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Sample records for tissue scar formation

  1. Control of Scar Tissue Formation in the Cornea: Strategies in Clinical and Corneal Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha L. Wilson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Corneal structure is highly organized and unified in architecture with structural and functional integration which mediates transparency and vision. Disease and injury are the second most common cause of blindness affecting over 10 million people worldwide. Ninety percent of blindness is permanent due to scarring and vascularization. Scarring caused via fibrotic cellular responses, heals the tissue, but fails to restore transparency. Controlling keratocyte activation and differentiation are key for the inhibition and prevention of fibrosis. Ophthalmic surgery techniques are continually developing to preserve and restore vision but corneal regression and scarring are often detrimental side effects and long term continuous follow up studies are lacking or discouraging. Appropriate corneal models may lead to a reduced need for corneal transplantation as presently there are insufficient numbers or suitable tissue to meet demand. Synthetic optical materials are under development for keratoprothesis although clinical use is limited due to implantation complications and high rejection rates. Tissue engineered corneas offer an alternative which more closely mimic the morphological, physiological and biomechanical properties of native corneas. However, replication of the native collagen fiber organization and retaining the phenotype of stromal cells which prevent scar-like tissue formation remains a challenge. Careful manipulation of culture environments are under investigation to determine a suitable environment that simulates native ECM organization and stimulates keratocyte migration and generation.

  2. Modulation of scar tissue formation using different dermal regeneration templates in the treatment of experimental full-thickness wounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Druecke, D.; Lamme, E.N.; Hermann, S.; Pieper, J.S.; May, P.S.; Steinau, H.U.; Steinstraesser, L.

    2004-01-01

    The recovery of skin function is the goal of each burn surgeon. Split-skin graft treatment of full-thickness skin defects leads to scar formation, which is often vulnerable and instable. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze wound healing and scar tissue formation in acute full-thickness

  3. Formation of hypertrophic scars: Evolution and susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahdavian Delavary, B.; van der Veer, W.M.; Ferreira, J.A.; Niessen, F.B.

    2012-01-01

    Formation of hypertrophic scars is a common complication of wound healing, and at present little is known about the incidence and risk factors. Our aim was to analyse the incidence, progression, and regression of postoperative hypertrophic scars over time and to identify risk factors of hypertrophic

  4. MicroRNA-143-3p inhibits hyperplastic scar formation by targeting connective tissue growth factor CTGF/CCN2 via the Akt/mTOR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Shengzhi; Kang, Bei; Zeng, Weihui; Sun, Yaowen; Yang, Fan

    2016-05-01

    Post-traumatic hypertrophic scar (HS) is a fibrotic disease with excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) production, which is a response to tissue injury by fibroblasts. Although emerging evidence has indicated that miRNA contributes to hypertrophic scarring, the role of miRNA in HS formation remains unclear. In this study, we found that miR-143-3p was markedly downregulated in HS tissues and fibroblasts (HSFs) using qRT-PCR. The expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) was upregulated both in HS tissues and HSFs, which is proposed to play a key role in ECM deposition in HS. The protein expression of collagen I (Col I), collagen III (Col III), and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was obviously inhibited after treatment with miR-143-3p in HSFs. The CCK-8 assay showed that miR-143-3p transfection reduced the proliferation ability of HSFs, and flow cytometry showed that either early or late apoptosis of HSFs was upregulated by miR-143-3p. In addition, the activity of caspase 3 and caspase 9 was increased after miR-143-3p transfection. On the contrary, the miR-143-3p inhibitor was demonstrated to increase cell proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of HSFs. Moreover, miR-143-3p targeted the 3'-UTR of CTGF and caused a significant decrease of CTGF. Western blot demonstrated that Akt/mTOR phosphorylation and the expression of CTGF, Col I, Col III, and α-SMA were inhibited by miR-143-3p, but increased by CTGF overexpression. In conclusion, we found that miR-143-3p inhibits hypertrophic scarring by regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of human HSFs, inhibiting ECM production-associated protein expression by targeting CTGF, and restraining the Akt/mTOR pathway.

  5. Prevention and curative management of hypertrophic scar formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, M.C.; Veer, van der W.M.; Ulrich, M.; Zuijlen, van P.P.; Niessen, F.B.; Middelkoop, E.

    2009-01-01

    Although hypertrophic scarring commonly occurs following burns, many aspects such as incidence of and optimal treatment for scar hypertrophy remain unclear. This review will focus on hypertrophic scar formation after burn in particular, exploring multiple treatment options and describing their

  6. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  7. Overcoming scarring in the urethra: Challenges for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Aldamanhori, Reem; Chapple, Christopher R; MacNeil, Sheila

    2018-04-01

    Urethral stricture disease is increasingly common occurring in about 1% of males over the age of 55. The stricture tissue is rich in myofibroblasts and multi-nucleated giant cells which are thought to be related to stricture formation and collagen synthesis. An increase in collagen is associated with the loss of the normal vasculature of the normal urethra. The actual incidence differs based on worldwide populations, geography, and income. The stricture aetiology, location, length and patient's age and comorbidity are important in deciding the course of treatment. In this review we aim to summarise the existing knowledge of the aetiology of urethral strictures, review current treatment regimens, and present the challenges of using tissue-engineered buccal mucosa (TEBM) to repair scarring of the urethra. In asking this question we are also mindful that recurrent fibrosis occurs in other tissues-how can we learn from these other pathologies?

  8. Nonlinear optics for the study of human scar tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, D. P.; Vieira-Damiani, G.; Adam, R. L.; Cesar, C. L.; Metze, Konradin

    2012-03-01

    Collagen fibers are an essential component of the dynamic process of scarring, which accompanies various diseases. Scar tissue may reveal different morphologic expressions, such as hypertrophic scars or keloids. Collagen fibers can be visualized by fluorescent light when stained with eosin. Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) creates a non linear signal that occurs only in molecules without inversion symmetry and is particularly strong in the collagen fibers arranged in triple helices. The aim of this study was to describe the methodology for the analysis of the density and texture of collagen in keloids, hypertrophic scars and conventional scars. Samples were examined in the National Institute of Science and Technology on Photonics Applied to Cell Biology (INFABIC) at the State University of Campinas. The images were acquired in a multiphoton microscopy LSM 780-NLO Zeiss 40X. Both signals, two-photon fluorescence (TPEF) and SHG, were excited by a Mai-Tai Ti:Sapphire laser at 940 nm. We used a LP490/SP485 NDD filter for SHG, and a BP565-610 NDD filter for fluorescence In each case, ten images were acquired serially (512×512 μm) in Z-stack and joined together to one patchwork-image . Image analysis was performed by a gliding-box-system with in-house made software. Keloids, hypertrophic scars and normal scar tissue show different collagen architecture. Inside an individual case differences of the scar process may be found between central and peripheral parts. In summary, the use of nonlinear optics is a helpful tool for the study of scars tissue.

  9. Overcoming scarring in the urethra: Challenges for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmuttalip Simsek

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture disease is increasingly common occurring in about 1% of males over the age of 55. The stricture tissue is rich in myofibroblasts and multi-nucleated giant cells which are thought to be related to stricture formation and collagen synthesis. An increase in collagen is associated with the loss of the normal vasculature of the normal urethra. The actual incidence differs based on worldwide populations, geography, and income. The stricture aetiology, location, length and patient's age and comorbidity are important in deciding the course of treatment. In this review we aim to summarise the existing knowledge of the aetiology of urethral strictures, review current treatment regimens, and present the challenges of using tissue-engineered buccal mucosa (TEBM to repair scarring of the urethra. In asking this question we are also mindful that recurrent fibrosis occurs in other tissues—how can we learn from these other pathologies? Keywords: Urethral strictures, Fibrosis, Tissue-engineered buccal mucosa, Augmentation urethroplasty

  10. Macrophage Phenotypes Regulate Scar Formation and Chronic Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Mark; Sahin, Katherine B; West, Zoe E; Murray, Rachael Z

    2017-07-17

    Macrophages and inflammation play a beneficial role during wound repair with macrophages regulating a wide range of processes, such as removal of dead cells, debris and pathogens, through to extracellular matrix deposition re-vascularisation and wound re-epithelialisation. To perform this range of functions, these cells develop distinct phenotypes over the course of wound healing. They can present with a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype, more often found in the early stages of repair, through to anti-inflammatory M2 phenotypes that are pro-repair in the latter stages of wound healing. There is a continuum of phenotypes between these ranges with some cells sharing phenotypes of both M1 and M2 macrophages. One of the less pleasant consequences of quick closure, namely the replacement with scar tissue, is also regulated by macrophages, through their promotion of fibroblast proliferation, myofibroblast differentiation and collagen deposition. Alterations in macrophage number and phenotype disrupt this process and can dictate the level of scar formation. It is also clear that dysregulated inflammation and altered macrophage phenotypes are responsible for hindering closure of chronic wounds. The review will discuss our current knowledge of macrophage phenotype on the repair process and how alterations in the phenotypes might alter wound closure and the final repair quality.

  11. Renal scar formation after urinary tract infection in children

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    Young Seo Park

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is a common bacterial illness in children. Acute pyelonephritis in children may lead to renal scarring with the risk of later hypertension, preeclampsia during pregnancy, proteinuria, and renal insufficiency. Until now, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR has been considered the most important risk factor for post-UTI renal scar formation in children. VUR predisposes children with UTI to pyelonephritis, and both are associated with renal scarring. However, reflux nephropathy is not always acquired; rather, it reflects refluxassociated congenital dysplastic kidneys. The viewpoint that chronic kidney disease results from renal maldevelopment-associated VUR has led to questioning the utility of any regimen directed at identifying or treating VUR. Despite the recognition that underlying renal anomalies may be the cause of renal scarring that was previously attributed to infection, the prevention of renal scarring remains the goal of all therapies for childhood UTI. Therefore, children at high risk of renal scar formation after UTI should be treated and investigated until a large clinical study and basic research give us more information.

  12. Etiopathogenesis of Post-endodontic Periapical Scar Formation

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    Edita Horká

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A periapical scar represents a clinically asymptomatic, non-progressive, small, periapical radiolucency in patients with a previously well-performed root canal treatment.The hypothesis: We introduce a hypothesis that periapical scar formation is caused by osseoinhibitory molecular signaling from the epithelial cell rests of Malassez.Evaluation of the hypothesis: When epithelial cell rests of Malassez are present in teeth with an infected root canal system, a periapical cyst develops, whereas in the case of a treated root canal system infection, periapical inflammation is diminished and the periapical leasion heals until the regeneration process reaches the apical part of the tooth where epithelial cell rests of Malassez are present. Cytokines cause rapidly progressive defensive fibroproduction and scar formation, in which osteoblasts cannot differentiate into

  13. Collagen cross-linking by adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and scar-derived mesenchymal cells: Are mesenchymal stromal cells involved in scar formation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaerdt, van den A.J.; Veen, van der A.G.; Zuijlen, van P.P.; Reijnen, L.; Verkerk, M.; Bank, R.A.; Middelkoop, E.; Ulrich, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, different fibroblast-like (mesenchymal) cell populations that might be involved in wound healing were characterized and their involvement in scar formation was studied by determining collagen synthesis and processing. Depending on the physical and mechanical properties of the tissues,

  14. Collagen cross-linking by adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and scar-derived mesenchymal cells : Are mesenchymal stromal cells involved in scar formation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J.; van der Veen, Vincent C.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.; Reijnen, Linda; Verkerk, Michelle; Bank, Ruud A.; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M. W.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, different fibroblast-like (mesenchymal) cell populations that might be involved in wound healing were characterized and their involvement in scar formation was studied by determining collagen synthesis and processing. Depending on the physical and mechanical properties of the tissues,

  15. Triterpenes for Well-Balanced Scar Formation in Superficial Wounds

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    Stefan Kindler

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Triterpenes are demonstrably effective for accelerating re-epithelialisation of wounds and known to improve scar formation for superficial lesions. Among the variety of triterpenes, betuline is of particular medical interest. Topical betuline gel (TBG received drug approval in 2016 from the European Commission as the first topical therapeutic agent with the proven clinical benefit of accelerating wound healing. Two self-conducted randomized intra-individual comparison clinical studies with a total of 220 patients involved in TBG treatment of skin graft surgical wounds have been screened for data concerning the aesthetic aspect of wound healing. Three months after surgery wound treatment with TBG resulted in about 30% of cases with more discreet scars, and standard of care in about 10%. Patients themselves appreciate the results of TBG after 3 months even more (about 50% compared to standard of care (about 10%. One year after surgery, the superiority of TBG counts for about 25% in comparison with about 10%, and from the patients’ point of view, for 25% compared to 4% under standard of care. In the majority of wound treatment cases, there is no difference visible between TBG treatment and standard of care after 1 year of scar formation. However, in comparison, TBG still offers a better chance for discreet scars and therefore happens to be superior in good care of wounds.

  16. Correction of accessory axillary breast tissue without visible scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Soo

    2004-01-01

    Various methods for correction of accessory axillary breast tissue have been proposed, including simple excision, diamond-shaped excision, a Y-V technique, and lipoplasty. We present an effective method for correction of a prominent axillary mound that combines lipoplasty with excision of accessory breast tissue along the axillary transverse line. Preoperative markings included an incision within the natural wrinkle line in the axillary fold, and demarcation of areas in which lipoplasty and excision were to be performed. After lipoplasty, deep dissection was performed to isolate and remove accessory breast tissue and excess fat tissue. A compression dressing was applied for 1 to 2 weeks postoperatively, and the patient was instructed to wear a sports bra for 1 to 2 months after removal of the dressing. We treated 7 patients using this procedure between October 1999 and March 2003. No major postoperative complications were detected and recurrence was not noted during the follow-up periods. Aesthetic results were satisfactory. We believe that a procedure that combines lipoplasty and excision provides numerous advantages as a surgical option in treating a prominent axillary mound. The main advantage is that the final scar is laid in the natural axillary fold, rendering scars less conspicuous and eliminating the need to remove excess skin. The one disadvantage was that elevation of the skin flap via small, remote incisions initially produced surgical difficulties, but these were overcome with experience.

  17. 5-Fluorouracil-Loaded Transfer some as Theranostics in Dermal Tumor of Hypertrophic Scar Tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Wang, X.; Chen, X.; Wo, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Biskup, E.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the ability of transfersomal gel carrying the anti scarring agent (5-FU) to permeate hypertrophic scars in vivo and in vitro, scar permeation studies were performed after the agent was labeled with the fluorescent agent, rhodamine 6GO. Laser con focal microscope was employed to dynamically observe the effects of transfersomal gel carrying 5-FU at different time points. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to analyze the contents of the agent in the scar tissues at different hours after administration. Scar elevation index (SEI) was used to evaluate the changes of the ear scar models in rabbits. Compared with the PBS gel of 5-FU, the transfers omal gel displayed greater permeation rate and depth, as well as a higher content retention of the agent in scar tissues. Local administrations of the agent for some certain periods effectively inhibited the hyperplasia of ear scars in rabbits. Transfersomes can be chosen as a potential transdermal drug delivery system

  18. Keratinocyte-derived growth factors play a role in the formation of hypertrophic scars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, FB; Andriessen, MP; Schalkwijk, J; Visser, L; Timens, W

    In predisposed individuals, wound healing can lead to hypertrophic scar or keloid formation, characterized by an overabundant extracellular matrix. It has recently been shown that hypertrophic scars are accompanied by abnormal keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation, and significantly

  19. Reconstructive Surgery of Extensive Face and Neck Burn Scars Using Tissue Expanders

    OpenAIRE

    Ashab Yamin, Mohammad Reza; Mozafari, Naser; Mozafari, Mohadase; Razi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neck reconstruction is considered as one of the most important surgeries in cosmetic and reconstructive surgery.?The present study aimed to assess the results of reconstructive surgery of extensive face and neck burning scars using tissue expanders. METHODS This descriptive prospective study was conducted on 36 patients with extensive burning scars on the neck and face. Operation for tissue expander insertion was performed and tissue distension started two or three weeks later, dep...

  20. miR-29b promotes skin wound healing and reduces excessive scar formation by inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingdong; Lin, Quan; Shao, Ying; Rong, Li; Zhang, Duo

    2017-04-01

    The hypertrophic scar is a medical difficulty of humans, which has caused great pain to patients. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of miR-29b on scar formation. The scalded model was established in mice and miR-29b mimics or a negative control was subcutaneously injected into the injury skin. Then various molecular biological experiments were performed to assess the effect of miR-29b on scar formation. According to our present study, first, the results demonstrated that miR-29b was down-regulated in thermal injury tissue and miR-29b treatment could promote wound healing, inhibit scar formation, and alleviate histopathological morphologic alteration in scald tissues. Additionally, miR-29b treatment suppressed collagen deposition and fibrotic gene expression in scar tissues. Finally, we found that miR-29b treatment inhibited the TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF signaling pathway. Taken together, our data suggest that miR-29b treatment has an inhibitory effect against scar formation via inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF signaling pathway and may provide a potential molecular basis for future treatments for hypertrophic scars.

  1. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy with low-energy flux density inhibits hypertrophic scar formation in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Zhang, Bo-Ru; Hong, Lei; Shi, Kai; Wu, Wei-Wei; Yu, Jia-Ao

    2018-04-01

    Hypertrophic scar is characterized by excessive deposits of collagen during skin wound healing, which could become a challenge to clinicians. This study assessed the effects of the extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on hypertrophic scar formation and the underlying gene regu-lation. A rabbit ear hypertrophic scar model was generated and randomly divided into three groups: L-ESWT group to receive L-ESWT (energy flux density of 0.1 mJ/mm2), H-ESWT (energy flux density of 0.2 mJ/mm2) and sham ESWT group (S-ESWT). Hypertrophic scar tissues were then collected and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome staining, respectively, to assess scar elevation index (SEI), fibroblast density and collagen fiber arrangement. Expression of cell proliferation marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were assessed using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in hypertrophic scar tissues. H&E staining sections showed significant reduction of SEI and fibroblast density in both ESWT treatment groups compared to S-ESWT, but there was no dramatic difference between L-ESWT and H-ESWT groups. Masson's trichrome staining showed that collagen fibers were more slender and broader and oriented in parallel to skin surface after administration of ESWT compared to control tissues. At the gene level, PCNA‑positive fibroblasts and α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts were significantly decreased after L-ESWT or H-ESWT compared to the controls. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression of PCNA mRNA between L-ESWT or H-ESWT and S-ESWT, whereas expression of α-SMA mRNA significantly decreased in L-ESWT compared to that of H-ESWT and S-ESWT (P=0.002 and P=0.030, respectively). In conclusion, L-ESWT could be effective on suppression of hypertrophic scar formation by inhibition of scar elevation index and fibroblast density as well as α-SMA expression in hypertrophic scar tissues of the rabbit model.

  2. Fibrotic scar formation in central serous chorioretinopathy developed during systemic treatment with corticosteroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymans, JMM

    1998-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the study is to demonstrate the development of subretinal fibrotic scar formation in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) that developed during systemic corticosteroid treatment. Methods: The clinical and photographic records of a patient in whom an unusual

  3. The cosmetic outcome of the scar formation after cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Möller-Christensen, T; Steele, R E

    1994-01-01

    Three methods of skin closure after cesarean section were tested and compared in a prospective trial. Eighty-nine (82.5%) appeared for follow-up investigation 4-5 months after delivery. The mean scar width was significantly narrower after phannenstiel incision compared with percutaneous nylon sut...

  4. Scar formation and tuberculin conversion following BCG vaccination in infants: A prospective cohort study

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    Sara S Dhanawade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is considerable variation in BCG scar failure rate on available data and correlation between BCG scar and tuberculin conversion remains controversial. Through this study we aimed to determine the scar failure rate and tuberculin conversion in term infants vaccinated with BCG within the first month. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted among 85 consecutive infants weighing >2 kg attending the immunization clinic of a medical college hospital. Fifteen subjects who could not complete the follow up were excluded. Total of 70 cases were analyzed. All babies were administered 0.1 ml of BCG and examined at 3 months (+1 week for scar. Tuberculin test was done with 5TU PPD. An induration of >5 mm was considered positive. Statistical analysis was done using Microsoft Excel and SPSS-22. Results: Out of the 70 infants, 41 (58.6% were males. Although majority (72.9% of infants were vaccinated within 7 days, only 18 (25.7% received BCG within 48 hours of birth. Sixty-four (91.4% had a visible scar at 12 weeks post vaccination representing a scar failure rate of 8.6%. Tuberculin test was positive in 50 (71.4%. The mean ± s.d. for scar and tuberculin skin test (TST reaction size was 4.93 ± 2.01 mm and 6.01 ± 3.22 mm, respectively. The association between scar formation and tuberculin positivity was highly significant (P < 0.001. There was significant correlation between scar size and TST size (r = 0.401, P = 0.001 Conclusions: Less than 10% of infants fail to develop a scar following BCG vaccination. There is good correlation between scar positivity and tuberculin conversion.

  5. The role of γ-ray-induced fibroblast apoptosis in inhibiting biliary duct hypertrophic scar formation in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Guijin; Zhang Hong; Gao Xinyi; Xu Shuhe; Gao Hong; Jiang Weiguo; Jiangtao; Dai Xianwei; Ma Kai

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of γ-ray-induced fibroblast apoptosis in the inhibition of biliary duct hypertrophic scar formation in dogs. Methods: γ-radiation-induced apoptotic fibroblast cells were analysed by using transmission electron microscopy and DNA from frozen biliary duct tissue was extracted with phenol chloroform. DNA ladder profile after extraction of RNA was observed, and apoptosis cells in paraffinem-bedded biliary duct tissue sections were examined used immuno-histochemical method. Dog biliary duct cross-sections were stained with hematoxylin-erosin, Masson's trichrome, and Verhoeff-van Giesen stains. Muscle formation area, lumen circumference, and stenosis degree were determined by a computer-assisted image analysis system. Results: 103 Pd radioactive stent significantly inhibited fibroblast proliferation. The features of fibroblast apoptosis (e.g, apoptic bodies, DNA ladder band) could be seen in the 103 Pd radioactive stent group. The fibroblast apoptotic rate was significantly increased in the 103 Pd radioactive stent group than in the control group (P 103 Pd radioactive stent significantly reduced biliary muscular formation. Conclusion: 103 Pd radioactive stent could have the effect of inhibiting the proliferation of scar-forming fibroblast, and thus could be used for treatment and (or) prevention of hypertrophic scar formation in biliary duct. (authors)

  6. Etiopathogenesis of post-endodontic periapical scar formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horká, E.; Foltán, R.; Hanzelka, T.; Pavlíková, G.; Klíma, K.; Šedý, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2012), s. 5-15 ISSN 2155-8213 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GAP304/10/0320 Grant - others:UK(CZ) UNCE 204021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : postendodontic scar * endodontics * tooth Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. Topical hemostatic powder promotes reepithelialization and reduces scar formation after extensive esophageal mucosal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beye, B; Barret, M; Alatawi, A; Beuvon, F; Nicco, C; Pratico, C A; Chereau, C; Chaussade, S; Batteux, F; Prat, F

    2016-08-01

    The development of techniques for endoscopic resection has provided new strategies for radical conservative treatment of superficial esophageal neoplasms, even those that are circumferential, such as Barrett's neoplasia. However, it is necessary to prevent the formation of scar tissue that can be responsible for esophageal strictures following circumferential resection. Preliminary data have suggested the possible efficacy of a hemostatic powder in the promotion of wound healing. The study aims to assess the effectiveness of Hemospray (Cook Medical) in a swine model of post-endoscopic esophageal stricture. Our prospective controlled study included 21 pigs. A 6-cm circumferential submucosal dissection of the esophagus (CESD) was performed in each pig. Group 1 (n = 11) only underwent CESD and Group 2 (n = 10) had repeated Hemospray applications after CESD. Clinical, endoscopic, and radiological monitoring were performed, blood levels of four inflammatory or pro-fibrotic cytokines were assessed, and histological analysis was performed. Median esophageal diameter was greater in the group treated with Hemospray (2 mm [1-3] vs. 3 mm [2-4], P = 0.01), and the rate of symptomatic esophageal stricture was 100% and 60% in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.09). The thicknesses of esophageal fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltrate were significantly lower in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P = 0.002 and 0.0003, respectively). The length of the neoepithelium was greater in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P = 0.0004). Transforming growth factor-β levels were significantly lower in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P = 0.01). The application of Hemospray after esophageal CESD reduces scar tissue formation and promotes reepithelialization, and therefore is a promising therapeutic approach in the prevention of post-endoscopic esophageal stricture. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  8. Transient activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling reporter in fibrotic scar formation after compression spinal cord injury in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagami, Takashi; Pleasure, David E; Lam, Kit S; Zhou, Chengji J

    2018-02-19

    After traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), a scar may form with a fibrotic core (fibrotic scar) and surrounding reactive astrocytes (glial scar) at the lesion site. The scar tissue is considered a major obstacle preventing regeneration both as a physical barrier and as a source for secretion of inhibitors of axonal regeneration. Understanding the mechanism of scar formation and how to control it may lead to effective SCI therapies. Using a compression-SCI model on adult transgenic mice, we demonstrate that the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling reporter TOPgal (TCF/Lef1-lacZ) positive cells appeared at the lesion site by 5 days, peaked on 7 days, and diminished by 14 days post injury. Using various representative cell lineage markers, we demonstrate that, these transiently TOPgal positive cells are a group of Fibronectin(+);GFAP(-) fibroblast-like cells in the core scar region. Some of them are proliferative. These results indicate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling may play a key role in fibrotic scar formation after traumatic spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling the Human Scarred Heart In Vitro : Toward New Tissue Engineered Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deddens, Janine C.; Sadeghi, Amir Hossein; Hjortnaes, Jesper; van Laake, Linda W.; Buijsrogge, Marc; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is critical for effective tissue healing, however, excessive production and deposition of extracellular matrix components contribute to scarring and failing of the heart. Despite the fact that novel therapies have emerged, there are still no lifelong solutions for this problem. An

  10. Fire-scar formation in Jeffrey pine - mixed conifer forests in the Sierra San Pedro Martir, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott L. Stephens; Danny L. Fry; Brandon M. Collins; Carl N. Skinner; Ernesto Franco-Vizcaino; Travis J. Freed

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the probability of fire-scar formation. In this study, we examined all mixed conifer trees for fire-scar formation in a 16 ha watershed that burned as part of a 2003 wildfire in Sierra San Pedro Ma´rtir National Park (SSPM), Mexico. In addition, we examine the probability of fire-scar formation in relation to the previous fire interval in forests...

  11. Wound healing in a fetal, adult, and scar tissue model: a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, N.A.; Schouten, K.C.; Boekema, B.K.; Middelkoop, E.; Ulrich, M.

    2010-01-01

    Early gestation fetal wounds heal without scar formation. Understanding the mechanism of this scarless healing may lead to new therapeutic strategies for improving adult wound healing. The aims of this study were to develop a human fetal wound model in which fetal healing can be studied and to

  12. Experimental and clinical research on the inhibition of scarring formation after glaucoma surgery 90Sr radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Meien; Wang Guzhu; Li Shuqing

    1994-01-01

    Beta radiation of 90 Sr can inhibit the scarring formation so that the success rate of filtration surgery may be improved. After success in animal experiment, trabeculectomy was performed with small sclera flap on 31 eyes of 23 cases of patients with a high risk of scarring formation. Local 90 Sr radiation with a total dosage of 30.24 Gy were given by several times 3 days postoperatively, combined with local use of steroids. The patients were followed-up at 1 to 24 months, averaging 7 months. The intraocular pressure were successfully controlled in 90.3% of the patients. No lens impairment and other complications were observed. This procedure is an adoptive method in preventing scarring formation after glaucoma filtering surgery

  13. The Effects of Topical Agent (Kelo-Cote or Contractubex Massage on the Thickness of Post-Burn Scar Tissue Formed in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Jin Ko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe conducted an experimental study to compare the effect of massage using topical agents (Kelo-cote or Contractubex on scar formation by massaging the healed burn wound on the dorsal area of Sprague-Dawley (SD rats.MethodsFour areas of second degree contact burn were made on the dorsal area of each of 15 SD rats, using a soldering iron 15 mm in diameter. After gross epithelialization in the defect, 15 SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: the Kelo-cote group, Contractubex group, Vaseline group, and control group. Rats in three of the groups (all but the Control group were massaged twice per day for 5 minutes each day, while those in the Control group were left unattended. For histologic analysis, we performed a biopsy and evaluated the thickness of scar tissue.ResultsIn the Kelo-cote and Contractubex groups, scar tissue thicknesses showed a significant decrease, compared with the Vaseline and control groups. However, no significant differences were observed between the Kelo-cote and Contractubex groups. In the Vaseline group, scar tissue thicknesses showed a significant decrease, compared with the control groups.ConclusionsThe findings of this study suggest that massage using a topical agent is helpful in the prevention of scar formation and that massage only with lubricant (no use of a topical agent also has a considerable effect, although not as much as the use of a topical agent. Thus, we recommend massage with a topical agent on the post-burn scar as an effective method for decreasing the scar thickness.

  14. Preceding bronchial cutting for exposure of the pulmonary artery buried in scar tissue after chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomori, Hiroaki; Cong, Yue; Sugimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    It is often difficult to expose the pulmonary artery buried in a scar tissue, especially in lung cancer patients that responded well to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Difficulty to access pulmonary artery branches may lead to potentially unnecessary pneumonectomy. To complete lobectomy in such cases, a technique with preceding bronchial cutting for exposure of the pulmonary artery is presented. After dissecting the pulmonary vein, the lobar bronchus is cut from the opposite side of the pulmonary artery with scissors. The back wall of the lobar bronchus is cut using a surgical knife from the luminal face, which can expose the pulmonary artery behind the bronchial stump and then complete lobectomy. Fourteen patients have been treated using the present technique, enabling complete resection by lobectomy (including sleeve lobectomy in 3 patients) without major bleeding. The present procedure can expose pulmonary artery buried in scar tissue, resulting in making the lobectomy safer.

  15. The heme-heme oxygenase system in wound healing; implications for scar formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Scharstuhl, A.; Tyrrell, R.M.; Hoff, J.W. Von den; Jozkowicz, A.; Dulak, J.; Russel, F.G.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing is an intricate process requiring the concerted action of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Here, we review the literature on normal wound healing and the pathological forms of wound healing, such as hypertrophic or excessive scar formation, with special

  16. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M.; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53−/− mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  17. Postdiscectomy lumbar MR with GD-DTPA in differentation between scar tissue and recurrent prolapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, A.; Pedrosa, P.; Schuth, M.; Higer, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    The non-invasive diagnostic possibilities of MR have resulted in better diagnosis of degenerative spinal diseases. Twenty-one patients with failed back surgery syndrome (postdiscectomy syndrome) were studied to evaluate the possibility of 1-Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) in differentiating post operative scar tissue from recurrent disc herniation. The enhanced MR studies correctly depicted the character of abnormal epidural tissue in all patients. We conclude that MR with Gd-DTPA might be the method of choice to differentiate reliably postoperative epidural fibrosis from recurrent disc prolapse. (orig.) [de

  18. A modified technique for application of tissue expanders for extremities in burn scars patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghalambor, A.

    2007-01-01

    Tissue expansion is considered a major advancement in reconstructive surgery. However, there are limitations to their application in the extremities and carries relatively higher rates of complications. The aim of this study was to propose a modification to this technique and assess the rate of complications with slower rate of expansion. Thirty females (age range 14 to 40) with burn scars in the upper or lower extremity (15 cases in each) were the subjects of this investigation. Various sized rectangular expanders were used and expanded at a rate of 5% of the maximum inflatable size over 20 weeks. All of the cases of expansion completed the procedure uneventfully. In one case that developed necrosis at the edge of the flap, one week after removal of the expander, which was debrided and repaired successfully completed the treatment. Slow expansion method is a useful method which can safely be applied for burn scars in the extremities. (author)

  19. Modulation of wound healing and scar formation by MG53 protein-mediated cell membrane repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-10-02

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53(-/-) mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Transurethral resection of fibrotic scar tissue combined with temporary urethral stent placement for patients with in anterior urethral stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Yong Yoon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Fibrotic scar formation is a main cause of recurrent urethral stricture after initial management with direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU. In the present study, we devised a new technique of combined the transurethral resection of fibrotic scar tissue and temporary urethral stenting, using a thermo-expandable urethral stent (MemokathTM 044TW in patients with anterior urethral stricture. Materials and Methods As a first step, multiple incisions were made around stricture site with cold-cutting knife and Collins knife electrode to release a stricture band. Fibrotic tissue was then resected with a 13Fr pediatric resectoscope before deployment of a MemokathTM 044TW stent (40 – 60mm on a pre-mounted sheath using 0° cystoscopy. Stents were removed within 12 months after initial placement. Results We performed this technique on 11 consecutive patients with initial (n = 4 and recurrent (n = 7 anterior urethral stricture (April 2009 – February 2013. At 18.9 months of mean follow-up (12-34 months, mean Qmax (7.8±3.9ml/sec vs 16.8 ± 4.8ml/sec, p < 0.001, IPSS (20.7 vs 12.5, p = 0.001 , and QoL score (4.7 vs 2.2, p < 0.001 were significantly improved. There were no significant procedure-related complications except two cases of tissue ingrowth at the edge of stent, which were amenable by transurethral resection. In 7 patients, an average 1.4 times (1-5 times of palliative urethral dilatation was carried out and no patients underwent open surgical urethroplasty during the follow-up period. Conclusion Combined transurethral resection and temporary urethral stenting is a effective therapeutic option for anterior urethral stricture. Further investigations to determine the long-term effects, and safety profile of this new technique are warranted.

  1. Modeling the Human Scarred Heart In Vitro: Toward New Tissue Engineered Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deddens, Janine C; Sadeghi, Amir Hossein; Hjortnaes, Jesper; van Laake, Linda W; Buijsrogge, Marc; Doevendans, Pieter A; Khademhosseini, Ali; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac remodeling is critical for effective tissue healing, however, excessive production and deposition of extracellular matrix components contribute to scarring and failing of the heart. Despite the fact that novel therapies have emerged, there are still no lifelong solutions for this problem. An urgent need exists to improve the understanding of adverse cardiac remodeling in order to develop new therapeutic interventions that will prevent, reverse, or regenerate the fibrotic changes in the failing heart. With recent advances in both disease biology and cardiac tissue engineering, the translation of fundamental laboratory research toward the treatment of chronic heart failure patients becomes a more realistic option. Here, the current understanding of cardiac fibrosis and the great potential of tissue engineering are presented. Approaches using hydrogel-based tissue engineered heart constructs are discussed to contemplate key challenges for modeling tissue engineered cardiac fibrosis and to provide a future outlook for preclinical and clinical applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Tissue alignment enhances remodeling potential of tendon-derived cells - Lessons from a novel microtissue model of tendon scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foolen, Jasper; Wunderli, Stefania L; Loerakker, Sandra; Snedeker, Jess G

    2018-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a widespread and unresolved clinical challenge, in which associated pain and hampered mobility present a major cause for work-related disability. Tendinopathy associates with a change from a healthy tissue with aligned extracellular matrix (ECM) and highly polarized cells that are connected head-to-tail, towards a diseased tissue with a disorganized ECM and randomly distributed cells, scar-like features that are commonly attributed to poor innate regenerative capacity of the tissue. A fundamental clinical dilemma with this scarring process is whether treatment strategies should focus on healing the affected (disorganized) tissue or strengthen the remaining healthy (anisotropic) tissue. The question was thus asked whether the intrinsic remodeling capacity of tendon-derived cells depends on the organization of the 3D extracellular matrix (isotropic vs anisotropic). Progress in this field is hampered by the lack of suitable in vitro tissue platforms. We aimed at filling this critical gap by creating and exploiting a next generation tissue platform that mimics aspects of the tendon scarring process; cellular response to a gradient in tissue organization from isotropic (scarred/non-aligned) to highly anisotropic (unscarred/aligned) was studied, as was a transient change from isotropic towards highly anisotropic. Strikingly, cells residing in an 'unscarred' anisotropic tissue indicated superior remodeling capacity (increased gene expression levels of collagen, matrix metalloproteinases MMPs, tissue inhibitors of MMPs), when compared to their 'scarred' isotropic counterparts. A numerical model then supported the hypothesis that cellular remodeling capacity may correlate to cellular alignment strength. This in turn may have improved cellular communication, and could thus relate to the more pronounced connexin43 gap junctions observed in anisotropic tissues. In conclusion, increased tissue anisotropy was observed to enhance the cellular potential for

  3. Extensive scarring induced by chronic intrathecal tubing augmented cord tissue damage and worsened functional recovery after rat spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-xin; Huang, Fengfa; Gates, Mary; White, Jason; Holmberg, Eric G

    2010-08-30

    Intrathecal infusion has been widely used to directly deliver drugs or neurotrophins to a lesion site following spinal cord injury. Evidence shows that intrathecal infusion is efficient for 7 days but is markedly reduced after 14 days, due to time dependent occlusion. In addition, extensive fibrotic scarring is commonly observed with intrathecal infusion. These anomalies need to be clearly elucidated in histology. In the present study, all adult Long-Evans rats received a 25 mm contusion injury on spinal cord T10 produced using the NYU impactor device. Immediately after injury, catheter tubing with an outer diameter of 0.38 mm was inserted through a small dural opening at L3 into the subdural space with the tubing tip positioned near the injury site. The tubing was connected to an Alzet mini pump, which was filled with saline solution and was placed subcutaneously. Injured rats without tubing served as control. Rats were behaviorally tested for 6 weeks using the BBB locomotor rating scale and histologically assessed for tissue scarring. Six weeks later, we found that the intrathecal tubing caused extensive scarring and inflammation, related to neutrophils, macrophages and plasma cells. The tubing's tip was occluded by scar tissue and inflammatory cells. The scar tissue surrounding the tubing consists of 20-70 layers of fibroblasts and densely compacted collagen fibers, seriously compressing and damaging the cord tissue. BBB scores of rats with intrathecal tubing were significantly lower than control rats (p<0.01) from 2 weeks after injury, implying serious impairment of functional recovery caused by the scarring. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Dry Eye Disease on Scar Formation in Rabbit Glaucoma Filtration Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ji

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The success rate of glaucoma filtration surgery is closely related to conjunctival inflammation, and the main mechanism of dry eye disease (DED is inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DED on bleb scar formation after rabbit glaucoma filtration surgery. Sixteen New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into control and DED groups. A DED model was induced by twice-daily topical administration of 0.1% benzalkonium chloride (BAC drops for three weeks. Ocular examinations were performed to verify the DED model. Surgical effects were assessed, and histologic assessments were performed on the 28th postoperative day. Higher fluorescein staining scores, lower basal tear secretion levels and goblet cell counts, and increased interleukin 1β (IL-1β levels were observed in the DED group. The DED eyes displayed significantly higher intraocular pressure (IOP% on the 14th postoperative day; a smaller bleb area on days 14, 21 and 28; and a shorter bleb survival time. Moreover, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA levels were significantly increased in the DED group. These results demonstrate that DED promotes filtering bleb scar formation and shortens bleb survival time; these effects may be mediated via IL-1β.

  5. Postlaminectomy Bone and Scar Formations in Presence of Ankaferd Blood Stopper and Bitter Melon (Momordica Charantia): An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruoglu, Enis; Onger, Mehmet Emin; Marangoz, Abdullah Hilmi; Kocacan, Suleyman Emre; Cokluk, Cengiz; Kaplan, Suleyman

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative model of postlaminectomy was designed in rats. The effects of Momordica Charantia (MC) and Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) on the bone and scar formation after laminectomy were concurrently evaluated. Eighteen adult Wistar albino rats underwent lumbar laminectomy at L2-L3 vertebral levels, and were randomly assigned to one of three groups of six rats each. The Treatment group received MC and ABS treatment and the Control group was left untreated. Rats were sacrificed 4 weeks after treatment. Then; the lumbar spine was excised en-block, fixed and decalcified. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson"s trichrome, and evaluated for peridural fibrosis (PF), new bone formation, and vascular proliferation. Total volume of new bone in the MC group was significantly increased in comparison to the Control group (p < 0.05). Also; there was highly significant increase in terms of the total volume of fibrous tissue in the MC and ABS groups when compared with the Control group (p < 0.01). Besides; there was a highly significant difference between the MC and the Control groups (p < 0.01) in point of total volume of vessel. Both MC and ABS are not convenient to prevent the PF formation and MC may promote new bone formation and angiogenesis after lumbar laminectomy in rats.

  6. Paracrine action of mesenchymal stromal cells delivered by microspheres contributes to cutaneous wound healing and prevents scar formation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sha; Wu, Yan; Gao, Dongyun; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) participate in wound healing to favor tissue regeneration and inhibit fibrotic tissue formation. However, the evidence of MSCs to suppress cutaneous scar is extremely rare, and the mechanism remains unidentified. This study aimed to demonstrate whether MSCs-as the result of their paracrine actions on damaged tissues-would accelerate wound healing and prevent cutaneous fibrosis. For efficient delivery of MSCs to skin wounds, microspheres were used to maintain MSC potency. Whether MSCs can accelerate wound healing and alleviate cutaneous fibrosis through paracrine action was investigated with the use of a Transwell co-culture system in vitro and a murine model in vivo. MSCs cultured on gelatin microspheres fully retained their cell surface marker expression profile, proliferation, differentiation and paracrine potential. Co-cultures of MSCs and fibroblasts indicated that the benefits of MSCs on suppressing fibroblast proliferation and its fibrotic behavior induced by inflammatory cytokines probably were caused by paracrine actions. Importantly, microspheres successfully delivered MSCs into wound margins and significantly accelerated wound healing and concomitantly reduced the fibrotic activities of cells within the wounds and excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix as well as the transforming growth factor-β1/transforming growth factor-β3 ratio. This study provides insight into what we believe to be a previously undescribed, multifaceted role of MSC-released protein in reducing cutaneous fibrotic formation. Paracrine action of MSCs delivered by microspheres may thus qualify as a promising strategy to enhance tissue repair and to prevent excessive fibrosis during cutaneous wound healing. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Objective Color Measurements: Clinimetric Performance of Three Devices on Normal Skin and Scar Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Martijn; Bloemen, Monica; Verhaegen, Pauline; Tuinebreijer, Wim; de Vet, Henrica; van Zuijlen, Paul; Middelkoop, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Color measurements are an essential part of scar evaluation. Thus, vascularization (erythema) and pigmentation (melanin) are common outcome parameters in scar research. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinimetric properties and clinical feasibility of the Mexameter, Colorimeter, and the

  8. Trans-nipple removal of fibro-glandular tissue in gynaecomastia surgery without additional scars: An innovative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The established techniques that have been used to treat gynaecomastia are said to have relatively less patient satisfaction rate as they leave some visible scars or mild elevation over the nipple areola complex, resulting in aesthetically unsatisfactory results. Even the slightest elevation or smallest scar over nipple areola complex leave patients extremely self conscious and in a dilemma of having a second intervention to get rid of that blemish. Aims: The aim of the study is to achieve - A flat chest without adding a scar and with no chances of re-occurrence of the condition. This article suggests an innovative approach to address the problem. Materials and Methods: The author presents trans-nipple incision approach for the delivery of fibro-glandular tissue component following liposuction for maximum patient satisfaction. This method consists of a unique small criss-cross incision right on the nipple itself for retrieving any volume of tough fibro-glandular tissues. Between the duration of January 2012 to October 2013, 28 male patients of different ages were operated with this technique. Results: The surgery resulted in well-shaped, symmetric chest contour without any visible elevation or additional scars on nipple areola complex. No complications were noticed in any of the patients. Conclusions: The presented technique is proved to have a high patient satisfaction rate and to be promising method to achieve good aesthetic results in gynaecomastia surgery.

  9. Microplasma radiofrequency technology combined with triamcinolone improved the therapeutic effect on Chinese patients with hypertrophic scar and reduced the risk of tissue atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shui; Li, Hengjin

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to assess the value of microplasma radiofrequency technology combined with triamcinolone for the therapy of Chinese patients with hypertrophic scar. A total of 120 participants with hypertrophic scars were enrolled in the current study. Participants were divided into two groups based on sex, and then randomly and evenly divided into four groups (Groups A, B, C, and D). Participants in Group A received microplasma radiofrequency technology combined with triamcinolone. Participants in Group B received microplasma radiofrequency technology combined with normal saline. Participants in Groups C and D received triamcinolone (40 and 10 mg/mL) injected directly into scar. Experienced physicians evaluated the condition of scars according to the Vancouver Scar Scale 1 month before and after the therapy. There was no difference in age, sex, area, height and location of scars, and Vancouver Scar Scale scores before the therapy between any groups (P>0.05 for all). Vancouver Scar Scale scores after the therapy were significantly lower than those before the therapy in all groups (P0.05 for all). Incidences of tissue atrophy after the therapy were significantly lower in Groups A and B than in Group C (P0.05 for all). Microplasma radiofrequency technology combined with triamcinolone improved the therapeutic effect on Chinese patients with hypertrophic scar and reduced the risk of tissue atrophy compared with the use of either microplasma radiofrequency technology or triamcinolone injection alone.

  10. DIEP flap customization using Fluobeam® indocyanine green tissue perfusion assessment with large previous abdominal scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Fallucco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Fluobeam® is a portable, near-infrared camera that is held and controlled by the surgeon to visualize tissue perfusion using indocyanine green (ICG fluorescence imaging. This case report describes how data obtained from ICG imaging allows intraoperative customization in a previously surgically scarred abdomen during autologous Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator (DIEP flap bilateral breast reconstruction. The outcome was successful breast mound recreation without fat necrosis.

  11. Scar formation following excisional and burn injuries in a red Duroc pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Britani N; Kim, Jayne Y; McFarland, Kevin L; Sen, Chandan K; Supp, Dorothy M; Bailey, J Kevin; Powell, Heather M

    2017-08-01

    Scar research is challenging because rodents do not naturally form excessive scars, and burn depth, size, and location cannot be controlled in human longitudinal studies. The female, red Duroc pig model has been shown to form robust scars with biological and anatomical similarities to human hypertrophic scars. To more closely mimic the mode of injury, recreate the complex chemical milieu of the burn wound environment and enhance scar development, an animal model of excessive burn-induced scarring was developed and compared with the more commonly used model, which involves excisional wounds created via dermatome. Standardized, full-thickness thermal wounds were created on the dorsum of female, red Duroc pigs. Wounds for the dermatome model were created using two different total dermatome settings: ∼1.5 mm and ≥ 1.9 mm. Results from analysis over 150 days showed that burn wounds healed at much slower rate and contracted more significantly than dermatome wounds of both settings. The burn scars were hairless, had mixed pigmentation, and displayed fourfold and twofold greater excess erythema values, respectively, compared with ∼1.5 mm and ≥ 1.9 mm deep dermatome injuries. Burn scars were less elastic, less pliable, and weaker than scars resulting from excisional injuries. Decorin and versican gene expression levels were elevated in the burn group at day 150 compared with both dermatome groups. In addition, transforming growth factor-beta 1 was significantly up-regulated in the burn group vs. the ∼1.5 mm deep dermatome group at all time points, and expression remained significantly elevated vs. both dermatome groups at day 150. Compared with scars from dermatome wounds, the burn scar model described here demonstrates greater similarity to human hypertrophic scar. Thus, this burn scar model may provide an improved platform for studying the pathophysiology of burn-related hypertrophic scarring, investigating current anti-scar therapies, and development of

  12. Scar-free cutaneous wound healing in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Hanna M; Gilbert, Emily A B; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal with two possible outcomes: scarification or near-perfect integumentary restoration. Whereas scar formation has been intensively investigated, less is known about the tissue-level events characterising wounds that spontaneously heal scar-free, particularly in non-foetal amniotes. Here, a spatiotemporal investigation of scar-free cutaneous wound healing following full-thickness excisional biopsies to the tail and body of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) is provided. All injuries healed without scarring. Cutaneous repair involves the development of a cell-rich aggregate within the wound bed, similar to scarring wounds. Unlike scar formation, scar-free healing involves a more rapid closure of the wound epithelium, and a delay in blood vessel development and collagen deposition within the wound bed. It was found that, while granulation tissue of scarring wounds is hypervascular, scar-free wound healing conspicuously does not involve a period of exuberant blood vessel formation. In addition, during scar-free wound healing the newly formed blood vessels are typically perivascular cell-supported. Immunohistochemistry revealed widespread expression of both the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor A and the anti-angiogenic factor thrombospondin-1 within the healing wound. It was found that scar-free wound healing is an intrinsic property of leopard gecko integument, and involves a modulation of the cutaneous scar repair program. This proportional revascularisation is an important factor in scar-free wound healing. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  13. The use of silicone occlusive sheeting (Sil-K) and silicone occlusive gel (epiderm) in the prevention of hypertrophic scar formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, FB; Spauwen, PHM; Robinson, PH; Fidler, [No Value; Kon, M

    The development of hypertrophic scars and keloids is an unsolved problem in the process of found healing. For this reason, a successful treatment to prevent excessive scar formation still has not been found. Over the last decade, however, a promising new treatment has been introduced. Silicone

  14. Mdivi-1 inhibits astrocyte activation and astroglial scar formation and enhances axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    gang li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury (SCI, astrocytes become hypertrophic and proliferative, forming a dense network of astroglial processes at the site of the lesion. This constitutes a physical and biochemical barrier to axonal regeneration. Mitochondrial fission regulates cell cycle progression; inhibiting the cell cycle of astrocytes can reduce expression levels of axon growth-inhibitory molecules as well as astroglial scar formation after SCI. We therefore investigated how an inhibitor of mitochondrial fission, Mdivi-1, would affect astrocyte proliferation, astroglial scar formation, and axonal regeneration following SCI in rats. Western blot and immunofluorescent double-labeling showed that Mdivi-1 markedly reduced the expression of the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and a cell proliferation marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, in astrocytes 3 days after SCI. Moreover, Mdivi-1 decreased the expression of GFAP and neurocan, a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. Notably, immunofluorescent labeling and Nissl staining showed that Mdivi-1 elevated the production of growth-associated protein-43 and increased neuronal survival at 4 weeks after SCI. Finally, hematoxylin-eosin staining and behavioral evaluation of motor function indicated that Mdivi-1 also reduced cavity formation and improved motor function 4 weeks after SCI. Our results confirm that Mdivi-1 promotes motor function after SCI, and indicate that inhibiting mitochondrial fission using Mdivi-1 can inhibit astrocyte activation and astroglial scar formation and contribute to axonal regeneration after SCI in rats.

  15. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management; Overview of current therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Al-Shaqsi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management.

  16. Prosthodontist contribution in treating post-burn hypertrophic facial scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmanabhan T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of hypertrophic scars is common following healing of the burn wound, particularly in children. The face is one of the areas of the body most frequently affected by burns. Scar formation as a result of burn wounds leads to contraction of the formed granulation tissue, which causes both aesthetic and functional impairment for the patient. Scarring has major psychological and physical repercussions. Scarring on the face and visible regions of the body can be very distressing for the patient. Prevention of scars involves early and continuous use of a compressive orthesis. However, their efficacy is often limited to the facial region because of the contours of this area of body. This paper describes a clinical case of post-burn hypertrophic scars treated with silicone gel sheeting applied with pressure under custom made auto-polymerizing resin stent.

  17. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the skin both skin cells and connective tissue cells (fibroblasts) begin multiplying to repair the damage. A scar is made up of 'connective tissue', gristle-like fibers deposited in the skin by ...

  18. Interventional bleeding, hematoma and scar-formation after vacuum-biopsy under stereotactic guidance: Mammotome®-system 11g/8g vs. ATEC®-system 12g/9g

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, F.K.W.; Order, B.M.; Eckmann-Scholz, C.; Strauss, A.; Hilpert, F.; Kroj, K.; Biernath-Wüpping, J.; Heller, M.; Jonat, W.; Schaefer, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prospectively the correlation of scar-formations after vacuum-assisted biopsy with different systems and needle-sizes and interventional bleeding/post-interventional hematoma. Methods and materials: Between 01/2008 and 12/2009, 479 patients underwent vacuum-assisted biopsy under stereotactic-guidance, using the Mammotome ® -system with 11/8-gauge and ATEC ® -system with 12/9-gauge, whereas in 178 cases with representative benign histology no surgical-biopsy after vacuum-assisted biopsy was performed and at least a 2-plane-follow-up-mammogram after 6 month post-vacuum-assisted biopsy was available. Bleeding during intervention, hematoma post-intervention and scar-tissue was scored as minimal and moderate/severe. Statistical analysis included Chi-Square-trend-test, p-value ® -system vs. 11-gauge-Mammotome ® -system (41.9% vs. 8.4%, p ® -systems 9-gauge vs. 12-gauge (26.9% vs. 29.7%, p = 0.799/42.3% vs. 43.2%, p = 0.596). 11-gauge-Mammotome ® -system vs. ATEC ® -12-gauge-system revealed significantly less bleedings/hematomas (8.4% vs. 29.7%, p = 0.015/16.7% vs. 43.2%, p = 0.001), no significant differences for the large-systems (p = 0.135/p = 0.352). Follow-up of Mammotome ® -11/8-gauge-system system has shown 13.1/16.1% minimal scar-formation and 1.2/3.2% moderate/severe scars, whereas ATEC ® -12/9-gauge-system has shown 10.8/3.8% minimal scar-formation and 0/11.5% moderate/severe scars, no significant differences. No significant difference was found when comparing Mammotome ® -11/8-g-systems vs. ATEC ® -12/9-g-systems (p = 0.609/p = 0.823). There was also no correlation between risk of scar-formation after occurrence of bleeding or hematoma with any examined VAB-system or any needle size in this study (p = 0.800). Conclusion: Using larger needle-sizes significantly (Mammotome ®) /not significant for ATEC ® ) more interventional bleedings and post-interventional hematomas were detected, only a tendency concerning scar-formation.

  19. Delayed expression of cell cycle proteins contributes to astroglial scar formation and chronic inflammation after rat spinal cord contusion

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    Wu Junfang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI induces secondary tissue damage that is associated with astrogliosis and inflammation. We previously reported that acute upregulation of a cluster of cell-cycle-related genes contributes to post-mitotic cell death and secondary damage after SCI. However, it remains unclear whether cell cycle activation continues more chronically and contributes to more delayed glial change. Here we examined expression of cell cycle-related proteins up to 4 months following SCI, as well as the effects of the selective cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKs inhibitor CR8, on astrogliosis and microglial activation in a rat SCI contusion model. Methods Adult male rats were subjected to moderate spinal cord contusion injury at T8 using a well-characterized weight-drop model. Tissue from the lesion epicenter was obtained 4 weeks or 4 months post-injury, and processed for protein expression and lesion volume. Functional recovery was assessed over the 4 months after injury. Results Immunoblot analysis demonstrated a marked continued upregulation of cell cycle-related proteins − including cyclin D1 and E, CDK4, E2F5 and PCNA − for 4 months post-injury that were highly expressed by GFAP+ astrocytes and microglia, and co-localized with inflammatory-related proteins. CR8 administrated systemically 3 h post-injury and continued for 7 days limited the sustained elevation of cell cycle proteins and immunoreactivity of GFAP, Iba-1 and p22PHOX − a key component of NADPH oxidase − up to 4 months after SCI. CR8 treatment significantly reduced lesion volume, which typically progressed in untreated animals between 1 and 4 months after trauma. Functional recovery was also significantly improved by CR8 treatment after SCI from week 2 through week 16. Conclusions These data demonstrate that cell cycle-related proteins are chronically upregulated after SCI and may contribute to astroglial scar

  20. A histological study on the effect of pressure therapy on the activities of myofibroblasts and keratinocytes in hypertrophic scar tissues after burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Tsang, Cecilia W P; Feng, Beibei; Huang, Lin; Liu, Xusheng; Shu, Bin; Chan, Yvonne T Y; Cheung, Kwok-Kuen

    2015-08-01

    Although pressure therapy (PT) has been widely used as the first-line treatment for hypertrophic scars (HS), the histopathological changes involved have seldom been studied. This study aimed to examine the longitudinal effect of PT on the histopathological changes in HS. Ten scar samples were selected from six patients with HS after burn and they were given a standardized PT intervention for 3 months while 16 scar samples were obtained on those without PT. The scar biopsies were collected pre-treatment, 1 and 3 months post-intervention for both clinical and histopathological examinations. Clinical assessments demonstrated significant improvement in the thickness and redness of the scars after PT. Histological examination revealed that cell density in the dermal layer was markedly reduced in the 3-months post-pressurized scar tissues, while the arrangement of the collagen fiber was changed from nodular to wave-like pattern. The α-smooth muscle actin immunoreactivity was significantly decreased after 1-month pressure treatment. There was a significant reduction of myofibroblasts population and a concomitant increase in the apoptotic index in the dermal layer in the 3-months' post-pressurized scars. A significant negative correlation was found between the myofibroblasts population and the apoptotic index. The keratinocyte proliferation was found inhibited after PT. Results demonstrated that PT appeared to promote HS maturation by inhibiting the keratinocyte proliferation and suppressing myofibroblasts population, the latter possibly via apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. A study on scar revision

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    Ashutosh Talwar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scars are psychologically distressing for the patients and have an impact on the quality of life and self esteem of the patients. Scar revision is an aesthetic skill which is mastered by plastic surgeons and encroached now by dermatosurgeons. Scars on the face are aesthetically unacceptable and various techniques have been improvised for making a scar aesthetically acceptable. Various types of techniques are used for scar revision like W plasty, Z plasty and VY plasty. Aims: To see the efficacy of various scar revision techniques including Z plasty, VY plasty and W plasty in 30 patients with disfiguring scars. Methods: We selected twenty patients of disfiguring scars for the study. The scars from various causes including trauma and burns were included in our study. Various techniques of scar revision include Z plasty, W plasty and VY plasty were performed according to the type and site of scar. Results: Male: female was 1.5: 1. The scar revision surgery yielded excellent results with minimal complications including haematoma formation, secondary infection and delayed healing seen in 5% patients each. Regarding the efficacy of scar revision, excellent improvement was seen in 60% patients, moderate improvement was seen in 30% patients and mild improvement was seen in 10% patients. Conclusions: Dermatologists can employ a number of surgical scar revision techniques. While some are better suited to treat specific types of scars, they can be used in combination with each other or with adjunctive therapies to achieve optimal results.

  2. [Facial injections of hyaluronic acid-based fillers for malformations. Preliminary study regarding scar tissue improvement and cosmetic betterment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, G; Neiva-Vaz, C; Picard, A; Vazquez, M-P

    2018-02-02

    Cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers have gained rapid acceptance for treating facial wrinkles, deep tissue folds and sunken areas due to aging. This study evaluates, in addition to space-filling properties, their effects on softness and elasticity as a secondary effect, following injection of 3 commercially available cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers (15mg/mL, 17,5mg/mL and 20mg/mL) in patients presenting with congenital or acquired facial malformations. We started injecting gels of cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers in those cases in 2013; we performed 46 sessions of injections in 32 patients, aged from 13-32. Clinical assessment was performed by the patient himself and by a plastic surgeon, 15 days after injections and 6-18 months later. Cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers offered very subtle cosmetic results and supplemented surgery with a very high level of satisfaction of the patients. When injected in fibrosis, the first session enhanced softness and elasticity; the second session enhanced the volume. Cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers fill sunken areas and better softness and elasticity of scar tissues. In addition to their well-understood space-filling function, as a secondary effect, the authors demonstrate that cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based fillers improve softness and elasticity of scarring tissues. Many experimental studies support our observations, showing that cross-linked hyaluronic acid stimulates the production of several extra-cellular matrix components, including dermal collagen and elastin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Acne Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or scrubbing scarred areas can further reduce skin elasticity and heighten the appearance of the scar. Pick ... technique or procedure is appropriate for my skin type? Did the doctor show me before-and-after ...

  4. Renal scar formation and kidney function following antibiotic-treated murine pyelonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. Olson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new preclinical model to study treatment, resolution and sequelae of severe ascending pyelonephritis. Urinary tract infection (UTI, primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, is a common disease in children. Severe pyelonephritis is the primary cause of acquired renal scarring in childhood, which may eventually lead to hypertension and chronic kidney disease in a small but important fraction of patients. Preclinical modeling of UTI utilizes almost exclusively females, which (in most mouse strains exhibit inherent resistance to severe ascending kidney infection; consequently, no existing preclinical model has assessed the consequences of recovery from pyelonephritis following antibiotic treatment. We recently published a novel mini-surgical bladder inoculation technique, with which male C3H/HeN mice develop robust ascending pyelonephritis, highly prevalent renal abscesses and evidence of fibrosis. Here, we devised and optimized an antibiotic treatment strategy within this male model to more closely reflect the clinical course of pyelonephritis. A 5-day ceftriaxone regimen initiated at the onset of abscess development achieved resolution of bladder and kidney infection. A minority of treated mice displayed persistent histological abscess at the end of treatment, despite microbiological cure of pyelonephritis; a matching fraction of mice 1 month later exhibited renal scars featuring fibrosis and ongoing inflammatory infiltrates. Successful antibiotic treatment preserved renal function in almost all infected mice, as assessed by biochemical markers 1 and 5 months post-treatment; hydronephrosis was observed as a late effect of treated pyelonephritis. An occasional mouse developed chronic kidney disease, generally reflecting the incidence of this late sequela in humans. In total, this model offers a platform to study the molecular pathogenesis of pyelonephritis, response to antibiotic therapy and emergence of sequelae

  5. 3D modeling of keloid scars in vitro by cell and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttho, Dutsadee; Mankhetkorn, Samlee; Binda, Delphine; Pazart, Lionel; Humbert, Philippe; Rolin, Gwenaël

    2017-01-01

    Keloids are pathologic scars defined as dermal fibrotic tumors resulting from a disturbance of skin wound healing process. Treatments against keloids are multiple, sometimes empirical and none of them really provides an effective tool for physicians. The lack of effective treatments is correlated with the poor understanding of keloid pathogenesis. To fill this gap, researchers need strong models mimicking keloids as closely as possible. The objective of this study was to establish in vitro a new reconstructed keloid model (RKM), by combining fibroblasts extracted from the three major area of a keloid (center, periphery, non-lesional) in a three-dimensional biomaterial. To this aim, fibroblasts of three keloid locations were extracted and characterized, and then integrated in a hydrated collagen gel matrix during a three-step procedure. The heterogeneity of fibroblasts was assessed according to their proliferative and remodeling capacities. RKMs were further visualized and characterized by both light and scanning electron microscopy. This reconstructed keloid model should be very useful for investigating keloid fibroblasts function in conditions mimicking in vivo situation. Moreover, RKM should also be a suitable model for either drug study and discovery or innovative approaches using medical devices both during cancer and cancer-like disease investigation.

  6. Transport of beta-aminopropionitrile through intact skin or scar tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibeault, J.D.; Cravens, R.B. Jr.; Chvapil, M.

    1989-01-01

    A lathyrogen, [ 14 C]aminopropionitrile (beta APN), was administered to 34 rats either in K-Y jelly or saline vehicles onto intact shaven skin or onto a healed splinted deep excision wound. The dynamics of beta APN transport and content in the skin or repair tissue was observed after 2, 5, 8, and 24 hr of topical administration. The repair tissue quickly absorbed the lathyrogen and reached maximum at the 2-hr sampling. The content of beta APN in the repair tissue was twice as high as that in K-Y jelly vehicle and remained high and stable for at least 24 hr only when beta APN was administered through a saline vehicle. The transport of beta APN through intact skin, irrespective of the vehicle tested, was slow and continuously increased. The study showed that almost 20% of the beta APN administered onto the wounded skin area was transported into the repair tissue within 2 hr. We suggest that, due to the absence of epidermal stratum corneum from the repair tissue, drugs, such as beta APN, penetrate quickly into the wound

  7. Modified Lengthening Temporalis Myoplasty Involving an Extended Lazy-S Incision to Avoid Facial Scar Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oji, Tomito; Hayashi, Akiteru; Ogino, Akihiro; Onishi, Kiyoshi

    2018-05-01

    Lengthening temporalis myoplasty is a faster and less invasive alternative to free muscle transfer for smile reconstruction. However, it requires a nasolabial fold incision, which leaves a midfacial scar. Based on esthetic considerations, a modified approach, involving an extended lazy-S (parotidectomy) incision instead of a nasolabial fold incision, was developed. A cadaveric study involving 10 hemifaces was conducted. From February 2013 to March 2016, the modified lengthening temporalis myoplasty procedure was employed in 10 patients. The results were graded from 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent) according to the Terzis grading system. The excursion of the oral commissure was also measured. The extended lazy-S incision provides easy and safe access to the coronoid process and good visibility. The patients' mean age was 56.5 years, and the mean duration of the postoperative follow-up period was 22.2 months. The patients' underlying conditions included acoustic neuroma (n = 2), Bell palsy (n = 3), congenital conditions (n = 2), brain infarction (n = 1), Ramsay Hunt syndrome (n = 1), and malignant parotid lymphoma (n = 1). One patient suffered a surgical site infection, which was successfully treated with irrigation. All the patients achieved improvements in smile symmetry: 2, 5, and 3 patients obtained excellent, good, and moderate results, respectively. The excursion of the oral commissure ranged from 5 to 10 mm. The modified lengthening temporalis myoplasty procedure provides satisfactory functional outcomes without causing significant complications. It does not leave a facial scar and is a preferable option, especially for young and female patients, and patients who have undergone ablative surgery involving the parotid region.

  8. Bioengineered Hydrogel to Inhibit Post-Traumatic Central Nervous System Scarring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0586 TITLE: Bioengineered Hydrogel to Inhibit Post-Traumatic Central Nervous System Scarring PRINCIPAL...Hydrogel to Inhibit Post-Traumatic Central Nervous System Scarring 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0586 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH- 14-1-0586 5c...barriers that prevent the optimal delivery of biologics and cells to the injured nervous system . A significant problem is the formation of scar tissue

  9. Curcumin-induced fibroblast apoptosis and in vitro wound contraction are regulated by antioxidants and heme oxygenase: implications for scar formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharstuhl, A.; Mutsaers, H.A.M.; Pennings, S.W.C.; Szarek, W.A.; Russel, F.G.M.; Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblast apoptosis plays a crucial role in normal and pathological scar formation and therefore we studied whether the putative apoptosis-inducing factor curcumin affects fibroblast apoptosis and may function as a novel therapeutic. We show that 25-microM curcumin causes fibroblast apoptosis and

  10. Articular cartilage: from formation to tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2016-05-26

    Hyaline cartilage is the nonlinear, inhomogeneous, anisotropic, poro-viscoelastic connective tissue that serves as friction-reducing and load-bearing cushion in synovial joints and is vital for mammalian skeletal movements. Due to its avascular nature, low cell density, low proliferative activity and the tendency of chondrocytes to de-differentiate, cartilage cannot regenerate after injury, wear and tear, or degeneration through common diseases such as osteoarthritis. Therefore severe damage usually requires surgical intervention. Current clinical strategies to generate new tissue include debridement, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte transplantation, and mosaicplasty. While articular cartilage was predicted to be one of the first tissues to be successfully engineered, it proved to be challenging to reproduce the complex architecture and biomechanical properties of the native tissue. Despite significant research efforts, only a limited number of studies have evolved up to the clinical trial stage. This review article summarizes the current state of cartilage tissue engineering in the context of relevant biological aspects, such as the formation and growth of hyaline cartilage, its composition, structure and biomechanical properties. Special attention is given to materials development, scaffold designs, fabrication methods, and template-cell interactions, which are of great importance to the structure and functionality of the engineered tissue.

  11. Dentoalveolar growth inhibition induced by bone denudation on palates: a study of two isolated cleft palates with asymmetric scar tissue distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, H; Iwasaki, H; Tsukada, H; Chu, S; Nakamura, S; Yamamoto, K

    1999-09-01

    This report presents two cases of isolated cleft palate with asymmetric distribution of postsurgical scar tissue determined by laser Doppler flowmetry. To determine the effect of mucoperiosteal denudation of the bone on maxillary alveolar growth, the analysis of dentoalveolar structures compared the affected side to the unaffected side of each case. Two Japanese girls with isolated cleft palates were examined. Both subjects had undergone pushback operations (a modified version of the procedure of Wardill) for palatal repair at 18 months of age. Palatal blood flow was examined by laser Doppler flowmetry when the girls were 12 years old to determine the extent of postsurgical scar tissue over the denuded bone. To analyze the maxillary dentoalveolar structures three dimensionally, the whole surface of the upper dental cast was measured and recorded by an optical measuring device when the girls were 7 years old. Analysis via flowmetry showed that the palatal scar tissue area was limited to the anterior tooth region on the right (unaffected) side but extended posteriorly to the premolar region on the left (affected) side in both subjects. The two girls had similar dentoalveolar structures, with the dental and alveolar arches deflected lingually at the deciduous molar area on the affected side. There were no differences in the buccolingual inclination of deciduous molars or in the vertical growth of the alveolar processes between the affected and unaffected sides. In both girls, bone denudation in the premolar region appeared to result in less than 3 mm of displacement of the teeth palatally, with no change in lingual inclination. Any effects of scar tissue on the vertical development of the alveolus were not substantiated.

  12. The impact of therapeutic delay time on acute scintigraphic lesion and ultimate scar formation in children with first febrile UTI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mi Mi; Kim, Jin Wook; Park, Min Gu; Kim, Je Jong; Yoo, Kee Hwan; Moon, Du Geon

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the role of therapeutic delay time (TDT) in acute renal cortical scintigraphic lesion (ASL) and ultimate scar formation (USF) in children with first febrile UTI and whether it is affected by the presence of vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR). 230 children, 90 girls and 140 boys with first febrile UTI were included. Radiologic (USG, DMSA, and VCUG), clinical (age, gender, peak fever, therapeutic delay time) and laboratory (CBC with differential count, ANC (absolute neutrophil count), BUN, Creatinine, urine analysis, gram stain, culture, CRP and ESR) variables were analysed. DMSA was performed within 5 days and after six months. VCUG was performed after acute phase of UTI. The differences in TDT according to the presence of ASL, USF and VUR were assessed. And the correlation between ASL or USF with the duration of TDT was assessed. Of 230 patients enrolled, 142 patients had refluxing UTI and 88 patients had non-refluxing UTI. TDT was the risk factor associated with ASL and USF along with presence of VUR. TDT was longer in ASL positive group compared with the ASL negative group. Also USF group showed longer TDT compared with those without USF in both refluxing UTI and non refluxing UTI. The TDT was significantly shorter in USF group with the presence of VUR. Positive linear association was noted between prevalence of ASL and USF and duration of TDT. In conclusion, the impact of UTI on formation of USF may be enhanced by the presence of VUR with shorter duration of TDT.

  13. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury.

  14. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Feng; Wu, Er-jun; Zhang, Pei-xun; Li-ya, A; Kou, Yu-hui; Yin, Xiao-feng; Han, Na

    2015-01-01

    We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker) at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury. PMID:25788929

  15. AKAP12 mediates barrier functions of fibrotic scars during CNS repair.

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    Jong-Ho Cha

    Full Text Available The repair process after CNS injury shows a well-organized cascade of three distinct stages: inflammation, new tissue formation, and remodeling. In the new tissue formation stage, various cells migrate and form the fibrotic scar surrounding the lesion site. The fibrotic scar is known as an obstacle for axonal regeneration in the remodeling stage. However, the role of the fibrotic scar in the new tissue formation stage remains largely unknown. We found that the number of A-kinase anchoring protein 12 (AKAP12-positive cells in the fibrotic scar was increased over time, and the cells formed a structure which traps various immune cells. Furthermore, the AKAP12-positive cells strongly express junction proteins which enable the structure to function as a physical barrier. In in vivo validation, AKAP12 knock-out (KO mice showed leakage from a lesion, resulting from an impaired structure with the loss of the junction complex. Consistently, focal brain injury in the AKAP12 KO mice led to extended inflammation and more severe tissue damage compared to the wild type (WT mice. Accordingly, our results suggest that AKAP12-positive cells in the fibrotic scar may restrict excessive inflammation, demonstrating certain mechanisms that could underlie the beneficial actions of the fibrotic scar in the new tissue formation stage during the CNS repair process.

  16. Wound healing during hibernation by black bears (Ursus americanus) in the wild: elicitation of reduced scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaizzo, Paul A; Laske, Timothy G; Harlow, Henry J; McClay, Carolyn B; Garshelis, David L

    2012-03-01

    Even mildly hypothermic body or limb temperatures can retard healing processes in mammals. Despite this, we observed that hibernating American black bears (Ursus americanus Pallas, 1780) elicit profound abilities in mounting inflammatory responses to infection and/or foreign bodies. In addition, they resolve injuries during hibernation while maintaining mildly hypothermic states (30-35 °C) and without eating, drinking, urinating or defecating. We describe experimental studies on free-ranging bears that document their abilities to completely resolve cutaneous cuts and punctures incurred during or prior to hibernation. We induced small, full-thickness cutaneous wounds (biopsies or incisions) during early denning, and re-biopsied sites 2-3 months later (near the end of denning). Routine histological methods were used to characterize these skin samples. All biopsied sites with respect to secondary intention (open circular biopsies) and primary intention (sutured sites) healed, with evidence of initial eschar (scab) formation, completeness of healed epidermis and dermal layers, dyskeratosis (inclusion cysts), and abilities to produce hair follicles. These healing abilities of hibernating black bears are a clear survival advantage to animals injured before or during denning. Bears are known to have elevated levels of hibernation induction trigger (delta-opioid receptor agonist) and ursodeoxycholic acid (major bile acid within plasma, mostly conjugated with taurine) during hibernation, which may relate to these wound-healing abilities. Further research as to the underlying mechanisms of wound healing during hibernation could have applications in human medicine. Unique approaches may be found to improve healing for malnourished, hypothermic, diabetic and elderly patients or to reduce scarring associated with burns and traumatic injuries. © 2012 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  17. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  18. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  19. Recombinant nAG (a Salamander-Derived Protein Decreases the Formation of Hypertrophic Scarring in the Rabbit Ear Model

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    Mohammad M. Al-Qattan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available nAG (newt-Anterrior Gradient protein is the key mediator of regrowth of amputated limbs in salamanders. In a previous work in our lab, a new nAG gene (suitable for humans was designed and cloned. The cloned vector was transfected into primary human fibroblasts. The expression of nAG in human primary fibroblasts was found to suppress collagen expression. The current study shows that local injection of recombinant nAG reduces scar hypertrophy in the rabbit ear model. This is associated with lower scar elevation index (SEI, lower levels of collagen I & III, higher levels of MMP1, and a higher degree of scar maturation in experimental wounds compared to controls.

  20. Usefulness of direct W-plasty application to wound debridement for minimizing scar formation in the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jin Hong; Park, Kyung Hye; Choi, Hong Lak; Park, Jung Soo; Lee, Ji Han; Kim, Hoon; Lee, Byung Kook; Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Taek Gu

    2017-12-01

    A suture line placed with the same direction as the relaxed skin tension line leads to good healing, but a suture line with over 30 degrees of angle from the relaxed skin tension line leads to longer healing time and more prominent scarring. W-plasty is widely used to change the direction of the scar or to divide it into several split scars. In this study, we applied W-plasty to patients with facial lacerations in the emergency department. From June 2012 to December 2014, 35 patients underwent simple repair or W-plasty for facial lacerations. Patients in the simple repair group underwent resection following a thermal margin, and the W-plasty group was resected within a pre-designed margin of W-shaped laceration. We assessed prognosis using the Stony Brook Scar Evaluation Scale (SBSES) after 10 days (short-term) and six months (long-term), respectively, following suture removal. Among 35 patients, 15 (42.9%) underwent simple debridement and 20 (57.1%) underwent W-plasty. In the W-plasty group, there was no difference between short-term and long-term follow-up showing high SBSES, but in the simple debridement group, long-term follow-up SBSES significantly decreased. W-plasty SBSES was higher than simple debridement at short-term as well as long-term follow-up. We experienced good results of direct W-plasty application at six-month long-term follow-up. Therefore, W-plasty application is more effective in reducing scar appearance than a simple debridement method for facial laceration patients with an angle of 30 degrees or more to the relaxed skin tension line. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MRI guided needle localization in a patient with recurrence pleomorphic sarcoma and post-operative scarring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ching-Di [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung (China); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Wei, Jesse; Wu, Jim S. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Goldsmith, Jeffrey D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Gebhardt, Mark C. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-07-15

    MRI-guided wire localization is commonly used for surgical localization of breast lesions. Here we introduce an alternative use of this technique to help with surgical resection of a recurrent pleomorphic sarcoma embedded in extensive post-treatment scar tissue. We describe a case of recurrent pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma in the thigh after treatment with neoadjuvant therapy, surgery, and radiation. Due to the distortion of the normal tissue architecture and formation of extensive scar tissue from prior treatment, wire localization under MRI was successfully used to assist the surgeon in identifying the recurrent tumor for removal. (orig.)

  2. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Robert A.; Dannenberg, Hilde; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; van Ginkel, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM) is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. Case

  3. Abnormalities in the basement membrane structure promote basal keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars to adopt a proliferative phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaowei; Sun, Yexiao; Geng, Zhijun; Ma, Kui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-05-01

    The majority of studies on scar formation have mainly focused on the dermis and little is known of the involvement of the epidermis. Previous research has demonstrated that the scar tissue-derived keratinocytes are different from normal cells at both the genetic and cell biological levels; however, the mechanisms responsible for the fundamental abnormalities in keratinocytes during scar development remain elusive. For this purpose, in this study, we used normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissue to examine the morphological changes which occur during epidermal regeneration as part of the wound healing process and found that the histological structure of hypertrophic scar tissues differed from that of normal skin, with a significant increase in epidermal thickness. Notably, staining of the basement membrane (BM) appeared to be absent in the scar tissues. Moreover, immunofluorescence staining for cytokeratin (CK)10, CK14, CK5, CK19 and integrin-β1 indicated the differential expression of cell markers in the epidermal keratinocytes among the normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissues, which corresponded with the altered BM structures. By using a panel of proteins associated with BM components, we validated our hypothesis that the BM plays a significant role in regulating the cell fate decision of epidermal keratinocytes during skin wound healing. Alterations in the structure of the BM promote basal keratinocytes to adopt a proliferative phenotype both in vivo and in vitro.

  4. Understanding the NG2 glial scar after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber R Hackett

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available NG2 cells, also known as oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, are located throughout the central nervous system and serve as a pool of progenitors to differentiate into oligodendrocytes. In response to spinal cord injury, NG2 cells increase their proliferation and differentiation into remyelinating oligodendrocytes. While astrocytes are typically associated with being the major cell type in the glial scar, many NG2 cells also accumulate within the glial scar but their function remains poorly understood. Similar to astrocytes, these cells hypertrophy, upregulate expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, inhibit axon regeneration, contribute to the glial-fibrotic scar border, and some even differentiate into astrocytes. Whether NG2 cells also have a role in other astrocyte functions, such as preventing the spread of infiltrating leukocytes and expression of inflammatory cytokines, is not yet known. Thus, NG2 cells are not only important for remyelination after spinal cord injury, but are also a major component of the glial scar with functions that overlap with astrocytes in this region. In this review, we describe the signaling pathways important for the proliferation and differentiation of NG2 cells, as well as the role of NG2 cells in scar formation and tissue repair.

  5. Adaptation of the dermal collagen structure of human skin and scar tissue in response to stretch: An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegen, Pauline D.; Schouten, Hennie J.; Tigchelaar-Gutter, Wikky; van Marle, Jan; van Noorden, Cornelis J.; Middelkoop, Esther; van Zuijlen, Paul P.

    2012-01-01

    Surgeons are often faced with large defects that are difficult to close. Stretching adjacent skin can facilitate wound closure. In clinical practice, intraoperative stretching is performed in a cyclical or continuous fashion. However, exact mechanisms of tissue adaptation to stretch remain unclear.

  6. Tissue alignment enhances remodeling potential of tendon-derived cells - lessons from a novel microtissue model of tendon scarring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foolen, J.; Wunderli, S.L.; Loerakker, S.; Snedeker, J.G.

    Tendinopathy is a widespread and unresolved clinical challenge, in which associated pain and hampered mobility present a major cause for work-related disability. Tendinopathy associates with a change from a healthy tissue with aligned extracellular matrix (ECM) and highly polarized cells that are

  7. Cutaneous osteosarcoma arising from a burn scar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min A.; Yi, Jaehyuck [Kyungpook National University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Jong Min [Kyungpook National University, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Tumors that develop in old burn scars are usually squamous cell carcinomas. Sarcomas have also been reported, albeit rarely. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of an extraskeletal osteosarcoma arising in a prior burn scar reported in the English-language literature, mainly discussing the clinicopathological features. Herein, we present a case of cutaneous osteosarcoma visualized as a mineralized soft-tissue mass arising from the scar associated with a previous skin burn over the back. This seems to be the first report describing the imaging features of a cutaneous osteosarcoma from an old burn scar. (orig.)

  8. Orthodontic scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic therapy apart from its benefits also has potential risks and limitations in terms of tissue damage. Fortunately, in orthodontics, risks are minimal and infrequent However, all potential risks and limitations should be considered and addressed when making the decision to undergo orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic treatment carries with it the risk of various types of soft and hard tissue damages (e.g. decalcification of enamel, lacerations, ulcerations, temporomandibular joint disorders, etc-, apart from treatment failure in itself. If correcting a malocclusion is to be of benefit, the advantages offered should outweigh any possible damage- All preventive procedures should be considered during and after orthodontic treatment to restore the normal health of soft and hard tissues. Hence, the orthodontist should be vigilant and prudent enough in assessing and monitoring every aspect of these tissues at any given stage and time in order to achieve a healthy and successful final result.

  9. Polarized protein transport and lumen formation during epithelial tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasky, Alex J; Mangan, Anthony; Prekeris, Rytis

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges in biology is to explain how complex tissues and organs arise from the collective action of individual polarized cells. The best-studied model of this process is the cross talk between individual epithelial cells during their polarization to form the multicellular epithelial lumen during tissue morphogenesis. Multiple mechanisms of apical lumen formation have been proposed. Some epithelial lumens form from preexisting polarized epithelial structures. However, de novo lumen formation from nonpolarized cells has recently emerged as an important driver of epithelial tissue morphogenesis, especially during the formation of small epithelial tubule networks. In this review, we discuss the latest findings regarding the mechanisms and regulation of de novo lumen formation in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Hypertrophic scars and keloids in surgery: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Colin

    2014-09-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids remain a challenge in surgery. We appreciate that our understanding of the process at cellular and molecular level, profound as it is, when it comes to the clinical evidence much is left to be desired. Although the bench to bedside conundrum remains, the science of translational research calls for an even higher level of cooperation between the scientist and the clinician for the impetus to succeed.The clinicians alerted us to the possible theories in the pathogenesis of keloid formation, inter alia, the ischemia theory, mast cell theory, immune theory, transforming growth factor β interaction, mechanical theory, and the melanocyte stimulating hormone theory. All of the above presupposed a stimulus that would result in an uncontrolled upregulation of collagen and extracellular matrix expression in the pathogenesis of the keloid. This bedside to bench initiative, as in true science, realized more ponderables than possibilities.By the same token, research into the epidermal-mesenchymal signaling, molecular biology, genomics, and stem cell research holds much promise in the bench top arena. To assess efficacy, many scar assessment scores exist in the literature. The clinical measurement of scar maturity can aid in determining end points for therapeutics. Tissue oxygen tension and color assessment of scars by standardized photography proved to be useful.In surgery, the use of dermal substitutes holds some promise as we surmise that quality scars that arise from dermal elements, molecular and enzyme behavior, and balance. Although a systematic review shows some benefit for earlier closure and healing of wounds, no such review exists at this point in time for the use of dermal substitutes in scars.Adipose-derived stem cell, as it pertains to scars, will hopefully realize the potential of skin regeneration rather than by repair in which we are familiar with as well as the undesirable scarring as a result of healing through the inflammatory

  11. Enhanced secretion of TIMP-1 by human hypertrophic scar keratinocytes could contribute to fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Franck; Bergeron, Daniele; Larochelle, Sébastien; Lopez-Vallé, Carlos A; Genest, Hervé; Armour, Alexis; Moulin, Véronique J

    2012-05-01

    Hypertrophic scars are a pathological process characterized by an excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components. Using a tissue-engineered reconstructed human skin (RHS) method, we previously reported that pathological keratinocytes induce formation of a fibrotic dermal matrix. We further investigated keratinocyte action using conditioned media. Results showed that conditioned media induce a similar action on dermal thickness similar to when an epidermis is present. Using a two-dimensional electrophoresis technique, we then compared conditioned media from normal or hypertrophic scar keratinocytes and determined that TIMP-1 was increased in conditioned media from hypertrophic scar keratinocytes. This differential profile was confirmed using ELISA, assaying TIMP-1 presence on media from monolayer cultured keratinocytes and from RHS. The dermal matrix of these RHS was recreated using mesenchymal cells from three different origins (skin, wound and hypertrophic scar). The effect of increased TIMP-1 levels on dermal fibrosis was also validated independently from the mesenchymal cell origin. Immunodetection of TIMP-1 showed that this protein was increased in the epidermis of hypertrophic scar biopsies. The findings of this study represent an important advance in understanding the role of keratinocytes as a direct potent modulator for matrix degradation and scar tissue remodeling, possibly through inactivation of MMPs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Endometriosis in an episiotomy scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine islimye Taskin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis that is defined as the presence of functional endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity is seen 5-10% of reproductive age women. Endometriosis can be seen any other site of the body; but the most frequently affected areas are ovaries, pelvic peritoneum, uterosacral ligament and Douglas pouche. Several teories exist for the development of endometriosis including retrograde menstruation, venous or lymphatic metastasis and immun dysfunction. Endometriosis of the perineum and vulva are extremely rare with the most common sites being episiotomy scars. Scar endometriosis is likely to be caused by mechanical transplantation of endometrium from the uterine cavity into the wound at the time of the surgery. The primary treatment for scar endometriosis is total surgical excision of the lesion. It is important not to leave residual tissue during surgery to prevent the recurrence. Here we present a patient who had her vaginal delivery 5 years ago, have a complaint of painful vulvar lump at the right mediolateral episiotomy scar since 1 year during her every menstruation period and whose final diagnosis was endometriosis after surgical removal and histopathologic examination. Althought vulvar endometrosis is rare, it should be considered in the patients who had a vaginal delivery and complaining painful vulvar lump with swelling in her mestrual cycle. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(1.000: 164-166

  13. Post-burn scars and scar contractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel Arun

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The mortality and morbidity from burns have diminished tremendously over the last six to seven decades. However, these do not truly reflect whether the victim could go back to society as a useful person or not and lead a normal life because of the inevitable post-burn scars, contractures and other deformities which collectively have aesthetic and functional considerations. This article gives an overview of the post-burn scars and scar contractures, especially their prevention, minimisation and principles of management.

  14. Novel use of a flowable collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrix (Integra™ Flowable Wound Matrix) combined with percutaneous cannula scar tissue release in treatment of post-burn malfunction of the hand--A preliminary 6 month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirche, C; Senghaas, A; Fischer, S; Hollenbeck, S T; Kremer, T; Kneser, U

    2016-02-01

    Long-term function following severe burns to the hand may be poor secondary to scar adhesions to the underlying tendons, webspaces, and joints. In this pilot study, we report the feasibility of applying a pasty dermal matrix combined with percutaneous cannula teno- and adhesiolysis. In this 6 month follow-up pilot study, we included eight hands in five patients with hand burns undergoing minimal-invasive, percutaneous cannula adhesiolysis and injection of INTEGRA™ Flowable Wound Matrix for a pilot study of this new concept. The flowable collagen-glycosaminoglycan wound matrix (FCGWM) was applied with a buttoned 2mm cannula to induce formation of a neo-gliding plane. Post treatment follow-up was performed to assess active range of motion (AROM), grip strength, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score, Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) and quality of life Short-Form (SF)-36 questionnaire. No complications were detected associated with the treatment of FCGWM injection. The mean improvement (AROM) at 6 months was 30.6° for digits 2-5. The improvement in the DASH score was a mean of 9 points out of 100. The VSS improved by a mean of 2 points out of 14. The study demonstrates the feasibility and safety of percutaneous FCGWM for dermal augmentation after burn. Results from this pilot study show improvements in AROM for digits 2-5, functional scores from the patient's perspective (DASH) and scar quality (VSS). The flowable form of established INTEGRA™ wound matrix offers the advantage of minimal-invasive injection after scar release in the post-burned hand with a reduction in the risk of postsurgical re-scarring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. SCAR/WAVE: A complex issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Insall, Robert H

    2013-11-01

    The SCAR/WAVE complex drives the actin polymerisation that underlies protrusion of the front of the cell and thus drives migration. However, it is not understood how the activity of SCAR/WAVE is regulated to generate the infinite range of cellular shape changes observed during cell motility. What are the relative roles of the subunits of the SCAR/WAVE complex? What signaling molecules do they interact with? And how does the complex integrate all this information in order to control the temporal and spatial polymerisation of actin during protrusion formation? Unfortunately, the interdependence of SCAR complex members has made genetic dissection hard. In our recent paper,(1) we describe stabilization of the Dictyostelium SCAR complex by a small fragment of Abi. Here we summarize the main findings and discuss how this approach can help reveal the inner workings of this impenetrable complex.

  16. Mechanisms of lamellar collagen formation in connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Samaneh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Smit, Theodoor H

    2016-08-01

    The objective of tissue engineering is to regenerate functional tissues. Engineering functional tissues requires an understanding of the mechanisms that guide the formation and evolution of structure in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In particular, the three-dimensional (3D) collagen fiber arrangement is important as it is the key structural determinant that provides mechanical integrity and biological function. In this review, we survey the current knowledge on collagen organization mechanisms that can be applied to create well-structured functional lamellar tissues and in particular intervertebral disc and cornea. Thus far, the mechanisms behind the formation of cross-aligned collagen fibers in the lamellar structures is not fully understood. We start with cell-induced collagen alignment and strain-stabilization behavior mechanisms which can explain a single anisotropically aligned collagen fiber layer. These mechanisms may explain why there is anisotropy in a single layer in the first place. However, they cannot explain why a consecutive collagen layer is laid down with an alternating alignment. Therefore, we explored another mechanism, called liquid crystal phasing. While dense concentrations of collagen show such behavior, there is little evidence that the conditions for liquid crystal phasing are actually met in vivo. Instead, lysyl aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links have been found essential for correct lamellar matrix deposition. Furthermore, we suggest that supra-cellular (tissue-level) shear stress may be instrumental in the alignment of collagen fibers. Understanding the potential mechanisms behind the lamellar collagen structure in connective tissues will lead to further improvement of the regeneration strategies of functional complex lamellar tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Robert A; Dannenberg, Hilde; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; van Ginkel, Robert J

    2012-07-16

    Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM) is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. A 66-year-old man presented with a painless, slow-growing lump in a small pox scar on his left shoulder. Histological biopsies showed the lesion to be a primary, well-differentiated cutaneous leiomyosarcoma. A CT scan of the thorax was conducted, which showed no signs of metastases. The complete lesion was then surgically excised, and histopathological examination revealed a radically excised cutaneous type leiomyosarcoma After 13 months' review the patient was doing well with no evidence of tumour recurrence. This is the first report of a CLM arising in a small pox scar. Although the extended time interval between scarring and malignant changes makes it difficult to advise strict follow-up for patients with small pox scars, one should be aware that atypical changes and/or symptoms occurring in a small pox scar could potentially mean malignant transformation.

  18. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pol Robert A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2–3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. Case presentation A 66-year-old man presented with a painless, slow-growing lump in a small pox scar on his left shoulder. Histological biopsies showed the lesion to be a primary, well-differentiated cutaneous leiomyosarcoma. A CT scan of the thorax was conducted, which showed no signs of metastases. The complete lesion was then surgically excised, and histopathological examination revealed a radically excised cutaneous type leiomyosarcoma After 13 months’ review the patient was doing well with no evidence of tumour recurrence. Conclusions This is the first report of a CLM arising in a small pox scar. Although the extended time interval between scarring and malignant changes makes it difficult to advise strict follow-up for patients with small pox scars, one should be aware that atypical changes and/or symptoms occurring in a small pox scar could potentially mean malignant transformation.

  19. [Physical therapy for scars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanovic, Marguerite Guillot

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy consists notably of hand or mechanical massages, pressure therapy using various fabrics or splints, cryotherapy, laser therapy, etc. It forms part of the range of therapies used to treat pathological scars, including medical and surgical treatment. While the results are often satisfactory for hypertrophic scars, they remain uncertain for major keloids.

  20. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keep the head elevated when lying down, to use cold compresses to reduce swelling, and to avoid any activity that places undue stress on the area of the incision. Depending on the surgery performed and the site of the scar, the facial plastic surgeon will explain the types of activities to ...

  1. Different effects of BCG strains - A natural experiment evaluating the impact of the Danish and the Russian BCG strains on morbidity and scar formation in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, H; Byberg, S; Andersen, Morten Bjerregaard

    2016-01-01

    's urban study area received the Danish or Russian BCG in a natural experiment. Health center consultations were registered at point of care and scar status and size at age 4½ months. We assessed the effect of strain on consultation rates between vaccination and age 45days in Cox proportional hazards...

  2. Genetically engineered tissue to screen for glycan function in tissue formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M., Adamopoulou; E.M., Pallesen; A., Levann

    2017-01-01

    engineered GlycoSkin tissue models can be used to study biological interactions involving glycan structure on lipids, or glycosaminoglycans. This engineering approach will allow us to investigate the functions of glycans in homeostasis and elucidate the role of glycans in normal epithelial formation....... We use genetic engineering with CRISPR/Cas9 combined with 3D organotypic skin models to examine how distinct glycans influence epithelial formation. We have performed knockout and knockin of more than 100 select genes in the genome of human immortalized human keratinocytes, enabling a systematic...... analysis of the impact of specific glycans in the formation and transformation of the human skin. The genetic engineered human skin models (GlycoSkin) was designed with and without all major biosynthetic pathways in mammalian glycan biosynthesis, including GalNAc-O-glycans, O-fucosylation, O...

  3. A Comparative Study on the Formation Mechanism of Wear Scars during the Partial and Full Scale Fretting Wear Tests of Spacer Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Ho; Shin, Chang Hwan; Oh, Dong Seok; Kang, Heung Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Fretting wear studies for evaluating the contact damages of nuclear fuel rods have been focused on the contact shape, rod motion, contact condition, environment, etc.. However, fretting wear mechanism was dramatically changed with slight variation of test variables such as test environments and contact shapes. For example, in an unlubricated condition, effects of wear debris and/or its layer on the fretting wear mechanism showed that the formation of a well-developed layer on the contact surfaces has a beneficial effect for decreasing a friction coefficient. Otherwise, a severe wear was happened due to a third body abrasion. In addition, in water lubrication condition, some of wear debris was remained on worn surface of fuel rod specimens at both sliding and impacting loading conditions. So, it is apparent that a wear rate of fuel rod specimen was easily accelerated by the third-body abrasion. This is because the restrained agglomeration behavior between generated wear particles results in rapid removal of wear debris and its layer. In case of contact shape effects, previous studies show that wear debris are easily trapped between contact surfaces and its debris layer was well developed in a localized area especially in a concave spring rather than a convex spring shape. Consequently, localized wear was happened at both ends of a concave spring and center region of a convex spring. So, it is useful for determining the fretting wear resistance of spacer gird spring and dimple by using part unit in the various lubricated conditions. It is well known that the fretting wear phenomenon of nuclear fuel rod is originated from a flow-induced vibration (FIV) due to the rapid primary coolant. This means that both rod vibration and debris removal behavior were affected by flow fields around the contact regions between fuel rod and spring/dimple. However, all most of the fretting tests were performed by simulating rod vibrating motions such as axial vibration, conservative rod

  4. A Comparative Study on the Formation Mechanism of Wear Scars during the Partial and Full Scale Fretting Wear Tests of Spacer Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Ho; Shin, Chang Hwan; Oh, Dong Seok; Kang, Heung Seok

    2012-01-01

    Fretting wear studies for evaluating the contact damages of nuclear fuel rods have been focused on the contact shape, rod motion, contact condition, environment, etc.. However, fretting wear mechanism was dramatically changed with slight variation of test variables such as test environments and contact shapes. For example, in an unlubricated condition, effects of wear debris and/or its layer on the fretting wear mechanism showed that the formation of a well-developed layer on the contact surfaces has a beneficial effect for decreasing a friction coefficient. Otherwise, a severe wear was happened due to a third body abrasion. In addition, in water lubrication condition, some of wear debris was remained on worn surface of fuel rod specimens at both sliding and impacting loading conditions. So, it is apparent that a wear rate of fuel rod specimen was easily accelerated by the third-body abrasion. This is because the restrained agglomeration behavior between generated wear particles results in rapid removal of wear debris and its layer. In case of contact shape effects, previous studies show that wear debris are easily trapped between contact surfaces and its debris layer was well developed in a localized area especially in a concave spring rather than a convex spring shape. Consequently, localized wear was happened at both ends of a concave spring and center region of a convex spring. So, it is useful for determining the fretting wear resistance of spacer gird spring and dimple by using part unit in the various lubricated conditions. It is well known that the fretting wear phenomenon of nuclear fuel rod is originated from a flow-induced vibration (FIV) due to the rapid primary coolant. This means that both rod vibration and debris removal behavior were affected by flow fields around the contact regions between fuel rod and spring/dimple. However, all most of the fretting tests were performed by simulating rod vibrating motions such as axial vibration, conservative rod

  5. Axolotl cells and tissues enhances cutaneous wound healing in mice

    OpenAIRE

    DEMIRCAN, Turan; KESKIN, Ilknur; GUNAL, Yalcin; ILHAN, Ayse Elif; KOLBASI, Bircan; OZTURK, Gurkan

    2017-01-01

    Adult mammalian skin wound repair is defective due to loss of the regulation in balancing the complete epithelial regeneration and excessive connective tissue production, and this repair process commonly results in scar tissue formation. However, unlike mammals, adult salamanders repair the wounds by regeneration compared to scarring. To elucidate the healing capability of a salamander, Axolotl, in a different species, here we addressed this question by treating the wounds in mice with Axolot...

  6. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  7. [How to optimize scarring in dermatologic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amici, J M; Chaussade, V

    2016-12-01

    Scarring is the response elicited by the skin surface to injury and loss of tissue material. Wound healing takes place through a complex natural repair system consisting of vascular, inflammatory and proliferative phenomena, followed by a remodelling and cell apoptosis phase. This incredible repair system is inevitable, but sometimes unpredictable due to individual differences based on multiple factors. The scar is the objective criterion of a skin surgery, both for the patient and the dermsurgeon. It is therefore crucial to establish with the patient during the preoperative consultation, the size and positioning of the expected scar, taking into account the oncologic, anatomic and surgical constraints. Scars can ideally blend into normal skin, but may also give rise to various abnormalities. We can manage and prevent these abnormalities by mastering initial inflammation, that may induce hyperpigmentation and hypertrophy. Early massage using cortocosteroid topic or anti-inflammatory moisturizers may be effective. Random individual scarring may be minimized by a dynamic personalized accompanying scarring. © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  8. Radiation scars on mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, H.; Breining, H.; Knappschafts-Krankenhaus Essen

    1985-01-01

    Six patients with radiation scars are described. In each case the diagnosis was confirmed histologically in five cases corresponding mammograms were available. The histological appearances of radiation scars are described and the radiological features are presented. These lesions can be diagnosed mammographically in vivo. Macroscopically differentiation from a scirrhous carcinoma is not possible and therefore a radiation scar must always be excised; this also leads to definitive cure. On mammographic screening the incidence is 0.5 to 0.9 per thousand. The significance of radiation scars depends on the fact that they are pre-cancerous and therefore are equivalent to the early diagnosis of a carcinoma with the possibility of a complete cure. (orig.) [de

  9. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Mediates Fibroblast Activity via RAGE-MAPK and NF-κB Signaling in Keloid Scar Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihee Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerging studies have revealed the involvement of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 in systemic fibrotic diseases, yet its role in the cutaneous scarring process has not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that HMGB1 may promote fibroblast activity to cause abnormal cutaneous scarring. In vitro wound healing assay with normal and keloid fibroblasts demonstrated that HMGB1 administration promoted the migration of both fibroblasts with increased speed and a greater traveling distance. Treatment of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizic acid (GA showed an opposing effect on both activities. To analyze the downstream mechanism, the protein levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, protein kinase B (AKT, and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB were measured by western blot analysis. HMGB1 increased the expression levels of ERK1/2, AKT, and NF-κB compared to the control, which was suppressed by GA. HMGB1 promoted both normal and keloid fibroblasts migration to a degree equivalent to that achieved with TGF-β. We concluded that HMGB1 activates fibroblasts via the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE—mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and NF-κB interaction signaling pathways. Further knowledge of the relationship of HMGB1 with skin fibrosis may lead to a promising clinical approach to manage abnormal scarring.

  10. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Mediates Fibroblast Activity via RAGE-MAPK and NF-κB Signaling in Keloid Scar Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihee; Park, Jong-Chul; Lee, Mi Hee; Yang, Chae Eun; Lee, Ju Hee; Lee, Won Jai

    2017-12-28

    Emerging studies have revealed the involvement of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in systemic fibrotic diseases, yet its role in the cutaneous scarring process has not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that HMGB1 may promote fibroblast activity to cause abnormal cutaneous scarring. In vitro wound healing assay with normal and keloid fibroblasts demonstrated that HMGB1 administration promoted the migration of both fibroblasts with increased speed and a greater traveling distance. Treatment of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizic acid (GA) showed an opposing effect on both activities. To analyze the downstream mechanism, the protein levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, protein kinase B (AKT), and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) were measured by western blot analysis. HMGB1 increased the expression levels of ERK1/2, AKT, and NF-κB compared to the control, which was suppressed by GA. HMGB1 promoted both normal and keloid fibroblasts migration to a degree equivalent to that achieved with TGF-β. We concluded that HMGB1 activates fibroblasts via the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE)-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and NF-κB interaction signaling pathways. Further knowledge of the relationship of HMGB1 with skin fibrosis may lead to a promising clinical approach to manage abnormal scarring.

  11. An objective device for measuring surface roughness of skin and scars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, Monica C. T.; van Gerven, Maaike S.; van der Wal, Martijn B. A.; Verhaegen, Pauline D. H. M.; Middelkoop, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Scar formation remains a major clinical problem; therefore, various therapies have been developed to improve scar quality. To evaluate the effectiveness of these therapies, objective measurement tools are necessary. An appropriate, objective measuring instrument for assessment of surface roughness

  12. An objective device for measuring surface roughness of skin and scars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, M.C.T.; van Gerven, M.S.; van der Wal, M.B.A.; Verhaegen, P.D.H.M.; Middelkoop, E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Scar formation remains a major clinical problem; therefore, various therapies have been developed to improve scar quality. To evaluate the effectiveness of these therapies, objective measurement tools are necessary. An appropriate, objective measuring instrument for assessment of surface

  13. High- and ultrahigh-field magnetic resonance imaging of na?ve, injured and scarred vocal fold mucosae in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kishimoto, Ayami Ohno; Kishimoto, Yo; Young, David L.; Zhang, Jinjin; Rowland, Ian J.; Welham, Nathan V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Subepithelial changes to the vocal fold mucosa, such as fibrosis, are difficult to identify using visual assessment of the tissue surface. Moreover, without suspicion of neoplasm, mucosal biopsy is not a viable clinical option, as it carries its own risk of iatrogenic injury and scar formation. Given these challenges, we assessed the ability of high- (4.7?T) and ultrahigh-field (9.4?T) magnetic resonance imaging to resolve key vocal fold subepithelial tissue structures in the rat, an...

  14. Pathological mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of chronic scarred myocardium in contrast agent enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate possible mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of scarred myocardium by investigating the relationship of contrast agent (CA first pass and delayed enhancement patterns with histopathological changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen pigs underwent 4 weeks ligation of 1 or 2 diagonal coronary arteries to induce chronic infarction. The hearts were then removed and perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. The hearts firstly experienced phosphorus 31 MR spectroscopy. The hearts in group I (n = 9 and II (n = 9 then received the bolus injection of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (0.05 mmol/kg and gadolinium-based macromolecular agent (P792, 15 µmol/kg, respectively. First pass T2* MRI was acquired using a gradient echo sequence. Delayed enhanced T1 MRI was acquired with an inversion recovery sequence. Masson's trichrome and anti- von Willebrand Factor (vWF staining were performed for infarct characterization. RESULTS: Wash-in of both kinds of CA caused the sharp and dramatic T2* signal decrease of scarred myocardium similar to that of normal myocardium. Myocardial blood flow and microvessel density were significantly recovered in 4-week-old scar tissue. Steady state distribution volume (ΔR1 relaxation rate of Gd-DTPA was markedly higher in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium, whereas ΔR1 relaxation rate of P792 did not differ significantly between scarred and normal myocardium. The ratio of extracellular volume to the total water volume was significantly greater in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium. Scarred myocardium contained massive residual capillaries and dilated vessels. Histological stains indicated the extensively discrete matrix deposition and lack of cellular structure in scarred myocardium. CONCLUSIONS: Collateral circulation formation and residual vessel effectively delivered CA into scarred myocardium. However, residual vessel without abnormal hyperpermeability allowed Gd

  15. Bioactive scaffolds for the controlled formation of complex skeletal tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, S.; Garcia-Fuentes, M.; Eberli, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue Engineering may offer new treatment alternatives for organ replacement or repair deteriorated organs. Among the clinical applications of Tissue Engineering are the production of artificial skin for burn patients, tissue engineered trachea, cartilage for knee-replacement procedures, urinary

  16. The Subunit Principle in Scar Face Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahat, Ahmed; Lashin, Riham

    2017-06-01

    Facial scaring is considered one of the most difficult cosmetic problems for any plastic surgeon to solve. The condition is more difficult if the direction of the scar is not parallel to relaxed skin tension lines. Attempts to manage this difficult situation included revisions using geometric designs, Z plasties or W plasties to camouflage the straight line visible scaring. The use of long-lasting resorbable sutures was tried too. Recently, the use of botulinum toxin during revision improved the results. Fractional CO2 lasers, microfat grafts, and platelet-rich plasma were added to the armamentarium. The scar is least visible if placed in the junction between the facial subunits. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of the subunit principle to improve the results of scar revision. Four patients were included in this study. Tissue expansion of the intact part of the subunit allowed shifting the scar to the junction between the affected subunit and the adjacent one. Tissue expansion, delivery of the expanders, and advancement of the flaps were successful in all patients. The fact that this is a 2-stage procedure and sacrifices some of the intact skin from the affected facial subunit, makes this technique reserved to patients with ugly facial scars who are ambitious to improve their appearance.

  17. In search of scar seeking radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehi, N.; Lawlor, J.M.; Lichtenstein, M.; Allaway, M.; Barencevic, A. [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine]|[University of Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: Sensitive detection of acute peri-osseous scar tissue should be valuable for detection of partial ligamentous, tears and other common rheumatological conditions including back pain and ligamentous scars. Our aim was to investigate acute scar uptake of {sup 99m}Tc(V)-DMSA (dimercapto-succinic-acid), {sup 99m}Tc-DMAD (di- methyl-aminodiphosphonate) compared to {sup 99m}Tc-MDP (methylen-diphosphonate), the standard bone-scanning radiopharmaceutical. New Zealand white rabbits were anaesthetised and had 5-7cm of their mid-line abdominal wall surgically incised. At 24, 48, 72, 96 and 240 hours post surgery, 74 MBq (2 mCi) of the above radiopharmaceuticals were injected intravenously and scintigraphy performed 2.5 hours later. Relative count rate in scar is tabulated. In conclusion, the increased activity in the acute surgical site and lesser bone uptake confirmed that Tc (V)-DMSA and Tc-DMAD are superior to Tc- MDP for detection of new scar tissue in the region of bone. 1 tab.

  18. Enamel matrix derivative enhances tissue formation around scaffolds used for tissue engineering of ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Michael P; Raïf, El M; Seedhom, Bahaa B; Brookes, Steven J

    2010-02-01

    The following in vitro translational study investigated whether enamel matrix derivative (EMD), an approved biomimetic treatment for periodontal disease (Emdogain) and hard-to-heal wounds (Xelma), enhanced synovial cell colonization and protein synthesis around a scaffold used clinically for in situ tissue engineering of the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Synovial cells were enzymatically extracted from bovine synovium and dynamically seeded onto polyethylene terephthalate (PET) scaffolds. The cells were cultured in low-serum medium (0.5% FBS) for 4 weeks with either a single administration of EMD at the start of the 4 week period or multiple administrations of EMD at regular intervals throughout the 4 weeks. Samples were harvested and evaluated using the Hoechst DNA assay, BCA protein assay, cresolphthalein complexone calcium assay, SDS-PAGE, ELISA and electron microscopy. A significant increase in cell number (DNA) (p < 0.01), protein content (p < 0.01) and TGFbeta1 synthesis (p < 0.01) was observed with multiple administrations of EMD. Additionally, SDS-PAGE showed an increase in high molecular weight proteins, characteristic of the fibril-forming collagens. Electron microscopy supported these findings, showing that scaffolds treated with multiple administrations of EMD were heavily coated with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) that enveloped the fibres. Multiple administrations of EMD to synovial cell-seeded scaffolds enhanced the formation of tissue in vitro. Additionally, it was shown that EMD enhanced TGFbeta1 synthesis of synovial cells, suggesting a potential mode of action for EMD's capacity to stimulate tissue regeneration.

  19. Lumican alleviates hypertrophic scarring by suppressing integrin-FAK signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuqian; Li, Xueyong; Xu, Xiaoli; He, Zhi; Cui, Lei; Lv, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scarring (HS) is an overcompensation of wound healing that increases the risk of cosmetic disfigurement and functional impairment. No gold standard has been established for the treatment or prevention of HS. Our study aims to elucidate the expression and function of lumican in the pathogenesis of HS as well as the underlying mechanism involved in this procedure. An animal model of HS (rabbit ear) was established, and the Ad-lumican vectors were locally injected. Primary fibroblasts isolated from patients with hypertrophic burn scars were used in vitro. Histological and molecular changes in HS pathogenesis were evaluated. The results showed that lumican is significantly reduced in HS tissues and fibroblasts from HS patients as compared to normal skin or cells. Lumican levels were further suppressed in response to TGF-β stimulation. However, lumican upregulation effectively thinned the scar area and inhibited fibroblast proliferation and the cell cycle. Meanwhile, Ad-lumican administration suppressed the deposition of extracellular matrix, such as collagen and CTGF. Ad-lumican injected animals or fibroblasts presented comparable integrin α 2 β 1 expression while greatly reduced phosphorylation of FAK compared to the negative control. Moreover, Ad-lumican administration largely enhanced the binding of lumican to integrin α 2 β 1 and may thus inhibit the signaling propagation of collagen-integrin α 2 β 1 . Overall, the restoration of lumican levels contributed to suppressing the HS progression by inhibiting collagen-integrin α 2 β 1 -FAK signaling. - Highlights: • Lumican is downregulated during hypertrophic scar formation. • Lumican inhibits fibroblast proliferation. • Lumican inhibits extracellular matrix deposition. • Lumican suppresses collagen-integrin-FAK signaling.

  20. 3D tissue formation : the kinetics of human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera Sierra, Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    The main thesis in this book proposes that physical phenomena underlies the formation of three-dimensional (3D) tissue. In this thesis, tissue regeneration with mesenchymal stem cells was studied through the law of conservation of mass. MSCs proliferation and 3D tissue formation were explored from

  1. A Study Of 7 Cases Of Depressed Facial Scars Corrected By Subcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malakar Subrata

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven (7 cases of depressed facial scars which included depressed distensile acne scars, depressed bound down scars of acne excluding deep ice pick scars, and scars of varicella constituted the study group. The scars were treated with a new method named subcuticular undermining. A tri-bevelled hypodermic needle was inserted through a puncture in the skin surface and its sharp edges were manouevered under the scar. The depression was lifted by the releasing action of the needle maneuevere and from connective tissue that forms in course of normal wound healing. Approximately 50% to 80% improvement of all the scars were noticed. Patient’s compliance was highly satisfactory. Subcision is an appropriate, option in depressed scars of black skin (Type IV-Type VI where dermabrasion and medium-depth and deep chemical peeling are contraindicated.

  2. Cesarean scar pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kathrine Birch; Hoffmann, Elise; Rifbjerg Larsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study treatment modalities for cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs), focusing on efficacy and complications in relation to study quality. DESIGN: Systematic review. SETTING: Not applicable. PATIENT(S): A total of 2,037 women with CSP. INTERVENTION(S): Review of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Coch......OBJECTIVE: To study treatment modalities for cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs), focusing on efficacy and complications in relation to study quality. DESIGN: Systematic review. SETTING: Not applicable. PATIENT(S): A total of 2,037 women with CSP. INTERVENTION(S): Review of MEDLINE, EMBASE...

  3. Early treatment using fractional CO2 laser before skin suture during scar revision surgery in Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Feiya; Yu, Yusheng; Zhou, Zhiqin; Wang, Liujia; Zheng, Shusen

    2018-04-01

    Fractional CO 2 laser is one of the most effective treatment options used to resurface scars. However, most previous studies have been performed on mature scars at least 2 months after surgery. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of early treatment to reduce scar formation. In the present study, we described our experience with fractional CO 2 laser intervention before skin suture during scar revision surgery in Asians, and found the treatment was safe and effective.

  4. Epimorphic regeneration approach to tissue replacement in adult mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urodeles and fetal mammals are capable of impressive epimorphic regeneration in a variety of tissues, whereas the typical default response to injury in adult mammals consists of inflammation and scar tissue formation. One component of epimorphic regeneration is the recruitment of resident progenitor...

  5. Fractional CO2 laser treatment of caesarean section scars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmisholt, Katrine E; Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Wulff, Camilla B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Caesarean section (c-section) scars can be pose functional and cosmetic challenges and ablative fractional laser (AFXL) treatment may offer benefit to patients. We evaluated textural and color changes over time in AFXL-treated versus untreated control scars. MATERIALS...... AND METHODS: A randomized, controlled, intra-individual split-scar trial with three sessions of AFXL-treatments for mature c-section scars. Settings of AFXL were adjusted to each individual scar. End-points were blinded on-site clinical evaluations at 1, 3, and 6 months follow-up (Patient and Observer Scar...... Assessment Scale [POSAS] and Vancouver Scar Scale [VSS]), blinded photo-evaluations, reflectance measurements, tissue histology, and patients satisfaction. RESULTS: Eleven of 12 patients completed the study. At 1 month follow-up, AFXL-treated scars were significantly improved in pliability (POSAS P = 0...

  6. Cell-size distribution in epithelial tissue formation and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puliafito, Alberto; Primo, Luca; Celani, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    How cell growth and proliferation are orchestrated in living tissues to achieve a given biological function is a central problem in biology. During development, tissue regeneration and homeostasis, cell proliferation must be coordinated by spatial cues in order for cells to attain the correct size and shape. Biological tissues also feature a notable homogeneity of cell size, which, in specific cases, represents a physiological need. Here, we study the temporal evolution of the cell-size distribution by applying the theory of kinetic fragmentation to tissue development and homeostasis. Our theory predicts self-similar probability density function (PDF) of cell size and explains how division times and redistribution ensure cell size homogeneity across the tissue. Theoretical predictions and numerical simulations of confluent non-homeostatic tissue cultures show that cell size distribution is self-similar. Our experimental data confirm predictions and reveal that, as assumed in the theory, cell division times scale like a power-law of the cell size. We find that in homeostatic conditions there is a stationary distribution with lognormal tails, consistently with our experimental data. Our theoretical predictions and numerical simulations show that the shape of the PDF depends on how the space inherited by apoptotic cells is redistributed and that apoptotic cell rates might also depend on size. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. High-Density Spot Seeding for Tissue Model Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquette, Michele L. (Inventor); Sognier, Marguerite A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A model of tissue is produced by steps comprising seeding cells at a selected concentration on a support to form a cell spot, incubating the cells to allow the cells to partially attach, rinsing the cells to remove any cells that have not partially attached, adding culture medium to enable the cells to proliferate at a periphery of the cell spot and to differentiate toward a center of the cell spot, and further incubating the cells to form the tissue. The cells may be C2C12 cells or other subclones of the C2 cell line, H9c2(2-1) cells, L6 cells, L8 cells, QM7 cells, Sol8 cells, G-7 cells, G-8 cells, other myoblast cells, cells from other tissues, or stem cells. The selected concentration is in a range from about 1 x 10(exp 5) cells/ml to about 1 x 10(exp 6) cells/ml. The tissue formed may be a muscle tissue or other tissue depending on the cells seeded.

  8. Mathematical modelling of tissue formation in chondrocyte filter cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catt, C J; Schuurman, W; Sengers, B G; van Weeren, P R; Dhert, W J A; Please, C P; Malda, J

    2011-12-17

    In the field of cartilage tissue engineering, filter cultures are a frequently used three-dimensional differentiation model. However, understanding of the governing processes of in vitro growth and development of tissue in these models is limited. Therefore, this study aimed to further characterise these processes by means of an approach combining both experimental and applied mathematical methods. A mathematical model was constructed, consisting of partial differential equations predicting the distribution of cells and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), as well as the overall thickness of the tissue. Experimental data was collected to allow comparison with the predictions of the simulation and refinement of the initial models. Healthy mature equine chondrocytes were expanded and subsequently seeded on collagen-coated filters and cultured for up to 7 weeks. Resulting samples were characterised biochemically, as well as histologically. The simulations showed a good representation of the experimentally obtained cell and matrix distribution within the cultures. The mathematical results indicate that the experimental GAG and cell distribution is critically dependent on the rate at which the cell differentiation process takes place, which has important implications for interpreting experimental results. This study demonstrates that large regions of the tissue are inactive in terms of proliferation and growth of the layer. In particular, this would imply that higher seeding densities will not significantly affect the growth rate. A simple mathematical model was developed to predict the observed experimental data and enable interpretation of the principal underlying mechanisms controlling growth-related changes in tissue composition.

  9. Bacterial biofilm formation and treatment in soft tissue fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Er, Ozge; Eickhardt, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    that once the bacteria had settled (into biofilms) within the gels, even succesive treatments with high concentrations of relevant antibiotics were not effective. Our data substantiate bacteria as a cause of adverse reactions reported when using tissue fillers, and the sustainability of these infections...

  10. Acne Scar Treatment: A Multimodality Approach Tailored to Scar Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski-Larsen, Lisa A; Fabi, Sabrina G; McGraw, Timothy; Taylor, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Acne scarring can be classified into atrophic icepick, boxcar, and rolling scars in addition to keloidal and hypertrophic scars. Additionally, these scars can be erythematous, hyperpigmented, and/or hypopigmented. Each scar type has a different structural cause warranting a customized approach. Many cosmetic options exist to address these changes individually, but little literature exists about the safety and efficacy of combining such procedures and devices. A Medline search was performed on combination treatments because it relates to facial acne scarring, and results are summarized. Practical applications for these combinations of procedures are also discussed. Studies examining the efficacy and safety of ablative, nonablative, fractionated, and nonfractionated lasers, dermabrasion, chemical peels, needling, subcision, radiofrequency, stem cell therapy, fat transplantation, platelet-rich plasma, and hyaluronic acid dermal fillers for acne scars were found. The authors review their experience in combining these techniques. Review of the literature revealed multiple single options for facial acne scarring treatment with minimal evidence in the literature found on the safety and efficacy of combining such procedures and devices. The authors' experience is that combining acne scar treatment techniques can be performed safely and synergistically with optimal patient outcomes.

  11. Fibromodulin reduces scar size and increases scar tensile strength in normal and excessive-mechanical-loading porcine cutaneous wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenlu; Ting, Kang; Lee, Soonchul; Zara, Janette N; Song, Richard; Li, Chenshuang; Chen, Eric; Zhang, Xinli; Zhao, Zhihe; Soo, Chia; Zheng, Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is a major postoperative complication which leads to severe disfigurement and dysfunction in patients and usually requires multiple surgical revisions due to its high recurrence rates. Excessive-mechanical-loading across wounds is an important initiator of hypertrophic scarring formation. In this study, we demonstrate that intradermal administration of a single extracellular matrix (ECM) molecule-fibromodulin (FMOD) protein-can significantly reduce scar size, increase tensile strength, and improve dermal collagen architecture organization in the normal and even excessive-mechanical-loading red Duroc pig wound models. Since pig skin is recognized by the Food and Drug Administration as the closest animal equivalent to human skin, and because red Duroc pigs show scarring that closely resembles human proliferative scarring and hypertrophic scarring, FMOD-based technologies hold high translational potential and applicability to human patients suffering from scarring-especially hypertrophic scarring. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  12. Altitudinal variations of ground tissue and xylem tissue in terminal shoot of woody species: implications for treeline formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Wang, Haiyang; Liu, Yanfang; Dong, Li

    2013-01-01

    1. The terminal shoot (or current-year shoot), as one of the most active parts on a woody plant, is a basic unit determining plant height and is potentially influenced by a variety of environmental factors. It has been predicted that tissues amount and their allocation in plant stems may play a critical role in determining plant size in alpine regions. The primary structure in terminal shoots is a key to our understanding treeline formation. The existing theories on treeline formation, however, are still largely lacking of evidence at the species level, much less from anatomy for the terminal shoot. 2. The primary structures within terminal shoot were measured quantitatively for 100 species from four elevation zones along the eastern slope of Gongga Mountain, southwestern China; one group was sampled from above the treeline. An allometric approach was employed to examine scaling relationships interspecifically, and a principal components analysis (PCA) was performed to test the relation among primary xylem, ground tissue, species growth form and altitude. 3. The results showed that xylem tissue size was closely correlated with ground tissue size isometrically across species, while undergoing significant y- or/and x-intercept shift in response to altitudinal belts. Further, a conspicuous characteristic of terminal shoot was its allocation of contrasting tissues between primary xylem and ground tissues with increasing elevation. The result of the PCA showed correlations between anatomical variation, species growth form/height classes and environment. 4. The current study presents a comparative assessment of the allocation of tissue in terminal shoot across phylogenically and ecologically diverse species, and analyzes tissue, function and climate associations with plant growth forms and height classes among species. The interspecific connection between primary xylem ratio and plant size along an elevation gradient suggests the importance of primary xylem in explaining

  13. Altitudinal variations of ground tissue and xylem tissue in terminal shoot of woody species: implications for treeline formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Chen

    Full Text Available 1. The terminal shoot (or current-year shoot, as one of the most active parts on a woody plant, is a basic unit determining plant height and is potentially influenced by a variety of environmental factors. It has been predicted that tissues amount and their allocation in plant stems may play a critical role in determining plant size in alpine regions. The primary structure in terminal shoots is a key to our understanding treeline formation. The existing theories on treeline formation, however, are still largely lacking of evidence at the species level, much less from anatomy for the terminal shoot. 2. The primary structures within terminal shoot were measured quantitatively for 100 species from four elevation zones along the eastern slope of Gongga Mountain, southwestern China; one group was sampled from above the treeline. An allometric approach was employed to examine scaling relationships interspecifically, and a principal components analysis (PCA was performed to test the relation among primary xylem, ground tissue, species growth form and altitude. 3. The results showed that xylem tissue size was closely correlated with ground tissue size isometrically across species, while undergoing significant y- or/and x-intercept shift in response to altitudinal belts. Further, a conspicuous characteristic of terminal shoot was its allocation of contrasting tissues between primary xylem and ground tissues with increasing elevation. The result of the PCA showed correlations between anatomical variation, species growth form/height classes and environment. 4. The current study presents a comparative assessment of the allocation of tissue in terminal shoot across phylogenically and ecologically diverse species, and analyzes tissue, function and climate associations with plant growth forms and height classes among species. The interspecific connection between primary xylem ratio and plant size along an elevation gradient suggests the importance of primary

  14. Microneedle physical contact as a therapeutic for abnormal scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, David C; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; Xu, Chenjie

    2017-08-14

    Abnormal (keloid and hypertrophic) scars are a significant affliction with no satisfactory single modality therapy to-date. Available options are often ineffective, painful, potentially hazardous, and require healthcare personnel involvement. Herein a self-administered microneedle device based on drug-free physical contact for inhibiting abnormal scars is reported. Its therapeutic activity through microneedle contact eliminates hazards associated with toxic anti-scarring drugs while self-treatment enables administration flexibility. The microneedle patch was fabricated with FDA-approved liquid crystalline polymer under good manufacturing practice. It was first tested to ascertain its ability to inhibit (keloid) fibroblast proliferation. Later the microneedle patch was examined on the rabbit ear hypertrophic scar model to explore its potential in inhibiting the generation of abnormal scars post-injury. Finally, the microneedle patch was applied to the caudal region of a hypertrophic scar located on a female patient's dorsum to verify clinical efficacy. On untreated control cultures, barely any non-viable fibroblasts could be seen. After 12-h treatment with the microneedle patch, the non-viable proportion increased to 83.8 ± 11.96%. In rabbit ear hypertrophic scar model, 100% of the control wounds without the presence of patches on rabbit ears generated regions of raised dermis originating from the wound site (3/3), whereas microneedle treatment prevented dermis tissue thickening in 83.33% of the wounds (15/18). In the clinical test, the microneedle patch was well tolerated by the patient. Compared to the untreated region, microneedle treatment decreased the number of infiltrated inflammatory cells, with less disrupted dermis tissue architecture and more flattened appearance. A self-administered, drug-free microneedle patch appears highly promising in reducing abnormal scarring as observed from in vitro, in vivo and clinical experiments. Larger cohort clinical

  15. Roentgenodiagnosis of stomach postulcer scar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strunin, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the X-ray picture of the stomach postulcer scar in correlation with fibrogastroscopy in 39 patients. The X-ray picture was characterized by considerable polymorphism and at the same time it was difficult to single out pathognomonic features. For specified diagnosis and differentiation the detection of the postulcer scar must become a multifaceted roentgenoendoscopic problem. Stomach ulcers may scar, sometimes with the complete regeneration of the mucosa relief, however their recurrences can develop in the zone of the postulcer scar

  16. Probability mapping of scarred myocardium using texture and intensity features in CMR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The myocardium exhibits heterogeneous nature due to scarring after Myocardial Infarction (MI). In Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) imaging, Late Gadolinium (LG) contrast agent enhances the intensity of scarred area in the myocardium. Methods In this paper, we propose a probability mapping technique using Texture and Intensity features to describe heterogeneous nature of the scarred myocardium in Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) images after Myocardial Infarction (MI). Scarred tissue and non-scarred tissue are represented with high and low probabilities, respectively. Intermediate values possibly indicate areas where the scarred and healthy tissues are interwoven. The probability map of scarred myocardium is calculated by using a probability function based on Bayes rule. Any set of features can be used in the probability function. Results In the present study, we demonstrate the use of two different types of features. One is based on the mean intensity of pixel and the other on underlying texture information of the scarred and non-scarred myocardium. Examples of probability maps computed using the mean intensity of pixel and the underlying texture information are presented. We hypothesize that the probability mapping of myocardium offers alternate visualization, possibly showing the details with physiological significance difficult to detect visually in the original CMR image. Conclusion The probability mapping obtained from the two features provides a way to define different cardiac segments which offer a way to identify areas in the myocardium of diagnostic importance (like core and border areas in scarred myocardium). PMID:24053280

  17. Formation of tissue factor activity following incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein with plasma lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, T.; Kisiel, W.

    1990-01-01

    Incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein (Apo-TF) with human plasma decreased the recalcified clotting time of this plasma in a time-and dose-dependent manner suggesting relipidation of the Apo-TF by plasma lipoproteins. Incubation of Apo-TF with purified preparations of human very low density, low density and high density lipoproteins resulted in tissue factor activity in a clotting assay. The order of effectiveness was VLDL greater than LDL much greater than HDL. Tissue factor activity generated by incubation of a fixed amount of Apo-TF with plasma lipoproteins was lipoprotein concentration-dependent and saturable. The association of Apo-TF with lipoprotein particles was supported by gel filtration studies in which 125 I-Apo-TF coeluted with the plasma lipoprotein in the void volume of a Superose 6 column in the presence and absence of calcium ions. In addition, void-volume Apo-TF-lipoprotein fractions exhibited tissue factor activity. These results suggest that the factor VIII-bypassing activity of bovine Apo-TF observed in a canine hemophilic model may be due, in part, to its association with plasma lipoproteins and expression of functional tissue factor activity

  18. Sequential treatment with intradermal incision (intracision) and 2,940-nm Er:YAG laser for chicken pox scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ju; Kim, Young Koo; Choi, Sun Young; Park, Kui Young; Seo, Seong Jun

    2014-01-01

    Boxcar scars, such as chicken pox scars, are round to oval depressions with sharply defined vertical edges. Subcision is a simple and safe procedure for treatment of atrophic and depressed scars, but boxcar scars are generally not eliminated by subcision. Intradermal incision technique (intracision) can treat chicken pox scars by untethering fibrotic strands, raising collagen synthesis, and having additional intradermal blood pocket formation. We have found that chicken pox scars further improve when intracision is followed by laser skin resurfacing. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The Effect of Cryopreserved Human Placental Tissues on Biofilm Formation of Wound-Associated Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yong; Singh-Varma, Anya; Hoffman, Tyler; Dhall, Sandeep; Danilkovitch, Alla; Kohn, Joachim

    2018-01-08

    Biofilm, a community of bacteria, is tolerant to antimicrobial agents and ubiquitous in chronic wounds. In a chronic DFU (Diabetic Foot Ulcers) clinical trial, the use of a human cryopreserved viable amniotic membrane (CVAM) resulted in a high rate of wound closure and reduction of wound-related infections. Our previous study demonstrated that CVAM possesses intrinsic antimicrobial activity against a spectrum of wound-associated bacteria under planktonic culture conditions. In this study, we evaluated the effect of CVAM and cryopreserved viable umbilical tissue (CVUT) on biofilm formation of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa , the two most prominent pathogens associated with chronic wounds. Firstly, we showed that, like CVAM, CVUT released antibacterial activity against multiple bacterial pathogens and the devitalization of CVUT reduced its antibacterial activity. The biofilm formation was then measured using a high throughput method and an ex vivo porcine dermal tissue model. We demonstrate that the formation of biofilm was significantly reduced in the presence of CVAM- or CVUT-derived conditioned media compared to control assay medium. The formation of P. aeruginosa biofilm on CVAM-conditioned medium saturated porcine dermal tissues was reduced 97% compared with the biofilm formation on the control medium saturated dermal tissues. The formation of S. auerus biofilm on CVUT-conditioned medium saturated dermal tissues was reduced 72% compared with the biofilm formation on the control tissues. This study is the first to show that human cryopreserved viable placental tissues release factors that inhibit biofilm formation. Our results provide an explanation for the in vivo observation of their ability to support wound healing.

  20. The Effect of Cryopreserved Human Placental Tissues on Biofilm Formation of Wound-Associated Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Mao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm, a community of bacteria, is tolerant to antimicrobial agents and ubiquitous in chronic wounds. In a chronic DFU (Diabetic Foot Ulcers clinical trial, the use of a human cryopreserved viable amniotic membrane (CVAM resulted in a high rate of wound closure and reduction of wound-related infections. Our previous study demonstrated that CVAM possesses intrinsic antimicrobial activity against a spectrum of wound-associated bacteria under planktonic culture conditions. In this study, we evaluated the effect of CVAM and cryopreserved viable umbilical tissue (CVUT on biofilm formation of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, the two most prominent pathogens associated with chronic wounds. Firstly, we showed that, like CVAM, CVUT released antibacterial activity against multiple bacterial pathogens and the devitalization of CVUT reduced its antibacterial activity. The biofilm formation was then measured using a high throughput method and an ex vivo porcine dermal tissue model. We demonstrate that the formation of biofilm was significantly reduced in the presence of CVAM- or CVUT-derived conditioned media compared to control assay medium. The formation of P. aeruginosa biofilm on CVAM-conditioned medium saturated porcine dermal tissues was reduced 97% compared with the biofilm formation on the control medium saturated dermal tissues. The formation of S. auerus biofilm on CVUT-conditioned medium saturated dermal tissues was reduced 72% compared with the biofilm formation on the control tissues. This study is the first to show that human cryopreserved viable placental tissues release factors that inhibit biofilm formation. Our results provide an explanation for the in vivo observation of their ability to support wound healing.

  1. Episiotomy Scar Endometriosis Diagnosed on Cytology - A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-30

    Jun 30, 2017 ... Dnyanada Kokode*, Anne Wilkinson, Sadhana Mahore and Trupti Dongre ... Endometriosis, the presence of functioning endometrial tissue outside the ... examination, a tender, irregular, raised nodule measuring .... hematoma, hypertrophic scar tissue, traumatic neuroma, ... CT and MRI seem to be useful in.

  2. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth / For Teens / Can Acne ... eliminar las cicatrices del acné? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  3. [THE PECULIARITIES OF UTERINE STRUCTURE AFTER DELIVERY IN RATS WITH THE MYOMETRIAL SCAR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiborodin, I V; Pekarev, O G; Yakimova, N V; Pekareva, Ye O; Maiborodina, V I; Perminova, Ye I

    2015-01-01

    The uterine tissues of female rats (n=30) with a scarred myometrium were examined by methods of light microscopy after the delivery. 1.5-2 months after the delivery no significant differences in the parameters of blood and lymph flow in the deep layers of the endometrium, myometrium and the myometrial scar tissue were found between the intact rats, nulliparous rats with a scarred uterus, rats that gave birth after laparotomy only and those that gave birth under the conditions of myometrial scar. In the course of pregnancy and labor activity, the damage of the tissues was observed not in the uterine scar proper, but at its borders with the myometrium. This is supported by the old hemorrhages and lymphostasis phenomena, greater number of lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages and erythrocytes. In determining the indications and contraindications to vaginal childbirth in women with scarred uterus it is necessary to examine not only the scar proper, but also its border with the myometrium. The myometrial scar by itself, is not an absolute contraindication to vaginal delivery, the natural delivery is feasible in the absence of cavities with liquid and hemorrhages in the tissues of the uterine scar and at its border with myometrium.

  4. In vivo monitoring of glial scar proliferation on chronically implanted neural electrodes by fiber optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yijing; Martini, Nadja; Hassler, Christina; Kirch, Robert D.; Stieglitz, Thomas; Seifert, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2014-01-01

    In neural prosthetics and stereotactic neurosurgery, intracortical electrodes are often utilized for delivering therapeutic electrical pulses, and recording neural electrophysiological signals. Unfortunately, neuroinflammation impairs the neuron-electrode-interface by developing a compact glial encapsulation around the implants in long term. At present, analyzing this immune reaction is only feasible with post-mortem histology; currently no means for specific in vivo monitoring exist and most applicable imaging modalities can not provide information in deep brain regions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a well established imaging modality for in vivo studies, providing cellular resolution and up to 1.2 mm imaging depth in brain tissue. A fiber based spectral domain OCT was shown to be capable of minimally invasive brain imaging. In the present study, we propose to use a fiber based spectral domain OCT to monitor the progression of the tissue's immune response through scar encapsulation progress in a rat animal model. A fine fiber catheter was implanted in rat brain together with a flexible polyimide microelectrode in sight both of which acts as a foreign body and induces the brain tissue immune reaction. OCT signals were collected from animals up to 12 weeks after implantation and thus gliotic scarring in vivo monitored for that time. Preliminary data showed a significant enhancement of the OCT backscattering signal during the first 3 weeks after implantation, and increased attenuation factor of the sampled tissue due to the glial scar formation. PMID:25191264

  5. Matrix Metalloproteinases Are Differentially Regulated and Responsive to Compression Therapy in a Red Duroc Model of Hypertrophic Scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Taryn E; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Prindeze, Nicholas J; Moffatt, Lauren T; Carney, Bonnie C; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Proteins of the matrix metalloproteinases family play a vital role in extracellular matrix maintenance and basic physiological processes in tissue homeostasis. The function and activities of matrix metalloproteinases in response to compression therapies have yet to be defined. Here, a swine model of hypertrophic scar was used to profile the transcription of all known 26 matrix metalloproteinases in scars treated with a precise compression dose. Methods: Full-thickness excisional wounds were created. Wounds underwent healing and scar formation. A subset of scars underwent 2 weeks of compression therapy. Biopsy specimens were preserved, and microarrays, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were performed to characterize the transcription and expression of various matrix metalloproteinase family members. Results: Microarray results showed that 13 of the known 26 matrix metalloproteinases were differentially transcribed in wounds relative to the preinjury skin. The predominant upregulation of these matrix metalloproteinases during early wound-healing stages declined gradually in later stages of wound healing. The use of compression therapy reduced this decline in 10 of the 13 differentially regulated matrix metalloproteinases. Further investigation of MMP7 using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction confirmed the effect of compression on transcript levels. Assessment of MMP7 at the protein level using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry was concordant. Conclusions: In a swine model of hypertrophic scar, the application of compression to hypertrophic scar attenuated a trend of decreasing levels of matrix metalloproteinases during the process of hypertrophic wound healing, including MMP7, whose enzyme regulation was confirmed at the protein level.

  6. Ectopic Liver Tissue Formation in Rats with Induced Liver Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauyrzhan Umbayev

    2014-12-01

    engraftment, we conducted immunohistochemical staining against HepPar1.Results: We observed a 30% mortality rate among rats with LF within 1 week after NDMA exposure cessation, while 100% of animals with HT survived. ALT, AST, and GGT activities and bilirubin levels were markedly elevated in blood samples of LF rats compared to the control animals. However, HT significantly improved ALT, AST, and GGT activity as well as bilirubin levels. We also observed decreased levels of total protein and albumin in the blood serum of rats with LF, while HT normalized these parameters. At the same time, we have not detected any statistical differences of the studied parameters in the group 4, which was treated with Cyclosporine A only, compared with the intact animals. HepPar1 immunohistochemical staining of the different tissue sections demonstrated the presence of engrafted hepatocytes, mainly within enlarged Peyer's patches (aggregated lymphoid nodules in the lowest portion of the small intestine.Conclusion: The results of our study provide evidence that HT improves animal survival and liver functions. One potential reason for these results is that ectopic hepatic mass inside the Peyer's patches can rescue rats from liver failure.

  7. Monitoring sinew contraction during formation of tissue-engineered fibrin-based ligament constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Jennifer Z; Wudebwe, Uchena N G; Wang, Anqi; Woods, Daniel; Grover, Liam M

    2012-08-01

    The ability to study the gross morphological changes occurring during tissue formation is vital to producing tissue-engineered structures of clinically relevant dimensions in vitro. Here, we have used nondestructive methods of digital imaging and optical coherence tomography to monitor the early-stage formation and subsequent maturation of fibrin-based tissue-engineered ligament constructs. In addition, the effect of supplementation with essential promoters of collagen synthesis, ascorbic acid (AA) and proline (P), has been assessed. Contraction of the cell-seeded fibrin gel occurs unevenly within the first 5 days of culture around two fixed anchor points before forming a longitudinal ligament-like construct. AA+P supplementation accelerates gel contraction in the maturation phase of development, producing ligament-like constructs with a higher collagen content and distinct morphology to that of unsupplemented constructs. These studies highlight the importance of being able to control the methods of tissue formation and maturation in vitro to enable the production of tissue-engineered constructs with suitable replacement tissue characteristics for repair of clinical soft-tissue injuries.

  8. Mathematical modeling of chemotaxis and glial scarring around implanted electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silchenko, Alexander N; Tass, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the implantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation or microelectrode probes for the recording of neuronal activity is always accompanied by the response of the brain’s immune system leading to the formation of a glial scar around the implantation sites. The implantation of electrodes causes massive release of adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) and different cytokines into the extracellular space and activates the microglia. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y 2,12 as well as A3A/A2A adenosine receptors. The size and density of an insulating sheath around the electrode, formed by microglial cells, are important criteria for the optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio during microelectrode recordings or parameters of electrical current delivered to the brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards implanted electrodes as well as the possible impact of an anti-inflammatory coating consisting of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. We present a model describing the formation of a stable aggregate around the electrode due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP and the mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The bioactive coating is modeled as a source of chemo-repellent located near the electrode surface. The obtained analytical and numerical results allowed us to reveal the dependences of size and spatial location of the insulating sheath on the amount of released ATP and estimate the impact of immune suppressive coating on the scarring process. (paper)

  9. Predictors of renal scar in children with urinary infection and vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Alper; Demir, Belde Kasap; Türkmen, Mehmet; Bekem, Ozlem; Saygi, Murat; Cakmakçi, Handan; Kavukçu, Salih

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated the predictors of renal scar in children with urinary tract infections (UTIs) having primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Data of patients who were examined by dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy between 1995 and 2005 were evaluated retrospectively. Gender, age, reflux grade, presence/development of scarring, breakthrough UTIs, and resolution of reflux, were recorded. The relation of gender, age and VUR grade to preformed scarring and the relation of gender, age, VUR grade, presence of preformed scarring, number of breakthrough UTIs and reflux resolution to new scarring were assessed. There were 138 patients [male/female (M/F) 53/85]. Multivariate analysis showed that male gender [odds ratio (OR) 2.5], age > or = 27 months in girls (OR 4.2) and grades IV-V reflux (OR 12.4) were independent indicators of renal scarring. On the other hand, only the presence of previous renal scarring was found to be an independent indicator for the development of new renal scar (OR 13.4). In conclusion, while the most predictive variables for the presence of renal scarring among children presenting with a UTI were male gender, age > or = 27 months in girls, and grades IV-V reflux, the best predictor of new scar formation was presence of previous renal scarring.

  10. Umbilical scarring in hatchling American alligators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, J.J.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Buckland, J.E.; Anderson, S.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Umbilical scarring is the presence of excess scar tissue deposited between abdominal dermal layers at the site of yolk sac absorption in hatchling American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). The presence of this dermal condition plays a key evaluatory role in the overall quality and subsequent value for various commercial leather products. Despite the prevalent nature of this condition, currently the industry has no standardized protocols for its quantification. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between hatchling weight and age and incidence of umbilical scarring and to develop a quantifiable and reproducible technique to measure this dermal condition in hatchling American alligators. Thirty eggs from each of nine clutches were incubated in two separate incubators at different facilities and hatchling umbilical scarring was measured at 2 and 10 days of age using digital calipers. Umbilical area was calculated by multiplying umbilical length times umbilical width. There was a significant effect of both age and clutch on umbilical area (overall decline of 64%) by 10 days post-hatch. However, only five of the nine clutches utilized expressed a noticeable decline in the size of this dermal condition (range 67-74%). We had hypothesized that larger hatchlings would have larger umbilical areas and a slower rate of improvement in this condition during the first few days post-hatch. The differences in umbilical area and percent decline with age across clutches, however, were not associated with differences in initial hatchling weights. Within clutches and time periods, hatchling weight had no significant effect on the size and/or rate of decline of this condition. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Retrospective analysis of factors affecting the efficacy of surgical treatment of the scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z; Shi, X; Zhang, Y; Wang, S; Lei, Z; Liu, X; Fan, D

    2014-04-01

    The scar is a major problem in the medical profession. Its timely treatment is very important for the better outcome of the scar treatment and for the improvement of the life quality of the patients. The aim of this study was retrospectively analyzed the epidemiological characteristics affecting the efficacy of the scar surgical treatment of the people in the western part of China. Total 414 scar cases were retrospectively analyzed to clarify the epidemiological characteristics and the factors affecting the scar surgical treatment efficacy. The factors included were sex, age, area distribution, treatment seasons, injury sites, injury causes, and the time from scarring to the surgical treatment. All scar cases were surgically treated with the repairing technology including skin graft, flap and soft tissue dilation. There were 206 males and 208 females with the average age 20.53±12.9 years (age range 1-68 years). The patient proportions in the age groups of 0-20, 21-40 and >40 years were 61.4% (254 cases), 29.2% (121 cases), and 9.4% (39 cases) respectively. The patient's attendance rate reached the highest during the summer and winter. Most patients were from the rural areas with an increasing tendency each year. The burn scars were the most abundant and the injury sites were mostly the head and face. Univariate analysis showed that the time from scarring to the surgical treatment and the injury sites were significantly influenced the scar surgical treatment efficacy. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the injured sites of the head and face significantly influenced the scar surgical treatment efficacy. With the development of economy in China, more scar patients especially younger and children visit doctors predominantely from the rural areas. Usually, they get their scars in the exposed area of their bodies (head and face) which seriously affect the patient's appearance and function. Factors influencing the scar surgical treatment efficacy has

  12. Tuberculin reaction and BCG scar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Aaby, Peter

    2015-01-01

    rate ratio (MRR) comparing children with a BCG scar with those without was 0.42 (95% CI = 0.19; 0.93). There was a similar tendency for TST positivity: MRR = 0.47 (95% CI = 0.14; 1.54). For LBW children who had both a positive TST reaction and a scar, the MRR was 0.22 (95% CI = 0.05; 0.87). For NBW...

  13. The role of irradiated tissue during pattern formation in the regenerating limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maden, M.

    1979-01-01

    The amphibian limb regeneration blastema is used here to examine whether irradiated, non-dividing tissue can participate in the development of new patterns of morphogenesis. Irradiated blastemas were rotated 180 0 on normal stumps and normal blastemas rotated on irradiated stumps. In both cases supernumerary elements developed from the unirradiated tissue. The supernumeraries were defective but this did not seem to be due to a lack of tissue. Rather it suggested that this could be a realization of compartments in vertebrate development or simply reflect the limited regulative ability of the blastema. The results are also discussed in relation to a recent model of pattern formation. (author)

  14. Fractional ablative CO2 laser treatment versus scar subcision and autologous fat transfer in the treatment of atrophic acne scars: New technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There are different modalities for management of atrophic acne scars which include lasers. Ablative fractional CO2 laser was developed to address the shortcomings of traditional ablative lasers, with superior results to non-ablative fractional lasers. Autologous fat transfer has been utilized for nearly a decade in tissue augmentation and reconstruction.Present studies were designed to compare ablative fractional CO2 laser treatment with scar subcision and autologous fat transfer in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. 20 patients with atrophic acne scars were recruited: 10 patients were treated by three sessions of ablative fractional CO2 laser therapy, and 10 patients treated by subcision and autologous fat transfer. All patients were followed up for three months, and were assessed by digital photograph before and after treatment through the application of Goodman and Baron quantitative and qualitative grading systems, in addition to reports by three physicians committees and reports of patients’ satisfaction. Analysis of both groups showed significant improvements in all types of atrophic acne scars. The mean percentage of total quantitative improvement was more significant in the case of autologous fat transfer with regard to ice-pick and total number of scars. Therefore, scar subcision with autologous fat transfer proved to be as effective as, or even more effective than, ablative fractional CO2 laser in the treatment of atrophic acne scars with regard to the total number of scars as well as ice-pick type.

  15. Interrupted or continuous-intradermal suturing? Statistical analysis of postoperative scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Sarı

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Postoperative scar development is an important problem for patients treated in plastic surgery clinics. Most patients think that continuous intradermal suturing is superior to interrupted suturing because they assume that it creates less scarring. We evaluated scars that form following intradermal and interrupted suturing. This article presents our controlled study that objectively compared the scars on patients' faces using a wound evaluation scale. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients, who had undergone operations on the bilateral cheeks, were included in this study. Thirty patients were female; five patients were male. Their mean age was 40.05 years. The average scar evaluation time after surgery was 9.05 months. Elliptical excisions were made on the lesions under local anesthesia. The incisions on the right cheeks were sutured with 6/0 monofilament nonabsorbable sutures using the continuous intradermal suturing technique. The left cheek incisions were sutured with same sutures using the interrupted suturing method. Results: The patients were evaluated 7–11 months after operation (mean: 9.05 months using the Stony Brook Scar Evaluation Scale. A Related Samples T-test was used for statistical evaluation of the differences between the suturing techniques. No significant differences were noted in scar formation between the two suturing methods (p>0.05. Conclusion: We found no differences in scar formation between the two frequently used suturing techniques studied here. We believe that the suturing technique is a less important determinant of scar formation than are other factors.

  16. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: intrarater reliability, sensitivity, and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    The comparison of scar evaluation over time requires measurement tools with acceptable intrarater reliability and the ability to discriminate skin characteristics of interest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the intrarater reliability and sensitivity and specificity of the Cutometer, the Mexameter, and the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar (donor sites), and hypertrophic scar (HSc). A single investigator evaluated four tissue types (severe HSc, less severe HSc, donor site, and normal skin) in 30 burn survivors with all four measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the Cutometer was acceptable (> or =0.75) for the maximum deformation measure for the donor site and normal skin (>0.78) but was below the acceptable range for the HSc sites and all other parameters. The ICC for the Mexameter erythema (>0.75) and melanin index (>0.89) and the DermaScan C total thickness measurement (>0.82) were acceptable for all sites. The ICC for the total of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS was acceptable (0.81) for normal scar but below the acceptable range for the scar sites. The DermaScan C was clearly able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin based on the total thickness measure. The Cutometer was less discriminating but was still able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin. The Mexameter erythema index was not a good discriminator of HSc and normal scar. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to establish the best cutoff point for the DermaScan C total thickness and the Cutometer maximum deformation, which were 2.034 and 0.387 mm, respectively. This study showed that although the Cutometer, the DermaScan C, and the Mexameter have measurement properties that make them attractive substitutes for the mVSS, caution must be used when interpreting results since the Cutometer has a ceiling effect when

  17. Keloid scar (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissue at the site of a healed skin injury. They often create a thick, puckered effect simulating a tumor. Keloids may be reduced in size by freezing (cryotherapy), external pressure, corticosteroid injections, laser treatments, radiation, or surgical removal.

  18. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE OCCURRENCE OF HYPERTROPHIC SCARS AMONG POSTOPERATIVE PATIENTS IN GARUT, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andri Nugraha

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertrophic scar causes physical and psychological problems. Thus understanding the factors related to the occurrence of hypertrophic scar tissue is needed. Little is known about its influencing factors in Indonesia, especially in Garut. Objective: This study aims to examine the relationships between hypertrophic scar and its influencing factors, and identify the most dominant factor of the occurrence of hypertrophic scars. Methods: This was an observational case control study using retrospective approach in Polyclinic of Surgery of Regional Public Hospital of dr. Slamet of Garut Regency. There were 40 samples recruited in this study by purposive sampling, which was divided to be case group (20 patients and control group (20 patients. Data were collected using Stony Brook Scar Evaluation Scale by observation and documentation of the medical records of patients. Data were analyzed using logistic regression analysis Results: Findings indicated that there were significant relationships between the surgical wound infection (p = 0.02, family history (p = 0.026, and type of suture (p = 0.043 with the occurrence of hypertrophic scars. The most dominant factor on the occurrence of hypertrophic scars was type of suture, acid polyglactin 910. The variables that had no significant relationships with the occurrence of hypertrophic scar tissue were age (p = 0.34, area of surgical wound (p = 0.177, and smoking habit (p = 0.479. Conclusion: There were significant relationships between infection of surgical wound, genetic history, the type of suture, and the occurrence of hypertrophic scar tissue. The most dominant factor that influenced the occurrence of hypertrophic scar tissue was the type of suture. Therefore, it is suggested to health professionals to modify the using of acid polyglactin 910 sutures, and nurses particularly need to provide the information regarding the family history and genetic-related hypertrophic scar, and prevent the

  19. Time course of epidural scar enhancement with Gd-DTPA in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaser, S.I.; Ross, J.S.; Berridge, M.; Emery, S.; Bolesta, M.J.; Modic, M.T.; Masaryk, T.J.; Bohlman, H.

    1988-01-01

    In eight beagles following laminectomies, dynamic contrast enhancement of posterior epidural scar was assessed sequentially over 4 months by means of FLASH sequence (20/10/50) following Gd-DTPA. A consistent pattern of enhancement was apparent in all dogs. Maximum enhancement occurred after 1 month (80%-130%), with peak enhancement at 7-10 minutes. There was decreased enhancement each succeeding month with a similar time to peak. Time curves were obtained for blood, muscle, and scar following injection of 40 μCi Gd-153 DTPA and correlated well with in vivo MR image intensities. Histology showed granulation tissue early following surgery, which matured to scar by 4 months. These findings are in contrast to reports of enhancement of anterior scar in humans irrespective of age. The difference may be secondary to location in that posterior scar does not receive the trauma and stress acting on anterior scar associated with a degenerative disk

  20. Hard tissue formation of STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp stem cells in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Walboomers, X.F.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine hard tissue formation of STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp-derived stem cells, seeded into a calcium phosphate ceramic scaffold, and implanted subcutaneously in mice. Previously, STRO-1 selection was used to obtain a mesenchymal stem cell progenitor

  1. A clinical study and the diagnosis in magnetic resonance imaging of renal scarring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsugaya, Masayuki; Hirao, Noriaki; Ohtaguro, Kazuo; Kato, Jiro.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-nine kidneys of seventeen patients (nine boys and eight girls) with vesicoureteral reflux and repeated urinary tract infection were studied by magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of renal scarring and correlation between clinical data and the degree renal scarring. Renal scarring is classified into three types according to findings in magnetic resonance imaging. The degree of renal scarring are classified into five grades according to traditional grading of intravenous pyelogram. If a fine deformity of calyx is shown on intravenous pyelogram, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates renal scarring. Magnetic resonance imaging without irradiation is exceedingly valuable for the diagnosis of renal scarring. The appearances of magnetic resonance imaging were supported by X-ray computed tomography. There is a substantial correlation between serum creatinine and the grades of renal scarring by magnetic resonance imaging. There is a substantial correlation between fever attacks and the grade of renal scarring, and there is a significant reverse correlation between the age of the onset of upper urinary tract infection and the grade of renal scarring. It is suggested that upper urinary tract infection is the most significant factor in scar formation. (author)

  2. The soft mechanical signature of glial scars in the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Weber, Isabell P.; Sheridan, Graham K.; Koser, David E.; Soleman, Sara; Haenzi, Barbara; Bradbury, Elizabeth J.; Fawcett, James; Franze, Kristian

    2017-03-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) alters the molecular and cellular composition of neural tissue and leads to glial scarring, which inhibits the regrowth of damaged axons. Mammalian glial scars supposedly form a chemical and mechanical barrier to neuronal regeneration. While tremendous effort has been devoted to identifying molecular characteristics of the scar, very little is known about its mechanical properties. Here we characterize spatiotemporal changes of the elastic stiffness of the injured rat neocortex and spinal cord at 1.5 and three weeks post-injury using atomic force microscopy. In contrast to scars in other mammalian tissues, CNS tissue significantly softens after injury. Expression levels of glial intermediate filaments (GFAP, vimentin) and extracellular matrix components (laminin, collagen IV) correlate with tissue softening. As tissue stiffness is a regulator of neuronal growth, our results may help to understand why mammalian neurons do not regenerate after injury.

  3. Episiotomy scar endometriosis diagnosed on cytology - a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endometriosis, the presence of functioning endometrial tissue outside the uterus, is a common gynaecological condition. Perineal endometriosis is a rare disease characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrial stroma and glands in the perineum. Most commonly observed in the episiotomy scar after normal vaginal ...

  4. Updated Scar Management Practical Guidelines: Non-invasive and invasive measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monstrey, S.; Middelkoop, E.; Vranckx, J.J.; Bassetto, F.; Ziegler, U.E.; Meaume, S.; Teot, L.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids can be aesthetically displeasing and lead to severe psychosocial impairment. Many invasive and non-invasive options are available for the plastic (and any other) surgeon both to prevent and to treat abnormal scar formation. Recently, an updated set of practical

  5. Tanshinon IIA injection accelerates tissue expansion by reducing the formation of the fibrous capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingxiong; Sheng, Lingling; Yang, Mei; Zhu, Ming; Huang, Xiaolu; Li, Qingfeng

    2014-01-01

    The tissue expansion technique has been applied to obtain new skin tissue to repair large defects in clinical practice. The implantation of tissue expander could initiate a host response to foreign body (FBR), which leads to fibrotic encapsulation around the expander and prolongs the period of tissue expansion. Tanshinon IIA (Tan IIA) has been shown to have anti-inflammation and immunoregulation effect. The rat tissue expansion model was used in this study to observe whether Tan IIA injection systematically could inhibit the FBR to reduce fibrous capsule formation and accelerate the process of tissue expansion. Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into the Tan IIA group and control group with 24 rats in each group. The expansion was conducted twice a week to maintain a capsule pressure of 60 mmHg. The expansion volume and expanded area were measured. The expanded tissue in the two groups was harvested, and histological staining was performed; proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were examined. The expansion volume and the expanded area in the Tan IIA group were greater than that of the control group. The thickness of the fibrous capsule in the Tan IIA group was reduced with no influence on the normal skin regeneration. Decreased infiltration of macrophages, lower level of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and TGF-β, less proliferating myofibroblasts and enhanced neovascularization were observed in the Tan IIA group. Our findings indicated that the Tan IIA injection reduced the formation of the fibrous capsule and accelerated the process of tissue expansion by inhibiting the FBR.

  6. Tanshinon IIA injection accelerates tissue expansion by reducing the formation of the fibrous capsule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxiong Yu

    Full Text Available The tissue expansion technique has been applied to obtain new skin tissue to repair large defects in clinical practice. The implantation of tissue expander could initiate a host response to foreign body (FBR, which leads to fibrotic encapsulation around the expander and prolongs the period of tissue expansion. Tanshinon IIA (Tan IIA has been shown to have anti-inflammation and immunoregulation effect. The rat tissue expansion model was used in this study to observe whether Tan IIA injection systematically could inhibit the FBR to reduce fibrous capsule formation and accelerate the process of tissue expansion. Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into the Tan IIA group and control group with 24 rats in each group. The expansion was conducted twice a week to maintain a capsule pressure of 60 mmHg. The expansion volume and expanded area were measured. The expanded tissue in the two groups was harvested, and histological staining was performed; proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-1β (IL-1β and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β were examined. The expansion volume and the expanded area in the Tan IIA group were greater than that of the control group. The thickness of the fibrous capsule in the Tan IIA group was reduced with no influence on the normal skin regeneration. Decreased infiltration of macrophages, lower level of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and TGF-β, less proliferating myofibroblasts and enhanced neovascularization were observed in the Tan IIA group. Our findings indicated that the Tan IIA injection reduced the formation of the fibrous capsule and accelerated the process of tissue expansion by inhibiting the FBR.

  7. On the participation of irradiated tissues in the formation of limb regenerate in axolotls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuchkova, S.Ya.

    1976-01-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain further information on the participation of irradiated tissue cells in formation of regenerated limbs after X-irradiation of axolotls and experimental restoration of the regenerational ability. Cells of irradiated tissues were labeled with H 3 -thymidine; the presence of the label in regenerated tissues would be indicative of participation of irradiated cells in the regeneration process. Irradiation dose was 700 R. 30 axolotls with irradiated limbs were intramuscularly injected with rat muscle homogenate into the right limb once a day beginning from the day of treatment. 15 similarly irradiated animals which did not receive homogenate served as a control. The authors concluded that the presence of highly labeled cells in regenerated tissues was likely to indicate the participation of irradiated tissue cells in regeneration of the limb. However, the quantitative contribution of such cells was impossible to determine since remaining irradiated tissues of the organ contained mostly unlabeled cells. It was also impossible to rule out the possibility of cell migration from non-irradiated tissues [ru

  8. Handheld skin printer: in situ formation of planar biomaterials and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Navid; Cheng, Richard; Leng, Lian; Sotoudehfar, Mohammad; Ba, Phoenix Qing; Bakhtyar, Nazihah; Amini-Nik, Saeid; Jeschke, Marc G; Günther, Axel

    2018-05-15

    We present a handheld skin printer that enables the in situ formation of biomaterial and skin tissue sheets of different homogeneous and architected compositions. When manually positioned above a target surface, the compact instrument (weight <0.8 kg) conformally deposits a biomaterial or tissue sheet from a microfluidic cartridge. Consistent sheet formation is achieved by coordinating the flow rates at which bioink and cross-linker solution are delivered, with the speed at which a pair of rollers actively translate the cartridge along the surface. We demonstrate compatibility with dermal and epidermal cells embedded in ionically cross-linkable biomaterials (e.g., alginate), and enzymatically cross-linkable proteins (e.g., fibrin), as well as their mixtures with collagen type I and hyaluronic acid. Upon rapid crosslinking, biomaterial and skin cell-laden sheets of consistent thickness, width and composition were obtained. Sheets deposited onto horizontal, agarose-coated surfaces were used for physical and in vitro characterization. Proof-of-principle demonstrations for the in situ formation of biomaterial sheets in murine and porcine excisional wound models illustrate the capacity of depositing onto inclined and compliant wound surfaces that are subject to respiratory motion. We expect the presented work will enable the in situ delivery of a wide range of different cells, biomaterials, and tissue adhesives, as well as the in situ fabrication of spatially organized biomaterials, tissues, and biohybrid structures.

  9. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, Divyesh; Kang, Mandeep; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Jain, Vanita; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD) are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS). As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG) and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions

  10. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyesh Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS. As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  11. A hypothesis: factor VII governs clot formation, tissue repair and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Lewis S

    2007-01-01

    A hypothesis: thrombin is a "Universal Enzyme of Energy Transduction" that employs ATP energy in flowing blood to activate biochemical reactions and cell effects in both hemostasis and tissue repair. All cells possess PAR-1 (thrombin) receptors and are affected by thrombin elevations, and thrombin effects on individual cell types are determined by their unique complement of PAR-1 receptors. Disruption of the vascular endothelium (VE) activates a tissue repair mechanism (TRM) consisting of the VE, tissue factor (TF), and circulating Factors VII, IX and X that governs localized thrombin elevations to activate clot formation and cellular effects that repair tissue damage. The culmination of the repair process occurs with the restoration of the VE followed by declines in thrombin production that causes Apoptosis ("programmed cell death") in wound-healing fibroblasts, which functions as a mechanism to draw wound edges together. The location and magnitude of TRM activity governs the location and magnitude of Factor VIII activity and clot formation, but the large size of Factor VIII prevents it from penetrating the clot formed by its activity, so that its effects are self-limiting. Factors VII, IX and X function primarily as tissue repair enzymes, while Factor VIII and Factor XIII are the only serine protease enzymes in the "Coagulation Cascade" that are exclusively associated with hemostasis.

  12. From Cell to Tissue Properties-Modeling Skin Electroporation With Pore and Local Transport Region Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermol-Cerne, Janja; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2018-02-01

    Current models of tissue electroporation either describe tissue with its bulk properties or include cell level properties, but model only a few cells of simple shapes in low-volume fractions or are in two dimensions. We constructed a three-dimensional model of realistically shaped cells in realistic volume fractions. By using a 'unit cell' model, the equivalent dielectric properties of whole tissue could be calculated. We calculated the dielectric properties of electroporated skin. We modeled electroporation of single cells by pore formation on keratinocytes and on the papillary dermis which gave dielectric properties of the electroporated epidermis and papillary dermis. During skin electroporation, local transport regions are formed in the stratum corneum. We modeled local transport regions and increase in their radii or density which affected the dielectric properties of the stratum corneum. The final model of skin electroporation accurately describes measured electric current and voltage drop on the skin during electroporation with long low-voltage pulses. The model also accurately describes voltage drop on the skin during electroporation with short high-voltage pulses. However, our results indicate that during application of short high-voltage pulses additional processes may occur which increase the electric current. Our model connects the processes occurring at the level of cell membranes (pore formation), at the level of a skin layer (formation of local transport region in the stratum corneum) with the tissue (skin layers) and even level of organs (skin). Using a similar approach, electroporation of any tissue can be modeled, if the morphology of the tissue is known.

  13. Scars of the Wigner Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano; de Aguiar MA; Ozorio De Almeida AM

    2001-01-01

    We propose a picture of Wigner function scars as a sequence of concentric rings along a two-dimensional surface inside a periodic orbit. This is verified for a two-dimensional plane that contains a classical hyperbolic orbit of a Hamiltonian system with 2 degrees of freedom. The stationary wave functions are the familiar mixture of scarred and random waves, but the spectral average of the Wigner functions in part of the plane is nearly that of a harmonic oscillator and individual states are also remarkably regular. These results are interpreted in terms of the semiclassical picture of chords and centers.

  14. Classical resonances and quantum scarring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manderfeld, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    We study the correspondence between phase-space localization of quantum (quasi-)energy eigenstates and classical correlation decay, given by Ruelle-Pollicott resonances of the Frobenius-Perron operator. It will be shown that scarred (quasi-)energy eigenstates are correlated: pairs of eigenstates strongly overlap in phase space (scar in same phase-space regions) if the difference of their eigenenergies is close to the phase of a leading classical resonance. Phase-space localization of quantum states will be measured by L 2 norms of their Husimi functions

  15. AAV vector encoding human VEGF165-transduced pectineus muscular flaps increase the formation of new tissue through induction of angiogenesis in an in vivo chamber for tissue engineering: A technique to enhance tissue and vessels in microsurgically engineered tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moimas, Silvia; Manasseri, Benedetto; Cuccia, Giuseppe; Stagno d'Alcontres, Francesco; Geuna, Stefano; Pattarini, Lucia; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Colonna, Michele R

    2015-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, new approaches are required for the creation of tissue substitutes, and the interplay between different research areas, such as tissue engineering, microsurgery and gene therapy, is mandatory. In this article, we report a modification of a published model of tissue engineering, based on an arterio-venous loop enveloped in a cross-linked collagen-glycosaminoglycan template, which acts as an isolated chamber for angiogenesis and new tissue formation. In order to foster tissue formation within the chamber, which entails on the development of new vessels, we wondered whether we might combine tissue engineering with a gene therapy approach. Based on the well-described tropism of adeno-associated viral vectors for post-mitotic tissues, a muscular flap was harvested from the pectineus muscle, inserted into the chamber and transduced by either AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 or AAV vector expressing the reporter gene β-galactosidase, as a control. Histological analysis of the specimens showed that muscle transduction by AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 resulted in enhanced tissue formation, with a significant increase in the number of arterioles within the chamber in comparison with the previously published model. Pectineus muscular flap, transduced by adeno-associated viral vectors, acted as a source of the proangiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor, thus inducing a consistent enhancement of vessel growth into the newly formed tissue within the chamber. In conclusion, our present findings combine three different research fields such as microsurgery, tissue engineering and gene therapy, suggesting and showing the feasibility of a mixed approach for regenerative medicine.

  16. Three-dimensional assembly of tissue-engineered cartilage constructs results in cartilaginous tissue formation without retainment of zonal characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurman, W; Harimulyo, E B; Gawlitta, D; Woodfield, T B F; Dhert, W J A; van Weeren, P R; Malda, J

    2016-04-01

    Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capabilities. Chondrocytes from different layers of cartilage have specific properties, and regenerative approaches using zonal chondrocytes may yield better replication of the architecture of native cartilage than when using a single cell population. To obtain high seeding efficiency while still mimicking zonal architecture, cell pellets of expanded deep zone and superficial zone equine chondrocytes were seeded and cultured in two layers on poly(ethylene glycol)-terephthalate-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEGT-PBT) scaffolds. Scaffolds seeded with cell pellets consisting of a 1:1 mixture of both cell sources served as controls. Parallel to this, pellets of superficial or deep zone chondrocytes, and combinations of the two cell populations, were cultured without the scaffold. Pellet cultures of zonal chondrocytes in scaffolds resulted in a high seeding efficiency and abundant cartilaginous tissue formation, containing collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in all groups, irrespective of the donor (n = 3), zonal population or stratified scaffold-seeding approach used. However, whereas total GAG production was similar, the constructs retained significantly more GAG compared to pellet cultures, in which a high percentage of the produced GAGs were secreted into the culture medium. Immunohistochemistry for zonal markers did not show any differences between the conditions. We conclude that spatially defined pellet culture in 3D scaffolds is associated with high seeding efficiency and supports cartilaginous tissue formation, but did not result in the maintenance or restoration of the original zonal phenotype. The use of pellet-assembled constructs leads to a better retainment of newly produced GAGs than the use of pellet cultures alone. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Biomimetic strategies for fracture repair: engineering the cell microenvironment for directed tissue formation

    OpenAIRE

    Vas, Wollis J.; Shah, Mittal; Al Hosni, Rawiya; Owen, Helen C.; Roberts, Scott J.

    2017-01-01

    Complications resulting from impaired fracture healing have major clinical implications on fracture management strategies. Novel concepts taken from developmental biology have driven research strategies towards the elaboration of regenerative approaches that can truly harness the complex cellular events involved in tissue formation and repair. Advances in polymer technology and a better understanding of naturally derived scaffolds have given rise to novel biomaterials with an increasing abili...

  18. Radicals formation in the PVC/DOP plastisol radiolysis used as equivalent-tissue in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzin, A.P.T.; Salman, K.D.; Mei, L.H.I.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, a tissue simulator called bolus was developed at FEQ/UNICAMP, which is made of dioctyl phthalate and poly (vinyl chloride) (DOC/PVC). This bolus has the function of displacing the maximum dose the skin surface in radiation therapy of skin and breast cancer. In this way the healthy tissues around the tumor are protected. Research at the Center for Women's Health (CAISM) of the Clinical Hospital of UNICAMP has shown that this material can be used as the tissue-equivalent of skin. In the present work, bolus samples were irradiated by gamma rays and the radicals formed were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance at 110K. The results showed the radicals formation as a consequence of the homolytic scissions of the chemical bonds of DOP and the air presence interfere in the quantity of observed paramagnetic species. (author)

  19. Surgical correction of gynecomastia with minimal scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Kim, Il-Kug; Kim, Tae-Gon; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2012-12-01

    Gynecomastia is a benign, excessive development of the male breast that occurs at an overall incidence of 32-36 %. The authors effectively removed peripheral fat tissues with power-assisted liposuction (PAL) and periareolar glandular tissues with a cartilage shaver in a series of patients. The small periareolar incisions were not easily recognized. Between February 2010 and April 2012, the charts of 15 patients (28 breasts) treated with PAL and a cartilage shaver were retrospectively reviewed. The mean volume of fat tissue removed with liposuction was 319 mL, and the mean volume of glandular tissue removed with the cartilage shaver was 70 mL. The mean follow-up period was 11.2 months. No infection, nipple-areola complex necrosis, nipple retraction, or saucer deformity was encountered in this series. Intraoperative bleeding occurred in one patient. Mild asymmetries developed in three patients. Use of PAL and a cartilage shaver for the treatment of gynecomastia allows for effective removal of both the fat and the glandular tissue of the breast through a minimal periareolar incision. This technique can achieve excellent aesthetic results with inconspicuous scarring. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  20. Scar-free wound healing and regeneration following tail loss in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Stephanie Lynn; Lungu, Ilinca Mihaela; Vickaryous, Matthew Kenneth

    2012-10-01

    Many lizards are able to undergo scar-free wound healing and regeneration following loss of the tail. In most instances, lizard tail loss is facilitated by autotomy, an evolved mechanism that permits the tail to be self-detached at pre-existing fracture planes. However, it has also been reported that the tail can regenerate following surgical amputation outside the fracture plane. In this study, we used the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius, to investigate and compare wound healing and regeneration following autotomy at a fracture plane and amputation outside the fracture plane. Both forms of tail loss undergo a nearly identical sequence of events leading to scar-free wound healing and regeneration. Early wound healing is characterized by transient myofibroblasts and the formation of a highly proliferative wound epithelium immunoreactive for the wound keratin marker WE6. The new tail forms from what is commonly referred to as a blastema, a mass of proliferating mesenchymal-like cells. Blastema cells express the protease matrix metalloproteinase-9. Apoptosis (demonstrated by activated caspase 3 immunostaining) is largely restricted to isolated cells of the original and regenerating tail tissues, although cell death also occurs within dermal structures at the original-regenerated tissue interface and among clusters of newly formed myocytes. Furthermore, the autotomized tail is unique in demonstrating apoptosis among cells adjacent to the fracture planes. Unlike mammals, transforming growth factor-β3 is not involved in wound healing. We demonstrate that scar-free wound healing and regeneration are intrinsic properties of the tail, unrelated to the location or mode of tail detachment. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Reduced FOXO1 expression accelerates skin wound healing and attenuates scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Katsuya; de Kerckhove, Maiko; Okamoto, Momoko; Kashiyama, Kazuya; Tanaka, Katsumi; Kim, Sangeun; Kawata, Takuya; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Park, Seongjoon; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Martin, Paul; Shimokawa, Isao

    2014-09-01

    The forkhead box O (FOXO) family has been extensively investigated in aging and metabolism, but its role in tissue-repair processes remains largely unknown. Herein, we clarify the molecular aspect of the FOXO family in skin wound healing. We demonstrated that Foxo1 and Foxo3a were both up-regulated during murine skin wound healing. Partial knockout of Foxo1 in Foxo1(+/-) mice throughout the body led to accelerated skin wound healing with enhanced keratinocyte migration, reduced granulation tissue formation, and decreased collagen density, accompanied by an attenuated inflammatory response, but we observed no wound phenotype in Foxo3a(-/-) mice. Fibroblast growth factor 2, adiponectin, and notch1 genes were significantly increased at wound sites in Foxo1(+/-) mice, along with markedly altered extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and AKT phosphorylation. Similarly, transient knockdown of Foxo1 at the wound site by local delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides enhanced skin wound healing. The link between FOXO1 and scarring extends to patients, in particular keloid scars, where we see FOXO1 expression markedly increased in fibroblasts and inflammatory cells within the otherwise normal dermis. This occurs in the immediate vicinity of the keloid by comparison to the center of the mature keloid, indicating that FOXO1 is associated with the overgrowth of this fibrotic response into adjacent normal skin. Overall, our data indicate that molecular targeting of FOXO1 may improve the quality of healing and reduce pathological scarring. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multimodal imaging of vocal fold scarring in a rabbit model by multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarine, Alexei; Bouhabel, Sarah; Douillette, Annie H.; Kost, Karen; Li-Jessen, Nicole Y. K.; Mongeau, Luc; Wiseman, Paul W.

    2017-02-01

    Vocal fold scarring as a result of injury or disease can lead to voice disorders which can significantly affect the quality of life. During the scarring process, the normally elastic tissue of the vocal fold lamina propria is replaced by a much stiffer collagen-based fibrotic tissue, which impacts the fold's ability to vibrate. Surgical removal of this tissue is often ineffective and can result in further scarring. Injectable biomaterials, a form of tissue engineering, have been proposed as a potential solution to reduce existing scars or prevent scarring altogether. In order to properly evaluate the effectiveness of these new materials, multiphoton microscopy emerges as an effective tool due to its intrinsic multiple label free contrast mechanisms that highlight extracellular matrix elements. In this study, we evaluate the spatial distribution of collagen and elastin fibers in a rabbit model using second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG) and two photon autofluorescence (TPAF) applied to unlabeled tissue sections. In comparison to traditional methods that rely on histological staining or immunohistochemistry, SHG, THG and TPAF provide a more reliable detection of these native proteins. The evaluation of collagen levels allows us to follow the extent of scarring, while the presence of elastin fibers is thought to be indicative of the level of healing of the injured fold. Using these imaging modalities, we characterize the outcome of injectable biomaterial treatments in order to direct future treatments for tissue engineering.

  3. Skin cancer full-grown from scar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikiryakhodjaev, D.Z.; Sanginov, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter authors investigate the peculiarities of skin cancer full-grown from scar, the theory of it's descent, quote some statistical data on skin cancer full-grown from scar and variety clinical forms of skin cancer full-grown from scar was shown, quote some methods of treatment

  4. Techniques for Optimizing Surgical Scars, Part 2: Hypertrophic Scars and Keloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Kathryn; Konda, Sailesh; Ren, Vicky Zhen; Wang, Apphia Lihan; Srinivasan, Aditya; Chilukuri, Suneel

    2017-01-01

    Surgical management of benign or malignant cutaneous tumors may result in noticeable scars that are of great concern to patients, regardless of sex, age, or ethnicity. Techniques to optimize surgical scars are discussed in this three-part review. Part 2 focuses on scar revision for hypertrophic and keloids scars. Scar revision options for hypertrophic and keloid scars include corticosteroids, bleomycin, fluorouracil, verapamil, avotermin, hydrogel scaffold, nonablative fractional lasers, ablative and fractional ablative lasers, pulsed dye laser (PDL), flurandrenolide tape, imiquimod, onion extract, silicone, and scar massage.

  5. Neutrophil depletion reduces edema formation and tissue loss following traumatic brain injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenne Ellinor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain edema as a result of secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major clinical concern. Neutrophils are known to cause increased vascular permeability leading to edema formation in peripheral tissue, but their role in the pathology following TBI remains unclear. Methods In this study we used controlled cortical impact (CCI as a model for TBI and investigated the role of neutrophils in the response to injury. The outcome of mice that were depleted of neutrophils using an anti-Gr-1 antibody was compared to that in mice with intact neutrophil count. The effect of neutrophil depletion on blood-brain barrier function was assessed by Evan's blue dye extravasation, and analysis of brain water content was used as a measurement of brain edema formation (24 and 48 hours after CCI. Lesion volume was measured 7 and 14 days after CCI. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess cell death, using a marker for cleaved caspase-3 at 24 hours after injury, and microglial/macrophage activation 7 days after CCI. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney test for non-parametric data. Results Neutrophil depletion did not significantly affect Evan's blue extravasation at any time-point after CCI. However, neutrophil-depleted mice exhibited a decreased water content both at 24 and 48 hours after CCI indicating reduced edema formation. Furthermore, brain tissue loss was attenuated in neutropenic mice at 7 and 14 days after injury. Additionally, these mice had a significantly reduced number of activated microglia/macrophages 7 days after CCI, and of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells 24 h after injury. Conclusion Our results suggest that neutrophils are involved in the edema formation, but not the extravasation of large proteins, as well as contributing to cell death and tissue loss following TBI in mice.

  6. Forensic analysis of rockfall scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vilder, Saskia J.; Rosser, Nick J.; Brain, Matthew J.

    2017-10-01

    We characterise and analyse the detachment (scar) surfaces of rockfalls to understand the mechanisms that underpin their failure. Rockfall scars are variously weathered and comprised of both discontinuity release surfaces and surfaces indicative of fracturing through zones of previously intact rock, known as rock bridges. The presence of rock bridges and pre-existing discontinuities is challenging to quantify due to the difficulty in determining discontinuity persistence below the surface of a rock slope. Rock bridges form an important control in holding blocks onto rockslopes, with their frequency, extent and location commonly modelled from the surface exposure of daylighting discontinuities. We explore an alternative approach to assessing their role, by characterising failure scars. We analyse a database of multiple rockfall scar surfaces detailing the areal extent, shape, and location of broken rock bridges and weathered surfaces. Terrestrial laser scanning and gigapixel imagery were combined to record the detailed texture and surface morphology. From this, scar surfaces were mapped via automated classification based on RGB pixel values. Our analysis of the resulting data from scars on the North Yorkshire coast (UK) indicates a wide variation in both weathering and rock bridge properties, controlled by lithology and associated rock mass structure. Importantly, the proportion of rock bridges in a rockfall failure surface does not increase with failure size. Rather larger failures display fracturing through multiple rock bridges, and in contrast smaller failures fracture occurs only through a single critical rock bridge. This holds implications for how failure mechanisms change with rockfall size and shape. Additionally, the location of rock bridges with respect to the geometry of an incipient rockfall is shown to determine failure mode. Weathering can occur both along discontinuity surfaces and previously broken rock bridges, indicating the sequential stages of

  7. Promoted new bone formation in maxillary distraction osteogenesis using a tissue-engineered osteogenic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Kazuhiko; Hibi, Hideharu; Yamada, Yoichi; Ueda, Minoru

    2008-01-01

    Bilateral maxillary distraction was performed at a higher rate in rabbits to determine whether locally applied tissue-engineered osteogenic material (TEOM) enhances bone regeneration. The material was an injectable gel composed of autologous mesenchymal stem cells, which were cultured then induced to be osteogenic in character, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). After a 5-day latency period, distraction devices were activated at a rate of 2.0 mm once daily for 4 days. Twelve rabbits were divided into 2 groups. At the end of distraction, the experimental group of rabbits received an injection of TEOM into the distracted tissue on one side, whereas, saline solution was injected into the distracted tissue on the contralateral side as the internal control. An additional control group received an injection of PRP or saline solution into the distracted tissue in the same way as the experimental group. The distraction regenerates were assessed by radiological and histomorphometric analyses. The radiodensity of the distraction gap injected with TEOM was significantly higher than that injected with PRP or saline solution at 2, 3, and 4 weeks postdistraction. The histomorphometric analysis also showed that both new bone zone and bony content in the distraction gap injected with TEOM were significantly increased when compared with PRP or saline solution. Our results demonstrated that the distraction gap injected with TEOM showed significant new bone formation. Therefore, injections of TEOM may be able to compensate for insufficient distraction gaps.

  8. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  9. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of soft tissue with metaplastic bone and cartilage formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorfman, H.D.; Bhagavan, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of bone and cartilage in some cases of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the soft tissue as a microscopic finding has been reported previously but little note has been taken of the radiologic manifestations of these tumor elements. A series of five such cases with sufficient metaplastic osseous and cartilaginous elements to produce roentgenographic evidence of their presence is reported here. An additional two cases showed only histologic evidence of bone or cartilage formation. The reactive ossification tends to be peripheral in location, involving the pseudocapsule of the sarcoma or its fibrous septa. In three there was a zoning pattern with peripheral or polar orientation, strongly suggesting the diagnosis of myositis ossificans. The latter was the diagnosis considered radiologically in four of the five cases. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma with reactive bone and cartilage must be considered in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue masses with calcific densities, particularly when these occur in tumors of the extremities. (orig.)

  10. A three dimensional in vitro glial scar model to investigate the local strain effects from micromotion around neural implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kevin C; Sy, Jay C; Falcón-Banchs, Roberto; Cima, Michael J

    2017-02-28

    Glial scar formation remains a significant barrier to the long term success of neural probes. Micromotion coupled with mechanical mismatch between the probe and tissue is believed to be a key driver of the inflammatory response. In vitro glial scar models present an intermediate step prior to conventional in vivo histology experiments as they enable cell-device interactions to be tested on a shorter timescale, with the ability to conduct broader biochemical assays. No established in vitro models have incorporated methods to assess device performance with respect to mechanical factors. In this study, we describe an in vitro glial scar model that combines high-precision linear actuators to simulate axial micromotion around neural implants with a 3D primary neural cell culture in a collagen gel. Strain field measurements were conducted to visualize the local displacement within the gel in response to micromotion. Primary brain cell cultures were found to be mechanically responsive to micromotion after one week in culture. Astrocytes, as determined by immunohistochemical staining, were found to have significantly increased in cell areas and perimeters in response to micromotion compared to static control wells. These results demonstrate the importance of micromotion when considering the chronic response to neural implants. Going forward, this model provides advantages over existing in vitro models as it will enable critical mechanical design factors of neural implants to be evaluated prior to in vivo testing.

  11. Short bursts of cyclic mechanical compression modulate tissue formation in a 3D hybrid scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, M; Perrault, C M; Lacroix, D

    2017-07-01

    Among the cues affecting cells behaviour, mechanical stimuli are known to have a key role in tissue formation and mineralization of bone cells. While soft scaffolds are better at mimicking the extracellular environment, they cannot withstand the high loads required to be efficient substitutes for bone in vivo. We propose a 3D hybrid scaffold combining the load-bearing capabilities of polycaprolactone (PCL) and the ECM-like chemistry of collagen gel to support the dynamic mechanical differentiation of human embryonic mesodermal progenitor cells (hES-MPs). In this study, hES-MPs were cultured in vitro and a BOSE Bioreactor was employed to induce cells differentiation by mechanical stimulation. From day 6, samples were compressed by applying a 5% strain ramp followed by peak-to-peak 1% strain sinewaves at 1Hz for 15min. Three different conditions were tested: unloaded (U), loaded from day 6 to day 10 (L1) and loaded as L1 and from day 16 to day 20 (L2). Cell viability, DNA content and osteocalcin expression were tested. Samples were further stained with 1% osmium tetroxide in order to investigate tissue growth and mineral deposition by micro-computed tomography (µCT). Tissue growth involved volumes either inside or outside samples at day 21 for L1, suggesting cyclic stimulation is a trigger for delayed proliferative response of cells. Cyclic load also had a role in the mineralization process preventing mineral deposition when applied at the early stage of culture. Conversely, cyclic load during the late stage of culture on pre-compressed samples induced mineral formation. This study shows that short bursts of compression applied at different stages of culture have contrasting effects on the ability of hES-MPs to induce tissue formation and mineral deposition. The results pave the way for a new approach using mechanical stimulation in the development of engineered in vitro tissue as replacement for large bone fractures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  12. Effect of skin graft thickness on scar development in a porcine burn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruler, Danielle M; Blackstone, Britani N; McFarland, Kevin L; Baumann, Molly E; Supp, Dorothy M; Bailey, J Kevin; Powell, Heather M

    2018-06-01

    Animal models provide a way to investigate scar therapies in a controlled environment. It is necessary to produce uniform, reproducible scars with high anatomic and biologic similarity to human scars to better evaluate the efficacy of treatment strategies and to develop new treatments. In this study, scar development and maturation were assessed in a porcine full-thickness burn model with immediate excision and split-thickness autograft coverage. Red Duroc pigs were treated with split-thickness autografts of varying thickness: 0.026in. ("thin") or 0.058in. ("thick"). Additionally, the thin skin grafts were meshed and expanded at 1:1.5 or 1:4 to evaluate the role of skin expansion in scar formation. Overall, the burn-excise-autograft model resulted in thick, raised scars. Treatment with thick split-thickness skin grafts resulted in less contraction and reduced scarring as well as improved biomechanics. Thin skin autograft expansion at a 1:4 ratio tended to result in scars that contracted more with increased scar height compared to the 1:1.5 expansion ratio. All treatment groups showed Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression that increased over time and peaked 4 weeks after grafting. Burns treated with thick split-thickness grafts showed decreased expression of pro-inflammatory genes 1 week after grafting, including insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and TGF-β1, compared to wounds treated with thin split-thickness grafts. Overall, the burn-excise-autograft model using split-thickness autograft meshed and expanded to 1:1.5 or 1:4, resulted in thick, raised scars similar in appearance and structure to human hypertrophic scars. This model can be used in future studies to study burn treatment outcomes and new therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. Review: Biological and Molecular Differences between Tail Regeneration and Limb Scarring in Lizard: An Inspiring Model Addressing Limb Regeneration in Amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    Tissue regeneration in lizards represents a unique model of regeneration and scarring in amniotes. The tail and limb contain putative stem cells but also dedifferentiating cells contribute to regeneration. Following tail amputation, inflammation is low and cell proliferation high, leading to regeneration while the intense inflammation in the limb leads to low proliferation and scarring. FGFs stimulate tail and limb regeneration and are present in the wound epidermis and blastema while they disappear in the limb wound epidermis 2-3 weeks postamputation in the scarring outgrowth. FGFs localize in the tail blastema and the apical epidermal peg (AEP), an epidermal microregion that allows tail growth but is absent in the limb. Inflammatory cells invade the limb blastema and wound epidermis, impeding the formation of an AEP. An embryonic program of growth is activated in the tail, dominated by Wnt-positive and -negative regulators of cell proliferation and noncoding RNAs, that represent the key regenerative genes. The balanced actions of these regulators likely impede the formation of a tumor in the tail tip. Genes for FACIT and fibrillar collagens, protease inhibitors, and embryonic keratins are upregulated in the regenerating tail blastema. A strong downregulation of genes for both B and T-lymphocyte activation suggests the regenerating tail blastema is a temporal immune-tolerated organ, whereas a scarring program is activated in the limb. Wnt inhibitors, pro-inflammatory genes, negative regulators of cell proliferation, downregulation of myogenic genes, proteases, and oxidases favoring scarring are upregulated. The evolution of an efficient immune system may be the main limiting barrier for organ regeneration in amniotes, and the poor regeneration of mammals and birds is associated with the efficiency of their mature immune system. This does not tolerate embryonic antigens formed in reprogrammed embryonic cells (as for neoplastic cells) that are consequently

  14. [Clinical study of influential factors on renal scarring after ESWL monotherapy for renal stone disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishito, Noritaka; Takamoto, Hitoshi; Kunitomi, Kimito; Satoh, Eiichi; Ishii, Ayano; Shiotuka, Youichi; Sako, Shinichi; Ohta, Naoki; Araki, Tohru

    2002-11-01

    ESWL is now widely used for the treatment of renal stone disease. Although ESWL has many advantages for patients' quality of life, few reports have demonstrated the long-term outcomes of the alterations of renal morphology after ESWL. We reported renal scarring after ESWL monotherapy in patients with renal calyceal stones. In this study, we evaluated a large series of patients' cohort treated at our institution, and assessed the causal effect of ESWL on the late occurrence of renal scar formation. ESWL was performed with EDAP (LT-01,02) that generates shock wave energy by piezoelectric discharge. We analyzed the records of 285 kidneys treated between Dec. 1986 and Nov. 1998. Renal scarring was noted in 44 kidneys and not in 241 kidneys with periodical ultrasonography. We compared the backgrounds of the two groups using chi-square or non-parametric analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression model determined the analysis of renal scar formation. Univariate and multiple regression analysis revealed that the total amount of ESWL emission and hyperuricemia independently affected the probability of renal scar formation. Over-emission of ESWL (over 10,000 shots) must be care for the prevention of renal scarring in patients with renal calyceal calculi, especially when associated with hyperuricemia. After ESWL, periodical checkups with ultrasonography will provide useful information for the clinical diagnosis of renal scarring.

  15. Platelet lysate gel and endothelial progenitors stimulate microvascular network formation in vitro: tissue engineering implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Tiago M; Beltrami, Cristina; Emanueli, Costanza; De Bank, Paul A; Pula, Giordano

    2016-05-04

    Revascularisation is a key step for tissue regeneration and complete organ engineering. We describe the generation of human platelet lysate gel (hPLG), an extracellular matrix preparation from human platelets able to support the proliferation of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) in 2D cultures and the formation of a complete microvascular network in vitro in 3D cultures. Existing extracellular matrix preparations require addition of high concentrations of recombinant growth factors and allow only limited formation of capillary-like structures. Additional advantages of our approach over existing extracellular matrices are the absence of any animal product in the composition hPLG and the possibility of obtaining hPLG from patients to generate homologous scaffolds for re-implantation. This discovery has the potential to accelerate the development of regenerative medicine applications based on implantation of microvascular networks expanded ex vivo or the generation of fully vascularised organs.

  16. Rap1 integrates tissue polarity, lumen formation, and tumorigenicpotential in human breast epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Masahiko; Nelson, Celeste M.; Myers, Connie A.; Bissell,Mina J.

    2006-09-29

    Maintenance of apico-basal polarity in normal breast epithelial acini requires a balance between cell proliferation, cell death, and proper cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix signaling. Aberrations in any of these processes can disrupt tissue architecture and initiate tumor formation. Here we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is a crucial element in organizing acinar structure and inducing lumen formation. Rap1 activity in malignant HMT-3522 T4-2 cells is appreciably higher than in S1 cells, their non-malignant counterparts. Expression of dominant-negative Rap1 resulted in phenotypic reversion of T4-2 cells, led to formation of acinar structures with correct apico-basal polarity, and dramatically reduced tumor incidence despite the persistence of genomic abnormalities. The resulting acini contained prominent central lumina not observed when other reverting agents were used. Conversely, expression of dominant-active Rap1 in T4-2 cells inhibited phenotypic reversion and led to increased invasiveness and tumorigenicity. Thus, Rap1 acts as a central regulator of breast architecture, with normal levels of activation instructing apical polarity during acinar morphogenesis, and increased activation inducing tumor formation and progression to malignancy.

  17. Care for the Critically Injured Burn Patient Modulation of Burn Scars Through Laser Deliver of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Miller School of Medicine and the USAISR. To obtain ADSCs, a sample of adipose tissue was surgically removed from the back (front shoulder) region... center of the animal and resulted in better overall similarity in clinical scar morphology. Histologic evaluation of wounds 70 days after burn...isolate and grow tissue fibroblast from the treated and control burn scars. Tissue samples (3 per time point) were decontaminated using several

  18. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordelia Ziraldo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available People with spinal cord injury (SCI are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU. PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to "better" vs. "worse" outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU.

  19. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-06-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to "better" vs. "worse" outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU.

  20. Serpine2 deficiency results in lung lymphocyte accumulation and bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solleti, Siva Kumar; Srisuma, Sorachai; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Bijli, Kaiser M; Randall, Troy D; Rahman, Arshad; Mariani, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitor, clade E, member 2 (SERPINE2), is a cell- and extracellular matrix-associated inhibitor of thrombin. Although SERPINE2 is a candidate susceptibility gene for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the physiologic role of this protease inhibitor in lung development and homeostasis is unknown. We observed spontaneous monocytic-cell infiltration in the lungs of Serpine2-deficient (SE2(-/-)) mice, beginning at or before the time of lung maturity, which resulted in lesions that resembled bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT). The initiation of lymphocyte accumulation in the lungs of SE2(-/-) mice involved the excessive expression of chemokines, cytokines, and adhesion molecules that are essential for BALT induction, organization, and maintenance. BALT-like lesion formation in the lungs of SE2(-/-) mice was also associated with a significant increase in the activation of thrombin, a recognized target of SE2, and excess stimulation of NF-κB, a major regulator of chemokine expression and inflammation. Finally, systemic delivery of thrombin rapidly stimulated lung chemokine expression in vivo These data uncover a novel mechanism whereby loss of serine protease inhibition leads to lung lymphocyte accumulation.-Solleti, S. K., Srisuma, S., Bhattacharya, S., Rangel-Moreno, J., Bijli, K. M., Randall, T. D., Rahman, A., Mariani, T. J. Serpine2 deficiency results in lung lymphocyte accumulation and bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue formation. © FASEB.

  1. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M. Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to “better” vs. “worse” outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU. PMID:26111346

  2. Histologic features of alopecias: part II: scarring alopecias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernárdez, C; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of disorders of the hair and scalp can generally be made on clinical grounds, but clinical signs are not always diagnostic and in some cases more invasive techniques, such as a biopsy, may be necessary. This 2-part article is a detailed review of the histologic features of the main types of alopecia based on the traditional classification of these disorders into 2 major groups: scarring and nonscarring alopecias. Scarring alopecias are disorders in which the hair follicle is replaced by fibrous scar tissue, a process that leads to permanent hair loss. In nonscarring alopecias, the follicles are preserved and hair growth can resume when the cause of the problem is eliminated. In the second part of this review, we describe the histologic features of the main forms of scarring alopecia. Since a close clinical-pathological correlation is essential for making a correct histopathologic diagnosis of alopecia, we also include a brief description of the clinical features of the principal forms of this disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  3. NG2/CSPG4 and progranulin in the posttraumatic glial scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Michael K E; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2018-08-01

    Traumatic injury of the central nervous system is one of the leading causes of death and disability in young adults. Failure of regeneration is caused by autonomous neuronal obstacles and by formation of the glial scar, which is essential to seal the injury but also constitutes a barrier for regrowing axons. The scar center is highly inflammatory and populated by NG2+ glia, whereas astrocytes form the sealing border and trap regrowing axons, suggesting that the non-permissive environment of activated astrocytes and extracellular matrix components is one of the reasons for the regenerative failure. Particularly, secreted chondroitin-sulfate proteoglycans, CSPGs, of the lectican family hinder axonal regrowth. In contrast, the transmembrane CSPG, NG2/CSPG4, appears to be functionally closer related to axon growth permissive heparan sulfate proteoglycans, HSPGs, and synaptic adhesion molecules, which all regulate synaptic signaling and plasticity upon alpha-secretase mediated shedding. Consequently, knockout of NG2/CSPG4 aggravates tissue loss, inflammation and neurologic deficits after brain injury, a phenotype partly mimicked by deletion of HSPG-binding proteins such as the HSPG2/perlecan-interacting protein, progranulin that is also a functional ligand of Notch and Eph2a. Indeed, structural features or progranulin's targets and NG2 may point to direct reciprocal regulations that may act in concert to overcome injury-evoked inflammation and neuronal dystrophy. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of the glial scar after brain injury, with a specific focus on NG2/CSPG4, its functions before and after shedding and putative reciprocal influences with the glycoprotein progranulin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Synergistic and additive effects of hydrostatic pressure and growth factors on tissue formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Elder

    2008-06-01

    factor application has allowed for the formation of tissue engineered constructs with biomechanical and biochemical properties spanning native tissue values.

  5. Biomaterials with persistent growth factor gradients in vivo accelerate vascularized tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Banu; Jiang, Bin; Somo, Sami I; Appel, Alyssa A; Larson, Jeffery C; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Brey, Eric M

    2015-12-01

    Gradients of soluble factors play an important role in many biological processes, including blood vessel assembly. Gradients can be studied in detail in vitro, but methods that enable the study of spatially distributed soluble factors and multi-cellular processes in vivo are limited. Here, we report on a method for the generation of persistent in vivo gradients of growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) biomaterial system. Fibrin loaded porous poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) scaffolds were generated using a particulate leaching method. Platelet derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) was encapsulated into poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres which were placed distal to the tissue-material interface. PLGA provides sustained release of PDGF-BB and its diffusion through the porous structure results in gradient formation. Gradients within the scaffold were confirmed in vivo using near-infrared fluorescence imaging and gradients were present for more than 3 weeks. The diffusion of PDGF-BB was modeled and verified with in vivo imaging findings. The depth of tissue invasion and density of blood vessels formed in response to the biomaterial increased with magnitude of the gradient. This biomaterial system allows for generation of sustained growth factor gradients for the study of tissue response to gradients in vivo. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Effect of thumus cell injections on germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues of nude (thymusless) mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, E.B.; Caporale, L.H.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1974-01-01

    Nude mice, partially backcrossed to Balb/c or DBA/2, were injected iv with 5 x 10 7 thymus cells from the respective inbred strain. The response of these mice to immunization with Brucella abortus antigen was studied, with respect to both antibody production and the formation of germinal centers in their lymphoid tissues. The results were compared to those obtained with nude mice to which no thymus cells were given, as well as to Balb/c, DBA/2, or +/question litter mate controls. Nude mice formed less 19S as well as 7S antibody than did litter mate controls and completely lacked germinal centers in lymph nodes and gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Those nude mice which had been injected with thymus cells made a much better secondary response, both for 19S and for 7S antibody, and had active germinal centers in their lymph nodes as early as 3 wk after thymus cell injection. Intestinal lymphoid tissue in nude mice showed only slight reconstitution of germinal center activity several months after thymus cell injection and none at earlier times. Irradiated (3000 R) thymus cells appeared as effective as normal cells in facilitating germinal center appearance and 7S antibody production in the nude mice

  7. A Case of Multiple Spontaneous Keloid Scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhadi Jfri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Keloid scars result from an abnormal healing response to cutaneous injury or inflammation that extends beyond the borders of the original wound. Spontaneous keloid scars forming in the absence of any previous trauma or surgical procedure are rare. Certain syndromes have been associated with this phenomenon, and few reports have discussed the evidence of single spontaneous keloid scar, which raises the question whether they are really spontaneous. Here, we present a 27-year-old mentally retarded single female with orbital hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, repaired cleft lip and high-arched palate who presented with progressive multiple spontaneous keloid scars in different parts of her body which were confirmed histologically by the presence of typical keloidal collagen. This report supports the fact that keloid scars can appear spontaneously and are possibly linked to a genetic factor. Furthermore, it describes a new presentation of spontaneous keloid scars in the form of multiple large lesions in different sites of the body.

  8. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Scarring Trachoma Indicates Infiltration by Natural Killer and Undefined CD45 Negative Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Victor H; Luthert, Philip J; Derrick, Tamsyn; Pullin, James; Weiss, Helen A; Massae, Patrick; Mtuy, Tara; Makupa, William; Essex, David; Mabey, David C W; Bailey, Robin L; Holland, Martin J; Burton, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    The phenotype and function of immune cells infiltrating the conjunctiva in scarring trachoma have yet to be fully characterized. We assessed tissue morphology and immunophenotype of cellular infiltrates found in trachomatous scarring compared to control participants. Clinical assessments and conjunctival biopsy samples were obtained from 34 individuals with trachomatous scarring undergoing trichiasis surgery and 33 control subjects undergoing cataract or retinal detachment surgery. Biopsy samples were fixed in buffered formalin and embedded in paraffin wax. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was performed for assessment of the inflammatory cell infiltrate. Immunohistochemical staining of single markers on individual sections was performed to identify cells expressing CD3 (T-cells), CD4 (helper T-cells), CD8 (suppressor/cytotoxic T-cells and Natural Killer, NK, cells), NCR1 (NK cells), CD20 (B-cells), CD45 (nucleated hematopoietic cells), CD56 (NK and T-cells), CD68 (macrophages/monocytes) and CD83 (mature dendritic cells). The degree of scarring was assessed histologically using cross-polarized light to visualize collagen fibres. Scarring, regardless of clinical inflammation, was associated with increased inflammatory cell infiltrates on H&E and CD45 staining. Scarring was also associated with increased CD8+ and CD56+ cells, but not CD3+ cells, suggestive of a NK cell infiltrate. This was supported by the presence of NCR1+ cells. There was some increase in CD20+ cells, but no evidence for increased CD4+, CD68+ or CD83+ cells. Numerous CD45 negative cells were also seen in the population of infiltrating inflammatory cells in scarred conjunctiva. Disorganization of the normal collagen architecture was strongly associated with clinical scarring. These data point to the infiltration of immune cells with a phenotype suggestive of NK cells in conjunctival trachomatous scarring. A large proportion of CD45 negative inflammatory cells were also present. Future work should

  9. Cell differentiation and tissue formation in the unique fruits of devil's claws (Martyniaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbens, Melanie; Gao, Jie; Neinhuis, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    • Premise of the study: Martyniaceae are characterized by capsules with two upwardly curved, horn-shaped extensions representing morphologically specialized epizoochorous fruits. Because the capsules are assumed to cling to hooves and ankles of large mammals, fiber arrangement and tissue combinations within the endocarp ensuring proper attachment to the vector's feet during transport are of particular interest. In this first detailed anatomical investigation, the functional adaptation of the fruits and their implications for the specific dispersal mode are provided. The peculiar fiber arrangement may also be of interest for future biomimetic composite materials.• Methods: Endocarp anatomy and details of tissue differentiation were examined in fruits of Ibicella lutea and Proboscidea louisianica subsp. fragrans combining light microscopy, SEM, and x-ray microtomography analysis.• Key results: While tips of the extensions are predominantly reinforced by longitudinally oriented fibers, in the middle segment these fibers are densely packed in individual bundles entwined and separated by transversely elongated cells. Within the capsule wall, the fiber bundles are embedded in a dense mesh of transversely oriented fibers that circularly reinforce and protect the loculus. This fibrous pericarp tissue develops within few days by localized cell divisions and intrusive growth of primarily isodiametric parenchyma cells in the pistil.• Conclusions: The study allows insight into a unique and complex example of functionally driven cell growth and tissue formation. Long-horned fruits of Martyniaceae obviously are highly specialized to epizoochorous dispersal, pointing to primary vector-related seed dispersal. The highly ordered arrangement of fibers results in a great mechanical firmness. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  10. [Investigation and analysis of the cognition degree of parents of 150 pediatric burn patients on scar rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Da-wei; Fu, Jin-feng; Yan, Gang; Jiang, He; Liu, Wen-jun

    2013-02-01

    To analyze the cognition degree of parents of pediatric burn patients on hyperplasia of scar and its prevention and rehabilitation, so as to provide a guidance for preventing deformity and dysfunction caused by scar hyperplasia. Questionnaire survey was carried out among parents of 150 pediatric burn patients hospitalized from October 2010 to November 2011 to analyze the cognition degree of patients on the formation of scar after burns, the demand degree for scar treatment between parents of different genders of patients and among parents of patients with burn injury occurred in different body sites, the relationship between the literacy level of parents and their degree of willingness of undergoing scar treatment, and the degree of comprehension and acceptance on the part of parents regarding the methods of prevention and treatment of scar. Data were processed with chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. (1) Only the parents of 19 pediatric burn patients (accounting for 12.7%) realized the possibility of scar formation before admission. After admission, more than half of the parents were told that their children would bear scar and need regular follow-up, while only parents of 52 patients (34.7%) were instructed the methods of preventing and treating scar. (2) One hundred and forty parents (93.3%) considered their children need prevention and treatment of scar after burns. There was no statistically significant difference between parents of male patients and female patients in the demand for scar treatment (χ(2) = 0.825, P > 0.05). The demand degree of parents for rehabilitation treatment for the upper limbs after burns surpassed those of the other sites of body, and altogether there were 85 parents accounting for 97.7% of all. (3) The difference among parents with different levels of literacy was not obvious in the willingness of receiving treatment for scar hyperplasia (P > 0.05). (4) Eight methods were chosen by parents to prevent and treat scars of patients

  11. Mammographic scar for stereotaxic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman Tattis; Hincapie U, Ana Lucia; Patino P, Jairo Hernando

    1997-01-01

    It is reported the case of 56 years old woman who underwent a stereotactic biopsy because of having a circumscribed breast nodule. The histologic diagnosis was benign. After six months, during the mammographic control, it was noticed that the nodule showed irregular contours, because of that a surgical biopsy was performed. The histopathology was reported as benign. it is considered then, that the mammographic changes observed in the mammographic control are due to scar phenomenon after stereotactic biopsy. This findings has not been reported previously

  12. Outcome after burns: An observational study on burn scar maturation and predictors for severe scarring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, M.B.A.; Vloemans, J.F.P.M.; Tuinebreijer, W.E.; van de Ven, P.M.; van Unen, E.; van Zuijlen, P.P.M.; Middelkoop, E.

    2012-01-01

    Long-term outcome of burn scars as well as the relation with clinically relevant parameters has not been studied quantitatively. Therefore, we conducted a detailed analysis on the clinical changes of burn scars in a longitudinal setup. In addition, we focused on the differences in scar quality in

  13. Histophilus somni biofilm formation in cardiopulmonary tissue of the bovine host following respiratory challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, Indra; Shao, Jian Q.; Annadata, Satish

    2009-01-01

    Biofilms form in a variety of host sites following infection with many bacterial species. However, the study of biofilms in a host is hindered due to the lack of protocols for the proper experimental investigation of biofilms in vivo. Histophilus somni is an agent of respiratory and systemic...... diseases in bovines, and readily forms biofilms in vitro. In the present study the capability of H. somni to form biofilms in cardiopulmonary tissue following experimental respiratory infection in the bovine host was examined by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy...... haemagglutinin (FHA), predicted to be involved in attachment. Thus, this investigation demonstrated that H. somni is capable of forming a biofilm in its natural host, that such a biofilm may be capable of harboring other bovine respiratory disease pathogens, and that the genes responsible for biofilm formation...

  14. Biomaterial Substrate-Mediated Multicellular Spheroid Formation and Their Applications in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ting-Chen; Wong, Chui-Wei; Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2017-12-01

    Three-dimentional (3D) multicellular aggregates (spheroids), compared to the traditional 2D monolayer cultured cells, are physiologically more similar to the cells in vivo. So far there are various techniques to generate 3D spheroids. Spheroids obtained from different methods have already been applied to regenerative medicine or cancer research. Among the cell spheroids created by different methods, the substrate-derived spheroids and their forming mechanism are unique. This review focuses on the formation of biomaterial substrate-mediated multicellular spheroids and their applications in tissue engineering and tumor models. First, the authors will describe the special chitosan substrate-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) spheroids and their greater regenerative capacities in various tissues. Second, the authors will describe tumor spheroids derived on chitosan and hyaluronan substrates, which serve as a simple in vitro platform to study 3D tumor models or to perform cancer drug screening. Finally, the authors will mention the self-assembly process for substrate-derived multiple cell spheroids (co-spheroids), which may recapitulate the heterotypic cell-cell interaction for co-cultured cells or crosstalk between different types of cells. These unique multicellular mono-spheroids or co-spheroids represent a category of 3D cell culture with advantages of biomimetic cell-cell interaction, better functionalities, and imaging possibilities. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Acute Marjolin’s Ulcer in a Postauricular Scar after Mastoidectomy

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    Kholoud A. Alhysoni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Marjolin’s ulcer is a rare, aggressive cutaneous malignancy that arises primarily in burn scars but can occur in other types of scars. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common variant, and while malignant degeneration usually takes a long time, it can develop acutely. Case Report. a 30-year-old man who developed Marjolin’s ulcer acutely in a right postauricular scar after mastoidectomy and the incision and drainage of a mastoid abscess. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe a Marjolin’s ulcer in a postauricular surgical scar. However, it has been reported in others areas in the head and neck. Conclusion. Marjolin’s ulcer is most commonly observed after postburn scars, but it may be observed after any type of scars, as our patient developed an SCC with a postsurgical scar. Early diagnosis is essential, and a biopsy should be performed on any nonhealing wound or chronic wound that undergoes a sudden change. Tissue samples should be taken from both the centre and the margins of the wound.

  16. In vivo cyclic loading as a potent stimulatory signal for bone formation inside tissue engineering scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Roshan-Ghias

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In clinical situations, bone defects are often located at load bearing sites. Tissue engineering scaffolds are future bone substitutes and hence they will be subjected to mechanical stimulation. The goal of this study was to test if cyclic loading can be used as stimulatory signal for bone formation in a bone scaffold. Poly(L-lactic acid (PLA/ 5% beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP scaffolds were implanted in both distal femoral epiphyses of eight rats. Right knees were stimulated (10N, 4Hz, 5 min five times, every two days, starting from the third day after surgery while left knees served as control. Finite element study of the in vivo model showed that the strain applied to the scaffold is similar to physiological strains. Using micro-computed tomography (CT, all knees were scanned five times after the surgery and the related bone parameters of the newly formed bone were quantified. Statistical modeling was used to estimate the evolution of these parameters as a function of time and loading. The results showed that mechanical stimulation had two effects on bone volume (BV: an initial decrease in BV at week 2, and a long-term increase in the rate of bone formation by 28%. At week 13, the BV was then significantly higher in the loaded scaffolds.

  17. In vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue formation with porous poly-L-lactide matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Wen; Okada, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Fumito; Okita, Naoya; Inami, Kaoru; Nishiura, Aki; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to establish an in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue (HPdLLT) by three-dimensional culturing of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPdLFs) in a porous poly-L-lactide (PLLA) matrix modified hydrophilically with ammonia solution. After ammonia modification, the surface roughness and culture-medium-soaking-up ability of the PLLA matrix increased, whereas the contact angle of water drops decreased. The thickness, porosity, and pore size of the PLLA matrix were 400 ± 50 μm, 83.3%, and 75–150 μm, respectively. HPdLFs (1 × 10 5 cells) were seeded on the modified PLLA matrix and centrifuged to facilitate seeding into its interior and cultured for 14 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, proliferation assay, picrosirius-red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for type-1 collagen (COL1), periodontal ligament associated protein-1 (PLAP-1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA were conducted on days 1, 3, 7, and 14. HPdLFs were observed entirely from the surface to the rear side of the matrix. Cell proliferation analysis, SEM observation, and picrosirius-red staining showed both progressive growth of 3D-cultured HPdLFs and extracellular matrix maturation by the secretion of COL1 and type 3 collagen (COL3) from days 1 to 14. Expressions of COL1, PLAP-1, and FGF-2 mRNA suggested the formation of cellular components and supplementation of extracellular components. Expressions of ALP, COL1, and PLAP-1 mRNA suggested the osteogenic potential of the HPdLLT. The results indicated in vitro HPdLLT formation, and it could be used in future periodontal ligament tissue engineering to achieve optimal periodontal regeneration. - Highlights: • First report on ammonia treated PLLA matrix for in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue generation. • Good combination of matrix thickness, pore size, and porosity. • Biodegradable PLLA is also possible to be used in vivo

  18. In vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue formation with porous poly-L-lactide matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Wen [Graduate School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Okada, Masahiro [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Sakamoto, Fumito; Okita, Naoya [Graduate School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Inami, Kaoru; Nishiura, Aki [Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Hashimoto, Yoshiya, E-mail: yoshiya@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Matsumoto, Naoyuki [Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to establish an in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue (HPdLLT) by three-dimensional culturing of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPdLFs) in a porous poly-L-lactide (PLLA) matrix modified hydrophilically with ammonia solution. After ammonia modification, the surface roughness and culture-medium-soaking-up ability of the PLLA matrix increased, whereas the contact angle of water drops decreased. The thickness, porosity, and pore size of the PLLA matrix were 400 ± 50 μm, 83.3%, and 75–150 μm, respectively. HPdLFs (1 × 10{sup 5} cells) were seeded on the modified PLLA matrix and centrifuged to facilitate seeding into its interior and cultured for 14 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, proliferation assay, picrosirius-red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for type-1 collagen (COL1), periodontal ligament associated protein-1 (PLAP-1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA were conducted on days 1, 3, 7, and 14. HPdLFs were observed entirely from the surface to the rear side of the matrix. Cell proliferation analysis, SEM observation, and picrosirius-red staining showed both progressive growth of 3D-cultured HPdLFs and extracellular matrix maturation by the secretion of COL1 and type 3 collagen (COL3) from days 1 to 14. Expressions of COL1, PLAP-1, and FGF-2 mRNA suggested the formation of cellular components and supplementation of extracellular components. Expressions of ALP, COL1, and PLAP-1 mRNA suggested the osteogenic potential of the HPdLLT. The results indicated in vitro HPdLLT formation, and it could be used in future periodontal ligament tissue engineering to achieve optimal periodontal regeneration. - Highlights: • First report on ammonia treated PLLA matrix for in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue generation. • Good combination of matrix thickness, pore size, and porosity. • Biodegradable PLLA is also possible to be used in vivo.

  19. Tissue Engineering Strategies for Myocardial Regeneration: Acellular Versus Cellular Scaffolds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech, Maribella; Polo-Corrales, Lilliana; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E; Freytes, Donald O

    2016-12-01

    Heart disease remains one of the leading causes of death in industrialized nations with myocardial infarction (MI) contributing to at least one fifth of the reported deaths. The hypoxic environment eventually leads to cellular death and scar tissue formation. The scar tissue that forms is not mechanically functional and often leads to myocardial remodeling and eventual heart failure. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine principles provide an alternative approach to restoring myocardial function by designing constructs that will restore the mechanical function of the heart. In this review, we will describe the cellular events that take place after an MI and describe current treatments. We will also describe how biomaterials, alone or in combination with a cellular component, have been used to engineer suitable myocardium replacement constructs and how new advanced culture systems will be required to achieve clinical success.

  20. Echocardiography as a Screening Test for Myocardial Scarring in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

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    Gregory Compton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is burdened with morbidity and mortality including tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. These complications are attributed in part to the formation of proarrhythmic scars in the myocardium. The presence of extensive LGE is a risk factor for adverse outcomes in HCM. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI is the standard for the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial scars. However, echocardiography represents an attractive screening tool for myocardial scarring. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of echocardiography to detect myocardial scars to the standard of cMRI-LGE. Methods. The cMRI studies and echocardiograms from 56 consecutive children with HCM were independently evaluated for the presence of cMRI-LGE and echocardiographic evidence of scarring by expert readers. Results. Echocardiography had a high sensitivity (93% and negative predictive value (94% in comparison to LGE. The false positive rate was high, leading to a low specificity (37% and a low positive predictive value (35%. Conclusions. Given the poor specificity and positive predictive value, echocardiography is not a suitable screening test for the presence of myocardial scarring in children with HCM. However, children without echocardiographic evidence of myocardial scarring may not need to undergo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to “rule in” LGE.

  1. Strong quantum scarring by local impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukko, Perttu J. J.; Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Kaplan, Lev; Heller, Eric J.; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-11-01

    We discover and characterise strong quantum scars, or quantum eigenstates resembling classical periodic orbits, in two-dimensional quantum wells perturbed by local impurities. These scars are not explained by ordinary scar theory, which would require the existence of short, moderately unstable periodic orbits in the perturbed system. Instead, they are supported by classical resonances in the unperturbed system and the resulting quantum near-degeneracy. Even in the case of a large number of randomly scattered impurities, the scars prefer distinct orientations that extremise the overlap with the impurities. We demonstrate that these preferred orientations can be used for highly efficient transport of quantum wave packets across the perturbed potential landscape. Assisted by the scars, wave-packet recurrences are significantly stronger than in the unperturbed system. Together with the controllability of the preferred orientations, this property may be very useful for quantum transport applications.

  2. Outcome after burns: an observational study on burn scar maturation and predictors for severe scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Martijn B A; Vloemans, Jos F P M; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; van de Ven, Peter; van Unen, Ella; van Zuijlen, Paul P M; Middelkoop, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Long-term outcome of burn scars as well as the relation with clinically relevant parameters has not been studied quantitatively. Therefore, we conducted a detailed analysis on the clinical changes of burn scars in a longitudinal setup. In addition, we focused on the differences in scar quality in relation to the depth, etiology of the burn wound and age of the patient. Burn scars of 474 patients were subjected to a scar assessment protocol 3, 6, and 12 months postburn. Three different age groups were defined (≤5, 5-18, and ≥18 years). The observer part of the patient and observer scar assessment scale revealed a significant (p burned (p  0.230) have no significant influence on scar quality when corrected for sex, total body surface area burned, time, and age or etiology, respectively. © 2012 by the Wound Healing Society.

  3. Concomitant multipotent and unipotent dental pulp progenitors and their respective contribution to mineralised tissue formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dimitrova-Nakov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Upon in vitro induction or in vivo implantation, the stem cells of the dental pulp display hallmarks of odontoblastic, osteogenic, adipogenic or neuronal cells. However, whether these phenotypes result from genuine multipotent cells or from coexistence of distinct progenitors is still an open question. Furthermore, determining whether a single cell-derived progenitor is capable of undergoing a differentiation cascade leading to tissue repair in situ is important for the development of cell therapy strategies. Three clonal pulp precursor cell lines (A4, C5, H8, established from embryonic ED18 first molars of mouse transgenic for a recombinant plasmid adeno-SV40, were induced to differentiate towards the odonto/osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic programme. Expression of phenotypic markers of each lineage was evaluated by RT-PCR, histochemistry or immunocytochemistry. The clones were implanted into mandibular incisors or calvaria of adult mice. The A4 clone was capable of being recruited towards at least 3 mesodermal lineages in vitro and of contributing to dentin-like or bone formation, in vivo, thus behaving as a multipotent cell. In contrast, the C5 and H8 clones displayed a more restricted potential. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that isolated monopotent and multipotent clones could be distinguished by a differential expression of CD90. Altogether, isolation of these clonal lines allowed demonstrating the coexistence of multipotential and restricted-lineage progenitors in the mouse pulp. These cells may further permit unravelling specificities of the different types of pulp progenitors, hence facilitating the development of cell-based therapies of the dental pulp or other cranio-facial tissues.

  4. High- and ultrahigh-field magnetic resonance imaging of naïve, injured and scarred vocal fold mucosae in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Ayami Ohno; Kishimoto, Yo; Young, David L.; Zhang, Jinjin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Subepithelial changes to the vocal fold mucosa, such as fibrosis, are difficult to identify using visual assessment of the tissue surface. Moreover, without suspicion of neoplasm, mucosal biopsy is not a viable clinical option, as it carries its own risk of iatrogenic injury and scar formation. Given these challenges, we assessed the ability of high- (4.7 T) and ultrahigh-field (9.4 T) magnetic resonance imaging to resolve key vocal fold subepithelial tissue structures in the rat, an important and widely used preclinical model in vocal fold biology. We conducted serial in vivo and ex vivo imaging, evaluated an array of acquisition sequences and contrast agents, and successfully resolved key anatomic features of naïve, acutely injured, and chronically scarred vocal fold mucosae on the ex vivo scans. Naïve lamina propria was hyperintense on T1-weighted imaging with gadobenate dimeglumine contrast enhancement, whereas chronic scar was characterized by reduced lamina propria T1 signal intensity and mucosal volume. Acutely injured mucosa was hypointense on T2-weighted imaging; lesion volume steadily increased, peaked at 5 days post-injury, and then decreased – consistent with the physiology of acute, followed by subacute, hemorrhage and associated changes in the magnetic state of hemoglobin and its degradation products. Intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide conferred no T2 contrast enhancement during the acute injury period. These findings confirm that magnetic resonance imaging can resolve anatomic substructures within naïve vocal fold mucosa, qualitative and quantitative features of acute injury, and the presence of chronic scar. PMID:27638667

  5. High- and ultrahigh-field magnetic resonance imaging of naïve, injured and scarred vocal fold mucosae in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Ayami Ohno; Kishimoto, Yo; Young, David L; Zhang, Jinjin; Rowland, Ian J; Welham, Nathan V

    2016-11-01

    Subepithelial changes to the vocal fold mucosa, such as fibrosis, are difficult to identify using visual assessment of the tissue surface. Moreover, without suspicion of neoplasm, mucosal biopsy is not a viable clinical option, as it carries its own risk of iatrogenic injury and scar formation. Given these challenges, we assessed the ability of high- (4.7 T) and ultrahigh-field (9.4 T) magnetic resonance imaging to resolve key vocal fold subepithelial tissue structures in the rat, an important and widely used preclinical model in vocal fold biology. We conducted serial in vivo and ex vivo imaging, evaluated an array of acquisition sequences and contrast agents, and successfully resolved key anatomic features of naïve, acutely injured, and chronically scarred vocal fold mucosae on the ex vivo scans. Naïve lamina propria was hyperintense on T1-weighted imaging with gadobenate dimeglumine contrast enhancement, whereas chronic scar was characterized by reduced lamina propria T1 signal intensity and mucosal volume. Acutely injured mucosa was hypointense on T2-weighted imaging; lesion volume steadily increased, peaked at 5 days post-injury, and then decreased - consistent with the physiology of acute, followed by subacute, hemorrhage and associated changes in the magnetic state of hemoglobin and its degradation products. Intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide conferred no T2 contrast enhancement during the acute injury period. These findings confirm that magnetic resonance imaging can resolve anatomic substructures within naïve vocal fold mucosa, qualitative and quantitative features of acute injury, and the presence of chronic scar. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. High- and ultrahigh-field magnetic resonance imaging of naïve, injured and scarred vocal fold mucosae in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayami Ohno Kishimoto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subepithelial changes to the vocal fold mucosa, such as fibrosis, are difficult to identify using visual assessment of the tissue surface. Moreover, without suspicion of neoplasm, mucosal biopsy is not a viable clinical option, as it carries its own risk of iatrogenic injury and scar formation. Given these challenges, we assessed the ability of high- (4.7 T and ultrahigh-field (9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging to resolve key vocal fold subepithelial tissue structures in the rat, an important and widely used preclinical model in vocal fold biology. We conducted serial in vivo and ex vivo imaging, evaluated an array of acquisition sequences and contrast agents, and successfully resolved key anatomic features of naïve, acutely injured, and chronically scarred vocal fold mucosae on the ex vivo scans. Naïve lamina propria was hyperintense on T1-weighted imaging with gadobenate dimeglumine contrast enhancement, whereas chronic scar was characterized by reduced lamina propria T1 signal intensity and mucosal volume. Acutely injured mucosa was hypointense on T2-weighted imaging; lesion volume steadily increased, peaked at 5 days post-injury, and then decreased – consistent with the physiology of acute, followed by subacute, hemorrhage and associated changes in the magnetic state of hemoglobin and its degradation products. Intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide conferred no T2 contrast enhancement during the acute injury period. These findings confirm that magnetic resonance imaging can resolve anatomic substructures within naïve vocal fold mucosa, qualitative and quantitative features of acute injury, and the presence of chronic scar.

  7. Clinical efficacy of utilizing Ultrapulse CO2 combined with fractional CO2 laser for the treatment of hypertrophic scars in Asians-A prospective clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ying; Li, Shi Feng; Yu, Yi Ling; Tan, Jun; Gold, Michael H

    2017-06-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is seen regularly. Tissue penetration of laser energy into hypertrophic scars using computer defaults from some lasers may be insufficient and penetration not enough. We have developed a treatment with an interrupted laser "drilling" by the Ultrapulse CO 2 (Manual Fractional Technology, MFT) and, a second pass, with fractional CO 2 . The MFT with fractional CO 2 lasers to treat hypertrophic scars is evaluated. A total of 158 patients with hypertrophic scars had three sessions of MFT with fractional CO 2 laser at 3-month intervals. Evaluations made before and 6 months after the 3rd treatment: (1) the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS), (2) the University of North Carolina (UNC) Scar Scale, and (3) a survey of patient satisfaction. All data were analyzed using a t-test before and after treatment. The VSS score decreased from 9.35 to 3.12 (Plaser drilling by MFT and a fractional CO2 laser had profound effects on the hypertrophic scars treated. It works by increasing the penetration depth of the CO 2 laser in the scar tissue, exerting more precise effects on the hypertrophic scars. MFT combined with fractional CO 2 laser has the potential to be a major advance in the treatment of hypertrophic scars. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Presentation and management of keloid scarring following median sternotomy: a case study

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    Javangula Kalyana C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Keloid scars following median sternotomy are rare and occur more frequently in pigmented skin. Different management strategies have been described with variable success. We present a case of keloid scar formation following cardiac surgery including our management and the final aesthetic result. Case description A 64 year old female of fair complexion underwent mitral valve replacement. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uncomplicated, however, during the following year, thick keloid scars formed over the incision sites. Initial non surgical measures failed to relieve pain and did not offer any tangible aesthetic benefit. Eventually surgical excision was attempted. She presented to our clinic for nine months follow up with significant improvement in pain and aesthetic result. Discussion and Evaluation Several theories have attempted to explore the pathophysiology of keloid scar formation. A number of predisposing factors have been documented however none existed in this case. A variety of invasive and non invasive approaches have been described but significant differences in success rates and methodology of investigations still precludes a standardized management protocol. Conclusions In this case study a rare presentation of keloid scar has been presented. The variety of methods used to improve pain and aesthetic result demonstrates the propensity of keloid scars to recur and the therapeutic challenges that surgeons have to face in their quest for a satisfactory patient outcome.

  9. A physiological model of the interaction between tissue bubbles and the formation of blood-borne bubbles under decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappell, M A; Payne, S J

    2006-01-01

    Under decompression, bubbles can form in the human body, and these can be found both within the body tissues and the bloodstream. Mathematical models for the growth of both types of bubbles have previously been presented, but they have not been coupled together. This work thus explores the interaction between the growth of tissue and blood-borne bubbles under decompression, specifically looking at the extent to which they compete for the common resource of inert gas held in solution in the tissues. The influence of tissue bubbles is found to be significant for densities as low as 10 ml -1 for tissues which are poorly perfused. However, the effects of formation of bubbles in the blood are not found until the density of bubble production sites reaches 10 6 ml -1 . From comparison of the model predictions with experimental evidence for bubbles produced in animals and man under decompression, it is concluded that the density of tissue bubbles is likely to have a significant effect on the number of bubbles produced in the blood. However, the density of nucleation sites in the blood is unlikely to be sufficiently high in humans for the formation of bubbles in the blood to have a significant impact on the growth of the bubbles in the tissue

  10. Values of a Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale to Evaluate the Facial Skin Graft Scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jin Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Park, Kun

    2016-10-01

    The patient and observer scar assessment scale (POSAS) recently emerged as a promising method, reflecting both observer's and patient's opinions in evaluating scar. This tool was shown to be consistent and reliable in burn scar assessment, but it has not been tested in the setting of skin graft scar in skin cancer patients. To evaluate facial skin graft scar applied to POSAS and to compare with objective scar assessment tools. Twenty three patients, who diagnosed with facial cutaneous malignancy and transplanted skin after Mohs micrographic surgery, were recruited. Observer assessment was performed by three independent rates using the observer component of the POSAS and Vancouver scar scale (VSS). Patient self-assessment was performed using the patient component of the POSAS. To quantify scar color and scar thickness more objectively, spectrophotometer and ultrasonography was applied. Inter-observer reliability was substantial with both VSS and the observer component of the POSAS (average measure intraclass coefficient correlation, 0.76 and 0.80, respectively). The observer component consistently showed significant correlations with patients' ratings for the parameters of the POSAS (all p -valuesskin graft scar assessment in skin cancer patients, the POSAS showed acceptable inter-observer reliability. This tool was more comprehensive and had higher correlation with patient's opinion.

  11. Spectroscopic investigation on formation and growth of mineralized nanohydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, D.; Nithiya, S.; Shinyjoy, E.; Kavitha, L.

    Synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP,Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is a well-known bioceramic material used in orthopaedic and dental applications because of its excellent biocompatibility and bone-bonding ability. Substitution of trace elements, such as Sr, Mg and Zn ions into the structure of calcium phosphates is the subject of widespread investigation. In this paper, we have reported the synthesis of Sr, Mg and Zn co-substituted nanohydroxyapatite by soft solution freezing method. The effect of pH on the morphology of bioceramic nanomaterial was also discussed. The in vitro bioactivity of the as-synthesized bioceramic nanomaterial was determined by soaking it in SBF for various days. The as-synthesized bioceramic nanomaterial was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X- ray diffraction analysis, Scanning electron microscopy and Energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Transmission electron microscopic techniques respectively. The results obtained in our study have revealed that pH 10 was identified to induce the formation of mineralized nanohydroxyapatite. It is observed that the synthesis of bioceramic nanomaterial not only support the growth of apatite layer on its surface but also accelerate the growth which is evident from the in vitro studies. Therefore, mineralized nanohydroxyapatite is a potential candidate in bone tissue engineering.

  12. A novel experimental rat model of peripheral nerve scarring that reliably mimics post-surgical complications and recurring adhesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lemke

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, fibrosis and perineural adhesions with the surrounding tissue are common pathological processes following nerve injury and surgical interventions on peripheral nerves in human patients. These features can reoccur following external neurolysis, currently the most common surgical treatment for peripheral nerve scarring, thus leading to renewed nerve function impairment and chronic pain. To enable a successful evaluation of new therapeutic approaches, it is crucial to use a reproducible animal model that mimics the main clinical symptoms occurring in human patients. However, a clinically relevant model combining both histological and functional alterations has not been published to date. We therefore developed a reliable rat model that exhibits the essential pathological processes of peripheral nerve scarring. In our study, we present a novel method for the induction of nerve scarring by applying glutaraldehyde-containing glue that is known to cause nerve injury in humans. After a 3-week contact period with the sciatic nerve in female Sprague Dawley rats, we could demonstrate severe intra- and perineural scarring that resulted in grade 3 adhesions and major impairments in the electrophysiological peak amplitude compared with sham control (P=0.0478. Immunohistochemical analysis of the nerve structure revealed vigorous nerve inflammation and recruitment of T cells and macrophages. Also, distinct nerve degeneration was determined by immunostaining. These pathological alterations were further reflected in significant functional deficiencies, as determined by the analysis of relevant gait parameters as well as the quantification of the sciatic functional index starting at week 1 post-operation (P<0.01. Moreover, with this model we could, for the first time, demonstrate not only the primary formation, but also the recurrence, of severe adhesions 1 week after glue removal, imitating a major clinical challenge. As a comparison, we tested a

  13. Multifactorial Optimization of Contrast-Enhanced Nanofocus Computed Tomography for Quantitative Analysis of Neo-Tissue Formation in Tissue Engineering Constructs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Sonnaert

    Full Text Available To progress the fields of tissue engineering (TE and regenerative medicine, development of quantitative methods for non-invasive three dimensional characterization of engineered constructs (i.e. cells/tissue combined with scaffolds becomes essential. In this study, we have defined the most optimal staining conditions for contrast-enhanced nanofocus computed tomography for three dimensional visualization and quantitative analysis of in vitro engineered neo-tissue (i.e. extracellular matrix containing cells in perfusion bioreactor-developed Ti6Al4V constructs. A fractional factorial 'design of experiments' approach was used to elucidate the influence of the staining time and concentration of two contrast agents (Hexabrix and phosphotungstic acid and the neo-tissue volume on the image contrast and dataset quality. Additionally, the neo-tissue shrinkage that was induced by phosphotungstic acid staining was quantified to determine the operating window within which this contrast agent can be accurately applied. For Hexabrix the staining concentration was the main parameter influencing image contrast and dataset quality. Using phosphotungstic acid the staining concentration had a significant influence on the image contrast while both staining concentration and neo-tissue volume had an influence on the dataset quality. The use of high concentrations of phosphotungstic acid did however introduce significant shrinkage of the neo-tissue indicating that, despite sub-optimal image contrast, low concentrations of this staining agent should be used to enable quantitative analysis. To conclude, design of experiments allowed us to define the most optimal staining conditions for contrast-enhanced nanofocus computed tomography to be used as a routine screening tool of neo-tissue formation in Ti6Al4V constructs, transforming it into a robust three dimensional quality control methodology.

  14. Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Morrissey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In vivo gene therapy directed at tissues of mesenchymal origin could potentially augment healing. We aimed to assess the duration and magnitude of transene expression in vivo in mice and ex vivo in human tissues. Methods. Using bioluminescence imaging, plasmid and adenoviral vector-based transgene expression in murine quadriceps in vivo was examined. Temporal control was assessed using a doxycycline-inducible system. An ex vivo model was developed and optimised using murine tissue, and applied in ex vivo human tissue. Results. In vivo plasmid-based transgene expression did not silence in murine muscle, unlike in liver. Although maximum luciferase expression was higher in muscle with adenoviral delivery compared with plasmid, expression reduced over time. The inducible promoter cassette successfully regulated gene expression with maximum levels a factor of 11 greater than baseline. Expression was re-induced to a similar level on a temporal basis. Luciferase expression was readily detected ex vivo in human muscle and tendon. Conclusions. Plasmid constructs resulted in long-term in vivo gene expression in skeletal muscle, in a controllable fashion utilising an inducible promoter in combination with oral agents. Successful plasmid gene transfection in human ex vivo mesenchymal tissue was demonstrated for the first time.

  15. Mechanical Model of Geometric Cell and Topological Algorithm for Cell Dynamics from Single-Cell to Formation of Monolayered Tissues with Pattern

    KAUST Repository

    Kachalo, Së ma; Naveed, Hammad; Cao, Youfang; Zhao, Jieling; Liang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    development, and other emerging behavior. Here we describe a cell model and an efficient geometric algorithm for studying the dynamic process of tissue formation in 2D (e.g. epithelial tissues). Our approach improves upon previous methods by incorporating

  16. Mechanical stimulation to stimulate formation of a physiological collagen architecture in tissue-engineered cartilage; a numerical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Ito, K.

    2011-01-01

    The load-bearing capacity of today's tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage is insufficient. The arcade-like collagen network in native cartilage plays an important role in its load-bearing properties. Inducing the formation of such collagen architecture in engineered cartilage can, therefore, enhance

  17. Moisturisers in scar management following burn: A survey report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Tanja; Kurmis, Rochelle; Munn, Zachary; Heath, Kathryn; Greenwood, John

    2017-08-01

    Scar management is a recognised key component of rehabilitation following burn. Moisturising often combined with massage is commenced once healing tissue has gained sufficient strength to tolerate surface friction, with the aim being to hydrate the dry scar. The studies on various moisturisers and creams provide some guidance on moisturiser selection, but many are inconclusive. This survey aimed to determine the current expert opinion regarding moisturiser recommendations, including the basis for these recommendations, across the burns community. A brief web-based survey was distributed to burn therapists via mailing lists of the Australian and New Zealand Burn Association (ANZBA), and American Burn Association (ABA) 'Occupational and Physical Therapist Burn Special Interest Group'. The fifty three respondents indicated that there were 29 different moisturisers commonly recommended in practice. Three main themes were indicated as influencing recommendations for moisturiser: the perceived effects on the scar/skin (48%); the general properties of the moisturiser (38%); the ingredients (14%). Therapists reported that the principle stimuli determining their recommendations were patient feedback and the choice of the previous burn therapist in their service. Many were also guided by medical staff, pharmacists and sales representatives. Only three respondents were able to provide citations for published evidence supporting their recommendations. There is a paucity of evidence currently to support optimal moisturiser choice. This survey demonstrates that conflicting opinions are held on the ideal moisturiser brand, properties and ingredients. The recommendations made are based on low level evidence. Further research is required to inform clinicians which moisturiser to recommend to their clients. An ideal moisturiser should be one that is conducive to scar maturation, non- or minimally irritant, prevent skin drying, minimise transepidermal water loss and have no negative

  18. The use of chemotherapeutics for the treatment of keloid scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher David Jones

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Keloid scars are pathological scars, which develop as a result of exaggerated dermal tissue proliferation following cutaneous injury and often cause physical, psychological and cosmetic problems. Various theories regarding keloidogenesis exist, however the precise pathophysiological events remain unclear. Many different treatment modalities have been implicated in their management, but currently there is no entirely satisfactory method for treating all keloid lesions. We review a number of different chemotherapeutic agents which have been proposed for the treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars while giving insight into some of the novel chemotherapeutic drugs which are currently being investigated. Non-randomized trials evaluating the influence of different chemotherapeutic agents, such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; mitomycin C; bleomycin and steroid injection, either alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents or alternative treatment modalities, for the treatment of keloids were identified using a predefined PubMed search strategy. Twenty seven papers were identified. Scar improvement ≥50% was found in the majority of cases treated with 5-FU, with similar results found for mitomycin C, bleomycin and steroid injection. Combined intralesional 5-FU and steroid injection produced statistically significant improvements when compared to monotherapy. Monotherapy recurrence rates ranged from 0-47% for 5-FU, 0-15% for bleomycin and 0-50% for steroid injection. However, combined therapy in the form of surgical excision and adjuvant 5-FU or steroid injections demonstrated lower recurrence rates; 19% and 6% respectively. Currently, most of the literature supports the use of combination therapy (usually surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy as the mainstay treatment of keloids, however further investigation is necessary to determine success rates over longer time frames. Furthermore, there is the potential for novel therapies, but further

  19. The effects of prostaglandin E2 in growing rats - Increased metaphyseal hard tissue and cortico-endosteal bone formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, W. S. S.; Ueno, K.; Deng, Y. P.; Woodbury, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The role of in vivo prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in bone formation is investigated. Twenty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing between 223-267 g were injected subcutaneously with 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0 mg of PGE2-kg daily for 21 days. The processing of the tibiae for observation is described. Radiographs and histomorphometric analyses are also utilized to study bone formation. Body weight, weights of soft tissues and bones morphometry are evaluated. It is observed that PGE2 depressed longitudinal bone growth, increased growth cartilage thickness, decreased degenerative cartilage cell size and cartilage cell production, and significantly increased proximal tibial metaphyseal hard tissue mass. The data reveal that periosteal bone formation is slowed down at higher doses of PGE2 and endosteal bone formation is slightly depressed less than 10 days post injection; however, here is a late increase (10 days after post injection) in endosteal bone formation and in the formation of trabecular bone in the marrow cavity of the tibial shaft. It is noted that the effects of PGE2 on bone formation are similar to the responses of weaning rats to PGE2.

  20. Enhanced in Vivo Delivery of 5-Fluorouracil by Ethosomal Gels in Rabbit Ear Hypertrophic Scar Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Applying Ethosomal Gels (EGs in transdermal drug delivery systems has evoked considerable interest because of their good water-solubility and biocompatibility. However, there has not been an explicit description of applying EGs as a vehicle for hypertrophic scars treatment. Here, a novel transdermal EGs loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU EGs was successfully prepared and characterized. The stability assay in vitro revealed that 5-FU EGs stored for a period of 30 days at 4 ± 1 °C had a better size stability than that at 25 ± 1 °C. Furthermore, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, EGs labeled with Rhodamine 6 G penetrated into the deep dermis of the hypertrophic scar within 24 h in the rabbit ear hypertrophic model suggested that the EGs were an optional delivery carrier through scar tissues. In addition, the value of the Scar Elevation Index (SEI of 5-FU EGs group in the rabbit ear scar model was lower than that of 5-FU Phosphate Buffered Saline gel and Control groups. To conclude, these results suggest that EGs delivery system loaded 5-fluorouracil is a perfect candidate drug for hypertrophic scars therapy in future.

  1. Medical makeup for concealing facial scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Donna; Wong, Brian J F

    2012-10-01

    Surgical, laser, and pharmacological therapies are all used to correct scars and surgical incisions, though have limits with respect to how well facial skin can be restored or enhanced. The use of cosmetics has long been a relevant adjunct to all scar treatment modalities. In recent years, technical advancements in the chemistry and composition of cosmetic products have provided the patient with a broader range of products to employ for concealing scars. This review will provide an overview of contemporary methods for concealing facial scars, birthmarks, and pigmentary changes without the use of traditional/dated, heavy appearing camouflage products. Additionally, general guidelines and information will be provided with respect to identifying competent makeup artists for care of the medical patient. The article by no means is meant to be a tutorial, but rather serves as a starting point in this allied field of medicine. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Assessment of scar quality after cleft lip closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frans, Franceline A.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.; Griot, J. P. W. Don; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    To assess scar quality after cleft lip repair. The linear scars of patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate were evaluated in a prospective study using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Linear regression was performed to identify which scar characteristics were important

  3. Degradation of mangrove tissues and implications for peat formation in Belizean island forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, B.A.; McKee, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    1. Macrofaunal leaf consumption and degradation of leaves, woody twigs and roots were studied in mangrove island forests on a Belizean island. Factors influencing accumulation of organic matter deposited both above and below ground in this oligotrophic, autochothonous system were assessed. 2. Leaf degradation rates of Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove), Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) and Laguncularia racemosa (white mangrove) measured in mesh bags, were much faster in the lower than the upper intertidal zone. Mass loss was most rapid in A. germinans but zonal effects were much larger than species differences. 3. Exposure to invertebrates such as crabs and amphipods tripled overall rates of leaf litter breakdown. In the lower intertidal, crabs completely consumed some unbagged leaves within 23 days. Crabs also had an effect on some upper intertidal sites, where degradation of leaves placed in artificial burrows was 2.4 times faster than when placed on the soil surface. 4. In contrast to leaves (27??5% remaining after 230 days), roots and woody twigs were highly refractory (40??2% and 51??6% remaining after 584 and 540 days, respectively). Root degradation did not vary by soil depth, zone or species. Twigs of R. mangle and A. germinans degraded faster on the ground than in the canopy, whereas those of L. racemosa were highly resistant to decay regardless of position. 5. Peat formation at Twin Cays has occurred primarily through deposition and slow turnover of mangrove roots, rather than above-ground tissues that are either less abundant (woody twigs) or more readily removed (leaves).

  4. Overview of surgical scar prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Daegu; Harijan, Aram

    2014-06-01

    Management of incisional scar is intimately connected to stages of wound healing. The management of an elective surgery patient begins with a thorough informed consent process in which the patient is made aware of personal and clinical circumstances that cannot be modified, such as age, ethnicity, and previous history of hypertrophic scars. In scar prevention, the single most important modifiable factor is wound tension during the proliferative and remodeling phases, and this is determined by the choice of incision design. Traditional incisions most often follow relaxed skin tension lines, but no such lines exist in high surface tension areas. If such incisions are unavoidable, the patient must be informed of this ahead of time. The management of a surgical incision does not end when the sutures are removed. Surgical scar care should be continued for one year. Patient participation is paramount in obtaining the optimal outcome. Postoperative visits should screen for signs of scar hypertrophy and has a dual purpose of continued patient education and reinforcement of proper care. Early intervention is a key to control hyperplastic response. Hypertrophic scars that do not improve by 6 months are keloids and should be managed aggressively with intralesional steroid injections and alternate modalities.

  5. Scar modification. Techniques for revision and camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horswell, B B

    1998-09-01

    The surgery and management of scars is a protracted and staged process that includes preparation of the skin through hygienic measures, scar softening (if indicated) with steroids, massage and pressure dressings, skilled execution of the surgical plan, and thorough postoperative wound care. This process generally covers a 1-year period for the various stages mentioned. Many general host and local skin factors will directly affect the final revision result. The two most important indirect factors that the surgeon must endeavor to control are optimal patient preparation and cutaneous health, and patient compliance with, and an ability to carry out, those wound care measures that the surgeon prescribes. Keloid and burn contracture scars represent two entities that are complicated and challenging to treat owing to their abnormal morphophysiologic features. Management of these scars is prolonged, and the patient must understand that the ultimate result will usually be a compromise. New grafting techniques, such as cultured autodermal grafts, offer improved initial management of burn wounds that may subsequently optimize scar revision in these patients. Keloids, and to a lesser extent hypertrophic scars, require steroid injections, pressure treatment, careful surgery, and protracted wound support and pressure treatment (exceeding 6 months) after surgery.

  6. Risk factors for renal scarring in children with primary vesicoureteral reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Mir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the incidence of renal scarring among patients with primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR and the possible risk factor(s, we studied 90 children (60 girls and 30 boys with VUR followed in the Pediatric Nephrology Unit at the Ege University Hospital from 1998 to 2003. All the patients were assessed for VUR grade by voiding cystoureterography and for presence of renal scarring by (99 m technetium dimercapto-succinic acid scintigraphy. All infants with VUR were given low-dose prophylactic antibiotics and followed-up until resolution of the reflux. Grade of reflux and number of urinary tract infection (UTI episodes (≥3 were found to be statistically significant risk factors for renal scarring (P 0.05. Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference of frequency of renal scarring among the different age groups (P >0.05. We conclude that recurrences of UTI and VUR severity are significant risk factors for renal scarring in children with VUR. Therefore, identification of VUR at an early age may offer the opportunity to prevent episodes of UTI and possible formation of renal scars that may result in end-stage renal failure.

  7. Physiologically Distributed Loading Patterns Drive the Formation of Zonally Organized Collagen Structures in Tissue-Engineered Meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetzer, Jennifer L; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2016-07-01

    The meniscus is a dense fibrocartilage tissue that withstands the complex loads of the knee via a unique organization of collagen fibers. Attempts to condition engineered menisci with compression or tensile loading alone have failed to reproduce complex structure on the microscale or anatomic scale. Here we show that axial loading of anatomically shaped tissue-engineered meniscus constructs produced spatial distributions of local strain similar to those seen in the meniscus when the knee is loaded at full extension. Such loading drove formation of tissue with large organized collagen fibers, levels of mechanical anisotropy, and compressive moduli that match native tissue. Loading accelerated the development of native-sized and aligned circumferential and radial collagen fibers. These loading patterns contained both tensile and compressive components that enhanced the major biochemical and functional properties of the meniscus, with loading significantly improved glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation 200-250%, collagen accumulation 40-55%, equilibrium modulus 1000-1800%, and tensile moduli 500-1200% (radial and circumferential). Furthermore, this study demonstrates local changes in mechanical environment drive heterogeneous tissue development and organization within individual constructs, highlighting the importance of recapitulating native loading environments. Loaded menisci developed cartilage-like tissue with rounded cells, a dense collagen matrix, and increased GAG accumulation in the more compressively loaded horns, and fibrous collagen-rich tissue in the more tensile loaded outer 2/3, similar to native menisci. Loaded constructs reached a level of organization not seen in any previous engineered menisci and demonstrate great promise as meniscal replacements.

  8. Regeneration of soft tissues is promoted by MMP1 treatment after digit amputation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    Full Text Available The ratio of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs to the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs in wounded tissues strictly control the protease activity of MMPs, and therefore regulate the progress of wound closure, tissue regeneration and scar formation. Some amphibians (i.e. axolotl/newt demonstrate complete regeneration of missing or wounded digits and even limbs; MMPs play a critical role during amphibian regeneration. Conversely, mammalian wound healing re-establishes tissue integrity, but at the expense of scar tissue formation. The differences between amphibian regeneration and mammalian wound healing can be attributed to the greater ratio of MMPs to TIMPs in amphibian tissue. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of MMP1 to effectively promote skeletal muscle regeneration by favoring extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling to enhance cell proliferation and migration. In this study, MMP1 was administered to the digits amputated at the mid-second phalanx of adult mice to observe its effect on digit regeneration. Results indicated that the regeneration of soft tissue and the rate of wound closure were significantly improved by MMP1 administration, but the elongation of the skeletal tissue was insignificantly affected. During digit regeneration, more mutipotent progenitor cells, capillary vasculature and neuromuscular-related tissues were observed in MMP1 treated tissues; moreover, there was less fibrotic tissue formed in treated digits. In summary, MMP1 was found to be effective in promoting wound healing in amputated digits of adult mice.

  9. EFFECT OF RECOMBINANT TISSUE-PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR ON INTRAABDOMINAL ABSCESS FORMATION IN RATS WITH GENERALIZED PERITONITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; de Graaf, JS; Kooi, K; Sluiter, WJ; Bom, VJJ; van der Meer, J; Bleichrodt, RP

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During generalized peritonitis, intraabdominal fibrin deposition is stimulated whereas fibrinolytic activity is reduced, which predisposes intra-abdominal abscess formation. We investigated the effects of increasing the intra-abdominal fibrinolytic activity on abscess formation by

  10. MR imaging of skeletal soft tissue infection: utility of diffusion-weighted imaging in detecting abscess formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harish, Srinivasan; Rebello, Ryan; Chiavaras, Mary M.; Kotnis, Nikhil

    2011-01-01

    Our objectives were to assess if diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can help identify abscess formation in the setting of soft tissue infection and to assess whether abscess formation can be diagnosed confidently with a combination of DWI and other unenhanced sequences. Eight cases of soft tissue infection imaged with MRI including DWI were retrospectively reviewed. Two male and six female patients were studied (age range 23-50 years). Unenhanced MRI including DWI was performed in all patients. Post-contrast images were obtained in seven patients. All patients had clinically or surgically confirmed abscesses. Abscesses demonstrated restricted diffusion. DWI in conjunction with other unenhanced imaging showed similar confidence levels as post-contrast images in diagnosing abscess formation in four cases. In two cases, although the combined use of DWI and other unenhanced imaging yielded the same confidence levels as post-contrast imaging, DWI was more definitive for demonstrating abscess formation. In one case, post-contrast images had a better confidence for suggesting abscess. In one case, DWI helped detected the abscess, where gadolinium could not be administered because of a contraindication. This preliminary study suggests that DWI is a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of skeletal soft tissue abscesses. (orig.)

  11. Role of fine needle aspiration cytology and cell block in diagnosis of scar endometriosis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sashibhusan Dash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of endometrial glands and stroma in places other than the uterus is called endometriosis. It can be pelvic or extra-pelvic. Abdominal scar endometriosis is an extra-pelvic endometriosis that can occur after surgery involving the uterus. Post-caesarean section, scar endometriosis is a rare event. The diagnosis is frequently made only after excision of disease tissue. We present a case of post-caesarean section abdominal scar endometriosis presenting as a tumor on the abdominal wall, which was diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology and confirmed by cell block preparation.

  12. Tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP-HA) bone scaffold as potential candidate for the formation of tissue engineered bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Shamsul Bin; Keong, Tan Kok; Cheng, Chen Hui; Saim, Aminuddin Bin; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2013-06-01

    Various materials have been used as scaffolds to suit different demands in tissue engineering. One of the most important criteria is that the scaffold must be biocompatible. This study was carried out to investigate the potential of HA or TCP/HA scaffold seeded with osteogenic induced sheep marrow cells (SMCs) for bone tissue engineering. HA-SMC and TCP/HA-SMC constructs were induced in the osteogenic medium for three weeks prior to implantation in nude mice. The HA-SMC and TCP/HA-SMC constructs were implanted subcutaneously on the dorsum of nude mice on each side of the midline. These constructs were harvested after 8 wk of implantation. Constructs before and after implantation were analyzed through histological staining, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and gene expression analysis. The HA-SMC constructs demonstrated minimal bone formation. TCP/HA-SMC construct showed bone formation eight weeks after implantation. The bone formation started on the surface of the ceramic and proceeded to the centre of the pores. H&E and Alizarin Red staining demonstrated new bone tissue. Gene expression of collagen type 1 increased significantly for both constructs, but more superior for TCP/HA-SMC. SEM results showed the formation of thick collagen fibers encapsulating TCP/HA-SMC more than HA-SMC. Cells attached to both constructs surface proliferated and secreted collagen fibers. The findings suggest that TCP/HA-SMC constructs with better osteogenic potential compared to HA-SMC constructs can be a potential candidate for the formation of tissue engineered bone.

  13. The role of massage in scar management: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Thuzar M; Bordeaux, Jeremy S

    2012-03-01

    Many surgeons recommend postoperative scar massage to improve aesthetic outcome, although scar massage regimens vary greatly. To review the regimens and efficacy of scar massage. PubMed was searched using the following key words: "massage" in combination with "scar," or "linear," "hypertrophic," "keloid," "diasta*," "atrophic." Information on study type, scar type, number of patients, scar location, time to onset of massage therapy, treatment protocol, treatment duration, outcomes measured, and response to treatment was tabulated. Ten publications including 144 patients who received scar massage were examined in this review. Time to treatment onset ranged from after suture removal to longer than 2 years. Treatment protocols ranged from 10 minutes twice daily to 30 minutes twice weekly. Treatment duration varied from one treatment to 6 months. Overall, 65 patients (45.7%) experienced clinical improvement based on Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale score, Vancouver Scar Scale score, range of motion, pruritus, pain, mood, depression, or anxiety. Of 30 surgical scars treated with massage, 27 (90%) had improved appearance or Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale score. The evidence for the use of scar massage is weak, regimens used are varied, and outcomes measured are neither standardized nor reliably objective, although its efficacy appears to be greater in postsurgical scars than traumatic or postburn scars. Although scar massage is anecdotally effective, there is scarce scientific data in the literature to support it. © 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effectiveness of Onion Extract Gel on Surgical Scars in Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumutnart Chanprapaph

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Onion extracts have been shown in vitro to accelerate wound healing. Results from clinical studies on surgical scars in Caucasians were disappointing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of onion extract gel in improving the cosmetic and symptoms of surgical scars in Asians. Patients/Methods. Twenty Asians who had new Pfannenstiel’s cesarean section scars were recruited in this prospective double-blinded, split-scar study. Each side was randomly assigned treatment with onion extract gel or placebo at 7 days after surgery. The product was applied three times daily for 12 weeks. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and 4th and 12th weeks. Scar redness was assessed by calorimeter, scar height and pliability were assessed by blinded investigators, and scar symptoms and overall cosmetic improvement were assessed by subjects. Results. Sixteen subjects completed the study. A statistically significant difference between two sides of scar in terms of scar height and scar symptoms was found. There was no statistically significant difference in scar redness, scar pliability, and overall cosmetic appearance between two sides. Conclusions. The early use of topical 12% onion extract gel on Pfannenstiel’s cesarean section scar in Asians resulted in the improvement of scar height and scar symptoms.

  15. Electrospun nanofibers: Formation, characterization, and evaluation for nerve tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Nicole E.

    direction showed the most promise for use in cell culture assays. While surface chemistry and topography are important, porosity of the scaffold is also critical to control cellular infiltration and tissue formation. To enhance the porosity of our electrospun nanofiber scaffolds and improve the infiltration of cells, two methods were explored to control porosity. In the first method, the scaffold polymer polycaprolactone was co-electrospun with a sacrificial polymer polyethylene oxide, which was removed after the bi-component fiber mat was formed. In doing so, the void space was increased. In the second method, the spinning solution concentration of polycaprolactone was varied to control fiber diameter and porosity. The second method proved to be more effective at improving the cellular infiltration of PC12 cells. Two orders of magnitude range of fiber diameters were achieved, and nearly full infiltration of PC12 cells was observed for the mats with the highest porosity. The pore sizes of these mats were on the order of the size of the cell bodies (approximately 6-10 µm). Although the majority of this work focuses on using conventional electrospinning to generate solid-core fibers, core-shell fibers, have many applications in tissue engineering, among other fields. We explored an efficient way to generate these fibers from an emulsion solution using a conventional electrospinning apparatus. We characterized the fibers using an atomic force microscope (AFM) elastic modulus mapping technique, along with AFM phase imaging, angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis, to determine the chemical and molar composition of the core and shell layers. This work presents novel analytical techniques for the characterization of core-shell nanofibers in order to better predict and understand their material properties. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  16. Critical role of tissue kallikrein in vessel formation and maturation : Implications for therapeutic revascularization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, O.A.; Richer, C.; Emanueli, C.; Weel, V. van; Quax, P.H.A.; Katare, R.; Kraenkel, N.; Campagnolo, P.; Barcelos, L.S.; Siragusa, M.; Sala-Newby, G.B.; Baldessari, D.; Mione, M.; Vincent, M.P.; Benest, A.V.; Al Haj Zen, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Bates, D.O.; Alhenc-Gelas, F.; Madeddu, P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE : Human Tissue Kallikrein (hKLK1) overexpression promotes an enduring neovascularization of ischemic tissue, yet the cellular mechanisms of hKLK1-induced arteriogenesis remain unknown. Furthermore, no previous study has compared the angiogenic potency of hKLK1, with its loss of function

  17. Vertical scar versus the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty : A 10-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwer, Lesley R.; van der Biezen, Jan Jaap; Spronk, Cees A.; van der Lei, Berend

    2012-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate whether the initial outcome of two types of reduction mammaplasty techniques (vertical scar reduction mammaplasty vs. the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty) remains stable in the long term: Sixty-nine patients who had undergone breast reduction

  18. Periauricular Keloids on Face-Lift Scars in a Patient with Facial Nerve Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayo Aoki, MD, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Keloids are caused by excessive scar formation that leads to scar growth beyond the initial scar boundaries. Keloid formation and progression is promoted by mechanical stress such as skin stretch force. Consequently, keloids rarely occur in paralyzed areas and areas with little skin tension, such as the periauricular region. Therefore, periauricular incision is commonly performed for face lifts. We report a rare case of keloids that arose from face-lift scars in a patient with bilateral facial nerve paralysis. A 51-year-old Japanese man presented with abnormal proliferative skin masses in bilateral periauricular scars. Seventeen years before, he had a cerebral infarction that resulted in permanent bilateral facial nerve paralysis. Three years before presentation, the patient underwent face-lift surgery with periauricular incisions. We diagnosed multiple keloids. We removed the masses surgically, closed the wounds with sutures in the superficial musculoaponeurotic system layer to reduce tension on the wound edges, reconstructed the earlobes with local skin flaps, and provided 2 consecutive days of radiotherapy. The wounds/scars were managed with steroid plasters and injections. Histology confirmed that the lesions were keloids. Ten months after surgery, the lesions did not exhibit marked regrowth. The keloids appeared to be caused by the patient's helmet, worn during his 3-hour daily motorcycle rides, which placed repeated tension on the periauricular area. This rare case illustrates how physical force contributes to auricular and periauricular keloid development and progression. It also shows that when performing surgery with periauricular incisions, care should be taken to eliminate wound/scar stretching.

  19. Resin duct characteristics in the wood of fire-scarred North American conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel; Elaine K. Sutherland; Kevin T. Smith; Donald A. Falk

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic resin ducts form in xylem and phloem tissue of conifers in response to abiotic wounding, fungal invasion, and insect attack. Little is known about resin duct characteristics in the wood of fire-scarred trees. The aim of this study is to quantify changes in traits of both axial and radial resin ducts, along with those of associated epithelial cells and...

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma originating from a cutaneous scar in a llama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K; Barrington, G M; Parish, S M

    1997-01-01

    A nonhealing wound associated with a laceration in a 12-year-old llama was evaluated. Initial attempts at closure were unsuccessful and biopsy revealed scar tissue. Subsequent biopsies, 18 mo later, revealed squamous cell carcinoma with regional metastasis. This report describes squamous cell carcinoma, secondary to a traumatic wound in a llama. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9332750

  1. Squamous cell carcinoma originating from a cutaneous scar in a llama.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, K; Barrington, G M; Parish, S M

    1997-01-01

    A nonhealing wound associated with a laceration in a 12-year-old llama was evaluated. Initial attempts at closure were unsuccessful and biopsy revealed scar tissue. Subsequent biopsies, 18 mo later, revealed squamous cell carcinoma with regional metastasis. This report describes squamous cell carcinoma, secondary to a traumatic wound in a llama.

  2. Effects of Initial Seeding Density and Fluid Perfusion Rate on Formation of Tissue-Engineered Bone

    OpenAIRE

    GRAYSON, WARREN L.; BHUMIRATANA, SARINDR; CANNIZZARO, CHRISTOPHER; CHAO, P.-H. GRACE; LENNON, DONALD P.; CAPLAN, ARNOLD I.; VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC, GORDANA

    2008-01-01

    We describe a novel bioreactor system for tissue engineering of bone that enables cultivation of up to six tissue constructs simultaneously, with direct perfusion and imaging capability. The bioreactor was used to investigate the relative effects of initial seeding density and medium perfusion rate on the growth and osteogenic differentiation patterns of bone marrow–derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on three-dimensional scaffolds. Fully decellularized bovine trabecular bon...

  3. The influence of tethered epidermal growth factor on connective tissue progenitor colony formation

    OpenAIRE

    Marcantonio, Nicholas A.; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Rozic, Richard J.; Au, Ada; Wells, Alan; Muschler, George F.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2009-01-01

    Strategies to combine aspirated marrow cells with scaffolds to treat connective tissue defects are gaining increasing clinical attention and use. In situations such as large defects where initial survival and proliferation of transplanted connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) are limiting, therapeutic outcomes might be improved by using the scaffold to deliver growth factors that promote the early stages of cell function in the graft. Signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pl...

  4. Assessment of bone formation capacity using in vivo transplantation assays: procedure and tissue analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Ditzel, Nicholas; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    In vivo assessment of bone formation (osteogenesis) potential by isolated cells is an important method for analysis of cells and factors control ling bone formation. Currently, cell implantation mixed with hydroxyapa-tite/tricalcium phosphate in an open system (subcutaneous implantation) in immun...

  5. Microvascular changes during acne lesion initiation and scarring is revealed in vivo using optical microangiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Utku; Li, Yuandong; Choi, Woo J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-02-01

    Acne is a common skin disease in society and often leads to scarring. In this paper, we demonstrate the capabilities of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) in detecting specific features of acne lesion initiation and scarring on human facial skin in vivo over 30 days. Optical microangiography (OMAG) technique made it possible to image 3D tissue microvasculature changes up to 1 mm depth in vivo without the need of exogenous contrast agents in ~10 seconds. The presented results show promise to facilitate clinical trials of treatment and prognosis of acne vulgaris by detecting cutaneous microvasculature and structural changes within human skin in vivo.

  6. 3D tissue formation by stacking detachable cell sheets formed on nanofiber mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Byungjun; Kim, Hong Nam; Bang, Seokyoung; Yang, Hee Seok; Kang, Seong Min; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Park, Suk-Hee; Jeon, Noo Li

    2017-03-23

    We present a novel approach for assembling 3D tissue by layer-by-layer stacking of cell sheets formed on aligned nanofiber mesh. A rigid frame was used to repeatedly collect aligned electrospun PCL (polycaprolactone) nanofiber to form a mesh structure with average distance between fibers 6.4 µm. When human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), human foreskin dermal fibroblasts, and skeletal muscle cells (C2C12) were cultured on the nanofiber mesh, they formed confluent monolayers and could be handled as continuous cell sheets with areas 3 × 3 cm 2 or larger. Thicker 3D tissues have been formed by stacking multiple cell sheets collected on frames that can be nested (i.e. Matryoshka dolls) without any special tools. When cultured on the nanofiber mesh, skeletal muscle, C2C12 cells oriented along the direction of the nanofibers and differentiated into uniaxially aligned multinucleated myotube. Myotube cell sheets were stacked (upto 3 layers) in alternating or aligned directions to form thicker tissue with ∼50 µm thickness. Sandwiching HUVEC cell sheets with two dermal fibroblast cell sheets resulted in vascularized 3D tissue. HUVECs formed extensive networks and expressed CD31, a marker of endothelial cells. Cell sheets formed on nanofiber mesh have a number of advantages, including manipulation and stacking of multiple cell sheets for constructing 3D tissue and may find applications in a variety of tissue engineering applications.

  7. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  8. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Regeneration of Vocal Folds: A Study on a Chronic Vocal Fold Scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelou Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the study was to assess the histological effects of autologous infusion of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC on a chronic vocal fold scar in a rabbit model as compared to an untreated scar as well as in injection of hyaluronic acid. Study Design. Animal experiment. Method. We used 74 New Zealand rabbits. Sixteen of them were used as control/normal group. We created a bilateral vocal fold wound in the remaining 58 rabbits. After 18 months we separated our population into three groups. The first group served as control/scarred group. The second one was injected with hyaluronic acid in the vocal folds, and the third received an autologous adipose-derived stem cell infusion in the scarred vocal folds (ADSC group. We measured the variation of thickness of the lamina propria of the vocal folds and analyzed histopathologic changes in each group after three months. Results. The thickness of the lamina propria was significantly reduced in the group that received the ADSC injection, as compared to the normal/scarred group. The collagen deposition, the hyaluronic acid, the elastin levels, and the organization of elastic fibers tend to return to normal after the injection of ADSC. Conclusions. Autologous injection of adipose-derived stem cells on a vocal fold chronic scar enhanced the healing of the vocal folds and the reduction of the scar tissue, even when compared to other treatments.

  9. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Regeneration of Vocal Folds: A Study on a Chronic Vocal Fold Scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliki, Kalodimou; Irini, Messini; Nikolaos, Psychalakis; Karampela, Eleftheria; Apostolos, Papalois

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to assess the histological effects of autologous infusion of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) on a chronic vocal fold scar in a rabbit model as compared to an untreated scar as well as in injection of hyaluronic acid. Study Design. Animal experiment. Method. We used 74 New Zealand rabbits. Sixteen of them were used as control/normal group. We created a bilateral vocal fold wound in the remaining 58 rabbits. After 18 months we separated our population into three groups. The first group served as control/scarred group. The second one was injected with hyaluronic acid in the vocal folds, and the third received an autologous adipose-derived stem cell infusion in the scarred vocal folds (ADSC group). We measured the variation of thickness of the lamina propria of the vocal folds and analyzed histopathologic changes in each group after three months. Results. The thickness of the lamina propria was significantly reduced in the group that received the ADSC injection, as compared to the normal/scarred group. The collagen deposition, the hyaluronic acid, the elastin levels, and the organization of elastic fibers tend to return to normal after the injection of ADSC. Conclusions. Autologous injection of adipose-derived stem cells on a vocal fold chronic scar enhanced the healing of the vocal folds and the reduction of the scar tissue, even when compared to other treatments. PMID:26933440

  10. Magnetic assembly of 3D cell clusters: visualizing the formation of an engineered tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Kumar, S R P; Puri, I K; Elankumaran, S

    2016-02-01

    Contactless magnetic assembly of cells into 3D clusters has been proposed as a novel means for 3D tissue culture that eliminates the need for artificial scaffolds. However, thus far its efficacy has only been studied by comparing expression levels of generic proteins. Here, it has been evaluated by visualizing the evolution of cell clusters assembled by magnetic forces, to examine their resemblance to in vivo tissues. Cells were labeled with magnetic nanoparticles, then assembled into 3D clusters using magnetic force. Scanning electron microscopy was used to image intercellular interactions and morphological features of the clusters. When cells were held together by magnetic forces for a single day, they formed intercellular contacts through extracellular fibers. These kept the clusters intact once the magnetic forces were removed, thus serving the primary function of scaffolds. The cells self-organized into constructs consistent with the corresponding tissues in vivo. Epithelial cells formed sheets while fibroblasts formed spheroids and exhibited position-dependent morphological heterogeneity. Cells on the periphery of a cluster were flattened while those within were spheroidal, a well-known characteristic of connective tissues in vivo. Cells assembled by magnetic forces presented visual features representative of their in vivo states but largely absent in monolayers. This established the efficacy of contactless assembly as a means to fabricate in vitro tissue models. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Uterine arterial chemoembolization combined with curettage for the treatment of cesarean scar pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai Zhigang; Gao Shufeng; Zhang Xuehui

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate uterine arterial chemoembolization combined with curettage in treating cesarean scar pregnancy. Methods: Super-selective bilateral uterine arterial catheterization and angiography was performed in 64 patients with cesarean scar pregnancy (duration of amenorrhea 43-84 days), which was followed by arterial infusion of MTX and embolization with Gelfoam particles. Then curettage was carried out. The technical success rate and the therapeutic results were observed and analyzed. Results: Technical success in catheterization and in performing chemoembolization was achieved in all 64 patients. The pregnant tissues were successfully cleared away in 62 patients. The average blood loss during curettage procedure was 21.4 ml. For the remaining two patients lesion resection together with repair of lower segment was employed. No severe complications occurred after the treatment. Conclusion: Uterine arterial chemoembolization combined with curettage is a safe,minimally-invasive and effective treatment for cesarean scar pregnancy. It is worth popularizing this technique in clinical practice. (authors)

  12. Collagen-binding peptidoglycans inhibit MMP mediated collagen degradation and reduce dermal scarring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Stuart

    Full Text Available Scarring of the skin is a large unmet clinical problem that is of high patient concern and impact. Wound healing is complex and involves numerous pathways that are highly orchestrated, leaving the skin sealed, but with abnormal organization and composition of tissue components, namely collagen and proteoglycans, that are then remodeled over time. To improve healing and reduce or eliminate scarring, more rapid restoration of healthy tissue composition and organization offers a unique approach for development of new therapeutics. A synthetic collagen-binding peptidoglycan has been developed that inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-1 and 13 (MMP-1 and MMP-13 mediated collagen degradation. We investigated the synthetic peptidoglycan in a rat incisional model in which a single dose was delivered in a hyaluronic acid (HA vehicle at the time of surgery prior to wound closure. The peptidoglycan treatment resulted in a significant reduction in scar tissue at 21 days as measured by histology and visual analysis. Improved collagen architecture of the treated wounds was demonstrated by increased tensile strength and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis of collagen fibril diameters compared to untreated and HA controls. The peptidoglycan's mechanism of action includes masking existing collagen and inhibiting MMP-mediated collagen degradation while modulating collagen organization. The peptidoglycan can be synthesized at low cost with unique design control, and together with demonstrated preclinical efficacy in reducing scarring, warrants further investigation for dermal wound healing.

  13. Ectopic Hard Tissue Formation by Odonto/Osteogenically In Vitro Differentiated Human Deciduous Teeth Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seunghye; Song, Je Seon; Jeon, Mijeong; Shin, Dong Min; Kim, Seong-Oh; Lee, Jae Ho

    2015-07-01

    There have been many attempts to use the pulp tissue from human deciduous teeth for dentin or bone regeneration. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of deciduous teeth pulp stem cells (DTSCs) on their in vivo hard tissue-forming potential. DTSCs were isolated from extracted deciduous teeth using the outgrowth method. These cells were exposed to odonto/osteogenic stimuli for 4 and 8 days (Day 4 and Day 8 groups, respectively), while cells in the control group were cultured in normal medium. The in vitro differentiated DTSCs and the control DTSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice with macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate and sacrificed at 8 weeks post-implantation. The effect of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation was evaluated using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The in vivo effect was evaluated by qualitative RT-PCR, assessment of ALP activity, histologic analysis, and immunohistochemical staining. The amount of hard tissue was greater in Day 4 group than Day 8 group (p = 0.014). However, Day 8 group generated lamellar bone-like structure, which was immunonegative to anti-human dentin sialoprotein with significantly low expression level of DSPP compared with the control group (p = 0.008). This study demonstrates that odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs enhances the formation of bone-like tissue, instead of dentin-like tissue, when transplanted subcutaneously using MBCP as a carrier. The odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs may be an effective modification that enhances in vivo bone formation by DTSCs.

  14. The clinical outcome of cesarean scar pregnancies implanted "on the scar" versus "in the niche".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelin Agten, Andrea; Cali, Giuseppe; Monteagudo, Ana; Oviedo, Johana; Ramos, Joanne; Timor-Tritsch, Ilan

    2017-05-01

    The term cesarean scar pregnancy refers to placental implantation within the scar of a previous cesarean delivery. The rising numbers of cesarean deliveries in the last decades have led to an increased incidence of cesarean scar pregnancy. Complications of cesarean scar pregnancy include morbidly adherent placenta, uterine rupture, severe hemorrhage, and preterm labor. It is suspected that cesarean scar pregnancies that are implanted within a dehiscent scar ("niche") behave differently compared with those implanted on top of a well-healed scar. To date there are no studies that have compared pregnancy outcomes between cesarean scar pregnancies implanted either "on the scar" or "in the niche." The purpose of this study was to determine the pregnancy outcome of cesarean scar pregnancy implanted either "on the scar" or "in the niche." This was a retrospective 2-center study of 17 patients with cesarean scar pregnancy that was diagnosed from 5-9 weeks gestation (median, 8 weeks). All cesarean scar pregnancies were categorized as either implanted or "on the scar" (group A) or "in the niche" (group B), based on their first-trimester transvaginal ultrasound examination. Clinical outcomes based on gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, blood loss at delivery, neonate weight and placental histopathologic condition were compared between the groups with the use of the Mann-Whitney U test. Myometrial thickness overlying the placenta was compared among all the patients who required hysterectomy and those who did not with the use of the Mann-Whitney U test. Myometrial thickness was also correlated with gestational age at delivery with the use of Spearman's correlation. Group A consisted of 6 patients; group B consisted of 11 patients. Gestational age at delivery was lower in group B (median, 34 weeks; range, 20-36 weeks) than in group A (median, 38 weeks; range, 37-39 weeks; P=.001). In group A, 5 patients were delivered via cesarean delivery (with normal placenta), and

  15. Ectopic bone formation during tissue-engineered cartilage repair using autologous chondrocytes and novel plasma-derived albumin scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robla Costales, David; Junquera, Luis; García Pérez, Eva; Gómez Llames, Sara; Álvarez-Viejo, María; Meana-Infiesta, Álvaro

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: first, to evaluate the production of cartilaginous tissue in vitro and in vivo using a novel plasma-derived scaffold, and second, to test the repair of experimental defects made on ears of New Zealand rabbits (NZr) using this approach. Scaffolds were seeded with chondrocytes and cultured in vitro for 3 months to check in vitro cartilage production. To evaluate in vivo cartilage production, a chondrocyte-seeded scaffold was transplanted subcutaneously to a nude mouse. To check in vivo repair, experimental defects made in the ears of five New Zealand rabbits (NZr) were filled with chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds. In vitro culture produced mature chondrocytes with no extracellular matrix (ECM). Histological examination of redifferentiated in vitro cultures showed differentiated chondrocytes adhered to scaffold pores. Subcutaneous transplantation of these constructs to a nude mouse produced cartilage, confirmed by histological study. Experimental cartilage repair in five NZr showed cartilaginous tissue repairing the defects, mixed with calcified areas of bone formation. It is possible to produce cartilaginous tissue in vivo and to repair experimental auricular defects by means of chondrocyte cultures and the novel plasma-derived scaffold. Further studies are needed to determine the significance of bone formation in the samples. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. "Scars" connect classical and quantum theory

    CERN Multimedia

    Monteiro, T

    1990-01-01

    Chaotic systems are unstable and extremely sensitive to initial condititions. So far, scientists have been unable to demonstrate that the same kind of behaviour exists in quantum or microscopic systems. New connections have been discovered though between classical and quantum theory. One is the phenomena of 'scars' which cut through the wave function of a particle (1 page).

  17. Recombinant human endostatin reduces hypertrophic scar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Sixteen New Zealand white rabbits were used to establish HS models. Then, rabbit ears containing HS were randomly assigned to either the Endostar group or the control group. The changes of appearance and histology were evaluated using the naked eye, hematoxylin eosin staining, and a scar elevation index.

  18. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited to...

  19. Persistent scarring and dilated cardiomyopathy suggest incomplete regeneration of the apex resected neonatal mouse myocardium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Baun, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Heart damage in mammals is generally considered to result in scar formation, whereas zebrafish completely regenerate their hearts following an intermediate and reversible state of fibrosis after apex resection (AR). Recently, using the AR procedure, one-day-old mice were suggested to have full...... capacity for cardiac regeneration as well. In contrast, using the same mouse model others have shown that the regeneration process is incomplete and that scarring still remains 21days after AR. The present study tested the hypothesis that like in zebrafish, fibrosis in neonatal mammals could...... be an intermediate response before the onset of complete heart regeneration. Myocardial damage was performed by AR in postnatal day 1 C57BL/6 mice, and myocardial function and scarring assessed at day 180 using F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and histology, respectively. AR mice...

  20. Predisposing factors for renal scarring in children with urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Beiraghdar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to determine the predisposing factors for renal scarring in children with urinary tract infection. In this prospective cohort study, 176 children with documented urinary tract infection were categorized into four groups: ≤1 year old, 1-2 years old, 2-7 years and 7-14 years old. Ultrasonography and Technetium-99 m-DMSA scan were used to detect the possible abnormalities. Infants under 12 months old presented as the most common group for renal scarring (27 cases, 52.9%, and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR was diagnosed in 29 cases (56.8%. Fifteen (41.67% children between the ages of one and two years had renal scar, and VUR was detected in half of the patients. In the third group, 36.3%, and in fourth group, 41.6% of the patients had renal scar. Also, 38.6% in group three and 50% in the final group had VUR. A co-incidental finding that was observed in this study was the high incidence of pseudohypoaldesteronism (PHA in our patients: in 39.2% of the children in group one, 22.2% in group two and 4% in group three. In group four however, none of the patients had PHA. Risk of scar formation with urinary tract infection (UTI was higher in the younger age group and in those with recurrent UTIs.

  1. Exposure of zebra mussels to extracorporeal shock waves demonstrates formation of new mineralized tissue inside and outside the focus zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternecker, Katharina; Geist, Juergen; Beggel, Sebastian; Dietz-Laursonn, Kristin; de la Fuente, Matias; Frank, Hans-Georg; Furia, John P; Milz, Stefan; Schmitz, Christoph

    2018-04-03

    The success rate of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for fracture nonunions in human medicine (i.e., radiographic union at six months after ESWT) is only approximately 75%. Detailed knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms that induce bio-calcification after ESWT is limited. We analyzed the biological response within mineralized tissue of a new invertebrate model organism, the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha , after exposure with extracorporeal shock waves (ESWs). Mussels were exposed to ESWs with positive energy density of 0.4 mJ/mm 2 (A) or were sham exposed (B). Detection of newly calcified tissue was performed by exposing the mussels to fluorescent markers. Two weeks later, the A-mussels showed a higher mean fluorescence signal intensity within the shell zone than the B-mussels (pmussels was independent of the size and position of the focal point of the ESWs. These data demonstrate that induction of bio-calcification after ESWT may not be restricted to the region of direct energy transfer of ESWs into calcified tissue. The results of the present study are of relevance for better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that induce formation of new mineralized tissue after ESWT. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Indium-111 octreotide uptake in the surgical scar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degirmenci, B.; Bekis, R.; Durak, H.; Derebeck, E. [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Sen, M. [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1999-07-01

    Indium-111 octreotide uptake has been reported in various somatostatin receptor positive tumors, granulomas and autoimmune diseases in which activated leucocytes may play a role, subcutaneous cavernous hemangioma and angiofibroma. We present Indium-111 octreotide uptake in a surgical abdominal scar tissue 1.5 to 6 months after surgery in a patient who had been treated for recurrent carcinoid tumor in the rectosigmoid junction. Indium-111 octreotide uptake in a surgical scar may be related to the binding to somatostatin receptors in the activated lymphocytes and fibroblasts that is previously reported. (orig.) [German] In verschiedenen Somatostatinrezeptor-positiven Tumoren, Granulomen, bei Autoimmunerkrankungen, in denen aktivierte Leukozyten eine Rolle spielen, subcutanen kavernoesen Hammangiomen und Angiofibromen wurde ueber die Anreicherung von Indium-111-Oktreotid berichtet. Wir berichten ueber die Anreicherung von Indium-111-Oktreotid in einer chirurgischen Narbe ueber dem Abdomen nach 1,5 und 6 Monaten bei einem Patienten mit einem Rezidiv-Karzinoid im rektosigmoidalen Uebergang. Die Anreicherung von Indium-111-Oktreotid in chirurgischen Narbengewebe koennte in Zusammenhang stehen mit einer Bindung an Somatostationrezeptoren in aktivierten Lymphozyten und Fibroblasten, ueber die schon berichtet wurde. (orig.)

  3. Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rio, E.; Bardet, E.; Peuvrel, P.; Martinet, L.; Perrot, P.; Baraer, F.; Loirat, Y.; Sartre, J.Y.; Malard, O.; Ferron, C.; Dreno, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (L.D.R.) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medico surgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6 h). The median dose was 20 Gy (range, 15-40 Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6 cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5 cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6 cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6 cm (p = 0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Conclusion: Early perioperative L.D.R. brachytherapy delivering 20 Gy at 5 mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. (authors)

  4. MR imaging findings in cesarean scar pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangqun; Xu Yikai; Luo Xiaoqin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze MRI findings of cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP). Methods: The MR findings in 18 patients who were diagnosed as CSP by surgery from March 2010 to November 2011 were retrospectively analyzed, and comparison was made between the MRI findings and surgical results. Results: All Gestational sacs (18) were clearly detected by MRI. Among the 18 cases,gestational sac presented as cystic mass with smooth margin located within the scar of uterine wall at the lower anterior uterus in 16 cases. In 2 of the 16 cases, gestational sac was found within the myometrium, whereas in the remaining 14 cases, gestational sac was found partially within the myometrium with extension into the uterine cavity. The anterior wall of isthmus uteri became thinner. In the remaining 2 of the 18 cases, gestational sac presented as irregular, multilobolated mass, growing deep into the myometrium as well as into the uterine cavity. On T 2 WI, the mass showed heterogeneous signal intensity. A small amount of hemorrhage within the mass and uterine cavity could be seen on T 1 WI. An enhancing solid component with a heterogeneous mass could be seen. All gestational sacs in 18 cases were located at or adjacent to the previous cesarean scar. In the area of cesarean scar,the signal of the uterine wall was disconnected, with focal indentation or thinning and the previous cesarean scar exhibited hypointensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI. Conclusion: CSP has its unique findings on MRI, these specific features can provide useful information in the management of CSP. (authors)

  5. Proteomics of plasma membranes from poplar trees reveals tissue distribution of transporters, receptors, and proteins in cell wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Robert; Bernfur, Katja; Gustavsson, Niklas; Bygdell, Joakim; Wingsle, Gunnar; Larsson, Christer

    2010-02-01

    By exploiting the abundant tissues available from Populus trees, 3-4 m high, we have been able to isolate plasma membranes of high purity from leaves, xylem, and cambium/phloem at a time (4 weeks after bud break) when photosynthesis in the leaves and wood formation in the xylem should have reached a steady state. More than 40% of the 956 proteins identified were found in the plasma membranes of all three tissues and may be classified as "housekeeping" proteins, a typical example being P-type H(+)-ATPases. Among the 213 proteins predicted to be integral membrane proteins, transporters constitute the largest class (41%) followed by receptors (14%) and proteins involved in cell wall and carbohydrate metabolism (8%) and membrane trafficking (8%). ATP-binding cassette transporters (all members of subfamilies B, C, and G) and receptor-like kinases (four subfamilies) were two of the largest protein families found, and the members of these two families showed pronounced tissue distribution. Leaf plasma membranes were characterized by a very high proportion of transporters, constituting almost half of the integral proteins. Proteins involved in cell wall synthesis (such as cellulose and sucrose synthases) and membrane trafficking were most abundant in xylem plasma membranes in agreement with the role of the xylem in wood formation. Twenty-five integral proteins and 83 soluble proteins were exclusively found in xylem plasma membranes, which identifies new candidates associated with cell wall synthesis and wood formation. Among the proteins uniquely found in xylem plasma membranes were most of the enzymes involved in lignin biosynthesis, which suggests that they may exist as a complex linked to the plasma membrane.

  6. Evaluation of Bone Metastasis from Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using 18F FDG PET/CT and 99mTc HDP Bone Scintigraphy: Characteristics of Soft Tissue Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Youg Hyu; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mijin; Choi, Hye Jin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can present with soft tissue formation, resulting in oncologic emergency. Contrast enhanced FDG PET/CT and bone scintigraphy were compared to evaluate characteristics of bone metastases with of without soft tissue formation from HCC. of 4,151 patients with HCC, 263 patients had bone metastases. Eighty five patients with bone metastasis from HCC underwent contrast enhanced FDG PET/CT. Fifty four of the enrolled subjects had recent 99mT c HDP bone scintigraphy available for comparison. Metastatic bone lesions were identified with visual inspection on FDG PET/CT, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was used for the quantitative analysis. Confirmation of bone metastasis was based on histopathology, combined imaging modalities, or serial follow up studies. Forty seven patients (55%) presented with soft tissue formation, while the remaining 38 patients presented without soft tissue formation. Frequent sites of bone metastases from HCC were the spine (39%), pelvis (19%), and rib cage (14%). The soft tissue formation group had more frequent bone pain (77 vs. 37%, p<0.0001), higher SUVmax (6.02 vs. 3.52, p<0.007), and higher incidence of photon defect in bone scintigraphy (75 vs. 0%) compared to the non soft tissue formation group. FDG PET/CT had higher detection rate for bone metastasis than bone scintigraphy both in lesion based analysis (98 vs. 53%, p=0.0015) and in patient based analysis (100 vs. 80%, p<0.001). Bone metastasis from HCC showed a high incidence of soft tissue formation requiring emergency treatment. Although the characteristic findings for soft tissue formation such as photon defect in bone scintigraphy are helpful in detection, overall detectability of bone metastasis is higher in FDG PET/CT. Contrast enhanced PET/CT will be useful in finding and delineating soft tissue forming bone metastasis from HCC.

  7. The formation of human auricular cartilage from microtic tissue: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Mohamad Fikeri bin; See, Goh Bee; Hui, Chua Kien; Abdullah, Asma bt; Saim, Lokman bin; Saim, Aminuddin bin; Idrus, Ruszymah bt Haji

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to isolate, culture-expand and characterize the chondrocytes isolated from microtic cartilage and evaluate its potential as a cell source for ear cartilage reconstruction. Specific attention was to construct the auricular cartilage tissue by using fibrin as scaffold. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. After ear reconstructive surgery at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, chondrocytes were isolated from microtic cartilage. Chondrocytes isolated from the tissue were cultured expanded until passage 4 (P4). Upon confluency at P4, chondrocytes were harvested and tissue engineered constructs were made with human plasma polymerized to fibrin. Constructs formed later is implanted at the dorsal part of nude mice for 8 weeks, followed by post-implantation evaluation with histology staining (Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and Safranin O), immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR for chondrogenic associated genes expression level. Under gross assessment, the construct after 8 weeks of implantation showed similar physical characteristics that of cartilage. Histological staining showed abundant lacunae cells embedded in extracellular matrix similar to that of native cartilage. Safranin O staining showed positive staining which indicates the presence of proteoglycan-rich matrix. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the strong positive staining for collagen type II, the specific collagen type in the cartilage. Gene expression quantification showed no significant differences in the expression of chondrogenic gene used which is collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan core protein (ACP), elastin and sox9 genes when compared to construct formed from normal auricular tissue. Chondrocytes isolated from microtia cartilage has the potential to be used as an alternative cell source for external ear reconstruction in future clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  8. Erythropoietin promotes network formation of transplanted adipose tissue-derived microvascular fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Karschnia

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The seeding of tissue constructs with adipose tissue-derived microvascular fragments (ad-MVF is an emerging pre-vascularisation strategy. Ad-MVF rapidly reassemble into new microvascular networks after in vivo implantation. Herein it was analysed whether this process was improved by erythropoietin (EPO. Ad-MVF were isolated from green fluorescent protein (GFP+ as well as wild-type C57BL/6 mice and cultivated for 24 h in medium supplemented with EPO (20 IU/mL or vehicle. Freshly isolated, non-cultivated ad-MVF served as controls. Protein expression, cell viability and proliferation of ad-MVF were assessed by proteome profiler array and fluorescence microscopy. GFP+ ad-MVF were seeded on collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrices, which were implanted into dorsal skinfold chambers of C57BL/6 mice, to analyse their vascularisation over 14 d by intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology and immunohistochemistry. Cultivation up-regulated the expression of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors within both vehicle- and EPO-treated ad-MVF when compared with non-cultivated controls. Moreover, EPO treatment suppressed cultivation-associated apoptosis and significantly increased the number of proliferating endothelial cells in ad-MVF when compared with vehicle-treated and non-cultivated ad-MVF. Accordingly, implanted matrices seeded with EPO-treated ad-MVF exhibited an improved vascularisation, as indicated by a significantly higher functional microvessel density. The matrices of the three groups contained a comparably large fraction of GFP+ microvessels originating from the ad-MVF, whereas the tissue surrounding the matrices seeded with EPO-treated ad-MVF exhibited a significantly increased microvessel density when compared with the other two groups. These findings indicated that EPO represents a promising cytokine to further boost the excellent vascularisation properties of ad-MVF in tissue-engineering applications.

  9. Combination therapy in the management of atrophic acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrophic acne scars are difficult to treat. The demand for less invasive but highly effective treatment for scars is growing. Objective: To assess the efficacy of combination therapy using subcision, microneedling and 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA peel in the management of atrophic scars. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with atrophic acne scars were graded using Goodman and Baron Qualitative grading. After subcision, dermaroller and 15% TCA peel were performed alternatively at 2-weeks interval for a total of 6 sessions of each. Grading of acne scar photographs was done pretreatment and 1 month after last procedure. Patients own evaluation of improvement was assessed. Results: Out of 16 patients with Grade 4 scars, 10 (62.5% patients improved to Grade 2 and 6 (37.5% patients improved to Grade 3 scars. Out of 22 patients with Grade 3 scars, 5 (22.7% patients were left with no scars, 2 (9.1% patients improved to Grade 1and 15 (68.2% patients improved to Grade 2. All 11 (100% patients with Grade 2 scars were left with no scars. There was high level of patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This combination has shown good results in treating not only Grade 2 but also severe Grade 4 and 3 scars.

  10. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  11. Prevalence of scar contractures after burn : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, Anouk M; Mouton, Leonora J; Schouten, Hennie; Disseldorp, Laurien M; van der Schans, Cees P.; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K

    OBJECTIVE: Burn scar contractures are the pathological outcome of excessive scarring and ongoing scar contraction. Impairment of joint range of motion is a threat to performing activities in daily living. To direct treatment strategies to prevent and/or correct such contractures, insight into the

  12. Pulmonary scar carcinoma in South Africa | Jenkins | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-obstructive bronchiectasis and other changes secondary to cancer were considered not to represent scarring. Results. We identified 435 cases of primary lung cancer. In total, 95 patients (21.8%) had CT evidence of pulmonary scarring. Eighty-three of 85 patients (97.6%) had focal scarring in the same lobe as the ...

  13. Anterior abdominal Wall scar endometriosis: Case series and review of imaging modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işık Üstüner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of endometriosis to pelvic and abdominal scar tissue is a very rare occurrence. Most commonly observed after cesarean sections due to implantation of uterine endometrial stem cells to outside tissues. Patients are often asymptomatic but may present with cyclic pain and mass. Imaging diagnosis is possible when classical implantation site near the scar tissue, clinical history and imaging findings are combined. In ultrasound imaging the lesion is often solid, mildly hypoechoic and often isoechoic to surrounding muscle. Presence of bleeding and fluid may cause the lesion to appear more heterogeneous. On computed tomography imaging the most pronounced finding is avid contrast enhancement of the lesion whereas in magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity to blood products.

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 and decorin expression in old fracture fragments and surrounding tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X G; Wang, D K; Gao, F; Liu, R H; Bi, Z G

    2015-09-21

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) can promote fracture healing. Although the complex role BMP-2 in bone formation is increasingly understood, the role of endogenous BMP-2 in nonunion remains unclear. Decorin (DCN) can promote the formation of bone matrix and calcium deposition to control bone morphogenesis. In this study, tissue composition and expression of BMP-2 and DCN were detected in different parts of old fracture zones to explore inherent anti-fibrotic ability and osteogenesis. Twenty-three patients were selected, including eight cases of delayed union and 15 cases of nonunion. Average duration of delayed union or nonunion was 15 months. Fracture fragments and surrounding tissues, including bone grafts, marrow cavity contents, and sticking scars, were categorically sampled during surgery. Through observation and histological testing, component comparisons were made between fracture fragments and surrounding tissue. The expression levels of DCN and BMP-2 in different tissues were detected by immunohistochemical staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of DCN and BMP- 2 in different parts of the nonunion area showed that, compared with bone graft and marrow cavity contents, sticking scars had the highest expression of BMP-2. Compared with the marrow cavity contents and sticking scars, bone grafts had the highest expression of DCN. The low antifibrotic and osteogenic activity of the nonunion area was associated with non-co-expression of BMP-2 and DCN. Therefore, the co-injection of osteogenic factor BMP and DCN into the nonunion area can improve the induction of bone formation and enhance the conversion of the old scar, thereby achieving better nonunion treatment.

  15. Elevated plasma factor VIII enhances venous thrombus formation in rabbits: contribution of factor XI, von Willebrand factor and tissue factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Chihiro; Yamashita, Atsushi; Matsuura, Yunosuke; Iwakiri, Takashi; Okuyama, Nozomi; Matsuda, Shuntaro; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Inoue, Osamu; Harada, Aya; Kitazawa, Takehisa; Hattori, Kunihiro; Shima, Midori; Asada, Yujiro

    2013-07-01

    Elevated plasma levels of factor VIII (FVIII) are associated with increased risk of deep venous thrombosis. The aim of this study is to elucidate how elevated FVIII levels affect venous thrombus formation and propagation in vivo. We examined rabbit plasma FVIII activity, plasma thrombin generation, whole blood coagulation, platelet aggregation and venous wall thrombogenicity before and one hour after an intravenous infusion of recombinant human FVIII (rFVIII). Venous thrombus induced by the endothelial denudation of rabbit jugular veins was histologically assessed. Thrombus propagation was evaluated as indocyanine green fluorescence intensity. Argatroban, a thrombin inhibitor, and neutralised antibodies for tissue factor (TF), factor XI (FXI), and von Willebrand factor (VWF) were infused before or after thrombus induction to investigate their effects on venous thrombus formation or propagation. Recombinant FVIII (100 IU/kg) increased rabbit plasma FVIII activity two-fold and significantly enhanced whole blood coagulation and total plasma thrombin generation, but did not affect initial thrombin generation time, platelet aggregation and venous wall thrombogenicity. The rFVIII infusion also increased the size of venous thrombus 1 hour after thrombus induction. Argatroban and the antibodies for TF, FXI or VWF inhibited such enhanced thrombus formation and all except TF suppressed thrombus propagation. In conclusion, elevated plasma FVIII levels enhance venous thrombus formation and propagation. Excess thrombin generation by FXI and VWF-mediated FVIII recruitment appear to contribute to the growth of FVIII-driven venous thrombus.

  16. Pneumocystis-Driven Inducible Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Formation Requires Th2 and Th17 Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddens, Taylor; Elsegeiny, Waleed; Garcia-Hernadez, Maria de la Luz; Castillo, Patricia; Trevejo-Nunez, Giraldina; Serody, Katelin; Campfield, Brian T; Khader, Shabaana A; Chen, Kong; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Kolls, Jay K

    2017-03-28

    Inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) is an ectopic lymphoid structure composed of highly organized T cell and B cell zones that forms in the lung in response to infectious or inflammatory stimuli. Here, we develop a model for fungal-mediated iBALT formation, using infection with Pneumocystis that induces development of pulmonary lymphoid follicles. Pneumocystis-dependent iBALT structure formation and organization required CXCL13 signaling. Cxcl13 expression was regulated by interleukin (IL)-17 family members, as Il17ra -/- , Il17rb -/- , and Il17rc -/- mice failed to develop iBALT. Interestingly, Il17rb -/- mice have intact Th17 responses, but failed to generate an anti-Pneumocystis Th2 response. Given a role for Th2 and Th17 immunity in iBALT formation, we demonstrated that primary pulmonary fibroblasts synergistically upregulated Cxcl13 transcription following dual stimulation with IL-13 and IL-17A in a STAT3/GATA3-dependent manner. Together, these findings uncover a role for Th2/Th17 cells in regulating Cxcl13 expression and provide an experimental model for fungal-driven iBALT formation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypoxia enhances proliferation and tissue formation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayson, Warren L.; Zhao, Feng; Bunnell, Bruce; Ma, Teng

    2007-01-01

    Changes in oxygen concentrations affect many of the innate characteristics of stem and progenitor cells. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were maintained under hypoxic atmospheres (2% O 2 ) for up to seven in vitro passages. This resulted in approximately 30-fold higher hMSC expansion over 6 weeks without loss of multi-lineage differentiation capabilities. Under hypoxia, hMSCs maintained their growth-rates even after reaching confluence, resulting in the formation of multiple cell layers. Hypoxic hMSCs also displayed differences in the cell and nuclear morphologies as well as enhanced ECM formation and organization. These changes in cellular characteristics were accompanied by higher mRNA levels of Oct-4 and HIF-2α, as well as increased expression levels of connexin-43, a protein used in gap junction formation. The results from this study demonstrated that oxygen concentrations affected many aspects of stem-cell physiology, including growth and in vitro development, and may be a critical parameter during expansion and differentiation

  18. Mechanical Model of Geometric Cell and Topological Algorithm for Cell Dynamics from Single-Cell to Formation of Monolayered Tissues with Pattern

    KAUST Repository

    Kachalo, Sëma

    2015-05-14

    Geometric and mechanical properties of individual cells and interactions among neighboring cells are the basis of formation of tissue patterns. Understanding the complex interplay of cells is essential for gaining insight into embryogenesis, tissue development, and other emerging behavior. Here we describe a cell model and an efficient geometric algorithm for studying the dynamic process of tissue formation in 2D (e.g. epithelial tissues). Our approach improves upon previous methods by incorporating properties of individual cells as well as detailed description of the dynamic growth process, with all topological changes accounted for. Cell size, shape, and division plane orientation are modeled realistically. In addition, cell birth, cell growth, cell shrinkage, cell death, cell division, cell collision, and cell rearrangements are now fully accounted for. Different models of cell-cell interactions, such as lateral inhibition during the process of growth, can be studied in detail. Cellular pattern formation for monolayered tissues from arbitrary initial conditions, including that of a single cell, can also be studied in detail. Computational efficiency is achieved through the employment of a special data structure that ensures access to neighboring cells in constant time, without additional space requirement. We have successfully generated tissues consisting of more than 20,000 cells starting from 2 cells within 1 hour. We show that our model can be used to study embryogenesis, tissue fusion, and cell apoptosis. We give detailed study of the classical developmental process of bristle formation on the epidermis of D. melanogaster and the fundamental problem of homeostatic size control in epithelial tissues. Simulation results reveal significant roles of solubility of secreted factors in both the bristle formation and the homeostatic control of tissue size. Our method can be used to study broad problems in monolayered tissue formation. Our software is publicly

  19. Variations in lead isotopic abundances in Sprague-Dawley rat tissues: possible reason of formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duojian Liu

    Full Text Available It has been reported in previous research that the lead isotopic composition of blood, urine and feces samples statistically differed from the given lead sources in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. However, the reason for this phenomenon is still unclear. An animal experiment was performed to investigate the lead isotope fractionation in diverse biological samples (i.e., lungs, liver, kidneys, bone and to explore the possible reasons. SD rats were intratracheally instilled with lead acetate at the concentrations of 0, 0.02, 0.2, and 2 mg/kg body weight. Biological samples were collected for lead isotope analysis using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Significant differences are observed in lead isotope abundances among the diverse biological samples. The lead isotope abundances ((206Pb, (207Pb and (208Pb in diverse biological samples show different degrees and directions of departure from the given lead source. The results suggest that differences in enrichment or depletion capacity for each lead isotope in the various tissues might lead to the variation in lead isotopic abundances in tissues. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead level and the lead isotope abundances in liver and bone is observed. When the whole-blood level is higher than 50 ng/mL, the lead isotopic compositions of biological samples tend to be the same. Thus, the data support the speculation of a fractionation functional threshold.

  20. Primary chondrocytes enhance cartilage tissue formation upon co-culture with expanded chondrocytes, dermal fibroblasts, 3T3 feeder cells and embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.A.A.; Miclea, Razvan L.; Schotel, Roka; de Bruijn, Ewart; Moroni, Lorenzo; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Riesle, J.U.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    Co-culture models have been increasingly used in tissue engineering applications to understand cell–cell interactions and consequently improve regenerative medicine strategies. Aiming at further elucidating cartilage tissue formation, we co-cultured bovine primary chondrocytes (BPCs) with human

  1. Electron microscopic studies of the matrix formation of hard tissue organized cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Ching-Eng

    1982-01-01

    In order to study the functions of odontoblast, especially on the matrix formation, odontoblasts of rats' incisor and molar teeth were used. The animals were sacrificed 5 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours and 24 hours after 3 H-proline administration to obtain the specimen. The specimens were processed for electron microscopic autoradiography. The following results were obtained. 1. 5 minutes after 3 H-proline administration: Silver grains indicated 3 H-proline uptake were already noted within the cells and localized in the rough surfaced endoplasmic reticulum and surrounding ribosomes, partially within the karyoplasm. 2. 15 minutes after 3 H-proline administration: The number of silver grains were generally increased as compared with the findings obtained in 5 minutes. The localization moved to the Golgi apparatus and their surroundings. 3. 30 minutes after 3 H-proline administration: Silver grains obtained in Tome's fibers area and some in predentin. In this area granules derived from Golgi body were found. 4. 1 hour after 3 H-proline administration: The number of silver grains were generally decreased and more pronounced movement toward predentin, the marked movement of silver grains were obtained onto the collagen fibers and surroundings. 5. 2 hours after 3 H-proline administration: Silver grains moved to the calcified area and there collagen fibers became more remarkable. 6. 24 hours after 3 H-proline administration: No silver grains were founded in the odontoblast side but deposited in the predentin calcified area with stable condition. Based on the results of these observations, odontoblasts were shown to perform the function of synthesis, storage, transportation and control of collagen formation in addition to the role of matrix formation. (author)

  2. Effect of thumus cell injections on germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues of nude (thymusless) mice. [X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, E.B.; Caporale, L.H.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1974-09-01

    Nude mice, partially backcrossed to Balb/c or DBA/2, were injected iv with 5 x 10/sup 7/ thymus cells from the respective inbred strain. The response of these mice to immunization with Brucella abortus antigen was studied, with respect to both antibody production and the formation of germinal centers in their lymphoid tissues. The results were compared to those obtained with nude mice to which no thymus cells were given, as well as to Balb/c, DBA/2, or +/question litter mate controls. Nude mice formed less 19S as well as 7S antibody than did litter mate controls and completely lacked germinal centers in lymph nodes and gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Those nude mice which had been injected with thymus cells made a much better secondary response, both for 19S and for 7S antibody, and had active germinal centers in their lymph nodes as early as 3 wk after thymus cell injection. Intestinal lymphoid tissue in nude mice showed only slight reconstitution of germinal center activity several months after thymus cell injection and none at earlier times. Irradiated (3000 R) thymus cells appeared as effective as normal cells in facilitating germinal center appearance and 7S antibody production in the nude mice.

  3. Combination laser treatment for immediate post-surgical scars: a retrospective analysis of 33 immature scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongsoo; Kim, Wooram

    2017-07-01

    The application of laser treatments beginning on the day of stitch removal has been demonstrated to improve scar quality. However, there are few guidelines for the treatment of immature scars (ISs), which are defined as "scars whose features are not yet expressed." The purpose of this study was to extract information about early combination laser treatment (CLT) beyond what is currently known by analyzing 33 pairs of pre-treatment and post-treatment photographs of ISs. Two hundred fifty medical records of patients with scars were reviewed, and 33 scars were included in the study. The included scars were treated with vascular lasers (585 or 532 nm) followed by 1550-nm fractional lasers from May 2014 to July 2015 (fewer than 52 days after stitch removal, Fitzpatrick's skin types III-IV, mean age = 16.0 years). Blinded evaluators (one plastic surgeon and two dermatologists) evaluated the pre-treatment and post-treatment photographs. The pre-treatment photographs were scored on a spectrum from "0," when no difference with the surrounding unaffected skin was observed, to "100," when the worst scarring was present. The pre-treatment and post-treatment photographs were compared, and the results were graded on a spectrum from 0, when no difference between the pre-treatment and post-treatment photographs was observed, to 100, when no difference was observed between the post-treatment skin and the surrounding unaffected skin. Statistical analyses were performed with PASW 17.0, SPSS Korea, Seoul, Korea (p laser groups. Patient age and Wtd score were negatively correlated, and a significant difference was observed in the Wtd scores between the age groups (≥15 and lasers are equally effective for CLT of ISs.

  4. Current options for the treatment of pathological scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetschke, Julian; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-05-01

    Scarring is the consequence of surgery, trauma or different skin diseases. Apart from fresh, immature scars,that transform into mature scars over the course of would healing and that do not require further treatment,linear hypertrophic scars, widespread hypertrophic scars, keloids and atrophic scars exist. Symptoms like pruritusand pain, stigmatization as well as functional and aesthetic impairments that are very disturbing for the affected patients can bethe basis for the desire for treatment. Today, a multitude of options for the treatment and prevention of scars exists. Topical agents based on silicone or onion extract, intralesional injections of cristalline glucocorticoids (oftentimes in combinationwith cryotherapy) or 5-Fluorouracil as well as ablative and nonablative laser treatment are used. Current guidelines summarize the multitude of available treatment options and the currently available datafor the treating physicians, allowing them to make clear therapy recommendations for every single scar type. Relieving patients of their discomfort and doing their aesthetic demands justice is thus possible. Apart from scar prevention becoming more and more important, the increased use of modernlaser treatment options constitutes a key point in clinical scar treatment. At the same time the attention is turned to evaluating current therapeutic options with the help of contemporary study designs so as to graduallyimprove the level of evidence in scar treatment. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Hyaline cartilage formation and tumorigenesis of implanted tissues derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Taku; Yano, Fumiko; Mori, Daisuke; Kawata, Manabu; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Masaki, Hideki; Otsu, Makoto; Eto, Koji; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Chung, Ung-il; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising cell source for cartilage regenerative medicine. Meanwhile, the risk of tumorigenesis should be considered in the clinical application of human iPSCs (hiPSCs). Here, we report in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of hiPSCs and maturation of the differentiated hiPSCs through transplantation into mouse knee joints. Three hiPSC clones showed efficient chondrogenic differentiation using an established protocol for human embryonic stem cells. The differentiated hiPSCs formed hyaline cartilage tissues at 8 weeks after transplantation into the articular cartilage of NOD/SCID mouse knee joints. Although tumors were not observed during the 8 weeks after transplantation, an immature teratoma had developed in one mouse at 16 weeks. In conclusion, hiPSCs are a potent cell source for regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. However, the risk of tumorigenesis should be managed for clinical application in the future.

  6. Multifunctional surfaces with biomimetic nanofibres and drug-eluting micro-patterns for infection control and bone tissue formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XN Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available For long-term orthopaedic implants, the creation of a surface that is repulsive to bacteria while adhesive to tissue cells represents a promising strategy to control infection. To obtain such multifunctional surfaces, two possible approaches were explored to incorporate a model antibiotic, rifampicin (Rf, into the osteogenic polycaprolactone (PCL/chitosan (CHS biomimetic nanofibre meshes by (1 blending Rf into the electrospinning solutions and then electrospinning into nanofibres (i.e., Rf-incorporating fibres, or (2 depositing Rf-containing poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA micro-patterns onto the PCL/chitosan nanofibre meshes via ink-jet printing (i.e., Rf-eluting micro-pattern/fibre. Rapid release of Rf from both meshes was measured even though a relatively slower release rate was obtained from the Rf-eluting micro-pattern ones. Antibacterial assay with Staphylococcus epidermidis showed that both mesh surfaces could effectively kill bacteria and prevent biofilm formation. However, only Rf-eluting micro-pattern meshes favoured the attachment, spreading and metabolic activity of preosteoblasts in the cell culture study. Furthermore, the Rf-eluting micro-pattern meshes could better support the osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblasts by up-regulating the gene expression of bone markers (type I collagen and alkaline phosphatase. Clearly, compared to Rf-incorporating nanofibre meshes, Rf-eluting micro-patterns could effectively prevent biofilm formation without sacrificing the osteogenic properties of PCL/chitosan nanofibre surfaces. This finding provides an innovative avenue to design multifunctional surfaces for enhancing bone tissue formation while controlling infection.

  7. Treatment of facial atrophic scars with Esthélis, a hyaluronic acid filler with polydense cohesive matrix (CPM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Ariel; Romero, William A

    2010-12-01

    The treatment of atrophic scars is difficult and dermal filler materials provide a simple alternative with immediate results. Esthélis® is an injectable non-animal crosslinked hyaluronic acid of Swiss origin characterized by a polydense cohesive matrix (CPM®) which produces a gel of uniform consistency with better biointegration to the tissues and a longer duration. To evaluate Esthélis in the treatment of atrophic scars. Twelve patients aged 18-56 years with facial atrophic scars caused by acne vulgaris, dog bite, piercing, basal cell carcinoma and leishmaniasis were treated with Esthélis. The injection technique was linear threading, serial puncture or a combination of both. Clinical efficacy was assessed independently by the authors and by patients immediately, one week and one month after the injection. Adverse events were registered. Authors described the results as moderate (27%), good (57%) and excellent (17%), immediately, one week and one month after the injection. Patients evaluated the cosmetic improvement as good (42%) or excellent (58%) one month after the treatment. Pain during the injection was described as slight or moderate. Only mild erythema was observed immediately after injection, which spontaneously resolved within few hours. Esthélis showed good or excellent results in most patients with atrophic scars, and these were perceived as even better when patients evaluated the cosmetic improvement. The best results were observed in patients with more deforming scars such as surgical scars or trauma.

  8. Comparative study of the efficacy of Platelet-rich plasma combined with carboxytherapy vs its use with fractional carbon dioxide laser in atrophic acne scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Taweel, Abdul-Aziz Ibrahim; Al Refae, Abdul-Aziz Abdul-Salam; Hamed, Ahmed Mohamed; Kamal, Asmaa Mostafa

    2018-04-22

    Acne scars are a major concerning problem to all acne patients affecting their quality of life. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and fractional CO 2 laser are innovative treatment modalities for acne scars. Carboxytherapy can also be used to improve scar tissue through the increase in collagen deposition and reorganization, and the improvement in skin texture and tone. The aim of this work was to compare the efficacy, safety, and complications of the intradermal injection of PRP combined with carboxytherapy and PRP combined with fractional CO 2 laser, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Forty patients with atrophic acne scars were divided into 2 groups. Group A included 20 patients and was subjected to three fractional CO 2 laser sessions combined with PRP injection. Group B included 20 patients and was subjected to three sessions of carboxytherapy combined with PRP injection. Both fractional CO 2 laser and carboxytherapy combined with PRP showed improvement in acne scars and patients' satisfaction but the improvement with fractional CO 2 laser was significantly better than carboxytherapy but with more side effects. Improvement of acne scars was noted in both treatment modalities with obvious higher and statistically significant results in favor of fractional CO 2 laser but with more side effects. Carboxytherapy is a promising tool in treatment of acne scars with less complication. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Bioprinting by laser-induced forward transfer for tissue engineering applications: jet formation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezel, C; Hallo, L [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, UMR 5107 Universite Bordeaux 1-CNRS-CEA, 33405 Talence, Cedex (France); Souquet, A; Guillemot, F, E-mail: mezel@celia.u-bordeaux1.f [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Universite Bordeaux 2 - UMR 577, 146 Rue Leo Saignat, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex (France)

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, a nanosecond LIFT process is analyzed both from experimental and modeling points of view. Experimental results are first presented and compared to simple estimates obtained from physical analysis, i.e. energy balance, jump relations and analytical pocket dynamics. Then a self-consistent 2D axisymmetric modeling strategy is presented. It is shown that data accessible from experiments, i.e. jet diameter and velocity, can be reproduced. Moreover, some specific mechanisms involved in the rear-surface deformation and jet formation may be described by some scales of hydrodynamic process, i.e. shock waves propagation and expansion waves, as a consequence of the laser heating. It shows that the LIFT process is essentially driven by hydrodynamics and thermal transfer, and that a coupled approach including self-consistent laser energy deposition, heating by thermal conduction and specific models for matter is required.

  10. Bioprinting by laser-induced forward transfer for tissue engineering applications: jet formation modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezel, C; Hallo, L; Souquet, A; Guillemot, F

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a nanosecond LIFT process is analyzed both from experimental and modeling points of view. Experimental results are first presented and compared to simple estimates obtained from physical analysis, i.e. energy balance, jump relations and analytical pocket dynamics. Then a self-consistent 2D axisymmetric modeling strategy is presented. It is shown that data accessible from experiments, i.e. jet diameter and velocity, can be reproduced. Moreover, some specific mechanisms involved in the rear-surface deformation and jet formation may be described by some scales of hydrodynamic process, i.e. shock waves propagation and expansion waves, as a consequence of the laser heating. It shows that the LIFT process is essentially driven by hydrodynamics and thermal transfer, and that a coupled approach including self-consistent laser energy deposition, heating by thermal conduction and specific models for matter is required.

  11. Bioprinting by laser-induced forward transfer for tissue engineering applications: jet formation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mézel, C; Souquet, A; Hallo, L; Guillemot, F

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, a nanosecond LIFT process is analyzed both from experimental and modeling points of view. Experimental results are first presented and compared to simple estimates obtained from physical analysis, i.e. energy balance, jump relations and analytical pocket dynamics. Then a self-consistent 2D axisymmetric modeling strategy is presented. It is shown that data accessible from experiments, i.e. jet diameter and velocity, can be reproduced. Moreover, some specific mechanisms involved in the rear-surface deformation and jet formation may be described by some scales of hydrodynamic process, i.e. shock waves propagation and expansion waves, as a consequence of the laser heating. It shows that the LIFT process is essentially driven by hydrodynamics and thermal transfer, and that a coupled approach including self-consistent laser energy deposition, heating by thermal conduction and specific models for matter is required.

  12. Bisphosphonate-adsorbed ceramic nanoparticles increase bone formation in an injectable carrier for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegan L Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB is a sugar-based carrier. We have previously applied SAIB as a minimally invasive system for the co-delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2 and found synergy when co-delivering zoledronic acid (ZA and hydroxyapatite (HA nanoparticles. Alternative bioceramics were investigated in a murine SAIB/rhBMP-2 injection model. Neither beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP nor Bioglass (BG 45S5 had a significant effect on bone volume (BV alone or in combination with the ZA. 14C-labelled ZA binding assays showed particle size and ceramic composition affected binding with nano-HA > micro-HA > TCP > BG. Micro-HA and nano-HA increased BV in a rat model of rhBMP-2/SAIB injection (+278% and +337%, and BV was further increased with ZA–adsorbed micro-HA and nano-HA (+530% and +889%. These data support the use of ZA–adsorbed nanoparticle-sized HA as an optimal additive for the SAIB/rhBMP-2 injectable system for bone tissue engineering.

  13. Long-term effects of ionizing radiation on the rat spinal cord: intramedullary connective tissue formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, S.A.

    1973-01-01

    Light microscopy was used to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on spinal cords of rats irradiated when three days of age and killed at intervals up to 28 months after irradiation. The amounts of x-rays administered (2,000 R; 1,000 R; 500 R) were those which had been demonstrated by short-term studies to cause either no histopathologic changes or only transient, reparable alterations. The most significant and previously unreported finding was the development, usually restricted to the gray matter, of elongated, spindle-shaped cells that produce prodigious amounts of fibers clearly demonstrated by the Wilder's reticular stain. In cases where extensive cellular development had occurred, these cells were oriented around the perikarya of the large ventral motor neurons and formed a well-developed capsule of reticular fibers. This phenomenon occurred more frequently in rats receiving the greater amounts of radiation and killed 12 months or more after exposure. The other observation of interest was the development of lesser amounts of connective tissue-producing cells in the dorsal gray matter, where these cells were seen initially in the substantia gelatinosa. The significance of these changes is discussed in relation to previously reported long-term effects of ionizing radiation on the central nervous system

  14. Mathematical modelling of tissue formation on the basis of ordinary differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim N. Nazarov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is proposed for describing the population dynamics of cellular clusters on the basis of systems of the first-order ordinary differential equations. The main requirement for the construction of model equations was to obtain a formal biological justification for their derivation, as well as proof of their correctness. In addition, for all the parameters involved in the model equations, the presence of biological meaning was guaranteed, as well as the possibility of evaluating them either during the experiment or by using models of intracellular biochemistry. In the desired model the intercellular exchange of a special signal molecules was chosen as the main mechanism for coordination of the tissue growth and new types selection during cell division. For simplicity, all signalling molecules that can create cells of the same type were not considered separately in the model, but were instead combined in a single complex of molecules: a ‘generalized signal’. Such an approach allows us to eventually assign signals as a functions of cell types and introduce their effects in the form of matrices in the models, where the rows are responsible for the types of cells receiving the signals, and the columns for the types of cells emitting signals.

  15. Biobankonomics: developing a sustainable business model approach for the formation of a human tissue biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Jimmie; Rogers, Joyce; Carolin, Todd; Compton, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The preservation of high-quality biospecimens and associated data for research purposes is being performed in variety of academic, government, and industrial settings. Often these are multimillion dollar operations, yet despite these sizable investments, the economics of biobanking initiatives is not well understood. Fundamental business principles must be applied to the development and operation of such resources to ensure their long-term sustainability and maximize their impact. The true costs of developing and maintaining operations, which may have a variety of funding sources, must be better understood. Among the issues that must be considered when building a biobank economic model are: understanding the market need for the particular type of biobank under consideration and understanding and efficiently managing the biobank's "value chain," which includes costs for case collection, tissue processing, storage management, sample distribution, and infrastructure and administration. By using these value chain factors, a Total Life Cycle Cost of Ownership (TLCO) model may be developed to estimate all costs arising from owning, operating, and maintaining a large centralized biobank. The TLCO approach allows for a better delineation of a biobank's variable and fixed costs, data that will be needed to implement any cost recovery program. This article represents an overview of the efforts made recently by the National Cancer Institute's Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research as part of its effort to develop an appropriate cost model and cost recovery program for the cancer HUman Biobank (caHUB) initiative. All of these economic factors are discussed in terms of maximizing caHUB's potential for long-term sustainability but have broad applicability to the wide range of biobanking initiatives that currently exist.

  16. The Efficacy of a Silicone Sheet in Postoperative Scar Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Sam; Hong, Joon Pio; Choi, Jong Woo; Seo, Dong Kyo; Lee, Eun Sook; Lee, Ho Seong

    2016-09-01

    Silicone gel sheeting has been introduced to prevent scarring, but objective evidence for its usefulness in scar healing is limited. Therefore, the authors' objective was to examine the effectiveness of silicone gel sheeting by randomly applying it to only unilateral scars from a bilateral hallux valgus surgery with symmetrical closure. In a prospective randomized, blinded, intraindividual comparison study, the silicone gel sheeting was applied to 1 foot of a hallux valgus incision scar (an experiment group) for 12 weeks upon removal of the stitches, whereas the symmetrical scar from the other foot was left untreated (a control group). The scars were evaluated at 4 and 12 weeks after the silicon sheet application. The Vancouver Scar Scale was used to measure the vascularity, pigmentation, pliability, height, and length of the scars. Adverse effects were also evaluated, and they included pain, itchiness, rash, erythema, and skin softening. At weeks 4 and 12, the experiment group scored significantly better on the Vancouver Scar Scale in all items, except length (P sheet does not cause adverse effects (P sheet application did show a significant improvement in prevention of postoperative scarring.

  17. Sonographic evaluation of surgical repair of uterine cesarean scar defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorski, Michal; Fuchs, Tomasz; Rosner-Tenerowicz, Anna; Zimmer, Mariusz

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the clinical outcomes of surgical repair of uterine cesarean scar defects with sonography (US). Seven nonpregnant women with history of cesarean section and a large uterine scar defect were enrolled. The surgical repair was performed by minilaparotomy. The US assessment of the uterine scar was performed using a standardized approach at baseline, then at a first visit 2-3 days following the surgical intervention (V1) and at a follow-up visit 3 months later (V2). Residual myometrial thickness (RMT), width, and depth of the scar defect were measured. The mean RMT increased significantly from 1.9 mm at baseline to 8.8 mm at V1 and 8.0 mm at V2. No intraoperative complications were observed. Postmenstrual spotting and abdominal pain reported preoperatively resolved after the operation. A surgical repair procedure for an incompletely healed uterine cesarean scar is effective in increasing RMT thickness, decreasing the depth of the scar, and reducing symptoms related to the cesarean section scar defect. Further studies on post-repair pregnancy outcomes are required to evaluate whether the procedure affects the rate of cesarean scar pregnancy, morbidly adherent placenta, and/or uterine scar dehiscence and rupture. The repair of a cesarean scar defect is recommended only for symptomatic women. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 45:455-460, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Scar formation in mice deafened with kanamycin and furosemide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zak, Magdalena; van der Linden, Cynthia A; Bezdjian, Aren; Hendriksen, Ferry G; Klis, Sjaak F L; Grolman, Wilko

    In mammals, hair cell loss is irreversible and leads to hearing loss. To develop and test the functioning of different strategies aiming at hair cell regeneration, animal models of sensorineural hearing loss are essential. Although cochleae of these animals should lack hair cells, supporting cells

  19. [Pannus Formation Six-years after Aortic and Mitral Valve Replacement with Tissue Valves;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Muraoka, Arata; Aizawa, Kei; Akutsu, Hirohiko; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-07-01

    A 77-year-old man presented with exertional dyspnea. He had undergone aortic and mitral valve replacement with tissue valves 6-years earlier. The patient's hemoglobin level was 9.8 g/dl and serum aspartate aminotransferase (70 mU/ml) and lactate dehydrogenase (1,112 mU/ml) were elevated. Echocardiography revealed stenosis of the prosthetic valve in the aortic position with peak flow velocity of 3.8 m/second and massive mitral regurgitation. The patient underwent repeat valve replacement. Pannus formation around both implanted valves was observed. The aortic valve orifice was narrowed by the pannus, and one cusp of the prosthesis in the mitral position was fixed and caused the regurgitation, but they were free from cusp laceration or calcification. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and he continues to do well 14 months after surgery.

  20. Mineralized soft-tissue structure and chemistry in a mummified hadrosaur from the Hell Creek Formation, North Dakota (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Phillip L; Morris, Peter M; McMahon, Adam; Jones, Emrys; Gize, Andy; Macquaker, Joe H S; Wolff, George; Thompson, Anu; Marshall, Jim; Taylor, Kevin G; Lyson, Tyler; Gaskell, Simon; Reamtong, Onrapak; Sellers, William I; van Dongen, Bart E; Buckley, Mike; Wogelius, Roy A

    2009-10-07

    An extremely well-preserved dinosaur (Cf. Edmontosaurus sp.) found in the Hell Creek Formation (Upper Cretaceous, North Dakota) retains soft-tissue replacement structures and associated organic compounds. Mineral cements precipitated in the skin apparently follow original cell boundaries, partially preserving epidermis microstructure. Infrared and electron microprobe images of ossified tendon clearly show preserved mineral zonation, with silica and trapped carbon dioxide forming thin linings on Haversian canals within apatite. Furthermore, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of materials recovered from the skin and terminal ungual phalanx suggests the presence of compounds containing amide groups. Amino acid composition analyses of the mineralized skin envelope clearly differ from the surrounding matrix; however, intact proteins could not be obtained using protein mass spectrometry. The presence of endogenously derived organics from the skin was further demonstrated by pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GCMS), indicating survival and presence of macromolecules that were in part aliphatic (see the electronic supplementary material).

  1. Inhibition effects of a negative electret 5-FU patch on the growth of a hypertrophic scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, YUAN; Lili, XU; Ping, HUANG; Xiaoqiang, AN; Lili, CUI; Jian, JIANG

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the hypertrophic scar (HS) model in rats was established. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) patch, ‑1000 V and ‑2000 V polypropylene (PP) electret 5-FU patches were prepared and applied onto the wound. The in vitro permeation experiment was performed using the Franz diffusion cell system to determine the permeation cumulative amount and retention amount of 5-FU through/in scar skin. The inhibition effect of negative electret on growth of HS was studied by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, Masson staining and the immunohistologicall methods. The permeation study indicated that a negative electret could enhance the permeation and retention of 5-FU through and in scar skin respectively. HE staining and Masson staining indicated a better effect for ‑1000 V and ‑2000 V electret 5-FU patches on HS inhibition after 28 d post-wounding compared with 5-FU patch. The immunohistological study showed much more reduced expressions of collegan type I, collegan type III, TGF-β1 and HSP47 in scar tissue after application of negative electret 5-FU patches than those of 5-FU patch. A negative electret 5-FU patch may be advantageous for HS treatment.

  2. Tissue-engineered bone formation using human bone marrow stromal cells and novel β-tricalcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangpeng; Zhao Li; Cui Lei; Liu Wei; Cao Yilin

    2007-01-01

    In this study we investigated not only the cellular proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) on the novel β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds in vitro but also bone formation by ectopic implantation in athymic mice in vivo. The interconnected porous β-TCP scaffolds with pores of 300-500 μm in size were prepared by the polymeric sponge method. β-TCP scaffolds with the dimension of 3 mm x 3 mm x 3 mm were combined with hBMSCs, and incubated with (+) or without (-) osteogenic medium in vitro. Cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation on the scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OCN) content measurement. SEM observation showed that hBMSCs attached well on the scaffolds and proliferated rapidly. No significant difference in the MTT assay could be detected between the two groups, but the ALP activity and OCN content of scaffolds (+) were much higher than those of the scaffolds (-) (p < 0.05). These results indicated that the novel porous β-TCP scaffolds can support the proliferation and subsequent osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro. After being cultured in vitro for 14 days, the scaffolds (+) and (-) were implanted into subcutaneous sites of athymic mice. In β-TCP scaffolds (+), woven bone formed after 4 weeks of implantation and osteogenesis progressed with time. Furthermore, tissue-engineered bone could be found at 8 weeks, and remodeled lamellar bone was also observed at 12 weeks. However, no bone formation could be found in β-TCP scaffolds (-) at each time point checked. The above findings illustrate that the novel porous β-TCP scaffolds developed in this work have prominent osteoconductive activity and the potential for applications in bone tissue engineering

  3. Tissue-engineered bone formation using human bone marrow stromal cells and novel {beta}-tricalcium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Guangpeng [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Zhao Li [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Cui Lei [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Liu Wei [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Cao Yilin [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China)

    2007-06-01

    In this study we investigated not only the cellular proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) on the novel {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) scaffolds in vitro but also bone formation by ectopic implantation in athymic mice in vivo. The interconnected porous {beta}-TCP scaffolds with pores of 300-500 {mu}m in size were prepared by the polymeric sponge method. {beta}-TCP scaffolds with the dimension of 3 mm x 3 mm x 3 mm were combined with hBMSCs, and incubated with (+) or without (-) osteogenic medium in vitro. Cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation on the scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OCN) content measurement. SEM observation showed that hBMSCs attached well on the scaffolds and proliferated rapidly. No significant difference in the MTT assay could be detected between the two groups, but the ALP activity and OCN content of scaffolds (+) were much higher than those of the scaffolds (-) (p < 0.05). These results indicated that the novel porous {beta}-TCP scaffolds can support the proliferation and subsequent osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro. After being cultured in vitro for 14 days, the scaffolds (+) and (-) were implanted into subcutaneous sites of athymic mice. In {beta}-TCP scaffolds (+), woven bone formed after 4 weeks of implantation and osteogenesis progressed with time. Furthermore, tissue-engineered bone could be found at 8 weeks, and remodeled lamellar bone was also observed at 12 weeks. However, no bone formation could be found in {beta}-TCP scaffolds (-) at each time point checked. The above findings illustrate that the novel porous {beta}-TCP scaffolds developed in this work have prominent osteoconductive activity and the potential for applications in bone tissue engineering.

  4. AAV vector encoding human VEGF165–transduced pectineus muscular flaps increase the formation of new tissue through induction of angiogenesis in an in vivo chamber for tissue engineering: A technique to enhance tissue and vessels in microsurgically engineered tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Moimas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In regenerative medicine, new approaches are required for the creation of tissue substitutes, and the interplay between different research areas, such as tissue engineering, microsurgery and gene therapy, is mandatory. In this article, we report a modification of a published model of tissue engineering, based on an arterio-venous loop enveloped in a cross-linked collagen–glycosaminoglycan template, which acts as an isolated chamber for angiogenesis and new tissue formation. In order to foster tissue formation within the chamber, which entails on the development of new vessels, we wondered whether we might combine tissue engineering with a gene therapy approach. Based on the well-described tropism of adeno-associated viral vectors for post-mitotic tissues, a muscular flap was harvested from the pectineus muscle, inserted into the chamber and transduced by either AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 or AAV vector expressing the reporter gene β-galactosidase, as a control. Histological analysis of the specimens showed that muscle transduction by AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 resulted in enhanced tissue formation, with a significant increase in the number of arterioles within the chamber in comparison with the previously published model. Pectineus muscular flap, transduced by adeno-associated viral vectors, acted as a source of the proangiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor, thus inducing a consistent enhancement of vessel growth into the newly formed tissue within the chamber. In conclusion, our present findings combine three different research fields such as microsurgery, tissue engineering and gene therapy, suggesting and showing the feasibility of a mixed approach for regenerative medicine.

  5. [Experimental study on preventing postoperative posterior urethra scar in response to Tablet Fu Kang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jiacong; Wang, Shengyi

    2004-07-01

    To find an effective measurement to prevent and decrease the posterior urethral scar stricture. Twenty New Zealand rabbits were chosen. All the rabbits were made posterior urethra disruption model, and at the same time, the urethra anastomosis operation was performed. Twenty rabbits were divided into two groups after operation at random. One group was treated by Tablet Fu Kang (experimental group), another group was treated by NS (control group). All the rabbits were killed three weeks later, the urethra anastomotic stoma tissue was chosen and stained with Masson. All the figures of slides were inputted into figure analytic system. There were little collagenous fiber, sparsely and arranged in good order in scar tissue of urethra anastomotic stoma in experimental group. The area of collagenous fibers was 117.11 +/- 10.17 microm2 in three visual fields. There were many collagenous fibers, densely,and arranged in disorder in scar tissue of urethra anastomotic stoma in control group, the relative area was 136.43 +/- 15.85 microm2. There was statistic significance when comparing the area of collagenous fiber in two groups (P urethra.

  6. A 1-Year Follow-Up of Post-operative Scars After the Use of a 1210-nm Laser-Assisted Skin Healing (LASH) Technology: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, D; Alliez, A; Baptista, C; Gonelli, D; Lemdjadi, Z; Bohbot, S

    2017-08-01

    Laser therapies are used prophylactically for excessive scar formation. The Laser-Assisted Skin Healing treatment induces a controlled heat stress that promotes tissue regeneration. This comparative trial is the first to evaluate the performance of a new automated 1210-nm laser system, compatible with all Fitzpatrick scale phototypes. Forty women undergoing bilateral breast reduction were enrolled in this double-blinded randomized controlled trial. The horizontal sutured incision of one breast was treated with the portable 1210-nm laser while in the operating theatre. The other breast was used as the study control. Objective measurements, subjective clinical assessments and safety evaluation were carried out over 1 year by both clinicians and patients. Six weeks following surgery, better overall appearance and modified OSAS scores were reported for the laser-treated scars when compared to the control group (p = 0.024 and p = 0.079). This supports an early effect of the laser treatment during the inflammatory stage of the healing process. After a post-treatment period of 6 months, there continued to be a strong tendency in favour of the laser treatment based on the subjective scores and corroborated by the objective improvement of the treated scar volume (p = 0.038). At 1 year, the laser-treated scars continued to improve compared to the control ones in terms of volume (p = 0.004), surface (p = 0.017) and roughness (p = 0.002), and these comparatively better results were strengthened with the blind expression of patients' preference for their laser-treated scar (p = 0.025). This new 1210-nm laser treatment, used as a single session performed immediately after surgery, provides significant objective and subjective improvements in scar appearance. These data can be useful when preparing patients to undergo their surgical procedure. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence

  7. Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy: Laparoscopic Resection and Total Scar Dehiscence Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Sara; Gabriele, Victor; Faller, Emilie; Langer, Bruno; Wattiez, Arnaud; Lecointre, Lise; Akladios, Cherif

    2018-02-01

    To illustrate a laparoscopic technique for the resection of cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy, associated with isthmocele repair. Case report (Canadian Task Force classification III). A tertiary referral center in Strasbourg, France. Cesarean scar pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy. The major risk of this type of pregnancy is the early uterine rupture with massive, sometimes life-threatening, bleeding. Thus, active management of these pregnancies starting immediately after diagnosis is crucial. Therapeutic options can be medical, surgical, or a combination. Numerous case reports or case series can be found in the literature, but there are few clinical studies, which are difficult to conduct because of case rarity and inconclusiveness. A 2016 meta-analysis that included 194 articles published between 1978 and 2014 (126 case reports, 45 cases series, and 23 clinical studies) concluded that hysteroscopy or laparoscopic hysterotomy seems to be the best first-line approach to treating cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy, with uterine artery embolization reserved for significant bleeding and/or a high suspicion index for arteriovenous malformation [1]. There is no consensus on the treatment of reference, however. The case involves a 38-year-old primiparous women who underwent a cesarean section delivery in 2010 and who was diagnosed by ultrasound scan at 7 weeks gestation with cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy, which was confirmed by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. The patient initially received medical treatment with 2 intramuscular injections of methotrexate and one local intragestational injection of KCl. Her initial human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) level was 82 000 IU/L. Rigorous weekly biological and ultrasound monitoring revealed an involution of the ectopic pregnancy associated with decreasing hCG. No bleeding or infectious complications occurred during this period. After 10 weeks of monitoring, her hCG had stabilized at 300 IU/L, and a residual image

  8. Fetal brain extracellular matrix boosts neuronal network formation in 3D bioengineered model of cortical brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Disha; Chwalek, Karolina; Stuntz, Emily; Pouli, Dimitra; Du, Chuang; Tang-Schomer, Min; Georgakoudi, Irene; Black, Lauren D; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting up to 20% of the organ volume is a significant component of the brain due to its instructive role in the compartmentalization of functional microdomains in every brain structure. The composition, quantity and structure of ECM changes dramatically during the development of an organism greatly contributing to the remarkably sophisticated architecture and function of the brain. Since fetal brain is highly plastic, we hypothesize that the fetal brain ECM may contain cues promoting neural growth and differentiation, highly desired in regenerative medicine. Thus, we studied the effect of brain-derived fetal and adult ECM complemented with matricellular proteins on cortical neurons using in vitro 3D bioengineered model of cortical brain tissue. The tested parameters included neuronal network density, cell viability, calcium signaling and electrophysiology. Both, adult and fetal brain ECM as well as matricellular proteins significantly improved neural network formation as compared to single component, collagen I matrix. Additionally, the brain ECM improved cell viability and lowered glutamate release. The fetal brain ECM induced superior neural network formation, calcium signaling and spontaneous spiking activity over adult brain ECM. This study highlights the difference in the neuroinductive properties of fetal and adult brain ECM and suggests that delineating the basis for this divergence may have implications for regenerative medicine.

  9. Statins improve the resolution of established murine venous thrombosis: reductions in thrombus burden and vein wall scarring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase W Kessinger

    Full Text Available Despite anticoagulation therapy, up to one-half of patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT will develop the post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS. Improving the long-term outcome of DVT patients at risk for PTS will therefore require new approaches. Here we investigate the effects of statins--lipid-lowering agents with anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties--in decreasing thrombus burden and decreasing vein wall injury, mediators of PTS, in established murine stasis and non-stasis chemical-induced venous thrombosis (N = 282 mice. Treatment of mice with daily atorvastatin or rosuvastatin significantly reduced stasis venous thrombus burden by 25% without affecting lipid levels, blood coagulation parameters, or blood cell counts. Statin-driven reductions in VT burden (thrombus mass for stasis thrombi, intravital microscopy thrombus area for non-stasis thrombi compared similarly to the therapeutic anticoagulant effects of low molecular weight heparin. Blood from statin-treated mice showed significant reductions in platelet aggregation and clot stability. Statins additionally reduced thrombus plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, tissue factor, neutrophils, myeloperoxidase, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, and macrophages, and these effects were most notable in the earlier timepoints after DVT formation. In addition, statins reduced DVT-induced vein wall scarring by 50% durably up to day 21 in stasis VT, as shown by polarized light microscopy of picrosirius red-stained vein wall collagen. The overall results demonstrate that statins improve VT resolution via profibrinolytic, anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and anti-vein wall scarring effects. Statins may therefore offer a new pharmacotherapeutic approach to improve DVT resolution and to reduce the post-thrombotic syndrome, particularly in subjects who are ineligible for anticoagulation therapy.

  10. Statins improve the resolution of established murine venous thrombosis: reductions in thrombus burden and vein wall scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessinger, Chase W; Kim, Jin Won; Henke, Peter K; Thompson, Brian; McCarthy, Jason R; Hara, Tetsuya; Sillesen, Martin; Margey, Ronan J P; Libby, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Lin, Charles P; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2015-01-01

    Despite anticoagulation therapy, up to one-half of patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) will develop the post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Improving the long-term outcome of DVT patients at risk for PTS will therefore require new approaches. Here we investigate the effects of statins--lipid-lowering agents with anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties--in decreasing thrombus burden and decreasing vein wall injury, mediators of PTS, in established murine stasis and non-stasis chemical-induced venous thrombosis (N = 282 mice). Treatment of mice with daily atorvastatin or rosuvastatin significantly reduced stasis venous thrombus burden by 25% without affecting lipid levels, blood coagulation parameters, or blood cell counts. Statin-driven reductions in VT burden (thrombus mass for stasis thrombi, intravital microscopy thrombus area for non-stasis thrombi) compared similarly to the therapeutic anticoagulant effects of low molecular weight heparin. Blood from statin-treated mice showed significant reductions in platelet aggregation and clot stability. Statins additionally reduced thrombus plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), tissue factor, neutrophils, myeloperoxidase, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and macrophages, and these effects were most notable in the earlier timepoints after DVT formation. In addition, statins reduced DVT-induced vein wall scarring by 50% durably up to day 21 in stasis VT, as shown by polarized light microscopy of picrosirius red-stained vein wall collagen. The overall results demonstrate that statins improve VT resolution via profibrinolytic, anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and anti-vein wall scarring effects. Statins may therefore offer a new pharmacotherapeutic approach to improve DVT resolution and to reduce the post-thrombotic syndrome, particularly in subjects who are ineligible for anticoagulation therapy.

  11. Cesarean scar pregnancy and early placenta accreta share common histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timor-Tritsch, I E; Monteagudo, A; Cali, G; Palacios-Jaraquemada, J M; Maymon, R; Arslan, A A; Patil, N; Popiolek, D; Mittal, K R

    2014-04-01

    To determine, by evaluation of histological slides, images and descriptions of early (second-trimester) placenta accreta (EPA) and placental implantation in cases of Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP), whether these are pathologically indistinguishable and whether they both represent different stages in the disease continuum leading to morbidly adherent placenta in the third trimester. The database of a previously published review of CSP and EPA was used to identify articles with histopathological descriptions and electronic images for pathological review. When possible, microscopic slides and/or paraffin blocks were obtained from the original researchers. We also included from our own institutions cases of CSP and EPA for which pathology specimens were available. Two pathologists examined all the material independently and, blinded to each other's findings, provided a pathological diagnosis based on microscopic appearance. Interobserver agreement in diagnosis was determined. Forty articles were identified, which included 31 cases of CSP and 13 cases of EPA containing histopathological descriptions and/or images of the pathology. We additionally included six cases of CSP and eight cases of EPA from our own institutions, giving a total of 58 cases available for histological evaluation (37 CSP and 21 EPA) containing clear definitions of morbidly adherent placenta. In the 29 cases for which images/slides were available for histopathological evaluation, both pathologists attested to the various degrees of myometrial and/or scar tissue invasion by placental villi with scant or no intervening decidua, consistent with the classic definition of morbidly adherent placenta. Based on the reviewed material, cases with a diagnosis of EPA and those with a diagnosis of CSP showed identical histopathological features. Interobserver correlation was high (kappa = 0.93). EPA and placental implantation in CSP are histopathologically indistinguishable and may represent different stages in

  12. Microneedle physical contact as a therapeutic for abnormal scars

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, David C.; Balmayor, Elizabeth R.; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; Xu, Chenjie

    2017-01-01

    Background Abnormal (keloid and hypertrophic) scars are a significant affliction with no satisfactory single modality therapy to-date. Available options are often ineffective, painful, potentially hazardous, and require healthcare personnel involvement. Herein a self-administered microneedle device based on drug-free physical contact for inhibiting abnormal scars is reported. Its therapeutic activity through microneedle contact eliminates hazards associated with toxic anti-scarring drugs whil...

  13. In vitro evaluation of a basic fibroblast growth factor-containing hydrogel toward vocal fold lamina propria scar treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erndt-Marino, Josh D; Jimenez-Vergara, Andrea C; Diaz-Rodriguez, Patricia; Kulwatno, Jonathan; Diaz-Quiroz, Juan Felipe; Thibeault, Susan; Hahn, Mariah S

    2018-04-01

    Scarring of the vocal fold lamina propria can lead to debilitating voice disorders that can significantly impair quality of life. The reduced pliability of the scar tissue-which diminishes proper vocal fold vibratory efficiency-results in part from abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition by vocal fold fibroblasts (VFF) that have taken on a fibrotic phenotype. To address this issue, bioactive materials containing cytokines and/or growth factors may provide a platform to transition fibrotic VFF within the scarred tissue toward an anti-fibrotic phenotype, thereby improving the quality of ECM within the scar tissue. However, for such an approach to be most effective, the acute host response resulting from biomaterial insertion/injection likely also needs to be considered. The goal of the present work was to evaluate the anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory capacity of an injectable hydrogel containing tethered basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in the dual context of scar and biomaterial-induced acute inflammation. An in vitro co-culture system was utilized containing both activated, fibrotic VFF and activated, pro-inflammatory macrophages (MΦ) within a 3D poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel containing tethered bFGF. Following 72 h of culture, alterations in VFF and macrophage phenotype were evaluated relative to mono-culture and co-culture controls. In our co-culture system, bFGF reduced the production of fibrotic markers collagen type I, α smooth muscle actin, and biglycan by activated VFF and promoted wound-healing/anti-inflammatory marker expression in activated MΦ. Cumulatively, these data indicate that bFGF-containing hydrogels warrant further investigation for the treatment of vocal fold lamina propria scar. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 1258-1267, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Scarred resonances and steady probability distribution in a chaotic microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Young; Rim, Sunghwan; Kim, Chil-Min; Ryu, Jung-Wan; Kwon, Tae-Yoon

    2005-01-01

    We investigate scarred resonances of a stadium-shaped chaotic microcavity. It is shown that two components with different chirality of the scarring pattern are slightly rotated in opposite ways from the underlying unstable periodic orbit, when the incident angles of the scarring pattern are close to the critical angle for total internal reflection. In addition, the correspondence of emission pattern with the scarring pattern disappears when the incident angles are much larger than the critical angle. The steady probability distribution gives a consistent explanation about these interesting phenomena and makes it possible to expect the emission pattern in the latter case

  15. NEW MOLECULAR MEDICINE-BASED SCAR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arno, Anna I; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Barret, Juan P; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are prevalent disabling conditions with still suboptimal treatments. Basic science and molecular-based medicine research has contributed to unravel new bench-to-bedside scar therapies, and to dissect the complex signaling pathways involved. Peptides such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, with SMADs, Ski, SnoN, Fussels, endoglin, DS-Sily, Cav-1p, AZX100, thymosin-β4 and other related molecules may emerge as targets to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars. The aim of this review is to describe the basic complexity of these new molecular scar management strategies, and point out new fibrosis research lines. PMID:24438742

  16. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Chadwick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options.

  17. Vibratory function and healing outcomes after small intestinal submucosa biomaterial implantation for chronic vocal fold scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Michael J; Kurita, Takashi; Powell, Maria E; Kimball, Emily E; Mizuta, Masanobu; Chang, Siyuan; Garrett, C Gaelyn; Rousseau, Bernard

    2018-04-01

    Vocal fold scar is a major cause of dysphonia, and optimal treatments do not currently exist. Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a biomaterial developed for the treatment of a variety of pathologies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of SIS implantation on tissue remodeling in scarred vocal folds using routine staining, immunohistochemistry, and high-speed videoendoscopy (HSV). Prospective, blinded group analysis. Thirteen New Zealand White rabbits underwent a vocal fold scarring procedure followed by microflap elevation with or without SIS implantation. Seven months later, they underwent a phonation procedure with HSV and laryngeal harvest. Alcian blue and elastica van Gieson staining and immunohistochemistry for collagen types I and III were used to evaluate histological healing outcomes. Dynamic functional remodeling of the scarred vocal fold in the presence of SIS implants was evaluated using HSV imaging to capture restoration of vibratory amplitude, amplitude ratio, and left-right phase symmetry. Density of collagen I was significantly decreased in SIS versus microflap-treated vocal folds. No differences were found between groups for hyaluronic acid, elastin, or collagen type III. Organization of elastin in the subepithelial region appeared to affect amplitude of vibration and the shape of the vocal fold edge. SIS implantation into chronic scar reduced the density of collagen I deposits. There was no evidence of a negative impact or complication from SIS implantation. Regardless of treatment type, organization of elastin in the subepithelial region may be important to vibratory outcomes. NA. Laryngoscope, 128:901-908, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Kaempferol inhibits fibroblast collagen synthesis, proliferation and activation in hypertrophic scar via targeting TGF-β receptor type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongwei; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yuebing; Gao, Zhigang

    2016-10-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HPS) formation is a debilitating condition that results in pain, esthetic symptom and loss of tissue function. So far, no satisfactory therapeutic approach has been available for HPS treatment. In this study, we discovered that a natural small molecule, kaempferol, could significantly inhibit HPS formation in a mechanical load-induced mouse model. Our results also demonstrated that kaempferol remarkably attenuated collagen synthesis, proliferation and activation of fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo. Western blot analysis further revealed that kaempferol significantly down-regulated Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. At last, we found that such bioactivity of kaempferol which resulted from the inhibition of TGF-β1/Smads signaling was induced by the selective binding of kaempferol to TGF-β receptor type I (TGFβRI). These findings suggest that kaempferol could be developed into a promising agent for the treatment of HPS or other fibroproliferative disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental Study of 5-fluorouracil Encapsulated Ethosomes Combined with CO2 Fractional Laser to Treat Hypertrophic Scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Jun; Huang, Jun; Wo, Yan; Zhang, Yixin; Chen, Xiangdong

    2018-01-18

    This study is designed to explore permeability of ethosomes encapsulated with 5-florouracil (5-FU) mediated by CO 2 fractional laser on hypertrophic scar tissues. Moreover, therapeutic and duration effect of CO 2 fractional laser combined with 5-FU encapsulated ethosomes in rabbit ear hypertrophic scar model will be evaluated. The permeated amount of 5-FU and retention contents of 5-FU were both determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Fluorescence intensities of ethosomes encapsulated with 5-FU (5E) labeled with Rodanmin 6GO (Rho) were measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The permeability promotion of 5E labeled with Rho in rabbit ear hypertrophic scar mediated by CO 2 fractional laser was evaluated at 0 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 3 days and 7 days after the irradiation. The opening rates of the micro-channels were calculated according to CLSM. The therapeutic effect of 5EL was evaluated on rabbit ear hypertrophic scar in vivo. Relative thickness of rabbit ear hypertrophic scar before and after the treatment was measured by caliper method. Scar elevation index (SEI) of rabbit ear hypertrophic scar was measured using H&E staining. The data showed that the penetration amount of 5EL group was higher than 5E group (4.15 ± 2.22 vs. 0.73 ± 0.33; p 5E group (107.61 ± 13.27 vs. 20.73 ± 3.77; p 5E group (24.42 ± 4.37 vs.12.25 ± 1.64; p 5E group at different time points (1, 6, and 24 h). The opening rates of the micro-channels were decreased gradually within 24 h, and micro-channels were closed completely 3 days after the irradiation by CO 2 fractional laser. The relative thickness and SEI of rabbit ear hypertrophic scar after 7 days of treatment in the 5EL group were significantly lower than the 5E group. CO 2 fractional laser combined with topical 5E can be effective in the treatment of hypertrophic scar in vivo and supply a novel therapy method for human hypertrophic scar.

  20. Collagen metabolism during wound healing in rats. The aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen in serum and wound fluid in relation to formation of granulation tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L T; Garbarsch, C; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    1993-01-01

    The aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) in serum has been shown to correlate with fibrillogenesis, and thus to be a potential direct marker of type III collagen deposition. The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between changes in serum PIIINP and formation ......, changes in serum PIIINP mirror fibrillogenesis. Furthermore, our study provides experimental evidence consistent with the hypothesis that wound fluid PIIINP directly mirrors the local formation of granulation tissue, independent of weight loss and cyclophosphamide treatment.......The aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) in serum has been shown to correlate with fibrillogenesis, and thus to be a potential direct marker of type III collagen deposition. The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between changes in serum PIIINP and formation...... loss caused by treatment, weight loss caused by starvation was investigated. In untreated rats, serum PIIINP and wound fluid PIIINP were related to formation of granulation tissue (serum: r = 0.58, p

  1. Reliable scar scoring system to assess photographs of burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecott, Gabriel A; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M; Branski, Ludwik K; Hegde, Sachin; Kraft, Robert; Williams, Felicia N; Maldonado, Susana A; Rivero, Haidy G; Rodriguez-Escobar, Noe; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-12-01

    Several scar-scoring scales exist to clinically monitor burn scar development and maturation. Although scoring scars through direct clinical examination is ideal, scars must sometimes be scored from photographs. No scar scale currently exists for the latter purpose. We modified a previously described scar scale (Yeong et al., J Burn Care Rehabil 1997) and tested the reliability of this new scale in assessing burn scars from photographs. The new scale consisted of three parameters as follows: scar height, surface appearance, and color mismatch. Each parameter was assigned a score of 1 (best) to 4 (worst), generating a total score of 3-12. Five physicians with burns training scored 120 representative photographs using the original and modified scales. Reliability was analyzed using coefficient of agreement, Cronbach alpha, intraclass correlation coefficient, variance, and coefficient of variance. Analysis of variance was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Color mismatch and scar height scores were validated by analyzing actual height and color differences. The intraclass correlation coefficient, the coefficient of agreement, and Cronbach alpha were higher for the modified scale than those of the original scale. The original scale produced more variance than that in the modified scale. Subanalysis demonstrated that, for all categories, the modified scale had greater correlation and reliability than the original scale. The correlation between color mismatch scores and actual color differences was 0.84 and between scar height scores and actual height was 0.81. The modified scar scale is a simple, reliable, and useful scale for evaluating photographs of burn patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypertrophic Scars: Are Vitamins and Inflammatory Biomarkers Related with the Pathophysiology of Wound Healing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia-Sá, Inês; Serrão, Paula; Marques, Marisa; Vieira-Coelho, Maria A

    2017-12-01

    Hypertrophic scars are a consequence of wound healing. The objective of the present study is to evaluate vitamin D and inflammatory biomarker plasma levels during wound healing. A prospective study was performed in patients (n = 63) submitted to body contouring surgery. Blood samples were collected before (t 0 ) and 5 days after surgery (t 5 ). Blood cell count, protein inflammatory biomarkers, and circulating plasma levels of 25(OH)D, vitamin A and vitamin E were quantified. Six months after surgery, scars were evaluated and classified as normal or hypertrophic. At the end of the study, 73% of the patients developed a normal scar (control group, n = 46) and 27% of the patients presented hypertrophic scars (HT group, n = 17). The patients in the HT group presented higher eosinophil (0.145 × 10 9 /L vs. 0.104 × 10 9 /L, p = 0.028) and basophil count (0.031 × 10 9 /L vs. 0.22 × 10 9 /L, p = 0.049) and C-reactive protein levels (6.12 mg/L vs. 2.30 mg/L, p = 0.015) in t 0 than the patients in the control group. At t 5 , the patients in the HT group showed a decrease in neutrophil (3.144 × 10 9/L vs. 4.03 × 10 9 /L, p = 0.031) and an increase in basophil (0.024 × 10 9 /L vs. 0.015 × 10 9 /L, p = 0.005) and lymphocyte count (1.836 × 10 9 /L vs. 1.557 × 10 9 /L; p = 0.028). Before surgery, vitamin D plasma levels were found to be decreased by almost 50% (23.52 ng/mL vs. 15.46 ng/mL, p = 0.031) in the patients who developed hypertrophic scars. Thirty-one percent of the patients submitted to bariatric surgery had more hypertrophic scars, versus 24% of the patients with no previous bariatric surgery. There is a different systemic inflammatory profile response in the patients during the formation of hypertrophic scars. Vitamin D plasma levels are marked reduced in these patients. Considering the powerful anti-inflammatory effect of vitamin D, these findings could be related.

  3. Soft tissue wound healing around teeth and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard; Bosshardt, Dieter D

    2014-04-01

    To provide an overview on the biology and soft tissue wound healing around teeth and dental implants. This narrative review focuses on cell biology and histology of soft tissue wounds around natural teeth and dental implants. The available data indicate that: (a) Oral wounds follow a similar pattern. (b) The tissue specificities of the gingival, alveolar and palatal mucosa appear to be innately and not necessarily functionally determined. (c) The granulation tissue originating from the periodontal ligament or from connective tissue originally covered by keratinized epithelium has the potential to induce keratinization. However, it also appears that deep palatal connective tissue may not have the same potential to induce keratinization as the palatal connective tissue originating from an immediately subepithelial area. (d) Epithelial healing following non-surgical and surgical periodontal therapy appears to be completed after a period of 7–14 days. Structural integrity of a maturing wound between a denuded root surface and a soft tissue flap is achieved at approximately 14-days post-surgery. (e) The formation of the biological width and maturation of the barrier function around transmucosal implants requires 6–8 weeks of healing. (f) The established peri-implant soft connective tissue resembles a scar tissue in composition, fibre orientation, and vasculature. (g) The peri-implant junctional epithelium may reach a greater final length under certain conditions such as implants placed into fresh extraction sockets versus conventional implant procedures in healed sites. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Designing the stem cell microenvironment for guided connective tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, Danielle R; Lu, Helen H

    2017-12-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for regenerative medicine because of their ability to self-renew and their capacity for multilineage differentiation and tissue regeneration. For connective tissues, such as ligaments or tendons, MSCs are vital to the modulation of the inflammatory response following acute injury while also interacting with resident fibroblasts to promote cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. To date, MSC injection for connective tissue repair has yielded mixed results in vivo, likely due to a lack of appropriate environmental cues to effectively control MSC response and promote tissue healing instead of scar formation. In healthy tissues, stem cells reside within a complex microenvironment comprising cellular, structural, and signaling cues that collectively maintain stemness and modulate tissue homeostasis. Changes to the microenvironment following injury regulate stem cell differentiation, trophic signaling, and tissue healing. Here, we focus on models of the stem cell microenvironment that are used to elucidate the mechanisms of stem cell regulation and inspire functional approaches to tissue regeneration. Recent studies in this frontier area are highlighted, focusing on how microenvironmental cues modulate MSC response following connective tissue injury and, more importantly, how this unique cell environment can be programmed for stem cell-guided tissue regeneration. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Learning, Memory and Formation System of Free Radicals in Brain Tissues of Vascular Dementia Model Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王黎; 唐纯志; 赖新生

    2004-01-01

    In order to observe the regulative effect of electro-acupuncture on the formation system of free radicals in the brain tissues and learning and memory in vascular dementia (VD) model rats, the Morris's water labyrinth was used for testing the learning ability and memory in VD model rats made by 4-vessel occlusion method, and the activities or contents of nitric oxide (NO), NO synthase (NOS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were determined. Results showed that the mean escape latency in the electro-acupuncture group was markedly reduced in place test, and the times swam the place of the plate-form in the original plate-form quadrant were significantly more than those in the rest three quadrants in spatia1 probe test as compared with the model group. In the electro-acupuncture group and the nimodipine group the contents of NO and MDA and the activity of NOS were decreased, while the activities of SOD and GSH-Px were increased. It is indicated that electro-acupuncture can modulate the production and clearance of free radicals, and improve the ability of learning and memory of the VD model rats.

  6. Ancient expansion of the hox cluster in lepidoptera generated four homeobox genes implicated in extra-embryonic tissue formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ferguson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplications within the conserved Hox cluster are rare in animal evolution, but in Lepidoptera an array of divergent Hox-related genes (Shx genes has been reported between pb and zen. Here, we use genome sequencing of five lepidopteran species (Polygonia c-album, Pararge aegeria, Callimorpha dominula, Cameraria ohridella, Hepialus sylvina plus a caddisfly outgroup (Glyphotaelius pellucidus to trace the evolution of the lepidopteran Shx genes. We demonstrate that Shx genes originated by tandem duplication of zen early in the evolution of large clade Ditrysia; Shx are not found in a caddisfly and a member of the basally diverging Hepialidae (swift moths. Four distinct Shx genes were generated early in ditrysian evolution, and were stably retained in all descendent Lepidoptera except the silkmoth which has additional duplications. Despite extensive sequence divergence, molecular modelling indicates that all four Shx genes have the potential to encode stable homeodomains. The four Shx genes have distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns in early development of the Speckled Wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria, with ShxC demarcating the future sites of extraembryonic tissue formation via strikingly localised maternal RNA in the oocyte. All four genes are also expressed in presumptive serosal cells, prior to the onset of zen expression. Lepidopteran Shx genes represent an unusual example of Hox cluster expansion and integration of novel genes into ancient developmental regulatory networks.

  7. Barium-cross-linked alginate-gelatine microcapsule as a potential platform for stem cell production and modular tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh Sardroud, Hamed; Nemati, Sorour; Baradar Khoshfetrat, Ali; Nabavinia, Mahbobeh; Beygi Khosrowshahi, Younes

    2017-08-01

    Influence of gelatine concentration and cross-linker ions of Ca 2+ and Ba 2+ was evaluated on characteristics of alginate hydrogels and proliferation behaviours of model adherent and suspendable stem cells of fibroblast and U937 embedded in alginate microcapsules. Increasing gelatine concentration to 2.5% increased extent of swelling to 15% and 25% for barium- and calcium-cross-linked hydrogels, respectively. Mechanical properties also decreased with increasing swelling of hydrogels. Both by increasing gelatine concentration and using barium ions increased considerably the proliferation of encapsulated model stem cells. Barium-cross-linked alginate-gelatine microcapsule tested for bone building block showed a 13.5 ± 1.5-fold expansion for osteoblast cells after 21 days with deposition of bone matrix. The haematopoietic stem cells cultured in the microcapsule after 7 days also showed up to 2-fold increase without adding any growth factor. The study demonstrates that barium-cross-linked alginate-gelatine microcapsule has potential for use as a simple and efficient 3D platform for stem cell production and modular tissue formation.

  8. External charring and fire scarring in three western conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. K. Sutherland; Josh Farella; David K Wright; Ian Hyp; K. T. Smith; Donald A. Falk; Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel

    2013-01-01

    Fires that injure but do not kill trees cause scars used as proxies for the reconstruction of wildfire history. Understanding about these wildfires - and their relationship to vegetation dynamics and climate - has profoundly affected wildfire and land management policy globally. To better understand scarring in the context of wildfire behavior, landscape and biological...

  9. Macroanatomy of compartmentalization in fire scars of three western conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Elaine Sutherland; Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel; Donald. Falk

    2013-01-01

    Fire scars are visible evidence of compartmentalization and closure processes that contribute to tree survival after fire injury. Preliminary observations of dissected fire scars from trees injured within the last decade showed centripetal development of wound-initiated discoloration (WID) through 2-3 decades of former sapwood in Larix occidentalis and Pseudotsuga...

  10. Fractional CO2 laser resurfacing for atrophic acne scars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, Lene; Haak, Christina Skovbølling; Togsverd-Bo, Katrine

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of acne scars with fractional CO(2) lasers is gaining increasing impact, but has so far not been compared side-by-side to untreated control skin.......The treatment of acne scars with fractional CO(2) lasers is gaining increasing impact, but has so far not been compared side-by-side to untreated control skin....

  11. Relationship between tuberculous scar and carcinomas of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, S.; Hirsch, A.; Bickel, M.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a transversal case-control study are reported which shows that there is a statistically significant association between tuberculous scars and carcinoma of the lung. Accordingly the possibility of malignancy has to be kept in mind when radiological or scintigraphic scanning reveal the presence of lung scars. (orig.)

  12. Trachomatous Scar Ranking: A Novel Outcome for Trachoma Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Angela; Ryner, Alexander M; Tadesse, Zerihun; Shiferaw, Ayalew; Callahan, Kelly; Fry, Dionna M; Zhou, Zhaoxia; Lietman, Thomas M; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2017-06-01

    AbstractWe evaluated a new trachoma scarring ranking system with potential use in clinical research. The upper right tarsal conjunctivas of 427 individuals from Ethiopian villages with hyperendemic trachoma were photographed. An expert grader first assigned a scar grade to each photograph using the 1981 World Health Organization (WHO) grading system. Then, all photographs were ranked from least (rank = 1) to most scarring (rank = 427). Photographic grading found 79 (18.5%) conjunctivae without scarring (C0), 191 (44.7%) with minimal scarring (C1), 105 (24.6%) with moderate scarring (C2), and 52 (12.2%) with severe scarring (C3). The ranking method demonstrated good internal validity, exhibiting a monotonic increase in the median rank across the levels of the 1981 WHO grading system. Intrarater repeatability was better for the ranking method (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.74-0.94). Exhibiting better internal and external validity, this ranking method may be useful for evaluating the difference in scarring between groups of individuals.

  13. Intralesional Cryotherapy for Treatment of Keloid Scars: A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.C.E.; van der Wal, M.B.A.; Bulstra, A.E.J.; Galindo Garre, F.; Molier, J.; van Zuijlen, P.P.M.; van Leeuwen, P.A.M.; Niessen, F.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intralesional cryotherapy is a novel treatment for keloid scars in which the scar is frozen from inside. Published results are promising, but the treatment has only been tested in a Caucasian patient population. Therefore, the authors evaluated intralesional cryotherapy in a patient

  14. Patient reported facial scar assessment: directions for the professional

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, C.J.; van Baar, M.E.; Middelkoop, E.; van Loey, N.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The face is central to our identity and provides our most expressive means of communication. Currently, the role of facial scarring in relation to self-esteem is unclear and the value of self-reported scar assessment is insufficiently understood. The aim of this study was twofold: (1) to

  15. Patient reported facial scar assessment : directions for the professional

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, Cornelis J; van Baar, Margriet E; Middelkoop, Esther; Van Loey, N.E.E.

    BACKGROUND: The face is central to our identity and provides our most expressive means of communication. Currently, the role of facial scarring in relation to self-esteem is unclear and the value of self-reported scar assessment is insufficiently understood. The aim of this study was twofold: (1) to

  16. Semiclassical scar functions in phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas, Alejandro M F

    2007-01-01

    We develop a semiclassical approximation for the scar function in the Weyl-Wigner representation in the neighborhood of a classically unstable periodic orbit of chaotic two-dimensional systems. The prediction of hyperbolic fringes, asymptotic to the stable and unstable manifolds, is verified computationally for a (linear) cat map, after the theory is adapted to a discrete phase space appropriate to a quantized torus. Characteristic fringe patterns can be distinguished even for quasi-energies where the fixed point is not Bohr-quantized. Also the patterns are highly localized in the neighborhood of the periodic orbit and along its stable and unstable manifolds without any long distance patterns that appear for the case of the spectral Wigner function

  17. [Comparative study of expression of homeobox gene Msx-1, Msx-2 mRNA during the hard tissue formation of mouse tooth development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J; Gao, Y

    2001-07-01

    To observe and compare the expression pattern of Msx-1, Msx-2 mRNA during the different stages of hard tissue formation in the first mandibular molar of mouse and investigate the relationship between the two genes. First mandibular molar germs from 1, 3, 7 and 14-days old mouse were separated and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed on the total RNA of them using Msx-1, Msx-2 specific primers separately. Expression of both genes were detected during the different stages of hard tissue formation in the mouse first mandibular molars, but there was some interesting differences in the quantitiy between the two genes. Msx-1 transcripts appeared at the 1 day postnatally, and increase through 3 day, 7 day, then maximally expressed at 14 days postnatally; while Msx-2 mRNA was seen and expressed maximally at the 3 days postnatally, then there was a gradual reduction at 7 days, and 14 days postnatally. The homeobox gene Msx-1, Msx-2 may play a role in the events of the hard tissue formation. The complementary expression pattern of them during the specific stage of hard tissue formation indicates that there may be some functional redundancy between them during the biomineralization.

  18. Breast Cancer from the Excisional Scar of a Benign Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Lee, Ji Young; Youk, Ji Hyun; Park, Byeong Woo; Kim, Hae Ryoung; Oh, Ki Keun

    2007-01-01

    Burns and chronic inflammation are well-known circumstances in which malignant transformation may occur during wound healing. There are many reports of malignancies developing from a burn scar; however, there are only a few reports of malignancy arising from chronic inflammation or from the skin of a surgical scar following excision of a benign mass, in any part of the body. There are only twelve reported cases of breast cancer developing from a surgical scar, moreover, there have been no reports in the last 30 years. This case is a recent example of breast cancer developing in a surgical scar that showed subtle changes on sequential sonograms. The imaging findings of this case were subtle but the mass that had been shrinking developed an angular margin in one region. These findings, along with the penetrating vascularity revealed on Doppler, prompted us to proceed to a biopsy of the lesion. It was of critical importance to compare the size and the shape of the lesion with previous ultrasounds in order to exclude malignancy in any iatrogenically altered lesion. Based on this case, we conclude that whenever a subtle change is detected, at a surgical site, a biopsy should be performed. Breast cancer developing from a surgical scar is rare; this type of malignancy has been reported in only 12 cases to date. Herein, we report on a 52-year-old female who developed infiltrating ductal carcinoma in a surgical scar following excision of a benign mass. Two years previously, the patient underwent surgery and radiotherapy for invasive ductal carcinoma of the contralateral breast. The initial appearance of the scar was similar to fat necrosis; it was observed to be progressively shrinking on follow-up sonography. On the two year follow-up ultrasound, the appearance changed, an angular margin and vascularity at the periphery of the scar were noted. A biopsy and subsequent excision of the scar were performed; the diagnosis of infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the scar was

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Soft Tissue Regeneration and Bone Formation in Mice: Implications in Fracture Repair and Wound Healing in Humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baylink, David

    2003-01-01

    The primary goal of the project funded by the U.S. Army is to identify genes which play an anabolic role in bone tissue and soft tissue function, particularly during regeneration, and to clarify the function of these genes...

  20. A Case of Atrial Tachycardia Circulating around a Left Atrial Roof Scar with Diabetes Mellitus and Renal Failure on Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Hijioka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Little is known about the effects of volume change by hemodialysis (HD and mechanical stress caused by an anatomical structure being in contact with the left atrium on the progression of atrial remodeling. We experienced a case of atrial tachycardia (AT in a patient who had left atrial (LA scarring at the LA roof and a low-voltage area with slow conduction around the LA scar as components of AT circuit. Here, we present the conceivable hypothesis of the LA scar and the low-voltage area formation. Our concept can be useful in developing a strategy for ablation in a patient with chronic renal failure (CRF on HD. Case Report. A 65-year-old man with CRF on HD was referred for AT ablation. Three-dimensional electroanatomical mapping revealed that the AT conducted around an LA scar in a counterclockwise fashion. There was a slow conduction area at the superior side of the LA scar, where the AT was terminated during the ablation. Computed tomography indicated a close relationship between the LA and the anatomical structures (ascending aorta and pulmonary artery. Conclusion. Volume change by HD and close contact of anatomical structures to the LA can promote atrial remodeling, resulting in AT occurrence.

  1. Combinatorial Approaches to Controlling Cell Behaviour and Tissue Formation in 3D via Rapid-Prototyping and Smart Scaffold Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodfield, T.B.F.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Malda, Jos

    2009-01-01

    The understanding of fundamental phenomena involved in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is continuously growing and leads to the demand for three-dimensional (3D) models that better represent tissue architecture and direct cells into the proper lineage for specific tissue repair. Porous

  2. Clinical relevance of aberrant polypoid nodule scar after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes, Vitor; Uedo, Noriya; Pedrosa, Moises Salgado; Tomita, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe a series of patients with aberrant polypoid nodule scar developed after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and to discuss its pathogenesis and clinical management. METHODS We reviewed retrospectively the endoscopic database of two academic institutions located in Brazil and Japan and searched for all patients that underwent ESD to manage gastric neoplasms from 2003 to 2015. The criteria for admission in the study were: (1) successful en bloc ESD procedure with R0 and curative resection confirmed histologically; (2) postoperative endoscopic examination with identification of a polypoid nodule scar (PNS) at ESD scar; (3) biopsies of the PNS with hyperplastic or regenerative tissue, reviewed by two independent experienced gastrointestinal pathologists, one from each Institution. Data were examined for patient demographics, Helicobacter pylori status, precise neoplastic lesion location in the stomach, tumor size, histopathological assessment of the ESD specimen, and postoperative information including medical management, endoscopic and histological findings, and clinical outcome. RESULTS A total of 14 patients (10 men/4 women) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were enrolled in this study. One center contributed with 8 cases out of 60 patients (13.3%) from 2008 to 2015. The second center contributed with 6 cases (1.7%) out of 343 patients from 2003 to 2015. Postoperative endoscopic follow-up revealed similar findings in all patients: A protruded polypoid appearing nodule situated in the center of the ESD scar surrounded by convergence of folds. Biopsies samples were taken from PNS, and histological assessment revealed in all cases regenerative and hyperplastic tissue, without recurrent tumor or dysplasia. Primary neoplastic lesions were located in the antrum in 13 patients and in the angle in one patient. PNS did not develop in any patient after ESD undertaken for tumors located in the corpus, fundus or cardia. All patients have been

  3. Standard guidelines of care: Keloids and hypertrophic scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somesh Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Keloids and hypertrophic scars (HTS are the result of overgrowth of fibrous tissue, following healing of a cutaneous injury, and cause morbidity. There are several treatment modalities which are useful for the management of keloids, though no single modality is completely effective. The most commonly used modalities are pressure, silicone gel sheet, intralesional steroids, 5-fluorouracil (5 FU, cryotherapy, surgical excision, and lasers. They may be used either singly or, as is done more commonly, in combinations. Any qualified dermatologist who has attained postgraduate qualification in dermatology can treat keloids and HTS. Some procedures, such as cryosurgery and surgical excision, may require additional training in dermatologic surgery. Most modalities for keloids, including intralesional injections and mechanical therapies such as pressure and silicone gel based products, can be given/prescribed on OPD basis. Surgical excision requires a minor operation theater with the facility to handle emergencies. It is important to counsel the patient about the nature of the problem. One should realize that keloid will only improve and not disappear completely. Patients should be informed about the high recurrence rates. Different modalities carry risk of adverse effects and complications and the treating physician needs to be aware of these and patients should be informed about them.

  4. Application of 5-Fluorouracil-Polycaprolactone Sustained-Release Film in Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implantation Inhibits Postoperative Bleb Scarring in Rabbit Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiu-Zeng; Pan, Wei-Hua; Yu, Xin-Ping; Song, Zong-Ming; Ren, Zeng-Jin; Sun, Min; Li, Cong-Hui; Nan, Kai-Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu)-polycaprolactone sustained-release film in Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation inhibits postoperative bleb scarring in rabbit eyes. Eighteen New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups (A, B and C; n = 6 per group). Group A received combined 5-Fu-polycaprolactone sustained-release film application and Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation, group B received local infiltration of 5-Fu and Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation, and group C received Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. Postoperative observations were made of the anterior segment, intraocular pressure, central anterior chamber depth, blebs, drainage tube, and accompanying ciliary body detachment. The pathology of the blebs and surrounding tissues were observed at month 3 postoperatively. We revealed that the 5-Fu-polycaprolactone sustained-release film maintained a release concentration range of 13.7 ± 0.12 to 37.41 ± 0.47 μg/ml over three months in vitro. Postoperatively, diffuse blebs with ridges were found in all eyes in group A, two blebs were observed in group B, and no bleb formation was present in group C. The postoperative central anterior chamber depth in group A was significantly less than that of the other two groups. The postoperative intraocular pressure of group A stabilized at 6.33-8.67 mmHg, whereas that of group C gradually remained at 7.55-10.02 mmHg. The histopathology showed that the fibrous tissue thickness of the blebs in group A was significantly thinner than that of the other groups. We conclude that the 5-Fu-polycaprolactone sustained-release film had a sustained drug release effect, which promoted the inhibition of bleb scarring after Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation.

  5. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing on medicinal plants which have been scientifically tested in vitro and/or in vivo and proved as potential agents for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Although the chemical components and mechanisms of action of medicinal plants with antihypertrophic scarring potential have been investigated, many others remain unknown. More investigations and clinical trials are necessary to make use of these medical plants reasonably and phytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach against hypertrophic scars.

  6. External rhinoplasty for the Arabian nose: a columellar scar analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate columellar scar problems after external rhinoplasty in the Arabian population, and to analyze the technical factors that help prevent such problems and maximize the scar cosmesis. The investigation was conducted in university and private practice settings of the author in Alexandria, Egypt. A total of 600 Arab patients who underwent external rhinoplasty were included in the study. All the patients underwent surgery using the external rhinoplasty approach, in which bilateral alar marginal incisions were connected by an inverted V-shaped transcolumellar incision. At completion of the procedure, a two-layer closure of the columellar incision was performed. At a minimum of 1 year postoperatively, the columellar scar was evaluated subjectively by means of a patient questionnaire, and objectively by clinical examination and comparison of the close-up pre- and postoperative basal view photographs. Objectively, anything less than a barely visible, leveled, thin, linear scar was considered unsatisfactory. Subjectively, 95.5% of the patients rated the scar as unnoticeable, 3% as noticeable but acceptable, and 1.5% as unacceptable. Objectively, the scar was unsatisfactory in 7% of the cases. This was because of scar widening with or without depression (5%), hyperpigmentation (1.5%), and columellar rim notching (0.5%). The use of a deep 6/0 polydioxanon (PDS) suture significantly decreased the incidence of scar widening (p < 0.005).The columellar incision can be used safely in the Arab population regardless of their thick, dark, and oily skin. Technical factors that contributed to the favorable outcome of the columellar scar included proper planning of location and design of the incision used, precise execution, meticulous multilayered closure, and good postoperative care.

  7. Deep sequencing of ESTs from nacreous and prismatic layer producing tissues and a screen for novel shell formation-related genes in the pearl oyster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeharu Kinoshita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite its economic importance, we have a limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying shell formation in pearl oysters, wherein the calcium carbonate crystals, nacre and prism, are formed in a highly controlled manner. We constructed comprehensive expressed gene profiles in the shell-forming tissues of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata and identified novel shell formation-related genes candidates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed the GS FLX 454 system and constructed transcriptome data sets from pallial mantle and pearl sac, which form the nacreous layer, and from the mantle edge, which forms the prismatic layer in P. fucata. We sequenced 260477 reads and obtained 29682 unique sequences. We also screened novel nacreous and prismatic gene candidates by a combined analysis of sequence and expression data sets, and identified various genes encoding lectin, protease, protease inhibitors, lysine-rich matrix protein, and secreting calcium-binding proteins. We also examined the expression of known nacreous and prismatic genes in our EST library and identified novel isoforms with tissue-specific expressions. CONCLUSIONS: We constructed EST data sets from the nacre- and prism-producing tissues in P. fucata and found 29682 unique sequences containing novel gene candidates for nacreous and prismatic layer formation. This is the first report of deep sequencing of ESTs in the shell-forming tissues of P. fucata and our data provide a powerful tool for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms of molluscan biomineralization.

  8. Burn Scar Reconstruction of the Neck with FTSG Obtained from Lower Abdominal Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadrollah Motamed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Burns account for a significant proportion of injuries, and of these the face, neck, and anterior torso are commonly affected. Burn scars remain a lasting reminder of the insult both for the patient and the outside world. There is little doubt that the change in appearance and the limitation imposed by a burn scar contribute to negative body image. Treatment of hypertrophic scars in the neck has been quite challenging if there is no intact tissue for local flaps. So application of full-thickness skin grafts could be of great value. We applied full-thickness grafts obtained from lower abdominal skin for treatment of severe neck contractures in four patients when other treatment modalities such as local flaps could not be used. Full-thickness skin graft of the neck is a safe and reliable treatment option with fairly good functional and aesthetic results. It has little donor site morbidity in spite of providing a large surface area of full-thickness skin.

  9. Size and spatial orientation of uterine tissue transplants on the peritoneum crucially determine the growth and cyst formation of endometriosis-like lesions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körbel, Christina; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W

    2010-10-01

    In many studies in rodents, intraperitoneal endometriosis-like lesions are surgically induced by syngeneic or autologous transplantation of uterine tissue samples, which are sutured to the abdominal wall. However, until now the surgical techniques have not been standardized, and we address this issue here. Uterine tissue samples were transplanted to the peritoneum of C57BL/6 mice (four study groups, n = 7 each). Using non-invasive high-resolution ultrasound imaging over a period of 4 weeks, we analyzed growth characteristics and cyst formation of the endometriosis-like lesions which developed, in relation to mode of transplantation (syngeneic versus autologous), type of tissue fixed adjacent to the peritoneum (endometrium versus perimetrium), and size of tissue transplanted (2 versus 3 mm). Immunohistochemical analysis was also performed. When the perimetrium, with underlying myometrium, was sutured next to the host peritoneum the endometriosis-like lesions which developed exhibited a higher growth rate (Pendometriosis-like lesions. Our study demonstrates that size and spatial orientation of peritoneally fixed uterine tissue samples crucially determine growth and cyst formation of endometriotic lesions in mice. These findings should improve the standardization and reliability of future studies, performed in the frequently used mouse model of surgically induced endometriosis.

  10. Etiology of Cesarean Uterine Scar Defect (Niche): Detailed Critical Analysis of Hypotheses and Prevention Strategies and Peritoneal Closure Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L

    2018-03-01

    There is an increasing incidence of cesarean scar (CS) defect/niche and its sequelae, probably not entirely explained by better diagnosis or rising cesarean rate. Discussion of possible etiological factors has received scant attention but would be important to formulate preventive strategies. Meaningful informative studies on long-term sequelae of cesarean section are very difficult and none are available for causation of CS defect. Hence, it is crucial to identify key areas in etiology of CS defect for focused research. This practical review proposes an "ischemia and mal-apposition hypothesis for CS niche", stating that the surgical technique of uterine incision closure is the most important determinant of CS defect formation. Other factors such as cervical location incision, adhesion formation and patient specific factors seem far less important in etiology. Rather than the headline theme of "single versus double-layer closure of uterus", the finer details of surgical technique which achieve good apposition without inducing tissue ischemia seem more important. Different techniques are discussed and it is proposed that continuous, non-locking absorbable sutures in two layers, without including much of decidua and without undue tight (constricting/devasculaizing) pulling of sutures are likely to result in good healing of uterine scar. Single-layer technique may be best reserved for thin myometrial edges especially during repeat cesareans. Adhesions between uterine isthmus and bladder/abdominal wall seem common associations but not causative for CS niche. It would be desirable to prove these surgical principles by good quality prospective randomized "quantitative" studies but the wait may be very long and this should not hinder the adoption of good surgical principles. Science is much cognitive and not just empirical. To consider a related example, the current recommendation of non-suturing of peritoneal layers during cesarean is mistakenly based on short

  11. Churg-Strauss syndrome presenting as scar reactivation: histopathologic features and an illustration of 'locus minoris resistentiae'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Sarah N; Harris, Anna C; Zimarowski, Mary Jane

    2013-05-01

    We report a 33-year-old female with cutaneous involvement by Churg-Strauss syndrome confined to surgical scars that were obtained 13 years before. She presented to the emergency department with 2-day history of fever, night sweats, right-sided weakness, hoarseness and worsening asthma symptoms. She was found to have an eosinophilia and two sub-5-mm pulmonary nodules. The patient also reported that the scars on her right thumb, inner wrist and back had been swollen, red and painful for 2 days. Examination revealed tender, erythematous, well-healed edematous scars studded with small skin colored papules. She had no clinical findings that were classic for cutaneous vasculitis. A skin biopsy of a scar revealed perivascular and palisading granulomatous inflammation consisting of histiocytes and neutrophils with leukocytoclasia. Focal vascular injury was identified. Scattered tissue eosinophils were seen. Special stains were negative for infection. Thereafter, she was started on intravenous steroids, at which point the fever, pulmonary and cutaneous symptoms subsided. Although scar sarcoidosis is a well-described phenomenon, granulomatous inflammation and vasculitis seen in Churg-Strauss syndrome exclusively manifesting in well-healed surgical scars highlights the unique features seen in this case and draws attention to the concept of locus minoris resistentiae. This case also highlights how a skin biopsy in the setting of suspected systemic vasculitis can confirm the presence of vasculitis and/or granulomatous inflammation and obviate the need for more invasive, higher risk procedures such as lung biopsy. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Relationship of myocardial hibernation, scar, and angiographic collateral flow in ischemic cardiomyopathy with coronary chronic total occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Lu, Min-Jie; Feng, Lei; Wang, Juan; Fang, Wei; He, Zuo-Xiang; Dou, Ke-Fei; Zhao, Shi-Hua; Yang, Min-Fu

    2018-03-07

    The relationship between myocardial viability and angiographic collateral flow is not fully elucidated in ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) with coronary artery chronic total occlusion (CTO). We aimed to clarify the relationship between myocardial hibernation, myocardial scar, and angiographic collateral flow in these patients. Seventy-one consecutive ICM patients with 122 CTOs and 652 dysfunctional segments within CTO territories were retrospectively analyzed. Myocardial hibernation (perfusion-metabolism mismatch) and the extent of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) abnormalities were assessed using 99m Tc-sestamibi and 18 F-FDG imaging. Myocardial scar was evaluated by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Collateral flow observed on coronary angiography was assessed using Rentrop classification. In these patients, neither the extent nor frequency of myocardial hibernation or scar was related to the status of collateral flow. Moreover, the matching rate in determining myocardial viability was poor between any 2 imaging indices. The extent of 18 F-FDG abnormalities was linearly related to the extent of LGE rather than myocardial hibernation. Of note, nearly one-third (30.4%) of segments with transmural scar still had hibernating tissue. Hibernation and non-transmural scar had higher sensitivity (63.0% and 66.7%) than collateral flow (37.0%) in predicting global functional improvement. Angiographic collateral cannot accurately predict myocardial viability, and has lower sensitivity in prediction of functional improvement in CTO territories in ICM patients. Hence, assessment of myocardial viability with non-invasive imaging modalities is of importance. Moreover, due to the lack of correlation between myocardial hibernation and scar, these two indices are complementary but not interchangeable.

  13. Challenges in the transvaginal management of abnormal uterine bleeding secondary to cesarean section scar defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chin-Jung; Huang, Huei-Jean; Chao, Angel; Lin, Yu-Pin; Pan, Yi-Jung; Horng, Shang-Gwo

    2011-02-01

    Research suggests that the resectoscopic management of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) following cesarean section (CS) is safe and effective. There is, however, a lack of complementary data from routine clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of resectoscopic remodeling of the CS scar in the management of post CS AUB (pCSAUB). The case notes of 57 women with pCSAUB who had undergone a resectoscopic remodeling procedure were reviewed retrospectively. Primary outcome measures were the duration of preoperative and postoperative menstruation, and postoperative menstrual change. Secondary outcome measures were the impact of patient-dependent variables on the success of the resectoscopic remodeling procedure. The CS scar was located using transvaginal ultrasonography and hysteroscopy. The remodeling procedure was performed with a hysteroscopic resectoscope, and commenced with resection of the fibromuscular scar. This started at the roof of the scar pouch and progressed towards the external os. It then continued along a line parallel to the axis of the cervical canal. The exposed dilated blood vessels and endometrial-like tissue in the roof of the remaining pouch were electrocauterized with a roller-ball electrode. The mean operating time was 30.2 ± 6.6 min. There was a significant difference in the mean duration of preoperative and postoperative menstruation (12.9 ± 2.9 days and 9.4 ± 4.1 days, respectively; p uterine remodeling is an appropriate therapy in patients with pCSAUB and an anteflexed uterus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. SU-F-J-174: A Series of Computational Human Phantoms in DICOM-RT Format for Normal Tissue Dose Reconstruction in Epidemiological Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyakuryal, A; Moroz, B; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Lee, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risk in radiotherapy patients often require individualized dose estimates of normal tissues. Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D radiological images or not even available. Generic patient CT images are often used in commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) to reconstruct normal tissue doses. The objective of the current work was to develop a series of reference size computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format for direct use in dose reconstruction in TPS. Methods: Contours of 93 organs and tissues were extracted from a series of pediatric and adult hybrid computational human phantoms (newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-year-old, and adult males and females) using Rhinoceros software. A MATLAB script was created to convert the contours into the DICOM-RT structure format. The simulated CT images with the resolution of 1×1×3 mm3 were also generated from the binary phantom format and coupled with the DICOM-structure files. Accurate volumes of the organs were drawn in the format using precise delineation of the contours in converted format. Due to complex geometry of organs, higher resolution (1×1×1 mm3) was found to be more efficient in the conversion of newborn and 1-year-old phantoms. Results: Contour sets were efficiently converted into DICOM-RT structures in relatively short time (about 30 minutes for each phantom). A good agreement was observed in the volumes between the original phantoms and the converted contours for large organs (NRMSD<1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD<7.7%). Conclusion: A comprehensive series of computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format was created to support epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in radiotherapy patients. We confirmed the DICOM-RT phantoms were successfully imported into the TPS programs of major vendors.

  15. SU-F-J-174: A Series of Computational Human Phantoms in DICOM-RT Format for Normal Tissue Dose Reconstruction in Epidemiological Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyakuryal, A; Moroz, B [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C; Jung, J [East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States); Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risk in radiotherapy patients often require individualized dose estimates of normal tissues. Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D radiological images or not even available. Generic patient CT images are often used in commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) to reconstruct normal tissue doses. The objective of the current work was to develop a series of reference size computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format for direct use in dose reconstruction in TPS. Methods: Contours of 93 organs and tissues were extracted from a series of pediatric and adult hybrid computational human phantoms (newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-year-old, and adult males and females) using Rhinoceros software. A MATLAB script was created to convert the contours into the DICOM-RT structure format. The simulated CT images with the resolution of 1×1×3 mm3 were also generated from the binary phantom format and coupled with the DICOM-structure files. Accurate volumes of the organs were drawn in the format using precise delineation of the contours in converted format. Due to complex geometry of organs, higher resolution (1×1×1 mm3) was found to be more efficient in the conversion of newborn and 1-year-old phantoms. Results: Contour sets were efficiently converted into DICOM-RT structures in relatively short time (about 30 minutes for each phantom). A good agreement was observed in the volumes between the original phantoms and the converted contours for large organs (NRMSD<1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD<7.7%). Conclusion: A comprehensive series of computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format was created to support epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in radiotherapy patients. We confirmed the DICOM-RT phantoms were successfully imported into the TPS programs of major vendors.

  16. In vivo polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography of human burn scars: birefringence quantification and correspondence with histologically determined collagen density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Mariëlle E. H.; Feroldi, Fabio; Vlig, Marcel; de Boer, Johannes F.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Obtaining adequate information on scar characteristics is important for monitoring their evolution and the effectiveness of clinical treatment. The aberrant type of collagen in scars may give rise to specific birefringent properties, which can be determined using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate a method to quantify the birefringence of the scanned volume and correlate it with the collagen density as measured from histological slides. Five human burn scars were measured in vivo using a handheld probe and custom-made PS-OCT system. The local retardation caused by the tissue birefringence was extracted using the Jones formalism. To compare the samples, histograms of birefringence values of each volume were produced. After imaging, punch biopsies were harvested from the scar area of interest and sent in for histological evaluation using Herovici polychrome staining. Two-dimensional en face maps showed higher birefringence in scars compared to healthy skin. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for the collagen density as measured by histology versus the measured birefringence was calculated at r=0.80 (p=0.105). In conclusion, the custom-made PS-OCT system was capable of in vivo imaging and quantifying the birefringence of human burn scars, and a nonsignificant correlation between PS-OCT birefringence and histological collagen density was found.

  17. Effect of botulinum toxin type A on transforming growth factor beta1 in fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhibo; Zhang, Fengmin; Lin, Weibin; Zhang, Miaobo; Liu, Ying

    2010-08-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a common dermal disease. Numerous treatments are currently available but they do not always yield excellent therapeutic results. Hence, alternatives are needed. Recent basic and clinical research has shown that botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) has antihypertrophic scar properties but the molecular mechanism for this action is unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of BTXA on transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) in fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar and further elucidate its actual mechanism. Fibroblasts were isolated from tissue specimens of hypertrophic scar. Fibroblasts were treated with BTXA and the difference in proliferation between treated and nontreated cells was analyzed through the MTT method from the first to the fifth day after treatment. Proteins of TGF-beta1 were checked using ELISA in fibroblasts with BTXA and without BTXA from the first to the fifth day. The growth of the fibroblast treated with BTXA was obviously slower than that of the fibroblast without BTXA treatment (p < 0.01), which showed that BTXA effectively inhibited the growth of fibroblasts. Proteins of TGF-beta1 between fibroblasts with BTXA and fibroblasts without BTXA are statistically significant (p < 0.01). These results suggest that BTXA effectively inhibited the growth of fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar and in turn caused a decrease in TGF-beta1 protein, indicating that BTXA-based therapies for hypertrophic scar are promising and worth investigating further.

  18. Sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), differential-display .... were synthesized by Sangon Biological Engineering Technology and. Services ..... to cold tolerance to scar markers in common carp. J. Dalian.

  19. Managing Caesarean Scar Pregnancy in low Resource Settings: 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    ultrasound guided approach with dilatation of uterine cervix and subsequent evacuation of uterine ... Keywords: caesarean scar pregnancy, transrectal ultrasound guided surgical approach. ... a viable embryo with a crown rump length (CRL).

  20. Before and After Photos: Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Before and after photos: Treatment of hypertrophic scars ...

  1. Before and After Photos: Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back Injectable Deoxycholic Acid Injectable Hyaluronic Acid Injectable Poly-l-lactic Acid Injectable Polymethylmethacrylate + Bovine Collagen Filler ... Does acne scar removal hurt? What are my pain management and anesthesia options? How long is the ...

  2. Prevention of vocal fold scarring by local application of basic fibroblast growth factor in a rat vocal fold injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Kawai, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Takuya; Hiwatashi, Nao; Kishimoto, Yo; Tateya, Ichiro; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Hirano, Shigeru

    2017-02-01

    Vocal fold scarring, which causes severe hoarseness, is intractable. The optimal treatment for vocal fold scarring has not been established; therefore, prevention of scarring is important. The aim of this study was to clarify the effectiveness of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for prevention of postsurgical vocal fold scarring. Prospective animal experiments with controls. The vocal folds of Sprague-Dawley rats were injured unilaterally or bilaterally after local application of a 10 μL solution of bFGF. Larynges ware harvested for histological and immunohistochemical examination 2 months postoperation and for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis 1 week postoperation. Histological examination showed significantly increased hyaluronic acid and decreased deposition of dense collagen in the bFGF-treated group at 100 ng/10 μL compared with the sham-treated group. Immunohistochemical examination showed significantly decreased collagen type III deposition in the bFGF-treated group at 100 ng/10 μL compared with the sham-treated group. qRT-PCR revealed that hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2), Has3, and hepatocyte growth factor were upregulated in bFGF-treated groups compared with sham-treated group. The current results suggest that local application of bFGF at the time of injury has the potential to prevent vocal fold scarring. Preventive injection of bFGF could be applied at the time of phonomicrosurgery to avoid postoperative scar formation. N/A. Laryngoscope, 2016 127:E67-E74, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: interrater reliability and concurrent validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    Research into the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertrophic scar (HSc) remains limited by the heterogeneity of scar and the imprecision with which its severity is measured. The objective of this study was to test the interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the Cutometer measurement of elasticity, the Mexameter measurement of erythema and pigmentation, and total thickness measure of the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar, and HSc. Three independent investigators evaluated 128 sites (severe HSc, moderate or mild HSc, donor site, and normal skin) on 32 burn survivors using all of the above measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient, which was used to measure interrater reliability, reflects the inherent amount of error in the measure and is considered acceptable when it is >0.75. Interrater reliability of the totals of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS fell below the acceptable limit ( congruent with0.50). The individual subscales of the mVSS fell well below the acceptable level (0.89) for each study site with the exception of severe scar. Mexameter and DermaScan C reliability measurements were acceptable for all sites (>0.82). Concurrent validity correlations with the mVSS were significant except for the comparison of the mVSS pliability subscale and the Cutometer maximum deformation measure comparison in severe scar. In conclusion, the Mexameter and DermaScan C measurements of scar color and thickness of all sites, as well as the Cutometer measurement of elasticity in all but the most severe scars shows high interrater reliability. Their significant concurrent validity with the mVSS confirms that these tools are measuring the same traits as the mVSS, and in a more objective way.

  4. Do Preexisting Abdominal Scars Threaten Wound Healing in Abdominoplasty?

    OpenAIRE

    Shermak, Michele A.; Mallalieu, Jessie; Chang, David

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Abdominal scars may impair healing after abdominoplasty. We aimed to determine whether right subcostal or upper midline scars led to increased wound healing problems. Methods and Materials: Review of all patients who had abdominoplasty from March 1998 to February 2008 was performed. Variables studied included age, gender, body mass index (BMI), medical history, and postoperative complications. Statistical analysis was performed in Stata SE, version 10. Results: Of 420 abdominoplasty ...

  5. Combined effect of fluoride and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on mouse dental hard tissue formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Eija; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Partanen, Anna-Maija; Sahlberg, Carin; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-08-01

    Fluoride interferes with enamel matrix secretion and mineralization and dentin mineralization. The most toxic dioxin congener, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), also impairs dental hard tissue formation and mineralization in vitro and in vivo. Our aim was to investigate in vitro whether the combined effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) and TCDD on dental hard tissue formation is potentiative. For this purpose, mandibular first and second molar tooth germs of E18 mouse embryos were cultured for 5-12 days with NaF and TCDD alone at various concentrations (2.5, 5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 20 μM and 5, 10, 12.5, and 15 nM, respectively) to determine the highest concentrations, which alone cause no or negligible effects. Morphological changes were studied from the whole tooth photographs and histological tissue sections. The concentrations found were 15 μM for NaF and 10 nM for TCDD. While at these concentrations, the effects of NaF and TCDD alone were barely detectable, the effect of simultaneous exposure on dentin and enamel formation was overt; mineralization of predentin to dentin and enamel matrix secretion and mineralization were impaired. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the combined exposure modified amelogenin expression by odontoblasts. Morphology of ameloblasts and the expression of amelogenin indicated that ameloblasts were still secretory. The results show that NaF and TCDD have potentiative, harmful effects on the formation of dental hard tissues. Since children can be exposed to subclinical levels of fluoride and dioxins during early childhood, coincidently with mineralization of the first permanent teeth, this finding may have clinical significance.

  6. Integra artificial skin dermal regeneration templates in burn scar surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rexon Ngim

    1999-01-01

    Integra artificial skin is a porous matrix used as a permanent dermal replacement. Developed in the 1970's, it has been used successfully in the treatment of acute bums requiring full or deep partial thickness skin replacement. Three patients with burn scars received Integra Artificial Skin to resurface various areas of burn scars and also contractures. The first was a 24-year-old woman who had two pieces of Integra to resurface a forearm/elbow/wrist defect. The second was a 28-year-old woman who had two pieces of Integra to resurface a neck contracture. The third was a 44 year-old woman who had two pieces to correct severe burn contractures/ scars of her hands. The results of these three patients, probably the first time Integra was used for bum scar and contracture revision, indicate that there is a place for Integra in Burn Scar surgery. However, the basic principle of its application must be adhered to. These include excision to remove the complete scar, recreation of original size of skin defect and meticulous application of the Artificial Skin and its care post-operatively. Details of its application will be highlighted

  7. The group A streptococcal collagen-like protein 1, Scl1, mediates biofilm formation by targeting the EDA-containing variant of cellular fibronectin expressed in wounded tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver-Kozup, Heaven; Martin, Karen H.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Green, Brett J.; Betts, Courtney; Shinde, Arti V.; Van De Water, Livingston; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Wounds are known to serve as portals of entry for group A Streptococcus (GAS). Subsequent tissue colonization is mediated by interactions between GAS surface proteins and host extracellular matrix components. We recently reported that the streptococcal collagen-like protein-1, Scl1, selectively binds the cellular form of fibronectin (cFn) and also contributes to GAS biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. One structural feature of cFn, which is predominantly expressed in response to tissue injury, is the presence of a spliced variant containing extra domain A (EDA/EIIIA). We now report that GAS biofilm formation is mediated by the Scl1 interaction with EDA-containing cFn. Recombinant Scl1 proteins that bound cFn also bound recombinant EDA within the C-C′ loop region recognized by the α9β1 integrin. The extracellular 2-D matrix derived from human dermal fibroblasts supports GAS adherence and biofilm formation. Altogether, this work identifies and characterizes a novel molecular mechanism by which GAS utilizes Scl1 to specifically target an extracellular matrix component that is predominantly expressed at the site of injury in order to secure host tissue colonization. PMID:23217101

  8. Conservative treatment of bone tissue metabolic disorders among patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II with genetic abnormality of type I collagen formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Martsyniak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of the article is to determine the effect of conservative therapy on genetically caused disorders of bone tissue metabolism in patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II and genetic abnormality of type I collagen formation (VDDR(COL1. Materials and methods. At the premises of consulting and outpatient department of SI “Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics of the NAMS of Ukraine”, 13 patients having VDDR type II and genetic damage of type I collagen formation were examined and treated. The medical treatment was conducted in four stages. The first stage included full examination of patients (calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood serum and their urinary excretion, as well as determination of calcidiol and calcitriol serum levels, indicators of parathyroid hormone and osteocalcin, and a marker of bone formation P1NP and osteoresorption b-CTx. At this stage, children were obligated to undergo a genetic test to detect changes (polymorphism in alleles of receptors to vitamin D and type I collagen. Besides genetic tests, examinations at the other stages were conducted in full. Results. The study has shown the following. The genetically caused abnormality of reception to vitamin D results into substantial accumulation of vitamin D active metabolite in the blood serum. When combined with gene­tic abnormality of type I collagen formation, it significantly affected bone formation and destruction processes that causes development of osteomalacia (parathormone — vitamin D — osteocalcin system. The comprehensive study of vitamin D metabolism and biochemical vitals of bone tissue in patients having VDDR (COL1 brought us to understanding of some issues related to pathogenesis and nature of osteomalacia and, in future, osteoporotic changes on different levels, ensured us to express these changes by corresponding indices in the biochemical research and, finally, to develop appropriate schemes for the treatment of

  9. Observation of deep oscillation usage and its effectiveness on burn scars – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna A. Pogorzelska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An organism that has undergone tissue damage pursues its immediate recovery. In order to do so, it uses a dynamic and congeneric process of regeneration consisting of several phases. Currently, innovative methods are being sought influencing tissue healing. One such system is deep oscillation, which is based on an intermittent electrostatic field created between the device and the patient’s skin. It causes a unique, deep, and resonant vibration. It is a noninvasive and painless method. The aim of deep oscillation is purposeful interfering in the physiological processes of tissue trophism. In the thesis, the case of 16-month-old girl is presented, who experienced a thermal scald to her left arm and her chest. The aim of the following thesis is observation of deep oscillation use and its effectiveness in the event of newly formed burn scars that undergo remodelling and can lead to curtailment of the healing process.

  10. Boon and Bane of Inflammation in Bone Tissue Regeneration and Its Link with Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Kwee, Brian J; Mooney, David J; Duda, Georg N

    2015-08-01

    Delayed healing or nonhealing of bone is an important clinical concern. Although bone, one of the two tissues with scar-free healing capacity, heals in most cases, healing is delayed in more than 10% of clinical cases. Treatment of such delayed healing condition is often painful, risky, time consuming, and expensive. Tissue healing is a multistage regenerative process involving complex and well-orchestrated steps, which are initiated in response to injury. At best, these steps lead to scar-free tissue formation. At the onset of healing, during the inflammatory phase, stationary and attracted macrophages and other immune cells at the fracture site release cytokines in response to injury. This initial reaction to injury is followed by the recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells, synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins, angiogenesis, and finally tissue remodeling. Failure to heal is often associated with poor revascularization. Since blood vessels mediate the transport of circulating cells, oxygen, nutrients, and waste products, they appear essential for successful healing. The strategy of endogenous regeneration in a tissue such as bone is interesting to analyze since it may represent a blueprint of successful tissue formation. This review highlights the interdependency of the time cascades of inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue regeneration. A better understanding of these inter-relations is mandatory to early identify patients at risk as well as to overcome critical clinical conditions that limit healing. Instead of purely tolerating the inflammatory phase, modulations of inflammation (immunomodulation) might represent a valid therapeutic strategy to enhance angiogenesis and foster later phases of tissue regeneration.

  11. Comparison of fractional microneedling radiofrequency and bipolar radiofrequency on acne and acne scar and investigation of mechanism: comparative randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seonguk; Park, Seon Yong; Yoon, Ji Young; Suh, Dae Hun

    2015-12-01

    Fractional microneedling radiofrequency (FMR) is one of the promising methods in acne treatment. Moreover, bipolar radiofrequency (BR) generates heat thereby which induces neocollagenosis. FMR may have the potential to be a safe and effective treatment for the patients both with acne and acne scar. This study was performed to compare the efficacy and safety of FMR and BR in acne and acne scar treatment. Furthermore, mechanism of the FMR treatment was investigated through skin tissues obtained from subjects. Twenty subjects with mild-to-moderate acne and acne scars were treated in a split-face manner with FMR and BR. Two sessions of treatment was done 4 weeks apart in a total 12-week prospective single-blind, randomized clinical trial. Clinical assessment and sebum measurement were carried out for the evaluation of efficacy and safety. Skin tissues were acquired for investigation of molecular changes. FMR was more effective for acne scar especially in icepick and boxcar scar compared to BR. Both inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions decreased by 80 and 65 % in the FMR-treated side at the final visit of 12 weeks, respectively. FMR treatment resulted in significant reduction of sebum excretion. Both treatments showed no severe adverse effects other than erythema. The FMR showed superior efficacy in acne and acne scar compared with BR. Increased expression of TGFβ and collagen I and decreased expression of NF-κB, IL-8 are suggested to involve in the improvement of acne scar and acne lesion by FMR.

  12. Micronuclei Formation and 8-Hydroxy-2-Deoxyguanosine Enzyme Detection in Ovarian Tissues After Radiofrequency Exposure at 1800 MHz in Adult Sprague–Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saeed Hammoodi Alchalabi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Human fertility and its correlation to ovarian function and cytological changes are linked to ever-increasing use of mobile phones. Wireless communications have become a critical topic of concern because of an increasing number of studies in this field with controversial outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effect of GSM frequency at 1800 MHz on ovarian function. Sixty female Sprague–Dawley rats were distributed over six groups (control group and the exposure groups with whole-body exposure for 2 h/day, 7 days/week for 15, 30 and 60 continuous days. The study investigated the oxidative stress, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine enzyme, micronuclei formation and histopathological changes in ovarian tissue. The results showed an induced oxidative stress via an increase in lipid peroxidation and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity. There was also an elevation in the 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine enzyme and an increased rate of micronuclei formation in ovarian tissues of exposed animals with 60-day exposure compared with control animals. Cytological changes were recorded such as micronuclei formation, vacuolation, degeneration and impaired folliculogenesis. The study suggests that GSM frequency at 1800 MHz was negatively impacted on female reproductive performances mediated by oxidative stress induction and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine formation leading to overall impaired ovarian function.

  13. Care for the Critically Injured Burn Patient Modulation of Burn Scars Through Laser Assisted Delivery of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    FL 33186 REPORT DATE: October 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick...2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sept 2015 to 29 Sept 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Care for the Critically...associated with a debridement effect that might facilitate cells to enter tissues or deliver materials to the burn scar. This effect is noted more

  14. ICG-fluorescence imaging for detection of peritoneal metastases and residual tumoral scars in locally advanced ovarian cancer: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veys, Isabelle; Pop, Florin-Catalin; Vankerckhove, Sophie; Barbieux, Romain; Chintinne, Marie; Moreau, Michel; Nogaret, Jean-Marie; Larsimont, Denis; Donckier, Vincent; Bourgeois, Pierre; Liberale, Gabriel

    2018-02-01

    No intraoperative imaging techniques exist for detecting tumor nodules or tumor scar tissues in patients treated with upfront or interval cytoreductive surgery (CS) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence imaging (FI) for the detection of peritoneal metastases (PM) and evaluate whether it can be used to detect remnant tumor cells in scar tissue. Patients with PM from ovarian cancer admitted for CS were included. ICG, at 0.25 mg per kg of patient weight, was injected intraoperatively after explorative laparotomy before CS. A total of 108 peritoneal lesions, including 25 scars, were imaged in 20 patients. Seventy-three were malignant (67.6%) and 35 benign (32.4%). The mean Tumor to Background Ratio (ex vivo) was 1.8 (SD 1.3) in malignant and 1.0 (SD 0.79) in benign nodules (P = 0.007). Of 25 post-NAC scars, the mean Tumor to Background Ratio (TBR) (in vivo) was 2.06 (SD 1.15) in malignant and 1.21 (SD 0.50) in benign nodules (P = 0.26). The positive predictive value of ICG-FI to detect tumor cells in scars was 57.1%. ICG-FI is accurate to demonstrate PM in ovarian cancer but unable to discriminate between benign and malignant post-NAC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Tissues development in stems of Aristolochia clematitis L. in the point of view of multicellular complexes formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Puławska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After cytokinesis the cells do not separate but remain within the wall of the mother cell. After a series of divisions a multicellular complex arises. In the stems of Aristolochia clematitis procambium is closer related to protoxylem than to protophloem, and metaphloem is closer related to metaxylem than to protophloem. Since protophloem has a closer common origin with fibre primordia than with the remaining tissues, it cannot be decided unequivocally what is the origin of the fibres or when procambium differentiates. The common origin of the primary vascular tissues is visible in the pattern of the multicellular complexes, whereas the common origin of the secondary vascular tissue developing in the underground several-year-old parts of the stem can be traced in the arrangement of the single radial tiers. Some characteristics of symplastic growth are discussed.

  16. Long-term scar quality after hydrosurgical versus conventional debridement of deep dermal burns (HyCon trial): Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Legemate (Nine); H. Goei (Harold); E. Middelkoop (Esther); I.M.M.H. Oen (Irma); T.H.J. Nijhuis (Tim); Kwa, K.A.A. (Kelly A.A.); P.P.M. van Zuijlen (P. P M); G.I.J.M. Beerthuizen; M. Nieuwenhuis (Marianne); M.E. van Baar (Margriet); C.H. van der Vlies (Cornelis)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Deep dermal burns require tangential excision of non-viable tissue and skin grafting to improve wound healing and burn-scar quality. Tangential excision is conventionally performed with a knife, but during the last decade hydrosurgery has become popular as a new tool for

  17. Time course of fibronectin in the peri-implant tissue and neointima formation after functional implantation of polyester-based vascular prostheses with different porosity in pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrzyk, Maciej; Hoene, Andreas [Department of Surgery, Ernst Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Friedrich-Loeffler-Str. 23, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Jarchow, Raymond [Computation Centre, Ernst Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 12, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Wilhelm, Lutz [Department of Surgery, Hospital Demmin, Loitzer Str. 1, D-17109 Demmin (Germany); Walschus, Uwe; Schlosser, Michael [Research Group of Predictive Diagnostics of the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Institute of Pathophysiology, Ernst Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Greifswalder Str. 11c, D-17495 Karlsburg (Germany); Zippel, Roland, E-mail: schlosse@uni-greifswald.d [Department of Surgery, Elbland Hospital Center, Weinbergstr. 8, D-01589 Riesa (Germany)

    2010-10-01

    Intima hyperplasia, resulting from extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion, can lead to vascular prosthesis occlusion and is a major problem in vascular surgery. Fibronectin might contribute to ongoing ECM secretion. However, the exact role of fibronectin and its influence on neointima formation remains unclear. This study was aimed at investigating the time course of the fibronectin area fraction and neointima formation following the functional implantation of three different polyester vascular prostheses into pigs. The infrarenal aorta from 15 animals (n = 5/group) was replaced by prosthesis segments with low, medium and high primary porosity. After 7, 14, 21, 28 and 116 days, the prostheses were morphometrically examined. Overall, the fibronectin area fraction was inversely correlated with the neointima thickness, demonstrating high fibronectin levels in the early phase (days 7 and 14) and low levels in the later phase with almost complete neointima formation (days 21-116). Throughout the study, fibronectin levels were highest at the proximal anastomosis region. The low porosity prosthesis had the highest fibronectin area fraction and a delayed neointima formation in the middle phase (days 21 and 28) but the highest neointima lining on day 116. The results indicate a relationship between fibronectin and neointima formation with the prosthesis porosity, demonstrating the importance of the textile design for tissue reactions following implantation.

  18. Regional disturbances in blood flow and metabolism in equine limb wound healing with formation of exuberant granulation tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette A.; Petersen, Lars; Bundgaard, Louise

    2014-01-01

    As in other fibroproliferative disorders, hypoxia has been suggested to play a key role in the pathogenesis of exuberant granulation tissue (EGT). The purpose of this study was to investigate metabolism and blood flow locally in full-thickness wounds healing with (limb wounds) and without (body...

  19. Data-driven model comparing the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions on chronic neural recordings in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaga, Karlo A.; Schroeder, Karen E.; Patel, Paras R.; Irwin, Zachary T.; Thompson, David E.; Bentley, J. Nicole; Lempka, Scott F.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Patil, Parag G.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. We characterized electrode stability over twelve weeks of impedance and neural recording data from four chronically-implanted Utah arrays in two rhesus macaques, and investigated the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions at the electrode recording site on signal quality using a computational model. Approach. A finite-element model of a Utah array microelectrode in neural tissue was coupled with a multi-compartmental model of a neuron to quantify the effects of encapsulation thickness, encapsulation resistivity, and interface resistivity on electrode impedance and waveform amplitude. The coupled model was then reconciled with the in vivo data. Histology was obtained seventeen weeks post-implantation to measure gliosis. Main results. From week 1-3, mean impedance and amplitude increased at rates of 115.8 kΩ/week and 23.1 μV/week, respectively. This initial ramp up in impedance and amplitude was observed across all arrays, and is consistent with biofouling (increasing interface resistivity) and edema clearing (increasing tissue resistivity), respectively, in the model. Beyond week 3, the trends leveled out. Histology showed that thin scars formed around the electrodes. In the model, scarring could not match the in vivo data. However, a thin interface layer at the electrode tip could. Despite having a large effect on impedance, interface resistivity did not have a noticeable effect on amplitude. Significance. This study suggests that scarring does not cause an electrical problem with regard to signal quality since it does not appear to be the main contributor to increasing impedance or significantly affect amplitude unless it displaces neurons. This, in turn, suggests that neural signals can be obtained reliably despite scarring as long as the recording site has sufficiently low impedance after accumulating a thin layer of biofouling. Therefore, advancements in microelectrode technology may be expedited by focusing on improvements to the

  20. ["Palimpsest scar" lesions in a context of torture (Darfur, Sudan)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, P; Bou Abdallah, F; Mostefai Dulac, Y; Deo, S; Jacqueline, S; Brun, L; Hervé, C

    2017-11-01

    As a result of the current exponentially growing refugee population from the Middle-East and East Africa (Sudan, Darfur, Eritrea), clinicians (including forensic pathologists) are seeing atypical skin lesions, mainly of a traumatic nature, but in some cases associated with long-standing lesions related to ethnic practices. A case of torture sequelae is presented herein in a patient originally from Darfur (Sudan): cutaneous incisions were made on old scars several times using a knife. The clinical presentation of scarification lesions and that of atypically healed wounds (presumably an effect of inflammation induced by the introduction of irritating foreign bodies such as sand, salt, etc.) are completely different: in all cases they indicate a relative timeframe of the facts, which the clinician should not overlook in reconstructing the patient's course and the injuries to which he has been subjected (hence the proposed designation of "palimpsest scar", in the sense that a palimpsest is a manuscript on a parchment that previously contained writing but has been scratched clean to be overwritten). Thus, a "palimpsest scar" constitutes a fresh scar on top of and hiding another (ritual) scar in a context of ethnic cleansing. The diagnostic and clinical significance comes from the importance of differentiating between ethnic-type lesions and those induced by physical violence and abuse in a context of war. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Comparision of Different Methods of Area Measurement in Irregular Scar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, D; Li, W J; Sun, Q G; Li, J Q; Xia, Q

    2016-10-01

    To determine a measurement standard of irregular scar area by comparing the advantages and disadvantages of different measurement methods in measuring same irregular scar area. Irregular scar area was scanned by digital scanning and measured by coordinate reading method, AutoCAD pixel method, Photoshop lasso pixel method, Photoshop magic bar filled pixel method and Foxit PDF reading software, and some aspects of these methods such as measurement time, repeatability, whether could be recorded and whether could be traced were compared and analyzed. There was no significant difference in the scar areas by the measurement methods above. However, there was statistical difference in the measurement time and repeatability by one or multi performers and only Foxit PDF reading software could be traced back. The methods above can be used for measuring scar area, but each one has its advantages and disadvantages. It is necessary to develop new measurement software for forensic identification. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  2. Caesarean section greatly increases risk of scar endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nominato, Nilo Sérgio; Prates, Luis Felipe Victor Spyer; Lauar, Isabela; Morais, Jaqueline; Maia, Laura; Geber, Selmo

    2010-09-01

    To estimate the incidence of scar endometriosis after different surgical procedures. A retrospective study of 72 patients diagnosed with scar endometriosis between 1978 and 2003 was performed. Patient age, site of endometriosis, previous operations, time-gap between last surgery and onset of symptoms, nodule characteristics, and recurrence were evaluated. Age ranged from 16 to 48 years. Location varied according to the previous surgery: 46 caesarean section, one hysterectomy, one in abdominal surgery, 19 episiotomy, one was a relapse and two pelvic floor procedures, two women with no previous surgery. The incidence of scar endometriosis after caesarean section was significantly higher than after episiotomy (0.2 and 0.06%, respectively: p<0.00001) with a relative risk of 3.3. Pain was the most frequent symptom. The mean time between surgery and onset of symptoms was 3.7 years. Our findings confirm that scar endometriosis is a rare condition and indicate, probably for the first time, that caesarean section greatly increases the risk of developing scar endometriosis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Emergent scar lines in chaotic advection of passive directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Bardia; Mehlig, Bernhard; Voth, Greg A.

    2017-12-01

    We examine the spatial field of orientations of slender fibers that are advected by a two-dimensional fluid flow. The orientation field of these passive directors are important in a wide range of industrial and geophysical flows. We introduce emergent scar lines as the dominant coherent structures in the orientation field of passive directors in chaotic flows. Previous work has identified the existence of scar lines where the orientation rotates by π over short distances, but the lines that were identified disappeared as time progressed. As a result, earlier work focused on topological singularities in the orientation field, which we find to play a negligible role at long times. We use the standard map as a simple time-periodic two-dimensional flow that produces Lagrangian chaos. This class of flows produces persistent patterns in passive scalar advection and we find that a different kind of persistent pattern develops in the passive director orientation field. We identify the mechanism by which emergent scar lines grow to dominate these patterns at long times in complex flows. Emergent scar lines form where the recent stretching of the fluid element is perpendicular to earlier stretching. Thus these scar lines can be labeled by their age, defined as the time since their stretching reached a maximum.

  4. Lactic acid peeling in superficial acne scarring in Indian skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Silonie

    2010-09-01

    Chemical peeling with both alpha and beta hydroxy acids has been used to improve acne scarring with pigmentation. Lactic acid, a mild alpha hydroxy acid, has been used in the treatment of various dermatological indications but no study is reported in acne scarring with pigmentation. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of full strength pure lactic acid 92% (pH 2.0) chemical peel in superficial acne scarring in Indian skin. Seven patients, Fitzpatrick skin type IV-V, in age group 20-30 years with superficial acne scarring were enrolled in the study. Chemical peeling was done with lactic acid at an interval of 2 weeks to a maximum of four peels. Pre- and post-peel clinical photographs were taken at every session. Patients were followed every month for 3 months after the last peel to evaluate the effects. At the end of 3 months, there was definite improvement in the texture, pigmentation, and appearance of the treated skin, with lightening of scars. Significant improvement (greater than 75% clearance of lesions) occurred in one patient (14.28%), good improvement (51-75% clearance) in three patients (42.84%), moderate improvement (26-50% clearance) in two patients (28.57%), and mild improvement (1-25% clearance) in one patient (14.28%). © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Design and implementation of therapeutic ultrasound generating circuit for dental tissue formation and tooth-root healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon Tiong Ang; Scurtescu, C; Wing Hoy; El-Bialy, T; Ying Yin Tsui; Jie Chen

    2010-02-01

    Biological tissue healing has recently attracted a great deal of research interest in various medical fields. Trauma to teeth, deep and root caries, and orthodontic treatment can all lead to various degrees of root resorption. In our previous study, we showed that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) enhances the growth of lower incisor apices and accelerates their rate of eruption in rabbits by inducing dental tissue growth. We also performed clinical studies and demonstrated that LIPUS facilitates the healing of orthodontically induced teeth-root resorption in humans. However, the available LIPUS devices are too large to be used comfortably inside the mouth. In this paper, the design and implementation of a low-power LIPUS generator is presented. The generator is the core of the final intraoral device for preventing tooth root loss and enhancing tooth root tissue healing. The generator consists of a power-supply subsystem, an ultrasonic transducer, an impedance-matching circuit, and an integrated circuit composed of a digital controller circuitry and the associated driver circuit. Most of our efforts focus on the design of the impedance-matching circuit and the integrated system-on-chip circuit. The chip was designed and fabricated using 0.8- ¿m high-voltage technology from Dalsa Semiconductor, Inc. The power supply subsystem and its impedance-matching network are implemented using discrete components. The LIPUS generator was tested and verified to function as designed and is capable of producing ultrasound power up to 100 mW in the vicinity of the transducer's resonance frequency at 1.5 MHz. The power efficiency of the circuitry, excluding the power supply subsystem, is estimated at 70%. The final products will be tailored to the exact size of teeth or biological tissue, which is needed to be used for stimulating dental tissue (dentine and cementum) healing.

  6. Elastin Is Differentially Regulated by Pressure Therapy in a Porcine Model of Hypertrophic Scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Bonnie C; Liu, Zekun; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Travis, Taryn E; Ramella-Roman, Jessica; Moffatt, Lauren T; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    Beneficial effects of pressure therapy for hypertrophic scars have been reported, but the mechanisms of action are not fully understood. This study evaluated elastin and its contribution to scar pliability. The relationship between changes in Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) scores of pressure-treated scars and differential regulation of elastin was assessed. Hypertrophic scars were created and assessed weekly using VSS and biopsy procurement. Pressure treatment began on day 70 postinjury. Treated scars were compared with untreated shams. Treatment lasted 2 weeks, through day 84, and scars were assessed weekly through day 126. Transcript and protein levels of elastin were quantified. Pressure treatment resulted in lower VSS scores compared with sham-treated scars. Pliability (VSSP) was a key contributor to this difference. At day 70 pretreatment, VSSP = 2. Without treatment, sham-treated scars became less pliable, while pressure-treated scars became more pliable. The percentage of elastin in scars at day 70 was higher than in uninjured skin. Following treatment, the percentage of elastin increased and continued to increase through day 126. Untreated sham scars did not show a similar increase. Quantification of Verhoeff-Van Gieson staining corroborated the findings and immunofluorescence revealed the alignment of elastin fibers. Pressure treatment results in increased protein level expression of elastin compared with sham-untreated scars. These findings further characterize the extracellular matrix's response to the application of pressure as a scar treatment, which will contribute to the refinement of rehabilitation practices and ultimately improvements in functional and psychosocial outcomes for patients.

  7. Radiation-induced DNA damage in tumors and normal tissues. III. Oxygen dependence of the formation of strand breaks and DNA-protein crosslinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Wallen, C.A.; Wheeler, K.T.; Joch, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    Results from several laboratories, including ours, have suggested that measurements of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) may be used to estimate the hypoxic fraction or fractional hypoxic volume of tumors and normal tissues. This suggestion has been predicated on both published and nonpublished information that (1) the oxygen dependence of the formation of strand breaks in irradiated mammalian cells is similar to the oxygen dependence of radiation-produced cell killing, and (2) the oxygen dependence of the formation of DPCs in irradiated mammalian cells is the mirror image of the oxygen dependence of radiation-induced cell killing. However, the published studies that attempted to determine the relationship between the oxygen dependence of the formation of strand breaks and the radiation sensitivity of mammalian cells were not performed at 37 degrees C, the exact oxygen concentrations were not always known, and the results were conflicting. In addition, most of the data on the oxygen dependence of the formation of DPCs are unpublished. Consequently, we have undertaken a comprehensive investigation of one cell line, 9L/Ro rat brain tumor cells, to determine if the shape of the oxygen dependence curve and the K m value for radiation-induced strand breaks and DPCs were similar when 9L cells were irradiated under both ideal gas-liquid equilibrium conditions at 4 degrees C and nonideal gas-liquid equilibrium conditions at 37 degrees C. At 4 degrees C under ideal gas-liquid equilibrium conditions, the K m for the formation of strand breaks was approximately 0.0045 mM, and Km for radiation sensitivity was approximately 0.005mM. A similar comparison for the formation of DPCs at 4 degrees C could not be made, because the efficiency of the formation of DPC was much lower at 4 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. 30 refs., 3 figs

  8. Reproducibility of small animal cine and scar cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using a clinical 3.0 tesla system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manka, Robert; Jahnke, Cosima; Hucko, Thomas; Dietrich, Thore; Gebker, Rolf; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Graf, Kristof; Paetsch, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the inter-study, inter-reader and intra-reader reproducibility of cardiac cine and scar imaging in rats using a clinical 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. Thirty-three adult rats (Sprague–Dawley) were imaged 24 hours after surgical occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery using a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) equipped with a dedicated 70 mm solenoid receive-only coil. Left-ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, ejection fraction and amount of myocardial scar tissue were measured. Intra-and inter-observer reproducibility was assessed in all animals. In addition, repeat MR exams were performed in 6 randomly chosen rats within 24 hours to assess inter-study reproducibility. The MR imaging protocol was successfully completed in 32 (97%) animals. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated high intra-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), -1.7%; LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), -2.2%; LV ejection fraction (LVEF), 1.0%; LV mass, -2.7%; and scar mass, -1.2%) and high inter-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LVEDV, 3.3%; LVESV, 6.2%; LVEF, -4.8%; LV mass, -1.9%; and scar mass, -1.8%). In addition, a high inter-study reproducibility was found (mean bias%: LVEDV, 0.1%; LVESV, -1.8%; LVEF, 1.0%; LV mass, -4.6%; and scar mass, -6.2%). Cardiac MR imaging of rats yielded highly reproducible measurements of cardiac volumes/function and myocardial infarct size on a clinical 3.0 Tesla MR scanner system. Consequently, more widely available high field clinical MR scanners can be employed for small animal imaging of the heart e.g. when aiming at serial assessments during therapeutic intervention studies

  9. A Prospective Study of Ripple Mapping the Post-Infarct Ventricular Scar to Guide Substrate Ablation for Ventricular Tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Vishal; Linton, Nick W F; Jamil-Copley, Shahnaz; Koa-Wing, Michael; Lim, Phang Boon; Qureshi, Norman; Ng, Fu Siong; Hayat, Sajad; Whinnett, Zachary; Davies, D Wyn; Peters, Nicholas S; Kanagaratnam, Prapa

    2016-06-01

    Post-infarct ventricular tachycardia is associated with channels of surviving myocardium within scar characterized by fractionated and low-amplitude signals usually occurring late during sinus rhythm. Conventional automated algorithms for 3-dimensional electro-anatomic mapping cannot differentiate the delayed local signal of conduction within the scar from the initial far-field signal generated by surrounding healthy tissue. Ripple mapping displays every deflection of an electrogram, thereby providing fully informative activation sequences. We prospectively used CARTO-based ripple maps to identify conducting channels as a target for ablation. High-density bipolar left ventricular endocardial electrograms were collected using CARTO3v4 in sinus rhythm or ventricular pacing and reviewed for ripple mapping conducting channel identification. Fifteen consecutive patients (median age 68 years, left ventricular ejection fraction 30%) were studied (6 month preprocedural implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapies: median 19 ATP events [Q1-Q3=4-93] and 1 shock [Q1-Q3=0-3]). Scar (ripple mapping conducting channels were seen within each scar (length 60 mm; initial component 0.44 mV; delayed component 0.20 mV; conduction 55 cm/s). Ablation was performed along all identified ripple mapping conducting channels (median 18 lesions) and any presumed interconnected late-activating sites (median 6 lesions; Q1-Q3=2-12). The diastolic isthmus in ventricular tachycardia was mapped in 3 patients and colocated within the ripple mapping conducting channels identified. Ventricular tachycardia was noninducible in 85% of patients post ablation, and 71% remain free of ventricular tachycardia recurrence at 6-month median follow-up. Ripple mapping can be used to identify conduction channels within scar to guide functional substrate ablation. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Inflammatory responses, matrix remodeling, and re-epithelialization after fractional CO2 laser treatment of scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruler, Danielle M; Blackstone, Britani N; Baumann, Molly E; McFarland, Kevin L; Wulff, Brian C; Wilgus, Traci A; Bailey, J Kevin; Supp, Dorothy M; Powell, Heather M

    2017-09-01

    Fractional CO 2 laser therapy has been used to improve scar pliability and appearance; however, a variety of treatment protocols have been utilized with varied outcomes. Understanding the relationship between laser power and extent of initial tissue ablation and time frame for remodeling could help determine an optimum power and frequency for laser treatment. The characteristics of initial injury caused by fractional CO 2 laser treatment, the rates of dermal remodeling and re-epithelialization, and the extent of inflammation as a function of laser stacking were assessed in this study in a porcine scar model. Full-thickness burn wounds were created on female Red Duroc pigs followed by immediate excision of the eschar and split-thickness autografting. Three months after injury, the resultant scars were treated with a fractional CO 2 laser with 70 mJ of energy delivered as either a single pulse or stacked for three consecutive pulses. Immediately prior to laser treatment and at 1, 24, 96, and 168 hours post-laser treatment, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema, and microscopic characteristics of laser injury were measured. In addition, markers for inflammatory cytokines, extracellular matrix proteins, and re-epithelialization were quantified at all time points using qRT-PCR. Both treatments produced erythema in the scar that peaked 24 hours after treatment then decreased to basal levels by 168 hours. TEWL increased after laser treatment and returned to normal levels between 24 and 96 hours later. Stacking of the pulses did not significantly increase the depth of ablated wells or extend the presence of erythema. Interleukin 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were found to increase significantly 1 hour after treatment but returned to baseline by 24 hours post laser. In contrast, expression of transforming growth factor β1 and transforming growth factor β3 increased slowly after treatment with a more modest increase than interleukin 6 and monocyte

  11. Epithelial control of gut-associated lymphoid tissue formation through p38α-dependent restraint of NF-κB signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Franco, Celia; Guma, Monica; Choo, Min-Kyung; Sano, Yasuyo; Enzler, Thomas; Karin, Michael; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Park, Jin Mo

    2015-01-01

    The protein kinase p38α mediates cellular responses to environmental and endogenous cues that direct tissue homeostasis and immune responses. Studies of mice lacking p38α in several different cell types have demonstrated that p38α signaling is essential to maintaining the proliferation-differentiation balance in developing and steady-state tissues. The mechanisms underlying these roles involve cell-autonomous control of signaling and gene expression by p38α. Here we show that p38α regulates gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) formation in a non-cell-autonomous manner. From an investigation of mice with intestinal epithelial cell-specific deletion of the p38α gene, we find that p38α serves to limit NF-κB signaling and thereby attenuate GALT-promoting chemokine expression in the intestinal epithelium. Loss of this regulation results in GALT hyperplasia and, in some animals, mucosa-associated B cell lymphoma. These anomalies occur independently of luminal microbial stimuli and are likely driven by direct epithelial-lymphoid interactions. Our study illustrates a novel p38α-dependent mechanism preventing excessive generation of epithelial-derived signals that drive lymphoid tissue overgrowth and malignancy. PMID:26792803

  12. Epithelial Control of Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Formation through p38α-Dependent Restraint of NF-κB Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Franco, Celia; Guma, Monica; Choo, Min-Kyung; Sano, Yasuyo; Enzler, Thomas; Karin, Michael; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Park, Jin Mo

    2016-03-01

    The protein kinase p38α mediates cellular responses to environmental and endogenous cues that direct tissue homeostasis and immune responses. Studies of mice lacking p38α in several different cell types have demonstrated that p38α signaling is essential to maintaining the proliferation-differentiation balance in developing and steady-state tissues. The mechanisms underlying these roles involve cell-autonomous control of signaling and gene expression by p38α. In this study, we show that p38α regulates gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) formation in a noncell-autonomous manner. From an investigation of mice with intestinal epithelial cell-specific deletion of the p38α gene, we find that p38α serves to limit NF-κB signaling and thereby attenuate GALT-promoting chemokine expression in the intestinal epithelium. Loss of this regulation results in GALT hyperplasia and, in some animals, mucosa-associated B cell lymphoma. These anomalies occur independently of luminal microbial stimuli and are most likely driven by direct epithelial-lymphoid interactions. Our study illustrates a novel p38α-dependent mechanism preventing excessive generation of epithelial-derived signals that drive lymphoid tissue overgrowth and malignancy. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Effect of the gamma radiation and common antioxidants on some aspects of osteoblast differentiation during the formation of bone tissue in an in-vivo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinones O, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma radiation is the emission of energy through short electromagnetic waves to a higher level of frequency with respect to ultraviolet light. This type of energy in the medical application is used as a tool to kill cancer cells in humans, however, adverse damages to its exposure can produce secondary effects in the short and long term depending on the damage in cells and tissues nearby to the irradiation zone, the human body will present various injuries and conditions. In bone tissue, secondary effects that have been observed, is an alteration of the architecture and integrity of bone extracellular matrix of cortical and trabecular tissue, which causes loss of bone density. However, the reason that the bone tissue is affected is not clear, but is believed to be related to the formation of free radicals, which generate oxidative damage in biomolecules of the cells, damaging the tissue structure, organs and systems of the human body. The studies to identify the main reasons that will affect bone tissue as a result of radiotherapy have been carried out by models In-vitro and some In-vivo. In most studies in-vitro with cells with osteoblast phenotype, the results suggest alterations in proliferation and differentiation of these cells. However, the etiology and the role of these changes in disorders and bone injuries as adverse secondary effects of the radiotherapy are very poorly understood to date. In the present study an In-vivo model was used, that are ectopic bone plates which are developed by endochondral ossification, after having implanted demineralized bone particles at 16 days of development, at which time they are constituted by bone tissue. Ectopic bone plates were used with the aim of knowing as gamma radiation indirectly modifies to cellular level the osteoblast differentiation, cells that are involved in the formation and mineralization of bone extracellular matrix. One of the well known effects of gamma radiation is the generation of free radicals

  14. Evaluation of Bone Metastasis from Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT and {sup 99mT}c HDP Bone Scintigraphy: Characteristics of Soft Tissue Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Youg Hyu; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mijin; Choi, Hye Jin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Bone metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can present with soft tissue formation, resulting in oncologic emergency. Contrast enhanced FDG PET/CT and bone scintigraphy were compared to evaluate characteristics of bone metastases with of without soft tissue formation from HCC. of 4,151 patients with HCC, 263 patients had bone metastases. Eighty five patients with bone metastasis from HCC underwent contrast enhanced FDG PET/CT. Fifty four of the enrolled subjects had recent {sup 99mT}c HDP bone scintigraphy available for comparison. Metastatic bone lesions were identified with visual inspection on FDG PET/CT, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was used for the quantitative analysis. Confirmation of bone metastasis was based on histopathology, combined imaging modalities, or serial follow up studies. Forty seven patients (55%) presented with soft tissue formation, while the remaining 38 patients presented without soft tissue formation. Frequent sites of bone metastases from HCC were the spine (39%), pelvis (19%), and rib cage (14%). The soft tissue formation group had more frequent bone pain (77 vs. 37%, p<0.0001), higher SUVmax (6.02 vs. 3.52, p<0.007), and higher incidence of photon defect in bone scintigraphy (75 vs. 0%) compared to the non soft tissue formation group. FDG PET/CT had higher detection rate for bone metastasis than bone scintigraphy both in lesion based analysis (98 vs. 53%, p=0.0015) and in patient based analysis (100 vs. 80%, p<0.001). Bone metastasis from HCC showed a high incidence of soft tissue formation requiring emergency treatment. Although the characteristic findings for soft tissue formation such as photon defect in bone scintigraphy are helpful in detection, overall detectability of bone metastasis is higher in FDG PET/CT. Contrast enhanced PET/CT will be useful in finding and delineating soft tissue forming bone metastasis from HCC.

  15. An autoradiographic study of new fat cell formation in adipose tissue in adult mice during malnutrition and refeeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasubuchi, Yasuo; Mino, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Kusunoki, Tomoichi

    1979-01-01

    The renewal of adipose cells in adult mice has been autoradiographically studied. The number of adipose cells was diminished by eighty percent during malnutrition and the same number of adipose cells proliferated during the refeeding stage. The results of our study showed that adipose tissue, which had previously been believed to be stable in cell number, has the capacity for cell proliferation according to changes in nutritional status. (author)

  16. Cell type-specific modulation of lipid mediator's formation in murine adipose tissue by omega-3 fatty acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuda, Ondřej; Rombaldová, Martina; Janovská, Petra; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecký, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 469, č. 3 (2016), s. 731-736 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP13-04449P; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00871S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14040 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : adipose tissue macrophages * omega-3 PUFA * protectin D1 * lipid mediators * lipidomics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.466, year: 2016

  17. Autoradiographic study of new fat cell formation in adipose tissue in adult mice during malnutrition and refeeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasubuchi, Y; Mino, M; Yoshioka, H; Kusunoki, T [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1979-10-01

    The renewal of adipose cells in adult mice has been autoradiographically studied. The number of adipose cells was diminished by eighty percent during malnutrition and the same number of adipose cells proliferated during the refeeding stage. The results of our study showed that adipose tissue, which had previously been believed to be stable in cell number, has the capacity for cell proliferation according to changes in nutritional status.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from inflamed dental pulpal and gingival tissue: a potential application for bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Laura; Mauceri, Rodolfo; Coppola, Antonina; Pitrone, Maria; Pizzo, Giuseppe; Campisi, Giuseppina; Pizzolanti, Giuseppe; Giordano, Carla

    2017-08-01

    Chronic periodontal disease is an infectious disease consisting of prolonged inflammation of the supporting tooth tissue and resulting in bone loss. Guided bone regeneration procedures have become common and safe treatments in dentistry, and in this context dental stem cells would represent the ideal solution as autologous cells. In this study, we verified the ability of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells (DPSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) harvested from periodontally affected teeth to produce new mineralized bone tissue in vitro, and compared this to cells from healthy teeth. To characterize DPSCs and GMSCs, we assessed colony-forming assay, immunophenotyping, mesenchymal/stem cell phenotyping, stem gene profiling by means of flow cytometry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The effects of proinflammatory cytokines on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation and differentiation potential were investigated. We also observed participation of several heat shock proteins (HSPs) and actin-depolymerizing factors (ADFs) during osteogenic differentiation. DPSCs and GMSCs were successfully isolated both from periodontally affected dental tissue and controls. Periodontally affected dental MSCs proliferated faster, and the inflamed environment did not affect MSC marker expressions. The calcium deposition was higher in periodontally affected MSCs than in the control group. Proinflammatory cytokines activate a cytoskeleton remodeling, interacting with HSPs including HSP90 and HSPA9, thioredoxin-1, and ADFs such as as profilin-1, cofilin-1, and vinculin that probably mediate the increased acquisition in the inflamed environment. Our findings provide evidence that periodontally affected dental tissue (both pulp and gingiva) can be used as a source of MSCs with intact stem cell properties. Moreover, we demonstrated that the osteogenic capability of DPSCs and GMSCs in the test group was not only preserved but increased by the overexpression of

  19. Integration of 3D Printed and Micropatterned Polycaprolactone Scaffolds for Guidance of Oriented Collagenous Tissue Formation In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipchuk, Sophia P; Monje, Alberto; Jiao, Yizu; Hao, Jie; Kruger, Laura; Flanagan, Colleen L; Hollister, Scott J; Giannobile, William V

    2016-03-01

    Scaffold design incorporating multiscale cues for clinically relevant, aligned tissue regeneration has potential to improve structural and functional integrity of multitissue interfaces. The objective of this preclinical study is to develop poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds with mesoscale and microscale architectural cues specific to human ligament progenitor cells and assess their ability to form aligned bone-ligament-cementum complexes in vivo. PCL scaffolds are designed to integrate a 3D printed bone region with a micropatterned PCL thin film consisting of grooved pillars. The patterned film region is seeded with human ligament cells, fibroblasts transduced with bone morphogenetic protein-7 genes seeded within the bone region, and a tooth dentin segment positioned on the ligament region prior to subcutaneous implantation into a murine model. Results indicate increased tissue alignment in vivo using micropatterned PCL films, compared to random-porous PCL. At week 6, 30 μm groove depth significantly enhances oriented collagen fiber thickness, overall cell alignment, and nuclear elongation relative to 10 μm groove depth. This study demonstrates for the first time that scaffolds with combined hierarchical mesoscale and microscale features can align cells in vivo for oral tissue repair with potential for improving the regenerative response of other bone-ligament complexes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Liver tissue engineering based on aggregate assembly: efficient formation of endothelialized rat hepatocyte aggregates and their immobilization with biodegradable fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Y; Shinohara, M; Komori, K; Sakai, Y; Montagne, K

    2012-01-01

    To realize long-term in vitro culture of hepatocytes at a high density while maintaining a high hepatic function for aggregate-based liver tissue engineering, we report here a novel culture method whereby endothelialized rat hepatocyte aggregates were formed using a PDMS microwell device and cultured in a perfusion bioreactor by introducing spacers between aggregates to improve oxygen and nutrient supply. Primary rat hepatocyte aggregates around 100 µm in diameter coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were spontaneously and quickly formed after 12 h of incubation, thanks to the continuous supply of oxygen by diffusion through the PDMS honeycomb microwell device. Then, the recovered endothelialized rat hepatocyte aggregates were mixed with biodegradable poly-l-lactic acid fibres in suspension and packed into a PDMS-based bioreactor. Perfusion culture of 7 days was successfully achieved with more than 73.8% cells retained in the bioreactor. As expected, the fibres acted as spacers between aggregates, which was evidenced from the enhanced albumin production and more spherical morphology compared with fibre-free packing. In summary, this study shows the advantages of using PDMS-based microwells to form heterotypic aggregates and also demonstrates the feasibility of spacing tissue elements for improving oxygen and nutrient supply to tissue engineering based on modular assembly. (paper)

  1. Disruption of the ECM33 Gene in Candida albicans Prevents Biofilm Formation, Engineered Human Oral Mucosa Tissue Damage and Gingival Cell Necrosis/Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Rouabhia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we demonstrated that ΔCaecm33 double mutant showed reduced biofilm formation and causes less damage to gingival mucosa tissues. This was confirmed by the reduced level of necrotic cells and Bax/Bcl2 gene expression as apoptotic markers. In contrast, parental and Caecm33 mutant strains decreased basement membrane protein production (laminin 5 and type IV collagen. We thus propose that ECM33 gene/protein represents a novel target for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by Candida.

  2. Three-dimensional graphene foams loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells promote skin wound healing with reduced scarring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhonghua [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, The Fourth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Wang, Haiqin [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Fifth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yang, Bo; Sun, Yukai [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, The Fourth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Huo, Ran, E-mail: rhuo12@163.com [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China)

    2015-12-01

    The regeneration of functional skin remains elusive, due to poor engraftment, deficient vascularization, and excessive scar formation. Aiming to overcome these issues, the present study proposed the combination of a three-dimensional graphene foam (GF) scaffold loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to improve skin wound healing. The GFs demonstrated good biocompatibility and promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in animal model. The dermis formed in the presence of the GF structure loaded with MSCs was thicker and possessed a more complex structure at day 14 post-surgery. The transplanted MSCs correlated with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which may lead to neo-vascularization. Additionally, an anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of the 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs, as evidenced by a downregulation of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) together with an increase of TGF-β3. Altogether, the GF scaffold could guide the wound healing process with reduced scarring, and the MSCs were crucial to enhance vascularization and provided a better quality neo-skin. The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs possesses necessary bioactive cues to improve wound healing with reduced scarring, which may be of great clinical significance for skin wound healing. - Highlights: • The GFs promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. • The GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in the animal model. • An anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs. • The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs has great effect on skin wound healing.

  3. Three-dimensional graphene foams loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells promote skin wound healing with reduced scarring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhonghua; Wang, Haiqin; Yang, Bo; Sun, Yukai; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    The regeneration of functional skin remains elusive, due to poor engraftment, deficient vascularization, and excessive scar formation. Aiming to overcome these issues, the present study proposed the combination of a three-dimensional graphene foam (GF) scaffold loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to improve skin wound healing. The GFs demonstrated good biocompatibility and promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in animal model. The dermis formed in the presence of the GF structure loaded with MSCs was thicker and possessed a more complex structure at day 14 post-surgery. The transplanted MSCs correlated with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which may lead to neo-vascularization. Additionally, an anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of the 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs, as evidenced by a downregulation of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) together with an increase of TGF-β3. Altogether, the GF scaffold could guide the wound healing process with reduced scarring, and the MSCs were crucial to enhance vascularization and provided a better quality neo-skin. The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs possesses necessary bioactive cues to improve wound healing with reduced scarring, which may be of great clinical significance for skin wound healing. - Highlights: • The GFs promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. • The GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in the animal model. • An anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs. • The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs has great effect on skin wound healing

  4. Disfiguring scarring following mesotherapy-associated Mycobacterium cosmeticum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Kenneth; Waibel, Jill

    2009-04-01

    Mesotherapy is a popular procedure that poses risks that include scarring, contour changes and bacterial infections. The benefits of the procedure remain to be objectively delineated in a placebo-controlled, blinded study. Despite the lack of evidence to support its use, it is marketed as a "nonsurgical and safe" way to remove fat. The authors report a case of mycobacterial infection resulting from mesotherapy. This infection should be considered when a patient presents with a mesotherapy complication and should be discussed with the patient prior to the procedure. Options for treatment of the scarring are considered.

  5. Merlin, the product of NF2 gene, is associated with aromatase expression and estrogen formation in human liver tissues and liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocciadiferro, Letizia; Miceli, Vitale; Granata, Orazia M; Carruba, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    The product of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene, also known as Merlin/neurofibromin 2, homeostatically regulates liver stem cells by controlling abundance and signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), with a mechanism independent of the Hippo pathway. We have reported that locally elevated estrogen formation, driven by abnormally high expression and function of aromatase, may be implicated in development and progression of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through activation of a rapid signaling pathway mediated by amphiregulin (AREG) and EGFR. We have recently presented a model by which the aromatase-estrogen-amphiregulin-EGFR axis is activated in response to tissue injury and/or inflammatory disease, with its alteration eventually leading to development of major human tumors (liver, breast, prostate) and other chronic diseases (diabetes, obesity, Alzheimer's and heart disease). In this study, we investigated NF2 expression in liver cancer cells and tissues in relation to aromatase expression/function, estrogen receptor (ER) status and amphiregulin. Our data indicate that NF2 expression is associated with aromatase and AREG expression, being elevated in HCC tissues and HepG2 cells, intermediate in cirrhotic tissues and Huh7 cells, and lower in nontumoral liver and HA22T cells. In addition, NF2 expression is inversely related to wild type hERα66 and proportional to the expression of the membrane-associated hERα36 splice variant, as measured by exon-specific RT-PCR analysis, both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, incubation with estradiol induced a significant decrease of NF2 expression in both HA22T and Huh7 cells (over 54% and 22%, respectively), while no change could be observed in HepG2 cells, this effect being inversely related to aromatase expression and activity in HCC cell lines. Based on the above combined evidence, we hypothesize that NF2 behaves as a protein sensing tissue damage and aromatase-driven local estrogen formation

  6. The impact of obesity on febrile urinary tract infection and renal scarring in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, H J; Ha, J Y; Jung, W; Kim, B H; Park, C H; Kim, C I

    2017-02-01

    via electronic medical records, and the small number of subjects. This study showed that obesity in patients with VUR has an effect on fUTI and renal scar formation. If the patients with VUR have obesity, close follow-up should be performed, and VUR patients should be started on a weight-loss program, which could reduce the number of patients with chronic kidney disease in the future. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cooperation of Rho family proteins Rac1 and Cdc42 in cartilage development and calcified tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Mikiko; Yamada, Atsushi; Fujita, Koji; Yoshida, Yuko; Kato, Tadashi; Sakashita, Akiko; Ogata, Hiroaki; Iijima, Takehiko; Kuroda, Masahiko; Chikazu, Daichi; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2018-04-20

    Rac1 and Cdc42, Rho family low molecular weight G proteins, are intracellular signaling factors that transmit various information from outside to inside cells. Primarily, they are known to control various biological activities mediated by actin cytoskeleton reorganization, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In order to investigate the functions of Rac1 and Cdc42 in bone formation, we prepared cartilage-specific double conditional knockout mice, Rac1 fl/fl ; Cdc42 fl/fl ; Col2-Cre (Rac1: Cdc42 dcKO mice), which died just after birth, similar to Cdc42 fl/fl ; Col2-Cre mice (Cdc42 cKO mice). Our findings showed that the long tubule bone in Rac1: Cdc42 dcKO mice was shorter than that in Rac1 fl/fl ; Col2-Cre mice (Rac1 cKO mice) and Cdc42 cKO mice. Abnormal skeleton formation was also observed and disordered columnar formation in the growth plate of the Rac1: Cdc42 dcKO mice was more severe as compared to the Rac1 cKO and Cdc42 cKO mice. Together, these results suggest that Rac1 and Cdc42 have cooperating roles in regulation of bone development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of Punch Elevation Combined with Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing in Facial Atrophic Acne Scarring: A Randomized Split-face Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Gita; Nouraei, Saeid; Asilian, Ali; Keyvan, Shima; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Rakhshanpour, Mehrdad; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of treatments for reducing the appearance of acne scars are available, but general guidelines for optimizing acne scar treatment do not exist. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness and side effects of fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing combined with punch elevation with fractional CO2 laser resurfacing alone in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Materials and Methods: Forty-two Iranian subjects (age range 18–55) with Fitzpatrick skin types III to IV and moderate to severe atrophic acne scars on both cheeks received randomized split-face treatments: One side received fractional CO2 laser treatment and the other received one session of punch elevation combined with two sessions of laser fractional CO2 laser treatment, separated by an interval of 1 month. Two dermatologists independently evaluated improvement in acne scars 4 and 16 weeks after the last treatment. Side effects were also recorded after each treatment. Results: The mean ± SD age of patients was 23.4 ± 2.6 years. Clinical improvement of facial acne scarring was assessed by two dermatologists blinded to treatment conditions. No significant difference in evaluation was observed 1 month after treatment (P = 0.56). Their evaluation found that fractional CO2 laser treatment combined with punch elevation had greater efficacy than that with fractional CO2 laser treatment alone, assessed 4 months after treatment (P = 0.02). Among all side effects, coagulated crust formation and pruritus at day 3 after fractional CO2 laser treatment was significant on both treatment sides (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Concurrent use of fractional laser skin resurfacing with punch elevation offers a safe and effective approach for the treatment of acne scarring. PMID:26538695

  9. Efficacy of punch elevation combined with fractional carbon dioxide laser resurfacing in facial atrophic acne scarring: A randomized split-face clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Faghihi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of treatments for reducing the appearance of acne scars are available, but general guidelines for optimizing acne scar treatment do not exist. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness and side effects of fractional carbon dioxide (CO 2 laser resurfacing combined with punch elevation with fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing alone in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Materials and Methods: Forty-two Iranian subjects (age range 18-55 with Fitzpatrick skin types III to IV and moderate to severe atrophic acne scars on both cheeks received randomized split-face treatments: One side received fractional CO 2 laser treatment and the other received one session of punch elevation combined with two sessions of laser fractional CO 2 laser treatment, separated by an interval of 1 month. Two dermatologists independently evaluated improvement in acne scars 4 and 16 weeks after the last treatment. Side effects were also recorded after each treatment. Results: The mean ± SD age of patients was 23.4 ± 2.6 years. Clinical improvement of facial acne scarring was assessed by two dermatologists blinded to treatment conditions. No significant difference in evaluation was observed 1 month after treatment (P = 0.56. Their evaluation found that fractional CO 2 laser treatment combined with punch elevation had greater efficacy than that with fractional CO 2 laser treatment alone, assessed 4 months after treatment (P = 0.02. Among all side effects, coagulated crust formation and pruritus at day 3 after fractional CO 2 laser treatment was significant on both treatment sides (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Concurrent use of fractional laser skin resurfacing with punch elevation offers a safe and effective approach for the treatment of acne scarring.

  10. EW-7197 eluting nano-fiber covered self-expandable metallic stent to prevent granulation tissue formation in a canine urethral model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kichang Han

    Full Text Available To evaluate an EW-7197-eluting nanofiber-covered stent (NFCS for suppressing granulation tissue formation after stent placement in a canine urethral model.All experiments were approved by the committee of animal research. A total of 12 NFCSs were placed in the proximal and distal urethras of six dogs. Dogs were divided into two groups with 3 dogs each. The control stent (CS group received NFCSs and the drug stent (DS group received EW-7197 (1000 μg-eluting NFCSs. All dogs were sacrificed 8 weeks after stent placement Histologic findings of the stented urethra were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test.Stent placement was technically successful in all dogs without procedure-related complications. On urethrographic analysis, the mean luminal diameter was significantly larger in the DS group than in the CS group at 4 and 8 weeks after stent placement (all p 0.05.The EW-7197-eluting NFCS is effective and safe for suppressing granulation tissue formation after stent placement in a canine urethral model.

  11. Bio-composites composed of a solid free-form fabricated polycaprolactone and alginate-releasing bone morphogenic protein and bone formation peptide for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MinSung; Jung, Won-Kyo; Kim, GeunHyung

    2013-11-01

    Biomedical scaffolds should be designed with highly porous three-dimensional (3D) structures that have mechanical properties similar to the replaced tissue, biocompatible properties, and biodegradability. Here, we propose a new composite composed of solid free-form fabricated polycaprolactone (PCL), bone morphogenic protein (BMP-2) or bone formation peptide (BFP-1), and alginate for bone tissue regeneration. In this study, PCL was used as a mechanical supporting component to enhance the mechanical properties of the final biocomposite and alginate was used as the deterring material to control the release of BMP-2 and BFP-1. A release test revealed that alginate can act as a good release control material. The in vitro biocompatibilities of the composites were examined using osteoblast-like cells (MG63) and the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition were assessed. The in vitro test results revealed that PCL/BFP-1/Alginate had significantly higher ALP activity and calcium deposition than the PCL/BMP-2/Alginate composite. Based on these findings, release-controlled BFP-1 could be a good growth factor for enhancement of bone tissue growth and the simple-alginate coating method will be a useful tool for fabrication of highly functional biomaterials through release-control supplementation.

  12. The persistence to slaughter age of scars resulting from damage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cut wounds were persistent to slaughter as were scratch marks, with only a small percentage of scratch wounds incurred at a young age not persisting to slaughter age. Mean scar size at slaughter became smaller with an increase in age at which the wounds were inflicted, except at 13 months of age where it was assumed ...

  13. Macular scar secondary to congenital toxoplasmosis | El Hamichi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 8 years old girl suffers from strabismus since her first months of life. Her visual acuity was very low and could only see fingers moving in her left eye. Her left eye fundus showed a chorioretinal scar in the macula due to congenital toxoplasmosis. The biological findings proved the diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis.

  14. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Breast Augmentation Scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lisa R; Cresce, Nicole D; Russell, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with a persistent lesion on the inferior right breast. The lesion was located within the scar from a breast augmentation procedure 12 years ago. The lesion had been treated as several conditions with no improvement. Biopsy revealed a superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma, and the lesion was successfully removed with Mohs micrographic surgery. Basal cell carcinoma arising in a surgical scar is exceedingly rare with only 13 reported cases to date. This is the first reported case of basal cell carcinoma arising in a breast augmentation scar. We emphasize the importance of biopsy for suspicious lesions or those refractory to treatment, particularly those lesions that form within a scar. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  15. Using a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... This work used sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker to detect the Bacillus cereus strain in strawberry fields. The purpose was to develop an effective molecular method for detecting the functional target microorganisms applied in agricultural fields. A 3×109. CFU/ml vegetative cell.

  16. The Purse-String Reinforced SMASectomy Short Scar Facelift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lei, Berend; Cromheecke, Michel; Hofer, Stefan O. P.

    Background: Over the last two decades, short scar facelifts, often referred to as "mini'' facelifts, have gained popularity. We use a purse-string reinforced (PRS) superficial musculoaponeurotic system rhytidectomy (SMASectomy) shortscar facelift that combines a SMASectomy in the vertical direction

  17. Terminology and biology of fire scars in selected central hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland

    2001-01-01

    Dendrochronological analysis of fire scars requires tree survival of fire exposure. Trees survive fire exposure by: (1) avoidance of injury through constitutive protection and (2) induced defense. Induced defenses include (a) compartmentalization processes that resist the spread of injury and infection and (b) closure processes that restore the continuity of the...

  18. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Young Woo [Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Center, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin [Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won Jin [Dr. Park' s Aesthetic Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong In, E-mail: oncochem@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Soo, E-mail: khsmd@unitel.co.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  19. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Young Woo; Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin; Park, Won Jin; Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong; Lee, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. → Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. → hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  20. Postmastectomy radiotherapy with integrated scar boost using helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Yi; Yadav, Poonam; Welsh, James S.; Fahner, Tasha; Paliwal, Bhudatt

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate helical tomotherapy dosimetry in postmastectomy patients undergoing treatment for chest wall and positive nodal regions with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in the scar region using strip bolus. Six postmastectomy patients were scanned with a 5-mm-thick strip bolus covering the scar planning target volume (PTV) plus 2-cm margin. For all 6 cases, the chest wall received a total cumulative dose of 49.3–50.4 Gy with daily fraction size of 1.7–2.0 Gy. Total dose to the scar PTV was prescribed to 58.0–60.2 Gy at 2.0–2.5 Gy per fraction. The supraclavicular PTV and mammary nodal PTV received 1.7–1.9 dose per fraction. Two plans (with and without bolus) were generated for all 6 cases. To generate no-bolus plans, strip bolus was contoured and overrode to air density before planning. The setup reproducibility and delivered dose accuracy were evaluated for all 6 cases. Dose-volume histograms were used to evaluate dose-volume coverage of targets and critical structures. We observed reduced air cavities with the strip bolus setup compared with what we normally see with the full bolus. The thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in vivo dosimetry confirmed accurate dose delivery beneath the bolus. The verification plans performed on the first day megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image verified that the daily setup and overall dose delivery was within 2% accuracy compared with the planned dose. The hotspot of the scar PTV in no-bolus plans was 111.4% of the prescribed dose averaged over 6 cases compared with 106.6% with strip bolus. With a strip bolus only covering the postmastectomy scar region, we observed increased dose uniformity to the scar PTV, higher setup reproducibility, and accurate dose delivered beneath the bolus. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a strip bolus over the scar using tomotherapy for SIB dosimetry in postmastectomy treatments.

  1. The adult brain tissue response to hollow fiber membranes of varying surface architecture with or without cotransplanted cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning

    A variety of biomaterials have been chronically implanted into the central nervous system (CNS) for repair or therapeutic purposes. Regardless of the application, chronic implantation of materials into the CNS induces injury and elicits a wound healing response, eventually leading to the formation of a dense extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich scar tissue that is associated with the segregation of implanted materials from the surrounding normal tissue. Often this reaction results in impaired performance of indwelling CNS devices. In order to enhance the performance of biomaterial-based implantable devices in the CNS, this thesis investigated whether adult brain tissue response to implanted biomaterials could be manipulated by changing biomaterial surface properties or further by utilizing the biology of co-transplanted cells. Specifically, the adult rat brain tissue response to chronically implanted poly(acrylonitrile-vinylchloride) (PAN-PVC) hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) of varying surface architecture were examined temporally at 2, 4, and 12 weeks postimplantation. Significant differences were discovered in the brain tissue response to the PAN-PVC HFMs of varying surface architecture at 4 and 12 weeks. To extend this work, whether the soluble factors derived from a co-transplanted cellular component further affect the brain tissue response to an implanted HFM in a significant way was critically exploited. The cells used were astrocytes, whose ability to influence scar formation process following CNS injury by physical contact with the host tissue had been documented in the literature. Data indicated for the first time that astrocyte-derived soluble factors ameliorate the adult brain tissue reactivity toward HFM implants in an age-dependent manner. While immature astrocytes secreted soluble factors that suppressed the brain tissue reactivity around the implants, mature astrocytes secreted factors that enhanced the gliotic response. These findings prove the feasibility

  2. Biofabrication enables efficient interrogation and optimization of sequential culture of endothelial cells, fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes for formation of vascular cords in cardiac tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Rohin K; Radisic, Milica; Chiu, Loraine L Y; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that preculture of fibroblasts (FBs) and endothelial cells (ECs) prior to cardiomyocytes (CMs) improved the structural and functional properties of engineered cardiac tissue compared to culture of CMs alone or co-culture of all three cell types. However, these approaches did not result in formation of capillary-like cords, which are precursors to vascularization in vivo. Here we hypothesized that seeding the ECs first on Matrigel and then FBs 24 h later to stabilize the endothelial network (sequential preculture) would enhance cord formation in engineered cardiac organoids. Three sequential preculture groups were tested by seeding ECs (D4T line) at 8%, 15% and 31% of the total cell number on Matrigel-coated microchannels and incubating for 24 h. Cardiac FBs were then seeded (32%, 25% and 9% of the total cell number, respectively) and incubated an additional 24 h. Finally, neonatal rat CMs (60% of the total cell number) were added and the organoids were cultivated for seven days. Within 24 h, the 8% EC group formed elongated cords which eventually developed into beating cylindrical organoids, while the 15% and 31% EC groups proliferated into flat EC monolayers with poor viability. Excitation threshold (ET) in the 8% EC group (3.4 ± 1.2 V cm −1 ) was comparable to that of the CM group (3.3 ± 1.4 V cm −1 ). The ET worsened with increasing EC seeding density (15% EC: 4.4 ± 1.5 V cm −1 ; 31% EC: 4.9 ± 1.5 V cm −1 ). Thus, sequential preculture promoted vascular cord formation and enhanced architecture and function of engineered heart tissues. (paper)

  3. Lower energy radial shock wave therapy improves characteristics of hypertrophic scar in a rabbit ear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Zhang, Bo-Ru; Shi, Kai; Wang, Jian; Yu, Qing-Hua; Yu, Jia-Ao

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) on scar characteristics and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/Smad signaling in order to explore a potential modality for the treatment of hypertrophic scars (HS). The HS model was generated in rabbit ears, then rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups: Lower (L)-ESWT [treated with rESWT with lower energy flux density (EFD) of 0.1 mJ/mm 2 ], higher (H)-ESWT (treated with a higher EFD of 0.18 mJ/mm 2 ) and the sham ESWT group (S-ESWT; no ESWT treatment). Scar characteristics (wrinkles, texture, diameter, area, volume of elevation, hemoglobin and melanin) were assessed using the Antera 3D ® system. The protein and mRNA expression of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The Antera 3D ® results indicated that wrinkles and hemoglobin of the HS were significantly improved in both of the rESWT groups when compared with the S-ESWT group. However, these changes appeared much earlier in the L-ESWT group than the H-ESWT. Scar texture was also improved in the L-ESWT group. However, rESWT did not influence HS diameter, area, volume of elevation or melanin levels. rESWT had no effect on TGF-β1 or Smad7 expression in either of rESWT groups. Although no difference was observed in Smad2 mRNA expression in the L-ESWT group, the Smad3 mRNA and protein expression significantly decreased when compared with the H-ESWT and S-ESWT groups. By contrast, Smad2 and Smad3 mRNA expression were upregulated in the H-ESWT group. These results demonstrated that rESWT with 0.1 mJ/mm 2 EFD improved some characteristics of the HS tissue. Downregulation of Smad3 expression may underlie this inhibitory effect. Inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smad signal transduction pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for the management of HS.

  4. Blood-derived small Dot cells reduce scar in wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Wuyi; Li Shaowei; Longaker, Michael T.; Lorenz, H. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Wounds in fetal skin heal without scar, however the mechanism is unknown. We identified a novel group of E-cadherin positive cells in the blood of fetal and adult mice and named them 'Dot cells'. The percentage of Dot cells in E16.5 fetal mice blood is more than twenty times higher compared to adult blood. Dot cells also express integrin β1, CD184, CD34, CD13 low and Sca1 low , but not CD45, CD44, and CD117. Dot cells have a tiny dot shape between 1 and 7 μm diameters with fast proliferation in vitro. Most of the Dot cells remain positive for E-cadherin and integrin β1 after one month in culture. Transplantation of Dot cells to adult mice heals skin wounds with less scar due to reduced smooth muscle actin and collagen expression in the repair tissue. Tracking GFP-positive Dot cells demonstrates that Dot cells migrate to wounds and differentiate into dermal cells, which also express strongly to FGF-2, and later lose their GFP expression. Our results indicate that Dot cells are a group of previously unidentified cells that have strong wound healing effect. The mechanism of scarless wound healing in fetal skin is due to the presence of a large number of Dot cells

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cell injection promotes vocal fold scar repair without long-term engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARTLETT, R.S.; GUILLE, J.T.; CHEN, X.; CHRISTENSEN, M.B.; WANG, S.F.; THIBEAULT, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Regenerative medicine holds promise for restoring voice in patients with vocal fold scarring. As experimental treatments approach clinical translation, several considerations remain. Our objective was to evaluate efficacy and biocompatibility of four bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) and tunable hyaluronic acid based hydrogel (HyStem-VF) treatments for vocal fold scar using clinically acceptable materials, a preclinical sample size and a dosing comparison. Methods Vocal folds of 84 rabbits were injured and injected with four treatment variations (BM-MSC, HyStem-VF, and BM-MSC in HyStem-VF at two concentrations) 6 weeks later. Efficacy was assessed with rheometry, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and histology at 2, 4 and 10 weeks following treatment. Lung, liver, kidney, spleen and vocal folds were screened for biocompatibility by a pathologist. Results and discussion Persistent inflammation was identified in all hydrogel-injected groups. The BM-MSC alone treatment appeared to be the most efficacious and safe, providing an early resolution of viscoelasticity, gene expression consistent with desirable extracellular matrix remodeling (less fibronectin, collagen 1α2, collagen 3, procollagen, transforming growth factor [TGF]β1, alpha smooth muscle actin, interleukin-1β, interleukin-17β and tumor necrosis factor [TNF] than injured controls) and minimal inflammation. Human beta actin expression in BM-MSC–treated vocal folds was minimal after 2 weeks, suggesting that paracrine signaling from the BM-MSCs may have facilitated tissue repair. PMID:27637759

  6. Radial scars detected mammographically in a breast cancer screening programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azavedo, E.; Svane, G.

    1992-01-01

    Radial scars are getting more and more common since implementation of mammography as diagnostic tool in screening women for breast cancer. At Karolinska Hospital, 18987 asymptomatic women, aged 50-69, were screened for breast cancer through mammography during August 1989-May 1991. A total of 735 (3.87%) were recalled for additional views after initial mammograms and 463 (2.44%) were assessed with help of cytology. In all 175 women (0.92%) were selected for surgery and 146 (0.77%) had histologically verified cancers. The remaining 29 (0.15%) had non- malignant lesions of which 11 (0.06%) were radial scars. All radial scars were diagnosed on mammograms and later confirmed with histology. The radiologic characteristics were found to be a) rather thick and long radiating structures accompanied by radiolucent linear structures parallel to some of the spicules, b) absence of calcifications, c) radiolucent areas in the body of the lesion, d) an average mean size of 6 mm and e) changing image in different views. Most of the lesions, 73% (8/11), were in moderately dense breasts and there was no specific relation to the right or left breast. A majority of radial scars, 64% (7/11), were found in the upper outer quadrants, 3/11 in the lower outer quadrants and 1/11 in the lower inner quadrant. Literature shows that histology uses many synonyms for radial scars and therefore team work between radiologists and pathologists is suggested for better conformity of the diagnosis. (author). 32 refs.; 1 fig

  7. Nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite bone substitute leads to sufficient bone tissue formation already after 3 months: histological and histomorphometrical analysis 3 and 6 months following human sinus cavity augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanaati, Shahram; Barbeck, Mike; Willershausen, Ines; Thimm, Benjamin; Stuebinger, Stefan; Korzinskas, Tadas; Obreja, Karina; Landes, Constantin; Kirkpatrick, Charles J; Sader, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    In this study the de novo bone formation capacity of a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite bone substitute was assessed 3 and 6 months after its insertion into the human sinus cavity. Sinus cavity augmentation was performed in a total of 14 patients (n = 7 implantation after 3 months; n = 7 implantation after 6 months) with severely atrophic maxillary bone. The specimens obtained after 3 and 6 months were analyzed histologically and histomorphometrically with special focus on bone metabolism within the residual bone and the augmented region. This study revealed that bone tissue formation started from the bone-biomaterial-interface and was directed into the most cranial parts of the augmented region. There was no statistically significant difference in new bone formation after 3 and 6 months (24.89 ± 10.22% vs 31.29 ± 2.29%), respectively. Within the limits of the present study and according to previously published data, implant insertion in regions augmented with this bone substitute material could be considered already after 3 months. Further clinical studies with bone substitute materials are necessary to validate these findings. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A new ankylosaurine dinosaur from the Judith River Formation of Montana, USA, based on an exceptional skeleton with soft tissue preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Victoria M.; Evans, David C.

    2017-05-01

    The terrestrial Judith River Formation of northern Montana was deposited over an approximately 4 Myr interval during the Campanian (Late Cretaceous). Despite having been prospected and collected continuously by palaeontologists for over a century, few relatively complete dinosaur skeletons have been recovered from this unit to date. Here we describe a new genus and species of ankylosaurine dinosaur, Zuul crurivastator, from the Coal Ridge Member of the Judith River Formation, based on an exceptionally complete and well-preserved skeleton (ROM 75860). This is the first ankylosaurin skeleton known with a complete skull and tail club, and it is the most complete ankylosaurid ever found in North America. The presence of abundant soft tissue preservation across the skeleton, including in situ osteoderms, skin impressions and dark films that probably represent preserved keratin, make this exceptional skeleton an important reference for understanding the evolution of dermal and epidermal structures in this clade. Phylogenetic analysis recovers Zuul as an ankylosaurin ankylosaurid within a clade of Dyoplosaurus and Scolosaurus, with Euoplocephalus being more distantly related within Ankylosaurini. The occurrence of Z. crurivastator from the upper Judith River Formation fills a gap in the ankylosaurine stratigraphic and geographical record in North America, and further highlights that Campanian ankylosaurines were undergoing rapid evolution and stratigraphic succession of taxa as observed for Laramidian ceratopsids, hadrosaurids, pachycephalosaurids and tyrannosaurids.

  9. Macroanatomy and compartmentalization of recent fire scars in three North American conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Estelle Arbellay; Donald A. Falk; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland

    2016-01-01

    Fire scars are initiated by cambial necrosis caused by localized lethal heating of the tree stem. Scars develop as part of the linked survival processes of compartmentalization and wound closure. The position of scars within dated tree ring series is the basis for dendrochronological reconstruction of fire history. Macroanatomical features were described for western...

  10. Epithelioid sarcoma and squamous cell carcinoma arising in a burn scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusum D Jashnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of a malignant tumor is a well known complication of a chronic burn scar. Most of these tumors are squamous cell carcinomas and only 28 cases of burn scar sarcomas have been reported in literature. We report the first occurrence of the combination of squamous cell carcinoma and epithelioid sarcoma arising in a burn scar.

  11. Evidence-Based Scar Management: How to Improve Results with Technique and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansa, Ibrahim; Harrison, Bridget; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2016-09-01

    Scars represent the visible sequelae of trauma, injury, burn, or surgery. They may induce distress in the patient because of their aesthetically unpleasant appearance, especially if they are excessively raised, depressed, wide, or erythematous. They may also cause the patient symptoms of pain, tightness, and pruritus. Numerous products are marketed for scar prevention or improvement, but their efficacy is unclear. A literature review of high-level studies analyzing methods to prevent or improve hypertrophic scars, keloids, and striae distensae was performed. The evidence from these articles was analyzed to generate recommendations. Each intervention's effectiveness at preventing or reducing scars was rated as none, low, or high, depending on the strength of the evidence for that intervention. For the prevention of hypertrophic scars, silicone, tension reduction, and wound edge eversion seem to have high efficacy, whereas onion extract, pulsed-dye laser, pressure garments, and scar massage have low efficacy. For the treatment of existing hypertrophic scars, silicone, pulsed-dye laser, CO2 laser, corticosteroids, 5-fluorouracil, bleomycin, and scar massage have high efficacy, whereas onion extract and fat grafting seem to have low efficacy. For keloid scars, effective adjuncts to excision include corticosteroids, mitomycin C, bleomycin, and radiation therapy. No intervention seems to have significant efficacy in the prevention or treatment of striae distensae. Although scars can never be completely eliminated in an adult, this article presents the most commonly used, evidence-based methods to improve the quality and symptoms of hypertrophic scars, as well as keloid scars and striae distensae.

  12. Weather, logging, and tree growth associated with fir engraver attack scars in white fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    George T. Ferrell

    1973-01-01

    The boles of 32 recently killed, and 41 living, white fir were examined for embedded fir engraver (Scolytus ventralis) attack scars. Of 287 scars found in annual rings for the years 1934-69, only 2 to 3 percent represented reproductively successful attacks. Trends in scar abundance were directly correlated with trends in white fir killed by ...

  13. Prevention and Reduction of Atrophic Acne Scars with Adapalene 0.3%/Benzoyl Peroxide 2.5% Gel in Subjects with Moderate or Severe Facial Acne: Results of a 6-Month Randomized, Vehicle-Controlled Trial Using Intra-Individual Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dréno, Brigitte; Bissonnette, Robert; Gagné-Henley, Angélique; Barankin, Benjamin; Lynde, Charles; Kerrouche, Nabil; Tan, Jerry

    2018-04-01

    Very few clinical trials have investigated the effect of topical acne treatment on scarring. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of adapalene 0.3%/benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel (A0.3/BPO2.5) in atrophic acne scar formation in patients with acne. In this multicenter, randomized, investigator-blinded, vehicle-controlled study, subjects with moderate or severe facial acne (Investigator's Global Assessment [IGA] score 3 or 4; ≥ 25 inflammatory lesions; ten or more atrophic acne scars) applied A0.3/BPO2.5 or vehicle daily per half face for 24 weeks. Subjects with acne requiring systemic treatment were excluded. Assessments included investigator atrophic acne scar count, Scar Global Assessment (SGA), acne lesion count, IGA, skin roughness and skin texture, subject self-assessment of clinical acne-related scars and satisfaction questionnaire, tolerability, and safety. Included subjects (n = 67) had mainly moderate acne (92.5% IGA 3); mean scores at baseline were approximately 40 acne lesions and 12 scars per half face. By week 24, the change from baseline in total scar count was - 15.5% for A0.3/BPO2.5 versus  + 14.4% for vehicle (approximately 30% difference), with a mean of 9.5 scars versus 13.3 per half face, respectively (p vehicle (p vehicle (p vehicle side, most commonly skin irritation (14.9 vs. 6%, respectively). Topical A0.3/BPO2.5 prevented and reduced atrophic scar formation. Scar count increased with vehicle (+ 14.4%) but decreased with A0.3/BPO2.5 (- 15.5%) over 24 weeks. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02735421.

  14. Regrowing the adult brain: NF-κB controls functional circuit formation and tissue homeostasis in the dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Imielski

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders.

  15. Regrowing the Adult Brain: NF-κB Controls Functional Circuit Formation and Tissue Homeostasis in the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imielski, Yvonne; Schwamborn, Jens C.; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Heimann, Peter; Holzberg, Magdalena; Werner, Hendrikje; Leske, Oliver; Püschel, Andreas W.; Memet, Sylvie; Heumann, Rolf; Israel, Alain; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus) of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders. PMID:22312433

  16. Substantial species differences in relation to formation and degradation of N-acyl-ethanolamine phospholipids in heart tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, B.; Petersen, G.; Hansen, Harald S.

    2002-01-01

    beneficial effects on the heart, but in the literature there are indications of species differences in the activity of these enzymes. We have examined heart microsomes from rats, mice, guinea pigs, rabbits, frogs, cows, dogs, cats, mini pigs and human beings for activities of these two enzymes. N......-Acyl-transferase activity was very high in dogs and cats (>13 pmol/min/mg protein) whereas it was very low to barely detectable in the other species (45 pmol/min/mg protein) whereas it was 9 pmol/min/mg protein in frogs and below that in the other species. The ratio of activity between the two enzymes varied from 0.......002 to 15 in the investigated species. The activity of the two enzymes in rat hearts as opposed to rat brain did not change during development. These results indicate that there may be substantial species differences in the generation of anandamide and other NAEs as well as NAPEs in heart tissues....

  17. Antibody formation towards porcine tissue in patients implanted with crosslinked heart valves is directed to antigenic tissue proteins and αGal epitopes and is reduced in healthy vegetarian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böer, Ulrike; Buettner, Falk F R; Schridde, Ariane; Klingenberg, Melanie; Sarikouch, Samir; Haverich, Axel; Wilhelmi, Mathias

    2017-03-01

    Glutaraldehyde-fixed porcine heart valves (ga-pV) are one of the most frequently used substitutes for insufficient aortic and pulmonary heart valves which, however, degenerate after 10-15 years. Yet, xeno-immunogenicity of ga-pV in humans including identification of immunogens still needs to be investigated. We here determined the immunogenicity of ga-pV in patients with respect to antibody formation, identity of immunogens and potential options to reduce antibody levels. Levels of tissue-specific and anti-αGal antibodies were determined retrospectively in patients who received ga-pV for 51 months (n=4), 25 months (n=6) or 5 months (n=4) and compared to age-matched untreated subjects (n=10) or younger subjects with or without vegetarian diet (n=12/15). Immunogenic proteins were investigated by Western blot approaches. Tissue-specific antibodies in patients were elevated after 5 (1.73-fold) and 25 (1.46-fold, both PVegetarian diet reduced significantly (0.63-fold, P<.01) the level of pre-formed αGal but not of tissue-specific antibodies. Immune response in patients towards ga-pV is induced by the porcine proteins albumin and collagen 6A1 as well as αGal epitopes, which seemed to be more sustained. In contrast, in healthy young subjects pre-formed anti-Gal antibodies were reduced by a meat-free nutrition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Zonun’s regime (35% glycolic acid peel with microneedling followed by tretinoin 0.05% plus glycolic acid 12% application followed by salicylic acid 30% peeling for treatment of acne scars: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonunsanga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acne scars are the result of inflammation within the dermis brought on by acne. The scar is created by the wound trying to heal itself resulting in too much collagen in one spot. Current treatment available are not much satisfactory. Microneedling injure the dermis, thereby stimulating collagen formation. Glycolic acid acts as vehicle for delivery of drugs to dermis: in addition to that, it also has a role in collagen induction. Tretinoin helps in collagen formation. Salicylic acid remodel the superficial skin after the treatment. Material and Methods: A total of 4 patients in which 3 out of 4 patient, grade 3 acne scars and 1 out of 4 had grade 2 scar were treated with the regime. After taking consent 35% Glycolic acid peeling was done followed by microneedling. From the next day 12% Glycolic acid plus 0.05% Tretinoin is applied once a day for 2 months. After 2 months 30% Salicylic acid peeling is done. Photographs were taken before treatment, after 1 month and after 2 months of completion of the therapy and compared. Objective assessment was done according to Global Acne Scarring Classification. Result: subjectively 2 patients reported excellent response and 2 patients reported good response. Objectively, all patients showed good to excellent response. Conclusion: Zonun’s regime may be effective for treatment of acne scars.

  19. Long-term scar quality after hydrosurgical versus conventional debridement of deep dermal burns (HyCon trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legemate, Catherine M; Goei, Harold; Middelkoop, Esther; Oen, Irma M M H; Nijhuis, Tim H J; Kwa, Kelly A A; van Zuijlen, Paul P M; Beerthuizen, Gerard I J M; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K; van Baar, Margriet E; van der Vlies, Cornelis H

    2018-04-19

    Deep dermal burns require tangential excision of non-viable tissue and skin grafting to improve wound healing and burn-scar quality. Tangential excision is conventionally performed with a knife, but during the last decade hydrosurgery has become popular as a new tool for tangential excision. Hydrosurgery is generally thought to be a more precise and controlled manner of burn debridement leading to preservation of viable tissue and, therefore, better scar quality. Although scar quality is considered to be one of the most important outcomes in burn surgery today, no randomized controlled study has compared the effect of these two common treatment modalities with scar quality as a primary outcome. The aim of this study is, therefore, to compare long-term scar quality after hydrosurgical versus conventional tangential excision in deep dermal burns. A multicenter, randomized, intra-patient, controlled trial will be conducted in the Dutch burn centers of Rotterdam, Beverwijk, and Groningen. All patients with deep dermal burns that require excision and grafting are eligible. Exclusion criteria are: a burn wound burned > 30%, full-thickness burns, chemical or electrical burns, infected wounds (clinical symptoms in combination with positive wound swabs), insufficient knowledge of the Dutch or English language, patients that are unlikely to comply with requirements of the study protocol and follow-up, and patients who are (temporarily) incompetent because of sedation and/or intubation. A total of 137 patients will be included. Comparable wound areas A and B will be appointed, randomized and either excised conventionally with a knife or with the hydrosurgery system. The primary outcome is scar quality measured by the observer score of the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS); a subjective scar-assessment instrument, consisting of two separate six-item scales (observer and patient) that are both scored on a 10-point rating scale. This study will contribute to

  20. Left ventricular volume during supine exercise: importance of myocardial scar in patients with coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, D.L.; Scharf, J.; Ahnve, S.; Gilpin, E.

    1987-01-01

    Existing studies suggest that exercise-induced ischemia produces an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic volume; however, all of these studies have included patients with previous myocardial infarction. To test whether the end-diastolic volume response to exercise is related to the extent of myocardial scar, the results of gated radionuclide supine exercise tests performed on 130 subjects were reviewed. The patient group comprised 130 subjects were reviewed. The patient group comprised 130 men aged 35 to 65 years (mean +/- SD 52 +/- 5) with documented coronary heart disease. The extent of myocardial ischemia and scar formation was assessed by stress electrocardiography and thallium-201 scintigraphy. Patients were classified into three groups on the basis of left ventricular end-diastolic volume response at peak exercise: group 1 (n = 72) had an increase of end-diastolic volume greater than 10%, group 2 (n = 41) had a change in end-diastolic volume less than 10% and group 3 (n = 17) had a decrease in end-diastolic volume greater than 10% (n = 17). At rest there was no significant difference among groups in heart rate, systolic blood pressure, end-diastolic (EDVrest) or end-systolic volumes or ejection fraction (p greater than 0.05); however, at peak exercise the end-systolic volume response was significantly greater for group 1 (p less than 0.002)

  1. Scar evaluation of split thickness skin graft donor site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani Muha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. Split thickness skin graft harvesting causes a certain degree of scaring on the donor site. Donor site scar can cause aesthetic and functional sequelae on the patient's body. Our goal was to study the process of donor site selection, and then evaluate donor site scars and their impact on patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS. This retrospective study included 45 patients aged 5 to 61 years (in average 36, who have been treated with STSG in the 2004–2010 period. 57.8% of them were men. On a follow-up visit, we photographed healed skin defects and donor sites. We then determined and compared the surface areas of skin defect and the donor site using the Adobe® Illustrator® CS5 computer program. Donor site scars were assessed according to the Vancouver scar scale (VSS. We examined scar’s light touch sensitivity with monofilaments and skin colouring compared to adjacent healthy skin using colorimeter. Patients were also interviewed about their treatment course in a form of a standardized questionnaire. RESULTS. Our research has revealed that 20.0% of patients participated in the decision making process of choosing the donor site, while in 80.0% the donor site was chosen by the surgeon himself. 6.7% of patients were not satisfied with their donor site. Most of the patients (37/45 had donor sites on their thighs. In average, the donor site surface area was 94% bigger than the skin defect area. We found statistically significant differences in VSS values, light touch sensitivity and skin colouring between donor site scaring and adjacent healthy skin. CONCLUSIONS. Donor site scar can represent a lasting aesthetic and functional disability for patients. Our research has shown that most of the patients do not participate in the donor site selection process, but are satisfied with their donor site. In most cases, STGSs are harvested from the thigh, other anatomical regions, where scarring would be aesthetically less obtrusive, are underused

  2. Incidence of stunned, hibernating and scarred myocardium in ischaemic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Pampaloni, Miguel; Morita, Koichi; Dutka, David P.; Camici, Paolo G.; Bax, Jeroen J.

    2005-01-01

    Different criteria to identify residual viability in chronically dysfunctioning myocardium in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) can be derived by the combined assessment of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and glucose utilisation (MRG) using positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a large number of patients, the prevalence of these different patterns by purely quantitative means. One hundred and sixteen consecutive patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy (LVEF ≤40%) underwent resting 2D echocardiography to assess regional contractile function (16-segment model). PET with 15 O-labelled water (H 2 15 O) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to quantify MBF and MRG during hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp. Dysfunctional segments with normal MBF (≥0.6 ml min -1 g -1 ) were classified as stunned, and segments with reduced MBF ( -1 g -1 ) as hibernating if MRG was ≥0.25 μmol min -1 g -1 . Segments with reduced MBF and MRG -1 g -1 were classified as transmural scars and segments with reduced MBF and MRG between 0.20 and 0.25 μmol min -1 g -1 as non-transmural scars. Eight hundred and thirty-four (46%) segments were dysfunctional. Of these, 601 (72%) were chronically stunned, with 368 (61%) having normal MRG (0.47±0.20 μmol min -1 g -1 ) and 233 (39%) reduced MRG (0.16±0.05 μmol min -1 g -1 ). Seventy-four (9%) segments with reduced MBF had preserved MRG (0.40±0.18 μmol min -1 g -1 ) and were classified as hibernating myocardium. In addition, 15% of segments were classified as transmural and 4% as non-transmural scar. The mean MBF was highest in stunned myocardium (0.95±0.32 ml min -1 g -1 ), intermediate in hibernating myocardium and non-transmural scars (0.47±0.09 ml min -1 g -1 and 0.48±0.08 ml min -1 g -1 , respectively), and lowest in transmural scars (0.40±0.14 ml min -1 g -1 , P -1 g -1 vs 0.46±0.20 μmol min -1 g -1 , NS), and lowest in stunned myocardium with reduced MRG and transmural scars

  3. Comparison of therapeutic response of keloids and hypertrophic scars to cryotherapy plus intralesional steroid and bleomycin tattoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Fatemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Keloids and hypertrophic scars are abnormal responses of body to skin injuries. Overproduction of compacted fibrous tissue is the basic cause of these lesions. In this study the result of treatment of these skin conditions with bleomycin tattoo are compared with cryotherapy and triamcinolone injection. This study involved 45 patients with hypertrophic scar or keloid. Patients were divided into two groups consecutively. Group A (23 patients was treated with bleomycin tattoo and the group B with cryotherapy and triamcinolone injection. There were four therapeutic sessions one month apart. All patients were followedup for three month after the end of treatment .The therapeutic response was determined as reduction of lesion size or flattening relative to initial size. Therapeutic response was 88.3±14% in group A and 67.4 ±22.5% in group B (p<0.001. In group A 69%, but in group B only 49% of patients were asymptomatic after the end of treatment. In group A there was no relation between therapeutic response and lesion size (p=0.58 but in group B lesions those were smaller (<100mm2 had better therapeutic response than larger ones (p=0.007. It was concluded that bleomycin tattoo is more effective in treatment of hypertrophic scar and keloid than traditional treatment, cryotherapy plus triamcinolone injection especially in larger ones.

  4. Intra-arterial infusion of MTX for the treatment of cesarean scar pregnancy: a comparative study between different doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Weijin; Wang Haiyun; Wan Jun; Zhang Lei; Wang Ying; Wang Wei; Ji Fang; Ji Lihua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effective dose of methotrexate (MTX) via intra-arterial infusion for the treatment of cesarean scar pregnancy. Methods: Thirty-six cases of incisional scar pregnancy at the gestational age of 5-9 weeks received bilateral uterine arterial infusion of MTX. According to the dose of MTX used, the patients were randomly and equally divided into four groups with MTX dose of 60, 100, 150 and 200 mg respectively. After the perfusion was completed the embolization of both uterine arteries with Gelfoam was carried out until the uterine arteries were no longer visualized on DSA. Uterine curettage was conducted within 1-7 days after the treatment. Results: In one week after the procedure, the difference in the decreasing rate of serum β-HCG and progesterone between group 60 mg and group 200 mg was of statistical significance (P 0.05). The hospitalization days of group 60 mg was the longest, while that of group 200 mg was the shortest. Conclusion: The recommended dose of MTX used via intra-arterial infusion in treating cesarean scar pregnancy is 200 mg. The interventional procedure can kill the embryo tissue and quickly lower the serum β-HCG and progesterone levels,it can also shorten the patient's hospitalization time. (authors)

  5. The role of serum and urine interleukin-8 on acute pyelonephritis and subsequent renal scarring in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Ji-Nan; Chen, Shan-Ming; Meng, Meng-Hsiao; Lue, Ko-Huang

    2009-10-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 acts as a potent neutrophils chemoattractant responsible for the migration of neutrophils into the infected renal tissue to protect against invading pathogens. The aim of this study was to assess the role of IL-8 on acute-phase pyelonephritis and later renal scarring in children. A total of 124 children with a first-time febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) were studied. The diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis was confirmed by Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scan. Serum and urine samples were obtained from 124 children with UTI and 20 healthy children for IL-8 measurement. The 124 children were divided into acute pyelonephritis (n = 70) and lower UTI (n = 54) groups according to the results of DMSA scans. The initial serum and urine IL-8 values of children with acute pyelonephritis were significantly higher when compared with lower UTI and healthy controls (all P or =III all were independent predictors of renal scarring. Those children younger than 2 years of age with the highest IL-8 concentrations during the acute phase of pyelonephritis as well as children with reflux grades of III or greater are at a high-risk for developing renal scarring in the future.

  6. Engineering on the straight and narrow: the mechanics of nanofibrous assemblies for fiber-reinforced tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauck, Robert L; Baker, Brendon M; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Burdick, Jason A; Li, Wan-Ju; Tuan, Rocky S; Elliott, Dawn M

    2009-06-01

    Tissue engineering of fibrous tissues of the musculoskeletal system represents a considerable challenge because of the complex architecture and mechanical properties of the component structures. Natural healing processes in these dense tissues are limited as a result of the mechanically challenging environment of the damaged tissue and the hypocellularity and avascular nature of the extracellular matrix. When healing does occur, the ordered structure of the native tissue is replaced with a disorganized fibrous scar with inferior mechanical properties, engendering sites that are prone to re-injury. To address the engineering of such tissues, we and others have adopted a structurally motivated approach based on organized nanofibrous assemblies. These scaffolds are composed of ultrafine polymeric fibers that can be fabricated in such a way to recreate the structural anisotropy typical of fiber-reinforced tissues. This straight-and-narrow topography not only provides tailored mechanical properties, but also serves as a 3D biomimetic micropattern for directed tissue formation. This review describes the underlying technology of nanofiber production and focuses specifically on the mechanical evaluation and theoretical modeling of these structures as it relates to native tissue structure and function. Applying the same mechanical framework for understanding native and engineered fiber-reinforced tissues provides a functional method for evaluating the utility and maturation of these unique engineered constructs. We further describe several case examples where these principles have been put to test, and discuss the remaining challenges and opportunities in forwarding this technology toward clinical implementation.

  7. Engineering on the Straight and Narrow: The Mechanics of Nanofibrous Assemblies for Fiber-Reinforced Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Burdick, Jason A.; Li, Wan-Ju; Tuan, Rocky S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering of fibrous tissues of the musculoskeletal system represents a considerable challenge because of the complex architecture and mechanical properties of the component structures. Natural healing processes in these dense tissues are limited as a result of the mechanically challenging environment of the damaged tissue and the hypocellularity and avascular nature of the extracellular matrix. When healing does occur, the ordered structure of the native tissue is replaced with a disorganized fibrous scar with inferior mechanical properties, engendering sites that are prone to re-injury. To address the engineering of such tissues, we and others have adopted a structurally motivated approach based on organized nanofibrous assemblies. These scaffolds are composed of ultrafine polymeric fibers that can be fabricated in such a way to recreate the structural anisotropy typical of fiber-reinforced tissues. This straight-and-narrow topography not only provides tailored mechanical properties, but also serves as a 3D biomimetic micropattern for directed tissue formation. This review describes the underlying technology of nanofiber production and focuses specifically on the mechanical evaluation and theoretical modeling of these structures as it relates to native tissue structure and function. Applying the same mechanical framework for understanding native and engineered fiber-reinforced tissues provides a functional method for evaluating the utility and maturation of these unique engineered constructs. We further describe several case examples where these principles have been put to test, and discuss the remaining challenges and opportunities in forwarding this technology toward clinical implementation. PMID:19207040

  8. Distribution of epidermal growth factor receptors in rat tissues during embryonic skin development, hair formation, and the adult hair growth cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1984-01-01

    on the binding distribution of [125I]EGF, representing the tissue localization of available EGF receptors, during embryonic rat skin development including hair follicle formation and the adult hair growth cycle. At 16 days embryonic development a relatively low receptor density is seen over all the epidermal...... condensates marking the first stage of hair follicle development. This restricted and temporary loss of EGF receptors above these specialized mesenchymal condensates implies a role for the EGF receptor and possibly EGF or an EGF-like ligand in stimulating the epithelial downgrowth required for hair follicle...... development. In the anagen hair bulb, receptors for EGF are detected over the outer root sheath and the epithelial cell layers at the base of the follicle and show a correlation with the areas of epithelial proliferation in the hair bulb. During the catagen and telogen phases of the hair cycle, receptors...

  9. Stem cells are units of natural selection for tissue formation, for germline development, and in cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Irving L

    2015-07-21

    It is obvious that natural selection operates at the level of individuals and collections of individuals. Nearly two decades ago we showed that in multi-individual colonies of protochordate colonial tunicates sharing a blood circulation, there exists an exchange of somatic stem cells and germline stem cells, resulting in somatic chimeras and stem cell competitions for gonadal niches. Stem cells are unlike other cells in the body in that they alone self-renew, so that they form clones that are perpetuated for the life of the organism. Stem cell competitions have allowed the emergence of competitive somatic and germline stem cell clones. Highly successful germline stem cells usually outcompete less successful competitors both in the gonads of the genotype partner from which they arise and in the gonads of the natural parabiotic partners. Therefore, natural selection also operates at the level of germline stem cell clones. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri the formation of natural parabionts is prevented by a single-locus highly polymorphic histocompatibility gene called Botryllus histocompatibility factor. This limits germline stem cell predation to kin, as the locus has hundreds of alleles. We show that in mice germline stem cells compete for gonad niches, and in mice and humans, blood-forming stem cells also compete for bone marrow niches. We show that the clonal progression from blood-forming stem cells to acute leukemias by successive genetic and epigenetic events in blood stem cells also involves competition and selection between clones and propose that this is a general theme in cancer.

  10. Tissue-specific deletion of c-Jun in the pancreas has limited effects on pancreas formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ayako; Toyoda, Shuichi; Kato, Ken; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Hori, Masatsugu; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Kaneto, Hideaki

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that activating protein-1 (AP-1) is involved in a variety of cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. AP-1 is a dimer complex consisting of different subunits, and c-Jun is known to be one of its major components. In addition, it has been shown that mice lacking c-Jun are embryonic lethal and that c-Jun is essential for liver and heart development. However, the role of c-Jun in the pancreas is not well known. The aim of this study was to examine the possible role of c-Jun in the pancreas. First, c-Jun was strongly expressed in pancreatic duct-like structures at an embryonic stage, while a lower level of expression was observed in some part of the adult pancreas, implying that c-Jun might play a role during pancreas development. Second, to address this point, we generated pancreas-specific c-Jun knock-out mice (Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun flox/flox mice) by crossing Ptf1a-Cre knock-in mice with c-Jun floxed mice. Ptf1a is a pancreatic transcription factor and its expression is confined to pancreatic stem/progenitor cells, which give rise to all three types of pancreatic tissue: endocrine, exocrine, and duct. Contrary to our expectation, however, there was no morphological difference in the pancreas between Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun flox/flox and control mice. In addition, there was no difference in body weight, pancreas weight, and the expression of various pancreas-related factors (insulin, glucagon, cytokeratin, and amylase) between the two groups. Furthermore, there was no difference in glucose tolerance between Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun flox/flox and control mice. Taken together, although we cannot exclude the possibility that c-Jun ablation is compensated by some unknown factors, c-Jun appears to be dispensable for pancreas development at least after ptf1a gene promoter is activated

  11. Use of makeup, hairstyles, glasses, and prosthetics as adjuncts to scar camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidle, Douglas M; Decker, Jennifer R

    2011-08-01

    Scars after facial trauma or surgery can be a source of distress for patients, and facial plastic surgeons are frequently called upon to help manage them. Although no technique can remove a scar, numerous treatment modalities have been developed to improve facial scar appearance with varying levels of invasiveness. This article reviews techniques that camouflage scars without surgical intervention. Topical scar treatments, camouflage cosmetics, use of hairstyling and glasses, and facial prosthetics are discussed. In addition, professional counseling is provided on selection and application of topical cosmetics for use as part of an office practice. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Goniometry Paradigm Shift to Measure Burn Scar Contracture in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    movement.  Due to this  biomechanical  difference, the validity of current standard GM methods related to patient  function with burn scars is questioned...as a source of tissue recruitment or  restriction when evaluating ROM.  Standard GM methods do not account for the cutaneous  biomechanical ...complete. Each  column is labelled according to the categories on the CRFs and data should be entered  horizontally in the top available  row . The excel

  13. Laparoscopic Scar: a mimicker of Sister Mary Joseph's nodule on positron emission tomography/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setty, B.; Blake, M.A.; Holalkere, N.S.; Blaszkowsky, L.S.; Fischman, A.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/CT is an established imaging method in the diagnosis and staging of cancers. 18 F -fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the most commonly used radiotracer in positron emission tomography/CT. It is a tumour viability agent and usually its uptake within a lesion reflects the presence of a viable tumour tissue. However, false-positive FDG uptake is known to occur in benign processes of either inflammatory or infectious aetiology. We describe FDG uptake at the site of laparoscopic scar that mimicked Sister Mary Joseph's nodule in a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma. Here, the knowledge of the patient's history and subtle imaging findings helped in accurate staging of the patient. In this case report, we emphasize the value of the knowledge of the patient history and awareness of different pitfalls of FDG to achieve a correct diagnosis on positron emission tomography/CT

  14. In vitro bone formation using muscle-derived cells: a new paradigm for bone tissue engineering using polymer-bone morphogenetic protein matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Helen H; Kofron, Michelle D; El-Amin, Saadiq F; Attawia, Mohammed A; Laurencin, Cato T

    2003-06-13

    Over 800,000 bone grafting procedures are performed in the United States annually, creating a demand for viable alternatives to autogenous bone, the grafting standard in osseous repair. The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy of a BMP-polymer matrix in inducing the expression of the osteoblastic phenotype and in vitro bone formation by muscle-derived cells. Specifically, we evaluated the ability of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7), delivered from a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) matrix, to induce the differentiation of cells derived from rabbit skeletal muscle into osteoblast-like cells and subsequently form mineralized tissue. Results confirmed that muscle-derived cells attached and proliferated on the PLAGA substrates. BMP-7 released from PLAGA induced the muscle-derived cells to increase bone marker expression and form mineralized cultures. These results demonstrate the efficacy of a BMP-polymer matrix in inducing the expression of the osteoblastic phenotype by muscle-derived cells and present a new paradigm for bone tissue engineering.

  15. Control of the skin scarring response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia M. Ferreira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available There comes a time when the understanding of the cutaneous healing process becomes essential due to the need for a precocious tissue repair to reduce the physical, social, and psychological morbidity. Advances in the knowledge on the control of interaction among cells, matrix and growth factors will provide more information on the Regenerative Medicine, an emerging area of research in medical bioengineering. However, considering the dynamism and complexity of the cutaneous healing response, it is fundamental to understand the control mechanism exerted by the interaction and synergism of both systems, cutaneous nervous and central nervous, via hypothalamus hypophysis-adrenal axis, a relevant subject, but hardly ever explored. The present study reviews the neuro-immune-endocrine physiology of the skin responsible for its multiple functions and the extreme disturbances of the healing process, like the excess and deficiency of the extracellular matrix deposition.Aproxima-se uma época na qual é fundamental a compreensão do processo cicatricial cutâneo frente à necessidade da restauração tecidual precoce, visando a diminuição das morbidades física, social e psicológica. O avanço no conhecimento acerca do controle das interações entre as células, a matriz e os fatores de crescimento dará maiores informações à Medicina Regenerativa, área de pesquisa emergente da bioengenharia médica. Entretanto, diante do dinamismo e complexidade da resposta cicatricial cutânea torna-se indispensável o entendimento do mecanismo de controle exercido pela interação e sinergismo do sistema nervoso cutâneo e o sistema nervoso central, via eixo hipotálamo-hipófise-adrenal, tema relevante, porém, pouco abordado. O presente estudo revisa a fisiologia neuro-imuno-endócrina da pele, responsável por suas múltiplas funções, e os distúrbios extremos do processocicatricial, como o excesso e deficiência de deposição da matriz extracelular.

  16. The effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Soo; Jeon, Jong Hyun; Hong, Aram; Yang, Hyeong Tae; Yim, Haejun; Cho, Yong Suk; Kim, Do-Hern; Hur, Jun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Chun, Wook; Lee, Boung Chul; Seo, Cheong Hoon

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn. One hundred and forty-six burn patients with hypertrophic scar(s) were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. All patients received standard rehabilitation therapy for hypertrophic scars and 76 patients (massage group) additionally received burn scar rehabilitation massage therapy. Both before and after the treatment, we determined the scores of visual analog scale (VAS) and itching scale and assessed the scar characteristics of thickness, melanin, erythema, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), sebum, and elasticity by using ultrasonography, Mexameter(®), Tewameter(®), Sebumeter(®), and Cutometer(®), respectively. The scores of both VAS and itching scale decreased significantly in both groups, indicating a significant intragroup difference. With regard to the scar characteristics, the massage group showed a significant decrease after treatment in scar thickness, melanin, erythema, TEWL and a significant intergroup difference. In terms of scar elasticity, a significant intergroup difference was noted in immediate distension and gross skin elasticity, while the massage group significant improvement in skin distensibility, immediate distension, immediate retraction, and delayed distension. Our results suggest that burn rehabilitation massage therapy is effective in improving pain, pruritus, and scar characteristics in hypertrophic scars after burn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Ectopic pregnancy in a Caesarean section scar: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Niziurski

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of a pregnancy in a scar after Caesarean section is one of the rarest locations of ectopic pregnancies. A diagnosis and/or treatment which is too late may lead to a uterine rupture, the necessity to remove the uterus and a significant increase in morbidity among mothers. The study presents a diagnostically difficult case of a 29-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with pregnancy in its seventh week, located in a scar after a Caesarean section, with highly increased values of human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG concentration in blood serum. The pregnancy was removed and the wound was stitched during laparotomy, without a need to remove the uterus.

  18. Assay format as a critical success factor for identification of novel inhibitor chemotypes of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase from high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Thomas D Y; Sergienko, Eduard; Millán, José Luis

    2010-04-27

    The tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) isozyme is centrally involved in the control of normal skeletal mineralization and pathophysiological abnormalities that lead to disease states such as hypophosphatasia, osteoarthritis, ankylosis and vascular calcification. TNAP acts in concert with the nucleoside triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase-1 (NPP1) and the Ankylosis protein to regulate the extracellular concentrations of inorganic pyrophosphate (PP(i)), a potent inhibitor of mineralization. In this review we describe the serial development of two miniaturized high-throughput screens (HTS) for TNAP inhibitors that differ in both signal generation and detection formats, but more critically in the concentrations of a terminal alcohol acceptor used. These assay improvements allowed the rescue of the initially unsuccessful screening campaign against a large small molecule chemical library, but moreover enabled the discovery of several unique classes of molecules with distinct mechanisms of action and selectivity against the related placental (PLAP) and intestinal (IAP) alkaline phosphatase isozymes. This illustrates the underappreciated impact of the underlying fundamental assay configuration on screening success, beyond mere signal generation and detection formats.

  19. Effects of hippocampal high-frequency electrical stimulation in memory formation and their association with amino acid tissue content and release in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Meneses, Alfredo; Peña-Ortega, Fernando; Gaona, Andres; Rocha, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal high frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) at 130 Hz has been proposed as a therapeutical strategy to control neurological disorders such as intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). This study was carried out to determine the effects of hippocampal HFS on the memory process and the probable involvement of amino acids. Using the autoshaping task, we found that animals receiving hippocampal HFS showed augmented short-term, but not long-term memory formation, an effect blocked by bicuculline pretreatment and associated with enhanced tissue levels of amino acids in hippocampus. In addition, microdialysis experiments revealed high extracellular levels of glutamate, aspartate, glycine, taurine, and alanine during the application of hippocampal HFS. In contrast, GABA release augmented during HFS and remained elevated for more than 1 h after the stimulation was ended. HFS had minimal effects on glutamine release. The present results suggest that HFS has an activating effect on specific amino acids in normal hippocampus that may be involved in the enhanced short-term memory formation. These data further provide experimental support for the concept that hippocampus may be a promising target for focal stimulation to treat intractable seizures in humans. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Inc.

  20. Risk Factors for Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection and Renal Scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Ron; Shaikh, Nader; Pohl, Hans; Gravens-Mueller, Lisa; Ivanova, Anastasia; Zaoutis, Lisa; Patel, Melissa; deBerardinis, Rachel; Parker, Allison; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Haralam, Mary Ann; Pope, Marcia; Kearney, Diana; Sprague, Bruce; Barrera, Raquel; Viteri, Bernarda; Egigueron, Martina; Shah, Neha; Hoberman, Alejandro

    2015-07-01

    To identify risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal scarring in children who have had 1 or 2 febrile or symptomatic UTIs and received no antimicrobial prophylaxis. This 2-year, multisite prospective cohort study included 305 children aged 2 to 71 months with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) receiving placebo in the RIVUR (Randomized Intervention for Vesicoureteral Reflux) study and 195 children with no VUR observed in the CUTIE (Careful Urinary Tract Infection Evaluation) study. Primary exposure was presence of VUR; secondary exposures included bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD), age, and race. Outcomes were recurrent febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection (F/SUTI) and renal