ablated material was transported with argon as carrier gas to the ICP ion source at a quadrupole ICP-MS instrument. Ion intensities of the investigated elements were measured together with 13 C + , 33 S + and 34 S + within the entire plant tissue section. Matrix matching standards (prepared using powder of dried tobacco leaves) were used to constitute calibration curves, whereas the regression coefficient of the attained calibration curves was typically 0.99. The variability of LA-ICP-MS process, sample heterogeneity and water content in the sample were corrected by using 13 C + as internal standard. Quantitative imaging of the selected elements revealed their inhomogeneous distribution in leaves, shoots and roots

  11. How-To-Do-It: Using Cauliflower to Demonstrate Plant Tissue Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldeman, Janice H.; Ellis, Jane P.

    1988-01-01

    Presents techniques used for disinfestation of plant material, preparation of equipment and media, and laboratory procedures for tissue culture using cauliflower. Details methods for preparing solutions and plant propagation by cloning. (CW)

  12. Rapid immunohistochemical diagnosis of tobacco mosaic virus disease by microwave-assisted plant sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellnig, Günther; Möstl, Stefan; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Immunoelectron microscopy is a powerful method to diagnose viral diseases and to study the distribution of the viral agent within plant cells and tissues. Nevertheless, current protocols for the immunological detection of viral diseases with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in plants take between 3 and 6 days and are therefore not suited for rapid diagnosis of virus diseases in plants. In this study, we describe a method that allows rapid cytohistochemical detection of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in leaves of tobacco plants. With the help of microwave irradiation, sample preparation of the leaves was reduced to 90 min. After sample sectioning, virus particles were stained on the sections by immunogold labelling of the viral coat protein, which took 100 min. After investigation with the TEM, a clear visualization of TMV in tobacco cells was achieved altogether in about half a day. Comparison of gold particle density by image analysis revealed that samples prepared with the help of microwave irradiation yielded significantly higher gold particle density as samples prepared conventionally at room temperature. This study clearly demonstrates that microwave-assisted plant sample preparation in combination with cytohistochemical localization of viral coat protein is well suited for rapid diagnosis of plant virus diseases in altogether about half a day by TEM. PMID:23580761

  13. Detection of Chlamydia in postmortal formalin-fixed tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemose, AG; Lundemose, JB; Birkelund, Svend

    1989-01-01

    A procedure to detect Chlamydia in postmortal formalin-fixed tissue is described. Monoclonal antibodies against a genus specific chlamydia epitope were used in immunofluorescence to detect chlamydia inclusions in formalin-fixed tissue sections. Lung sections from chlamydia-infected mice were....... Background and non-specific fluorescence were reduced by treating the tissue sections with trypsin, rabbit serum and Evans blue counterstain. Besides giving an exact diagnosis at autopsy, the method provides the possibility of determining the occurrence of chlamydia infections in various tissues, based...

  14. Direct linear measurement of root dentin thickness and dentin volume changes with post space preparation: A cone-beam computed tomography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoeb Yakub Shaikh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of the present study was direct linear measurement of dentin thickness and dentin volume changes for post space preparation with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Materials and Methods: Ten maxillary central incisors were scanned, before and after root canal and post space preparation, with Orthophos XG three-dimensional hybrid unit. Thirteen axial section scans of each tooth from orifice to apex and dentin thickness for buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal were measured using proprietary measuring tool and thereafter subjected to statistical analysis. Furthermore, dentin volume was evaluated using ITK-SNAP software. Results: There was statistically significant difference between the dentin thickness in pre- and postinstrumentation (paired t-test and also between different groups (one-way ANOVA. In the shortest post length of 4.5mm the post space preparation resulted in 2.17% loss of hard tissue volume, where as 11mm longest post length post space preparation resulted in >40% loss of hard tissue volume. Conclusion: CBCT axial section scan for direct measurements of root dentin thickness can be guideline before and after post space preparation for selection of drill length and diameter.

  15. Plant tissue culture techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Dieter Illg

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell and tissue culture in a simple fashion refers to techniques which utilize either single plant cells, groups of unorganized cells (callus or organized tissues or organs put in culture, under controlled sterile conditions.

  16. Plant Tissue Culture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    Plant tissue culture is a technique of culturing plant cells, tissues and organs on ... working methods (Box 2) and discovery of the need for B vita- mins and auxins for ... Kotte (Germany) reported some success with growing isolated root tips.

  17. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... flap; TRAM; Latissimus muscle flap with a breast implant; DIEP flap; DIEAP flap; Gluteal free flap; Transverse upper gracilis flap; TUG; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with natural tissue; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with natural tissue

  18. FRD tissue archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The fishery genetics tissue collection has over 80,000 tissues stored in 95% ethanol representing fishes and invertebrates collected globally but with a focus on the...

  19. Tissue banking in australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Lynette; McKelvie, Helen

    2003-01-01

    The legal structure for the regulation of tissue banking has existed for many years. In Australia, the donation of human tissue is regulated by legislation in each of the eight States and Territories. These substantially uniform Acts were passed in the late 1970's and early 1980's, based on model legislation and underpinned by the concept of consensual giving. However, it was not until the early 1990's that tissue banking came under the notice of regulatory authorities. Since then the Australian Government has moved quickly to oversee the tissue banking sector in Australia. Banked human tissue has been deemed to be a therapeutic good under the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989, and tissue banks are required to be licensed by the Therapeutic Goods Administration and are audited for compliance with the Code of Good Manufacturing Practice- Human Blood and Tissues. In addition, tissue banks must comply with a myriad of other standards, guidelines and recommendations.

  20. Breast Cancer Tissue Repository

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iglehart, J

    1997-01-01

    The Breast Tissue Repository at Duke enters its fourth year of finding. The purpose of the Repository at Duke is to provide substantial quantities of frozen tissue for explorative molecular studies...

  1. Differences in sensitivity of rat mesenteric small arteries to agonists when studied as ring preparations or as cannulated preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buus, N. H.; VanBavel, E.; Mulvany, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. Pharmacological experiments on vascular tissue are normally performed on isometric ring or strip preparations. The aim of this study was to compare the isometric characteristics with the characteristics obtained if vessels were examined under the more physiologically appropriate isobaric

  2. PATMA: parser of archival tissue microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Roszkowiak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue microarrays are commonly used in modern pathology for cancer tissue evaluation, as it is a very potent technique. Tissue microarray slides are often scanned to perform computer-aided histopathological analysis of the tissue cores. For processing the image, splitting the whole virtual slide into images of individual cores is required. The only way to distinguish cores corresponding to specimens in the tissue microarray is through their arrangement. Unfortunately, distinguishing the correct order of cores is not a trivial task as they are not labelled directly on the slide. The main aim of this study was to create a procedure capable of automatically finding and extracting cores from archival images of the tissue microarrays. This software supports the work of scientists who want to perform further image processing on single cores. The proposed method is an efficient and fast procedure, working in fully automatic or semi-automatic mode. A total of 89% of punches were correctly extracted with automatic selection. With an addition of manual correction, it is possible to fully prepare the whole slide image for extraction in 2 min per tissue microarray. The proposed technique requires minimum skill and time to parse big array of cores from tissue microarray whole slide image into individual core images.

  3. Vascularization after treatment of gingival recession defects with platelet-rich fibrin or connective tissue graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Gülnihal; Kantarcı, Alpdoğan; Sculean, Anton; Atilla, Gül

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate histologically the following treatment of bilateral localized gingival recessions with coronally advanced flap (CAF) combined with platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) or subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG). Tissue samples were harvested from 14 subjects either 1 or 6 months after the surgeries. The 2-mm punch biopsies were obtained from the mid-portion of the grafted sites. Neutral buffered formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded 5-μm thick tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin eosin and Masson's trichrome in order to analyze the collagen framework, epithelium thickness and rete-peg length. Multiple sequential sections were cut from paraffin-embedded blocks of tissue and immunohistochemically prepared for detection of vascular endothelial growth factor, CD31 and CD34, for the assessment of vascularization. Rete peg formation was significantly increased in the sites treated with PRF compared to the SCTG group after 6 months (p < 0.05). On the contrary, the number of vessels was increased in the SCTG group compared to the PRF group after 6 months (p < 0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed in the collagen density. Staining intensity of CD31 increased in submucosal area of PRF group than SCTG group after 1 month. Higher staining intensity of CD34 was observed in the submucosal area of PRF group compared with SCTG group after 6 months. The results of the present study suggest that in histological evaluation because of its biological compounds, PRF results earlier vessel formation and tissue maturation compared to connective tissue graft. PRF regulated the vascular response associated with an earlier wound healing.

  4. Improved method of producing satisfactory sections of whole eyeball by routine histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko-Boham, Benjamin; Ahenkorah, John; Hottor, Bismarck Afedo; Dennis, Esther; Addai, Frederick Kwaku

    2014-02-01

    To overcome the loss of structural integrity when eyeball sections are prepared by wax embedding, we experimentally modified the routine histological procedure and report satisfactorily well-preserved antero-posterior sections of whole eyeballs for teaching/learning purposes. Presently histological sections of whole eyeballs are not readily available because substantial structural distortions attributable to variable consistency of tissue components (and their undesired differential shrinkage) result from routine processing. Notably, at the dehydration stage of processing, the soft, gel-like vitreous humor considerably shrinks relative to the tough fibrous sclera causing collapse of the ocular globe. Additionally, the combined effects of fixation, dehydration, and embedding at 60°C renders the eye lens too hard for microtome slicing at thicknesses suitable for light microscopy. We satisfactorily preserved intact antero-posterior sections of eyeballs via routine paraffin wax processing procedure entailing two main modifications; (i) careful needle aspiration of vitreous humor and replacement with molten wax prior to wax infiltration; (ii) softening of lens in trimmed wax block by placing a drop of concentrated liquid phenol on it for 3 h during microtomy. These variations of the routine histological method produced intact whole eyeball sections with retinal detachment as the only structural distortion. Intact sections of the eyeball obtained compares well with the laborious, expensive, and 8-week long celloidin method. Our method has wider potential usability than costly freeze drying method which requires special skills and equipment (cryotome) and does not produce whole eyeball sections. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. 3D imaging of optically cleared tissue using a simplified CLARITY method and on-chip microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yibo; Shin, Yoonjung; Sung, Kevin; Yang, Sam; Chen, Harrison; Wang, Hongda; Teng, Da; Rivenson, Yair; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput sectioning and optical imaging of tissue samples using traditional immunohistochemical techniques can be costly and inaccessible in resource-limited areas. We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) imaging and phenotyping in optically transparent tissue using lens-free holographic on-chip microscopy as a low-cost, simple, and high-throughput alternative to conventional approaches. The tissue sample is passively cleared using a simplified CLARITY method and stained using 3,3′-diaminobenzidine to target cells of interest, enabling bright-field optical imaging and 3D sectioning of thick samples. The lens-free computational microscope uses pixel super-resolution and multi-height phase recovery algorithms to digitally refocus throughout the cleared tissue and obtain a 3D stack of complex-valued images of the sample, containing both phase and amplitude information. We optimized the tissue-clearing and imaging system by finding the optimal illumination wavelength, tissue thickness, sample preparation parameters, and the number of heights of the lens-free image acquisition and implemented a sparsity-based denoising algorithm to maximize the imaging volume and minimize the amount of the acquired data while also preserving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. As a proof of concept, we achieved 3D imaging of neurons in a 200-μm-thick cleared mouse brain tissue over a wide field of view of 20.5 mm2. The lens-free microscope also achieved more than an order-of-magnitude reduction in raw data compared to a conventional scanning optical microscope imaging the same sample volume. Being low cost, simple, high-throughput, and data-efficient, we believe that this CLARITY-enabled computational tissue imaging technique could find numerous applications in biomedical diagnosis and research in low-resource settings.

  6. 3D imaging of optically cleared tissue using a simplified CLARITY method and on-chip microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yibo

    2017-08-12

    High-throughput sectioning and optical imaging of tissue samples using traditional immunohistochemical techniques can be costly and inaccessible in resource-limited areas. We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) imaging and phenotyping in optically transparent tissue using lens-free holographic on-chip microscopy as a low-cost, simple, and high-throughput alternative to conventional approaches. The tissue sample is passively cleared using a simplified CLARITY method and stained using 3,3′-diaminobenzidine to target cells of interest, enabling bright-field optical imaging and 3D sectioning of thick samples. The lens-free computational microscope uses pixel super-resolution and multi-height phase recovery algorithms to digitally refocus throughout the cleared tissue and obtain a 3D stack of complex-valued images of the sample, containing both phase and amplitude information. We optimized the tissue-clearing and imaging system by finding the optimal illumination wavelength, tissue thickness, sample preparation parameters, and the number of heights of the lens-free image acquisition and implemented a sparsity-based denoising algorithm to maximize the imaging volume and minimize the amount of the acquired data while also preserving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. As a proof of concept, we achieved 3D imaging of neurons in a 200-μm-thick cleared mouse brain tissue over a wide field of view of 20.5 mm2. The lens-free microscope also achieved more than an order-of-magnitude reduction in raw data compared to a conventional scanning optical microscope imaging the same sample volume. Being low cost, simple, high-throughput, and data-efficient, we believe that this CLARITY-enabled computational tissue imaging technique could find numerous applications in biomedical diagnosis and research in low-resource settings.

  7. Development of tissue bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of tissue banking is as old as the use of skin grafting for resurfacing of burn wounds. Beneficial effects of tissue grafts led to wide spread use of auto and allograft for management of varied clinical conditions like skin wounds, bone defects following trauma or tumor ablation. Availability of adequate amount of tissues at the time of requirement was the biggest challenge that forced clinicians to find out techniques to preserve the living tissue for prolonged period of time for later use and thus the foundation of tissue banking was started in early twentieth century. Harvesting, processing, storage and transportation of human tissues for clinical use is the major activity of tissue banks. Low temperature storage of processed tissue is the best preservation technique at present. Tissue banking organization is a very complex system and needs high technical expertise and skilled personnel for proper functioning in a dedicated facility. A small lapse/deviation from the established protocol leads to loss of precious tissues and or harm to recipients as well as the risk of transmission of deadly diseases and tumors. Strict tissue transplant acts and stringent regulations help to streamline the whole process of tissue banking safe for recipients and to community as whole.

  8. Connective Tissue Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of connective tissue. Over 200 disorders that impact connective tissue. There are different types: Genetic disorders, such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and osteogenesis imperfecta Autoimmune disorders, such as lupus and scleroderma Cancers, like some types of soft tissue sarcoma Each ...

  9. A gene-protein assay for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2: brightfield tricolor visualization of HER2 protein, the HER2 gene, and chromosome 17 centromere (CEN17 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitta Hiroaki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eligibility of breast cancer patients for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-directed therapies is determined by the HER2 gene amplification and/or HER2 protein overexpression status of the breast tumor as determined by in situ hybridization (ISH or immunohistochemistry (IHC, respectively. Our objective was to combine the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved HER2 & chromosome 17 centromere (CEN17 brightfield ISH (BISH and HER2 IHC assays into a single automated HER2 gene-protein assay allowing simultaneous detection of all three targets in a single tissue section. Methods The HER2 gene-protein assay was optimized using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples of the xenograft tumors MCF7 [HER2 negative (non-amplified gene, protein negative] and Calu-3 [HER2 positive (amplified gene, protein positive]. HER2 IHC was performed using a rabbit monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody (clone 4B5 and a conventional 3,3'-diaminobenzidine IHC detection. The HER2 & CEN17 BISH signals were visualized using horseradish peroxidase-based silver and alkaline phosphatase-based red detection systems, respectively with a cocktail of 2,4-dinitrophenyl-labeled HER2 and digoxigenin-labeled CEN17 probes. The performance of the gene-protein assay on tissue microarray slides containing 189 randomly selected FFPE clinical breast cancer tissue cores was compared to that of the separate HER2 IHC and HER2 & CEN17 BISH assays. Results HER2 protein detection was optimal when the HER2 IHC protocol was used before (rather than after the BISH protocol. The sequential use of HER2 IHC and HER2 & CEN17 BISH detection steps on FFPE xenograft tumor sections appropriately co-localized the HER2 protein, HER2 gene, and CEN17 signals after mitigating the silver background staining by using a naphthol phosphate-containing hybridization buffer for the hybridization step. The HER2 protein and HER2 gene status obtained using the multiplex HER2 gene

  10. 7 CFR 905.8 - Prepare for market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prepare for market. 905.8 Section 905.8 Agriculture... TANGELOS GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 905.8 Prepare for market. Prepare for market means to wash, grade, size, or place fruit (whether or not wrapped) into any container whatsoever...

  11. 32 CFR 989.23 - Contractor prepared documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contractor prepared documents. 989.23 Section... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.23 Contractor prepared documents. All Air Force... should reflect on the cover sheet they are an Air Force document. Contractor preparation information...

  12. 29 CFR 780.911 - Preparation for transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preparation for transportation. 780.911 Section 780.911... Employment in Fruit and Vegetable Harvest Transportation; Exemption From Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section 13(b)(16) Exempt Operations on Fruits Or Vegetables § 780.911 Preparation for transportation. The...

  13. SEM investigation of heart tissue samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, R; Amoroso, M [Physics Department, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies (Trinidad and Tobago)

    2010-07-01

    We used the scanning electron microscope to examine the cardiac tissue of a cow (Bos taurus), a pig (Sus scrofa), and a human (Homo sapiens). 1mm{sup 3} blocks of left ventricular tissue were prepared for SEM scanning by fixing in 96% ethanol followed by critical point drying (cryofixation), then sputter-coating with gold. The typical ridged structure of the myofibrils was observed for all the species. In addition crystal like structures were found in one of the samples of the heart tissue of the pig. These structures were investigated further using an EDVAC x-ray analysis attachment to the SEM. Elemental x-ray analysis showed highest peaks occurred for gold, followed by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium. As the samples were coated with gold for conductivity, this highest peak is expected. Much lower peaks at carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium suggest that a cystallized salt such as a carbonate was present in the tissue before sacrifice.

  14. SEM investigation of heart tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, R; Amoroso, M

    2010-01-01

    We used the scanning electron microscope to examine the cardiac tissue of a cow (Bos taurus), a pig (Sus scrofa), and a human (Homo sapiens). 1mm 3 blocks of left ventricular tissue were prepared for SEM scanning by fixing in 96% ethanol followed by critical point drying (cryofixation), then sputter-coating with gold. The typical ridged structure of the myofibrils was observed for all the species. In addition crystal like structures were found in one of the samples of the heart tissue of the pig. These structures were investigated further using an EDVAC x-ray analysis attachment to the SEM. Elemental x-ray analysis showed highest peaks occurred for gold, followed by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium. As the samples were coated with gold for conductivity, this highest peak is expected. Much lower peaks at carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium suggest that a cystallized salt such as a carbonate was present in the tissue before sacrifice.

  15. Cell and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    “Cell and Tissue Engineering” introduces the principles and new approaches in cell and tissue engineering. It includes both the fundamentals and the current trends in cell and tissue engineering, in a way useful both to a novice and an expert in the field. The book is composed of 13 chapters all of which are written by the leading experts. It is organized to gradually assemble an insight in cell and tissue function starting form a molecular nano-level, extending to a cellular micro-level and finishing at the tissue macro-level. In specific, biological, physiological, biophysical, biochemical, medical, and engineering aspects are covered from the standpoint of the development of functional substitutes of biological tissues for potential clinical use. Topics in the area of cell engineering include cell membrane biophysics, structure and function of the cytoskeleton, cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and mechanotransduction. In the area of tissue engineering the focus is on the in vitro cultivation of ...

  16. Atomic force microscopy of histological sections using a chemical etching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiribilli, B.; Bani, D.; Quercioli, F.; Ghirelli, A.; Vassalli, M.

    2005-01-01

    Physiology and pathology have a big deal on tissue morphology, and the intrinsic spatial resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is able to observe ultrastructural details. In order to investigate cellular and subcellular structures in histological sections with the AFM, we used a new simple method for sample preparation, i.e. chemical etching of semithin sections from epoxy resin-embedded specimens: such treatment appears to melt the upper layers of the embedding resin; thus, removing the superficial roughness caused by the edge of the microtome knife and bringing into high relief the biological structures hidden in the bulk. Consecutive ultrathin sections embedded in epoxy resin were observed with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to compare the different imaging properties on the same specimen sample. In this paper we report, as an example, our AFM and TEM images of two different tissue specimens, rat pancreas and skeletal muscle fibres, showing that most of the inner details are visible with the AFM. These results suggest that chemical etching of histological sections may be a simple, fast and cost-effective method for AFM imaging with ultrastructural resolution

  17. [Strategies to choose scaffold materials for tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qingdong; Zhu, Xulong; Xiang, Junxi; Lü, Yi; Li, Jianhui

    2016-02-01

    Current therapies of organ failure or a wide range of tissue defect are often not ideal. Transplantation is the only effective way for long time survival. But it is hard to meet huge patients demands because of donor shortage, immune rejection and other problems. Tissue engineering could be a potential option. Choosing a suitable scaffold material is an essential part of it. According to different sources, tissue engineering scaffold materials could be divided into three types which are natural and its modified materials, artificial and composite ones. The purpose of tissue engineering scaffold is to repair the tissues or organs damage, so could reach the ideal recovery in its function and structure aspect. Therefore, tissue engineering scaffold should even be as close as much to the original tissue or organs in function and structure. We call it "organic scaffold" and this strategy might be the drastic perfect substitute for the tissues or organs in concern. Optimized organization with each kind scaffold materials could make up for biomimetic structure and function of the tissue or organs. Scaffold material surface modification, optimized preparation procedure and cytosine sustained-release microsphere addition should be considered together. This strategy is expected to open new perspectives for tissue engineering. Multidisciplinary approach including material science, molecular biology, and engineering might find the most ideal tissue engineering scaffold. Using the strategy of drawing on each other strength and optimized organization with each kind scaffold material to prepare a multifunctional biomimetic tissue engineering scaffold might be a good method for choosing tissue engineering scaffold materials. Our research group had differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into bile canaliculi like cells. We prepared poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(ε-caprolactone) biliary stent. The scaffold's internal played a part in the long-term release of cytokines which

  18. Engineering Complex Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIKOS, ANTONIOS G.; HERRING, SUSAN W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; LU, HELEN H.; KANDEL, RITA; SCHOEN, FREDERICK J.; TONER, MEHMET; MOONEY, DAVID; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; KAPLAN, DAVID; VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC, GORDANA

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elisseeff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from “adult biology” of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician’s perspective for functional tissue

  19. Photothermal effects of laser tissue soldering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, K.M.; Sorg, B.S.; Welch, A.J.; Dawes, J.M.; Owen, E.R.

    1999-01-01

    Low-strength anastomoses and thermal damage of tissue are major concerns in laser tissue welding techniques where laser energy is used to induce thermal changes in the molecular structure of the tissues being joined, hence allowing them to bond together. Laser tissue soldering, on the other hand, is a bonding technique in which a protein solder is applied to the tissue surfaces to be joined, and laser energy is used to bond the solder to the tissue surfaces. The addition of protein solders to augment tissue repair procedures significantly reduces the problems of low strength and thermal damage associated with laser tissue welding techniques. Investigations were conducted to determine optimal solder and laser parameters for tissue repair in terms of tensile strength, temperature rise and damage and the microscopic nature of the bonds formed. An in vitro study was performed using an 808 nm diode laser in conjunction with indocyanine green (ICG)-doped albumin protein solders to repair bovine aorta specimens. Liquid and solid protein solders prepared from 25% and 60% bovine serum albumin (BSA), respectively, were compared. The efficacy of temperature feedback control in enhancing the soldering process was also investigated. Increasing the BSA concentration from 25% to 60% greatly increased the tensile strength of the repairs. A reduction in dye concentration from 2.5mgml -1 to 0.25mgml -1 was also found to result in an increase in tensile strength. Increasing the laser irradiance and thus surface temperature resulted in an increased severity of histological injury. Thermal denaturation of tissue collagen and necrosis of the intimal layer smooth muscle cells increased laterally and in depth with higher temperatures. The strongest repairs were produced with an irradiance of 6.4Wcm -2 using a solid protein solder composed of 60% BSA and 0.25mgml -1 ICG. Using this combination of laser and solder parameters, surface temperatures were observed to reach 85±5 deg. C with a

  20. Engineering Musculoskeletal Tissue Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Bayrak

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering aims to bring together biomaterials, cells, and signaling molecules within properly designed microenvironments in order to create viable treatment options for the lost or malfunctioning tissues. Design and production of scaffolds and cell-laden grafts that mimic the complex structural and functional features of tissues are among the most important elements of tissue engineering strategy. Although all tissues have their own complex structure, an even more complex case in terms of engineering a proper carrier material is encountered at the tissue interfaces, where two distinct tissues come together. The interfaces in the body can be examined in four categories; cartilage-bone and ligament-bone interfaces at the knee and the spine, tendon-bone interfaces at the shoulder and the feet, and muscle-tendon interface at the skeletal system. These interfaces are seen mainly at the soft-to-hard tissue transitions and they are especially susceptible to injury and tear due to the biomechanical inconsistency between these tissues where high strain fields are present. Therefore, engineering the musculoskeletal tissue interfaces remain a challenge. This review focuses on recent advancements in strategies for musculoskeletal interface engineering using different biomaterial-based platforms and surface modification techniques.

  1. Cross-sectional anatomy for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    This self-study guide recognizes that evaluation and interpretation of CT-images demands a firm understanding of both cross-sectional anatomy and the principles of computed tomography. The objectives of this book are: to discuss the basic principles of CT, to stress the importance of cross-sectional anatomy to CT through study of selected cardinal transverse sections of head, neck, and trunk, to explain orientation and interpretation of CT-images with the aid of corresponding cross-sectional preparations

  2. Histopathological pattern of soft tissues tumors and tumour like lesions in the pathology department of lady reading hospital peshawar, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjad, M.; Ahmad, F.

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissues tumours are tumours of mesenchymal origin excluding epithelial, skeletal tissue, reticuloendothelial system, brain coverings and solid viscera of the body. The objective of this study was to know the histopathological pattern of soft tissues tumours in the Pathology Department of Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Pakistan. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on retrospective data from January 2009 to December 2013. All the soft tissues biopsy specimens were received in 10% formalin, labelled, gross performed, sections processed in alcohol, xylene, wax, block prepared, frozen, microtome sections taken and processed for H and E staining, mounted and reported by a Histopathologist. The inclusion criteria was any sufficient soft tissue tumour biopsy specimen of any age, sex, location in body whereas the exclusion criteria was autolysed biopsy specimen. A minimum of four and maximum of eight sections and 5 micron thick were taken from each specimen. Results: A total of 267 soft tissues tumours biopsy specimens were received in the pathology laboratory with age range of 01 to 75 years, with mean age of 30.68+-17.71 years. Male to female ratio was 1.13:1. Amongst the total, benign tumours were 176 (65.91%). Haemangioma, 73 (27.3%) was the commonest tumours followed by lipomas 41 (15.4%) cases. Amongst the total malignant tumours, i.e., 91 (34.08%), rhabdomyosarcoma, 35 (13.1%) was the commonest tumour followed by angiosarcoma 14 (5.2%) cases. Conclusion: Haemangioma is the commonest benign tumour and rhabdomyosarcoma is the commonest malignant tumour in this study. (author)

  3. Operating Room Fires and Surgical Skin Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edward L; Overbey, Douglas M; Chapman, Brandon C; Jones, Teresa S; Hilton, Sarah A; Moore, John T; Robinson, Thomas N

    2017-07-01

    Operating room fires are "never events" that remain an under-reported source of devastating complications. One common set-up that promotes fires is the use of surgical skin preparations combined with electrosurgery and oxygen. Limited data exist examining the incidence of fires and surgical skin preparations. A standardized, ex vivo model was created with a 15 × 15 cm section of clipped porcine skin. An electrosurgical "Bovie" pencil was activated for 2 seconds on 30 Watts coagulation mode in 21% oxygen (room air), both immediately and 3 minutes after skin preparation application. Skin preparations with and without alcohol were tested, and were applied with and without pooling. Alcohol-based skin preparations included 70% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate, 74% IPA with 0.7% iodine povacrylex, and plain 70% IPA. No fires occurred with nonalcohol-based preparations (p fires occurred in 38% (23 of 60) at 0 minutes and 27% (16 of 60) at 3 minutes. Alcohol-based skin preparations fuel operating room fires in common clinical scenarios. Following manufacturer guidelines and allowing 3 minutes for drying, surgical fires were still created in 1 in 10 cases without pooling and more than one-quarter of cases with pooling. Surgeons can decrease the risk of an operating room fire by using nonalcohol-based skin preparations or avoiding pooling of the preparation solution. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla F.; Olsen, Maja E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2011-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle – although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  5. Tissue engineering in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Salih, Vehid M; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. The authors used "PUBMED" to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., "tissue engineering", "approaches", "strategies" "dentistry", "dental stem cells", "dentino-pulp complex", "guided tissue regeneration", "whole tooth", "TMJ", "condyle", "salivary glands", and "oral mucosa". Abstracts and full text articles were used to identify causes of craniofacial tissue loss, different approaches for craniofacial reconstructions, how the tissue engineering emerges, different strategies of tissue engineering, biomaterials employed for this purpose, the major attempts to engineer different dental structures, finally challenges and future of tissue engineering in dentistry. Only those articles that dealt with the tissue engineering in dentistry were selected. There have been a recent surge in guided tissue engineering methods to manage periodontal diseases beyond the traditional approaches. However, the predictable reconstruction of the innate organisation and function of whole teeth as well as their periodontal structures remains challenging. Despite some limited progress and minor successes, there remain distinct and important challenges in the development of reproducible and clinically safe approaches for oral tissue repair and regeneration. Clearly, there is a convincing body of evidence which confirms the need for this type of treatment, and public health data worldwide indicates a more than adequate patient resource. The future of these therapies involving more biological approaches and the use of dental tissue stem cells is promising and advancing. Also there may be a significant interest of their application and wider potential to treat disorders beyond the craniofacial region. Considering the

  6. Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther J.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials serve as an integral component of tissue engineering. They are designed to provide architectural framework reminiscent of native extracellular matrix in order to encourage cell growth and eventual tissue regeneration. Bone and cartilage represent two distinct tissues with varying compositional and mechanical properties. Despite these differences, both meet at the osteochondral interface. This article presents an overview of current biomaterials employed in bone and cartilage applications, discusses some design considerations, and alludes to future prospects within this field of research. PMID:23820768

  7. Tissue Microarray Analysis Applied to Bone Diagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Barrios Mello, Rafael; Regis Silva, Maria Regina; Seixas Alves, Maria Teresa; Evison, Martin; Guimarães, Marco Aurélio; Francisco, Rafaella Arrabaça; Dias Astolphi, Rafael; Miazato Iwamura, Edna Sadayo

    2017-01-01

    Taphonomic processes affecting bone post mortem are important in forensic, archaeological and palaeontological investigations. In this study, the application of tissue microarray (TMA) analysis to a sample of femoral bone specimens from 20 exhumed individuals of known period of burial and age at death is described. TMA allows multiplexing of subsamples, permitting standardized comparative analysis of adjacent sections in 3-D and of representative cross-sections of a large number of specimens....

  8. Inmunomarcación de neuronas dopaminérgicas en cortes flotantes de hipotálamo de rata: preservación alternativa del tejido nervioso antes del corte Immunohistochemical Studies Of Dopaminergic Neurons On Free Floating Sections: Alternative Cryopreservation Method Of Nervous Tissue Before Cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Cholich

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio inmunohistoquímico de la enzima tirosina hidroxilasa (marcador de neuronas dopaminérgicas en el hipotálamo de ratas Wistar machos adultas en cortes flotantes de muestras fijadas por perfusión. Debido a que el número de cerebros que se procesaron fue superior al número que pueden ser cortados inmediatamente, el material debió almacenarse congelando los cerebros enteros a -80ºC. Pero por un desperfecto técnico del equipo de refrigeración, las muestras debieron trasladarse a -20ºC resultando en el deterioro de las mismas. Ante este inconveniente, los sucesivos cerebros fueron almacenados en sacarosa al 30% p/v en buffer fosfato salino (PBS con 0,01% de azida sódica y mantenidos a 4ºC durante tiempos variables (de semanas a meses hasta ser congelados con gas clorofluorado y cortados. Estos cerebros no mostraron alteración en la estructura morfológica del tejido. Esta metodología de preservación aquí descrita sería una alternativa de elección válida para aquellos laboratorios que no cuenten con un equipo de refrigeración de -80ºC.In central nervous system histological studies, free-floating sections of perfusion-fixed samples are frequently used. Samples storage may be performed freezing either the entire brain at -80ºC or sections at -20ºC. When studying hypothalamic tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme (dopaminergic neurons marker by immunohistochemistry in adult male Wistar rats, entire brains were stored at -80ºC. Due to an abrupt freezer technical failure, samples should be thawed to -20ºC with the resulting samples damage. To avoid this situation, subsequent brains were stored in 30% sucrose in saline phosphate buffer (PBS with 0.01% sodium azide and kept at 4ºC for different periods (weeks to months until they were frozen with chlorofluorade gas and cut. These brains showed no morphological alterations of tissue structure. This preservation method appeared to be an alternative valid option to

  9. Brain tissue stiffness is a sensitive marker for acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzmann, Kathrin; Gautier, Hélène O B; Christ, Andreas F; Guck, Jochen; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra; Franze, Kristian

    2016-09-15

    Carbon dioxide overdose is frequently used to cull rodents for tissue harvesting. However, this treatment may lead to respiratory acidosis, which potentially could change the properties of the investigated tissue. Mechanical tissue properties often change in pathological conditions and may thus offer a sensitive generic readout for changes in biological tissues with clinical relevance. In this study, we performed force-indentation measurements with an atomic force microscope on acute cerebellar slices from adult rats to test if brain tissue undergoes changes following overexposure to CO2 compared to other methods of euthanasia. The pH significantly decreased in brain tissue of animals exposed to CO2. Concomitant with the drop in pH, cerebellar grey matter significantly stiffened. Tissue stiffening was reproduced by incubation of acute cerebellar slices in acidic medium. Tissue stiffness provides an early, generic indicator for pathophysiological changes in the CNS. Atomic force microscopy offers unprecedented high spatial resolution to detect such changes. Our results indicate that the stiffness particularly of grey matter strongly correlates with changes of the pH in the cerebellum. Furthermore, the method of tissue harvesting and preparation may not only change tissue stiffness but very likely also other physiologically relevant parameters, highlighting the importance of appropriate sample preparation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Preservation and storage of prepared ballistic gelatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattijssen, E J A T; Alberink, I; Jacobs, B; van den Boogaard, Y

    2016-02-01

    The use of ballistic gelatine, generally accepted as a human muscle tissue simulant in wound ballistic studies, might be improved by adding a preservative (Methyl 4-hydroxybenzoate) which inhibits microbial growth. This study shows that replacing a part of the gelatine powder by the preservative does not significantly alter the penetration depth of projectiles. Storing prepared blocks of ballistic gelatine over time decreased the penetration depth of projectiles. Storage of prepared gelatine for 4 week already showed a significant effect on the penetration depth of projectiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of chronic administration of ketoconazol on spermatogenesis indices and testis tissue in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E Safavi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Ketoconazole, a broad spectrum antifungal agent has been employed widely in the treatment of fungal diseases. In addition to being antifungal, studies have indicated that this drug has an inhibitory effect on steroid hormone production including glucocorticoids and sex hormones and also its administration causes reduction in the amount of blood testosterone level and histologic changes in testicular tissue of laboratory animals. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of long term ketoconazole administration on spermatogenesis indices in testicular tissue of mice. In this experimental study 50 male mice were used which were allocated to 5 groups each containing 10 animals. The mice received a 50 mg/kg dose of ketoconazole daily for a period of 15 days, 1, 2 and 3 months orally. One group was used as the control and the other 4 groups received Ketoconazole, testicular tissue samples were collected at the end of the aforementioned time period, and after preparation of tissue sections and staining with hematoxylin and coin the spermiogenesis indices including tubular differentiation index (TDI, spermatogenesis index (SI and repopulation index (RI were studied. The results indicated that SI and RI decreased significantly (p

  12. A prototype for unsupervised analysis of tissue microarrays for cancer research and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenjin; Reiss, Michael; Foran, David J

    2004-06-01

    The tissue microarray (TMA) technique enables researchers to extract small cylinders of tissue from histological sections and arrange them in a matrix configuration on a recipient paraffin block such that hundreds can be analyzed simultaneously. TMA offers several advantages over traditional specimen preparation by maximizing limited tissue resources and providing a highly efficient means for visualizing molecular targets. By enabling researchers to reliably determine the protein expression profile for specific types of cancer, it may be possible to elucidate the mechanism by which healthy tissues are transformed into malignancies. Currently, the primary methods used to evaluate arrays involve the interactive review of TMA samples while they are viewed under a microscope, subjectively evaluated, and scored by a technician. This process is extremely slow, tedious, and prone to error. In order to facilitate large-scale, multi-institutional studies, a more automated and reliable means for analyzing TMAs is needed. We report here a web-based prototype which features automated imaging, registration, and distributed archiving of TMAs in multiuser network environments. The system utilizes a principal color decomposition approach to identify and characterize the predominant staining signatures of specimens in color space. This strategy was shown to be reliable for detecting and quantifying the immunohistochemical expression levels for TMAs.

  13. Slide-free histology via MUSE: UV surface excitation microscopy for imaging unsectioned tissue (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Richard M.; Harmany, Zachary; Demos, Stavros G.; Fereidouni, Farzad

    2016-03-01

    Widely used methods for preparing and viewing tissue specimens at microscopic resolution have not changed for over a century. They provide high-quality images but can involve time-frames of hours or even weeks, depending on logistics. There is increasing interest in slide-free methods for rapid tissue analysis that can both decrease turn-around times and reduce costs. One new approach is MUSE (microscopy with UV surface excitation), which exploits the shallow penetration of UV light to excite fluorescent signals from only the most superficial tissue elements. The method is non-destructive, and eliminates requirement for conventional histology processing, formalin fixation, paraffin embedding, or thin sectioning. It requires no lasers, confocal, multiphoton or optical coherence tomography optics. MUSE generates diagnostic-quality histological images that can be rendered to resemble conventional hematoxylin- and eosin-stained samples, with enhanced topographical information, from fresh or fixed, but unsectioned tissue, rapidly, with high resolution, simply and inexpensively. We anticipate that there could be widespread adoption in research facilities, hospital-based and stand-alone clinical settings, in local or regional pathology labs, as well as in low-resource environments.

  14. Intrinsic regulation of blood flow in adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Nielsen, Steen Levin; Paaske, W

    1976-01-01

    Previous studies on intact human subcutaneous tissue have shown, that blood flow remains constant during minor changes in perfusion pressure. This so-called autoregulatory response has not been demonstrable in isolated preparations of adipose tissue. In the present study on isolated, denervated...... subcutaneous tissue in female rabbits only 2 of 12 expts. revealed an autoregulatory response during reduction in arterial perfusion pressure. Effluent blood flow from the tissue in the control state was 15.5 ml/100 g-min (S.D. 6.4, n = 12) corresponding to slight vasodilatation of the exposed tissue...... vasoconstriction with pronounced flow reduction. These two reactions may be important for local regulation of blood flow in subcutaneous tissue during orthostatic changes in arterial and venous pressure. It is concluded that the response in adipose tissue to changes in arterial pressure (autoregulation), venous...

  15. Preparation of designed poly(D,L-lactide)/nanosized hydroxyapatite composite structures by stereolithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronca, A.; Ambrosio, L.; Grijpma, D. W.

    The preparation of scaffolds to facilitate the replacement of damaged tissues and organs by means of tissue engineering has been much investigated. The key properties of the biomaterials used to prepare such scaffolds include biodegradability, biocompatibility and a well-defined three-dimensional

  16. Preparation of designed poly(d,l-lactide)/nanosized hydroxyapatite composite structures by stereolithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronca, A.; Ambrosio, L.; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    2013-01-01

    The preparation of scaffolds to facilitate the replacement of damaged tissues and organs by means of tissue engineering has been much investigated. The key properties of the biomaterials used to prepare such scaffolds include biodegradability, biocompatibility and a well-defined three-dimensional

  17. Industrial tissue: perennialization of suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, M.; Hutin, J.P.; Tetreau, F.

    1996-01-01

    The durability of industrial tissue is a necessary condition, and certainly the most important, for the performance of actual park and the successful of its renewal. Reciprocally, the maintenance and the evolution of the actual park, the preparation of its renewal, are sources of activities to insure this durability of industrial and favour their international development. In the period of reduced activity, which began for the nuclear market, the dialogue which has always existed between EDF and its suppliers must be reinforced, in the respect of their respective responsibility, to insure: a right reciprocal understanding of activities and strategies, a right adaptation to these activities, and finally, the maintenance of the competitiveness. (N.C.)

  18. Chitosan based nanofibers in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagangadharan, K; Dhivya, S; Selvamurugan, N

    2017-11-01

    Bone tissue engineering involves biomaterials, cells and regulatory factors to make biosynthetic bone grafts with efficient mineralization for regeneration of fractured or damaged bones. Out of all the techniques available for scaffold preparation, electrospinning is given priority as it can fabricate nanostructures. Also, electrospun nanofibers possess unique properties such as the high surface area to volume ratio, porosity, stability, permeability and morphological similarity to that of extra cellular matrix. Chitosan (CS) has a significant edge over other materials and as a graft material, CS can be used alone or in combination with other materials in the form of nanofibers to provide the structural and biochemical cues for acceleration of bone regeneration. Hence, this review was aimed to provide a detailed study available on CS and its composites prepared as nanofibers, and their associated properties found suitable for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular imaging of lipids in cells and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borner, Katrin; Malmberg, Per; Mansson, Jan-Eric; Nygren, Hakan

    2007-02-01

    The distribution pattern of lipid species in biological tissues was analyzed with imaging mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS; time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry). The first application shows distribution of a glycosphingolipid, the galactosylceramide-sulfate (sulfatide) with different hydrocarbon chain lengths and the fatty acids palmitate and oleate in rat cerebellum. Sulfatides were seen localized in regions suggested as paranodal areas of rat cerebellar white matter as well as in the granular layer, with highest concentrations at the borders of the white matter. Different distribution patterns could be shown for the fatty acid C16:0 palmitate and C18:1 oleate in rat cerebellum, which seem to origin partly from the hydrocarbon chains of phosphatidylcholine. Results were shown for two different tissue preparation methods, which were plunge-freezing and cryostat sectioning as well as high-pressure freezing, freeze-fracturing and freeze-drying. The second application shows TOF-SIMS analysis on a biological trial of choleratoxin treatment in mouse intestine. The effect of cholera toxin on lipids in the intestinal epithelium was shown by comparing control and cholera toxin treated mouse intestine samples. A significant increase of the cholesterol concentration was seen after treatment. Cholesterol was mainly localized to the brush border of enterocytes of the intestinal villi, which could be explained by the presence of cholesterol-rich lipid rafts present on the microvilli or by relations to cholesterol uptake. After cholera toxin exposure, cholesterol was seen increased in the nuclei of enterocytes and apparently in the interstitium of the villi. We find that imaging TOF-SIMS is a powerful tool for studies of lipid distributions in cells and tissues, enabling the elucidation of their role in cell function and biology.

  20. Can tissues be owned?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-17

    Jun 17, 2013 ... Regulations Regarding Rendering of Clinical Forensic Medicine ... 1 Special Interest Research Group on Biotechnology and Medical Law of the College of Law, University of ... persons for the following medical and dental purposes: ... tissue to the international market were taking tissue without consent.

  1. Neural tissue-spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke K; Johansen, Mathias; Blaabjerg, Morten

    2007-01-01

    By combining new and established protocols we have developed a procedure for isolation and propagation of neural precursor cells from the forebrain subventricular zone (SVZ) of newborn rats. Small tissue blocks of the SVZ were dissected and propagated en bloc as free-floating neural tissue...... content, thus allowing experimental studies of neural precursor cells and their niche...

  2. The use of animal tissues alongside human tissue: Cultural and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaw, Anu; Jones, D Gareth; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and research facilities often use cadaveric material alongside animal tissues, although there appear to be differences in the way we handle, treat, and dispose of human cadaveric material compared to animal tissue. This study sought to analyze cultural and ethical considerations and provides policy recommendations on the use of animal tissues alongside human tissue. The status of human and animal remains and the respect because of human and animal tissues were compared and analyzed from ethical, legal, and cultural perspectives. The use of animal organs and tissues is carried out within the context of understanding human anatomy and function. Consequently, the interests of human donors are to be pre-eminent in any policies that are enunciated, so that if any donors find the presence of animal remains unacceptable, the latter should not be employed. The major differences appear to lie in differences in our perceptions of their respective intrinsic and instrumental values. Animals are considered to have lesser intrinsic value and greater instrumental value than humans. These differences stem from the role played by culture and ethical considerations, and are manifested in the resulting legal frameworks. In light of this discussion, six policy recommendations are proposed, encompassing the nature of consent, respect for animal tissues as well as human remains, and appropriate separation of both sets of tissues in preparation and display. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Post caesarean section anterior abdominal wall endometriosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdominal wall endometriosis is a likely sequelae of caesarean section as viable endometrial tissue are deposited in the peritoneal cavity or anterior abdominal wall. One such case to sensitize clinicians of this rare presentation of the disease is presented. The patient was a 48 year old woman who presented with a lesion ...

  4. Ga-67 uptake post cesarean section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, O.L.; Maisano, E.R.

    1984-02-01

    Gallium-67 distribution in normal patients is well known; it is also known that the concentration in some tissues may vary according to an individual physiologic stimulus. In this report, the case of a young woman is presented who was studied 15 days after a cesarean section and showed physiologic and pathologic Ga-67 accumulation.

  5. Ga-67 uptake post cesarean section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, O.L.; Maisano, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    Gallium-67 distribution in normal patients is well known; it is also known that the concentration in some tissues may vary according to an individual physiologic stimulus. In this report, the case of a young woman is presented who was studied 15 days after a cesarean section and showed physiologic and pathologic Ga-67 accumulation

  6. Materials Preparation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — MPC is recognized throughout the worldwide research community for its unique capabilities in purification, preparation, and characterization of: rare earth metals,...

  7. Debridement and wound bed preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falabella, Anna F

    2006-01-01

    Debridement can play a vital role in wound bed preparation and the removal of barriers that impair wound healing. In accordance with the TIME principles, debridement can help remove nonviable tissue, control inflammation or infection, decrease excess moisture, and stimulate a nonadvancing wound edge. There are many types of debridement, each with a set of advantages and disadvantages that must be clearly understood by the healthcare team. Failure to use the correct debridement method for a given type of wound may lead to further delays in healing, increase patient suffering, and unnecessarily increase the cost of care. This review article discusses the various methods of debridement, describes currently available debriding agents, evaluates the clinical data regarding their efficacy and safety, and describes strategies for the management of problematic nonhealing wounds.

  8. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  9. Traction force microscopy of engineered cardiac tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Francesco Silvio; Agarwal, Ashutosh; O'Connor, Blakely Bussie; Liu, Qihan; Sheehy, Sean P; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac tissue development and pathology have been shown to depend sensitively on microenvironmental mechanical factors, such as extracellular matrix stiffness, in both in vivo and in vitro systems. We present a novel quantitative approach to assess cardiac structure and function by extending the classical traction force microscopy technique to tissue-level preparations. Using this system, we investigated the relationship between contractile proficiency and metabolism in neonate rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) cultured on gels with stiffness mimicking soft immature (1 kPa), normal healthy (13 kPa), and stiff diseased (90 kPa) cardiac microenvironments. We found that tissues engineered on the softest gels generated the least amount of stress and had the smallest work output. Conversely, cardiomyocytes in tissues engineered on healthy- and disease-mimicking gels generated significantly higher stresses, with the maximal contractile work measured in NRVM engineered on gels of normal stiffness. Interestingly, although tissues on soft gels exhibited poor stress generation and work production, their basal metabolic respiration rate was significantly more elevated than in other groups, suggesting a highly ineffective coupling between energy production and contractile work output. Our novel platform can thus be utilized to quantitatively assess the mechanotransduction pathways that initiate tissue-level structural and functional remodeling in response to substrate stiffness.

  10. Tissue Printing to Visualize Polyphenol Oxidase and Peroxidase in Vegetables, Fruits, and Mushrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melberg, Amanda R.; Flurkey, William H.; Inlow, Jennifer K.

    2009-01-01

    A simple tissue-printing procedure to determine the tissue location of the endogenous enzymes polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in a variety of vegetables, fruits, and mushrooms is described. In tissue printing, cell contents from the surface of a cut section of the tissue are transferred to an adsorptive surface, commonly a nitrocellulose…

  11. Extravascular transport in normal and tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R K; Gerlowski, L E

    1986-01-01

    The transport characteristics of the normal and tumor tissue extravascular space provide the basis for the determination of the optimal dosage and schedule regimes of various pharmacological agents in detection and treatment of cancer. In order for the drug to reach the cellular space where most therapeutic action takes place, several transport steps must first occur: (1) tissue perfusion; (2) permeation across the capillary wall; (3) transport through interstitial space; and (4) transport across the cell membrane. Any of these steps including intracellular events such as metabolism can be the rate-limiting step to uptake of the drug, and these rate-limiting steps may be different in normal and tumor tissues. This review examines these transport limitations, first from an experimental point of view and then from a modeling point of view. Various types of experimental tumor models which have been used in animals to represent human tumors are discussed. Then, mathematical models of extravascular transport are discussed from the prespective of two approaches: compartmental and distributed. Compartmental models lump one or more sections of a tissue or body into a "compartment" to describe the time course of disposition of a substance. These models contain "effective" parameters which represent the entire compartment. Distributed models consider the structural and morphological aspects of the tissue to determine the transport properties of that tissue. These distributed models describe both the temporal and spatial distribution of a substance in tissues. Each of these modeling techniques is described in detail with applications for cancer detection and treatment in mind.

  12. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  13. Electroactive Tissue Scaffolds with Aligned Pores as Instructive Platforms for Biomimetic Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, John G; Cornelison, R Chase; Sukhavasi, Rushi C; Saballos, Richard J; Vu, Philip; Kaplan, David L; Schmidt, Christine E

    2015-01-14

    Tissues in the body are hierarchically structured composite materials with tissue-specific chemical and topographical properties. Here we report the preparation of tissue scaffolds with macroscopic pores generated via the dissolution of a sacrificial supramolecular polymer-based crystal template (urea) from a biodegradable polymer-based scaffold (polycaprolactone, PCL). Furthermore, we report a method of aligning the supramolecular polymer-based crystals within the PCL, and that the dissolution of the sacrificial urea yields scaffolds with macroscopic pores that are aligned over long, clinically-relevant distances ( i.e ., centimeter scale). The pores act as topographical cues to which rat Schwann cells respond by aligning with the long axis of the pores. Generation of an interpenetrating network of polypyrrole (PPy) and poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) in the scaffolds yields electroactive tissue scaffolds that allow the electrical stimulation of Schwann cells cultured on the scaffolds which increases the production of nerve growth factor (NGF).

  14. Electroactive Tissue Scaffolds with Aligned Pores as Instructive Platforms for Biomimetic Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Hardy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissues in the body are hierarchically structured composite materials with tissue-specific chemical and topographical properties. Here we report the preparation of tissue scaffolds with macroscopic pores generated via the dissolution of a sacrificial supramolecular polymer-based crystal template (urea from a biodegradable polymer-based scaffold (polycaprolactone, PCL. Furthermore, we report a method of aligning the supramolecular polymer-based crystals within the PCL, and that the dissolution of the sacrificial urea yields scaffolds with macroscopic pores that are aligned over long, clinically-relevant distances (i.e., centimeter scale. The pores act as topographical cues to which rat Schwann cells respond by aligning with the long axis of the pores. Generation of an interpenetrating network of polypyrrole (PPy and poly(styrene sulfonate (PSS in the scaffolds yields electroactive tissue scaffolds that allow the electrical stimulation of Schwann cells cultured on the scaffolds which increases the production of nerve growth factor (NGF.

  15. Documents preparation and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Ignalina Safety Analysis Group takes active role in assisting regulatory body VATESI to prepare various regulatory documents and reviewing safety reports and other documentation presented by Ignalina NPP in the process of licensing of unit 1. The list of main documents prepared and reviewed is presented

  16. 40 CFR 86.1432 - Vehicle preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle preparation. 86.1432 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Vehicles and New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty...

  17. Professional Preparation in Physical Education and Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is the product of a conference of the American Association of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, the purpose of which was to revise professional preparation quidelines in dance, physical education, recreation education, and health and safety education. This report includes sections on physical education and coaching and on…

  18. Data preparation for the computer code FLIRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veale, M E.R.; Wrigley, H E [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-08-15

    The report describes the data preparation for the reactor transient programme FLIRT, and the method of operation of the programme. It includes examples of both input and output for a typical transient calculation. It also includes a section on the numerical techniques used to increase the speed of solution. (author)

  19. Modification in the assembly technique of histological sections for analysis of spatial distribution of boron by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portu, A; Carpano, M; Dagrosa, A; Pozzi, E; Thorp, S; Curotto, P; Cabrini, R L; Saint Martin, G

    2012-01-01

    . It is necessary to find out other techniques to preserve necrotic areas for quantification. The preparation of tissue sections embedded in paraffin is widely used in pathology laboratories technique. To achieve these cuts, the samples must be processed previously. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using tissue sections embedded in paraffin as alternative arrangement, in order to preserve the structures that are damaged in frozen sections (author)

  20. High resolution SEM imaging of gold nanoparticles in cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, A; Soroka, Y; Frušić-Zlotkin, M; Popov, I; Kohen, R

    2014-12-01

    The growing demand of gold nanoparticles in medical applications increases the need for simple and efficient characterization methods of the interaction between the nanoparticles and biological systems. Due to its nanometre resolution, modern scanning electron microscopy (SEM) offers straightforward visualization of metallic nanoparticles down to a few nanometre size, almost without any special preparation step. However, visualization of biological materials in SEM requires complicated preparation procedure, which is typically finished by metal coating needed to decrease charging artefacts and quick radiation damage of biomaterials in the course of SEM imaging. The finest conductive metal coating available is usually composed of a few nanometre size clusters, which are almost identical to the metal nanoparticles employed in medical applications. Therefore, SEM monitoring of metal nanoparticles within cells and tissues is incompatible with the conventional preparation methods. In this work, we show that charging artefacts related to non-conductive biological specimen can be successfully eliminated by placing the uncoated biological sample on a conductive substrate. By growing the cells on glass pre-coated with a chromium layer, we were able to observe the uptake of 10 nm gold nanoparticles inside uncoated and unstained macrophages and keratinocytes cells. Imaging in back scattered electrons allowed observation of gold nanoparticles located inside the cells, while imaging in secondary electron gave information on gold nanoparticles located on the surface of the cells. By mounting a skin cross-section on an improved conductive holder, consisting of a silicon substrate coated with copper, we were able to observe penetration of gold nanoparticles of only 5 nm size through the skin barrier in an uncoated skin tissue. The described method offers a convenient modification in preparation procedure for biological samples to be analyzed in SEM. The method provides high

  1. FEMA DFIRM Cross Sections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — FEMA Cross Sections are required for any Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map database where cross sections are shown on the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally...

  2. Synovial tissue research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orr, Carl; Sousa, Elsa; Boyle, David L

    2017-01-01

    The synovium is the major target tissue of inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis. The study of synovial tissue has advanced considerably throughout the past few decades from arthroplasty and blind needle biopsy to the use of arthroscopic and ultrasonographic technologies that enable...... easier visualization and improve the reliability of synovial biopsies. Rapid progress has been made in using synovial tissue to study disease pathogenesis, to stratify patients, to discover biomarkers and novel targets, and to validate therapies, and this progress has been facilitated by increasingly...... diverse and sophisticated analytical and technological approaches. In this Review, we describe these approaches, and summarize how their use in synovial tissue research has improved our understanding of rheumatoid arthritis and identified candidate biomarkers that could be used in disease diagnosis...

  3. PREPARATIVE SKIN PREPARATION AND SURGICAL WOUND INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjanappa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: It is an established fact now that the normal skin of healthy human beings harbours a rich bacterial fl ora. Normally considered non - pathogenic , these organisms way be a potential source of infection of the surgical wound. Approximately 20% of the resident flora is beyond the reach of surgical scrubs and antiseptics. The goal of surgical preparation of the skin with antiseptics is to remove transient and pathogenic microorganisms on the skin surface and to reduce the resident flora to a low level. Povidone iodine (I odophors and chlorhexidine are most often used antiseptics for pre - operative skin preparation. OBJECTIVES : To evaluate the efficacy of povidone iodine alone and in combination with antiseptic agent containing alcoholic chlorhexidine in preoperative skin p reparation by taking swab culture. (2 To compare the rate of postoperative wound infection in both the groups. METHODS: One hundred patients (fifty in each group undergoing clean elective surgery with no focus of infection on the body were included in th e study. The pre - operative skin preparation in each group is done with the respective antiseptic regimen. In both the groups after application of antiseptics , sterile saline swab culture was taken immediately from site of incision. In cases which showed gr owth of organisms , the bacteria isolated were identified by their morphological and cultural characteristics. Grams staining , coagulase test and antibiotic sensitivity test were done wherever necessary and difference in colonization rates was determined as a measure of efficacy of antiseptic regimen. RESULTS: The results of the study showed that when compared to povidone iodine alone , using a combination of povidone iodine and alcoholic solution of chlorhexidine , the colonization rates of the site of incisi on were reduced significantly. As for the rate of post - operative wound infection , it is also proven that wound infections are also

  4. Optical tomography of tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimnyakov, D A; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2002-01-01

    Methods of optical tomography of biological tissues are considered, which include pulse-modulation and frequency-modulation tomography, diffusion tomography with the use of cw radiation sources, optical coherent tomography, speckle-correlation tomography of nonstationary media, and optoacoustic tomography. The method for controlling the optical properties of tissues is studied from the point of view of increasing a probing depth in optical coherent tomography. The modern state and prospects of the development of optical tomography are discussed. (review)

  5. The toughness of secondary cell wall and woody tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, P. W.; Tan, H. T. W.; Cheng, P. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The 'across grain' toughness of 51 woods has been determined on thin wet sections using scissors. The moisture content of sections and the varying sharpness of the scissor blades had little effect on the results. In thin sections (less than 0.6mm), toughness rose linearly with section thickness. The intercept toughness at zero thickness, estimated from regression analysis, was proportional to relative density, consistent with values reported for non-woody plant tissues. Extrapolation of the i...

  6. NONCHEMICAL DEHYDRATION OF FIXED TISSUE COMBINING MICROWAVES AND VACUUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOK, LP; BOON, ME

    A novel histoprocessing method for paraffin and plastic sections is presented in which dehydration of fixed tissue blocks is achieved within 5 minutes by microwaving under vacuum. Exploiting the decrease in boiling temperature under vacuum, we succeed in evaporating liquid molecules in the tissues

  7. Modeling light–tissue interaction in optical coherence tomography systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Thrane, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) performs high-resolution, cross-sectional tomographic imaging of the internal tissue microstructure by measuring backscattered or backreflected light. The scope of this chapter is to present analytical and numerical models that are able to describe light-tissue ...

  8. Decree of the 23 May 2016 related to installations of heat and/or electric power production from non-hazardous wastes prepared under the form of recovery solid fuels in installations designed for this purpose and associated or not with another fuel covered by section 2971 of the nomenclature of installations classified for the protection of the environment. Decree of the 23 May 2016 related to the preparation of recovery solid fuels in view of their use in installations covered by section 2971 of the nomenclature of installations classified for the protection of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortureux, M.

    2016-01-01

    A first decree presents the various prescriptions regulating installations used for the co-combustion of recovery solid fuels for the production of heat and/or electricity: definition and scope of application, design and general arrangement of installations, conditions for fuel admission and delivery, conditions of exploitation, risk prevention, air pollution prevention, water pollution prevention, management and processing of residues, release monitoring and impact on the environment, information on installation operation or stoppage. Appendices provide limit values for atmospheric releases, equivalence factors fo