WorldWideScience

Sample records for tissue including skin

  1. Sulfamethoxazole-Trimethoprim (Cotrimoxazole) for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Including Impetigo, Cellulitis, and Abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Asha C; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Currie, Bart J; Fowler, Vance; Chambers, Henry F; Tong, Steven Y C

    2017-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) affect millions of people globally, which represents a significant burden on ambulatory care and hospital settings. The role of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SXT) in SSTI treatment, particularly when group A Streptococcus (GAS) is involved, is controversial. We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials and observational studies that address the utility of SXT for SSTI treatment, caused by either GAS or Staphylococcus aureus , including methicillin-resistant (MRSA). We identified 196 studies, and 15 underwent full text review by 2 reviewers. Observational studies, which mainly focused on SSTI due to S aureus , supported the use of SXT when compared with clindamycin or β-lactams. Of 10 randomized controlled trials, 8 demonstrated the efficacy of SXT for SSTI treatment including conditions involving GAS. These findings support SXT use for treatment of impetigo and purulent cellulitis (without an additional β-lactam agent) and abscess and wound infection. For nonpurulent cellulitis, β-lactams remain the treatment of choice.

  2. MicroRNAs in skin tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kyle J; Brown, David A; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Ramchal, Talisha D; Levinson, Howard

    2015-07-01

    35.2 million annual cases in the U.S. require clinical intervention for major skin loss. To meet this demand, the field of skin tissue engineering has grown rapidly over the past 40 years. Traditionally, skin tissue engineering relies on the "cell-scaffold-signal" approach, whereby isolated cells are formulated into a three-dimensional substrate matrix, or scaffold, and exposed to the proper molecular, physical, and/or electrical signals to encourage growth and differentiation. However, clinically available bioengineered skin equivalents (BSEs) suffer from a number of drawbacks, including time required to generate autologous BSEs, poor allogeneic BSE survival, and physical limitations such as mass transfer issues. Additionally, different types of skin wounds require different BSE designs. MicroRNA has recently emerged as a new and exciting field of RNA interference that can overcome the barriers of BSE design. MicroRNA can regulate cellular behavior, change the bioactive milieu of the skin, and be delivered to skin tissue in a number of ways. While it is still in its infancy, the use of microRNAs in skin tissue engineering offers the opportunity to both enhance and expand a field for which there is still a vast unmet clinical need. Here we give a review of skin tissue engineering, focusing on the important cellular processes, bioactive mediators, and scaffolds. We further discuss potential microRNA targets for each individual component, and we conclude with possible future applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Biothermomechanical behavior of skin tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.Xu; T.J.Lu; K.A.Seffen

    2008-01-01

    Advances in laser,microwave and similar tech nologies have led to recent developments of thermal treatments involving skin tissue.The effectiveness of these treatments is governed by the coupled thermal,mechanical,biological and neural responses of the affected tissue:a favorable interaction results in a procedure with relatively little pain and no lasting side effects.Currently,even though each behavioral facet is to a certain extent established and understood,none exists to date in the interdisciplinarv area.A highly interdisciplinary approach is required for studying the biothermomechanical behavior of skin,involving bioheat transfer.biomechanics and physiology.A comprehensive literature review penrtinent to the subject is presented in this paper,covering four subject areas:(a)skin structure,(b)skin bioheat transfer and thermal damage,(c)skin biomechanics,and(d)skin biothermomechanics.The major problems,issues,and topics for further studies are also outlined.This review finds that significant advances in each of these aspects have been achieved in recent years.Although focus is placed upon the biothermomechanical behavior of skin tissue,the fundamental concepts and methodologies reviewed in this paper may also be applicable for studying other soft tissues.

  4. Quantification of thermal damage in skin tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Feng; Wen Ting; Lu Tianjian; Seffen Keith

    2008-01-01

    Skin thermal damage or skin burns are the most commonly encountered type of trauma in civilian and military communities. Besides, advances in laser, microwave and similar technologies have led to recent developments of thermal treatments for disease and damage involving skin tissue, where the objective is to induce thermal damage precisely within targeted tissue structures but without affecting the surrounding, healthy tissue. Further, extended pain sensation induced by thermal damage has also brought great problem for burn patients. Thus, it is of great importance to quantify the thermal damage in skin tissue. In this paper, the available models and experimental methods for quantification of thermal damage in skin tissue are discussed.

  5. Quantification of thermal damage in skin tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐峰; 文婷; 卢天健; Seffen; Keith

    2008-01-01

    Skin thermal damage or skin burns are the most commonly encountered type of trauma in civilian and military communities. Besides, advances in laser, microwave and similar technologies have led to recent developments of thermal treatments for disease and damage involving skin tissue, where the objective is to induce thermal damage precisely within targeted tissue structures but without affecting the surrounding, healthy tissue. Further, extended pain sensation induced by thermal damage has also brought great...

  6. Skin and soft-tissue infec tions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-06-01

    Jun 1, 2010 ... Patients with skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs) often initially present to family physicians. ..... Nosocomial infections are often caused by MRSA or mixed .... site infections are good hand hygiene, good surgical technique.

  7. Skin-associated lymphoid tissues (SALT): origins and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streilein, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    The skin has an unusual set of immunologic requirements. It is confronted by a specialized set of pathogenic organisms and environmental chemicals that represent a distinctive spectrum of antigenic specificities. Skin is subjected to physicochemical stresses such as irradiation with ultraviolet light that alter dramatically its immunologic properties. It is proposed that nature has provided skin with a unique collection of lymphoid cells, reticular cells, and organized lymphoid organs to deal with these special demands. Evidence in favor of the existence of skin-associated lymphoid tissues (SALT) includes (1) the cutaneous microenvironment is capable on its own of accepting, processing, and presenting nominal antigen; (2) strategically located peripheral lymph nodes are able to accept immunogenic signals derived from skin; (3) subsets of T lymphocytes display differential affinity for skin and its associated peripheral nodes; and (4) acquisition of this affinity by T cells is determined at least in part by differentiation signals received in situ from resident cutaneous cells. Responsibility for the establishment and integration of SALT rests with keratinocytes, Langerhans cells, and immunocompetent lymphocytes, each of which contributes uniquely to the synthesis. Together they provide skin with immune surveillance that effectively prejudices against the development of cutaneous neoplasms and persistent infection with intracellular pathogens. In patients who have been under long-term immunosuppressive therapy, the large majority of nonlymphoid malignancies arise within the skin, rather than other types of tissues. These data suggest that immune surveillance, once thought to be an immune defense operative in all somatic tissues, is a specialized immune function dedicated to the skin and mediated by SALT

  8. Skin and Soft Tissue Infections (Patera Foot) in Immigrants, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternavasio-de la Vega, Hugo-Guillermo; Ángel-Moreno, Alfonso; Hernández-Cabrera, Michele; Pisos-Álamo, Elena; Bolaños-Rivero, Margarita; Carranza-Rodriguez, Cristina; Calderín-Ortega, Antonio; Pérez-Arellano, José-Luis

    2009-01-01

    An unusual skin and soft tissue infection of the lower limbs has been observed in immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa who cross the Atlantic Ocean crowded on small fishing boats (pateras). Response to conventional treatment is usually poor. Extreme extrinsic factors (including new pathogens) may contribute to the etiology of the infection and its pathogenesis. PMID:19331742

  9. Comparison of tissue viability imaging and colorimetry: skin blanching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hongbo; Chan, Heidi P; Farahmand, Sara; Nilsson, Gert E; Maibach, Howard I

    2009-02-01

    Operator-independent assessment of skin blanching is important in the development and evaluation of topically applied steroids. Spectroscopic instruments based on hand-held probes, however, include elements of operator dependence such as difference in applied pressure and probe misalignment, while laser Doppler-based methods are better suited for demonstration of skin vasodilatation than for vasoconstriction. To demonstrate the potential of the emerging technology of Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) in the objective and operator-independent assessment of skin blanching. The WheelsBridge TiVi600 Tissue Viability Imager was used for quantification of human skin blanching with the Minolta chromameter CR 200 as an independent colorimeter reference method. Desoximetasone gel 0.05% was applied topically on the volar side of the forearm under occlusion for 6 h in four healthy adults. In a separate study, the induction of blanching in the occlusion phase was mapped using a transparent occlusion cover. The relative uncertainty in the blanching estimate produced by the Tissue Viability Imager was about 5% and similar to that of the chromameter operated by a single user and taking the a(*) parameter as a measure of blanching. Estimation of skin blanching could also be performed in the presence of a transient paradoxical erythema, using the integrated TiVi software. The successive induction of skin blanching during the occlusion phase could readily be mapped by the Tissue Viability Imager. TiVi seems to be suitable for operator-independent and remote mapping of human skin blanching, eliminating the main disadvantages of methods based on hand-held probes.

  10. Skin Diseases Modeling using Combined Tissue Engineering and Microfluidic Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Heidary Araghi, Behnaz; Beydaghi, Vahid; Geraili, Armin; Moradi, Farshid; Jafari, Parya; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Valente, Karolina Papera; Akbari, Mohsen; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, both tissue engineering and microfluidics have significantly contributed in engineering of in vitro skin substitutes to test the penetration of chemicals or to replace damaged skins. Organ-on-chip platforms have been recently inspired by the integration of microfluidics and biomaterials in order to develop physiologically relevant disease models. However, the application of organ-on-chip on the development of skin disease models is still limited and needs to be further developed. The impact of tissue engineering, biomaterials and microfluidic platforms on the development of skin grafts and biomimetic in vitro skin models is reviewed. The integration of tissue engineering and microfluidics for the development of biomimetic skin-on-chip platforms is further discussed, not only to improve the performance of present skin models, but also for the development of novel skin disease platforms for drug screening processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. [Microbiological diagnosis of infections of the skin and soft tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burillo, Almudena; Moreno, Antonio; Salas, Carlos

    2007-11-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections are often seen in clinical practice, yet their microbiological diagnosis is among the most complex of laboratory tasks. The diagnosis of a skin and a soft tissue infection is generally based on clinical criteria and not microbiological results. A microbiological diagnosis is reserved for cases in which the etiology of infection is required, e.g., when the infection is particularly severe, when less common microorganisms are suspected as the causative agent (e.g. in immunocompromised patients), when response to antimicrobial treatment is poor, or when a longstanding wound does not heal within a reasonable period of time. We report the indications, sampling and processing techniques, and interpretation criteria for various culture types, including quantitative cultures from biopsy or tissue specimens and semiquantitative and qualitative cultures performed on all types of samples. For non-invasive samples taken from open wounds, application of the Q index to Gram stains is a cost-effective way to standardize sample quality assessment and interpretation of the pathogenic involvement of the different microorganisms isolated from cultures. All these issues are covered in the SEIMC microbiological procedure number 22: Diagnóstico microbiológico de las infecciones de piel y tejidos blandos (Microbiological diagnosis of infections of the skin and soft tissues) (2nd ed., 2006, www.seimc.org/protocolos/microbiologia).

  12. Analysis of human skin tissue by millimeter-wave reflectometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, P.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background/pupose: Millimeter-wave reflectometry is a potentially interesting technique to analyze the human skin in vivo in order to determine the water content locally in the skin. Purpose of this work is to investigate the possibility of skin-tissue differentiation. In addition, it addresses the

  13. Monitoring of tritium-contaminated surfaces, including skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surette, R A; Wood, M J

    1994-05-01

    We have examined various commercially available tritium surface contamination monitors along with different swipe media and techniques for direct and indirect (swipe) monitoring of contaminated surfaces, including skin. None of the methods or instruments evaluated were more sensitive than the swipe and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) method. Swipe measurements with open-window proportional counters were, in general, less than half as sensitive as LSC, but have the advantages of having the results available almost immediately, and no sample preparation is required. The Nuclear Measurement Corporation`s PC-55 is the most suitable instrument we tested for the analysis of routine swipe measurement. The PC-55 was about one third as sensitive as LSC when used with Ontario Hydro filter paper swipe media. Surface contamination measurement results can be obtained within minutes using the PC-55, compared to hours using LSC. The selection of swipe media for use with proportional counter-based instruments is critical. A medium that is electrically insulating can develop an electrostatic charge on its surface; this may alter the field gradient in the detector and may adversely influence the results. Although the PC-55 is sufficiently sensitive and very convenient, operational experience with the instrument is needed before recommending that it replace current LSC methods. The PC-55`s susceptibility to internal tritium contamination may limit its practical usefulness. Because of the complexity of using live animals to evaluate direct and indirect methods for assessing skin contamination, pig skin was investigated as a possible substitute. We concluded that, for the first few hours post-exposure, pig skin mimics the kinetics of animal skin that has contacted a tritium-contaminated surface. (author). 30 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  14. Monitoring of tritium-contaminated surfaces, including skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surette, R.A.; Wood, M.J.

    1994-05-01

    We have examined various commercially available tritium surface contamination monitors along with different swipe media and techniques for direct and indirect (swipe) monitoring of contaminated surfaces, including skin. None of the methods or instruments evaluated were more sensitive than the swipe and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) method. Swipe measurements with open-window proportional counters were, in general, less than half as sensitive as LSC, but have the advantages of having the results available almost immediately, and no sample preparation is required. The Nuclear Measurement Corporation's PC-55 is the most suitable instrument we tested for the analysis of routine swipe measurement. The PC-55 was about one third as sensitive as LSC when used with Ontario Hydro filter paper swipe media. Surface contamination measurement results can be obtained within minutes using the PC-55, compared to hours using LSC. The selection of swipe media for use with proportional counter-based instruments is critical. A medium that is electrically insulating can develop an electrostatic charge on its surface; this may alter the field gradient in the detector and may adversely influence the results. Although the PC-55 is sufficiently sensitive and very convenient, operational experience with the instrument is needed before recommending that it replace current LSC methods. The PC-55's susceptibility to internal tritium contamination may limit its practical usefulness. Because of the complexity of using live animals to evaluate direct and indirect methods for assessing skin contamination, pig skin was investigated as a possible substitute. We concluded that, for the first few hours post-exposure, pig skin mimics the kinetics of animal skin that has contacted a tritium-contaminated surface. (author). 30 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  15. Skin Cancer (Including Melanoma)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer. The main types of skin cancer are squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Most deaths from skin cancer are caused by melanoma. Start here to find information on skin cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  16. Current Concepts in Tissue Engineering: Skin and Wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenhaus, Mayer; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Pure regenerative healing with little to no donor morbidity remains an elusive goal for both surgeon and patient. The ability to engineer and promote the development of like tissue holds so much promise, and efforts in this direction are slowly but steadily advancing. Products selected and reviewed reflect historical precedence and importance and focus on current clinically available products in use. Emerging technologies we anticipate will further expand our therapeutic options are introduced. The topic of tissue engineering is incredibly broad in scope, and as such the authors have focused their review on that of constructs specifically designed for skin and wound healing. A review of pertinent and current clinically related literature is included. Products such as biosynthetics, biologics, cellular promoting factors, and commercially available matrices can be routinely found in most modern health care centers. Although to date no complete regenerative or direct identical soft-tissue replacement exists, currently available commercial components have proven beneficial in augmenting and improving some types of wound healing scenarios. Cost, directed specificity, biocompatibility, and bioburden tolerance are just some of the impending challenges to adoption. Quality of life and in fact the ability to sustain life is dependent on our most complex and remarkable organ, skin. Although pure regenerative healing and engineered soft-tissue constructs elude us, surgeons and health care providers are slowly gaining comfort and experience with concepts and strategies to improve the healing of wounds.

  17. Skin penetration and tissue permeation after topical administration of diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Martina; Baker, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Topical delivery of drugs is an alternative to oral administration, often with similar efficacy but potentially a more favorable tolerability profile. However, topical formulations need to be able to penetrate the skin and permeate to the target areas in quantities sufficient to exert a therapeutic effect. Many factors can affect this process, including the physicochemical properties of the drug, the formulation used, and the site and mode of application. It is believed that measurement of drug concentrations at the sites of action may be an indicator of their likely efficacy. This review addresses these issues, with reference to topically administered diclofenac in osteoarthritis. Articles relevant to this review were identified after a systematic search of Medline and Embase, using the key words "diclofenac", "topical administration" and "osteoarthritis" in the search strategy. The sparse data available indicate that topical diclofenac can penetrate and permeate to deeper tissues, with a lower plasma to tissue ratio than oral diclofenac. The tissue diclofenac levels after topical delivery are sustained over time (at least several hours). However, there is not enough data to establish how diclofenac levels in the joint compare with IC 50 levels (50% of the maximum inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis) established following oral administration. After topical application, diclofenac can penetrate the skin and permeate to deeper tissues, where it reaches a concentration that appears to be sufficient to exert a therapeutic effect. More robust methods are required for in vivo characterization to better estimate the clinical efficacy of topically applied drugs.

  18. Tumors of the skin and soft tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    The majority of the body surface is covered by the skin. Many internal disorders are reflected in the condition of the skin. One of the major functions of the skin is protection of the other organ systems from a variety of environmental insults. In this role, the skin itself is exposed to factors that can ultimately cause chronic diseases and cancer. Since it is relatively easy to recognize skin abnormalities, most skin cancers are brought to professional attention sooner than other types of cancer. However, due to the close resemblance between many skin neoplasms and noncancerous dermatologic disorders, these neoplasms may be mistreated for months or even years. In veterinary oncology, as in human medicine, most cancers can be effectively treated or cured following an accurate diagnosis. Once diagnosed, skin neoplasms should be aggressively treated. If causal factors are known, exposure to these factors should be limited through removal of the agent (for chemical carcinogens) or limiting exposure to the agent (for other carcinogens such as sunlight). 10 tabs. (MHB)

  19. Terahertz pulse imaging in reflection geometry of human skin cancer and skin tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, Ruth M; Cole, Bryan E; Wallace, Vincent P; Pye, Richard J; Arnone, Donald D; Linfield, Edmund H; Pepper, Michael

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) in reflection geometry for the study of skin tissue and related cancers both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of terahertz radiation to polar molecules, such as water, makes TPI suitable for studying the hydration levels in the skin and the determination of the lateral spread of skin cancer pre-operatively. By studying the terahertz pulse shape in the time domain we have been able to differentiate between diseased and normal tissue for the study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Basal cell carcinoma has shown a positive terahertz contrast, and inflammation and scar tissue a negative terahertz contrast compared to normal tissue. In vivo measurements on the stratum corneum have enabled visualization of the stratum corneum-epidermis interface and the study of skin hydration levels. These results demonstrate the potential of terahertz pulse imaging for the study of skin tissue and its related disorders, both in vitro and in vivo

  20. Skin cancer risk in autoimmune connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostaki, D; Antonini, A; Peris, K; Fargnoli, M C

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous malignancies have been significantly associated with autoimmune connective tissue diseases (ACTDs). This review focuses on the current state of knowledge on skin cancer risk in the most prevalent ACTDs in dermatology including lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, dermatomyositis and Sjögren syndrome. Potential pathogenetic mechanisms for the association between ACTDs and malignancy involve disease-related impairment of immune system, sustained cutaneous inflammation, drug-associated immune suppression and increased susceptibility to acquired viral infections. An additional causal role might be played by environmental factors such as UV exposure and smoking. The occurrence of skin cancer can have a profound impact on the already compromised quality of life of ACTD patients. Therefore, effective screening and monitoring strategies are essential for ACTD patients as early detection and prompt therapeutic intervention can reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients.

  1. Tissue expansion and fluid absorption by skin tissue following intradermal injections through hollow microneedles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Pranav; Stoeber, Boris

    2017-11-01

    Hollow microneedles provide a promising alternative to conventional drug delivery techniques due to improved patient compliance and the dose sparing effect. The dynamics of fluid injected through hollow microneedles into skin, which is a heterogeneous and deformable porous medium, have not been investigated extensively in the past. We have introduced the use of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) for real-time visualization of fluid injections into excised porcine tissue. The results from ex-vivo experiments, including cross-sectional tissue images from OCT and pressure/flow-rate measurements, show a transient mode of high flow-rate into the tissue followed by a lower steady-state infusion rate. The injected fluid expands the underlying tissue and causes the external free surface of the skin to rise, forming a characteristic intradermal wheal. We have used OCT to visualize the evolution of tissue and free surface deformation, and advancement of the boundary between regions of expanding and stationary tissue. We will show the effect of different injection parameters such as fluid pressure, viscosity and microneedle retraction on the injected volume. This work has been supported through funding from the Collaborative Health Research Program by the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Health Research Institute, and through the Canada Research Chairs program.

  2. Tissue engineering skin: a paradigm shift in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, C

    2005-12-01

    Tissue-engineered skin for the treatment of burns and ulcers is a clinical success, but making it commercially viable is more problematic. This article examines the industry, its techniques and suggests the way forward.

  3. Skin Cancer (Including Melanoma)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are referred to as nonmelanoma skin cancers. Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes, which make the melanin. Find evidence-based information on skin cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, genetics, and statistics.

  4. Gingival Tissue Color Related With Facial Skin and Acrylic Resin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study is to determine the predominant gingival tissue colour in this environment; to assess the association of gingival tissue colour with gender and facial skin colour. Four hundred and thirty subjects that attended the Dental Centre, University College Hospital, Ibadan, who consented to participate in the ...

  5. Elemental composition of skin tissue by PIXE and INAA analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollands, R.; Spyrou, N.M.

    1997-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars are a particular type of scar that can form after any type of dermal injury. They are unsightly, red, elevated above normal skin level, itchy and painful. At present no-one knows why these scars form. Due to the differences between scar tissue and normal skin it was decided to analyse skin tissue which at a later date would be compared to scar tissue. Spit skin graft (epidermis) samples as well as full thickness skin (epidermis to dermis) tissue were analysed using PIXE and RBS with a 2 MeV proton beam. The epidermis was compared to the dermis to see if there were any variations between the two. In all the samples P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, and Cd were detected and in a majority of the samples Zn and Ba were found, using PIXE. It was found that, between the epidermis and dermis, there was an significant increase in P in the epidermis in both full thickness and split skin graft samples. Complementary elemental analysis was also performed using neutron activation, and Br, Na and Zn were detected. (author)

  6. Use of autologous tissue engineered skin to treat porcine full-thickness skin defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xia; CAO Yi-lin; CUI Lei; LIU Wei; GUAN Wen-xiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore a feasible method to repair full-thickness skin defects utilizing tissue engineered techniques. Methods: The Changfeng hybrid swines were used and the skin specimens were cut from the posterior limb girdle region, from which the keratinocytes and fibroblasts were isolated and harvested by trypsin, EDTA, and type II collagenase. The cells were seeded in Petri dishes for primary culture. When the cells were in logarithmic growth phase, they were treated with trypsin to separate them from the floor of the tissue culture dishes. A biodegradable material, Pluronic F-127, was prefabricated and mixed with these cells, and then the cell-Pluronic compounds were seeded evenly into a polyglycolic acid (PGA). Then the constructs were replanted to the autologous animals to repair the full-thickness skin defects. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the neotissue were observed in 1, 2, 4, and 8 postoperative weeks. Results: The cell-Pluronic F-127-PGA compounds repaired autologous full-thickness skin defects 1 week after implantation. Histologically, the tissue engineered skin was similar to the normal skin with stratified epidermis overlying a moderately thick collageneous dermis. Three of the structural proteins in the epidermal basement membrane zone, type IV collagen, laminin, and type VII collagen were detected using immunohistochemical methods. Conclusions: By studying the histology and immunohistochemistry of the neotissue, the bioengineered skin graft holds great promise for improving healing of the skin defects.

  7. Approaches to improve angiogenesis in tissue-engineered skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, Parbinder S; Burn, J Lance; Brown, Nicola J; MacNeil, Sheila

    2004-01-01

    A problem with tissue-engineered skin is clinical failure due to delays in vascularization. The aim of this study was to explore a number of simple strategies to improve angiogenesis/vascularization using a tissue-engineered model of skin to which small vessel human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were added. For the majority of these studies, a modified Guirguis chamber was used, which allowed the investigation of several variables within the same experiment using the same human dermis; cell type, angiogenic growth factors, the influence of keratinocytes and fibroblasts, mechanical penetration of the human dermis, the site of endothelial cell addition, and the influence of hypoxia were all examined. A qualitative scoring system was used to assess the impact of these factors on the penetration of endothelial cells throughout the dermis. Similar results were achieved using freshly isolated small vessel human dermal microvascular endothelial cells or an endothelial cell line and a minimum cell seeding density was identified. Cell penetration was not influenced by the addition of angiogenic growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor); similarly, including epidermal keratinocytes or dermal fibroblasts did not encourage endothelial cell entry, and neither did mechanical introduction of holes throughout the dermis. Two factors were identified that significantly enhanced endothelial cell penetration into the dermis: hypoxia and the site of endothelial cell addition. Endothelial cells added from the papillary surface entered into the dermis much more effectively than when cells were added to the reticular surface of the dermis. We conclude that this model is valuable in improving our understanding of how to enhance vascularization of tissue-engineered grafts.

  8. Imaging-guided two-photon excitation-emission-matrix measurements of human skin tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingqiu; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Wang, Hequn; Tang, Shuo; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2012-07-01

    There are increased interests on using multiphoton imaging and spectroscopy for skin tissue characterization and diagnosis. However, most studies have been done with just a few excitation wavelengths. Our objective is to perform a systematic study of the two-photon fluorescence (TPF) properties of skin fluorophores, normal skin, and diseased skin tissues. A nonlinear excitation-emission-matrix (EEM) spectroscopy system with multiphoton imaging guidance was constructed. A tunable femtosecond laser was used to vary excitation wavelengths from 730 to 920 nm for EEM data acquisition. EEM measurements were performed on excised fresh normal skin tissues, seborrheic keratosis tissue samples, and skin fluorophores including: NADH, FAD, keratin, melanin, collagen, and elastin. We found that in the stratum corneum and upper epidermis of normal skin, the cells have large sizes and the TPF originates from keratin. In the lower epidermis, cells are smaller and TPF is dominated by NADH contributions. In the dermis, TPF is dominated by elastin components. The depth resolved EEM measurements also demonstrated that keratin structure has intruded into the middle sublayers of the epidermal part of the seborrheic keratosis lesion. These results suggest that the imaging guided TPF EEM spectroscopy provides useful information for the development of multiphoton clinical devices for skin disease diagnosis.

  9. Unexpected complication associated with balneotherapy: Skin and soft tissue infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alım, Bülent; Bostancı, Fahrettin; Servi, M. Alperen; Ćetinel, Sinan; Bingöl, M. Ozan

    2017-04-01

    Balneotherapy cure is an ongoing process, but patients can benefit most when cure is complete. For these reason, patients should be closely monitored and necessary precautions should be taken in terms of the complications that may occur in order to prevent the interruption or discontinuation of balneotherapy. Here, we wanted to represent a case that developed left leg soft tissue infection during the application of balneotherapy and because of this reason we stopped the balneotherapy As a result, when balneotherapy is planned for patients with risk factors such as diabetes and obesity, frequent examination of the skin and the application of skin moisturizers will be beneficial to prevent itching and skin dryness.

  10. The prediction of blood-tissue partitions, water-skin partitions and skin permeation for agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Michael H; Gola, Joelle M R; Ibrahim, Adam; Acree, William E; Liu, Xiangli

    2014-07-01

    There is considerable interest in the blood-tissue distribution of agrochemicals, and a number of researchers have developed experimental methods for in vitro distribution. These methods involve the determination of saline-blood and saline-tissue partitions; not only are they indirect, but they do not yield the required in vivo distribution. The authors set out equations for gas-tissue and blood-tissue distribution, for partition from water into skin and for permeation from water through human skin. Together with Abraham descriptors for the agrochemicals, these equations can be used to predict values for all of these processes. The present predictions compare favourably with experimental in vivo blood-tissue distribution where available. The predictions require no more than simple arithmetic. The present method represents a much easier and much more economic way of estimating blood-tissue partitions than the method that uses saline-blood and saline-tissue partitions. It has the added advantages of yielding the required in vivo partitions and being easily extended to the prediction of partition of agrochemicals from water into skin and permeation from water through skin. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (MRSA) has become a key pathogen in skin and soft-tissue infections. (SSTIs). The emergence of ..... SSTI isolates; (iii) improved hospital infection control guidelines and practices to prevent .... So exposed in the field. And he'll never run off ...

  12. [Decellularized fish skin: characteristics that support tissue repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnússon, Skúli; Baldursson, Baldur Tumi; Kjartansson, Hilmar; Thorlacius, Guðný Ella; Axelsson, Ívar; Rolfsson, Óttar; Petersen, Pétur Henry; Sigurjónsson, Guðmundur Fertram

    2015-12-01

    Acellular fish skin of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is being used to treat chronic wounds. The prevalence of diabetes and the comorbidity of chronic wounds is increasing globally. The aim of the study was to assess the biocompatibility and biological characteristics of acellular fish skin, important for tissue repair. The structure of the acellular fish skin was examined with microscopy. Biocompatibility of the graft was conducted by a specialized certified laboratory. Protein extracts from the material were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Cytokine levels were measured with an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Angiogenic properties were assessed with a chick chorioallantoic membrane (chick CAM) assay. The structure of acellular fish skin is porous and the material is biocompatible. Electrophoresis revealed proteins around the size 115-130 kDa, indicative of collagens. The material did not have significant effect on IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-6 or TNF-α secretion from monocytes or macrophages. Acellular fish skin has significant effect on angiogenesis in the chick CAM assay. The acellular fish skin is not toxic and is not likely to promote inflammatory responses. The graft contains collagen I, promotes angiogenesis and supports cellular ingrowth. Compared to similar products made from mammalian sources, acellular fish skin does not confer a disease risk and contains more bioactive compounds, due to less severe processing.

  13. From Cell to Tissue Properties-Modeling Skin Electroporation With Pore and Local Transport Region Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermol-Cerne, Janja; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2018-02-01

    Current models of tissue electroporation either describe tissue with its bulk properties or include cell level properties, but model only a few cells of simple shapes in low-volume fractions or are in two dimensions. We constructed a three-dimensional model of realistically shaped cells in realistic volume fractions. By using a 'unit cell' model, the equivalent dielectric properties of whole tissue could be calculated. We calculated the dielectric properties of electroporated skin. We modeled electroporation of single cells by pore formation on keratinocytes and on the papillary dermis which gave dielectric properties of the electroporated epidermis and papillary dermis. During skin electroporation, local transport regions are formed in the stratum corneum. We modeled local transport regions and increase in their radii or density which affected the dielectric properties of the stratum corneum. The final model of skin electroporation accurately describes measured electric current and voltage drop on the skin during electroporation with long low-voltage pulses. The model also accurately describes voltage drop on the skin during electroporation with short high-voltage pulses. However, our results indicate that during application of short high-voltage pulses additional processes may occur which increase the electric current. Our model connects the processes occurring at the level of cell membranes (pore formation), at the level of a skin layer (formation of local transport region in the stratum corneum) with the tissue (skin layers) and even level of organs (skin). Using a similar approach, electroporation of any tissue can be modeled, if the morphology of the tissue is known.

  14. Uncovering of melanin fluorescence in human skin tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Matthias; Stankovic, Goran; Seewald, Gunter; Leupold, Dieter

    2007-07-01

    Due to its extremely low fluorescence quantum yield, in the conventionally (one-photon) excited autofluorescence of skin tissue, melanin fluorescence is masked by several other endogenous and possibly also exogenous fluorophores (e.g. NADH, FAD, Porphyrins). A first step to enhance the melanin contribution had been realized by two-photon fs-pulse excitation in the red/near IR, based on the fact that melanin can be excited by stepwise two-photon absorption, whereas all other fluorophores in this spectral region allow only simultaneous two-photon excitation. Now, the next and decisive step has been realized: Using an extremely sensitive detection system, for the first time twophoton fluorescence of skin tissue excited with pulses in the ns-range could be measured. The motivation for this step was based on the fact that the population density of the fluorescent level resulting from a stepwise excitation has a different dependence of the pulse duration than that from a simultaneous excitation (Δt2 vs. Δt). Due to this strong discrimination between the fluorophores, practically pure melanin fluorescence can be obtained. Examples for in-vivo, ex-vivo as well as paraffin embedded skin tissue will be shown. The content of information with respect to early diagnosis of skin deseases will be discussed.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue for skin tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sweta K. [Department of Polymer and Process Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Dinda, Amit K. [Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Potdar, Pravin D. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mishra, Narayan C., E-mail: mishrawise@gmail.com [Department of Polymer and Process Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2013-10-15

    The present study aims to fabricate scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue and evaluate it for skin tissue engineering applications. Decellularized goat-lung scaffold was fabricated by removing cells from cadaver goat-lung tissue enzymatically, to have cell-free 3D-architecture of natural extracellular matrix. DNA quantification assay and Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the absence of cellular material in the decellularized lung-tissue. SEM analysis of decellularized scaffold shows the intrinsic porous structure of lung tissue with well-preserved pore-to-pore interconnectivity. FTIR analysis confirmed non-denaturation and well maintainance of collagenous protein structure of decellularized scaffold. MTT assay, SEM analysis and H and E staining of human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cell, seeded over the decellularized scaffold, confirms stem cell attachment, viability, biocompatibility and proliferation over the decellularized scaffold. Expression of Keratin18 gene, along with CD105, CD73 and CD44, by human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cells over decellularized scaffold signifies that the cells are viable, proliferating and migrating, and have maintained their critical cellular functions in the presence of scaffold. Thus, overall study proves the applicability of the goat-lung tissue derived decellularized scaffold for skin tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • We successfully fabricated decellularized scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue. • Decellularized goat-lung scaffolds were found to be highly porous. • Skin derived MSC shows high cell viability and proliferation over the scaffold. • Phenotype of MSCs was well maintained over the scaffold. • The scaffold shows potential for applications in skin tissue engineering.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue for skin tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sweta K.; Dinda, Amit K.; Potdar, Pravin D.; Mishra, Narayan C.

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to fabricate scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue and evaluate it for skin tissue engineering applications. Decellularized goat-lung scaffold was fabricated by removing cells from cadaver goat-lung tissue enzymatically, to have cell-free 3D-architecture of natural extracellular matrix. DNA quantification assay and Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the absence of cellular material in the decellularized lung-tissue. SEM analysis of decellularized scaffold shows the intrinsic porous structure of lung tissue with well-preserved pore-to-pore interconnectivity. FTIR analysis confirmed non-denaturation and well maintainance of collagenous protein structure of decellularized scaffold. MTT assay, SEM analysis and H and E staining of human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cell, seeded over the decellularized scaffold, confirms stem cell attachment, viability, biocompatibility and proliferation over the decellularized scaffold. Expression of Keratin18 gene, along with CD105, CD73 and CD44, by human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cells over decellularized scaffold signifies that the cells are viable, proliferating and migrating, and have maintained their critical cellular functions in the presence of scaffold. Thus, overall study proves the applicability of the goat-lung tissue derived decellularized scaffold for skin tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • We successfully fabricated decellularized scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue. • Decellularized goat-lung scaffolds were found to be highly porous. • Skin derived MSC shows high cell viability and proliferation over the scaffold. • Phenotype of MSCs was well maintained over the scaffold. • The scaffold shows potential for applications in skin tissue engineering

  17. Fabrication and characterization of scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue for skin tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sweta K; Dinda, Amit K; Potdar, Pravin D; Mishra, Narayan C

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to fabricate scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue and evaluate it for skin tissue engineering applications. Decellularized goat-lung scaffold was fabricated by removing cells from cadaver goat-lung tissue enzymatically, to have cell-free 3D-architecture of natural extracellular matrix. DNA quantification assay and Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the absence of cellular material in the decellularized lung-tissue. SEM analysis of decellularized scaffold shows the intrinsic porous structure of lung tissue with well-preserved pore-to-pore interconnectivity. FTIR analysis confirmed non-denaturation and well maintainance of collagenous protein structure of decellularized scaffold. MTT assay, SEM analysis and H&E staining of human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cell, seeded over the decellularized scaffold, confirms stem cell attachment, viability, biocompatibility and proliferation over the decellularized scaffold. Expression of Keratin18 gene, along with CD105, CD73 and CD44, by human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cells over decellularized scaffold signifies that the cells are viable, proliferating and migrating, and have maintained their critical cellular functions in the presence of scaffold. Thus, overall study proves the applicability of the goat-lung tissue derived decellularized scaffold for skin tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Prestrain-induced Reduction in Skin Tissue Puncture Force of Microneedle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jonghun; Park, Sungmin; Nam, Gyungmok; Yoon, Sang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Despite all the recent advances in biodegradable material-based microneedles, the bending and failure (especially buckling) of a biodegradable microneedle during skin tissue insertion remains a major technical hurdle for its large-scale commercialization. A reduction in skin tissue puncture force during microneedle insertion remains an essential issue in successfully developing a biodegradable microneedle. Here, we consider uniaxial and equibiaxial prestrains applied to a skin tissue as mechanophysical stimuli that can reduce the skin tissue puncture force, and investigate the effect of prestrain on the changes in skin tissue puncture force. For a porcine skin tissue similar to that of humans, the skin tissue puncture force of a flat-end microneedle is measured with a z-axis stage equipped with a load cell, which provides a force-time curve during microneedle insertion. The findings of this study lead to a quantitative characterization of the relationship between prestrain and the skin tissue puncture force

  19. Prestrain-induced Reduction in Skin Tissue Puncture Force of Microneedle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jonghun; Park, Sungmin; Nam, Gyungmok; Yoon, Sang-Hee [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Despite all the recent advances in biodegradable material-based microneedles, the bending and failure (especially buckling) of a biodegradable microneedle during skin tissue insertion remains a major technical hurdle for its large-scale commercialization. A reduction in skin tissue puncture force during microneedle insertion remains an essential issue in successfully developing a biodegradable microneedle. Here, we consider uniaxial and equibiaxial prestrains applied to a skin tissue as mechanophysical stimuli that can reduce the skin tissue puncture force, and investigate the effect of prestrain on the changes in skin tissue puncture force. For a porcine skin tissue similar to that of humans, the skin tissue puncture force of a flat-end microneedle is measured with a z-axis stage equipped with a load cell, which provides a force-time curve during microneedle insertion. The findings of this study lead to a quantitative characterization of the relationship between prestrain and the skin tissue puncture force.

  20. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa; Krul, Cyrille A.M.

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ► We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ► We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ► The method

  1. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa [TNO Triskelion BV, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE, Zeist (Netherlands); Krul, Cyrille A.M., E-mail: cyrille.krul@tno.nl [TNO, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE Zeist (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ► We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ► We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ► The method

  2. Smart Antenna Skins, including Conformal Array, MMICs and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, F.L.M. van den

    2000-01-01

    Low-cost technologies are presented for future space-borne and airborne SAR systems. These technologies include state-of-the art highly integrated circuits to miniaturise front-end, solutions to lower-cost interconnection technologies, new beamforming aspects and new architectures. The MMICs address

  3. Analytical model of diffuse reflectance spectrum of skin tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisenko, S A; Kugeiko, M M; Firago, V A [Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus); Sobchuk, A N [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    2014-01-31

    We have derived simple analytical expressions that enable highly accurate calculation of diffusely reflected light signals of skin in the spectral range from 450 to 800 nm at a distance from the region of delivery of exciting radiation. The expressions, taking into account the dependence of the detected signals on the refractive index, transport scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and anisotropy factor of the medium, have been obtained in the approximation of a two-layer medium model (epidermis and dermis) for the same parameters of light scattering but different absorption coefficients of layers. Numerical experiments on the retrieval of the skin biophysical parameters from the diffuse reflectance spectra simulated by the Monte Carlo method show that commercially available fibre-optic spectrophotometers with a fixed distance between the radiation source and detector can reliably determine the concentration of bilirubin, oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin in the dermis tissues and the tissue structure parameter characterising the size of its effective scatterers. We present the examples of quantitative analysis of the experimental data, confirming the correctness of estimates of biophysical parameters of skin using the obtained analytical expressions. (biophotonics)

  4. The use of allodermis prepared from Euro skin bank to prepare autologous tissue engineered skin for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, P; Ralston, D R; MacNeil, S

    2013-09-01

    Over the past two decades a range of 3D models for human skin have been described. Some include native collagen and intrinsic basement membrane proteins and fibroblasts, others are based on xenogeneic collagen or synthetic supports often without fibroblasts. The aim of this study was to look at the influence of media calcium, basement membrane and fibroblasts on the quality of 3D tissue engineered skin produced using human de-epidermized acellular dermis. In this study we deliberately used Euro skin as the source of the donor dermis to examine to what extent this could provide an effective dermal substrate for producing 3D skin for clinical use. Keratinocytes were cultured in the presence and absence of fibroblasts and both with and without basement membrane on decellularized dermis at calcium concentrations ranging from 250μM to 1.6mM over a period of 14 days. Results showed the formation of a well attached epithelium with many of the features of normal skin in the presence of a basement membrane. This was largely independent of the presence of fibroblasts and not greatly influenced by the concentration of calcium in the media. However there was a clear requirement for physiological levels of calcium in the formation of a stratified epithelium in the absence of a basement membrane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. [Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Due to Corynebacterium ulcerans - Case Reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, Christian; Schwede, Ilona; Neumann, Volker; Pietsch, Cristine; Handrick, Werner

    2017-10-01

    History and clinical findings  We report on three patients suffering from skin and soft tissue infections of the legs due to toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans strains. In all three patients, there was a predisposition due to chronic diseases. Three patients had domestic animals (cat, dog) in their households. Investigations and diagnosis  A mixed bacterial flora including Corynebacterium ulcerans was found in wound swab samples. Diphtheric toxin was produced by the Corynebacterium ulcerans strains in all three cases. Treatment and course  In all three patients, successful handling of the skin and soft tissue infections was possible by combining local treatment with antibiotics. Diphtheria antitoxin was not administered in any case. Conclusion  Based on a review of the recent literature pathogenesis, clinical symptoms and signs, diagnostics and therapy of skin and soft tissue infections due to Corynebacterium ulcerans are discussed. Corynebacterium ulcerans should be considered as a potential cause of severe skin and soft tissue infections. Occupational or domestic animal contacts should be evaluated. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Quantification of Tissue Trauma following Insulin Pen Needle Insertions in Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Larsen, Rasmus; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack

    Objective: Within the field of pen needle development, most research on needle design revolves around mechanical tensile testing and patient statements. Only little has been published on the actual biological skin response to needle insertions. The objective of this study was to develop a computa......Objective: Within the field of pen needle development, most research on needle design revolves around mechanical tensile testing and patient statements. Only little has been published on the actual biological skin response to needle insertions. The objective of this study was to develop...... a computational method to quantify tissue trauma based on skin bleeding and immune response. Method: Two common sized pen needles of 28G (0.36mm) and 32G (0.23mm) were inserted into skin of sedated LYD pigs prior to termination. Four pigs were included and a total of 32 randomized needle insertions were conducted...... diameter. Conclusion: A computational and quantitative method has been developed to assess tissue trauma following insulin pen needle insertions. Application of the method is tested by conduction of a needle diameter study. The obtained quantitative measures of tissue trauma correlate positively to needle...

  7. Soft tissue augmentation in skin of color: market growth, available fillers, and successful techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Cheryl M

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, people of color have become an increasingly important market force for the cosmetics industry. Product lines have been expanded to accommodate a broader spectrum of skin colors and marketing strategies have been specialized in order to target specific ethnic populations. In addition, it is predicted that people with pigmented skin will eventually comprise a majority of the domestic and international population during the 21st century. Not surprisingly, people of color are increasingly seeking out products and procedures to fight the effects of aging, including an increase in surgical and nonsurgical cosmetic procedures. Among nonsurgical procedures, soft tissue augmentation has experienced dramatic growth. Today, clinicians are performing more and more of these procedures in people of color. As a result of these shifts in the cosmetics industry, clinicians performing soft tissue augmentation require increased expertise in the treatment of ethnic skin. This article reviews the important differences that exist between the appearance of the aging faces of Caucasians and people of color. In addition, soft tissue augmentation strategies and injection techniques that are specific to skin of color are discussed.

  8. Eyelid skin as a potential site for drug delivery to conjunctiva and ocular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Gerard Lee; Sagesaka, Ayano; Sugasawa, Satoko; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2017-11-25

    The feasibility of topical application onto the (lower) eyelid skin to deliver hydrophilic and lipophilic compounds into the conjunctiva and ocular tissues was evaluated by comparing with conventional eye drop application. Skin permeation and the concentration of several model compounds, and skin impedance were determined utilizing eyelid skin from hairless rats, as well as abdominal skin in the same animals for comparison. In vitro static diffusion cells were used to assess the skin permeation in order to provide key insights into the relationship between the skin sites and drugs. The obtained results revealed that drug permeation through the eyelid skin was much higher than that through abdominal skin regardless of the drug lipophilicity. Specifically, diclofenac sodium salt and tranilast exhibited approximately 6-fold and 11-fold higher permeability coefficients, respectively, through eyelid skin compared with abdominal skin. Histomorphological evaluation and in vivo distribution of model fluorescent dyes were also examined in the conjunctiva and skin after eyelid administration by conventional microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope analyses. The result revealed that eyelid skin has a thinner stratum corneum, thereby showing lower impedance, which could be the reason for the higher drug permeation through eyelid skin. Comparative evaluation of lipophilic and hydrophilic model compounds administered via the eyelid skin over 8h revealed stronger fluorescence intensity in the skin and surrounding tissues compared with eye drop administration. These results suggested that the (lower) eyelid skin is valuable as a prospective site for ophthalmic medicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. In vitro prediction of in vivo skin damage associated with the wiping of dry tissue against skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, David W; Dvoracek, Barb; Vongsa, Rebecca

    2013-02-01

    The ideal gentle cleansing product is one that effectively removes soils while minimizing damage to the skin. Thus, measuring physical abrasion caused by cleansing tissues is critical to the continued development of gentle cleansing products. Current analysis of cleansing materials for skin gentleness is time consuming and requires expensive human subject testing. This report describes the development of a rapid and inexpensive bench assay for the assessment of skin abrasion caused by wiping. Coefficient of friction (COF) evaluations using bench methods were compared with results from clinical studies of repeated wiping and with confocal visualizations of excised skin. A Monitor/Slip and Friction instrument (model 32-06; TMI, Amityville, NY, USA) was used to measure tissue friction on simulated skin (Vitro-Skin, N19-5X; IMS, Milford, CT, USA). Clinical data from a 4-day repetitive forearm wiping study measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in 30 subjects was compared with results from the bench top assay. In addition, excised skin samples were also treated using the COF bench assay and examined using confocal microscopy to visualize stratum corneum damage caused by wiping. Using the bench COF assay, we were able to distinguish between bath tissue codes by comparing average static friction value (ASFV) for the test codes, where lower ASFV indicated less abrasive tissue. The ASFV followed the same gentleness trend observed in the clinical study. Confocal microscopy of excised skin wiped with the same materials indicated stratum corneum damage consistent with the bench COF and clinical TEWL observations. We observed significant correlation between bench and clinical methods for measuring skin damage caused by wiping of skin with tissue. The bench method will facilitate rapid and inexpensive skin gentleness assessment of cleansing materials. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santema, Trientje B.; Poyck, Paul P. C.; Ubbink, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    Foot ulceration is a major problem in people with diabetes and is the leading cause of hospitalisation and limb amputations. Skin grafts and tissue replacements can be used to reconstruct skin defects for people with diabetic foot ulcers in addition to providing them with standard care. Skin

  11. Approach to skin and soft tissue infections in non-HIV immunocompromised hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Victoria E; Lopez, Fred A

    2017-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections are frequent contributors to morbidity and mortality in the immunocompromised host. This article reviews the changing epidemiology and clinical manifestations of the most common cutaneous pathogens in non-HIV immunocompromised hosts, including patients with solid organ transplants, stem cell transplants, solid tumors, hematologic malignancies, and receiving chronic immunosuppressive therapy for inflammatory disorders. Defects in the innate or adaptive immune response can predispose the immunocompromised host to certain cutaneous infections in a predictive fashion. Cutaneous lesions in patients with neutrophil defects are commonly due to bacteria, Candida, or invasive molds. Skin lesions in patients with cellular or humoral immunodeficiencies can be due to encapsulated bacteria, Nocardia, mycobacteria, endemic fungal infections, herpesviruses, or parasites. Skin lesions may reflect primary inoculation or, more commonly, disseminated infection. Tissue samples for microscopy, culture, and histopathology are critical to making an accurate diagnosis given the nonspecific and heterogeneous appearance of these skin lesions due to a blunted immune response. As the population of non-HIV immunosuppressed hosts expands with advances in medical therapies, the frequency and variety of cutaneous diseases in these hosts will increase.

  12. Skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santema, Trientje B; Poyck, Paul P C; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2016-02-11

    Foot ulceration is a major problem in people with diabetes and is the leading cause of hospitalisation and limb amputations. Skin grafts and tissue replacements can be used to reconstruct skin defects for people with diabetic foot ulcers in addition to providing them with standard care. Skin substitutes can consist of bioengineered or artificial skin, autografts (taken from the patient), allografts (taken from another person) or xenografts (taken from animals). To determine the benefits and harms of skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes. In April 2015 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. We also searched clinical trial registries to identify ongoing studies. We did not apply restrictions to language, date of publication or study setting. Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of skin grafts or tissue replacements for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the quality of the included studies. We included seventeen studies with a total of 1655 randomised participants in this review. Risk of bias was variable among studies. Blinding of participants, personnel and outcome assessment was not possible in most trials because of obvious differences between the treatments. The lack of a blinded outcome assessor may have caused detection bias when ulcer healing was assessed. However, possible detection bias is hard to prevent due to the nature of the skin replacement products we assessed, and the fact that they are easily recognisable. Strikingly, nearly all studies (15/17) reported industry involvement; at least one of the authors was connected to a commercial organisation or the study was funded by a commercial organisation. In addition, the funnel plot for

  13. The Ability of Tissue Engineered Skin Accelerating the Closure of Different Wound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionIn the past several decades, a number of reseacher have described the principal efficacy of tissue engineered skin to promote wound healing of venous and diabetic ulcers. But the true value of tissue-engineered skin products in different wound care remains yet to be more clearly defined. In this trial, we analysis the effective of tissue-engineered skin (ActivSkin) in the management of burns, donor sites and ulcers, which were also the frequently injury caused with warfare, disaster and terror...

  14. Future Prospects for Scaffolding Methods and Biomaterials in Skin Tissue Engineering: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Atul A; Vig, Komal; Baganizi, Dieudonné Radé; Sahu, Rajnish; Dixit, Saurabh; Dennis, Vida; Singh, Shree Ram; Pillai, Shreekumar R

    2016-11-25

    Over centuries, the field of regenerative skin tissue engineering has had several advancements to facilitate faster wound healing and thereby restoration of skin. Skin tissue regeneration is mainly based on the use of suitable scaffold matrices. There are several scaffold types, such as porous, fibrous, microsphere, hydrogel, composite and acellular, etc., with discrete advantages and disadvantages. These scaffolds are either made up of highly biocompatible natural biomaterials, such as collagen, chitosan, etc., or synthetic materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG), etc. Composite scaffolds, which are a combination of natural or synthetic biomaterials, are highly biocompatible with improved tensile strength for effective skin tissue regeneration. Appropriate knowledge of the properties, advantages and disadvantages of various biomaterials and scaffolds will accelerate the production of suitable scaffolds for skin tissue regeneration applications. At the same time, emphasis on some of the leading challenges in the field of skin tissue engineering, such as cell interaction with scaffolds, faster cellular proliferation/differentiation, and vascularization of engineered tissues, is inevitable. In this review, we discuss various types of scaffolding approaches and biomaterials used in the field of skin tissue engineering and more importantly their future prospects in skin tissue regeneration efforts.

  15. Future Prospects for Scaffolding Methods and Biomaterials in Skin Tissue Engineering: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul A. Chaudhari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Over centuries, the field of regenerative skin tissue engineering has had several advancements to facilitate faster wound healing and thereby restoration of skin. Skin tissue regeneration is mainly based on the use of suitable scaffold matrices. There are several scaffold types, such as porous, fibrous, microsphere, hydrogel, composite and acellular, etc., with discrete advantages and disadvantages. These scaffolds are either made up of highly biocompatible natural biomaterials, such as collagen, chitosan, etc., or synthetic materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL, and poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG, etc. Composite scaffolds, which are a combination of natural or synthetic biomaterials, are highly biocompatible with improved tensile strength for effective skin tissue regeneration. Appropriate knowledge of the properties, advantages and disadvantages of various biomaterials and scaffolds will accelerate the production of suitable scaffolds for skin tissue regeneration applications. At the same time, emphasis on some of the leading challenges in the field of skin tissue engineering, such as cell interaction with scaffolds, faster cellular proliferation/differentiation, and vascularization of engineered tissues, is inevitable. In this review, we discuss various types of scaffolding approaches and biomaterials used in the field of skin tissue engineering and more importantly their future prospects in skin tissue regeneration efforts.

  16. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  17. Tissue engineered skin substitutes created by laser-assisted bioprinting form skin-like structures in the dorsal skin fold chamber in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Michael

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering plays an important role in the production of skin equivalents for the therapy of chronic and especially burn wounds. Actually, there exists no (cellularized skin equivalent which might be able to satisfactorily mimic native skin. Here, we utilized a laser-assisted bioprinting (LaBP technique to create a fully cellularized skin substitute. The unique feature of LaBP is the possibility to position different cell types in an exact three-dimensional (3D spatial pattern. For the creation of the skin substitutes, we positioned fibroblasts and keratinocytes on top of a stabilizing matrix (Matriderm®. These skin constructs were subsequently tested in vivo, employing the dorsal skin fold chamber in nude mice. The transplants were placed into full-thickness skin wounds and were fully connected to the surrounding tissue when explanted after 11 days. The printed keratinocytes formed a multi-layered epidermis with beginning differentiation and stratum corneum. Proliferation of the keratinocytes was mainly detected in the suprabasal layers. In vitro controls, which were cultivated at the air-liquid-interface, also exhibited proliferative cells, but they were rather located in the whole epidermis. E-cadherin as a hint for adherens junctions and therefore tissue formation could be found in the epidermis in vivo as well as in vitro. In both conditions, the printed fibroblasts partly stayed on top of the underlying Matriderm® where they produced collagen, while part of them migrated into the Matriderm®. In the mice, some blood vessels could be found to grow from the wound bed and the wound edges in direction of the printed cells. In conclusion, we could show the successful 3D printing of a cell construct via LaBP and the subsequent tissue formation in vivo. These findings represent the prerequisite for the creation of a complex tissue like skin, consisting of different cell types in an intricate 3D pattern.

  18. Oxidative stress and CCN1 protein in human skin connective tissue aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoping Qin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS is an important pathogenic factor involved in human aging. Human skin is a primary target of oxidative stress from ROS generated from both extrinsic and intrinsic sources, like ultraviolet irradiation (UV and endogenous oxidative metabolism. Oxidative stress causes the alterations of collagen-rich extracellular matrix (ECM, the hallmark of skin connective tissue aging. Age-related alteration of dermal collagenous ECM impairs skin structural integrity and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin diseases, such as poor wound healing and skin cancer. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of oxidative stress and CCN1 protein (first member of CCN family proteins, a critical mediator of oxidative stress-induced skin connective tissue aging.

  19. Point-of-care instrument for monitoring tissue health during skin graft repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, R. S.; Seetamraju, M.; Zhang, J.; Feinberg, S. E.; Wolf, D. E.

    2011-06-01

    We have developed the necessary theoretical framework and the basic instrumental design parameters to enable mapping of subsurface blood dynamics and tissue oxygenation for patients undergoing skin graft procedures. This analysis forms the basis for developing a simple patch geometry, which can be used to map by diffuse optical techniques blood flow velocity and tissue oxygenation as a function of depth in subsurface tissue.skin graft, diffuse correlation analysis, oxygen saturation.

  20. Storage Conditions of Skin Affect Tissue Structure and Subsequent in vitro Percutaneous Penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Plasencia Gil, Maria Inés; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2011-01-01

    fluorescence microscopy) and in vitro percutaneous penetration of caffeine under four different storage conditions using skin samples from the same donors: fresh skin, skin kept at -20°C for 3 weeks (with or without the use of polyethylene glycol) and at -80°C. Our results show a correlation between increasing...... permeation of caffeine and tissue structural damage caused by the storage conditions, most so after skin storage at -80°C. The presented approach, which combines imaging techniques with studies on percutaneous penetration, enables the link between tissue damage at selected depths and penetration...

  1. Evaluation of Perfusion and Thermal Parameters of Skin Tissue Using Cold Provocation and Thermographic Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strąkowska Maria

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the perfusion coefficient and thermal parameters of skin tissue using dynamic thermography is presented in this paper. A novel approach based on cold provocation and thermal modelling of skin tissue is presented. The measurement was performed on a person’s forearm using a special cooling device equipped with the Peltier module. The proposed method first cools the skin, and then measures the changes of its temperature matching the measurement results with a heat transfer model to estimate the skin perfusion and other thermal parameters. In order to assess correctness of the proposed approach, the uncertainty analysis was performed.

  2. Can a one-layer optical skin model including melanin and inhomogeneously distributed blood explain spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectra?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hanna; Pettersson, Anders; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2011-02-01

    Model based analysis of calibrated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can be used for determining oxygenation and concentration of skin chromophores. This study aimed at assessing the effect of including melanin in addition to hemoglobin (Hb) as chromophores and compensating for inhomogeneously distributed blood (vessel packaging), in a single-layer skin model. Spectra from four humans were collected during different provocations using a twochannel fiber optic probe with source-detector separations 0.4 and 1.2 mm. Absolute calibrated spectra using data from either a single distance or both distances were analyzed using inverse Monte Carlo for light transport and Levenberg-Marquardt for non-linear fitting. The model fitting was excellent using a single distance. However, the estimated model failed to explain spectra from the other distance. The two-distance model did not fit the data well at either distance. Model fitting was significantly improved including melanin and vessel packaging. The most prominent effect when fitting data from the larger separation compared to the smaller separation was a different light scattering decay with wavelength, while the tissue fraction of Hb and saturation were similar. For modeling spectra at both distances, we propose using either a multi-layer skin model or a more advanced model for the scattering phase function.

  3. A spectrofluorimetric sensor based on grape skin tissue for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A spectrofluorimetric method based on the grape skin has been developed for the determination of Fe3+ at pH 5.0. The emission wavelength of the grape skin sensor occurs at 680 nm and the excitation wavelength at 421 nm. The fluorescence of sensor could be quenched by Fe3+ due to the complexing ability of ...

  4. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginot, A.; Doyen, J.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Courdi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Acute skin toxicity is frequent during radiation therapy and can lead to temporary arrest of the treatment. Chronic toxicity can occur and conduct to cosmetic problems. Alopecia is the most frequent toxicity concerning hair and is most of the time reversible. Several factors linked to patients influence skin toxicity, such as under-nutrition, old age, obesity, smoking, skin diseases, autoimmune diseases, failure of DNA reparation. Skin, hair and nail toxicities depend also on radiation schedule. Acute toxicity is greater when dose per fraction increases. Chronic and acute toxicities are more often when total dose increases. Under 45 Gy, the risk of severe skin toxicity is low, and begins above 50 Gy. Skin toxicity depends also on the duration of radiotherapy and split course schedules are associated with less toxicities. Irradiation surface seems to influence skin toxicity but interaction is more complex. Reirradiation is often feasible in case of cancer recurrence but with a risk of grade 3-4 toxicity above all in head and neck cancer. The benefit/risk ratio has to be always precisely evaluated. Permanent alopecia is correlated with the follicle dose. Modern techniques of radiation therapy allow to spare skin. (authors)

  5. Revascularization of autogenous skin grafts placed on irradiated tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.; Torii, S.; Kaneda, T.; Oka, T.

    1982-01-01

    Vascular changes in rat skin after irradiation were examined microangiographically. Revascularization of the skin transplanted during the chronic stage after irradiation was also studied. The results obtained through these examinations revealed higher vascular densities at the acute and the subacute stages, and low values at the chronic stages compared with those of the control. Furthermore, when the skin grafts were transplanted to the irradiated beds in the chronic stage, primary revascularization was scant, and the inhibited capillary proliferation in the recipient sites prevented new vessel penetration. This explains why grafts transplanted to previously irradiated beds fail to survive

  6. Photoprotection by pistachio bioactives in a 3-dimensional human skin equivalent tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-Y Oliver; Smith, Avi; Liu, Yuntao; Du, Peng; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Garlick, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during ultraviolet (UV) light exposure can induce skin damage and aging. Antioxidants can provide protection against oxidative injury to skin via "quenching" ROS. Using a validated 3-dimensional (3D) human skin equivalent (HSE) tissue model that closely mimics human skin, we examined whether pistachio antioxidants could protect HSE against UVA-induced damage. Lutein and γ-tocopherol are the predominant lipophilic antioxidants in pistachios; treatment with these compounds prior to UVA exposure protected against morphological changes to the epithelial and connective tissue compartments of HSE. Pistachio antioxidants preserved overall skin thickness and organization, as well as fibroblast morphology, in HSE exposed to UVA irradiation. However, this protection was not substantiated by the analysis of the proliferation of keratinocytes and apoptosis of fibroblasts. Additional studies are warranted to elucidate the basis of these discordant results and extend research into the potential role of pistachio bioactives promoting skin health.

  7. [NEW PROGRESS OF ACELLULAR FISH SKIN AS NOVEL TISSUE ENGINEERED SCAFFOLD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojuan; Wang, Nanping; He, Lan; Guo, Xiuyu; Gu, Qisheng

    2016-11-08

    To review the recent research progress of acellular fish skin as a tissue engineered scaffold, and to analyze the feasibility and risk management in clinical application. The research and development, application status of acellular fish skin as a tissue engineered scaffold were comprehensively analyzed, and then several key points were put forward. Acellular fish skin has a huge potential in clinical practice as novel acellular extracellular matrix, but there have been no related research reports up to now in China. As an emerging point of translational medicine, investigation of acellular fish skin is mainly focused on artificial skin, surgical patch, and wound dressings. Development of acellular fish skin-based new products is concerned to be clinical feasible and necessary, but a lot of applied basic researches should be carried out.

  8. 3D cell printing of in vitro stabilized skin model and in vivo pre-vascularized skin patch using tissue-specific extracellular matrix bioink: A step towards advanced skin tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung Soo; Kwon, Yang Woo; Kong, Jeong-Sik; Park, Gyu Tae; Gao, Ge; Han, Wonil; Kim, Moon-Bum; Lee, Hyungseok; Kim, Jae Ho; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2018-06-01

    3D cell-printing technique has been under spotlight as an appealing biofabrication platform due to its ability to precisely pattern living cells in pre-defined spatial locations. In skin tissue engineering, a major remaining challenge is to seek for a suitable source of bioink capable of supporting and stimulating printed cells for tissue development. However, current bioinks for skin printing rely on homogeneous biomaterials, which has several shortcomings such as insufficient mechanical properties and recapitulation of microenvironment. In this study, we investigated the capability of skin-derived extracellular matrix (S-dECM) bioink for 3D cell printing-based skin tissue engineering. S-dECM was for the first time formulated as a printable material and retained the major ECM compositions of skin as well as favorable growth factors and cytokines. This bioink was used to print a full thickness 3D human skin model. The matured 3D cell-printed skin tissue using S-dECM bioink was stabilized with minimal shrinkage, whereas the collagen-based skin tissue was significantly contracted during in vitro tissue culture. This physical stabilization and the tissue-specific microenvironment from our bioink improved epidermal organization, dermal ECM secretion, and barrier function. We further used this bioink to print 3D pre-vascularized skin patch able to promote in vivo wound healing. In vivo results revealed that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs)-laden 3D-printed skin patch together with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) accelerates wound closure, re-epithelization, and neovascularization as well as blood flow. We envision that the results of this paper can provide an insightful step towards the next generation source for bioink manufacturing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Face resurfacing using a cervicothoracic skin flap prefabricated by lateral thigh fascial flap and tissue expander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingfeng; Zan, Tao; Gu, Bin; Liu, Kai; Shen, Guoxiong; Xie, Yun; Weng, Rui

    2009-01-01

    Resurfacing of facial massive soft tissue defect is a formidable challenge because of the unique character of the region and the limitation of well-matched donor site. In this report, we introduce a technique for using the prefabricated cervicothoracic skin flap for facial resurfacing, in an attempt to meet the principle of flap selection in face reconstructive surgery for matching the color and texture, large dimension, and thinner thickness (MLT) of the recipient. Eleven patients with massive facial scars underwent resurfacing procedures with prefabricated cervicothoracic flaps. The vasculature of the lateral thigh fascial flap, including the descending branch of the lateral femoral circumflex vessels and the surrounding muscle fascia, was used as the vascular carrier, and the pedicles of the fascial flap were anastomosed to either the superior thyroid or facial vessels in flap prefabrication. A tissue expander was placed beneath the fascial flap to enlarge the size and reduce the thickness of the flap. The average size of the harvested fascia flap was 6.5 x 11.7 cm. After a mean interval of 21.5 weeks, the expanders were filled to a mean volume of 1,685 ml. The sizes of the prefabricated skin flaps ranged from 12 x 15 cm to 15 x 32 cm. The prefabricated skin flaps were then transferred to the recipient site as pedicled flaps for facial resurfacing. All facial soft tissue defects were successfully covered by the flaps. The donor sites were primarily closed and healed without complications. Although varied degrees of venous congestion were developed after flap transfers, the marginal necrosis only occurred in two cases. The results in follow-up showed most resurfaced faces restored natural contour and regained emotional expression. MLT is the principle for flap selection in resurfacing of the massive facial soft tissue defect. Our experience in this series of patients demonstrated that the prefabricated cervicothoracic skin flap could be a reliable alternative

  10. Skin symptoms in four ectodermal dysplasia syndromes including two case reports of Rapp-Hodgkin-Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaudt, Björn; Volz, Thomas; Krug, Markus; Burgdorf, Walter; Röcken, Martin; Berneburg, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The skin, hair and nail changes in four distinct ectodermal dysplasia syndromes are compared and reviewed. These syndromes comprise Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome; ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate syndrome; ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome and Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome. A comprehensive overview of the dermatological signs and symptoms in these syndromes was generated from the database of the Ectodermal Dysplasia Network Germany, the clinical findings in the patients seen in our department and an extensive review of the literature. The findings included abnormalities of skin, sweating, hair and nails. These clinical findings are discussed in relation to the underlying molecular defects known to play a role in these four ectodermal dysplasia syndromes.

  11. Use of Clotted Human Plasma and Aprotinin in Skin Tissue Engineering: A Novel Approach to Engineering Composite Skin on a Porous Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Michelle; Kaur, Pritinder; Herson, Marisa; Cheshire, Perdita; Cleland, Heather; Akbarzadeh, Shiva

    2015-10-01

    Tissue-engineered composite skin is a promising therapy for the treatment of chronic and acute wounds, including burns. Providing the wound bed with a dermal scaffold populated by autologous dermal and epidermal cellular components can further entice host cell infiltration and vascularization to achieve permanent wound closure in a single stage. However, the high porosity and the lack of a supportive basement membrane in most commercially available dermal scaffolds hinders organized keratinocyte proliferation and stratification in vitro and may delay re-epithelization in vivo. The objective of this study was to develop a method to enable the in vitro production of a human skin equivalent (HSE) that included a porous scaffold and dermal and epidermal cells expanded ex vivo, with the potential to be used for definitive treatment of skin defects in a single procedure. A collagen-glycosaminoglycan dermal scaffold (Integra(®)) was populated with adult fibroblasts. A near-normal skin architecture was achieved by the addition of coagulated human plasma to the fibroblast-populated scaffold before seeding cultured keratinocytes. This resulted in reducing scaffold pore size and improving contact surfaces. Skin architecture and basement membrane formation was further improved by the addition of aprotinin (a serine protease inhibitor) to the culture media to inhibit premature clot digestion. Histological assessment of the novel HSE revealed expression of keratin 14 and keratin 10 similar to native skin, with a multilayered neoepidermis morphologically comparable to human skin. Furthermore, deposition of collagen IV and laminin-511 were detected by immunofluorescence, indicating the formation of a continuous basement membrane at the dermal-epidermal junction. The proposed method was efficient in producing an in vitro near native HSE using the chosen off-the-shelf porous scaffold (Integra). The same principles and promising outcomes should be applicable to other biodegradable

  12. Dynamic skin deformation simulation using musculoskeletal model and soft tissue dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akihiko Murai; Q. Youn Hong; Katsu Yamane; Jessica K. Hodgins

    2017-01-01

    Deformation of skin and muscle is essential for bringing an animated character to life. This deformation is difficult to animate in a realistic fashion using traditional techniques because of the subtlety of the skin deformations that must move appropriately for the character design. In this paper, we present an algorithm that generates natural, dynamic, and detailed skin deformation (movement and jiggle) from joint angle data sequences. The algorithm has two steps: identification of parameters for a quasi-static muscle deformation model, and simulation of skin deformation. In the identification step, we identify the model parameters using a musculoskeletal model and a short sequence of skin deformation data captured via a dense marker set. The simulation step first uses the quasi-static muscle deformation model to obtain the quasi-static muscle shape at each frame of the given motion sequence (slow jump). Dynamic skin deformation is then computed by simulating the passive muscle and soft tissue dynamics modeled as a mass–spring–damper system. Having obtained the model parameters, we can simulate dynamic skin deformations for subjects with similar body types from new motion data. We demonstrate our method by creating skin deformations for muscle co-contraction and external impacts from four different behaviors captured as skeletal motion capture data. Experimental results show that the simulated skin deformations are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to measured actual skin deformations.

  13. Dynamic skin deformation simulation using musculoskeletal model and soft tissue dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akihiko Murai; Q.Youn Hong; Katsu Yamane; Jessica K.Hodgins

    2017-01-01

    Deformation of skin and muscle is essential for bringing an animated character to life. This deformation is difficult to animate in a realistic fashion using traditional techniques because of the subtlety of the skin deformations that must move appropriately for the character design. In this paper, we present an algorithm that generates natural, dynamic, and detailed skin deformation(movement and jiggle) from joint angle data sequences. The algorithm has two steps: identification of parameters for a quasi-static muscle deformation model, and simulation of skin deformation. In the identification step, we identify the model parameters using a musculoskeletal model and a short sequence of skin deformation data captured via a dense marker set. The simulation step first uses the quasi-static muscle deformation model to obtain the quasi-static muscle shape at each frame of the given motion sequence(slow jump). Dynamic skin deformation is then computed by simulating the passive muscle and soft tissue dynamics modeled as a mass–spring–damper system. Having obtained the model parameters, we can simulate dynamic skin deformations for subjects with similar body types from new motion data. We demonstrate our method by creating skin deformations for muscle co-contraction and external impacts from four different behaviors captured as skeletal motion capture data. Experimental results show that the simulated skin deformations are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to measured actual skin deformations.

  14. Tattoo ink nanoparticles in skin tissue and fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Colin A; Twigg, Peter C; Baker, Richard; Tobin, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    Tattooing has long been practised in various societies all around the world and is becoming increasingly common and widespread in the West. Tattoo ink suspensions unquestionably contain pigments composed of nanoparticles, i.e., particles of sub-100 nm dimensions. It is widely acknowledged that nanoparticles have higher levels of chemical activity than their larger particle equivalents. However, assessment of the toxicity of tattoo inks has been the subject of little research and ink manufacturers are not obliged to disclose the exact composition of their products. This study examines tattoo ink particles in two fundamental skin components at the nanometre level. We use atomic force microscopy and light microscopy to examine cryosections of tattooed skin, exploring the collagen fibril networks in the dermis that contain ink nanoparticles. Further, we culture fibroblasts in diluted tattoo ink to explore both the immediate impact of ink pigment on cell viability and also to observe the interaction between particles and the cells.

  15. Collagen synthesis in human musculoskeletal tissues and skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babraj, J A; Cuthbertson, D J R; Smith, K

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a direct method for the measurement of human musculoskeletal collagen synthesis on the basis of the incorporation of stable isotope-labeled proline or leucine into protein and have used it to measure the rate of synthesis of collagen in tendon, ligament, muscle, and skin....... In postabsorptive, healthy young men (28 +/- 6 yr) synthetic rates for tendon, ligament, muscle, and skin collagen were 0.046 +/- 0.005, 0.040 +/- 0.006, 0.016 +/- 0.002, and 0.037 +/- 0.003%/h, respectively (means +/- SD). In postabsorptive, healthy elderly men (70 +/- 6 yr) the rate of skeletal muscle collagen...... synthesis is greater than in the young (0.023 +/- 0.002%/h, P collagen are similar to those of mixed skeletal muscle protein in the postabsorptive state, whereas the rate for muscle collagen synthesis is much lower in both young and elderly men...

  16. Tattoo ink nanoparticles in skin tissue and fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin A. Grant

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tattooing has long been practised in various societies all around the world and is becoming increasingly common and widespread in the West. Tattoo ink suspensions unquestionably contain pigments composed of nanoparticles, i.e., particles of sub-100 nm dimensions. It is widely acknowledged that nanoparticles have higher levels of chemical activity than their larger particle equivalents. However, assessment of the toxicity of tattoo inks has been the subject of little research and ink manufacturers are not obliged to disclose the exact composition of their products. This study examines tattoo ink particles in two fundamental skin components at the nanometre level. We use atomic force microscopy and light microscopy to examine cryosections of tattooed skin, exploring the collagen fibril networks in the dermis that contain ink nanoparticles. Further, we culture fibroblasts in diluted tattoo ink to explore both the immediate impact of ink pigment on cell viability and also to observe the interaction between particles and the cells.

  17. Collagen and elastic fibers of skin connective tissue in patients with and without primary inguinal hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Bórquez M, Pablo; Garrido O, Luis; Manterola D, Carlos; Peña S, Patricio; Schlageter T, Carol; Orellana C, Juan José; Ulloa U, Hugo; Peña R, Juan Luis

    2003-01-01

    There are few studies looking for collagen matrix defects in patients with inguinal hernia. Aim: To study the skin connective tissue in patients with and without inguinal hernia. Patients and methods: Skin from the surgical wound was obtained from 23 patients with and 23 patients without inguinal hernia. The samples were processed for conventional light microscopy. Collagen fibers were stained with Van Giesson and elastic fibers with Weigert stain. Results: Patients without hernia had compact...

  18. Tissue-Engineered Skin Substitute Enhances Wound Healing after Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busra, Mohd Fauzi bin Mh; Chowdhury, Shiplu Roy; bin Ismail, Fuad; bin Saim, Aminuddin; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2016-03-01

    When given in conjunction with surgery for treating cancer, radiation therapy may result in impaired wound healing, which, in turn, could cause skin ulcers. In this study, bilayer and monolayer autologous skin substitutes were used to treat an irradiated wound. A single dose of 30 Gy of linear electron beam radiation was applied to the hind limb of nude mice before creating the skin lesion (area of 78.6 mm). Monolayer tissue-engineered skin substitutes (MTESSs) were prepared by entrapping cultured keratinocytes in fibrin matrix, and bilayer tissue-engineered skin substitutes (BTESSs) were prepared by entrapping keratinocytes and fibroblasts in separate layers. Bilayer tissue-engineered skin substitute and MTESS were implanted to the wound area. Gross appearance and wound area were analyzed to evaluate wound healing efficiency. Skin regeneration and morphological appearance were observed via histological and electron microscopy. Protein expressions of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in skin regeneration were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Macroscopic observation revealed that at day 13, treatments with BTESS completely healed the irradiated wound, whereas wound sizes of 1.1 ± 0.05 and 6.8 ± 0.14 mm were measured in the MTESS-treated and untreated control groups, respectively. Hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) analysis showed formation of compact and organized epidermal and dermal layers in the BTESS-treated group, as compared with MTESS-treated and untreated control groups. Ultrastructural analysis indicates maturation of skin in BTESS-treated wound evidenced by formation of intermediate filament bundles in the dermal layer and low intercellular space in the epidermal layer. Expressions of TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and VEGF were also higher in BTESS-treated wounds, compared with MTESS-treated wounds. These results indicate that BTESS is the preferred treatment for

  19. Low-intensity infrared lasers alter actin gene expression in skin and muscle tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, A S; Mencalha, A L; Campos, V M A; Ferreira-Machado, S C; Peregrino, A A F; Magalhães, L A G; Geller, M; Paoli, F

    2013-01-01

    The biostimulative effect of low-intensity lasers is the basis for treatment of diseases in soft tissues. However, data about the influence of biostimulative lasers on gene expression are still scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared lasers on the expression of actin mRNA in skin and muscle tissue. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats was exposed to low-intensity infrared laser radiation at different fluences and frequencies. One and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of actin mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency and time after exposure. The results could be useful for laser dosimetry, as well as to justify the therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases of skin and muscle tissues based on low-intensity infrared laser radiation. (paper)

  20. Discrimination between basal cell carcinoma and hair follicles in skin tissue sections by Raman micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraona-Puy, M.; Ghita, A.; Zoladek, A.; Perkins, W.; Varma, S.; Leach, I. H.; Koloydenko, A. A.; Williams, H.; Notingher, I.

    2011-05-01

    Skin cancer is the most common human malignancy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represents approximately 80% of the non-melanoma cases. Current methods of treatment require histopathological evaluation of the tissues by qualified personnel. However, this method is subjective and in some cases BCC can be confused with other structures in healthy skin, including hair follicles. In this preliminary study, we investigated the potential of Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) to discriminate between hair follicles and BCC in skin tissue sections excised during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). Imaging and diagnosis of skin sections was automatically generated using ' a priori'-built spectral model based on LDA. This model had 90 ± 9% sensitivity and 85 ± 9% specificity for discrimination of BCC from dermis and epidermis. The model used selected Raman bands corresponding to the largest spectral differences between the Raman spectra of BCC and the normal skin regions, associated mainly with nucleic acids and collagen type I. Raman spectra corresponding to the epidermis regions of the hair follicles were found to be closer to those of healthy epidermis rather than BCC. Comparison between Raman spectral images and the gold standard haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology diagnosis showed good agreement. Some hair follicle regions were misclassified as BCC; regions corresponded mainly to the outermost layer of hair follicle (basal cells) which are expected to have higher nucleic acid concentration. This preliminary study shows the ability of RMS to distinguish between BCC and other tissue structures associated to healthy skin which can be confused with BCC due to their similar morphology.

  1. Mechanical Stretching Promotes Skin Tissue Regeneration via Enhancing Mesenchymal Stem Cell Homing and Transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Huang, Xiaolu; Zhou, Yiwen; Jin, Rui; Li, Qingfeng

    2016-07-01

    Skin tissue expansion is a clinical procedure for skin regeneration to reconstruct cutaneous defects that can be accompanied by severe complications. The transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been proven effective in promoting skin expansion and helping to ameliorate complications; however, systematic understanding of its mechanism remains unclear. MSCs from luciferase-Tg Lewis rats were intravenously transplanted into a rat tissue expansion model to identify homing and transdifferentiation. To clarify underlying mechanisms, a systematic approach was used to identify the differentially expressed genes between mechanically stretched human MSCs and controls. The biological significance of these changes was analyzed through bioinformatic methods. We further investigated genes and pathways of interest to disclose their potential role in mechanical stretching-induced skin regeneration. Cross sections of skin samples from the expanded group showed significantly more luciferase(+) and stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α)(+), luciferase(+)keratin 14(+), and luciferase(+)CD31(+) cells than the control group, indicating MSC transdifferentiation into epidermal basal cells and endothelial cells after SDF-1α-mediated homing. Microarray analysis suggested upregulation of genes related to hypoxia, vascularization, and cell proliferation in the stretched human MSCs. Further investigation showed that the homing of MSCs was blocked by short interfering RNA targeted against matrix metalloproteinase 2, and that mechanical stretching-induced vascular endothelial growth factor A upregulation was related to the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (Jak-STAT) and Wnt signaling pathways. This study determines that mechanical stretching might promote skin regeneration by upregulating MSC expression of genes related to hypoxia, vascularization, and cell proliferation; enhancing transplanted MSC homing to the expanded skin; and

  2. Transport of beta-aminopropionitrile through intact skin or scar tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibeault, J.D.; Cravens, R.B. Jr.; Chvapil, M.

    1989-01-01

    A lathyrogen, [ 14 C]aminopropionitrile (beta APN), was administered to 34 rats either in K-Y jelly or saline vehicles onto intact shaven skin or onto a healed splinted deep excision wound. The dynamics of beta APN transport and content in the skin or repair tissue was observed after 2, 5, 8, and 24 hr of topical administration. The repair tissue quickly absorbed the lathyrogen and reached maximum at the 2-hr sampling. The content of beta APN in the repair tissue was twice as high as that in K-Y jelly vehicle and remained high and stable for at least 24 hr only when beta APN was administered through a saline vehicle. The transport of beta APN through intact skin, irrespective of the vehicle tested, was slow and continuously increased. The study showed that almost 20% of the beta APN administered onto the wounded skin area was transported into the repair tissue within 2 hr. We suggest that, due to the absence of epidermal stratum corneum from the repair tissue, drugs, such as beta APN, penetrate quickly into the wound

  3. Marine-derived biological macromolecule-based biomaterials for wound healing and skin tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandika, Pathum; Ko, Seok-Chun; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process that depends on the wound condition, the patient's health, and the physicochemical support given through external materials. The development of bioactive molecules and engineered tissue substitutes to provide physiochemical support to enhance the wound healing process plays a key role in advancing wound-care management. Thus, identification of ideal molecules in wound treatment is still in progress. The discovery of natural products that contain ideal molecules for skin tissue regeneration has been greatly advanced by exploration of the marine bioenvironment. Consequently, tremendously diverse marine organisms have become a great source of numerous biological macromolecules that can be used to develop tissue-engineered substitutes with wound healing properties. This review summarizes the wound healing process, the properties of macromolecules from marine organisms, and the involvement of these molecules in skin tissue regeneration applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene expression changes with age in skin, adipose tissue, blood and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Daniel; Viñuela, Ana; Davies, Matthew N; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Parts, Leopold; Knowles, David; Brown, Andrew A; Hedman, Asa K; Small, Kerrin S; Buil, Alfonso; Grundberg, Elin; Nica, Alexandra C; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O; Ryten, Mina; Durbin, Richard; McCarthy, Mark I; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Weale, Michael E; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim D

    2013-07-26

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gene expression levels change with age. These changes are hypothesized to influence the aging rate of an individual. We analyzed gene expression changes with age in abdominal skin, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines in 856 female twins in the age range of 39-85 years. Additionally, we investigated genotypic variants involved in genotype-by-age interactions to understand how the genomic regulation of gene expression alters with age. Using a linear mixed model, differential expression with age was identified in 1,672 genes in skin and 188 genes in adipose tissue. Only two genes expressed in lymphoblastoid cell lines showed significant changes with age. Genes significantly regulated by age were compared with expression profiles in 10 brain regions from 100 postmortem brains aged 16 to 83 years. We identified only one age-related gene common to the three tissues. There were 12 genes that showed differential expression with age in both skin and brain tissue and three common to adipose and brain tissues. Skin showed the most age-related gene expression changes of all the tissues investigated, with many of the genes being previously implicated in fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial activity, cancer and splicing. A significant proportion of age-related changes in gene expression appear to be tissue-specific with only a few genes sharing an age effect in expression across tissues. More research is needed to improve our understanding of the genetic influences on aging and the relationship with age-related diseases.

  5. The properties of connective tissue membrane and pig skin as raw materials for cooked sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolanne, E; Ruusunen, M

    1981-09-01

    Pig skin and epimysial membrane from young bulls were comminuted in a colloid grinder and mixed with water and additives. The resultant mixture was heated in a water bath to give an internal temperature of 72°C, and centrifuged while still hot. Such variations in the amount of water added, the salt content, the phosphate content and the pH value as are possible in cooked sausage heated to over 65°C during processing did not cause marked changes in the amount of water bound by the connective tissues, the amount of dissolved protein or the gel strength of the liquid released from the connective tissues. As the temperature rose the amount of bound water dropped, but the amount of dissolved protein and the gel strength increased. The liquid released from the connective tissue membranes formed a gel at 32°C and re-melted at 49°C. For pig skin, the corresponding temperatures were 23°C and 47°C. On the basis of this study it appears that connective tissue may be important for the water-binding capacity and firmness of cold sausage. The connective tissue membranes obtained from young bulls and pig skin are of roughly equal value in this respect, although the gel formed from connective tissue membrane is tougher. Copyright © 1981. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Mueller matrix polarimetry for characterizing microstructural variation of nude mouse skin during tissue optical clearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Zeng, Nan; Xie, Qiaolin; He, Honghui; Tuchin, Valery V; Ma, Hui

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the polarization features corresponding to changes in the microstructure of nude mouse skin during immersion in a glycerol solution. By comparing the Mueller matrix imaging experiments and Monte Carlo simulations, we examine in detail how the Mueller matrix elements vary with the immersion time. The results indicate that the polarization features represented by Mueller matrix elements m22&m33&m44 and the absolute values of m34&m43 are sensitive to the immersion time. To gain a deeper insight on how the microstructures of the skin vary during the tissue optical clearing (TOC), we set up a sphere-cylinder birefringence model (SCBM) of the skin and carry on simulations corresponding to different TOC mechanisms. The good agreement between the experimental and simulated results confirm that Mueller matrix imaging combined with Monte Carlo simulation is potentially a powerful tool for revealing microscopic features of biological tissues.

  7. Tissue responses to fractional transient heating with sinusoidal heat flux condition on skin surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Magdy A; El-Bary, Alaa A; Al-Sowayan, Noorah S

    2016-10-01

    A fractional model of Bioheat equation for describing quantitatively the thermal responses of skin tissue under sinusoidal heat flux conditions on skin surface is given. Laplace transform technique is used to obtain the solution in a closed form. The resulting formulation is applied to one-dimensional application to investigate the temperature distribution in skin with instantaneous surface heating for different cases. According to the numerical results and its graphs, conclusion about the fractional bioheat transfer equation has been constructed. Sensitivity analysis is performed to explore the thermal effects of various control parameters on tissue temperature. The comparisons are made with the results obtained in the case of the absence of time-fractional order. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  8. Fish collagen/alginate/chitooligosaccharides integrated scaffold for skin tissue regeneration application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandika, Pathum; Ko, Seok-Chun; Oh, Gun-Woo; Heo, Seong-Yeong; Nguyen, Van-Tinh; Jeon, You-Jin; Lee, Bonggi; Jang, Chul Ho; Kim, GeunHyung; Park, Won Sun; Chang, Wonseok; Choi, Il-Whan; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2015-11-01

    An emerging paradigm in wound healing techniques is that a tissue-engineered skin substitute offers an alternative approach to create functional skin tissue. Here we developed a fish collagen/alginate (FCA) sponge scaffold that was functionalized by different molecular weights of chitooligosaccharides (COSs) with the use of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride as a cross-linking agent. The effects of cross-linking were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that the homogeneous materials blending and cross-linking intensity were dependent on the molecular weights of COSs. The highly interconnected porous architecture with 160-260μm pore size and over 90% porosity and COS's MW driven swelling and retention capacity, tensile property and in vitro biodegradation behavior guaranteed the FCA/COS scaffolds for skin tissue engineering application. Further improvement of these properties enhanced the cytocompatibility of all the scaffolds, especially the scaffolds containing COSs with MW in the range of 1-3kDa (FCA/COS1) showed the best cytocompatibility. These physicochemical, mechanical, and biological properties suggest that the FCA/COS1 scaffold is a superior candidate that can be used for skin tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulation study of melanoma detection in human skin tissues by laser-generated surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Fu, Xing; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Lu, Zimo; Li, Tingting; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaotang

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution has been correlated to an increasing number of cases of human skin diseases in recent years. However, the investigation of human skin tissues has received only limited attention, to the point that there are not yet satisfactory modern detection technologies to accurately, noninvasively, and rapidly diagnose human skin at epidermis and dermis levels. In order to detect and analyze severe skin diseases such as melanoma, a finite element method (FEM) simulation study of the application of the laser-generated surface acoustic wave (LSAW) technique is developed. A three-layer human skin model is built, where LSAW’s are generated and propagated, and their effects in the skin medium with melanoma are analyzed. Frequency domain analysis is used as a main tool to investigate such issues as minimum detectable size of melanoma, filtering spectra from noise and from computational irregularities, as well as on how the FEM model meshing size and computational capabilities influence the accuracy of the results. Based on the aforementioned aspects, the analysis of the signals under the scrutiny of the phase velocity dispersion curve is verified to be a reliable, a sensitive, and a promising approach for detecting and characterizing melanoma in human skin.

  10. Simulation study of melanoma detection in human skin tissues by laser-generated surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Fu, Xing; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Lu, Zimo; Li, Tingting; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaotang

    2014-07-01

    Air pollution has been correlated to an increasing number of cases of human skin diseases in recent years. However, the investigation of human skin tissues has received only limited attention, to the point that there are not yet satisfactory modern detection technologies to accurately, noninvasively, and rapidly diagnose human skin at epidermis and dermis levels. In order to detect and analyze severe skin diseases such as melanoma, a finite element method (FEM) simulation study of the application of the laser-generated surface acoustic wave (LSAW) technique is developed. A three-layer human skin model is built, where LSAW's are generated and propagated, and their effects in the skin medium with melanoma are analyzed. Frequency domain analysis is used as a main tool to investigate such issues as minimum detectable size of melanoma, filtering spectra from noise and from computational irregularities, as well as on how the FEM model meshing size and computational capabilities influence the accuracy of the results. Based on the aforementioned aspects, the analysis of the signals under the scrutiny of the phase velocity dispersion curve is verified to be a reliable, a sensitive, and a promising approach for detecting and characterizing melanoma in human skin.

  11. Raman spectroscopic analysis of human skin tissue sections ex-vivo: evaluation of the effects of tissue processing and dewaxing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed M.; Bonnier, Franck; Tfayli, Ali; Lambkin, Helen; Flynn, Kathleen; McDonagh, Vincent; Healy, Claragh; Clive Lee, T.; Lyng, Fiona M.; Byrne, Hugh J.

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy coupled with K-means clustering analysis (KMCA) is employed to elucidate the biochemical structure of human skin tissue sections and the effects of tissue processing. Both hand and thigh sections of human cadavers were analyzed in their unprocessed and formalin-fixed, paraffin-processed (FFPP), and subsequently dewaxed forms. In unprocessed sections, KMCA reveals clear differentiation of the stratum corneum (SC), intermediate underlying epithelium, and dermal layers for sections from both anatomical sites. The SC is seen to be relatively rich in lipidic content; the spectrum of the subjacent layers is strongly influenced by the presence of melanin, while that of the dermis is dominated by the characteristics of collagen. For a given anatomical site, little difference in layer structure and biochemistry is observed between samples from different cadavers. However, the hand and thigh sections are consistently differentiated for all cadavers, largely based on lipidic profiles. In dewaxed FFPP samples, while the SC, intermediate, and dermal layers are clearly differentiated by KMCA of Raman maps of tissue sections, the lipidic contributions to the spectra are significantly reduced, with the result that respective skin layers from different anatomical sites become indistinguishable. While efficient at removing the fixing wax, the tissue processing also efficiently removes the structurally similar lipidic components of the skin layers. In studies of dermatological processes in which lipids play an important role, such as wound healing, dewaxed samples are therefore not appropriate. Removal of the lipids does however accentuate the spectral features of the cellular and protein components, which may be more appropriate for retrospective analysis of disease progression and biochemical analysis using tissue banks.

  12. Tissue-engineered skin preserving the potential of epithelial cells to differentiate into hair after grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larouche, Danielle; Cuffley, Kristine; Paquet, Claudie; Germain, Lucie

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether tissue-engineered skin produced in vitro was able to sustain growth of hair follicles in vitro and after grafting. Different tissues were designed. Dissociated newborn mouse keratinocytes or newborn mouse hair buds (HBs) were added onto dermal constructs consisting of a tissue-engineered cell-derived matrix elaborated from either newborn mouse or adult human fibroblasts cultured with ascorbic acid. After 7-21 days of maturation at the air-liquid interface, no hair was noticed in vitro. Epidermal differentiation was observed in all tissue-engineered skin. However, human fibroblast-derived tissue-engineered dermis (hD) promoted a thicker epidermis than mouse fibroblast-derived tissue-engineered dermis (mD). In association with mD, HBs developed epithelial cyst-like inclusions presenting outer root sheath-like attributes. In contrast, epidermoid cyst-like inclusions lined by a stratified squamous epithelium were present in tissues composed of HBs and hD. After grafting, pilo-sebaceous units formed and hair grew in skin elaborated from HBs cultured 10-26 days submerged in culture medium in association with mD. However, the number of normal hair follicles decreased with longer culture time. This hair-forming capacity after grafting was not observed in tissues composed of hD overlaid with HBs. These results demonstrate that epithelial stem cells can be kept in vitro in a permissive tissue-engineered dermal environment without losing their potential to induce hair growth after grafting.

  13. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, K S; Sergio, L P S; Mencalha, A L; Fonseca, A S; Paoli, F

    2016-01-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases. (paper)

  14. Refractive indices of human skin tissues at eight wavelengths and estimated dispersion relations between 300 and 1600 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Huafeng; Lu, Jun Q; Wooden, William A; Kragel, Peter J; Hu Xinhua

    2006-01-01

    The refractive index of human skin tissues is an important parameter in characterizing the optical response of the skin. We extended a previously developed method of coherent reflectance curve measurement to determine the in vitro values of the complex refractive indices of epidermal and dermal tissues from fresh human skin samples at eight wavelengths between 325 and 1557 nm. Based on these results, dispersion relations of the real refractive index have been obtained and compared in the same spectral region

  15. Cellulose/poly-(m-phenylene isophthalamide) porous film as a tissue-engineered skin bioconstruct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Woong; Han, Sung Soo; Zo, Sum Mi; Choi, Soon Mo

    2018-06-01

    Regarding the porous structure, coagulated cellulose may not provide sufficient voids for cell proliferation, resulting in tissue growth. For this reason, it was blended with poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) (PMIA), which could produce a porous structure in the resulting construct. The aim of this study was to confirm the potential of a novel cellulose/PMIA porous film as a tissue-engineered bioconstruct for impaired skin. The films were fabricated by a coagulation process added with a peel-off method, and the structural, mechanical properties were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and capillary flow porometry. CRL-2310 human keratinocytes were used to determine the biocompatibility of the prepared films. The attachment and proliferation of cells were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, DAPI staining, and a cell viability assay. The results show that cellulose/PMIA porous films have potential use as wound matrices for skin tissue genesis.

  16. Determination of the axial and circumferential mechanical properties of the skin tissue using experimental testing and constitutive modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Haghighatnama, Maedeh; Haghi, Afsaneh Motevalli

    2015-01-01

    The skin, being a multi-layered material, is responsible for protecting the human body from the mechanical, bacterial, and viral insults. The skin tissue may display different mechanical properties according to the anatomical locations of a body. However, these mechanical properties in different anatomical regions and at different loading directions (axial and circumferential) of the mice body to date have not been determined. In this study, the axial and circumferential loads were imposed on the mice skin samples. The elastic modulus and maximum stress of the skin tissues were measured before the failure occurred. The nonlinear mechanical behavior of the skin tissues was also computationally investigated through a suitable constitutive equation. Hyperelastic material model was calibrated using the experimental data. Regardless of the anatomic locations of the mice body, the results revealed significantly different mechanical properties in the axial and circumferential directions and, consequently, the mice skin tissue behaves like a pure anisotropic material. The highest elastic modulus was observed in the back skin under the circumferential direction (6.67 MPa), while the lowest one was seen in the abdomen skin under circumferential loading (0.80 MPa). The Ogden material model was narrowly captured the nonlinear mechanical response of the skin at different loading directions. The results help to understand the isotropic/anisotropic mechanical behavior of the skin tissue at different anatomical locations. They also have implications for a diversity of disciplines, i.e., dermatology, cosmetics industry, clinical decision making, and clinical intervention.

  17. Establishment and function of tissue-resident innate lymphoid cells in the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are a newly classified family of immune cells of the lymphoid lineage. While they could be found in both lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid tissues, ILCs are preferentially enriched in barrier tissues such as the skin, intestine, and lung where they could play important roles in maintenance of tissue integrity and function and protection against assaults of foreign agents. On the other hand, dysregulated activation of ILCs could contribute to tissue inflammatory diseases. In spite of recent progress towards understanding roles of ILCs in the health and disease, mechanisms regulating specific establishment, activation, and function of ILCs in barrier tissues are still poorly understood. We herein review the up-to-date understanding of tissue-specific relevance of ILCs. Particularly we will focus on resident ILCs of the skin, the outmost barrier tissue critical in protection against various foreign hazardous agents and maintenance of thermal and water balance. In addition, we will discuss remaining outstanding questions yet to be addressed.

  18. Establishment and function of tissue-resident innate lymphoid cells in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Luming; Xu, Ming; Xiong, Na

    2017-07-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a newly classified family of immune cells of the lymphoid lineage. While they could be found in both lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid tissues, ILCs are preferentially enriched in barrier tissues such as the skin, intestine, and lung where they could play important roles in maintenance of tissue integrity and function and protection against assaults of foreign agents. On the other hand, dysregulated activation of ILCs could contribute to tissue inflammatory diseases. In spite of recent progress towards understanding roles of ILCs in the health and disease, mechanisms regulating specific establishment, activation, and function of ILCs in barrier tissues are still poorly understood. We herein review the up-to-date understanding of tissue-specific relevance of ILCs. Particularly we will focus on resident ILCs of the skin, the outmost barrier tissue critical in protection against various foreign hazardous agents and maintenance of thermal and water balance. In addition, we will discuss remaining outstanding questions yet to be addressed.

  19. The effect of keratinocytes on the biomechanical characteristics and pore microstructure of tissue engineered skin using deep dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkey, Mathew; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2014-12-01

    Fibrosis affects most organs, it results in replacement of normal parenchymal tissue with collagen-rich extracellular matrix, which compromises tissue architecture and ultimately causes loss of function of the affected organ. Biochemical pathways that contribute to fibrosis have been extensively studied, but the role of biomechanical signaling in fibrosis is not clearly understood. In this study, we assessed the effect keratinocytes have on the biomechanical characteristics and pore microstructure of tissue engineered skin made with superficial or deep dermal fibroblasts in order to determine any biomaterial-mediated anti-fibrotic influences on tissue engineered skin. Tissue engineered skin with deep dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes were found to be less stiff and contracted and had reduced number of myofibroblasts and lower expression of matrix crosslinking factors compared to matrices with deep fibroblasts alone. However, there were no such differences between tissue engineered skin with superficial fibroblasts and keratinocytes and matrices with superficial fibroblasts alone. Also, tissue engineered skin with deep fibroblasts and keratinocytes had smaller pores compared to those with superficial fibroblasts and keratinocytes; pore size of tissue engineered skin with deep fibroblasts and keratinocytes were not different from those matrices with deep fibroblasts alone. A better understanding of biomechanical characteristics and pore microstructure of tissue engineered skin may prove beneficial in promoting normal wound healing over pathologic healing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Collagen-chitosan scaffold - Lauric acid plasticizer for skin tissue engineering on burn cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiyanti, Prihartini; Setyadi, Ewing Dian; Rudyardjo, Djony Izak

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of burns in the world is more than 800 cases per one million people each year and this is the second highest cause of death due to trauma after traffic accident. Many studies are turning to skin substitute methods of tissue engineering. The purpose of this study is to determine the composition of the collagen, chitosan, and lauric acid scaffold, as well as knowing the results of the characterization of the scaffold. The synthesis of chitosan collagen lauric acid scaffold as a skin tissue was engineered using freeze dried method. Results from making of collagen chitosan lauric acid scaffold was characterized physically, biologically and mechanically by SEM, cytotoxicity, biodegradation, and tensile strength. From the morphology test, the result obtained is that pore diameter size ranges from 94.11 to 140.1 µm for samples A,B,C,D, which are in the range of normal pore size 63-150 µm, while sample E has value below the standard which is about 37.87 to 47.36 µm. From cytotoxicity assay, the result obtained is the percentage value of living cells between 20.11 to 21.51%. This value is below 50% the standard value of living cells. Incompatibility is made possible because of human error mainly the replication of washing process over the standard. Degradation testing obtained values of 19.44% - 40% by weight which are degraded during the 7 days of observation. Tensile test results obtained a range of values of 0.192 - 3.53 MPa. Only sample A (3.53 MPa) and B (1.935 MPa) meet the standard values of skin tissue scaffold that is 1-24 MPa. Based on the results of the characteristics of this study, composite chitosan collagen scaffold with lauric acid plasticizer has a potential candidate for skin tissue engineering for skin burns cases.

  1. Influence trend of temperature distribution in skin tissue generated by different exposure dose pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ning; Wang, Zhijing; Liu, Xia

    2014-11-01

    Laser is widely applied in military and medicine fields because of its excellent capability. In order to effectively defend excess damage by laser, the thermal processing theory of skin tissue generated by laser should be carried out. The heating rate and thermal damage area should be studied. The mathematics model of bio-tissue heat transfer that is irradiated by laser is analyzed. And boundary conditions of bio-tissue are discussed. Three layer FEM grid model of bio-tissue is established. The temperature rising inducing by pulse laser in the tissue is modeled numerically by adopting ANSYS software. The changing trend of temperature in the tissue is imitated and studied under the conditions of different exposure dose pulse laser. The results show that temperature rising in the tissue depends on the parameters of pulse laser largely. In the same conditions, the pulse width of laser is smaller and its instant power is higher. And temperature rising effect in the tissue is very clear. On the contrary, temperature rising effect in the tissue is lower. The cooling time inducing by temperature rising effect in the tissue is longer along with pulse separation of laser is bigger. And the temperature difference is bigger in the pulse period.

  2. Handheld skin printer: in situ formation of planar biomaterials and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Navid; Cheng, Richard; Leng, Lian; Sotoudehfar, Mohammad; Ba, Phoenix Qing; Bakhtyar, Nazihah; Amini-Nik, Saeid; Jeschke, Marc G; Günther, Axel

    2018-05-15

    We present a handheld skin printer that enables the in situ formation of biomaterial and skin tissue sheets of different homogeneous and architected compositions. When manually positioned above a target surface, the compact instrument (weight <0.8 kg) conformally deposits a biomaterial or tissue sheet from a microfluidic cartridge. Consistent sheet formation is achieved by coordinating the flow rates at which bioink and cross-linker solution are delivered, with the speed at which a pair of rollers actively translate the cartridge along the surface. We demonstrate compatibility with dermal and epidermal cells embedded in ionically cross-linkable biomaterials (e.g., alginate), and enzymatically cross-linkable proteins (e.g., fibrin), as well as their mixtures with collagen type I and hyaluronic acid. Upon rapid crosslinking, biomaterial and skin cell-laden sheets of consistent thickness, width and composition were obtained. Sheets deposited onto horizontal, agarose-coated surfaces were used for physical and in vitro characterization. Proof-of-principle demonstrations for the in situ formation of biomaterial sheets in murine and porcine excisional wound models illustrate the capacity of depositing onto inclined and compliant wound surfaces that are subject to respiratory motion. We expect the presented work will enable the in situ delivery of a wide range of different cells, biomaterials, and tissue adhesives, as well as the in situ fabrication of spatially organized biomaterials, tissues, and biohybrid structures.

  3. HdhQ111 Mice Exhibit Tissue Specific Metabolite Profiles that Include Striatal Lipid Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jeffrey B.; Deik, Amy; Fossale, Elisa; Weston, Rory M.; Guide, Jolene R.; Arjomand, Jamshid; Kwak, Seung; Clish, Clary B.; MacDonald, Marcy E.

    2015-01-01

    The HTT CAG expansion mutation causes Huntington’s Disease and is associated with a wide range of cellular consequences, including altered metabolism. The mutant allele is expressed widely, in all tissues, but the striatum and cortex are especially vulnerable to its effects. To more fully understand this tissue-specificity, early in the disease process, we asked whether the metabolic impact of the mutant CAG expanded allele in heterozygous B6.HdhQ111/+ mice would be common across tissues, or whether tissues would have tissue-specific responses and whether such changes may be affected by diet. Specifically, we cross-sectionally examined steady state metabolite concentrations from a range of tissues (plasma, brown adipose tissue, cerebellum, striatum, liver, white adipose tissue), using an established liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry pipeline, from cohorts of 8 month old mutant and wild-type littermate mice that were fed one of two different high-fat diets. The differential response to diet highlighted a proportion of metabolites in all tissues, ranging from 3% (7/219) in the striatum to 12% (25/212) in white adipose tissue. By contrast, the mutant CAG-expanded allele primarily affected brain metabolites, with 14% (30/219) of metabolites significantly altered, compared to wild-type, in striatum and 11% (25/224) in the cerebellum. In general, diet and the CAG-expanded allele both elicited metabolite changes that were predominantly tissue-specific and non-overlapping, with evidence for mutation-by-diet interaction in peripheral tissues most affected by diet. Machine-learning approaches highlighted the accumulation of diverse lipid species as the most genotype-predictive metabolite changes in the striatum. Validation experiments in cell culture demonstrated that lipid accumulation was also a defining feature of mutant HdhQ111 striatal progenitor cells. Thus, metabolite-level responses to the CAG expansion mutation in vivo were tissue specific and most evident

  4. HdhQ111 Mice Exhibit Tissue Specific Metabolite Profiles that Include Striatal Lipid Accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B Carroll

    Full Text Available The HTT CAG expansion mutation causes Huntington's Disease and is associated with a wide range of cellular consequences, including altered metabolism. The mutant allele is expressed widely, in all tissues, but the striatum and cortex are especially vulnerable to its effects. To more fully understand this tissue-specificity, early in the disease process, we asked whether the metabolic impact of the mutant CAG expanded allele in heterozygous B6.HdhQ111/+ mice would be common across tissues, or whether tissues would have tissue-specific responses and whether such changes may be affected by diet. Specifically, we cross-sectionally examined steady state metabolite concentrations from a range of tissues (plasma, brown adipose tissue, cerebellum, striatum, liver, white adipose tissue, using an established liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry pipeline, from cohorts of 8 month old mutant and wild-type littermate mice that were fed one of two different high-fat diets. The differential response to diet highlighted a proportion of metabolites in all tissues, ranging from 3% (7/219 in the striatum to 12% (25/212 in white adipose tissue. By contrast, the mutant CAG-expanded allele primarily affected brain metabolites, with 14% (30/219 of metabolites significantly altered, compared to wild-type, in striatum and 11% (25/224 in the cerebellum. In general, diet and the CAG-expanded allele both elicited metabolite changes that were predominantly tissue-specific and non-overlapping, with evidence for mutation-by-diet interaction in peripheral tissues most affected by diet. Machine-learning approaches highlighted the accumulation of diverse lipid species as the most genotype-predictive metabolite changes in the striatum. Validation experiments in cell culture demonstrated that lipid accumulation was also a defining feature of mutant HdhQ111 striatal progenitor cells. Thus, metabolite-level responses to the CAG expansion mutation in vivo were tissue specific and

  5. Influence of skin surface roughness degree on energy characteristics of light scattered by a biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barun, V. V.; Ivanov, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    We present the results of modelling of photometric characteristics of light in soft tissues illuminated by a parallel beam along the normal to the surface, obtained with allowance for the skin roughness parameters and the angular structure of radiation approaching the surface from within the tissue. The depth structure of the fluence rate and the spectra of the diffuse reflection of light by the tissue in the interval of wavelengths 300 - 1000 nm are considered. We discuss the influence of the tilt angle variance of rough surface microelements and light refraction on the studied characteristics. It is shown that these factors lead to the reduction of the radiation flux only in the near-surface tissue layer and practically do not affect the depth of light penetration into the tissue. On the other hand, the degree of the surface roughness and the conditions of its illumination from within the tissue essentially affect the coefficient of diffuse reflection of light and lead to its considerable growth compared to the cases of a smooth interface and completely diffuse illumination, often considered to simplify the theoretical problem solution. The role of the roughness of skin surface is assessed in application to the solution of different direct and inverse problems of biomedical optics.

  6. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern and the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from skin and soft tissue in Tehran Razi skin hospital (2014-15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Fagheei-Aghmiyuni

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is the most common cause of skin and soft tissue infections. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of S. aureus isolated from skin and soft tissue and antibiotic susceptibility pattern among the patient hospitalized in Razi skin hospital (Tehran-Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on patients (n=400 with skin and soft tissue infections in Razi skin hospital. Sterilized swabs were used to collect the skin infection samples. S. aureus isolates were confirmed using biochemical tests (gram staining, catalase, coagulase, DNase test and manitol fermentation tests. Result: 51.3 %( 205 out of 400 of isolates were S. aureus. Ninety six (46.8% of isolates were methicillin and penicillin-resistant S. aureus. All of the isolates showed sensitivity to vancomycin, linezolid. 98% of the isolates were susceptible to daptomycin. One-hundred sixteen (56.6% isolates were multi- drug resistant. Conclusion: More than half of the skin and soft tissue infections were caused by S.aureus. More than 46 percent of the isolates were methicillin resistant. The highest resistance to penicillin was observed.

  7. Transient performances analysis of wind turbine system with induction generator including flux saturation and skin effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, H.; Zhao, B.; Han, L.

    2010-01-01

    In order to analyze correctly the effect of different models for induction generators on the transient performances of large wind power generation, Wind turbine driven squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG) models taking into account both main and leakage flux saturation and skin effect were...

  8. Chimeric Human Skin Substitute Tissue: A Novel Treatment Option for the Delivery of Autologous Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Cathy A; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2012-04-01

    For patients suffering from catastrophic burns, few treatment options are available. Chimeric coculture of patient-derived autologous cells with a "carrier" cell source of allogeneic keratinocytes has been proposed as a means to address the complex clinical problem of severe skin loss. Currently, autologous keratinocytes are harvested, cultured, and expanded to form graftable epidermal sheets. However, epidermal sheets are thin, are extremely fragile, and do not possess barrier function, which only develops as skin stratifies and matures. Grafting is typically delayed for up to 4 weeks to propagate a sufficient quantity of the patient's cells for application to wound sites. Fully stratified chimeric bioengineered skin substitutes could not only provide immediate wound coverage and restore barrier function, but would simultaneously deliver autologous keratinocytes to wounds. The ideal allogeneic cell source for this application would be an abundant supply of clinically evaluated, nontumorigenic, pathogen-free, human keratinocytes. To evaluate this potential cell-based therapy, mixed populations of a green fluorescent protein-labeled neonatal human keratinocyte cell line (NIKS) and unlabeled primary keratinocytes were used to model the allogeneic and autologous components of chimeric monolayer and organotypic cultures. Relatively few autologous keratinocytes may be required to produce fully stratified chimeric skin substitute tissue substantially composed of autologous keratinocyte-derived regions. The need for few autologous cells interspersed within an allogeneic "carrier" cell population may decrease cell expansion time, reducing the time to patient application. This study provides proof of concept for utilizing NIKS keratinocytes as the allogeneic carrier for the generation of bioengineered chimeric skin substitute tissues capable of providing immediate wound coverage while simultaneously supplying autologous human cells for tissue regeneration.

  9. Skin color and tissue thickness effects on transmittance, reflectance, and skin temperature when using 635 and 808 nm lasers in low intensity therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Barros, Leanna; Dhaidan, Ghaith; Maunula, Mikko; Solomon, Vaeda; Gabison, Sharon; Lilge, Lothar; Nussbaum, Ethne L

    2018-04-01

    To examine the role of skin color and tissue thickness on transmittance, reflectance, and skin heating using red and infrared laser light. Forty volunteers were measured for skin color and skin-fold thickness at a standardized site near the elbow. Transmittance, reflectance and skin temperature were recorded for energy doses of 2, 6, 9, and 12 Joules using 635 nm (36 mW) and 808 nm (40 mW) wavelength laser diodes with irradiances within American National Standards Institute safety guidelines (4.88 mm diameter, 0.192 W/cm 2 and 4.88 mm diameter, 0.214 W/cm 2 , respectively). The key factors affecting reflectance to an important degree were skin color and wavelength. However, the skin color effects were different for the two wavelengths: reflectance decreased for darker skin with a greater decrease for red light than near infrared light. Transmittance was greater using 808 nm compared with 635 nm. However, the effect was partly lost when the skin was dark rather than light, and was increasingly lost as tissue thickness increased. Dose had an increasing effect on temperature (0.7-1.6°C across the 6, 9, and 12 J doses); any effects of wavelength, skin color, and tissue thickness were insignificant compared to dose effects. Subjects themselves were not aware of the increased skin temperature. Transmittance and reflectance changes as a function of energy were very small and likely of no clinical significance. Absorption did not change with higher energy doses and increasing temperature. Skin color and skin thickness affect transmittance and reflectance of laser light and must be accounted for when selecting energy dose to ensure therapeutic effectiveness at the target tissue. Skin heating appears not to be a concern when using 635 and 808 nm lasers at energy doses of up to 12 J and irradiance within American National Standards Institute standards. Photobiomodulation therapy should never exceed the American National Standards Institute

  10. 3D Printing of Scaffold for Cells Delivery: Advances in Skin Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury or damage to tissue and organs is a major health problem, resulting in about half of the world’s annual healthcare expenditure every year. Advances in the fields of stem cells (SCs and biomaterials processing have provided a tremendous leap for researchers to manipulate the dynamics between these two, and obtain a skin substitute that can completely heal the wounded areas. Although wound healing needs a coordinated interplay between cells, extracellular proteins and growth factors, the most important players in this process are the endogenous SCs, which activate the repair cascade by recruiting cells from different sites. Extra cellular matrix (ECM proteins are activated by these SCs, which in turn aid in cellular migrations and finally secretion of growth factors that can seal and heal the wounds. The interaction between ECM proteins and SCs helps the skin to sustain the rigors of everyday activity, and in an attempt to attain this level of functionality in artificial three-dimensional (3D constructs, tissue engineered biomaterials are fabricated using more advanced techniques such as bioprinting and laser assisted printing of the organs. This review provides a concise summary of the most recent advances that have been made in the area of polymer bio-fabrication using 3D bio printing used for encapsulating stem cells for skin regeneration. The focus of this review is to describe, in detail, the role of 3D architecture and arrangement of cells within this system that can heal wounds and aid in skin regeneration.

  11. Tissue repair genes: the TiRe database and its implication for skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Hagai; Budovsky, Arie; Tacutu, Robi; Barzilay, Thomer; Abramovich, Amir; Ziesche, Rolf; Fraifeld, Vadim E

    2016-04-19

    Wound healing is an inherent feature of any multicellular organism and recent years have brought about a huge amount of data regarding regular and abnormal tissue repair. Despite the accumulated knowledge, modulation of wound healing is still a major biomedical challenge, especially in advanced ages. In order to collect and systematically organize what we know about the key players in wound healing, we created the TiRe (Tissue Repair) database, an online collection of genes and proteins that were shown to directly affect skin wound healing. To date, TiRe contains 397 entries for four organisms: Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Sus domesticus, and Homo sapiens. Analysis of the TiRe dataset of skin wound healing-associated genes showed that skin wound healing genes are (i) over-conserved among vertebrates, but are under-conserved in invertebrates; (ii) enriched in extracellular and immuno-inflammatory genes; and display (iii) high interconnectivity and connectivity to other proteins. The latter may provide potential therapeutic targets. In addition, a slower or faster skin wound healing is indicative of an aging or longevity phenotype only when assessed in advanced ages, but not in the young. In the long run, we aim for TiRe to be a one-station resource that provides researchers and clinicians with the essential data needed for a better understanding of the mechanisms of wound healing, designing new experiments, and the development of new therapeutic strategies. TiRe is freely available online at http://www.tiredb.org.

  12. Ballistic impacts on an anatomically correct synthetic skull with a surrogate skin/soft tissue layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Peter; Carr, Debra; Arm, Richard; Gibb, Iain; Hunt, Nicholas; Delaney, Russ J

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work was to further develop a synthetic model of ballistic head injury by the addition of skin and soft tissue layers to an anatomically correct polyurethane skull filled with gelatine 10% by mass. Six head models were impacted with 7.62 x 39 mm full metal jacket mild steel core (FMJ MSC) bullets with a mean velocity of 652 m/s. The impact events were filmed with high-speed cameras. The models were imaged pre- and post-impact using computed tomography. The models were assessed post impact by two experienced Home Office pathologists and the images assessed by an experienced military radiologist. The findings were scored against real injuries. The entry wounds, exit wounds and fracture patterns were scored positively, but the synthetic skin and soft tissue layer was felt to be too extendable. Further work is ongoing to address this.

  13. Redox proteomic evaluation of oxidative modification and recovery in a 3D reconstituted human skin tissue model exposed to UVB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, J M; Haines, S R; Thomas, A; Wang, W; Walls, R J; Clerens, S; Harland, D P

    2017-04-01

    Exposure to UV in humans resulting in sunburn triggers a complex series of events that are a mix of immediate and delayed damage mediation and healing. While studies on the effects of UV exposure on DNA damage and repair have been reported, changes in the oxidative modification of skin proteins are poorly understood at the molecular level, despite the important role played by structural proteins in skin tissue, and the effect of the integrity of these proteins on skin appearance and health. Proteomic molecular mapping of oxidation was here applied to try to enhance understanding of skin damage and recovery from oxidative damage and UVB exposure. A redox proteomic-based approach was applied to evaluating skin protein modification when exposed to varying doses of UVB after initial oxidative stress, via tracking changes in protein oxidation during the healing process in vitro using a full-thickness reconstituted human skin tissue model. Bioassays and structural evaluation confirmed that our cultured skin tissues underwent a normal physiological response to UVB exposure. A set of potential skin marker peptides was generated, for use in tracking skin protein oxidative modification. Exposure to UVB after thermal oxidative stress was found to result in higher levels of skin protein oxidation than a non-irradiated control for up to seven days after exposure. Recovery of the skin proteins from oxidative stress, as assessed by the overall protein oxidation levels, was found to be impaired by UVB exposure. Oxidative modification was largely observed in skin structural proteins. Exposure of skin proteins to UVB exacerbates oxidative damage to structural skin proteins, with higher exposure levels leading to increasingly impaired recovery from this damage. This has potential implications for the functional performance of the proteins and inter-related skin health and cosmetic appearance. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  14. Comparative Genomics of Escherichia coli Isolated from Skin and Soft Tissue and Other Extraintestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Amit; Shaik, Sabiha; Nandanwar, Nishant; Hussain, Arif; Tiwari, Sumeet K; Semmler, Torsten; Jadhav, Savita; Wieler, Lothar H; Alam, Munirul; Colwell, Rita R; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2017-08-15

    Escherichia coli , an intestinal Gram-negative bacterium, has been shown to be associated with a variety of diseases in addition to intestinal infections, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs), meningitis in neonates, septicemia, skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), and colisepticemia. Thus, for nonintestinal infections, it is categorized as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). It is also an opportunistic pathogen, causing cross infections, notably as an agent of zoonotic diseases. However, comparative genomic data providing functional and genetic coordinates for ExPEC strains associated with these different types of infections have not proven conclusive. In the study reported here, ExPEC E. coli isolated from SSTIs was characterized, including virulence and drug resistance profiles, and compared with isolates from patients suffering either pyelonephritis or septicemia. Results revealed that the majority of the isolates belonged to two pathogenic phylogroups, B2 and D. Approximately 67% of the isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), with 85% producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and 6% producing metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL). The bla CTX-M-15 genotype was observed in at least 70% of the E. coli isolates in each category, conferring resistance to an extended range of beta-lactam antibiotics. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative genomics of the ExPEC isolates revealed that two of the four isolates from SSTIs, NA633 and NA643, belong to pandemic sequence type ST131, whereas functional characteristics of three of the ExPEC pathotypes revealed that they had equal capabilities to form biofilm and were resistant to human serum. Overall, the isolates from a variety of ExPEC infections demonstrated similar resistomes and virulomes and did not display any disease-specific functional or genetic coordinates. IMPORTANCE Infections caused by extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are of global concern as they result in significant costs to

  15. Synthesis of highly interconnected 3D scaffold from Arothron stellatus skin collagen for tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Singaravelu, Sivakumar; Raja, M D; Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli

    2015-11-01

    The substrate which is avidly used for tissue engineering applications should have good mechanical and biocompatible properties, and all these parameters are often considered as essential for dermal reformation. Highly interconnected three dimensional (3D) wound dressing material with enhanced structural integrity was synthesized from Arothron stellatus fish skin (AsFS) collagen for tissue engineering applications. The synthesized 3D collagen sponge (COL-SPG) was further characterized by different physicochemical methods. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the material demonstrated that well interconnected pores with homogeneous microstructure on the surface aids higher swelling index and that the material also possessed good mechanical properties with a Young's modulus of 0.89±0.2 MPa. Biocompatibility of the 3D COL-SPG showed 92% growth for both NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Overall, the study revealed that synthesized 3D COL-SPG from fish skin will act as a promising wound dressing in skin tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tissue differences in fragile X mosaics: Mosaicism in blood cells may differ greatly from skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobkin, C.S.; Nolin, S.L.; Cohen, I. [NYS Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    The fragile X mutation is diagnosed from the structure of the FMR1 gene in blood cell DNA. An estimated 12 to 41% of affected males are mosaics who carry both a {open_quotes}full mutation{close_quotes} allele from which there is no gene expression and a {open_quotes}premutation{close_quotes} allele which has normal gene expression. We compared the DNA in blood cells and skin fibroblasts from four mosaic fragile X males to see if there was a difference in the relative amounts of premutation and full mutation alleles within the tissues of these individuals. Two of these males showed striking differences in the ratio of premutation to full mutation in different tissues while the other two showed only slight differences. These observations conform with the widely accepted hypothesis that the fragile X CGG repeat is unstable in somatic tissue during early embryogenesis. Accordingly, the mosaicism in brain and skin, which are both ectodermal in origin, may be similar to each other but different from blood which is not ectodermal in origin. Thus, the ratio of full mutation to premutation allele in skin fibroblasts might be a better indicator of psychological impairment than the ratio in blood cells. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Radiation exposure to patient's skin during percutaneous coronary intervention for various lesions, including chronic total occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Furui, Shigeru; Kohtake, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Kozuma, Ken; Yamamoto, Yoshito; Isshiki, Takaaki

    2006-01-01

    Radiation skin injuries have been reported as a result of various procedures, so in the present study the patients' entrance skin dose (ESD) during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was evaluated. ESDs were assessed during 97 procedures (13 for chronic total occlusion (CTO), 14 for multivessel stenoses, 22 for single-vessel multiple stenoses, and 48 for single stenosis). The patients wore jackets that had 48 or 52 radiosensitive indicators placed on the back during the PCI procedures, with 8 other indicators placed on both upper arms. After the procedure, the color of the indicators was analyzed with a color measuring instrument, and the patients' ESDs were calculated from the color difference of the indicators. The average maximum ESDs of the patients were 4.5±2.8 Gy (median: 4.6 Gy) for CTO, 2.3±0.7 Gy (median: 2.4 Gy) for multi-vessel stenoses, 1.8±1.0 Gy (median: 1.5 Gy) for single-vessel multiple stenoses, and 1.4±0.9 Gy (median: 1.2 Gy) for single stenosis. Skin injury can occur during PCI, especially for CTO, so it is important to estimate each patient's ESD and attempt to reduce it. (author)

  18. Design of a tissue oxygenation monitor and verification on human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyuan; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias; Huang, Xiabing

    2011-07-01

    We report the design of a tissue oxygen and temperature monitor. The non-invasive, fibre based device monitors tissue haemoglobin (Hb) and oxygen saturation (SO2) and is based on white-light reflectance spectroscopy.Visible light with wavelengths in the 500 - 650nm range is utilized. The spectroscopic algorithm takes into account the tissue scattering and melanin absorption for the calculation of tissue haemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation. The monitor can probe superficial layers of tissue with a high spatial resolution (mm3) and a high temporal resolution (40 Hz). It provides an accurate measurement with the accuracy of SO2 at 2 % and high reliability with less than 2 % variation of continuous SO2 measurement over 12 hours. It can also form a modular system when used in conjunction with a laser Doppler monitor, enabling simultaneous measurements of Hb, SO2 and blood flow. We found experimentally that the influence of the source-detector separation on the haemoglobin parameters is small. This finding is discussed by Monte Carlo simulations for the depth sensitivity profile. The influence of probe pressure and the skin pigmentation on the measurement parameters are assessed before in vivo experimental data is presented. The combination with laser Doppler flowmetry demonstrates the importance of a measurement of both the haemoglobin and the blood flow parameters for a full description of blood tissue perfusion. This is discussed in experimental data on human skin during cuff occlusion and after hyperemisation by a pharmacological cream. Strong correlation is observed between tissue oxygen (Hb and SO2) and blood flow measurements.

  19. The adhesion of pacemaker skin wounds with Histoacryl tissue adhesive: an analysis of its efficacy and cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yong; Jiang Haibin; Qin Yongwen; Chen Shaoping

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and cost of Histoacryl tissue adhesive in adhering the pacemaker skin wounds. Methods: During the period from April 2010 to October 2010, permanent cardiac pacemaker implantation was performed in 112 patients in authors' hospital. The patients were divided into tissue adhesive group (n=64) and conventional suture group (n=48). Histoacryl tissue adhesive was employed in patients of tissue adhesive group. The extent of wound healing, the post-procedure hospitalization days and the hospitalization cost were recorded, and the results were compared between the two groups. Results: The clinical baselines of the two groups were compatible with each other. Primary closure of wounds was achieved in all patients of two groups. The mean post-procedure hospitalization time in tissue adhesive group and in conventional suture group was (4.4±1.4) days and (6.2±1.3) days respectively, the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P<0.01). If the costs of pacemaker equipment, surgery and DSA were not included, the mean medical expenses in tissue adhesive group and in conventional suture group were (4383.39±792.40) and (4199.81±1059.93) Chinese Yuan respectively, and no significant difference in medical expenses existed between the two groups (P=0.651). Conclusion: Histoacryl tissue adhesive can effectively adhere pacemaker wounds tissue. Compared to the use of conventional suture, the use of Histoacryl tissue adhesive can reduce the post-procedure hospitalization days although the medical expenses are quite the same as that using conventional suture treatment. (authors)

  20. The effect of pressure and shear on tissue viability of human skin in relation to the development of pressure ulcers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogendoorn, Iris; Reenalda, Jasper; Koopman, Bart F J M; Rietman, Johan S

    2017-08-01

    Pressure ulcers are a significant problem in health care, due to high costs and large impact on patients' life. In general, pressure ulcers develop as tissue viability decreases due to prolonged mechanical loading. The relation between load and tissue viability is highly influenced by individual characteristics. It is proposed that measurements of skin blood flow regulation could provide good assessment of the risk for pressure ulcer development, as skin blood flow is essential for tissue viability. . Therefore, the aim of this systematic review is to gain insight in the relation between mechanical load and the response of the skin and underlying tissue to this loading measured in-vivo with non-invasive techniques. A systematic literature search was performed to identify articles analysing the relation between mechanical load (pressure and/or shear) and tissue viability measured in-vivo. Two independent reviewers scored the methodological quality of the 22 included studies. Methodological information as well as tissue viability parameters during load application and after load removal were extracted from the included articles and used in a meta-analysis. Pressure results in a decrease in skin blood flow parameters, compared to baseline; showing a larger decrease with higher magnitudes of load. The steepness of the decrease is mostly dependent on the anatomical location. After load removal the magnitude of the post-reactive hyperaemic peak is related to the magnitude of pressure. Lastly, shear in addition to pressure, shows an additional negative effect, but the effect is less apparent than pressure on skin viability. Copyright © 2017 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Finite element model to study temperature distribution in skin and deep tissues of human limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Mamta; Pardasani, K R

    2016-12-01

    The temperature of body tissues is viewed as an indicator of tissue response in clinical applications since ancient times. The tissue temperature depends on various physical and physiological parameters like blood flow, metabolic heat generation, thermal conductivity of tissues, shape and size of organs etc. In this paper a finite element model has been proposed to study temperature distribution in skin and deep tissues of human limbs. The geometry of human limb is taken as elliptical tapered shape. It is assumed that outer surface of the limb is exposed to the environment. The appropriate boundary conditions have been framed based on physical conditions of the problem. The model has been developed for a three dimensional steady state case. Hexahedral circular sectoral elements are used to discretize the region. The results have been computed to obtain temperature profiles and study the relation of tissue temperature with the parameters like atmospheric temperature, rate of evaporation, thickness of tissues layers and shape of the limb. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spectra from 2.5-15 μm of tissue phantom materials, optical clearing agents and ex vivo human skin: implications for depth profiling of human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viator, John A; Choi, Bernard; Peavy, George M; Kimel, Sol; Nelson, J Stuart

    2003-01-01

    Infrared measurements have been used to profile or image biological tissue, including human skin. Usually, analysis of such measurements has assumed that infrared absorption is due to water and collagen. Such an assumption may be reasonable for soft tissue, but introduction of exogenous agents into skin or the measurement of tissue phantoms has raised the question of their infrared absorption spectrum. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode to measure the infrared absorption spectra, in the range of 2-15 μm, of water, polyacrylamide, Intralipid, collagen gels, four hyperosmotic clearing agents (glycerol, 1,3-butylene glycol, trimethylolpropane, Topicare TM ), and ex vivo human stratum corneum and dermis. The absorption spectra of the phantom materials were similar to that of water, although additional structure was noted in the range of 6-10 μm. The absorption spectra of the clearing agents were more complex, with molecular absorption bands dominating between 6 and 12 μm. Dermis was similar to water, with collagen structure evident in the 6-10 μm range. Stratum corneum had a significantly lower absorption than dermis due to a lower content of water. These results suggest that the assumption of water-dominated absorption in the 2.5-6 μm range is valid. At longer wavelengths, clearing agent absorption spectra differ significantly from the water spectrum. This spectral information can be used in pulsed photothermal radiometry or utilized in the interpretation of reconstructions in which a constant μ ir is used. In such cases, overestimating μ ir will underestimate chromophore depth and vice versa, although the effect is dependent on actual chromophore depth. (note)

  3. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 1; Rat Skin, Normal and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R.; Ashman, R.; Choy, V.; Durnova, G.; Graf, B.; Griffith, P.; Kaplansky, A. S.; Kolis, S.; Martinez, D.; hide

    1994-01-01

    The skin repair studies started to be problematic for the following reasons: (1) It was very difficult to locate the wound and many lesions were not of the same dimensions. A considerable amount of time was devoted to the identification of the wound using polarized light. We understand that this experiment was added on to the overall project. Marking of the wound site and standard dimensions should be recommended for the next flight experiment. (2) The tissue was frozen, therefore thawing and fixation caused problems with some of the immunocytochemical staining for obtaining better special resolution with light microscopy image processing. Despite these problems, we were unable to detect any significant qualitative differences for the following wound markers: (1) Collagen Type 3, (2) Hematotoxylin and Eosin, and (3) Macrophage Factor 13. All protein markers were isolated from rat sources and antibodies prepared and tested for cross reactivity with other molecules at the University of Wisconsin Hybridoma Facility. However, rat skin from the non lesioned site 'normal' showed interesting biochemical results. Skin was prepared for the following measurements: (1) DNA content, (2) Collagen content by hydroxyproline, and (3) uronic acid content and estimation of ground substance. The results indicated there was a non-significant increase (10%) in the DNA concentration of skin from flight animals. However, the data expressed as a ratio DNA/Collagen estimates the cell or nuclear density that supports a given quantity of collagen showed a dramatic increase in the flight group (33%). This means flight conditions may have slowed down collagen secretion and/or increased cell proliferation in adult rat skin. Further biochemical tests are being done to determine the crosslinking of elastin which will enhance the insight to assessing changes in skin turnover.

  4. The role of subcutaneous tissue stiffness on microneedle performance in a representative in vitro model of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moronkeji, K; Todd, S; Dawidowska, I; Barrett, S D; Akhtar, R

    2017-11-10

    There has been growing interest in the mechanical behaviour of skin due to the rapid development of microneedle devices for drug delivery applications into skin. However, most in vitro experimentation studies that are used to evaluate microneedle performance do not consider the biomechanical properties of skin or that of the subcutaneous layers. In this study, a representative experimental model of skin was developed which was comprised of subcutaneous and muscle mimics. Neonatal porcine skin from the abdominal and back regions was used, with gelatine gels of differing water content (67, 80, 88 and 96%) to represent the subcutaneous tissue, and a type of ballistic gelatine, Perma-Gel®, as a muscle mimic. Dynamic nanoindentation was used to characterize the mechanical properties of each of these layers. A custom-developed impact test rig was used to apply dense polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microneedles to the skin models in a controlled and repeatable way with quantification of the insertion force and velocity. Image analysis methods were used to measure penetration depth and area of the breach caused by microneedle penetration following staining and optical imaging. The nanoindentation tests demonstrated that the tissue mimics matched expected values for subcutaneous and muscle tissue, and that the compliance of the subcutaneous mimics increased linearly with water content. The abdominal skin was thinner and less stiff as compared to back skin. The maximum force decreased with gel water content in the abdominal skin but not in the back skin. Overall, larger and deeper perforations were found in the skin models with increasing water content. These data demonstrate the importance of subcutaneous tissue on microneedle performance and the need for representative skin models in microneedle technology development. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Skin physiology in men and women: in vivo evaluation of 300 people including TEWL, SC hydration, sebum content and skin surface pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebberding, S; Krueger, N; Kerscher, M

    2013-10-01

    Evidence is given that differences in skin physiological properties exist between men and women. However, despite an assessable number of available publications, the results are still inconsistent. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study is the first systematic assessment of gender-related differences in skin physiology in men and women, with a special focus on changes over lifetime. A total of 300 healthy male and female subjects (20-74 years) were selected following strict criteria including age, sun behaviour or smoking habits. TEWL, hydration level, sebum production and pH value were measured with worldwide-acknowledged biophysical measuring methods at forehead, cheek, neck, volar forearm and dorsum of hand. Until the age of 50 men's TEWL is significantly lower than the water loss of women of the same age, regardless of the location. With ageing gender-related differences in TEWL assimilate. Young men show higher SC hydration in comparison with women. But, whereas SC hydration is stable or even increasing in women over lifetime, the skin hydration in men is progressively decreasing, beginning at the age of 40. Sebum production in male skin is always higher and stays stable with increasing age, whereas sebum production in women progressively decreases over lifetime. Across all localizations and age groups, the pH value in men is below 5, the pH value of female subjects is, aside from limited expectations, higher than 5. Skin physiological distinctions between the sexes exist and are particularly remarkable with regard to sebum production and pH value. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  6. Biocomposite nanofibrous strategies for the controlled release of biomolecules for skin tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhimathi C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chinnasamy Gandhimathi,1 Jayarama Reddy Venugopal,2 Velmurugan Bhaarathy,2 Seeram Ramakrishna,2 Srinivasan Dinesh Kumar1 1Cellular and Molecular Epigenetics Laboratory, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 2Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore Abstract: Nanotechnology and tissue engineering have enabled engineering of nanostructured strategies to meet the current challenges in skin tissue regeneration. Electrospinning technology creates porous nanofibrous scaffolds to mimic extracellular matrix of the native tissues. The present study was performed to gain some insights into the applications of poly(L-lactic acid-co-poly-(ε-caprolactone (PLACL/silk fibroin (SF/vitamin E (VE/curcumin (Cur nanofibrous scaffolds and to assess their potential for being used as substrates for the culture of human dermal fibroblasts for skin tissue engineering. PLACL/SF/VE/Cur nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning and characterized by fiber morphology, membrane porosity, wettability, mechanical strength, and chemical properties by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR analysis. Human dermal fibroblasts were cultured on these scaffolds, and the cell scaffold interactions were analyzed by cell proliferation, cell morphology, secretion of collagen, expression of F-actin, and 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA dye. The electrospun nanofiber diameter was obtained between 198±4 nm and 332±13 nm for PLACL, PLACL/SF, PLACL/SF/VE, and PLACL/SF/VE/Cur nanofibrous scaffolds. FTIR analysis showed the presence of the amide groups I, II, and III, and a porosity of up to 92% obtained on these nanofibrous scaffolds. The results showed that the fibroblast proliferation, cell morphology, F-actin, CMFDA dye expression, and secretion of collagen were significantly increased in PLACL/SF/VE/Cur when compared

  7. Polymer scaffolds with no skin-effect for tissue engineering applications fabricated by thermally induced phase separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasoju, Naresh; Kubies, Dana; Sedlačík, Tomáš; Kumorek, Marta M.; Rypáček, František; Janoušková, Olga; Koubková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) based methods are widely used for the fabrication of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering and related applications. However, formation of a less-/non-porous layer at the scaffold’s outer surface at the air–liquid interface, often known as the skin-effect, restricts the cell infiltration inside the scaffold and therefore limits its efficacy. To this end, we demonstrate a TIPS-based process involving the exposure of the just quenched poly(lactide-co-caprolactone):dioxane phases to the pure dioxane for a short time while still being under the quenching strength, herein after termed as the second quenching (2Q). Scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry and contact angle analysis revealed a direct correlation between the time of 2Q and the gradual disappearance of the skin, followed by the widening of the outer pores and the formation of the fibrous filaments over the surface, with no effect on the internal pore architecture and the overall porosity of scaffolds. The experiments at various quenching temperatures and polymer concentrations revealed the versatility of 2Q in removing the skin. In addition, the in vitro cell culture studies with the human primary fibroblasts showed that the scaffolds prepared by the TIPS based 2Q process, with the optimal exposure time, resulted in a higher cell seeding and viability in contrast to the scaffolds prepared by the regular TIPS. Thus, TIPS including the 2Q step is a facile, versatile and innovative approach to fabricate the polymer scaffolds with a skin-free and fully open porous surface morphology for achieving a better cell response in tissue engineering and related applications. (paper)

  8. Skin graft influence in human tissue radiated in nude mice regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Jurandir Tomaz de

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years it has increased the interest in the human skin grafts radio sterilized for application mainly in extensive and deep burns. Because these grafts quickly grip and present antigenic lower potential, compared with other treatments used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histoarchitecture of human skin grafts irradiated with doses 25 kGy, 50 kGy and non-irradiated during the repair tissue process in nude mice submitted by skin grafting in the dorsal region. Three groups of animals received irradiated human skin grafts (25 kGy and 50 kGy) and non-irradiated and were euthanized on the 3 rd , 7 th and 21 th day after the surgery. Indeed, routine histologic procedures, tissue samples were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) for quantification of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, immune cells and blood vessels and immunofluorescence (IF) was performed to determine the expression human collagen type I and collagen type I and III mouse. Therefore, quantification of both the cells and the collagen types was performed by image analysis using Image-Pro Plus 6.0 software. Histologic results demonstrated at a dose of 25 kGy that human skin irradiation when grafted influences the increase in the number of cells in wound site over time and it provides better dispersion of these cells. In addition, on the 21 st day, three groups of animals with human skin graft were embedded part of the graft in the healing process. On the other hand, the group not irradiated showed greater incorporation of the graft (43 %), but less production of collagen type III mouse (22 %). Since the groups irradiated skin graft showed lower graft incorporation (6 and 15%), but with greater production of collagen type III mice (35 % and 28 % to 25 kGy and 50 kGy, respectively). In conclusion, this study presented that the group irradiated to 25 kGy and it has a higher cell proliferation and vessel formation, and better remodeling of the healing area. (author)

  9. Effect of mechanical tissue properties on thermal damage in skin after IR-laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenz, M.; Romano, V.; Forrer, M.; Weber, H.P. (Inst. of Applied Physics, Bern Univ. (Switzerland)); Mischler, C.; Mueller, O.M. (Anatomical Inst., Bern Univ. (Switzerland))

    1991-04-01

    The damage created instantaneously in dorsal skin and in the subjacent skeletal muscle layer after CO{sub 2} and Er{sup 3+} laser incisions is histologically and ultrastructurally investigated. Light microscopical examinations show an up to three times larger damage zone in the subcutaneous layer of skeletal muscle than in the connective tissue above. The extent of thermally altered muscle tissue is classified by different zones and characterized by comparison to long time heating injuries. The unexpectedly large damage is a result of the change of elastic properties occurring abruptly at the transition between different materials. This leads to a discontinuity of the cutting dynamics that reduces the ejection of tissue material. We show that the degree of thermal damage originates from the amount of hot material that is not ejected out of the crater acting as a secondary heat source. (orig.).

  10. The tolerance of skin grafts to postoperative radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, W.T.; Zabell, A.; McDonald, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    During the last ten years at the National Cancer Institute, 11 patients have received 12 courses of postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy to skin grafts used for wound closure after the resection of soft-tissue sarcomas. The intervals between grafting and the initiation of radiation ranged between 3 and 20 weeks, and 4 patients received chemotherapy at the same time as their radiation. Ten of the 12 irradiated grafts remained intact after the completion of therapy. One graft had several small persistently ulcerated areas that required no further surgical treatment, and one graft required a musculocutaneous flap for reconstruction of a persistent large ulcer. Acute radiation effects on the grafted skin sometimes developed at slightly lower doses than usually seen with normal skin, but these acute effects necessitated a break in therapy on only five occasions. Concurrent chemotherapy and a relatively short interval between grafting and the initiation of radiation seemed to contribute to more severe radiation reactions. This experience indicates that postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy can be delivered to skin grafted areas without undue fear of complications, especially if the graft is allowed to heal adequately prior to initiating therapy and if chemotherapy is not given in conjunction with radiation

  11. Long-term changes in cell population kinetics of skin tissue after local beta-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1975-06-01

    Using /sup 3/H-thymidine autoradiography, long-term alterations in cell kinetics were studied in guinea pig skin after ..beta..irradiation with 3000 rads. After complete depopulation, epidermal basal cells at the radiation margin became proliferative 10 days postirradiation and spread over the depopulated area. When epithelization (20 days) was complete the cell cycle time of the basal cells reverted to normal, but the differentiation rate was much slower than that in unirradiated skin. This appeared to be a cause of the persistent (acanthotic) hyperplasia. Similar but slower changes were found in dermal tissue. Reparative proliferation of fibroblasts and capillary endothelial cells began at 20 and 30 days, respectively. Active fibroblastic proliferation was found as late as 110 days. This, along with the abortive nature of the reparative angiogenesis, seemed to be a cause of the later fibrosis (150 to 400 days).

  12. Modeling skin cooling using optical windows and cryogens during laser induced hyperthermia in a multilayer vascularized tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rupesh; Das, Koushik; Okajima, Junnosuke; Maruyama, Shigenao; Mishra, Subhash C.

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the spatial and the temporal evolution of tissue temperature during skin surface cooled laser induced hyperthermia. Three different skin surface cooling methodologies viz., optical window contact cooling, cryogenic spray cooling and cryogen cooled optical window contact cooling are considered. Sapphire, yttrium aluminum garnet, lithium tantalate, and magnesium oxide doped lithium niobate are the considered optical windows. The cryogens considered are liquid CO_2 and R1234yf. Heat transfer in the multilayer skin tissue embedded with thermally significant blood vessels pairs is modeled using the Pennes and Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat equations. Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat equation is used for the vascularized tissue. Laser transport in the tissue is modeled using the radiative transfer equation. Axial and radial (skin surface) temperature distributions for different combinations of optical windows and cryogens are analyzed. Liquid CO_2 cooled yttrium aluminum garnet is found to be the best surface cooling mechanism. - Highlights: • Skin surface cooled laser induced hyperthermia is studied. • A multi-layer 2-D cylindrical tissue geometry is considered. • Both Pennes and Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat models are considered. • Laser transport in the tissue is modeled using discrete ordinate method. • Results for 4 optical windows and 2 cryogens for skin cooling are presented.

  13. Quantitatively characterizing microstructural variations of skin tissues during ultraviolet radiation damaging process based on Mueller matrix polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Wei; He, Honghui; Dong, Yang; Ma, Hui

    2018-02-01

    As one of the most fundamental features of light, polarization can be used to develop imaging techniques which can provide insight into the optical and structural properties of tissues. Especially, the Mueller matrix polarimetry is suitable to detect the changes in collagen and elastic fibres, which are the main compositions of skin tissue. Here we demonstrate a novel quantitative, non-contact and in situ technique to monitor the microstructural variations of skin tissue during ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induced photoaging based on Mueller matrix polarimetry. Specifically, we measure the twodimensional (2D) backscattering Mueller matrices of nude mouse skin samples, then calculate and analyze the Mueller matrix derived parameters during the skin photoaging and self-repairing processes. To induce three-day skin photoaging, the back skin of each mouse is irradiated with UVR (0.05J/cm2) for five minutes per day. After UVR, the microstructures of the nude mouse skin are damaged. During the process of UV damage, we measure the backscattering Mueller matrices of the mouse skin samples and examine the relationship between the Mueller matrix parameters and the microstructural variations of skin tissue quantitatively. The comparisons between the UVR damaged groups with and without sunscreens show that the Mueller matrix derived parameters are potential indicators for fibrous microstructure variation in skin tissue. The pathological examinations and Monte Carlo simulations confirm the relationship between the values of Mueller matrix parameters and the changes of fibrous structures. Combined with smart phones or wearable devices, this technique may have a good application prospect in the fields of cosmetics and dermatological health.

  14. Influence of low-energy laser radiation on normal skin and certain tumor tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletnev, S.D.; Karpenko, O.M.

    For some years, the authors' Institute has studied the influence of various types of low-energy laser radiation on normal tissue and the growth of tumors. Radiation at 3 and 30 J/cm/sup 2/ causes an increase in biological activity of various cell elements, manifested as an increase in mitotic activity of the cells in the basal layer of the epidermis, conglomeration of chromatin in the cell nuclei and an increase in degranulation of fat cells in the process of their migration to the reticular layer. Also noted was an increase in content of fibroblastic and lymphohistocytic elements in the dermis, as well as an increase in collagenization of connective tissue. It was found that irradiation of the skin by helium-neon, cadmium-helium and nitrogen lasers before and after grafting of the cells of various tumors modifies the course of the tumor process. This effect is apparently related to the fact that systematic irradiation results in changes creating a favorable background for survival and proliferation of tumor cells in the skin tissue medium. The changes facilitate an increase in survival and growth of both pigmented and nonpigmented tumors. Low power radiation stimulates the activity of the cells or cell structures; medium power stimulates their activity; high power suppresses activity.

  15. National trends in ambulatory visits and antibiotic prescribing for skin and soft-tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Adam L; Chambers, Henry F; Maselli, Judith H; Gonzales, Ralph

    2008-07-28

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs) in the United States. It is unknown whether this development has affected the national rate of visits to primary care practices and emergency departments (EDs) and whether changes in antibiotic prescribing have occurred. We examined visits by patients with SSTIs to physician offices, hospital outpatient departments, and EDs using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 1997 to 2005. We estimated annual visit rates for all SSTIs and a subset classified as abscess/cellulitis. For abscess/cellulitis visits, we examined trends in characteristics of patients and clinical settings and in antibiotic prescribing. Overall rate of visits for SSTIs increased from 32.1 to 48.1 visits per 1000 population (50%; P = .003 for trend), reaching 14.2 million by 2005. More than 95% of this change was attributable to visits for abscess/cellulitis, which increased from 17.3 to 32.5 visits per 1000 population (88% increase; P trend). The largest relative increases occurred in EDs (especially in high safety-net-status EDs and in the South), among black patients, and among patients younger than 18 years. Use of antibiotics recommended for CA-MRSA increased from 7% to 28% of visits (P < .001) during the study period. Independent predictors of treatment with these antibiotics included being younger than 45 years, living in the South, and an ED setting. The incidence of SSTIs has rapidly increased nationwide in the CA-MRSA era and appears to disproportionately affect certain populations. Although physicians are beginning to modify antibiotic prescribing practices, opportunities for improvement exist, targeting physicians caring for patients who are at high risk.

  16. Human Memory B Cells Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Exotoxins Are Prevalent with Skin and Soft Tissue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Pelzek

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen that causes superficial and invasive infections in the hospital and community. High mortality from infection emphasizes the need for improved methods for prevention and treatment. Although S. aureus possesses an arsenal of virulence factors that contribute to evasion of host defenses, few studies have examined long-term humoral and B-cell responses. Adults with acute-phase skin and soft tissue infections were recruited; blood samples were obtained; and S. aureus isolates, including methicillin-resistant strains, were subjected to genomic sequence analysis. In comparisons of acute-phase sera with convalescent-phase sera, a minority (37.5% of patients displayed 2-fold or greater increases in antibody titers against three or more S. aureus antigens, whereas nearly half exhibited no changes, despite the presence of toxin genes in most infecting strains. Moreover, enhanced antibody responses waned over time, which could reflect a defect in B-cell memory or long-lived plasma cells. However, memory B cells reactive with a range of S. aureus antigens were prevalent at both acute-phase and convalescent-phase time points. While some memory B cells exhibited toxin-specific binding, those cross-reactive with structurally related leucocidin subunits were dominant across patients, suggesting the targeting of conserved epitopes. Memory B-cell reactivity correlated with serum antibody levels for selected S. aureus exotoxins, suggesting a relationship between the cellular and humoral compartments. Overall, although there was no global defect in the representation of anti-S. aureus memory B cells, there was evidence of restrictions in the range of epitopes recognized, which may suggest potential therapeutic approaches for augmenting host defenses.

  17. Fabrication of Chitin/Poly(butylene succinate/Chondroitin Sulfate Nanoparticles Ternary Composite Hydrogel Scaffold for Skin Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Deepthi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Skin loss is one of the oldest and still not totally resolved problems in the medical field. Since spontaneous healing of the dermal defects would not occur, the regeneration of full thickness of skin requires skin substitutes. Tissue engineering constructs would provide a three dimensional matrix for the reconstruction of skin tissue and the repair of damage. The aim of the present work is to develop a chitin based scaffold, by blending it with poly(butylene succinate (PBS, an aliphatic, biodegradable and biocompatible synthetic polymer with excellent mechanical properties. The presence of chondroitin sulfate nanoparticles (CSnp in the scaffold would favor cell adhesion. A chitin/PBS/CSnp composite hydrogel scaffold was developed and characterized by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope, FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and swelling ratio of scaffolds were analyzed. The scaffolds were evaluated for the suitability for skin tissue engineering application by cytotoxicity, cell attachment, and cell proliferation studies using human dermal fibroblasts (HDF. The cytotoxicity and cell proliferation studies using HDF confirm the suitability of the scaffold for skin regeneration. In short, these results show promising applicability of the developed chitin/PBS/CSnps ternary composite hydrogel scaffolds for skin tissue regeneration.

  18. The potential applications of fibrin-coated electrospun polylactide nanofibers in skin tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bačáková, Markéta; Musílková, Jana; Riedel, Tomáš; Stránská, D.; Brynda, Eduard; Žaloudková, Margit; Bačáková, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2016 (2016), s. 771-789 E-ISSN 1178-2013 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985891 Keywords : electrospun nanofibers * nanocoating * skin tissue engineering * fibroblasts * fibrin Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V); JI - Composite Materials (USMH-B) Impact factor: 4.300, year: 2016

  19. Preliminary observations on differences in the Raman spectra of cancerous and noncancerous cells and connective tissue of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Michael A.; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan; Alajlan, Abdulmajeed; Chen, Michael X.

    2005-04-01

    A less invasive method of reliably detecting skin cancers is required. Raman spectroscopy is just one of several spectroscopic methods that look promising, but are not yet sufficiently reliable. More information is needed on how and why the Raman spectra of cancerous skin tissue is different from its normal counterpart. We have used confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy with a spatial resolution of about a micron to obtain spectra of unstained thin sections of human skin. We found that there were clear differences in the Raman spectra between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue both in cells and in the connective tissue. The DNA contribution to the spectra was generally stronger in malignant cells than normal ones. In regions of the dermis far away from the tumor one obtains the usual collagen spectra of normal skin, but adjacent to the tumor the spectra no longer appeared to be those of native collagen.

  20. Consensus for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment: basal cell carcinoma, including a cost analysis of treatment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauvar, Arielle N B; Cronin, Terrence; Roenigk, Randall; Hruza, George; Bennett, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in the US population affecting approximately 2.8 million people per year. Basal cell carcinomas are usually slow-growing and rarely metastasize, but they do cause localized tissue destruction, compromised function, and cosmetic disfigurement. To provide clinicians with guidelines for the management of BCC based on evidence from a comprehensive literature review, and consensus among the authors. An extensive review of the medical literature was conducted to evaluate the optimal treatment methods for cutaneous BCC, taking into consideration cure rates, recurrence rates, aesthetic and functional outcomes, and cost-effectiveness of the procedures. Surgical approaches provide the best outcomes for BCCs. Mohs micrographic surgery provides the highest cure rates while maximizing tissue preservation, maintenance of function, and cosmesis. Mohs micrographic surgery is an efficient and cost-effective procedure and remains the treatment of choice for high-risk BCCs and for those in cosmetically sensitive locations. Nonsurgical modalities may be used for low-risk BCCs when surgery is contraindicated or impractical, but the cure rates are lower.

  1. One-stage reconstruction of soft tissue defects with the sandwich technique: Collagen-elastin dermal template and skin grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : A full-thickness soft tissue defect closure often needs complex procedures. The use of dermal templates can be helpful in improving the outcome. Objective : The objective was to evaluate a sandwich technique combining the dermal collagen-elastin matrix with skin grafts in a one-stage procedure. Materials and Methods : Twenty-three patients with 27 wounds were enrolled in this prospective single-centre observational study. The mean age was 74.8 ± 17.2 years. Included were full-thickness defects with exposed bone, cartilage and/ or tendons. The dermal collagen-elastin matrix was applied onto the wound bed accomplished by skin transplants, i.e. ′sandwich′ transplantation. In six wounds, the transplants were treated with intermittent negative pressure therapy. Results : The size of defects was ≤875 cm 2 . The use of the dermal template resulted in a complete and stable granulation in 100% of wounds. Seventeen defects showed a complete closure and 19 achieved a complete granulation with an incomplete closure. There was a marked pain relief. No adverse events were noted due to the dermal template usage. Conclusions : Sandwich transplantation with the collagen-elastin matrix is a useful tool when dealing with full-thickness soft tissue defects with exposed bone, cartilage or tendons.

  2. Novel keratin modified bacterial cellulose nanocomposite production and characterization for skin tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Zalike; Sendemir Urkmez, Aylin; Hames, E Esin

    2017-06-01

    As it is known that bacterial cellulose (BC) is a biocompatible and natural biopolymer due to which it has a large set of biomedical applications. But still it lacks some desired properties, which limits its uses in many other applications. Therefore, the properties of BC need to be boosted up to an acceptable level. Here in this study for the first time, a new natural nanocomposite was produced by the incorporating keratin (isolated from human hair) to the BC (produced by Acetobacter xylinum) to enhance dermal fibroblast cells' attachment. Two different approaches were used in BC based nanocomposite production: in situ and post modifications. BC/keratin nanocomposites were characterized using SEM, FTIR, EDX, XRD, DSC and XPS analyses. Both production methods have yielded successful results for production of BC based nanocomposite-containing keratin. In vitro cell culture experiments performed with human skin keratinocytes and human skin fibroblast cells indicate the potential of the novel BC/keratin nanocomposites for use in skin tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Is there a relationship between hygiene practices and skin and soft tissue infections in diapered children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominger, Annie Heffernan; Woods, Charles; Fallat, Mary; Stevenson, Michelle

    2013-05-01

    The perineal and gluteal regions are the most frequent areas of skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) in diapered children. No studies have investigated the relationship between perineal and general hygiene practices and SSTIs in this population. This study was conducted to evaluate this relationship. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in an urban pediatric emergency department. Subjects were recruited into 3 study groups as follows: gluteal/perineal SSTIs (SSTI), diaper dermatitis (DD), or healthy normal skin (NS). Survey responses were analyzed for significance followed by a clinically oriented staged regression to model predictors of SSTI compared with the NS and DD groups. There were 100 subjects in the SSTI, 206 in the NS, and 151 in the DD groups. Race was the only demographic characteristic that differed between the groups. After adjustment for race, no day care attendance, history of SSTI, household contact with SSTI history, and higher propensity for diaper rash were associated with SSTI compared with NS. Regression results comparing SSTI to DD revealed no day care attendance, history of SSTI, household contact with SSTI history, less sensitive skin, and less diaper cream use to be predictors of SSTI. Perineal and general hygiene practices were not significantly different between children with SSTI compared with children with NS or DD. Based on the results of this study, further prospective studies should evaluate diaper hygiene practices that prevent DD and subsequent SSTIs, the preventative role of day care attendance, and effective interventions that minimize the risk of recurrent SSTIs.

  4. Experimental testing and constitutive modeling of the mechanical properties of the swine skin tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagan, Sylwia D; Liber-Kneć, Aneta

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was an estimation of the possibility of using hyperelastic material models to fit experimental data obtained in the tensile test for the swine skin tissue. The uniaxial tensile tests of samples taken from the abdomen and back of a pig was carried out. The mechanical properties of the skin such as the mean Young's modulus, the mean maximum stress and the mean maximum elongation were calculated. The experimental data have been used to identify the parameters in specific strain-energy functions given in seven constitutive models of hyperelastic materials: neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin, Ogden, Yeoh, Martins, Humphrey and Veronda-Westmann. An analysis of errors in fitting of theoretical and experimental data was done. Comparison of load -displacement curves for the back and abdomen regions of skin taken showed a different scope of both the mean maximum loading forces and the mean maximum elongation. Samples which have been prepared from the abdominal area had lower values of the mean maximum load compared to samples from the spine area. The reverse trend was observed during the analysis of the values of elongation. An analysis of the accuracy of model fitting to the experimental data showed that, the least accurate were the model of neo- -Hookean, model of Mooney-Rivlin for the abdominal region and model of Veronda-Westmann for the spine region. An analysis of seven hyperelastic material models showed good correlations between the experimental and the theoretical data for five models.

  5. Polarimetry based partial least square classification of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma human skin tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ikram, Masroor

    2016-06-01

    Optical polarimetry was employed for assessment of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tissue samples from human skin. Polarimetric analyses revealed that depolarization and retardance for healthy tissue group were significantly higher (ppolarimetry together with PLS statistics hold promise for automated pathology classification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. FISH SKIN ISOLATED COLLAGEN CRYOGELS FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS: PURIFICATION, SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimet Bölgen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering aims regenerating damaged tissues by using porous scaffolds, cells and bioactive agents. The scaffolds are produced from a variety of natural and synthetic polymers. Collagen is a natural polymer widely used for scaffold production in the late years because of its being the most important component of the connective tissue and biocompatibility. Cryogelation is a relatively simple technique compared to other scaffold production methods, which enables to produce interconnected porous matrices from the frozen reaction mixtures of polymers or monomeric precursors. Considering these, collagen was isolated in this study from fish skin which is a non-commercial waste material, and scaffolds were produced from this collagen by cryogelation method. By SEM analysis, porous structure of collagen, and by UV-Vis analysis protein structure was proven, and by Zeta potential iso-electrical point of the protein was determined, and,  Amit A, Amit B, Amit I, Amit II and Amit III characteristical peaks were demonstrated by FTIR analysis. The collagen isolation yield was, 14.53% for acid soluble collagen and 2.42% for pepcin soluble collagen. Scaffolds were produced by crosslinking isolated acid soluble collagen with glutaraldehyde at cryogenic conditions. With FTIR analysis, C=N bond belonging to gluteraldehyde reaction with collagen was found to be at 1655 cm-1. It was demonstrated by SEM analysis that collagen and glutaraldeyhde concentration had significant effects on the pore morphology, diameter and wall thickness of the cryogels, which in turned changed the swelling ratio and degradation profiles of the matrices. In this study, synthesis and characterization results of a fish skin isolated collagen cryogel scaffold that may be potentially used in the regeneration of damaged tissues are presented.

  7. Analysis of laser surgery in non-melanoma skin cancer for optimal tissue removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Salas-García, Irene; Luis Arce-Diego, José

    2015-01-01

    Laser surgery is a commonly used technique for tissue ablation or the resection of malignant tumors. It presents advantages over conventional non-optical ablation techniques, like a scalpel or electrosurgery, such as the increased precision of the resected volume, minimization of scars and shorter recovery periods. Laser surgery is employed in medical branches such as ophthalmology or dermatology. The application of laser surgery requires the optimal adjustment of laser beam parameters, taking into account the particular patient and lesion. In this work we present a predictive tool for tissue resection in biological tissue after laser surgery, which allows an a priori knowledge of the tissue ablation volume, area and depth. The model employs a Monte Carlo 3D approach for optical propagation and a rate equation for plasma-induced ablation. The tool takes into account characteristics of the specific lesion to be ablated, mainly the geometric, optical and ablation properties. It also considers the parameters of the laser beam, such as the radius, spatial profile, pulse width, total delivered energy or wavelength. The predictive tool is applied to dermatology tumor resection, particularly to different types of non-melanoma skin cancer tumors: basocellular carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and infiltrative carcinoma. The ablation volume, area and depth are calculated for healthy skin and for each type of tumor as a function of the laser beam parameters. The tool could be used for laser surgery planning before the clinical application. The laser parameters could be adjusted for optimal resection volume, by personalizing the process to the particular patient and lesion. (paper)

  8. Analysis of laser surgery in non-melanoma skin cancer for optimal tissue removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Salas-García, Irene; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Laser surgery is a commonly used technique for tissue ablation or the resection of malignant tumors. It presents advantages over conventional non-optical ablation techniques, like a scalpel or electrosurgery, such as the increased precision of the resected volume, minimization of scars and shorter recovery periods. Laser surgery is employed in medical branches such as ophthalmology or dermatology. The application of laser surgery requires the optimal adjustment of laser beam parameters, taking into account the particular patient and lesion. In this work we present a predictive tool for tissue resection in biological tissue after laser surgery, which allows an a priori knowledge of the tissue ablation volume, area and depth. The model employs a Monte Carlo 3D approach for optical propagation and a rate equation for plasma-induced ablation. The tool takes into account characteristics of the specific lesion to be ablated, mainly the geometric, optical and ablation properties. It also considers the parameters of the laser beam, such as the radius, spatial profile, pulse width, total delivered energy or wavelength. The predictive tool is applied to dermatology tumor resection, particularly to different types of non-melanoma skin cancer tumors: basocellular carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and infiltrative carcinoma. The ablation volume, area and depth are calculated for healthy skin and for each type of tumor as a function of the laser beam parameters. The tool could be used for laser surgery planning before the clinical application. The laser parameters could be adjusted for optimal resection volume, by personalizing the process to the particular patient and lesion.

  9. A survey of knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards skin and soft tissue infections in rural Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Raczniak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus infections are common to south-western Alaska and have been associated with traditional steambaths. More than a decade ago, recommendations were made to affected communities that included preventive skin care, cleaning methods for steambath surfaces, and the use of protective barriers while in steambaths to reduce the risk of S. aureus infection. Objective: A review of community medical data suggested that the number of skin infection clinical encounters has increased steadily over the last 3 years and we designed a public health investigation to seek root causes. Study design: Using a mixed methods approach with in-person surveys, a convenience sample (n=492 from 3 rural communities assessed the range of knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning skin infections, skin infection education messaging, prevention activities and home self-care of skin infections. Results: We described barriers to implementing previous recommendations and evaluated the acceptability of potential interventions. Prior public health messages appear to have been effective in reaching community members and appear to have been understood and accepted. We found no major misconceptions regarding what a boil was or how someone got one. Overall, respondents seemed concerned about boils as a health problem and reported that they were motivated to prevent boils. We identified current practices used to avoid skin infections, such as the disinfection of steambaths. We also identified barriers to engaging in protective behaviours, such as lack of access to laundry facilities. Conclusions: These findings can be used to help guide public health strategic planning and identify appropriate evidence-based interventions tailored to the specific needs of the region.

  10. Skin pre-ablation and laser assisted microjet injection for deep tissue penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hun-Jae; Yeo, Seonggu; Yoh, Jack J

    2017-04-01

    For conventional needless injection, there still remain many unresolved issues such as the potential for cross-contamination, poor reliability of targeted delivery dose, and significantly painstaking procedures. As an alternative, the use of microjets generated with Er:YAG laser for delivering small doses with controlled penetration depths has been reported. In this study, a new system with two stages is evaluated for effective transdermal drug delivery. First, the skin is pre-ablated to eliminate the hard outer layer and second, laser-driven microjet penetrates the relatively weaker and freshly exposed epidermis. Each stage of operation shares a single Er:YAG laser that is suitable for skin ablation as well as for the generation of a microjet. In this study, pig skin is selected for quantification of the injection depth based on the two-stage procedure, namely pre-ablation and microjet injection. The three types of pre-ablation devised here consists of bulk ablation, fractional ablation, and fractional-rotational ablation. The number of laser pulses are 12, 18, and 24 for each ablation type. For fractional-rotational ablation, the fractional beams are rotated by 11.25° at each pulse. The drug permeation in the skin is evaluated using tissue marking dyes. The depth of penetration is quantified by a cross sectional view of the single spot injections. Multi-spot injections are also carried out to control the dose and spread of the drug. The benefits of a pre-ablation procedure prior to the actual microjet injection to the penetration is verified. The four possible combinations of injection are (a) microjet only; (b) bulk ablation and microjet injection; (c) fractional ablation and microjet injection; and (d) fractional-rotational ablation and microjet injection. Accordingly, the total depth increases with injection time for all cases. In particular, the total depth of penetration attained via fractional pre-ablation increased by 8 ∼ 11% and that of fractional

  11. Preclinical study of mouse pluripotent parthenogenetic embryonic stem cell derivatives for the construction of tissue-engineered skin equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yang; Cui, Jihong; Yin, Lu; Liu, Wei; Liu, Wenguang; Sun, Mei; Yan, Xingrong; Wang, Ling; Chen, Fulin

    2016-10-22

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) derivatives hold great promise for the construction of tissue-engineered skin equivalents (TESE). However, harvesting of ESCs destroys viable embryos and may lead to political and ethical concerns over their application. In the current study, we directed mouse parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells (pESCs) to differentiate into fibroblasts, constructed TESE, and evaluated its function in vivo. The stemness marker expression and the pluripotent differentiation ability of pESCs were tested. After embryoid body (EB) formation and adherence culture, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were enriched and directed to differentiate into fibroblastic lineage. Characteristics of derived fibroblasts were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA. Functional ability of the constructed TESE was tested by a mouse skin defects repair model. Mouse pESCs expressed stemness marker and could form teratoma containing three germ layers. MSCs could be enriched from outgrowths of EBs and directed to differentiate into fibroblastic lineage. These cells express a high level of growth factors including FGF, EGF, VEGF, TGF, PDGF, and IGF1, similar to those of ESC-derived fibroblasts and mouse fibroblasts. Seeded into collagen gels, the fibroblasts derived from pESCs could form TESE. Mouse skin defects could be successfully repaired 15 days after transplantation of TESE constructed by fibroblasts derived from pESCs. pESCs could be induced to differentiate into fibroblastic lineage, which could be applied to the construction of TESE and skin defect repair. Particularly, pESC derivatives avoid the limitations of political and ethical concerns, and provide a promising source for regenerative medicine.

  12. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Jian; Guo Zhixiong

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  13. Gelatin-GAG electrospun nanofibrous scaffold for skin tissue engineering: fabrication and modeling of process parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshki-Modaress, Mohamad; Mirzadeh, Hamid; Zandi, Mojgan

    2015-03-01

    Electrospinning is a very useful technique for producing polymeric nanofibers by applying electrostatic forces. In this study, fabrication of novel gelatin/GAG nanofibrous mats and also the optimization of electrospinning process using response surface methodology were reported. At optimization section, gelatin/GAG blend ratio, applied voltage and feeding rate, their individual and interaction effects on the mean fiber diameter (MFD) and standard deviation of fiber diameter (SDF) were investigated. The obtained model for MFD has a quadratic relationship with gelatin/GAG blend ratio, applied voltage and feeding rate. The interactions of blend ratio and applied voltage and also applied voltage and flow rate were found significant but the interactions of blend ratio and flow rate were ignored. The optimum condition for gelatin/GAG electrospinning was also introduced using the model obtained in this study. The potential use of optimized electrospun mat in skin tissue engineering was evaluated using culturing of human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). The SEM micrographs of HDF cells on the nanofibrous structure show that fibroblast cells can highly attach, grow and populate on the fabricated scaffold surface. The electrospun gelatin/GAG nanofibrous mats have a potential for using as scaffold for skin, cartilage and cornea tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao Jian; Guo Zhixiong [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: guo@jove.rutgers.edu

    2009-07-07

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  15. Demographic variation in community-based MRSA skin and soft tissue infection in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Stephen R; Fraser, John D; Libby, Eric; Morris, Arthur J; Rainey, Paul B; Thomas, Mark G

    2011-04-15

    To estimate the burden of skin and soft tissue infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and to determine the effects of ethnicity and age on the rate of skin and soft tissue due to MRSA in the Auckland community. We reviewed the culture and susceptibility results of all wound swabs processed by Auckland's only community microbiology laboratory in 2007. Demographic data for a random sample of 1000 people who had a wound swab collected and for all people from whom a methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain was isolated were obtained and compared to demographic data for the total population of Auckland. S. aureus was isolated from 23853/47047 (51%) wound swab cultures performed in 2007; the estimated annual incidence of S. aureus isolation from a wound swab was 1847/100,000 people; and the estimated annual incidence of MRSA isolation from a wound swab was 145/100,000 people. Maori and Pacific people had higher rates of non-multiresistant MRSA infection compared with New Zealand European and Asian people; elderly New Zealand European people had much higher rates of multiresistant MRSA infections compared with people from other ethnic groups. S. aureus is a very common cause of disease in the community and the incidence of infection with MRSA subtypes varies with ethnicity.

  16. Serum levels of IGF-1 are related to human skin characteristics including the conspicuousness of facial pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama-Nakagiri, Y; Naoe, A; Ohuchi, A; Kitahara, T

    2011-04-01

    Conspicuous facial pores are one type of serious aesthetic defects for many women. However, the mechanism(s) that underlie the conspicuousness of facial pores remains unclear. We previously characterized the epidermal architecture around facial pores that correlates with the appearance of those pores in various ethnic groups including Japanese. The goal of this study was to evaluate the possible relationships between facial pore size, the severity of impairment of epidermal architecture around facial pores and sebum output levels to investigate the possible role of IGF-1 in the pathogenesis of conspicuous facial pores. The subjects consisted of 38 healthy Japanese women (aged 22-41 years). IGF-1 was measured using immunoradiometric assay. Surface replicas were collected to compare pore sizes of cheek skin and horizontal cross-section images of cheek skin were obtained non-invasively from the same subjects using in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy and the severity of impairment of epidermal architecture around facial pores was determined. The skin surface lipids of each subject were collected from their cheeks and lipid classes were determined using gas chromatography/flame ionization detection. The serum level of IGF-1 correlated significantly with total pore area (R = 0.36, P facial pores (R = 0.43, P pore area (R = 0.32, P facial skin characteristics including facial pore size and with the severity of impairment of epidermal architecture around facial pores. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  17. Skin-Resident T Cells Drive Dermal Dendritic Cell Migration in Response to Tissue Self-Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Niwa; Zirak, Bahar; Truong, Hong-An; Maurano, Megan M; Gratz, Iris K; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2018-05-01

    Migratory dendritic cell (DC) subsets deliver tissue Ags to draining lymph nodes (DLNs) to either initiate or inhibit T cell-mediated immune responses. The signals mediating DC migration in response to tissue self-antigen are largely unknown. Using a mouse model of inducible skin-specific self-antigen expression, we demonstrate that CD103 + dermal DCs (DDCs) rapidly migrate from skin to skin DLN (SDLNs) within the first 48 h after Ag expression. This window of time was characterized by the preferential activation of tissue-resident Ag-specific effector T cells (Teffs), with no concurrent activation of Ag-specific Teffs in SDLNs. Using genetic deletion and adoptive transfer approaches, we show that activation of skin-resident Teffs is required to drive CD103 + DDC migration in response to tissue self-antigen and this Batf3-dependent DC population is necessary to mount a fulminant autoimmune response in skin. Conversely, activation of Ag-specific Teffs in SDLNs played no role in DDC migration. Our studies reveal a crucial role for skin-resident T cell-derived signals, originating at the site of self-antigen expression, to drive DDC migration during the elicitation phase of an autoimmune response. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Accuracy of Intraoral Digital Impressions for Whole Upper Jaws, Including Full Dentitions and Palatal Soft Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ning; Xiong, Yaoyang; Jiao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Intraoral digital impressions have been stated to meet the clinical requirements for some teeth-supported restorations, though fewer evidences were proposed for larger scanning range. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of intraoral digital impressions for whole upper jaws, including the full dentitions and palatal soft tissues, as well as to determine the effect of different palatal vault height or arch width on accuracy of intraoral digital impressions. Thirty-two volunteers were divided into three groups according to the palatal vault height or arch width. Each volunteer received three scans with TRIOS intraoral scanner and one conventional impression of whole upper jaw. Three-dimensional (3D) images digitized from conventional gypsum casts by a laboratory scanner were chose as the reference models. All datasets were imported to a specific software program for 3D analysis by "best fit alignment" and "3D compare" process. Color-coded deviation maps showed qualitative visualization of the deviations. For the digital impressions for palatal soft tissues, trueness was (130.54±33.95)μm and precision was (55.26±11.21)μm. For the digital impressions for upper full dentitions, trueness was (80.01±17.78)μm and precision was (59.52±11.29)μm. Larger deviations were found between intraoral digital impressions and conventional impressions in the areas of palatal soft tissues than that in the areas of full dentitions (pimpressions for palatal soft tissues was slightly better than that for full dentitions (p = 0.049). There was no significant effect of palatal vault height on accuracy of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues (p>0.05), but arch width was found to have a significant effect on precision of intraoral digital impressions for full dentitions (p = 0.016). A linear correlation was found between arch width and precision of digital impressions for whole upper jaws (r = 0.326, p = 0.034 for palatal soft tissues and r

  19. Accuracy of Intraoral Digital Impressions for Whole Upper Jaws, Including Full Dentitions and Palatal Soft Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ning; Xiong, Yaoyang; Jiao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Intraoral digital impressions have been stated to meet the clinical requirements for some teeth-supported restorations, though fewer evidences were proposed for larger scanning range. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of intraoral digital impressions for whole upper jaws, including the full dentitions and palatal soft tissues, as well as to determine the effect of different palatal vault height or arch width on accuracy of intraoral digital impressions. Thirty-two volunteers were divided into three groups according to the palatal vault height or arch width. Each volunteer received three scans with TRIOS intraoral scanner and one conventional impression of whole upper jaw. Three-dimensional (3D) images digitized from conventional gypsum casts by a laboratory scanner were chose as the reference models. All datasets were imported to a specific software program for 3D analysis by "best fit alignment" and "3D compare" process. Color-coded deviation maps showed qualitative visualization of the deviations. For the digital impressions for palatal soft tissues, trueness was (130.54±33.95)μm and precision was (55.26±11.21)μm. For the digital impressions for upper full dentitions, trueness was (80.01±17.78)μm and precision was (59.52±11.29)μm. Larger deviations were found between intraoral digital impressions and conventional impressions in the areas of palatal soft tissues than that in the areas of full dentitions (pimpressions for palatal soft tissues was slightly better than that for full dentitions (p = 0.049). There was no significant effect of palatal vault height on accuracy of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues (p>0.05), but arch width was found to have a significant effect on precision of intraoral digital impressions for full dentitions (p = 0.016). A linear correlation was found between arch width and precision of digital impressions for whole upper jaws (r = 0.326, p = 0.034 for palatal soft tissues and r

  20. Pathomorphological features of the skin and muscle tissue of experimental animals in the case of lifetime and postmortem damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of forensic medical diagnosis of tissue injury is currently the subject of numerous investigations. Pathomorphological changes of the skin and muscle tissue of experimental animals, resulting in the case of lifetime and postmortem traumatic injuries, depending on the time and temperature, were revealed by the author. Data obtained by the author is very necessary for improving the forensic medical diagnosis of traumatic soft tissue injuries.

  1. A facile synthesis method of hydroxyethyl cellulose-silver nanoparticle scaffolds for skin tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifli, Farah Hanani; Hussain, Fathima Shahitha Jahir; Zeyohannes, Senait Sileshi; Rasad, Mohammad Syaiful Bahari Abdull; Yusuff, Mashitah M

    2017-10-01

    Green porous and ecofriendly scaffolds have been considered as one of the potent candidates for tissue engineering substitutes. The objective of this study is to investigate the biocompatibility of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC)/silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), prepared by the green synthesis method as a potential host material for skin tissue applications. The substrates which contained varied concentrations of AgNO 3 (0.4%-1.6%) were formed in the presence of HEC, were dissolved in a single step in water. The presence of AgNPs was confirmed visually by the change of color from colorless to dark brown, and was fabricated via freeze-drying technique. The outcomes exhibited significant porosity of >80%, moderate degradation rate, and tremendous value of water absorption up to 1163% in all samples. These scaffolds of HEC/AgNPs were further characterized by SEM, UV-Vis, ATR-FTIR, TGA, and DSC. All scaffolds possessed open interconnected pore size in the range of 50-150μm. The characteristic peaks of Ag in the UV-Vis spectra (417-421nm) revealed the formation of AgNPs in the blend composite. ATR-FTIR curve showed new existing peak, which implies the oxidation of HEC in the cellulose derivatives. The DSC thermogram showed augmentation in T g with increased AgNO 3 concentration. Preliminary studies of cytotoxicity were carried out in vitro by implementation of the hFB cells on the scaffolds. The results substantiated low toxicity of HEC/AgNPs scaffolds, thus exhibiting an ideal characteristic in skin tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo evaluation of wound bed reaction and graft performance after cold skin graft storage: new targets for skin tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Alicia; Kornmann, Kai; Kerl, Katrin; Calcagni, Maurizio; Schmidt, Christian A; Vollmar, Brigitte; Giovanoli, Pietro; Lindenblatt, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Surplus harvested skin grafts are routinely stored at 4 to 6°C in saline for several days in plastic surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of storage on human skin graft performance in an in vivo intravital microscopic setting after transplantation. Freshly harvested human full-thickness skin grafts and split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs) after storage of 0, 3, or 7 days in moist saline at 4 to 6°C were transplanted into the modified dorsal skinfold chamber, and intravital microscopy was performed to evaluate vessel morphology and angiogenic change of the wound bed. The chamber tissue was harvested 10 days after transplantation for evaluation of tissue integrity and inflammation (hematoxylin and eosin) as well as for immunohistochemistry (human CD31, murine CD31, Ki67, Tdt-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labelling). Intravital microscopy results showed no differences in the host angiogenic response between fresh and preserved grafts. However, STSGs and full-thickness skin grafts exhibited a trend toward different timing and strength in capillary widening and capillary bud formation. Preservation had no influence on graft quality before transplantation, but fresh STSGs showed better quality 10 days after transplantation than 7-day preserved grafts. Proliferation and apoptosis as well as host capillary in-growth and graft capillary degeneration were equal in all groups. These results indicate that cells may activate protective mechanisms under cold conditions, allowing them to maintain function and morphology. However, rewarming may disclose underlying tissue damage. These findings could be translated to a new approach for the design of full-thickness skin substitutes.

  3. In vivo analysis of tissue by Raman microprobe: examination of human skin lesions and esophagus Barrett's mucosa on an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfayli, Ali; Piot, Olivier; Derancourt, Sylvie; Cadiot, Guillaume; Diebold, Marie D.; Bernard, Philippe; Manfait, Michel

    2006-02-01

    In the last few years, Raman spectroscopy has been increasingly used for the characterization of normal and pathological tissues. A new Raman system, constituted of optic fibers bundle coupled to an axial Raman spectrometer (Horiba Jobin Yvon SAS), was developed for in vivo investigations. Here, we present in vivo analysis on two tissues: human skin and esophagus mucosa on a rat model. The skin is a directly accessible organ, representing a high diversity of lesions and cancers. Including malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma, skin cancer is the cancer with the highest incidence worldwide. Several Raman investigations were performed to discriminate and classify different types of skin lesions, on thin sections of biopsies. Here, we try to characterize in vivo the different types of skin cancers in order to be able to detect them in their early stages of development and to define precisely the exeresis limits. Barrett's mucosa was also studied by in vivo examination of rat's esophagus. Barrett's mucosa, induced by gastro-esophageal reflux, is a pretumoral state that has to be carefully monitored due to its high risk of evolution in adenocarcinoma. A better knowledge of the histological transformation of esophagus epithelium in a Barrett's type will lead to a more efficient detection of the pathology for its early diagnosis. To study these changes, an animal model (rats developing Barrett's mucosa after duodenum - esophagus anastomosis) was used. Potential of vibrational spectroscopy for Barrett's mucosa identification is assessed on this model.

  4. In vitro assessment of skin irritation potential of surfactant-based formulations by using a 3-D skin reconstructed tissue model and cytokine response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Russel M; Gandolfi, Lisa; Mack, M Catherine; Fevola, Michael; Martin, Katharine; Hamilton, Mathew T; Hilberer, Allison; Barnes, Nicole; Wilt, Nathan; Nash, Jennifer R; Raabe, Hans A; Costin, Gertrude-Emilia

    2016-12-01

    The personal care industry is focused on developing safe, more efficacious, and increasingly milder products, that are routinely undergoing preclinical and clinical testing before becoming available for consumer use on skin. In vitro systems based on skin reconstructed equivalents are now established for the preclinical assessment of product irritation potential and as alternative testing methods to the classic Draize rabbit skin irritation test. We have used the 3-D EpiDerm™ model system to evaluate tissue viability and primary cytokine interleukin-1α release as a way to evaluate the potential dermal irritation of 224 non-ionic, amphoteric and/or anionic surfactant-containing formulations, or individual raw materials. As part of our testing programme, two representative benchmark materials with known clinical skin irritation potential were qualified through repeated testing, for use as references for the skin irritation evaluation of formulations containing new surfactant ingredients. We have established a correlation between the in vitro screening approach and clinical testing, and are continually expanding our database to enhance this correlation. This testing programme integrates the efforts of global manufacturers of personal care products that focus on the development of increasingly milder formulations to be applied to the skin, without the use of animal testing. 2016 FRAME.

  5. Age and Spatial Peculiarities of Non-neoplastic Diseases of the Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue in Kazakhstan, 2003–2015

    OpenAIRE

    IGISSINOV, Nurbek; KULMIRZAYEVA, Dariyana; BILYALOVA, Zarina; AKPOLATOVA, Gulnur; MAMYRBAYEVA, Marzya; ZHUMAGALIYEVA, Galina

    2017-01-01

    Background: Arrangement of effective management aimed at improving dermatological services and consistent care of patients with skin diseases depends on understanding the epidemiological situation. Methods: This retrospective study presents an epidemiological assessment of non-neoplastic skin and subcutaneous tissue diseases in Kazakhstan registered in 2003–2015. Results: The yearly incidence rate of the diseases among the whole population was in average 3,341.8±121.1 per 100000 population. T...

  6. Practical concept of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in the management of skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pea, Federico

    2016-04-01

    This article gives an overview of the practical concept of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles useful for clinicians in the management of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Recent studies suggest that distinguishing between bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity when choosing an antimicrobial for the treatment of severe infections could probably be clinically irrelevant. Conversely, what could help clinicians in maximizing the therapeutic efficacy of the various drugs in routine practice is taking care of some pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles. Concentration-dependent agents may exhibit more rapid bacterial killing than observed with time-dependent agents. Serum concentrations may not always adequately predict tissue exposure in patients with SSTIs, and measuring concentrations at the infection site is preferable. Hydrophilic antimicrobials showed generally lower penetration rates than the lipophilic ones and might require alternative dosing approaches in the presence of severe sepsis or septic shock. Conversely, tissue penetration of lipophilic antimicrobials is often unaffected by the pathophysiological status. Real-time therapeutic drug monitoring may be a very helpful tool for optimizing therapy of severe infections. Taking care of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles deriving from the most recent findings may help clinicians in maximizing treatment of SSTIs with antimicrobials in every situation.

  7. Evaluation of peripheral vasodilative indices in skin tissue of type 1 diabetic rats by use of RGB images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Noriyuki; Nishidate, Izumi; Nakano, Kazuya; Aizu, Yoshihisa; Niizeki, Kyuichi

    2016-04-01

    We investigated a method to evaluate the arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats from RGB digital color images. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the dorsal reversed McFarlane skin flap are calculated based on the responses of change in the total blood concentration to occlusion of blood flow to and from the flap tissues at a pressure of 50 mmHg. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin flap tissue were significantly reduced in type 1 diabetic rat group compared with the non-diabetic rat group. The results of the present study indicate the possibility of using the proposed method for evaluating the peripheral vascular dysfunctions in diabetes mellitus.

  8. Investigating tissue respiration and skin microhaemocirculation under adaptive changes and the synchronization of blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunaev, A V; Palmer, S G; Stewart, N A; Sokolovski, S G; Rafailov, E U; Sidorov, V V; Krupatkin, A I; Rafailov, I E

    2014-01-01

    Multi-functional laser non-invasive diagnostic systems allow the study of a number of microcirculatory parameters, including index of blood microcirculation (I m ) (by laser Doppler flowmetry, LDF) and oxygen saturation (S t O 2 ) of skin tissue (by tissue reflectance oximetry, TRO). This research aimed to use such a system to investigate the synchronization of microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms under normal and adaptive change conditions. Studies were conducted on eight healthy volunteers of 21–49 years. These volunteers were observed between one and six months, totalling 422 basic tests (3 min each). Measurements were performed on the palmar surface of the right middle finger and the lower forearm's medial surface. Rhythmic oscillations of LDF and TRO were studied using wavelet analysis. Combined tissue oxygen consumption data for all volunteers during ‘adaptive changes’ increased relative to normal conditions with and without arteriovenous anastomoses. Data analysis revealed resonance and synchronized rhythms in microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation as an adaptive change in myogenic oscillation (vasomotion) resulting from exercise and possibly psychoemotional stress. Synchronization of myogenic rhythms during adaptive changes may lead to increased oxygen consumption as a result of increased microvascular blood flow velocity. (paper)

  9. Investigation of the effect of hydration on dermal collagen in ex vivo human skin tissue using second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Wang, Nicholas K.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2016-02-01

    Effect of hydration on the dermal collagen structure in human skin was investigated using second harmonic generation microscopy. Dog ears from the Mohs micrographic surgery department were procured for the study. Skin samples with subject aged between 58-90 years old were used in the study. Three dimensional Multiphoton (Two-photon and backward SHG) control data was acquired from the skin samples. After the control measurement, the skin tissue was either soaked in deionized water for 2 hours (Hydration) or kept at room temperature for 2 hours (Desiccation), and SHG data was acquired. The data was normalized for changes in laser power and detector gain. The collagen signal per unit volume from the dermis was calculated. The desiccated skin tissue gave higher backward SHG compared to respective control tissue, while hydration sample gave a lower backward SHG. The collagen signal decreased with increase in hydration of the dermal collagen. Hydration affected the packing of the collagen fibrils causing a change in the backward SHG signal. In this study, the use of multiphoton microscopy to study the effect of hydration on dermal structure was demonstrated in ex vivo tissue.

  10. Novel wearable-type biometric devices based on skin tissue optics with multispectral LED-photodiode matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young Chang; Kim, Hae Na; Kang, Jae Hwan; Hong, Hyuck Ki; Choi, Yeon Shik; Jung, Suk Won; Kim, Sung Phil

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we examined the possibility of using a multispectral skin photomatrix (MSP) module as a novel biometric device. The MSP device measures optical patterns of the wrist skin tissue. Optical patterns consist of 2 × 8 photocurrent intensities of photodiode arrays, which are generated by optical transmission and diffuse reflection of photons from LED light sources with variable wavelengths into the wrist skin tissue. Optical patterns detected by the MSP device provide information on both the surface and subsurface characteristics of the human skin tissue. We found that in the 21 subjects we studied, they showed their unique characteristics, as determined using several wavelengths of light. The experimental results show that the best personal identification accuracy can be acquired using a combination of infrared light and yellow light. This novel biometric device, the MSP module, exhibited an excellent false acceptance rate (FAR) of 0.3% and a false rejection rate (FRR) of 0.0%, which are better than those of commercialized biometric devices such as a fingerprint biometric system. From these experimental results, we found that people exhibit unique optical patterns of their inner-wrist skin tissue and this uniqueness could be used for developing novel high-accuracy personal identification devices.

  11. Split-dose recovery in epithelial and vascular-connective tissue of pig skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peel, D.M.; Hopewell, J.W.; Simmonds, R.H.; Dodd, P.; Meistrich, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    In the first 16 weeks after irradiation, two distinct waves of reaction can be observed in pig skin; the first wave (3-9 weeks) represents the expression of damage to the epithelium while the second is indicative of primary damage to the dermis, mediated through vascular injury. Following β-irradiation with a strontium-90 applicator, a severe epithelial reaction was seen with little subsequent dermal effects. X-rays (250 kV) on the other hand, produced a minimal epithelial response at doses which led to the development of dermal necrosis after 10-16 weeks. Comparison of single doses with two equal doses separated by 24 h produced a D 2 -D 1 value of 7.0 Gy at the doses which produced moist desquamation in 50% of fields (ED 50 ) after strontium-90 irradiation. After X-irradiation comparison of ED 50 doses for the later dermal reaction suggested a D 2 -D 1 value of 4.5 Gy. Over this same dose range of X-rays the D 2 -D 1 value for the first wave epithelial reaction was 3.5 Gy. These values of D 2 -D 1 for epithelial and dermal reactions in pig skin were compared with published data and were examined in relation to the theoretical predictions of a linear quadratic model for tissue target cell survival. The results were broadly in keeping with the productions of such a model. (Auth.)

  12. Measurement of DNA biomarkers for the safety of tissue-engineered medical products, using artificial skin as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Henry; O'Connell, Catherine; Barker, Peter E; Atha, Donald H; Jaruga, Pawel; Birincioglu, Mustafa; Marino, Michael; McAndrew, Patricia; Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2004-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the process of tissue engineering introduces genetic damage to tissue-engineered medical products, we employed the use of five state-of-the-art measurement technologies to measure a series of DNA biomarkers in commercially available tissue-engineered skin as a model. DNA was extracted from the skin and compared with DNA from cultured human neonatal control cells (dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes) and adult human fibroblasts from a 55-year-old donor and a 96-year-old donor. To determine whether tissue engineering caused oxidative DNA damage, gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry were used to measure six oxidatively modified DNA bases as biomarkers. Normal endogenous levels of the modified DNA biomarkers were not elevated in tissue-engineered skin when compared with control cells. Next, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis-single strand conformation polymorphism were used to measure genetic mutations. Specifically, the TP53 tumor suppressor gene was screened for mutations, because it is the most commonly mutated gene in skin cancer. The tissue-engineered skin was found to be free of TP53 mutations at the level of sensitivity of these measurement technologies. Lastly, fluorescence in situ hybridization was employed to measure the loss of Y chromosome, which is associated with excessive cell passage and aging. Loss of Y chromosome was not detected in the tissue-engineered skin and cultured neonatal cells used as controls. In this study, we have demonstrated that tissue engineering (for TestSkin II) does not introduce genetic damage above the limits of detection of the state-of-the-art technologies used. This work explores the standard for measuring genetic damage that could be introduced during production of novel tissue-engineered products. More importantly, this exploratory work addresses technological

  13. Accuracy of Intraoral Digital Impressions for Whole Upper Jaws, Including Full Dentitions and Palatal Soft Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Gan

    Full Text Available Intraoral digital impressions have been stated to meet the clinical requirements for some teeth-supported restorations, though fewer evidences were proposed for larger scanning range. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision of intraoral digital impressions for whole upper jaws, including the full dentitions and palatal soft tissues, as well as to determine the effect of different palatal vault height or arch width on accuracy of intraoral digital impressions. Thirty-two volunteers were divided into three groups according to the palatal vault height or arch width. Each volunteer received three scans with TRIOS intraoral scanner and one conventional impression of whole upper jaw. Three-dimensional (3D images digitized from conventional gypsum casts by a laboratory scanner were chose as the reference models. All datasets were imported to a specific software program for 3D analysis by "best fit alignment" and "3D compare" process. Color-coded deviation maps showed qualitative visualization of the deviations. For the digital impressions for palatal soft tissues, trueness was (130.54±33.95μm and precision was (55.26±11.21μm. For the digital impressions for upper full dentitions, trueness was (80.01±17.78μm and precision was (59.52±11.29μm. Larger deviations were found between intraoral digital impressions and conventional impressions in the areas of palatal soft tissues than that in the areas of full dentitions (p0.05, but arch width was found to have a significant effect on precision of intraoral digital impressions for full dentitions (p = 0.016. A linear correlation was found between arch width and precision of digital impressions for whole upper jaws (r = 0.326, p = 0.034 for palatal soft tissues and r = 0.485, p = 0.002 for full dentitions. It was feasible to use the intraoral scanner to obtain digital impressions for whole upper jaws. Wider dental arch contributed to lower precision of an intraoral

  14. Experimental study on tissue phantoms to understand the effect of injury and suturing on human skin mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Arnab; Unnikrishnan, Vinu; Flynn, Zachary; Lackey, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Skin injuries are the most common type of injuries occurring in day-to-day life. A skin injury usually manifests itself in the form of a wound or a cut. While a shallow wound may heal by itself within a short time, deep wounds require surgical interventions such as suturing for timely healing. To date, suturing practices are based on a surgeon's experience and may vary widely from one situation to another. Understanding the mechanics of wound closure and suturing of the skin is crucial to improve clinical suturing practices and also to plan automated robotic surgeries. In the literature, phenomenological two-dimensional computational skin models have been developed to study the mechanics of wound closure. Additionally, the effect of skin pre-stress (due to the natural tension of the skin) on wound closure mechanics has been studied. However, in most of these analyses, idealistic two-dimensional skin geometries, materials and loads have been assumed, which are far from reality, and would clearly generate inaccurate quantitative results. In this work, for the first time, a biofidelic human skin tissue phantom was developed using a two-part silicone material. A wound was created on the phantom material and sutures were placed to close the wound. Uniaxial mechanical tests were carried out on the phantom specimens to study the effect of varying wound size, quantity, suture and pre-stress on the mechanical behavior of human skin. Also, the average mechanical behavior of the human skin surrogate was characterized using hyperelastic material models, in the presence of a wound and sutures. To date, such a robust experimental study on the effect of injury and sutures on human skin mechanics has not been attempted. The results of this novel investigation will provide important guidelines for surgical planning and validation of results from computational models in the future.

  15. Increased tissue leptin hormone level and mast cell count in skin tags: A possible role of adipoimmune in the growth of benign skin growths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Safoury Omar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin tags (ST are common tumors. They mainly consist of loose fibrous tissue and occur on the neck and major flexures as small, soft, pedunculated protrusions. Decrease in endocrine, hormone level and other factors are thought to play a role in the evolution of ST. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that acts as a major regulatory hormone for food intake and energy homeostasis. Leptin deficiency or resistance can result in profound obesity and diabetes in humans. A role of mast cell in the pathogenesis of ST is well recognized. Aims: To investigate the role of leptin in the pathogenesis of ST and to clarify whether there is a correlation between mast cell count and leptin level in ST. Methods: Forty-five skin biopsies were taken from 15 patients with ST. From each patient, a biopsy of a large ST (length >4 mm, a small ST (length <2 mm and a normal skin biopsy (as a control were taken. The samples were processed for leptin level. Skin biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and toluidine blue-uranyl nitrate metachromatic method for mast cell count was used. Results: There was a significant increased level of leptin in the ST compared to the normal skin. It was highly significant in small ST than in big ST (P = 0.0001 and it was highly significant in small and big ST compared to controls, P = 0.0001 and P = 0.001, respectively. There was a significant increase in mast cell count in the ST, which did not correlate with the increased levels of leptin. Conclusion: This is the first report to demonstrate that tissue leptin may play a role in the pathogenesis of ST. The significant increase in the levels of leptin and mast cell count in ST may indicate a possible role of adipoimmune in the benign skin growths.

  16. Enhancement of keratinocyte performance in the production of tissue-engineered skin using a low-calcium medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernon, Catherine A; Harrison, Caroline A; Thornton, Daniel J A; MacNeil, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    The success of laboratory-expanded autologous keratinocytes for the treatment of severe burn injuries is often compromised by their lack of dermal remnants and failure to establish a secure dermo-epidermal junction on the wound bed. We have developed a tissue-engineered skin substitute for in vivo use, based on a sterilized donor human dermis seeded with autologous keratinocytes and fibroblasts. However, culture rates are currently too slow for clinical use in acute burns. Our aim in this study was to increase the rate of production of tissue-engineered skin. Two approaches were explored: one using a commercial low-calcium media and the other supplementing well-established media for keratinocyte culture with the calcium-chelating agent ethylene glutamine tetra-acetic acid (EGTA). Using commercial low-calcium media for both the initial cell culture and subsequent culture of tissue-engineered skin did not produce tissue suitable for clinical use. However, it was possible to enhance the initial proliferation of keratinocytes and to increase their horizontal migration in tissue-engineered skin by supplementing established culture medium with 0.04 mM EGTA without sacrificing epidermal attachment and differentiation. Enhancement of keratinocyte migration with EGTA was also maximal in the absence of fibroblasts or basement membrane.

  17. The effects of different lying positions on interface pressure, skin temperature, and tissue blood flow in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källman, Ulrika; Engström, Maria; Bergstrand, Sara; Ek, Anna-Christina; Fredrikson, Mats; Lindberg, Lars-Göran; Lindgren, Margareta

    2015-03-01

    Although repositioning is considered an important intervention to prevent pressure ulcers, tissue response during loading in different lying positions has not been adequately explored. To compare the effects of different lying positions on interface pressure, skin temperature, and tissue blood flow in nursing home residents. From May 2011 to August 2012, interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at three tissue depths were measured for 1 hr over the sacrum in 30° supine tilt and 0° supine positions and over the trochanter major in 30° lateral and 90° lateral positions in 25 residents aged 65 years or older. Measurement of interface pressure was accomplished using a pneumatic pressure transmitter connected to a digital manometer, skin temperature using a temperature sensor, and blood flow using photoplethysmography and laser Doppler flowmetry. Interface pressure was significantly higher in the 0° supine and 90° lateral positions than in 30° supine tilt and 30° lateral positions. The mean skin temperature increased from baseline in all positions. Blood flow was significantly higher in the 30° supine tilt position compared to the other positions. A hyperemic response in the post pressure period was seen at almost all tissue depths and positions. The 30° supine tilt position generated less interface pressure and allowed greater tissue perfusion, suggesting that this position is the most beneficial. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Three-dimensional analysis and classification of arteries in the skin and subcutaneous adipofascial tissue by computer graphics imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, H; Minabe, T; Imanishi, N

    1998-09-01

    To develop new types of surgical flaps that utilize portions of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (e.g., a thin flap or an adipofascial flap), three-dimensional investigation of the vasculature in the skin and subcutaneous tissue has been anticipated. In the present study, total-body arterial injection and three-dimensional imaging of the arteries by computer graphics were performed. The full-thickness skin and subcutaneous adipofascial tissue samples, which were obtained from fresh human cadavers injected with radio-opaque medium, were divided into three distinct layers. Angiograms of each layer were introduced into a personal computer to construct three-dimensional images. On a computer monitor, each artery was shown color-coded according to the three portions: the deep adipofascial layer, superficial adipofascial layer, and dermis. Three-dimensional computerized images of each artery in the skin and subcutaneous tissue revealed the components of each vascular plexus and permitted their classification into six types. The distribution of types in the body correlated with the tissue mobility of each area. Clinically, appreciation of the three-dimensional structure of the arteries allowed the development of several new kinds of flaps.

  19. In Vitro Evaluation of a Biomedical-Grade Bilayer Chitosan Porous Skin Regenerating Template as a Potential Dermal Scaffold in Skin Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Keong Lim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a copolymer of N-acetylglucosamine and glucosamine. A bilayer chitosan porous skin regenerating template (CPSRT has been developed for skin tissue engineering. The pore size of the CPSRT was assessed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The in vitro cytocompatibility of the CPSRT was tested on primary human epidermal keratinocyte (pHEK cultures by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH levels and skin irritation by western blot analysis of the interleukin-8 (IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α secretions. The ability of the CPSRT to support cell ingrowth was evaluated by seeding primary human dermal fibroblasts (pHDFs on the scaffold, staining the cells with live/dead stain, and imaging the construct by confocal microscopy (CLSM. The CPSRT with pore sizes ranging from 50 to 150 μm was cytocompatible because it did not provoke the additional production of IL-8 and TNF-α by pHEK cultures. Cultured pHDFs were able to penetrate the CPSRT and had increased in number on day 14. In conclusion, the CPSRT serves as an ideal template for skin tissue engineering.

  20. Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Malignant disease involving the skin represents a significant work load to the general radiotherapist and can involve interesting diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Primary skin cancer is also relatively common and there is a need to provide an efficient service in which the first treatment is successful in the majority of patients. The reward for careful attention to technique is very considerable both in terms of clinical cancer control and functional results. Squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and intra-epidermal carcinoma constitute the majority of the lesions dealt with clinically, but metastatic disease, lymphomas, and malignant melanomas are also referred regularly for opinions and may require radiotherapy. The general principle of the techniques of assessment and radiotherapeutic management to be described are equally applicable to any malignant skin tumour once the decision has been made to accept it for radiotherapy. Dosage and fractionation may have to be adjusted to allow for the nature of the disease process and the intent of the treatment

  1. Human Stromal (Mesenchymal) Stem Cells from Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue and Skin Exhibit Differences in Molecular Phenotype and Differentiation Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Nbaheen, May; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Ali, Dalia

    2013-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent stem cells with ability to differentiate into mesoderm-type cells e.g. osteoblasts and adipocytes and thus they are being introduced into clinical trials for tissue regeneration. Traditionally, hMSCs have been isolated from bone marrow......, but the number of cells obtained is limited. Here, we compared the MSC-like cell populations, obtained from alternative sources for MSC: adipose tissue and skin, with the standard phenotype of human bone marrow MSC (BM-MSCs). MSC from human adipose tissue (human adipose stromal cells (hATSCs)) and human skin......, MSC populations obtained from different tissues exhibit significant differences in their proliferation, differentiation and molecular phenotype, which should be taken into consideration when planning their use in clinical protocols....

  2. Porcine skin visible lesion thresholds for near-infrared lasers including modeling at two pulse durations and spot sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, C P; Polhamus, G D; Roach, W P; Stolarski, D J; Schuster, K J; Stockton, K L; Rockwell, B A; Chen, Bo; Welch, A J

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of such systems as the airborne laser and advanced tactical laser, high-energy lasers that use 1315-nm wavelengths in the near-infrared band will soon present a new laser safety challenge to armed forces and civilian populations. Experiments in nonhuman primates using this wavelength have demonstrated a range of ocular injuries, including corneal, lenticular, and retinal lesions as a function of pulse duration. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) laser safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental data, and there is scant data for this wavelength. We are reporting minimum visible lesion (MVL) threshold measurements using a porcine skin model for two different pulse durations and spot sizes for this wavelength. We also compare our measurements to results from our model based on the heat transfer equation and rate process equation, together with actual temperature measurements on the skin surface using a high-speed infrared camera. Our MVL-ED50 thresholds for long pulses (350 micros) at 24-h postexposure are measured to be 99 and 83 J cm(-2) for spot sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 mm diam, respectively. Q-switched laser pulses of 50 ns have a lower threshold of 11 J cm(-2) for a 5-mm-diam top-hat laser pulse.

  3. Efficacy of a protocol including heparin ointment for treatment of multikinase inhibitor-induced hand-foot skin reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-ri; Yang, Chi-rei; Cheng, Chen-li; Ho, Hao-chung; Chiu, Kun-yuan; Su, Chung-Kuang; Chen, Wen-Ming; Wang, Shian-Shiang; Chen, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Cheng-Kuang; Ou, Yen-chuan

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a protocol including topical heparin therapy for hand-foot skin reactions (HFSR) during multikinase (MKI) treatment. We prospectively collected 26 patients who had HFSRs during treatment with the MKIs, sunitinib, sorafenib, or axitinib. The age distribution ranged from 46 to 87 years, with a mean of 66 years. The distribution of HFSR severity was 12 patients with grade 1, 12 with grade 2, and 2 with grade 3. A heparin-containing topical ointment treatment, combined with hand-foot shock absorbers and skin moisturizers, was used at the lesion sites. Changes in the grade of HFSR, MKI dosage, and interruptions of MKI therapy were recorded. The results showed that 66.7% of grade 1 patients were cured of disease, 83.3% of grade 2 patients had improved symptoms, and both grade 3 patients (100%) had improved symptoms and were downgraded to grade 2. Four (15.4%) patients required reduction of MKI dosage, but there were no treatment interruptions or dropouts. Our protocol is beneficial in promoting resolution of HFSRs induced by MKIs. Further validation in large control studies should be investigated.

  4. Clinical condition and comorbidity as determinants for blood culture positivity in patients with skin and soft-tissue infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, F. V.; Kallen, M. C.; van den Bosch, C. M. A.; Hulscher, M. E. J. L.; Geerlings, S. E.; Prins, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The utility of performing blood cultures in patients with a suspected skin infection is debated. We investigated the association between blood culture positivity rates and patients' clinical condition, including acute disease severity and comorbidity. We performed a retrospective study, including

  5. Isthmin 1 Is a Secreted Protein Expressed in Skin, Mucosal Tissues, and NK, NKT, and Th17 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Valle-Rios, Ricardo; Maravillas-Montero, José L.; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Martinez, Cynthia; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Homey, Bernhard; Gerber, Peter Arne; Robinson, Octavio; Hevezi, Peter; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Using a comprehensive microarray database of human gene expression, we identified that in mammals, a secreted protein known as isthmin 1 (ISM1) is expressed in skin, mucosal tissues, and selected lymphocyte populations. ISM1 was originally identified in Xenopus brain during development, and it encodes a predicted ∼50-kDa protein containing a signal peptide, a thrombospondin domain, and an adhesion-associated domain. We confirmed the pattern of expression of ISM1 in both human and mouse tissue...

  6. Source investigation of two outbreaks of skin and soft tissue infection by Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Coy, J A; Rodríguez-Castillo, B A; Pérez-Alfonzo, R; DE Waard, J H

    2016-04-01

    Outbreaks of soft tissue or skin infection due to non-tuberculous mycobacteria are reported frequently in scientific journals but in general the infection source in these outbreaks remains unknown. In Venezuela, in two distinct outbreaks, one after breast augmentation surgery and another after hydrolipoclasy therapy, 16 patients contracted a soft tissue infection due to Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus. Searching for the possible environmental infection sources in these outbreaks, initially the tap water (in the hydrolipoclasy therapy outbreak) and a surgical skin marker (in the breast implant surgery outbreak), were identified as the infection sources. Molecular typing of the strains with a variable number tandem repeat typing assay confirmed the tap water as the infection source but the molecular typing technique excluded the skin marker. We discuss the results and make a call for the implementation of stringent hygiene and disinfection guidelines for cosmetic procedures in Venezuela.

  7. Adaptation of the dermal collagen structure of human skin and scar tissue in response to stretch: An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegen, Pauline D.; Schouten, Hennie J.; Tigchelaar-Gutter, Wikky; van Marle, Jan; van Noorden, Cornelis J.; Middelkoop, Esther; van Zuijlen, Paul P.

    2012-01-01

    Surgeons are often faced with large defects that are difficult to close. Stretching adjacent skin can facilitate wound closure. In clinical practice, intraoperative stretching is performed in a cyclical or continuous fashion. However, exact mechanisms of tissue adaptation to stretch remain unclear.

  8. Variability of antibiotic susceptibility and toxin production of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sina, Haziz; Ahoyo, Theodora A.; Moussaoui, Wardi; Keller, Daniel; Bankole, Honore S.; Barogui, Yves; Stienstra, Ymkje; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Prevost, Gilles; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic commensal bacterium that mostly colonizes the skin and soft tissues. The pathogenicity of S. aureus is due to both its ability to resist antibiotics, and the production of toxins. Here, we characterize a group of genes responsible for toxin

  9. Reference values for the Chinese population of skin autofluorescence as a marker of advanced glycation end products accumulated in tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, X.; Hu, H.; Koetsier, M.; Graaff, R.; Han, C.

    Aim Advanced glycation end products play an important role in the pathophysiology of several chronic and age-related diseases, especially diabetes mellitus. Skin autofluorescence is a non-invasive method for assessing levels of tissue advanced glycation end products. This study aims to establish the

  10. Skin and soft tissue infections in intercontinental travellers and the import of multi-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nurjadi, D.; Friedrich-Jänicke, B.; Schäfer, J.; van Genderen, P. J. J.; Goorhuis, A.; Perignon, A.; Neumayr, A.; Mueller, A.; Kantele, A.; Schunk, M.; Gascon, J.; Stich, A.; Hatz, C.; Caumes, E.; Grobusch, M. P.; Fleck, R.; Mockenhaupt, F. P.; Zanger, P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is emerging globally. Treatment of infections is complicated by increasing antibiotic resistance. We collected clinical data and swabs of returnees with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) at 13 travel-clinics in Europe (www.staphtrav.eu). Sixty-two percent (196/318) SSTI

  11. Practices and Procedures to Prevent the Transmission of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in High School Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Stephanie A.; Long, Marcus; Gaebelein, Claude J.; Martin, Madeline S.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Yetter, John

    2012-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are frequent in student athletes and are often caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA). We evaluated the awareness of CA-MRSA among high school coaches and athletic directors in Missouri (n = 4,408) and evaluated hygiene practices affecting SSTI…

  12. Evaluation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infection prevention strategies at a military training center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Stephanie M; Blaesing, Carl R; Millar, Eugene V; Chukwuma, Uzo; Schlett, Carey D; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Tribble, David R; Ellis, Michael W

    2013-08-01

    Military trainees are at high risk for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), especially those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A multicomponent hygiene-based SSTI prevention strategy was implemented at a military training center. After implementation, we observed 30% and 64% reductions in overall and MRSA-associated SSTI rates, respectively.

  13. Aging changes in organs - tissue - cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and structure to the skin and internal organs. Epithelial tissue provides a covering for deeper body layers. The ... such as the gastrointestinal system, are made of epithelial tissue. Muscle tissue includes three types of tissue: Striated ...

  14. Pathologic bladder microenvironment attenuates smooth muscle differentiation of skin derived precursor cells: implications for tissue regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Tolg

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cell containing organs (bladder, heart, blood vessels are damaged by a variety of pathological conditions necessitating surgery or organ replacement. Currently, regeneration of contractile tissues is hampered by lack of functional smooth muscle cells. Multipotent skin derived progenitor cells (SKPs can easily be isolated from adult skin and can be differentiated in vitro into contractile smooth muscle cells by exposure to FBS. Here we demonstrate an inhibitory effect of a pathologic contractile organ microenvironment on smooth muscle cell differentiation of SKPs. In vivo, urinary bladder strain induces microenvironmental changes leading to de-differentiation of fully differentiated bladder smooth muscle cells. Co-culture of SKPs with organoids isolated from ex vivo stretched bladders or exposure of SKPs to diffusible factors released by stretched bladders (e.g. bFGF suppresses expression of smooth muscle markers (alpha SMactin, calponin, myocardin, myosin heavy chain as demonstrated by qPCR and immunofluorescent staining. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR signalling, previously observed to prevent bladder strain induced de-differentiation of fully differentiated smooth muscle cells in vitro, inhibits FBS-induced smooth muscle cell differentiation of undifferentiated SKPs. These results suggest that intended precursor cell differentiation may be paradoxically suppressed by the disease context for which regeneration may be required. Organ-specific microenvironment contexts, particularly prevailing disease, may play a significant role in modulating or attenuating an intended stem cell phenotypic fate, possibly explaining the variable and inefficient differentiation of stem cell constructs in in vivo settings. These observations must be considered in drafting any regeneration strategies.

  15. Optically-tracked handheld fluorescence imaging platform for monitoring skin response in the management of soft tissue sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamma, Emilie; Qiu, Jimmy; Lindvere-Teene, Liis; Blackmore, Kristina M.; Majeed, Safa; Weersink, Robert; Dickie, Colleen I.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Wunder, Jay S.; Ferguson, Peter C.; DaCosta, Ralph S.

    2015-07-01

    Standard clinical management of extremity soft tissue sarcomas includes surgery with radiation therapy. Wound complications (WCs) arising from treatment may occur due to bacterial infection and tissue breakdown. The ability to detect changes in these parameters during treatment may lead to earlier interventions that mitigate WCs. We describe the use of a new system composed of an autofluorescence imaging device and an optical three-dimensional tracking system to detect and coregister the presence of bacteria with radiation doses. The imaging device visualized erythema using white light and detected bacterial autofluorescence using 405-nm excitation light. Its position was tracked relative to the patient using IR reflective spheres and registration to the computed tomography coordinates. Image coregistration software was developed to spatially overlay radiation treatment plans and dose distributions on the white light and autofluorescence images of the surgical site. We describe the technology, its use in the operating room, and standard operating procedures, as well as demonstrate technical feasibility and safety intraoperatively. This new clinical tool may help identify patients at greater risk of developing WCs and investigate correlations between radiation dose, skin response, and changes in bacterial load as biomarkers associated with WCs.

  16. Isthmin 1 is a secreted protein expressed in skin, mucosal tissues, and NK, NKT, and th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Rios, Ricardo; Maravillas-Montero, José L; Burkhardt, Amanda M; Martinez, Cynthia; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Homey, Bernhard; Gerber, Peter Arne; Robinson, Octavio; Hevezi, Peter; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-10-01

    Using a comprehensive microarray database of human gene expression, we identified that in mammals, a secreted protein known as isthmin 1 (ISM1) is expressed in skin, mucosal tissues, and selected lymphocyte populations. ISM1 was originally identified in Xenopus brain during development, and it encodes a predicted ∼50-kDa protein containing a signal peptide, a thrombospondin domain, and an adhesion-associated domain. We confirmed the pattern of expression of ISM1 in both human and mouse tissues. ISM1 is expressed by DX5(+) lung lymphocytes that include NK and NKT-like cells, and is also expressed by some CD4(+) T cells upon activation but its expression increases significantly when CD4(+) T cells were polarized to the Th17 lineage in vitro. The presence of IFN-γ during CD4(+) T cell polarization inhibits ISM1 expression. Given that ISM1 has been reported to have anti-angiogenic properties, these observations suggest that ISM1 is a mediator of lymphocyte effector functions and may participate in both innate and acquired immune responses.

  17. Clinical Management of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in the U.S. Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh D. Mistry

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA has emerged as the most common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI in the United States. A nearly three-fold increase in SSTI visit rates had been documented in the nation’s emergency departments (ED. The objective of this study was to determine characteristics associated with ED performance of incision and drainage (I+D and use of adjuvant antibiotics in the management of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI. Methods: Cross-sectional study of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a nationally representative database of ED visits from 2007-09. Demographics, rates of I+D, and adjuvant antibiotic therapy were described. We used multivariable regression to identify factors independently associated with use of I+D and adjuvant antibiotics. Results: An estimated 6.8 million (95% CI: 5.9-7.8 ED visits for SSTI were derived from 1,806 sampled visits; 17% were for children <18 years of age and most visits were in the South (49%. I+D was performed in 27% (95% CI 24-31 of visits, and was less common in subjects <18 years compared to adults 19-49 years (p<0.001, and more common in the South. Antibiotics were prescribed for 85% of SSTI; there was no relationship to performance of I+D (p=0.72. MRSA-active agents were more frequently prescribed after I+D compared to non-drained lesions (70% versus 56%, p<0.001. After multivariable adjustment, I+D was associated with presentation in the South (OR 2.36; 95% CI 1.52-3.65 compared with Northeast, followed by West (OR 2.13; 1.31-3.45, and Midwest (OR 1.96; 1.96-3.22. Conclusion:Clinical management of most SSTIs in the U.S. involves adjuvant antibiotics, regardless of I+D. Although not necessarily indicated, CA-MRSA effective therapy is being used for drained SSTI. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:491–498.

  18. Chromium Is Elevated in Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus) Skin Tissue and Is Genotoxic to Fin Whale Skin Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Catherine F.; Wise, Sandra S.; Thompson, W. Douglas; Perkins, Christopher; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is present in the marine environment and is a known carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. Cr(VI) is the form of chromium that is well absorbed through the cell membrane. It is also the most prevalent form in seawater. We measured the total Cr levels in skin biopsies obtained from healthy free-ranging fin whales from the Gulf of Maine and found elevated levels relative to marine mammals in other parts of the world. The levels in fin whale biopsies ranged from 1.71 ug/g to 19.6 ug/g with an average level of 10.07 ug/g. We also measured the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cr(VI) in fin whale skin cells. We found that particulate and soluble Cr(VI) are both cytotoxic and genotoxic to fin whale skin cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The concentration range used in our cell culture studies used environmentally relevant concentrations based on the biopsy measurements. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for whales in the Gulf of Maine. PMID:25805270

  19. Bioprinting of Cartilage and Skin Tissue Analogs Utilizing a Novel Passive Mixing Unit Technique for Bioink Precellularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Patrick Scott; Orrhult, Linnea Stridh; Martínez, Héctor

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a powerful technique for the rapid and reproducible fabrication of constructs for tissue engineering applications. In this study, both cartilage and skin analogs were fabricated after bioink pre-cellularization utilizing a novel passive mixing unit technique. This technique was developed with the aim to simplify the steps involved in the mixing of a cell suspension into a highly viscous bioink. The resolution of filaments deposited through bioprinting necessitates the assurance of uniformity in cell distribution prior to printing to avoid the deposition of regions without cells or retention of large cell clumps that can clog the needle. We demonstrate the ability to rapidly blend a cell suspension with a bioink prior to bioprinting of both cartilage and skin analogs. Both tissue analogs could be cultured for up to 4 weeks. Histological analysis demonstrated both cell viability and deposition of tissue specific extracellular matrix (ECM) markers such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen I respectively. PMID:29364216

  20. SU-F-J-86: Method to Include Tissue Dose Response Effect in Deformable Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J; Liang, J; Chen, S; Qin, A; Yan, D [Beaumont Health Systeml, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Organ changes shape and size during radiation treatment due to both mechanical stress and radiation dose response. However, the dose response induced deformation has not been considered in conventional deformable image registration (DIR). A novel DIR approach is proposed to include both tissue elasticity and radiation dose induced organ deformation. Methods: Assuming that organ sub-volume shrinkage was proportional to the radiation dose induced cell killing/absorption, the dose induced organ volume change was simulated applying virtual temperature on each sub-volume. Hence, both stress and heterogeneity temperature induced organ deformation. Thermal stress finite element method with organ surface boundary condition was used to solve deformation. Initial boundary correspondence on organ surface was created from conventional DIR. Boundary condition was updated by an iterative optimization scheme to minimize elastic deformation energy. The registration was validated on a numerical phantom. Treatment dose was constructed applying both the conventional DIR and the proposed method using daily CBCT image obtained from HN treatment. Results: Phantom study showed 2.7% maximal discrepancy with respect to the actual displacement. Compared with conventional DIR, subvolume displacement difference in a right parotid had the mean±SD (Min, Max) to be 1.1±0.9(−0.4∼4.8), −0.1±0.9(−2.9∼2.4) and −0.1±0.9(−3.4∼1.9)mm in RL/PA/SI directions respectively. Mean parotid dose and V30 constructed including the dose response induced shrinkage were 6.3% and 12.0% higher than those from the conventional DIR. Conclusion: Heterogeneous dose distribution in normal organ causes non-uniform sub-volume shrinkage. Sub-volume in high dose region has a larger shrinkage than the one in low dose region, therefore causing more sub-volumes to move into the high dose area during the treatment course. This leads to an unfavorable dose-volume relationship for the normal organ

  1. Ultrasound skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkis, Kira; Alam, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound skin tightening is a noninvasive, nonablative method that allows for energy deposition into the deep dermal and subcutaneous tissue while avoiding epidermal heating. Ultrasound coagulation is confined to arrays of 1-mm(3) zones that include the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and connective tissue. This technology gained approval from the Food and Drug Administration as the first energy-based skin "lifting" device, specifically for lifting lax tissue on the neck, submentum, and eyebrows. Ultrasound has the unique advantage of direct visualization of treated structures during treatment. Ultrasound is a safe and efficacious treatment for mild skin tightening and lifting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Numerical solution of non-linear dual-phase-lag bioheat transfer equation within skin tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Kumar, P; Rai, K N

    2017-11-01

    This paper deals with numerical modeling and simulation of heat transfer in skin tissues using non-linear dual-phase-lag (DPL) bioheat transfer model under periodic heat flux boundary condition. The blood perfusion is assumed temperature-dependent which results in non-linear DPL bioheat transfer model in order to predict more accurate results. A numerical method of line which is based on finite difference and Runge-Kutta (4,5) schemes, is used to solve the present non-linear problem. Under specific case, the exact solution has been obtained and compared with the present numerical scheme, and we found that those are in good agreement. A comparison based on model selection criterion (AIC) has been made among non-linear DPL models when the variation of blood perfusion rate with temperature is of constant, linear and exponential type with the experimental data and it has been found that non-linear DPL model with exponential variation of blood perfusion rate is closest to the experimental data. In addition, it is found that due to absence of phase-lag phenomena in Pennes bioheat transfer model, it achieves steady state more quickly and always predict higher temperature than thermal and DPL non-linear models. The effect of coefficient of blood perfusion rate, dimensionless heating frequency and Kirchoff number on dimensionless temperature distribution has also been analyzed. The whole analysis is presented in dimensionless form. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genomic epidemiology of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus across colonisation and skin and soft tissue infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, Alex; Biggs, Patrick J; Zhang, Ji; Ritchie, Stephen; Oneroa, Zachary; O'Neill, Charlotte; Karkaba, Ali; Velathanthiri, Niluka S; Coombs, Geoffrey W

    2017-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infection (Sa-SSTI) places a significant burden on healthcare systems. New Zealand has a high incidence of Sa-SSTI, and here most morbidity is caused by a polyclonal methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) bacterial population. However, MSSA also colonise asymptomatically the cornified epithelia of approximately 20% of the population, and their divide between commensalism and pathogenicity is poorly understood. We aimed to see whether MSSA are genetically differentiated across colonisation and SSTI; and given the close interactions between people and pets, whether strains isolated from pets differ from human strains. We compared the genomes of contemporaneous colonisation and clinical MSSA isolates obtained in New Zealand from humans and pets. Core and accessory genome comparisons revealed a homogeneous bacterial population across colonisation, disease, humans, and pets. The rate of MSSA colonisation in dogs was comparatively low (5.4%). In New Zealand, most Sa-SSTI morbidity is caused by a random sample of the colonising MSSA population, consistent with the opportunistic infection model rather than the paradigm distinguishing strains according to their pathogenicity. Thus, studies of the factors determining colonisation and immune-escape may be more beneficial than comparative virulence studies. Contact with house-hold pets may pose low zoonotic risk. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interaction of low-intensity linearly polarized laser radiation with living tissues: effects on tissular acceleration of skin wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Martha Simoes

    2000-01-01

    According to the Maxwell's equations to optical properties of surfaces, the energy deposition efficiency in a microroughness interface depends on the electrical field polarization component. Considering a linearly polarized beam, this efficiency will depend on the roughness parameters to p-polarized light and it will not depend on such parameters to s-polarized light. In this work it was investigated the effects of low-intensity, linearly polarized He-Ne laser beam on skin wounds healing, considering two orthogonal directions of polarization. We have considered a preferential axis as the animals' spinal column and we aligned the linear laser polarization first parallel, then perpendicular to this direction. Burns about 6 mm in diameter were created with liquid N 2 on the back of the animals and the lesions were irradiated on days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-wounding, D= 1,0 J/cm 2 . Control lesions were not irradiated. The theoretical model consisted in describing linearly polarized light propagation in biological tissues using transport theory. The degree of polarization was measured in normal and pathological skin samples. It was verified that linearly polarized light can survive in the superficial layers of skin and it can be more preserved in skin under pathological condition when compared with health skin. The analysis of skin wound healing process has demonstrated that the relative direction of the laser polarization plays an important role on the wound healing process by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and radioautography. (author)

  5. Determining the origin of cells in tissue engineered skin substitutes: a pilot study employing in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Andreas Daniel; Pontiggia, Luca; Biedermann, Thomas; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2011-03-01

    Definitive and high-quality coverage of large and, in particular, massive skin defects remains a significant challenge in burn as well as plastic and reconstructive surgery because of donor site shortage. A novel and promising approach to overcome these problems is tissue engineering of skin. Clearly, before eventual clinical application, engineered skin substitutes of human origin must be grafted and then evaluated in animal models. For the various tests to be conducted it is indispensable to be able to identify human cells as such in culture and also to distinguish between graft and recipient tissue after transplantation. Here we describe a tool to identify human cells in vitro and in vivo. In situ hybridization allows for the detection and localization of specific DNA or RNA sequences in morphologically preserved cells in culture or tissue sections, respectively. We used digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes corresponding to human-specific Alu repeats in order to identify human keratinocytes grown in culture together with rat cells, and also to label split and full thickness skin grafts of human origin after transplantation on immuno-incompetent rats. Digoxigenin-labeled DNA probing resulted in an intensive nuclear staining of human cells, both in culture and after transplantation onto recipient animals, while recipient animal cells (rat cells) did not stain. In situ hybridization using primate-specific Alu probes reliably allows distinguishing between cells of human and non-human origin both in culture as well as in histological sections. This method is an essential tool for those preclinical experiments (performed on non-primate animals) that must be conducted before novel tissue engineered skin substitutes might be introduced into clinical practice.

  6. How Can Nanotechnology Help to Repair the Body? Advances in Cardiac, Skin, Bone, Cartilage and Nerve Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Marchal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologists have become involved in regenerative medicine via creation of biomaterials and nanostructures with potential clinical implications. Their aim is to develop systems that can mimic, reinforce or even create in vivo tissue repair strategies. In fact, in the last decade, important advances in the field of tissue engineering, cell therapy and cell delivery have already been achieved. In this review, we will delve into the latest research advances and discuss whether cell and/or tissue repair devices are a possibility. Focusing on the application of nanotechnology in tissue engineering research, this review highlights recent advances in the application of nano-engineered scaffolds designed to replace or restore the followed tissues: (i skin; (ii cartilage; (iii bone; (iv nerve; and (v cardiac.

  7. Risk Factors for Pressure Ulcers Including Suspected Deep Tissue Injury in Nursing Home Facility Residents: Analysis of National Minimum Data Set 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyochol; Cowan, Linda; Garvan, Cynthia; Lyon, Debra; Stechmiller, Joyce

    2016-04-01

    To provide information on risk factors associated with pressure ulcers (PrUs), including suspected deep tissue injury (sDTI), in nursing home residents in the United States. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Examine the literature related to risk factors for the development of PrUs.2. Compare risk factors associated with the prevalence of PrUs and sDTI from the revised Minimum Data Set 3.0 2012 using a modified Defloor's conceptual model of PrUs as a theoretical framework. This study aims to characterize and compare risk factors associated with pressure ulcers (PrUs), including suspected deep tissue injury (sDTI), in nursing home (NH) residents in the United States. Secondary analysis of the 2012 Minimum Data Set (MDS 3.0). Medicare- or Medicaid-certified NHs in the United States. Nursing home residents (n = 2,936,146) 18 years or older with complete PrU data, who received comprehensive assessments from January to December 2012. Pressure ulcer by stage was the outcome variable. Explanatory variables (age, gender, race and ethnicity, body mass index, skin integrity, system failure, disease, infection, mobility, and cognition) from the MDS 3.0 were aligned with the 4 elements of Defloor's conceptual model: compressive forces, shearing forces, tissue tolerance for pressure, and tissue tolerance for oxygen. Of 2,936,146 NH residents who had complete data for PrU, 89.9% had no PrU; 8.4% had a Stage 2, 3, or 4 or unstagable PrU; and 1.7% had an sDTI. The MDS variables corresponding to the 4 elements of Defloor's model were significantly predictive of both PrU and sDTI. Black residents had the highest risk of any-stage PrU, and Hispanic residents had the highest risk of sDTI. Skin integrity, system failure, infection, and disease risk factors had larger effect sizes for sDTI than for other PrU stages

  8. Does Spinal Block Through Tattooed Skin Cause Histological Changes in Nervous Tissue and Meninges?: An Experimental Model in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Isabela Leite; Barros, Guilherme Antônio Moreira de; Ferreira Neto, Patrícia Gomes; Solanki, Daneshivari; Marques, Mariângela Alencar; Machado, Vânia Maria de Vasconcelos; Cabral, Lucas Wynne; Lima, Rodrigo Moreira E; Vianna, Pedro Thadeu Galvão; Navarro, Lais Helena Camacho; Ganen, Eliana Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Although there is no documented evidence that tattoo pigments can cause neurological complications, the implications of performing neuraxial anesthesia through tattooed skin are unknown. In this study, we aimed to assess whether spinal puncture performed through tattooed skin of rabbits determines changes over the spinal cord and meninges. In addition, we sought to evaluate the presence of ink fragments entrapped in spinal needles. Thirty-six young male adult rabbits, each weighing between 3400 and 3900 g and having a spine length between 38.5 and 39 cm, were divided by lot into 3 groups as follows: GI, spinal puncture through tattooed skin; GII, spinal puncture through tattooed skin and saline injection; and GIII, spinal puncture through skin free of tattoo and saline injection. After intravenous anesthesia with ketamine and xylazine, the subarachnoid space was punctured at S1-S2 under ultrasound guidance with a 22-gauge 2½ Quincke needle. Animals in GII and GIII received 5 μL/cm of spinal length (0.2 mL) of saline intrathecally. In GI, the needle tip was placed into the yellow ligament, and no solution was injected into the intrathecal space; after tattooed skin puncture, 1 mL of saline was injected through the needle over a histological slide to prepare a smear that was dyed by the Giemsa method to enable tissue identification if present. All animals remained in captivity for 21 days under medical observation and were killed by decapitation. The lumbosacral spinal cord portion was removed for histological analysis using hematoxylin-eosin stain. None of the animals had impaired motor function or decreased nociception during the period of clinical observation. None of the animals from the control group (GIII) showed signs of injuries to meninges. In GII, however, 4 animals presented with signs of meningeal injury. The main histological changes observed were focal areas of perivascular lymphoplasmacyte infiltration in the pia mater and arachnoid. There was no

  9. L-carnitine mitigates UVA-induced skin tissue injury in rats through downregulation of oxidative stress, p38/c-Fos signaling, and the proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Samir A; Arab, Hany H; Omar, Hany A; Gad, Hesham S; Abd-Allah, Gamil M; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A; Al Robaian, Majed M

    2018-04-01

    UVA comprises more than 90% of the solar UV radiation reaching the Earth. Artificial lightening lamps have also been reported to emit significant amounts of UVA. Exposure to UVA has been associated with dermatological disorders including skin cancer. At the molecular level, UVA damages different cellular biomolecules and triggers inflammatory responses. The current study was devoted to investigate the potential protective effect of L-carnitine against UVA-induced skin tissue injury using rats as a mammalian model. Rats were distributed into normal control group (NC), L-carnitine control group (LC), UVA-Exposed group (UVA), and UVA-Exposed and L-carnitine-treated group (UVA-LC). L-carnitine significantly attenuated UVA-induced elevation of the DNA damage markers 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) as well as decreased DNA fragmentation and the activity of the apoptotic marker caspase-3. In addition, L-carnitine substantially reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation marker (TBARS) and protein oxidation marker (PCC) and significantly elevated the levels of the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and the antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) in the skin tissues. Interestingly, L-carnitine upregulated the level of the DNA repair protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Besides it mitigated the UVA-induced activation of the oxidative stress-sensitive signaling protein p38 and its downstream target c-Fos. Moreover, L-carnitine significantly downregulated the levels of the early response proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β. Collectively, our results highlight, for the first time, the potential attenuating effects of L-carnitine on UVA-induced skin tissue injury in rats that is potentially mediated through suppression of UVA-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. R179H mutation in ACTA2 expanding the phenotype to include prune-belly sequence and skin manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, J; Milewicz, D M; Gow, R; de Nanassy, J; Maharajh, G; Miller, E; Oppenheimer, L; Weiler, G; O'Connor, M

    2012-03-01

    Mutations in ACTA2 (smooth muscle cell-specific isoform of α-actin) lead to a predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysms and other vascular diseases. More recently, the ACTA2 R179H mutation has been described in individuals with global smooth muscle dysfunction. We report a patient heterozygous for the mutation in ACTA2 R179H who presented with megacystis at 13 weeks gestational age and, at birth, with prune-belly sequence. He also had deep skin dimples and creases on his palms and soles, a finding not previously described but possibly related to ACTA2. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the R179H mutation in ACTA2 in a child with prune-belly sequence. We think the R179H mutation in ACTA2 should be included in the differential diagnosis of individuals presenting with the sequence without an identified mechanical obstruction. Furthermore, as ACTA2 R179H has been reported in patients with severe vasculomyopathy and premature death, we recommend that molecular testing for this mutation be considered in fetuses presenting with fetal megacystis with a normal karyotype, particularly if the bladder diameter is 15 mm or more, to allow expectant parents to make an informed decision. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Molecular diagnosis of skin infections using paraffin-embedded tissue - review and interdisciplinary consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderkötter, Cord; Becker, Karsten; Kutzner, Heinz; Meyer, Thomas; Blödorn-Schlicht, Norbert; Reischl, Udo; Nenoff, Pietro; Geißdörfer, Walter; Gräser, Yvonne; Herrmann, Mathias; Kühn, Joachim; Bogdan, Christian

    2018-02-01

    Nucleic acid amplification techniques (NATs), such as PCR, are highly sensitive and specific methods that have become valuable supplements to culture and serology in the diagnosis of infectious disorders. However, especially when using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue, these techniques are associated with both false-negative and false-positive results, a pitfall that is frequently misjudged. Representatives of the German Society of Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) and the German Society of Dermatology (DDG) therefore set out to develop a consensus - in the form of a review article - on the appropriate indications for NATs using paraffin-embedded tissue, its contraindications, and the key points to be considered in the pre- and post-analytical phase. Given that fresh, naive tissue is preferably to be used in the workup of a suspected infection, PCR analysis on paraffin sections represents an exception. The latter may be considered if an infection is suspected at a later point in time and fresh tissue has not been preserved or can no longer be obtained. Potential indications include confirmation of histologically suspected infections with Leishmania spp., Bartonella spp., Rickettsia spp., or in case of ecthyma contagiosum. Infections with, for example, mycobacteria or RNA viruses, on the other hand, are not considered useful indications for NATs using paraffin sections. In order to avoid misinterpretation of test results, it is essential that laboratory reports on NATs using paraffin-embedded tissue contain information on the indication/diagnostic circumstances, the required and chosen pre-analytical steps, the limitations of the method, and on diagnostic alternatives. © 2018 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Successive Release of Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteinase-1 Through Graphene Oxide-Based Delivery System Can Promote Skin Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Cheng; Shi, Dike; Zheng, Yixiong; Nelson, Peter J.; Bao, Qi

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to testify the hypothesis that graphene oxide (GO) could act as an appropriate vehicle for the release of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) protein in the context of skin repair. GO characteristics were observed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis. After TIMP-1 absorbing GO, the release profiles of various concentrations of TIMP-1 from GO were compared. GO biocompatibility with fibroblast viability was assessed by measuring cell cycle and apoptosis. In vivo wound healing assays were used to determine the effect of TIMP-1-GO on skin regeneration. The greatest intensity of GO was 1140 nm, and the most intensity volume was 10,674.1 nm (nanometer). TIMP-1 was shown to be continuously released for at least 40 days from GO. The proliferation and viability of rat fibroblasts cultured with TIMP-1-GO were not significantly different as compared with the cells grown in GO or TIMP-1 alone ( p > 0.05). Skin defect of rats treated with TIMP-1 and TIMP-1-GO showed significant differences in histological and immunohistochemical scores ( p tissue regeneration in skin defect.

  13. Reverse tissue expansion by liposuction deflation adopted for harvest of large sheet of full-thickness skin graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A E; Debbas, C C; Dibo, S A; Atiyeh, B S; Abu-Sittah, G S; Isik, S

    2012-06-30

    Full-thickness skingraft is a valid option to release burn scar contractures with the main purpose of correcting the induced limitation in function and improve the disfiguring appearance of the scar. The main pitfall remains the limited availability of these grafts, especially when large sheets are needed. We present an application of a previously described technique known as reverse tissue expansion, which permits the harvesting of a large sheet of full thickness skin graft when needed. This method was adopted to release a burn scar contracture in a 32-yr-old man who sustained a 65% TBSA burn secondary to a gasoline tank explosion at the age of 7 yr followed by multiple reconstructive procedures. The patient presented with a disfiguring anterior neck contracture coupled to limited range of motion. Improvement of neck extension was contemplated using full-thickness skin graft harvested following reverse tissue expansion achieved by deflation liposuction of the donor site.

  14. Efficacy and safety of intravenous daptomycin in Japanese patients with skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Naoki; Kusachi, Shinya; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Takesue, Yoshio; Watanabe, Shinichi; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Morita, Akiko; Tsumori, Keiko; Kato, Yoshiaki; Yoshinari, Tomoko

    2013-06-01

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic active against gram-positive organisms and recently approved for marketing in Japan. This study investigates the efficacy and safety of daptomycin in Japanese patients with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for regulatory filing in Japan. Overall, 111 Japanese patients with SSTI were randomized in this open-label, randomized, active-comparator controlled, parallel-group, multicenter, phase III study. Patients received intravenous daptomycin 4 mg/kg once daily or vancomycin 1 g twice daily for 7-14 days. Efficacy was determined by a blinded Efficacy Adjudication Committee. Among patients with SSTIs caused by MRSA, 81.8 % (95 % CI, 69.1-90.9) of daptomycin recipients and 84.2 % (95 % CI, 60.4-96.6) of vancomycin recipients achieved a successful clinical response at the test-of-cure (TOC) visit. The microbiological success rate against MRSA at the TOC visit was 56.4 % (95 % CI, 42.3-69.7) with daptomycin and 47.4 % (95 % CI, 24.4-71.1) with vancomycin. Daptomycin was generally well tolerated; most adverse events were of mild to moderate severity. The measurement of daptomycin concentration in plasma revealed that patients with mild or moderate impaired renal function showed similar pharmacokinetics profiles to patients with normal renal function. Clinical and microbiological responses, stratified by baseline MRSA susceptibility, suggested that patients infected with MRSA of higher daptomycin MIC showed a trend of lower clinical success with a P value of 0.052 by Cochran-Armitage test. Daptomycin was clinically and microbiologically effective for the treatment of MRSA-associated SSTIs in Japanese patients.

  15. Treatment of skin and soft tissue infections in a pediatric observation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Roni D; Sandweiss, David R; Corneli, Howard M

    2014-05-01

    To report the success rate of observation unit (OU) treatment of pediatric skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and to see if we could identify variables at the time of initial evaluation that predicted successful OU treatment. A retrospective review of children less than 18 years of age admitted for SSTI treatment to our OU from the emergency department between January 2003 and June 2009. On records review, 853 patients matched eligibility criteria; median age was 5.2 years (interquartile range = 2.5-9 years). Of the 853 patients, 597 (70.0%) met the primary outcome criteria of successful OU discharge within 26 hours. Secondary analysis revealed that 82% of the patients achieved successful discharge from the OU within 48 hours. Although some laboratory variables demonstrated statistical association with success, none achieved a combination of high sensitivity and specificity to predict OU failure. OU success rates varied by location. Dental and face infections and those of the extremities or multiple sites demonstrated OU success rates higher than 65%, while infection of the groin, buttocks, trunk, or neck had success rates between 24% (neck) and 60% (groin). In multivariate analysis, only 3 variables remained significant. Unfavorable location was most strongly associated with OU failure, followed by C-reactive protein > 4 and then by erythrocyte sedimentation rate > 20. Our findings suggest that successful OU treatment is possible in a large group of patients needing hospitalization for SSTIs. Consideration of infection location may assist the emergency department clinician in determining the most appropriate unit for admission.

  16. In vivo Molecular Evaluation of Guinea Pig Skin Incisions Healing after Surgical Suture and Laser Tissue Welding Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimova, A.; Chakraverty, R.; Muthukattil, R.; Elder, S.; Katz, A.; Sriramoju, V.; Lipper, Stanley; Alfano, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    The healing process in guinea pig skin following surgical incisions was evaluated at the molecular level, in vivo, by the use of Raman spectroscopy. After the incisions were closed either by suturing or by laser tissue welding (LTW), differences in the respective Raman spectra were identified. The study determined that the ratio of the Raman peaks of the amide III (1247 cm−1) band to a peak at 1326 cm−1 (the superposition of elastin and keratin bands) can be used to evaluate the progression of wound healing. Conformational changes in the amide I band (1633 cm−1 to 1682 cm−1) and spectrum changes in the range of 1450 cm−1 to 1520 cm−1 were observed in LTW and sutured skin. The stages of the healing process of the guinea pig skin following LTW and suturing were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, using histopathology as the gold standard. LTW skin demonstrated better healing than sutured skin, exhibiting minimal hyperkeratosis, minimal collagen deposition, near-normal surface contour, and minimal loss of dermal appendages. A wavelet decomposition-reconstruction baseline correction algorithm was employed to remove the fluorescence wing from the Raman spectra. PMID:19581109

  17. Clinical application of a tissue-cultured skin autograft: an alternative for the treatment of non-healing or slowly healing wounds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöller, Nadja; Valesky, Eva; Butting, Manuel; Hofmann, Matthias; Kippenberger, Stefan; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The treatment regime of non-healing or slowly healing wounds is constantly improving. One aspect is surgical defect coverage whereby mesh grafts and keratinocyte suspension are applied. Tissue-cultured skin autografts may be an alternative for the treatment of full-thickness wounds and wounds that cover large areas of the body surface. Autologous epidermal and dermal cells were isolated, expanded in vitro and seeded on collagen-elastin scaffolds. The developed autograft was immunohistochemically characterized and subsequently transplanted onto a facial chronic ulceration of a 71-year-old patient with vulnerable atrophic skin. Characterization of the skin equivalent revealed comparability to healthy human skin due to the epidermal strata, differentiation and proliferation markers. Within 138 days, the skin structure at the transplantation site closely correlated with the adjacent undisturbed skin. The present study demonstrates the comparability of the developed organotypic skin equivalent to healthy human skin and the versatility for clinical applications.

  18. Electrospun Poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) Scaffolds for Skin Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbar, Sangamesh G.; Nukavarapu, Syam Prasad; James, Roshan; Nair, Lakshmi S.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2008-01-01

    Electrospun fiber matrices composed of scaffolds of varying fiber diameters were investigated for potential application of severe skin loss. Few systematic studies have been performed to examine the effect of varying fiber diameter electrospun fiber matrices for skin regeneration. The present study reports the fabrication of poly[lactic acid-co-glycolic acid] (PLAGA) matrices with fiber diameters of 150–225, 200–300, 250–467, 500–900, 600–1200, 2500–3000 and 3250–6000 nm via electrospinning. All fiber matrices found to have a tensile modulus from 39.23 ± 8.15 to 79.21 ± 13.71 MPa which falls in the range for normal human skin. Further, the porous fiber matrices have porosity between 38–60 % and average pore diameters between 10–14µm. We evaluated the efficacy of these biodegradable fiber matrices as skin substitutes by seeding them with human skin fibroblasts (hSF). Human skin fibroblasts acquired a well spread morphology and showed significant progressive growth on fiber matrices in the 350–1100 nm diameter range. Collagen type III gene expression was significantly up-regulated in hSF seeded on matrices with fiber diameters in the range of 350–1100 nm. Based on the need, the proposed fiber skin substitutes can be successfully fabricated and optimized for skin fibroblast attachment and growth. PMID:18639927

  19. Storage conditions of skin affect tissue structure and in vitro percutaneus penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    skin at -20oC causes structural changes in the upper Stratum Corneum observable with image techniques such as multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy. The presently available literature does, however, not support that the observed structural damage to the integrity is sufficient to cause...... structural changes in upper as well as deeper parts of Stratum Corneum. These more severe changes corresponds to significantly increased percutaneous penetration of chemicals applied to skin specimens stored at very low temperatures. Storage of human skin for later use in in vitro studies on percutaneous......For logistic and practical reasons it is difficult to perform in vitro studies on percutaneous penetration on fresh human skin obtained directly from surgery. Skin samples are therefore often kept frozen until use. The present chapter present the available literature on the topic. Storage of human...

  20. Disinfection of human skin allografts in tissue banking: a systematic review report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, C; Callum, J; Mohr, J; Duong, A; Garibaldi, A; Simunovic, N; Ayeni, O R

    2016-12-01

    The use of skin allografts to temporarily replace lost or damaged skin is practiced worldwide. Naturally occurring contamination can be present on skin or can be introduced at recovery or during processing. This contamination can pose a threat to allograft recipients. Bacterial culture and disinfection of allografts are mandated, but the specific practices and methodologies are not dictated by standards. A systematic review of literature from three databases found 12 research articles that evaluated bioburden reduction processes of skin grafts. The use of broad spectrum antibiotics and antifungal agents was the most frequently identified disinfection method reported demonstrating reductions in contamination rates. It was determined that the greatest reduction in the skin allograft contamination rates utilized 0.1 % peracetic acid or 25 kGy of gamma irradiation at lower temperatures.

  1. Prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pyogenic community and hospital acquired skin and soft tissues infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M. K.; Asrar, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the percentage and frequency of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community and hospital-acquired pyogenic skin and soft tissue infections. Methods: The descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at the Dermatology Department of Combined Military Hospital, Abbottabad, from June 2009 to March 2010, and comprised 144 community-acquired and 54 hospital-acquired skin and soft tissue infections. Pus swabs from the infected lesions one from each individual were sent to laboratory for culture and sensitivity tests. Methicillin resistance was detected by 1 (mu) g oxacillin disk. Organisms were labelled methicillin-resistant once the inhibition zone for oxocillin was less than 10 mm. Data analysis was done by using SPSS 20. Results: Of the 198 patients in the study, 98(49.5%) were males and 100(50.5%) were females, with an overall mean age of 33.7+-14.8144 years. There were 144(72.72%) community-acquired infections and 54(27.27%) had hospital-acquired infections. Community-acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus numbered 40(27.8%) and hospital-acquired ones numbered 26(48.1%). Conclusion: Prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community and hospital-acquired pyogenic skin and soft tissue infections was high. (author)

  2. Skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolery-Lloyd, Heather; Kammer, Jenna N

    2011-01-01

    Skin tightening describes the treatment of skin laxity via radiofrequency (RF), ultrasound, or light-based devices. Skin laxity on the face is manifested by progressive loss of skin elasticity, loosening of the connective tissue framework, and deepening of skin folds. This results in prominence of submandibular and submental tissues. Genetic factors (chronological aging) and extrinsic factors (ultraviolet radiation) both contribute to skin laxity. There are many RF, ultrasound, and light-based devices directed at treating skin laxity. All of these devices target and heat the dermis to induce collagen contraction. Heating of the dermis causes collagen denaturation and immediate collagen contraction in addition to long-term collagen remodeling. Via RF, light, or ultrasound, these skin tightening devices deliver heat to the dermis to create new collagen and induce skin tightening. This chapter will provide an overview of the various skin tightening devices. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Intrahost Evolution of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Among Individuals With Reoccurring Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarian, Taj; Daum, Robert S; Petty, Lindsay A; Steinbeck, Jenny L; Yin, Zachary; Nolan, David; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Hanage, W P; Salemi, Marco; David, Michael Z

    2016-09-15

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) USA300 is the leading cause of MRSA infections in the United States and has caused an epidemic of skin and soft-tissue infections. Recurrent infections with USA300 MRSA are common, yet intrahost evolution during persistence on an individual has not been studied. This gap hinders the ability to clinically manage recurrent infections and reconstruct transmission networks. To characterize bacterial intrahost evolution, we examined the clinical courses of 4 subjects with 3-6 recurrent USA300 MRSA infections, using patient clinical data, including antibiotic exposure history, and whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of all available MRSA isolates (n = 29). Among sequential isolates, we found variability in diversity, accumulation of mutations, and mobile genetic elements. Selection for antimicrobial-resistant populations was observed through both an increase in the number of plasmids conferring multidrug resistance and strain replacement by a resistant population. Two of 4 subjects had strain replacement with a genetically distinct USA300 MRSA population. During a 5-year period in 4 subjects, we identified development of antimicrobial resistance, intrahost evolution, and strain replacement among isolates from patients with recurrent MRSA infections. This calls into question the efficacy of decolonization to prevent recurrent infections and highlights the adaptive potential of USA300 and the need for effective sampling. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Short-term nanostructural effects of high radiofrequency treatment on the skin tissues of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Samjin; Cheong, Youjin; Shin, Jae-Ho; Lee, Hui-Jae; Lee, Gi-Ja; Choi, Seok Keun; Jin, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively investigate the short-term effects of RF tissue-tightening treatment in in vivo rabbit dermal collagen fibrils. These effects were measured at different energy levels and at varying pass procedures on the nanostructural response level using histology and AFM analysis. Each rabbit was divided into one of seven experimental groups, which included the following: control group, and six RF group according to RF energy (20 W and 40 W) and three RF pass procedures. The progressive changes in the diameter and D-periodicity of rabbit dermal collagen fibrils were investigated in detail over a 7-day post-treatment period. The dermal tissues treated with the RF tissue-tightening device showed more prominent inflammatory responses with inflammatory cell ingrowth compared to the control. This effect showed more prominent with the passage of day after treatment. Although an increase in the diameter and D-periodicity of dermal collagen fibrils was identified immediately after the RF treatment, a decrease in the morphology of dermal collagen fibrils continued until post-operative day 7. Furthermore, RF treatment led to the loss of distinct borders. Increases in RF energy with the same pass procedure, as well as an increase in the number of RF passes, increased the occurrence of irreversible collagen fibril injury. A multiple-pass treatment at low energy rather than a single-pass treatment at high energy showed a large amount of collagen fibrils contraction at the nanostructural level.

  5. Photoprotection beyond ultraviolet radiation--effective sun protection has to include protection against infrared A radiation-induced skin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, P; Calles, C; Benesova, T; Macaluso, F; Krutmann, J

    2010-01-01

    Solar radiation is well known to damage human skin, for example by causing premature skin ageing (i.e. photoageing). We have recently learned that this damage does not result from ultraviolet (UV) radiation alone, but also from longer wavelengths, in particular near-infrared radiation (IRA radiation, 760-1,440 nm). IRA radiation accounts for more than one third of the solar energy that reaches human skin. While infrared radiation of longer wavelengths (IRB and IRC) does not penetrate deeply into the skin, more than 65% of the shorter wavelength (IRA) reaches the dermis. IRA radiation has been demonstrated to alter the collagen equilibrium of the dermal extracellular matrix in at least two ways: (a) by leading to an increased expression of the collagen-degrading enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 1, and (b) by decreasing the de novo synthesis of the collagen itself. IRA radiation exposure therefore induces similar biological effects to UV radiation, but the underlying mechanisms are substantially different, specifically, the cellular response to IRA irradiation involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Effective sun protection requires specific strategies to prevent IRA radiation-induced skin damage. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. 3D printed optical phantoms and deep tissue imaging for in vivo applications including oral surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Brian Z.; Costas, Alfonso; Gaind, Vaibhav; Garcia, Jose M.; Webb, Kevin J.

    2017-03-01

    Progress in developing optical imaging for biomedical applications requires customizable and often complex objects known as "phantoms" for testing, evaluation, and calibration. This work demonstrates that 3D printing is an ideal method for fabricating such objects, allowing intricate inhomogeneities to be placed at exact locations in complex or anatomically realistic geometries, a process that is difficult or impossible using molds. We show printed mouse phantoms we have fabricated for developing deep tissue fluorescence imaging methods, and measurements of both their optical and mechanical properties. Additionally, we present a printed phantom of the human mouth that we use to develop an artery localization method to assist in oral surgery.

  7. Clinical Usefulness of Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction for the Diagnosis of Vibrio vulnificus Infection Using Skin and Soft Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Dong-Min; Yun, Na Ra; Kim, Choon-Mee; Lee, Sang-Hong

    2017-08-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic gram-negative bacillus isolated in seawater, fish, and shellfish. Infection by V. vulnificus is the most severe food-borne infection reported in the United States of America. Here, we aimed to examine the clinical usefulness of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using tissue specimens other than blood samples as a diagnostic tool for V. vulnificus infection. A retrospective study was conducted with patients who underwent real-time PCR of toxR in both blood and skin tissues, including serum, bullae, swab, and operation room specimens, between 2006 and 2009. The median V. vulnificus DNA load of 14 patients in real-time PCR analysis of serum at the time of admission was 638.5 copies/mL blood, which was within the interquartile range (IQR: 37-3,225). In contrast, the median value by real-time PCR using the first tissue specimen at the time of admission was 16,650 copies/mL tissue fluid (IQR: 4,419-832,500). This difference was statistically significant ( P = 0.022). DNA copy numbers in tissues were less affected by short-term antibiotic administration than that in blood samples, and antibiotic administration increased the DNA copy number in some patients. We found, for the first time, that DNA copy numbers in tissues of patients infected by V. vulnificus were higher than those in blood samples. Additionally, skin lesions were more useful than blood samples as specimens for PCR analysis in patients administered antibiotics for V. vulnificus infection before admission.

  8. Injectable Shape-Memorizing Three-Dimensional Hyaluronic Acid Cryogels for Skin Sculpting and Soft Tissue Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liying; Ji, Kai; Shih, Ting-Yu; Haddad, Anthony; Giatsidis, Giorgio; Mooney, David J.; Orgill, Dennis P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based fillers are used for various cosmetic procedures. However, due to filler migration and degradation, reinjections of the fillers are often required. Methacrylated HA (MA-HA) can be made into injectable shape-memorizing fillers (three-dimensional [3D] MA-HA) aimed to address these issues. In this study, shape retention, firmness, and biocompatibility of 3D MA-HA injected subcutaneously in mice were evaluated. Materials and Methods: Fifteen mice, each receiving two subcutaneous injections in their back, were divided into four groups receiving HA, MA-HA, 3D MA-HA, or saline, respectively. Digital imaging, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and in vivo imaging system (IVIS), durometry, and histology were utilized to evaluate in vitro/vivo degradation and migration, material firmness, and the angiogenic (CD31) and immunogenic (CD45) response of the host tissue toward the injected materials. Results: Digital imaging, SEM, and IVIS revealed that 3D MA-HA fillers maintained their predetermined shape for at least 30 days in vitro and in vivo. Little volume effects were noted in the saline and other control groups. There were no differences in skin firmness between the groups or over time. Histology showed intact skin architecture in all groups. Three-dimensional MA-HA maintained its macroporous structure with significant angiogenesis at the 3D MA-HA/skin interfaces and throughout the 3D MA-HA. There was no significant inflammatory response to any of the injected materials. Conclusion: 3D MA-HA showed remarkable tissue compatibility, compliance, and shape predictability, as well as retention, and thus might be suitable for various skin sculpting and soft tissue reconstruction purposes. PMID:27875939

  9. Surface modification of nanofibrous polycaprolactone/gelatin composite scaffold by collagen type I grafting for skin tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautam, Sneh; Chou, Chia-Fu; Dinda, Amit K.; Potdar, Pravin D.; Mishra, Narayan C.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a tri-polymer polycaprolactone (PCL)/gelatin/collagen type I composite nanofibrous scaffold has been fabricated by electrospinning for skin tissue engineering and wound healing applications. Firstly, PCL/gelatin nanofibrous scaffold was fabricated by electrospinning using a low cost solvent mixture [chloroform/methanol for PCL and acetic acid (80% v/v) for gelatin], and then the nanofibrous PCL/gelatin scaffold was modified by collagen type I (0.2–1.5 wt.%) grafting. Morphology of the collagen type I-modified PCL/gelatin composite scaffold that was analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), showed that the fiber diameter was increased and pore size was decreased by increasing the concentration of collagen type I. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis indicated the surface modification of PCL/gelatin scaffold by collagen type I immobilization on the surface of the scaffold. MTT assay demonstrated the viability and high proliferation rate of L929 mouse fibroblast cells on the collagen type I-modified composite scaffold. FE-SEM analysis of cell-scaffold construct illustrated the cell adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblasts on the surface of scaffold. Characteristic cell morphology of L929 was also observed on the nanofiber mesh of the collagen type I-modified scaffold. Above results suggest that the collagen type I-modified PCL/gelatin scaffold was successful in maintaining characteristic shape of fibroblasts, besides good cell proliferation. Therefore, the fibroblast seeded PCL/gelatin/collagen type I composite nanofibrous scaffold might be a potential candidate for wound healing and skin tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • PCL/gelatin/collagen type I scaffold was fabricated for skin tissue engineering. • PCL/gelatin/collagen type I scaffold showed higher fibroblast growth than PCL/gelatin one. • PCL/gelatin/collagen type I might be one of the ideal scaffold for

  10. Hyaluronate nanoparticles included in polymer films for the prolonged release of vitamin E for the management of skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gabriela Garrastazu; Detoni, Cassia Britto; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Rondelli, Valeria; Colombo, Paolo; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Sonvico, Fabio

    2016-02-15

    Lecithin and hyaluronic acid were used for the preparation of polysaccharide decorated nanoparticles loaded with vitamin E using the cationic lipid dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODMA). Nanoparticles showed mean particle size in the range 130-350 nm and narrow size distribution. Vitamin E encapsulation efficiency was higher than 99%. These nanoparticles were incorporated in polymeric films containing Aloe vera extract, hyaluronic acid, sodium alginate, polyethyleneoxide (PEO) and polyvinylalcohol (PVA) as an innovative treatment in skin wounds. Films were thin, flexible, resistant and suitable for application on burn wounds. Additionally, in vitro occlusion study highlighted the dependence of the occlusive effect on the presence of nanoparticles. The results obtained show that the bioadhesive films containing vitamin E acetate and Aloe vera could be an innovative therapeutic system for the treatment of skin wounds, such as burns. The controlled release of the vitamin along with a reduction in water loss through damaged skin provided by the nanoparticle-loaded polymer film are considered important features for an improvement in wound healing and skin regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. SMRT has tissue-specific isoform profiles that include a form containing one CoRNR box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, Stephen; Malartre, Marianne; Sharpe, Colin

    2005-01-01

    SMRT acts as a corepressor for a range of transcription factors. The amino-terminal part of the protein includes domains that mainly mediate transcriptional repression whilst the carboxy-terminal part includes domains that interact with nuclear receptors using up to three motifs called CoRNR boxes. The region of the SMRT primary transcript encoding the interaction domains is subject to alternative splicing that varies the inclusion of the third CoRNR box. The profile in mice includes an abundant, novel SMRT isoform that possesses just one CoRNR box. Mouse tissues therefore express SMRT isoforms containing one, two or three CoRNR boxes. In frogs, the SMRT isoform profile is tissue-specific. The mouse also shows distinct profiles generated by differential expression levels of the SMRT transcript isoforms. The formation of multiple SMRT isoforms and their tissue-specific regulation indicates a mechanism, whereby cells can define the repertoire of transcription factors regulated by SMRT

  12. Topical acetylsalicylic, salicylic acid and indomethacin suppress pain from experimental tissue acidosis in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, K H; Reeh, P W; Kreysel, H W

    1995-09-01

    Topically applied acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), salicylic acid (SA) and indomethacin were tested in an experimental pain model that provides direct nociceptor excitation through cutaneous tissue acidosis. In 30 volunteers, sustained burning pain was produced in the palmar forearm through a continuous intradermal pressure infusion of a phosphate-buffered isotonic solution (pH 5.2). In 5 different, double-blind, randomized cross-over studies with 6 volunteers each, the flow rate of the syringe pump was individually adjusted to result in constant pain ratings of around 20% (50% in study 4) on a visual analog scale (VAS). The painful skin area was then covered with either placebo or the drugs which had been dissolved in diethylether. In the first study on 6 volunteers, ASA (60 mg/ml) or lactose (placebo) in diethylether (10 ml) was applied, using both arms at 3-day intervals. Both treatments resulted in sudden and profound pain relief due to the cooling effect of the evaporating ether. With lactose, however, the mean pain rating was restored close to the baseline within 6-8 min while, with ASA, it remained significantly depressed for the rest of the observation period (another 20 min). This deep analgesia was not accompanied by a loss of tactile sensation. The further studies served to show that indomethacin (4.5 mg/ml) and SA (60 mg/ml) were equally effective as ASA (each 92-96% pain reduction) and that the antinociceptive effects were due to local but not systemic actions, since ASA and SA dis not reach measurable plasma levels up to 3 h after topical applications. With a higher flow rate of acid buffer producing more intense pain (VAS 50%). ASA and SA were still able to significantly reduce the ratings by 90% or 84%, respectively. On the other hand, by increasing the flow rate by a factor of 2 on average, during the period of fully developed drug effect it was possible to overcome the pain suppression, which suggests a competitive mechanism of (acetyl-) salicylic

  13. Factors Associated with Decision to Hospitalize Emergency Department Patients with Skin and Soft Tissue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talan, David A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency department (ED hospitalizations for skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI have increased, while concern for costs has grown and outpatient parenteral antibiotic options have expanded. To identify opportunities to reduce admissions, we explored factors that influence the decision to hospitalize an ED patient with a SSTI. Methods: We conducted a prospective study of adults presenting to 12 U.S. EDs with a SSTI in which physicians were surveyed as to reason(s for admission, and clinical characteristics were correlated with disposition. We employed chi-square binary recursive partitioning to assess independent predictors of admission. Serious adverse events were recorded. Results: Among 619 patients, median age was 38.7 years. The median duration of symptoms was 4.0 days, 96 (15.5% had a history of fever, and 46 (7.5% had failed treatment. Median maximal length of erythema was 4.0cm (IQR, 2.0-7.0. Upon presentation, 39 (6.3% had temperature >38oC, 81 (13.1% tachycardia, 35 (5.7%, tachypnea, and 5 (0.8% hypotension; at the time of the ED disposition decision, these findings were present in 9 (1.5%, 11 (1.8%, 7 (1.1%, and 3 (0.5% patients, respectively. Ninety-four patients (15.2% were admitted, 3 (0.5% to the intensive care unit (ICU. Common reasons for admission were need for intravenous antibiotics in 80 (85.1%; the only reason in 41.5%, surgery in 23 (24.5%, and underlying disease in 11 (11.7%. Hospitalization was significantly associated with the following factors in decreasing order of importance: history of fever (present in 43.6% of those admitted, and 10.5% discharged; maximal length of erythema >10cm (43.6%, 11.3%; history of failed treatment (16.1%, 6.0%; any co-morbidity (61.7%, 27.2%; and age >65 years (5.4%, 1.3%. Two patients required amputation and none had ICU transfer or died. Conclusion: ED SSTI patients with fever, larger lesions, and co-morbidities tend to be hospitalized, almost all to non-critical areas

  14. A quantitative and non-contact technique to characterise microstructural variations of skin tissues during photo-damaging process based on Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yang; He, Honghui; Sheng, Wei; Wu, Jian; Ma, Hui

    2017-10-31

    Skin tissue consists of collagen and elastic fibres, which are highly susceptible to damage when exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), leading to skin aging and cancer. However, a lack of non-invasive detection methods makes determining the degree of UVR damage to skin in real time difficult. As one of the fundamental features of light, polarization can be used to develop imaging techniques capable of providing structural information about tissues. In particular, Mueller matrix polarimetry is suitable for detecting changes in collagen and elastic fibres. Here, we demonstrate a novel, quantitative, non-contact and in situ technique based on Mueller matrix polarimetry for monitoring the microstructural changes of skin tissues during UVR-induced photo-damaging. We measured the Mueller matrices of nude mouse skin samples, then analysed the transformed parameters to characterise microstructural changes during the skin photo-damaging and self-repairing processes. Comparisons between samples with and without the application of a sunscreen showed that the Mueller matrix-derived parameters are potential indicators for fibrous microstructure in skin tissues. Histological examination and Monte Carlo simulations confirmed the relationship between the Mueller matrix parameters and changes to fibrous structures. This technique paves the way for non-contact evaluation of skin structure in cosmetics and dermatological health.

  15. Tissue engineering of ligaments: a comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eijk, F; Saris, D B F; Riesle, J; Willems, W J; Van Blitterswijk, C A; Verbout, A J; Dhert, W J A

    2004-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell source for tissue engineering of ligaments. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal cell source for tissue engineering of the anterior cruciate ligament. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), ACL, and skin fibroblasts were seeded onto a resorbable suture material [poly(L-lactide/glycolide) multifilaments] at five different seeding densities, and cultured for up to 12 days. All cell types tested attached to the suture material, proliferated, and synthesized extracellular matrix rich in collagen type I. On day 12 the scaffolds seeded with BMSCs showed the highest DNA content (p engineered ligament.

  16. Age and Spatial Peculiarities of Non-neoplastic Diseases of the Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue in Kazakhstan, 2003-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igissinov, Nurbek; Kulmirzayeva, Dariyana; Bilyalova, Zarina; Akpolatova, Gulnur; Mamyrbayeva, Marzya; Zhumagaliyeva, Galina

    2017-11-01

    Arrangement of effective management aimed at improving dermatological services and consistent care of patients with skin diseases depends on understanding the epidemiological situation. This retrospective study presents an epidemiological assessment of non-neoplastic skin and subcutaneous tissue diseases in Kazakhstan registered in 2003-2015. The yearly incidence rate of the diseases among the whole population was in average 3,341.8±121.1 per 100000 population. This represents 4835.0±156.1 for children, 5503.2±141.8 for adolescents and 2646.6±106.7 for adults per 100000 inhabitants. Space and time incidence rate was evaluated according to the administrative division. The overall trend decreased to 3.5% in children to 2.8% in adolescents to 1.9%, and in adults to 3.9%. Considerable variation in rates was seen across the country, with highest rates in East Kazakhstan, Mangystau and Aktobe regions, the lowest - in Atyrau and South-Kazakhstan regions. Non-neoplastic diseases of skin and subcutaneous tissue continue to be an urgent public health problem, especially among children in many regions of Kazakhstan.

  17. Preparation, characteristics and assessment of a novel gelatin-chitosan sponge scaffold as skin tissue engineering material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Dong, Yang; Su, Zhen; Yin, Ran; Song, Aihua; Li, Sanming

    2014-12-10

    In order to develop a skin tissue engineering material for wound dressing application, a novel gelatin-chitosan sponge scaffold was designed and studied. The effect of chitosan and gelatin ratio on the morphology, pore size, porosity, water uptake capacity, water retention capacity and the degradation behavior were evaluated. Biocompatibility was investigated by both MTT method and AO/EB staining method. Antibacterial assessment and in vivo pharmacodynamic was also studied to evaluate the potential for wound healing. Results showed the sponge scaffold have uniform porous structure with pore size range between 120 and 140 μm, high porosity (>90%), high water uptake capacity (>1500%), high water retention capacity (>400%), and degradation percent in 28 days between 38.3 and 53.9%. Biocompatibility results showed that the activity of cells could not be affected by the nature of the sponge and it was suitable for cell adhesion and proliferation for 21 days. In vivo evaluation indicated that the sponge scaffold could offer effective support and attachment to cells for skin wound healing. In conclusion, the developed sponge scaffold was a potential skin tissue engineering material with appropriate physical properties and good biocompatibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Melanoma-specific marker expression in skin biopsy tissues as a tool to facilitate melanoma diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Doru T; Kauffman, C Lisa; Jatkoe, Timothy A; Hartmann, Dan P; Vener, Tatiana; Wang, Haiying; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Wang, Yixin; Palma, John F

    2010-07-01

    Diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma requires accurate differentiation of true malignant tumors from highly atypical lesions, which lack the capacity to develop uncontrolled proliferation and to metastasize. We used melanoma markers from previous work to differentiate benign and atypical lesions from melanoma using paraffin-embedded tissue. This critical step in diagnosis generates the most uncertainty and discrepancy between dermatopathologists. A total of 193 biopsy tissues were selected: 47 melanomas, 48 benign nevi, and 98 atypical/suspicious, including 48 atypical nevi and 50 melanomas as later assigned by expert dermatopathologists. Performance for SILV, GDF15, and L1CAM normalized to TYR in unequivocal melanoma versus benign nevi resulted in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.94, 0.67, and 0.5, respectively. SILV also differentiated atypical cases classified as melanoma from atypical nevi with an AUC=0.74. Furthermore, SILV showed a significant difference between suspicious melanoma and each suspicious atypia group: melanoma versus severe atypia and melanoma versus moderate atypia had P-values of 0.0077 and 0.0009, respectively. SILV showed clear discrimination between melanoma and benign unequivocal cases as well as between different atypia subgroups in the group of suspicious samples. The role and potential utility of this molecular assay as an adjunct to the morphological diagnosis of melanoma are discussed.

  19. Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors Contribute to Upregulation of β-endorphin in Inflamed Skin Tissues by Electroacupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Tang-feng

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electroacupuncture (EA can produce analgesia by increasing the β-endorphin level and activation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors in inflamed tissues. Endogenous cannabinoids and peripheral cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2Rs are also involved in the antinociceptive effect of EA on inflammatory pain. However, little is known about how peripheral CB2Rs interact with the endogenous opioid system at the inflammatory site and how this interaction contributes to the antinociceptive effect of EA on inflammatory pain. In this study, we determined the role of peripheral CB2Rs in the effects of EA on the expression of β-endorphin in inflamed skin tissues and inflammatory pain. Results Inflammatory pain was induced by injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the left hindpaw of rats. Thermal hyperalgesia was tested with a radiant heat stimulus, and mechanical allodynia was quantified using von Frey filaments. The mRNA level of POMC and protein level of β-endorphin were quantified by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The β-endorphin-containing keratinocytes and immune cells in the inflamed skin tissues were detected by double-immunofluorescence labeling. The CB2R agonist AM1241 or EA significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, whereas the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist β-funaltrexamine significantly attenuated the antinociceptive effect produced by them. AM1241 or EA significantly increased the mRNA level of POMC and the protein level of β-endorphin in inflamed skin tissues, and these effects were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with the CB2R antagonist AM630. AM1241 or EA also significantly increased the percentage of β-endorphin-immunoreactive keratinocytes, macrophages, and T-lymphocytes in inflamed skin tissues, and these effects were blocked by AM630. Conclusions EA and CB2R stimulation reduce inflammatory pain through activation of μ-opioid receptors. EA increases

  20. Concentrations of 17 elements, including mercury, in the tissues, food and abiotic environment of Arctic shorebirds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargreaves, Anna L.; Whiteside, Douglas P.; Gilchrist, Grant

    2011-01-01

    concern for breeding bird populations. - Highlights: → We assess elements in soil, invertebrates, and breeding shorebird tissues in the Arctic. → Element levels, invertebrate composition and shorebird use differed among habitat types. → Hg was elevated in blood and eggs and was negatively related to egg volume. → Hg and Se showed significant bioaccumulation and biomagnification. → However, all element levels were within available Canadian safety guidelines.

  1. Concentrations of 17 elements, including mercury, in the tissues, food and abiotic environment of Arctic shorebirds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargreaves, Anna L., E-mail: alhargreaves@gmail.com [Calgary Zoo, Centre for Conservation Research, 1300 Zoo Rd NE, Calgary, AB, T2E 7V6 (Canada); Whiteside, Douglas P. [Calgary Zoo, Animal Health Centre, 1300 Zoo Rd NE, Calgary, AB, T2E 7V6 (Canada); University of Calgary, Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Gilchrist, Grant [Carleton University, National Wildlife Research Centre, Ottawa, ON, KIA OH3 (Canada)

    2011-09-01

    concern for breeding bird populations. - Highlights: {yields} We assess elements in soil, invertebrates, and breeding shorebird tissues in the Arctic. {yields} Element levels, invertebrate composition and shorebird use differed among habitat types. {yields} Hg was elevated in blood and eggs and was negatively related to egg volume. {yields} Hg and Se showed significant bioaccumulation and biomagnification. {yields} However, all element levels were within available Canadian safety guidelines.

  2. Analysis of skin tissues spatial fluorescence distribution by the Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churmakov, D Y; Meglinski, I V; Piletsky, S A; Greenhalgh, D A

    2003-01-01

    A novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account the spatial distribution of fluorophores, which would arise due to the structure of collagen fibres, compared to the epidermis and stratum corneum where the distribution of fluorophores is assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto-fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the near-infrared spectral region, whereas the spatial distribution of fluorescence sources within a sensor layer embedded in the epidermis is localized at an 'effective' depth

  3. Analysis of skin tissues spatial fluorescence distribution by the Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churmakov, D Y [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Meglinski, I V [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Piletsky, S A [Institute of BioScience and Technology, Cranfield University, Silsoe, MK45 4DT (United Kingdom); Greenhalgh, D A [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-21

    A novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account the spatial distribution of fluorophores, which would arise due to the structure of collagen fibres, compared to the epidermis and stratum corneum where the distribution of fluorophores is assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto-fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the near-infrared spectral region, whereas the spatial distribution of fluorescence sources within a sensor layer embedded in the epidermis is localized at an 'effective' depth.

  4. Analysis of skin tissues spatial fluorescence distribution by the Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Churmakov, D.; Meglinski, I. V.; Piletsky, S. A.; Greenhalgh, D. A.

    2003-07-01

    A novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account the spatial distribution of fluorophores, which would arise due to the structure of collagen fibres, compared to the epidermis and stratum corneum where the distribution of fluorophores is assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto-fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the near-infrared spectral region, whereas the spatial distribution of fluorescence sources within a sensor layer embedded in the epidermis is localized at an `effective' depth.

  5. Evaluation of the role of the cyclooxygenase signaling pathway during inflammation in skin and muscle tissues of ball pythons (Python regius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Ryan A; Schumacher, Juergen P; Rathore, Kusum; Newkirk, Kim M; Cole, Grayson; Seibert, Rachel; Cekanova, Maria

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine degrees of production of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 and other mediators of inflammation in noninflamed and inflamed skin and muscle tissues in ball pythons (Python regius). ANIMALS 6 healthy adult male ball pythons. PROCEDURES Biopsy specimens of noninflamed skin and muscle tissue were collected from anesthetized snakes on day 0. A 2-cm skin and muscle incision was then made 5 cm distal to the biopsy sites with a CO2 laser to induce inflammation. On day 7, biopsy specimens of skin and muscle tissues were collected from the incision sites. Inflamed and noninflamed tissue specimens were evaluated for production of COX-1, COX-2, phosphorylated protein kinase B (AKT), total AKT, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, phosphorylated extracellular receptor kinases (ERKs) 1 and 2, and total ERK proteins by western blot analysis. Histologic evaluation was performed on H&E-stained tissue sections. RESULTS All biopsy specimens of inflamed skin and muscle tissues had higher histologic inflammation scores than did specimens of noninflamed tissue. Inflamed skin specimens had significantly greater production of COX-1 and phosphorylated ERK than did noninflamed skin specimens. Inflamed muscle specimens had significantly greater production of phosphorylated ERK and phosphorylated AKT, significantly lower production of COX-1, and no difference in production of COX-2, compared with production in noninflamed muscle specimens. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Production of COX-1, but not COX-2, was significantly greater in inflamed versus noninflamed skin specimens from ball pythons. Additional research into the reptilian COX signaling pathway is warranted.

  6. Epidemiology and Outcomes of Complicated Skin and Soft Tissue Infections among Inpatients in Southern China from 2008 to 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Li

    Full Text Available Complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTI are some of the most commonly treated infections in hospitals, and place heavy economic burdens on patients and society. Here we report the findings from an analysis of cSSTI based on a retrospective study which was conducted within the Chinese inpatient population. We focused our research on the analysis of the patient population, antibiotic treatment, clinical outcome and economic burden. The study population comprised 527 selected patients hospitalized between 2008 and 2013. Among the hospitalizations with microbiological diagnoses, 61.41% (n = 113 were diagnosed as infected with Gram-positive bacteria, while 46.20% (n = 85 were infected with Gram-negative bacteria. The most commonly found Gram-positive bacteria was Staphylococcus aureus (40.76%, n = 75, and the most common Gram-negative bacteria was Escherichia coli (14.13%, n = 26. About 20% of the Staphylococcus aureus were methicillin-resistant. The resistance rate of isolated Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli to penicillin was around 90%; in contrast, the resistance rate to vancomycin, linezolid or imipenem was low (<20%. A large percentage of patients were treated with cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones, while vancomycin and imipenem were also included to treat drug-resistant pathogens. Over half of the hospitalizations (58.43%, n = 336 experienced treatment modifications. The cost to patients with antibiotic modifications was relatively higher than to those without. In conclusion, our study offers an analysis of the disease characteristics, microbiological diagnoses, treatment patterns and clinical outcomes of cSSTI in four hospitals in Guangdong Province, and sheds lights on the current clinical management of cSSTI in China.

  7. Influence of Cryopreservation Solution on the In Vitro Culture of Skin Tissues Derived from Collared Peccary (Pecari tajacu Linnaeus, 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alana A; Lira, Gabriela P O; Nascimento, Lucas E; Queiroz Neta, Luiza B; Santos, Maria V O; Oliveira, Moacir F; Silva, Alexandre R; Pereira, Alexsandra F

    2018-04-01

    Skin vitrification is a promising and alternative tool for the conservation of biodiversity, especially for wild mammals, such as collared peccaries. Several factors can affect the success of this procedure, such as the cryoprotectant solution used. Therefore, this study was carried out to compare the efficiency of various vitrification solutions for recovery of viable cells after in vitro culture of cryopreserved skin tissues derived from the collared peccary, aiming to study the application in biobanking, where cellular use is not immediately required. Then, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) composed of 2.2 g/L sodium bicarbonate and 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) was supplemented with 3.0 M ethylene glycol (EG) or 3.0 M dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or 1.5 M EG plus 1.5 M DMSO with or without sucrose (SUC; 0.25 M) to produce six solutions for solid-surface vitrification. After warming, skin tissues were cultured in vitro and recovered cells were analyzed for morphology, adhesion, subconfluence, and proliferative activity for developing the growth curve and determining the population doubling time (PDT), and viability by Trypan Blue. The vitrification did not alter the ability of the tissues to adhere to the culture dish, as well as the day of all explants with cell growth, subconfluence samples, subconfluence total time, and PDT (p > 0.05). Moreover, independent of the cryoprotectant solution used, the vitrification altered the day of all attached explants (p  0.05). Additionally, for viability after the third passage, only the EG-SUC group maintained the cell quality (88.3%), when compared with the nonvitrified (97.8%, p > 0.05). In conclusion, DMEM with 10% FBS, 3.0 M EG, and 0.25 M sucrose was the most efficient solution for vitrifying collared peccary skin tissues, leading to the in vitro culture of viable cells.

  8. An Ineffective Differential Diagnosis of Infective Endocarditis and Rheumatic Heart Disease after Streptococcal Skin and Soft Tissue Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Mawatari, Momoko; Iizuka, Toshihiko; Amano, Tatsuya; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Ohmagari, Norio

    2017-09-01

    We herein report the case of a 68-year-old woman with a skin and soft tissue infection at her extremities. The blood culture results were positive for Streptococcus pyogenes, and we started treatment using ampicillin and clindamycin, although subsequent auscultation revealed a new-onset heart murmur. We therefore suspected rheumatic heart disease and infective endocarditis. The case met both the Jones criteria and the modified Duke criteria. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed vegetation on the aortic valve, although the pathological findings were also compatible with both rheumatic heart disease and infective endocarditis. The present findings suggest that these two diseases can coexist in some cases.

  9. A spectrofluorimetric sensor based on grape skin tissue for determination of iron(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Zhang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A spectrofluorimetric method based on the grape skin has been developed for the determination of Fe3+ at pH 5.0. The emission wavelength of the grape skin sensor occurs at 680 nm and the excitation wavelength at 421 nm. The fluorescence of sensor could be quenched by Fe3+ due to the complexing ability of anthocyanin with the metal ions. Anthocyanin, the main pigment in the grape skin, has been found fluorescence sensing material. The sensor based on the grape skin exhibited a calibration response for Fe3+ in two concentration ranges of 1.0 × 10-8 - 1.0 × 10-5 M (r2 = 0.9888 and 3.2 × 10-5 - 3.2 × 10-4 (r2 = 0.9856 M at 60 oC. The detection limit was found to be 7.5×10-9 M, and the other common ions did not interfere.

  10. Development and characterisation of an in vitro photomicronucleus test using ex vivo human skin tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus, A.A.; Meeuwen, R.N.C. van; Vogel, N. de; Maas, W.J.M.; Krul, C.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Photosafety testing is of concern for the evaluation of personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Current regulatory guidance state that photosafety should be evaluated for compounds that absorb radiation between 290 and 700 nm with relevant exposure in the skin or eyes. However, oversensitivity

  11. The establishment of animal model of radiation-skin-burn and its changes of tissue metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xingan; Wu Shiliang; Wang Xiuzhen; Zhou Yinghui; Feng Yizhong; Tian Ye; Peng Miao

    2001-01-01

    The biochemistry metabolic changes of the tissues induced by 60 Co γ radiation or by accelerator β radiation on the animal local tissues were observed. The experiment results were shown as follows: (1) 60 Co γ radiation can induce the metabolic changes of the local tissue and led to ulcer or death. (2) Accelerator β radiation at the same dose of γ radiation can only produce ulcer but no death. (3) The biochemistry metabolic changes of the tissues induced by 60 Co γ radiation are similar to that by β radiation, but as a radiation-burn animal model, the latter is better

  12. Long-lived tissue resident HIV-1 specific memory CD8+ T cells are generated by skin immunization with live virus vectored microneedle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaric, Marija; Becker, Pablo Daniel; Hervouet, Catherine; Kalcheva, Petya; Ibarzo Yus, Barbara; Cocita, Clement; O'Neill, Lauren Alexandra; Kwon, Sung-Yun; Klavinskis, Linda Sylvia

    2017-12-28

    The generation of tissue resident memory (T RM ) cells at the body surfaces to provide a front line defence against invading pathogens represents an important goal in vaccine development for a wide variety of pathogens. It has been widely assumed that local vaccine delivery to the mucosae is necessary to achieve that aim. Here we characterise a novel micro-needle array (MA) delivery system fabricated to deliver a live recombinant human adenovirus type 5 vaccine vector (AdHu5) encoding HIV-1 gag. We demonstrate rapid dissolution kinetics of the microneedles in skin. Moreover, a consequence of MA vaccine cargo release was the generation of long-lived antigen-specific CD8 + T cells that accumulate in mucosal tissues, including the female genital and respiratory tract. The memory CD8 + T cell population maintained in the peripheral mucosal tissues was attributable to a MA delivered AdHu5 vaccine instructing CD8 + T cell expression of CXCR3 + , CD103 +, CD49a + , CD69 + , CD127 + homing, retention and survival markers. Furthermore, memory CD8 + T cells generated by MA immunization significantly expanded upon locally administered antigenic challenge and showed a predominant poly-functional profile producing high levels of IFNγ and Granzyme B. These data demonstrate that skin vaccine delivery using microneedle technology induces mobilization of long lived, poly-functional CD8 + T cells to peripheral tissues, phenotypically displaying hallmarks of residency and yields new insights into how to design and deliver effective vaccine candidates with properties to exert local immunosurveillance at the mucosal surfaces. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Increased US emergency department visits for skin and soft tissue infections, and changes in antibiotic choices, during the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallin, Daniel J; Egan, Daniel J; Pelletier, Andrea J; Espinola, Janice A; Hooper, David C; Camargo, Carlos A

    2008-03-01

    Test the hypotheses that emergency department (ED) visits for skin and soft tissue infections became more frequent during the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and that antibiotics typically active against community-associated MRSA were chosen increasingly. From merged National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data for 1993-2005, we identified ED visits with diagnosis of cellulitis, abscess, felon, impetigo, hidradenitis, folliculitis, infective mastitis, nonpurulent mastitis, breast abscess, or carbuncle and furuncle. Main outcomes were change over time in rate of ED visits with such a diagnosis and proportion of antibiotic regimens including an agent typically active against community-associated MRSA. We report national estimates derived from sample weights. We tested trends with least squares linear regression. In 1993, infections of interest were diagnosed at 1.2 million visits (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96 to 1.5 million) versus 3.4 million in 2005 (95% CI 2.8 to 4.1 million; P for trend trend trend skin and soft tissue infections increased markedly from 1993 to 2005, contemporaneously with the emergence of community-associated MRSA. ED clinicians prescribed more antibiotics typically active against community-associated MRSA, especially trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Possible confounders are discussed, such as increasing diabetes or shifts in locus of care.

  14. Expression of C4.4A in an in Vitro Human Tissue-Engineered Skin Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Benedikte; Larouche, Danielle; Rochette-Drouin, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    , the biological function of C4.4A remains unknown. To enable further studies, we evaluated the expression of C4.4A in monolayer cultures of normal human keratinocytes and in tissue-engineered skin substitutes (TESs) produced by the self-assembly approach, which allow the formation of a fully differentiated...... epidermis tissue. Results showed that, in monolayer, C4.4A was highly expressed in the centre of keratinocyte colonies at cell-cell contacts areas, while some cells located at the periphery presented little C4.4A expression. In TES, emergence of C4.4A expression coincided with the formation of the stratum...

  15. Skin-Tissue-sparing Excision with Electrosurgical Peeling (STEEP): a surgical treatment option for severe hidradenitis suppurativa Hurley stage II/III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, J L; Spoo, J R; Leeman, F W J; Jonkman, M F; Horváth, B

    2015-02-01

    Surgery is the only curative treatment for removal of the persistent sinus tracts in the skin that are characteristic of severe hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Complete resection of the affected tissue by wide excision is currently regarded as the preferred surgical technique in these cases. However, relatively large amounts of healthy tissue are removed with this method and suitable skin-tissue-saving techniques aiming at creating less-extensive surgical defects are therefore needed in severe HS. We describe a skin-tissue-saving surgical technique for HS Hurley stage II-III disease: the Skin-Tissue-sparing Excision with Electrosurgical Peeling (STEEP) procedure. In contrast to wide excisions that generally reach into the deep subcutaneous fat, the fat is maximally spared with the STEEP procedure by performing successive tangential excisions of lesional tissue until the epithelialized bottom of the sinus tracts has been reached. From here, secondary intention healing can occur. In addition, fibrotic tissue is completely removed in the same manner as this also serves as a source of recurrence. This tissue-sparing technique results in low recurrence rates, high patient satisfaction with relatively short healing times and favourable cosmetic outcomes without contractures. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  16. Skin equivalent tissue-engineered construct: co-cultured fibroblasts/ keratinocytes on 3D matrices of sericin hope cocoons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Nayak

    Full Text Available The development of effective and alternative tissue-engineered skin replacements to autografts, allografts and xenografts has became a clinical requirement due to the problems related to source of donor tissue and the perceived risk of disease transmission. In the present study 3D tissue engineered construct of sericin is developed using co-culture of keratinocytes on the upper surface of the fabricated matrices and with fibroblasts on lower surface. Sericin is obtained from "Sericin Hope" silkworm of Bombyx mori mutant and is extracted from cocoons by autoclave. Porous sericin matrices are prepared by freeze dried method using genipin as crosslinker. The matrices are characterized biochemically and biophysically. The cell proliferation and viability of co-cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes on matrices for at least 28 days are observed by live/dead assay, Alamar blue assay, and by dual fluorescent staining. The growth of the fibroblasts and keratinocytes in co-culture is correlated with the expression level of TGF-β, b-FGF and IL-8 in the cultured supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The histological analysis further demonstrates a multi-layered stratified epidermal layer of uninhibited keratinocytes in co-cultured constructs. Presence of involucrin, collagen IV and the fibroblast surface protein in immuno-histochemical stained sections of co-cultured matrices indicates the significance of paracrine signaling between keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the expression of extracellular matrix protein for dermal repair. No significant amount of pro inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide production are evidenced when macrophages grown on the sericin matrices. The results all together depict the potentiality of sericin 3D matrices as skin equivalent tissue engineered construct in wound repair.

  17. Excessive peptidergic sensory innervation of cutaneous arteriole-venule shunts (AVS) in the palmar glabrous skin of fibromyalgia patients: implications for widespread deep tissue pain and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Phillip J; Hou, Quanzhi; Argoff, Charles E; Storey, James R; Wymer, James P; Rice, Frank L

    2013-06-01

    To determine if peripheral neuropathology exists among the innervation of cutaneous arterioles and arteriole-venule shunts (AVS) in fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Cutaneous arterioles and AVS receive a convergence of vasoconstrictive sympathetic innervation, and vasodilatory small-fiber sensory innervation. Given our previous findings of peripheral pathologies in chronic pain conditions, we hypothesized that this vascular location may be a potential site of pathology and/or serotonergic and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) drug action. Twenty-four female FM patients and nine female healthy control subjects were enrolled for study, with 14 additional female control subjects included from previous studies. AVS were identified in hypothenar skin biopsies from 18/24 FM patient and 14/23 control subjects. Multimolecular immunocytochemistry to assess different types of cutaneous innervation in 3 mm skin biopsies from glabrous hypothenar and trapezius regions. AVS had significantly increased innervation among FM patients. The excessive innervation consisted of a greater proportion of vasodilatory sensory fibers, compared with vasoconstrictive sympathetic fibers. In contrast, sensory and sympathetic innervation to arterioles remained normal. Importantly, the sensory fibers express α2C receptors, indicating that the sympathetic innervation exerts an inhibitory modulation of sensory activity. The excessive sensory innervation to the glabrous skin AVS is a likely source of severe pain and tenderness in the hands of FM patients. Importantly, glabrous AVS regulate blood flow to the skin in humans for thermoregulation and to other tissues such as skeletal muscle during periods of increased metabolic demand. Therefore, blood flow dysregulation as a result of excessive innervation to AVS would likely contribute to the widespread deep pain and fatigue of FM. SNRI compounds may provide partial therapeutic benefit by enhancing the impact of sympathetically mediated inhibitory

  18. Effect of chest wall radiotherapy in different manners using tissue equivalent bolus on skin and lung of cavia cobayas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wei; Qu Yaqin; Song Xiangfu; Liu Shixin; Jia Xiaojing; Guo He; Yang Lei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To probe the influence of electron beam radiotherapy in different manners using different tissue equivalent boluses on skin and lung. Methods: Adult female cavia cobayas were randomly divided into four groups as control group, half-time with bolus group, half-time with bolus group and without bolus group. Acute-irradiation animal models were established using electron beam in different manners with or without 0.5 cm tissue equivalent bolus. Pathological changes in lung, hair vesicle and fibroblast cell count were analyzed 40 clays after irradiation. Results: The radiation dermatitis in the group with bolus was slighter than that of the group without bolus, but the radiation pneumonia was reverse. With bolus, the radiation dermatitis of haft-time group was slighter than that of full-time group. The injury repair of half-time group was more active than full-time group. Conclusions: The treatment of haft-time bolus could protect lung without serious skin complications. (authors)

  19. Antibiotics for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections: the challenge of outpatient therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Amy J; Terribilini, Reno Giovonni; Ghobadi, Farzaneh; Azhir, Alaleh; Barber, Andre; Pearson, Julie Marie; Kalantari, Hossein; Hassen, Getaw W

    2014-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are becoming increasingly prevalent in both community and hospital settings. Certain strains are notorious for causing skin and soft tissue infections in patients with no established risk factors. In this article, we report our findings on the dynamic antibiotic resistance pattern of MRSA and outpatient prescription trend for skin and soft tissue infections within our community. We conducted a retrospective medical record review of 1876 patients evaluated in the emergency department of an urban community hospital from 2003 to 2012. Data regarding culture isolates and associated antimicrobial resistance, antibiotic treatment, site of specimen collection, age, race, and sex were collected and analyzed. Analysis of 1879 culture specimens yielded 2193 isolates. In some cases, a single specimen yielded polymicrobial growth. Staphylococcus aureus represented 996 isolates (45.4%); 463 were methicillin-susceptible (21.1%) and 533 (24.3%) were methicillin-resistant. Most patients were prescribed a single- or poly-drug regimen of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cephalexin, and clindamycin. Antimicrobial resistance analysis indicated that MRSA became increasingly resistant to the aforementioned antibiotics over time: 10% and 6% in 2012 vs 3.5% and 3.4% in 2007 for clindamycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, respectively. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a particularly virulent, rapidly adaptive pathogen that is becoming increasingly difficult to combat with existing antibiotics. Care must be taken to ensure appropriate treatment and follow-up of patients with known MRSA infections. © 2013.

  20. The use of tissue expander in repairing skin and hair lesions of the head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatir A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Of 14 cases who underwent this operation only in one of them because of infection in operation site, we had to extract the expander. Also, in the first day of the operation that we injected serum inside the expander of two other patients, the wound opened up and the expander appeared and came out automatically. The remaining ten patients have tolerated the operation after treatment period without any complications and good result was achieved. This method in covering up skin lesions and in eliminating burn as well as old wound scars was very effective and the patient become satisfied because there was no need to remove skin from other parts of the body and thus no new scars would have been created. The only problems in this method of treatment were its duration which is needed for injection inside the expander as well as bad appearance in operation region and these problems cause the patients to become depressed and to become isolated from the public for a long period. For the past three years that we used this method for covering skin lesions in different parts of the body and even in treating extensive spots and the hemantrium we achieved excellent results and the report will subsequently be submitted.

  1. Histological and Ultrastructural Effects of Ultrasound-induced Cavitation on Human Skin Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani, Daniele; Quattrini Li, Alessandro; Freschi, Giancarlo; Russo, Giulia Lo

    2013-09-01

    In aesthetic medicine, the most promising techniques for noninvasive body sculpturing purposes are based on ultrasound-induced fat cavitation. Liporeductive ultrasound devices afford clinically relevant subcutaneous fat pad reduction without significant adverse reactions. This study aims at evaluating the histological and ultrastructural changes induced by ultrasound cavitation on the different cell components of human skin. Control and ultrasound-treated ex vivo abdominal full-thickness skin samples and skin biopsies from patients pretreated with or without ultrasound cavitation were studied histologically, morphometrically, and ultrastructurally to evaluate possible changes in adipocyte size and morphology. Adipocyte apoptosis and triglyceride release were also assayed. Clinical evaluation of the effects of 4 weekly ultrasound vs sham treatments was performed by plicometry. Compared with the sham-treated control samples, ultrasound cavitation induced a statistically significant reduction in the size of the adipocytes (P ultrasound treatment caused a significant reduction of abdominal fat. This study further strengthens the current notion that noninvasive transcutaneous ultrasound cavitation is a promising and safe technology for localized reduction of fat and provides experimental evidence for its specific mechanism of action on the adipocytes.

  2. Tissue repair genes: the TiRe database and its implication for skin wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Yanai, Hagai; Budovsky, Arie; Tacutu, Robi; Barzilay, Thomer; Abramovich, Amir; Ziesche, Rolf; Fraifeld, Vadim E.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is an inherent feature of any multicellular organism and recent years have brought about a huge amount of data regarding regular and abnormal tissue repair. Despite the accumulated knowledge, modulation of wound healing is still a major biomedical challenge, especially in advanced ages. In order to collect and systematically organize what we know about the key players in wound healing, we created the TiRe (Tissue Repair) database, an online collection of genes and proteins that ...

  3. Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Miguel A; Zakaria, Alan; Nizran, Parminder

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer accounts for most malignancies across the globe. They are primarily divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin malignancies. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Fair skin and chronic ultraviolet B exposure are the most important risk factors. Primary prevention is achieved by avoiding sun exposure and tanning beds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A stereotaxic, population-averaged T1w ovine brain atlas including cerebral morphology and tissue volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn eNitzsche

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Standard stereotaxic reference systems play a key role in human brain studies. Stereotaxic coordinate systems have also been developed for experimental animals including non-human primates, dogs and rodents. However, they are lacking for other species being relevant in experimental neuroscience including sheep. Here, we present a spatial, unbiased ovine brain template with tissue probability maps (TPM that offer a detailed stereotaxic reference frame for anatomical features and localization of brain areas, thereby enabling inter-individual and cross-study comparability. Three-dimensional data sets from healthy adult Merino sheep (Ovis orientalis aries, 12 ewes and 26 neutered rams were acquired on a 1.5T Philips MRI using a T1w sequence. Data were averaged by linear and non-linear registration algorithms. Moreover, animals were subjected to detailed brain volume analysis including examinations with respect to body weight, age and sex. The created T1w brain template provides an appropriate population-averaged ovine brain anatomy in a spatial standard coordinate system. Additionally, TPM for gray (GM and white (WM matter as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF classification enabled automatic prior-based tissue segmentation using statistical parametric mapping (SPM. Overall, a positive correlation of GM volume and body weight explained about 15% of the variance of GM while a positive correlation between WM and age was found. Absolute tissue volume differences were not detected, indeed ewes showed significantly more GM per bodyweight as compared to neutered rams. The created framework including spatial brain template and TPM represent a useful tool for unbiased automatic image preprocessing and morphological characterization in sheep. Therefore, the reported results may serve as a starting point for further experimental and/or translational research aiming at in vivo analysis in this species.

  5. Poly(I:C) induces expressions of MMP-1, -2, and -3 through various signaling pathways including IRF3 in human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cheng; Lee, Dong Hun; Oh, Jang-Hee; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Kyu Han; Park, Chi-Hyun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2015-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can result in premature skin aging (photoaging) which is characterized by decreased expression of collagen and increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) can be generated at various conditions including virally infected cells or UV-damaged skin cells. Recent studies have shown that a synthetic dsRNA, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)), can reduce procollagen expression in human skin fibroblasts. However, little is known about the effect of poly(I:C) on the expression of MMPs in skin fibroblasts and its underlying mechanisms. We examined the effect of poly(I:C) on MMP-1, -2, and -3 expressions in human skin fibroblasts. Then, we further explored the underlying signaling pathways involved in the processes. Human skin fibroblasts were treated with poly(I:C) for the indicated times in the presence or the absence of various chemical inhibitors or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) at the indicated concentrations. Protein and mRNA levels of various target molecules were examined by Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Poly(I:C) induced MMP-1, -2, and -3 expressions, which were dependent on TLR3. Poly(I:C) also induced activations of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and the interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) pathways. By using specific inhibitors, we found that poly(I:C)-induced expressions of MMP-1, -2, and -3 were differentially regulated by these signaling pathways. In particular, we found that the inhibition of IRF3 signaling pathways attenuated poly(I:C)-induced expressions of all the three MMPs. Our data show that the expressions of MMP-1, -2, and -3 are induced by poly(I:C) through various signaling pathways in human skin fibroblasts and suggest that TLR3 and/or IRF3 may be good targets for regulating the expressions of MMP-1, -2, and -3 induced by dsRNAs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  6. Tissue types (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  7. Fluorescein diacetate for determination of cell viability in tissue-engineered skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Alexis D; Powell, Heather M; Boyce, Steven T

    2008-03-01

    Assurance of the quality of cultured skin substitutes (CSSs) currently relies on representative histology and determination of surface hydration, which provide limited sampling at selected points. To evaluate uniformity of cell density on the collagen matrices before clinical use, a field assessment of cell viability is advantageous. This study aimed to develop a field measure of cell viability in CSSs in vitro using fluorescein diacetate (FdA). CSSs were stained 3 days after keratinocyte inoculation using 0.04 mg/mL FdA followed by exposure to 366 nm of ultraviolet light. CSS fluorescence quantified using Metamorph image analysis was correlated with inoculation density, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) values and histology of corresponding biopsies. CSS fluorescence correlated significantly with inoculation density (p < 0.001) and MTT values (p < 0.001) of biopsies collected immediately after FdA staining. Fluorescence at day 3 also predicted day 10 MTT values. No toxicity was detected in CSSs, and normal in vitro and in vivo histology was demonstrated after FdA exposure. In conclusion, measurement of intracellular fluorescence with FdA allows for the early, comprehensive measurement of cellular distributions and viability in engineered skin and may therefore facilitate quality assurance.

  8. In situ visualization of glucocerebrosidase in human skin tissue: zymography versus activity-based probe labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Dijkhoff, Irini M; Helder, Richard W J; Al-Khakany, Hanin; Boer, Daphne E C; Schreuder, Anne; Kallemeijn, Wouter W; Absalah, Samira; Overkleeft, Herman S; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2017-12-01

    Epidermal β-glucocerebrosidase (GBA1), an acid β-glucosidase normally located in lysosomes, converts (glucosyl)ceramides into ceramides, which is crucial to generate an optimal barrier function of the outermost skin layer, the stratum corneum (SC). Here we report on two developed in situ methods to localize active GBA in human epidermis: i ) an optimized zymography method that is less labor intensive and visualizes enzymatic activity with higher resolution than currently reported methods using either substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucopyranoside or resorufin-β-D-glucopyranoside; and ii ) a novel technique to visualize active GBA1 molecules by their specific labeling with a fluorescent activity-based probe (ABP), MDW941. The latter method pro-ved to be more robust and sensitive, provided higher resolution microscopic images, and was less prone to sample preparation effects. Moreover, in contrast to the zymography substrates that react with various β-glucosidases, MDW941 specifically labeled GBA1. We demonstrate that active GBA1 in the epidermis is primarily located in the extracellular lipid matrix at the interface of the viable epidermis and the lower layers of the SC. With ABP-labeling, we observed reduced GBA1 activity in 3D-cultured skin models when supplemented with the reversible inhibitor, isofagomine, irrespective of GBA expression. This inhibition affected the SC ceramide composition: MS analysis revealed an inhibitor-dependent increase in the glucosylceramide:ceramide ratio. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Adipose Tissue in Clinical Applications for Dermatological Indications and Skin Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Gaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating at multiple levels of control, mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (ADSCs communicate with organ systems to adjust immune response, provide signals for differentiation, migration, enzymatic reactions, and to equilibrate the regenerative demands of balanced tissue homeostasis. The identification of the mechanisms by which ADSCs accomplish these functions for dermatological rejuvenation and wound healing has great potential to identify novel targets for the treatment of disorders and combat aging. Herein, we review new insights into the role of adipose-derived stem cells in the maintenance of dermal and epidermal homeostasis, and recent advances in clinical applications of ADSCs related to dermatology.

  10. Intra-uterine tissue engineering of full-thickness skin defects in a fetal sheep model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosper, Nynke A.; Eggink, Alex J.; Roelofs, Luc A. J.; Wijnen, Rene M. H.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.; Bank, Ruud A.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Geutjes, Paul J.; Daamen, Willeke F.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Tiemessen, Dorien M.; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Crevels, Jane J.; Blokx, Willeke A. M.; Lotgering, Fred K.; van den Berg, Paul P.; Feitz, Wout F. J.

    In spina bifida the neural tube fails to close during the embryonic period and it is thought that prolonged exposure of the unprotected spinal cord to the amniotic fluid during pregnancy causes additional neural damage. Intra-uterine repair might protect the neural tissue from exposure to amniotic

  11. Blood flow in skin, subcutaneous adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in the forearm of normal man during an oral glucose load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Astrup, A; Christensen, N J

    1987-01-01

    Blood flow to the forearm, and the subcutaneous tissue and skin in the forearm were measured by strain gauge plethysmography, 133Xe-elimination and Laser Doppler flowmetry during an oral glucose load (I g glucose kg-1 lean body mass) and during control conditions. The forearm blood flow remained...... constant during both experiments. Glucose induced a two-fold vasodilatation in subcutaneous tissue. In skin, glucose induced a relative vasodilatation and later a relative vasoconstriction compared with control experiments. When estimated from forearm blood flow and subcutaneous and skin blood flows......, muscle blood flow decreased about 20-30% during both experiments. Proximal nervous blockade did not abolish the glucose-induced vasodilatation in subcutaneous tissue. In the glucose experiment, arterial glucose concentration increased to 7.8 +/- 1.17 mmol l-1 30 min after the load was given...

  12. Distribution of epidermal growth factor receptors in rat tissues during embryonic skin development, hair formation, and the adult hair growth cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1984-01-01

    on the binding distribution of [125I]EGF, representing the tissue localization of available EGF receptors, during embryonic rat skin development including hair follicle formation and the adult hair growth cycle. At 16 days embryonic development a relatively low receptor density is seen over all the epidermal...... condensates marking the first stage of hair follicle development. This restricted and temporary loss of EGF receptors above these specialized mesenchymal condensates implies a role for the EGF receptor and possibly EGF or an EGF-like ligand in stimulating the epithelial downgrowth required for hair follicle...... development. In the anagen hair bulb, receptors for EGF are detected over the outer root sheath and the epithelial cell layers at the base of the follicle and show a correlation with the areas of epithelial proliferation in the hair bulb. During the catagen and telogen phases of the hair cycle, receptors...

  13. Prevalence and characterisation of Staphylococcus aureus causing community-acquired skin and soft tissue infections on Java and Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosaningsih, Dewi; Santoso, Sanarto; Setijowati, Nanik; Rasyid, Harun A; Budayanti, Nyoman S; Suata, Ketut; Widhyatmoko, Dicky B; Purwono, Priyo B; Kuntaman, Kuntaman; Damayanti, Damayanti; Prakoeswa, Cita R S; Laurens, Mitchell; van Nierop, Josephine W I; Nanninga, Geraldine L; Oudenes, Neline; de Regt, Michelle; Snijders, Susan V; Verbrugh, Henri A; Severin, Juliëtte A

    2018-01-01

    To define the role of Staphylococcus aureus in community settings among patients with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) in Indonesia. Staphylococcus aureus were cultured from anterior nares, throat and wounds of 567 ambulatory patients presenting with SSTI. The mecA gene and genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL; lukF-PV and lukS-PV) and exfoliative toxin (ET; eta and etb) were determined by PCR. Clonal relatedness among methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and PVL-positive S. aureus was analysed using multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) typing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for a subset of isolates. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) was determined for all MRSA isolates. Moreover, determinants for S. aureus SSTI, and PVL/ET-positive vs PVL/ET-negative S. aureus were assessed. Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from SSTI wounds of 257 (45.3%) patients, eight (3.1%) of these were MRSA. Genes encoding PVL and ETs were detected in 21.8% and 17.5% of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), respectively. PVL-positive MRSA was not detected. Nasopharyngeal S. aureus carriage was an independent determinant for S. aureus SSTI (odds ratio [OR] 1.8). Primary skin infection (OR 5.4) and previous antibiotic therapy (OR 3.5) were associated with PVL-positive MSSA. Primary skin infection (OR 2.2) was the only factor associated with ET-positive MSSA. MLVA typing revealed two more prevalent MSSA clusters. One ST1-MRSA-SCCmec type IV isolate and a cluster of ST239-MRSA-SCCmec type III were found. Community-acquired SSTI in Indonesia was frequently caused by PVL-positive MSSA, and the hospital-associated ST239-MRSA may have spread from the hospital into the community. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Microporous dermal-mimetic electrospun scaffolds pre-seeded with fibroblasts promote tissue regeneration in full-thickness skin wounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P Bonvallet

    Full Text Available Electrospun scaffolds serve as promising substrates for tissue repair due to their nanofibrous architecture and amenability to tailoring of chemical composition. In this study, the regenerative potential of a microporous electrospun scaffold pre-seeded with dermal fibroblasts was evaluated. Previously we reported that a 70% collagen I and 30% poly(Ɛ-caprolactone electrospun scaffold (70:30 col/PCL containing 160 μm diameter pores had favorable mechanical properties, supported fibroblast infiltration and subsequent cell-mediated deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM, and promoted more rapid and effective in vivo skin regeneration when compared to scaffolds lacking micropores. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that the efficacy of the 70:30 col/PCL microporous scaffolds could be further enhanced by seeding scaffolds with dermal fibroblasts prior to implantation into skin wounds. To address this hypothesis, a Fischer 344 (F344 rat syngeneic model was employed. In vitro studies showed that dermal fibroblasts isolated from F344 rat skin were able to adhere and proliferate on 70:30 col/PCL microporous scaffolds, and the cells also filled the 160 μm pores with native ECM proteins such as collagen I and fibronectin. Additionally, scaffolds seeded with F344 fibroblasts exhibited a low rate of contraction (~14% over a 21 day time frame. To assess regenerative potential, scaffolds with or without seeded F344 dermal fibroblasts were implanted into full thickness, critical size defects created in F344 hosts. Specifically, we compared: microporous scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for 4 days; scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for only 1 day; acellular microporous scaffolds; and a sham wound (no scaffold. Scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for 4 days had the best response of all treatment groups with respect to accelerated wound healing, a more normal-appearing dermal matrix structure, and hair follicle regeneration

  15. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor 2 is found in skin and its C-terminal region encodes for antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Sørensen, Ole E; Lundqvist, Katarina; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor 2 (TFPI-2) is a matrix-associated serine protease inhibitor with an enigmatic function in vivo. Here, we describe that TFPI-2 is present in fibrin of wounds and also expressed in skin, where it is up-regulated upon wounding. Neutrophil elastase cleaved TFPI-2, and a C-terminal fragment was found to bind to bacteria. Similarly, a prototypic peptide representing this C-terminal part, EDC34, bound to bacteria and bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and induced bacterial permeabilization. The peptide also induced leakage in artificial liposomes, and displayed a random coil conformation upon interactions with liposomes as well as lipopolysaccharide. EDC34 was antibacterial against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in physiological buffer conditions. The results demonstrate that the C-terminus of TFPI-2 encodes for antimicrobial activity, and may be released during wounding.

  16. Multi-slice ultrasound image calibration of an intelligent skin-marker for soft tissue artefact compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masum, M A; Pickering, M R; Lambert, A J; Scarvell, J M; Smith, P N

    2017-09-06

    In this paper, a novel multi-slice ultrasound (US) image calibration of an intelligent skin-marker used for soft tissue artefact compensation is proposed to align and orient image slices in an exact H-shaped pattern. Multi-slice calibration is complex, however, in the proposed method, a phantom based visual alignment followed by transform parameters estimation greatly reduces the complexity and provides sufficient accuracy. In this approach, the Hough Transform (HT) is used to further enhance the image features which originate from the image feature enhancing elements integrated into the physical phantom model, thus reducing feature detection uncertainty. In this framework, slice by slice image alignment and calibration are carried out and this provides manual ease and convenience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnosis and management of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI). A literature review and consensus statement: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Silvano; Bassetti, Matteo; Concia, Ercole; De Simone, Giuseppe; De Rosa, Francesco G; Grossi, Paolo; Novelli, Andrea; Menichetti, Francesco; Petrosillo, Nicola; Tinelli, Marco; Tumbarello, Mario; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Viale, Pierluigi; Venditti, Mario; Viscoli, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    Skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections, posing considerable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Fourteen members of the Italian Society of Infectious Diseases, after a careful review of the most recent literature using Medline database and their own clinical experience, updated a previous paper published in 2011 by preparing a draught manuscript of the statements. The manuscript was successively reviewed by all members and ultimately re-formulated the present manuscript during a full day consensus meeting. The microbiological and clinical aspects together with diagnostic features were considered for necrotizing and not necrotizing SSTIs in the light of the most recent guidelines and evidences published in the last five years. The antimicrobial therapy was considered as well - both empirical and targeted to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and/or other pathogens, also taking into account the epidemiological and bacterial resistance data and the availability of new antibacterial agents.

  18. Spectrum and potency of ceftaroline against leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infections in Latin America, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    Full Text Available Ceftaroline, the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is a cephalosporin with in vitro bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms, including methicillinsusceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus, β-haemolytic and viridans group streptococci, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. In this study a total of 986 isolates collected in 2010 from patients in 15 medical centers in five Latin American countries from the Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance Evaluation Program were identified as community-acquired respiratory tract or skin and soft tissue infection pathogens. Ceftaroline was the most potent agent tested against S. pneumoniae with a MIC90 value (0.12 µg/mL that was eight-fold lower than ceftriaxone, levofloxacin, and linezolid. Its spectrum of coverage (100.0% susceptible was similar to tigecycline, linezolid, levofloxacin and vancomycin. Against Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis, ceftaroline was the most active agent tested. The activity of ceftaroline against S. aureus (including MRSA was similar to that of vancomycin and tetracycline (MIC90,1 µg/mL and linezolid (MIC90,2 Jg/mL. The 1-haemolytic streptococci exhibited 100.0% susceptibility to ceftaroline. Ceftaroline activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Enterobacter spp. was similar to that of ceftriaxone and ceftazidime. These parenteral cephalosporin agents have potent activity against non-extended-spectrum These parenteral cephalosporin agents have potent activity against non-extended-spectrum-lactamase-phenotype strains, but are not active against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-phenotype strains. These results confirm the in vitro activity of ceftaroline against pathogens common in communityacquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infection in Latin America, and suggest that ceftaroline fosamil could be an important therapeutic option for these infections.

  19. An investigation of electrospun Henna leaves extract-loaded chitosan based nanofibrous mats for skin tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefi, Iman, E-mail: iman_yousefi@ut.ac.ir [School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Medical Biomaterials Research Center (MBRC), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pakravan, Mehdi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Rahimi, Hoda [Department of Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahador, Abbas; Farshadzadeh, Zahra [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haririan, Ismael, E-mail: haririan@tums.ac.ir [Medical Biomaterials Research Center (MBRC), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmaceutical Biomaterial, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-01

    Wound healing characteristics of some plant extracts have been well known for many years, and they have been utilized for such applications in traditional way. Recently electrospun nanofibrous mats showed promising properties for tissue engineering and especially for skin repair. It is expected that incorporation of plant extracts into such structures could provide higher performance and synergistic effect for biomedical and wound healing applications. The final purpose of this study is to fabricate chitosan based nanofiber mats loaded with a traditional plant extract of Lawsonia inermis (Henna) leaves to enhance the antibacterial efficacy and wound healing of the precursor nanofibers. The morphology, structure, mechanical properties and swelling and weight loss degree of the electrospun nanofibers have been investigated in this study. Antibacterial activity, cell biocompatibility evaluations and in vivo wound healing activity of the abovementioned mats were also studied. The FESEM images of Henna leaves extract-loaded nanofibers proved that homogeneous, smooth and defect free nanofibers of 64–87 nm in diameter have been prepared. Presence of Henna extract in the electrospun fibers was approved by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Incorporation of Henna extract into the nanofiber mats exhibited significant synergistic antibacterial activity against bacterial cells. It was well supported by the results of cell viability and proliferation of human foreskin fibroblast cells on the prepared scaffolds. Therefore, the results of this work showed that Henna leaves extract incorporated chitosan nonwoven mats have a great potential to be used as the biodegradable, biobased and antibacterial wound healing dressings. - Highlights: • Henna leaves extract were successfully loaded into chitosan based nanofiber mats. • These mats demonstrated significant synergistic antibacterial activity. • Combined properties of chitosan nanofibers and Henna promoted cell

  20. An investigation of electrospun Henna leaves extract-loaded chitosan based nanofibrous mats for skin tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousefi, Iman; Pakravan, Mehdi; Rahimi, Hoda; Bahador, Abbas; Farshadzadeh, Zahra; Haririan, Ismael

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing characteristics of some plant extracts have been well known for many years, and they have been utilized for such applications in traditional way. Recently electrospun nanofibrous mats showed promising properties for tissue engineering and especially for skin repair. It is expected that incorporation of plant extracts into such structures could provide higher performance and synergistic effect for biomedical and wound healing applications. The final purpose of this study is to fabricate chitosan based nanofiber mats loaded with a traditional plant extract of Lawsonia inermis (Henna) leaves to enhance the antibacterial efficacy and wound healing of the precursor nanofibers. The morphology, structure, mechanical properties and swelling and weight loss degree of the electrospun nanofibers have been investigated in this study. Antibacterial activity, cell biocompatibility evaluations and in vivo wound healing activity of the abovementioned mats were also studied. The FESEM images of Henna leaves extract-loaded nanofibers proved that homogeneous, smooth and defect free nanofibers of 64–87 nm in diameter have been prepared. Presence of Henna extract in the electrospun fibers was approved by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Incorporation of Henna extract into the nanofiber mats exhibited significant synergistic antibacterial activity against bacterial cells. It was well supported by the results of cell viability and proliferation of human foreskin fibroblast cells on the prepared scaffolds. Therefore, the results of this work showed that Henna leaves extract incorporated chitosan nonwoven mats have a great potential to be used as the biodegradable, biobased and antibacterial wound healing dressings. - Highlights: • Henna leaves extract were successfully loaded into chitosan based nanofiber mats. • These mats demonstrated significant synergistic antibacterial activity. • Combined properties of chitosan nanofibers and Henna promoted cell

  1. Surface modification of nanofibrous polycaprolactone/gelatin composite scaffold by collagen type I grafting for skin tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Sneh; Chou, Chia-Fu; Dinda, Amit K; Potdar, Pravin D; Mishra, Narayan C

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a tri-polymer polycaprolactone (PCL)/gelatin/collagen type I composite nanofibrous scaffold has been fabricated by electrospinning for skin tissue engineering and wound healing applications. Firstly, PCL/gelatin nanofibrous scaffold was fabricated by electrospinning using a low cost solvent mixture [chloroform/methanol for PCL and acetic acid (80% v/v) for gelatin], and then the nanofibrous PCL/gelatin scaffold was modified by collagen type I (0.2-1.5wt.%) grafting. Morphology of the collagen type I-modified PCL/gelatin composite scaffold that was analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), showed that the fiber diameter was increased and pore size was decreased by increasing the concentration of collagen type I. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis indicated the surface modification of PCL/gelatin scaffold by collagen type I immobilization on the surface of the scaffold. MTT assay demonstrated the viability and high proliferation rate of L929 mouse fibroblast cells on the collagen type I-modified composite scaffold. FE-SEM analysis of cell-scaffold construct illustrated the cell adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblasts on the surface of scaffold. Characteristic cell morphology of L929 was also observed on the nanofiber mesh of the collagen type I-modified scaffold. Above results suggest that the collagen type I-modified PCL/gelatin scaffold was successful in maintaining characteristic shape of fibroblasts, besides good cell proliferation. Therefore, the fibroblast seeded PCL/gelatin/collagen type I composite nanofibrous scaffold might be a potential candidate for wound healing and skin tissue engineering applications. © 2013.

  2. Human adipose-derived stem cell spheroid treated with photobiomodulation irradiation accelerates tissue regeneration in mouse model of skin flap ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Su; Chung, Phil-Sang; Ahn, Jin Chul; Leproux, Anais

    2017-11-01

    Skin flap grafting is a form of transplantation widely used in plastic surgery. However, ischemia/reperfusion injury is the main factor which reduces the survival rate of flaps following grafting. We investigated whether photobiomodulation (PBM) precondition prior to human adipose-derived stromal cell (hASC) spheroid (PBM-spheroid) transplantation improved skin tissue functional recovery by the stimulation of angiogenesis and tissue regeneration in skin flap of mice. The LED had an emission wavelength peaked at 660 ± 20 nm (6 J/cm 2 , 10 mW/cm 2 ). The expression of angiogenic growth factors in PBM-spheroid hASCs was much greater than that of not-PBM-treated spheroid or monolayer-cultured hASCs. From immunochemical staining analysis, the hASCs of PBM-spheroid were CD31 + , KDR + , and CD34 + , whereas monolayer-cultured hASCs were negative for these markers. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of hASC PBM-spheroid in vivo, PBS, monolayer-cultured hASCs, and not-PBM-spheroid were transplanted into a skin flap model. The animals were observed for 14 days. The PBM-spheroid hASCs transplanted into the skin flap ischemia differentiated into endothelial cells and remained differentiated. Transplantation of PBM-spheroid hASCs into the skin flap ischemia significantly elevated the density of vascular formations through angiogenic factors released by the skin flap ischemia and enhanced tissue regeneration at the lesion site. Consistent with these results, the transplantation of PBM-spheroid hASCs significantly improved functional recovery compared with PBS, monolayer-cultured hASCs, and not-PBM-spheroid treatment. These findings suggest that transplantation of PBM-spheroid hASCs may be an effective stem cell therapy for the treatment of skin flap ischemia.

  3. Deep tissue injury in development of pressure ulcers: a decrease of inflammasome activation and changes in human skin morphology in response to aging and mechanical load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Stojadinovic

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms leading to pressure ulcer development are scarce in spite of high mortality of patients. Development of pressure ulcers that is initially observed as deep tissue injury is multifactorial. We postulate that biomechanical forces and inflammasome activation, together with ischemia and aging, may play a role in pressure ulcer development. To test this we used a newly-developed bio-mechanical model in which ischemic young and aged human skin was subjected to a constant physiological compressive stress (load of 300 kPa (determined by pressure plate analyses of a person in a reclining position for 0.5-4 hours. Collagen orientation was assessed using polarized light, whereas inflammasome proteins were quantified by immunoblotting. Loaded skin showed marked changes in morphology and NLRP3 inflammasome protein expression. Sub-epidermal separations and altered orientation of collagen fibers were observed in aged skin at earlier time points. Aged skin showed significant decreases in the levels of NLRP3 inflammasome proteins. Loading did not alter NLRP3 inflammasome proteins expression in aged skin, whereas it significantly increased their levels in young skin. We conclude that aging contributes to rapid morphological changes and decrease in inflammasome proteins in response to tissue damage, suggesting that a decline in the innate inflammatory response in elderly skin could contribute to pressure ulcer pathogenesis. Observed morphological changes suggest that tissue damage upon loading may not be entirely preventable. Furthermore, newly developed model described here may be very useful in understanding the mechanisms of deep tissue injury that may lead towards development of pressure ulcers.

  4. Homozygous deletion of six genes including corneodesmosin on chromosome 6p21.3 is associated with generalized peeling skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teye, Kwesi; Hamada, Takahiro; Krol, Rafal P; Numata, Sanae; Ishii, Norito; Matsuda, Mitsuhiro; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare autosomal recessive form of ichthyosis showing skin exfoliation. PSS is divided into acral and generalized PSS, and the latter is further classified into non-inflammatory type (PSS type A) and inflammatory type (PSS type B). PSS type B is now called peeling skin disease (PSD). Different loss-of-function mutations in the corneodesmosin (CDSN) gene have been reported to cause PSD. The aim of this study was to determine genetic basis of disease in a 14-year-old Japanese patient with PSD. Immunohistochemical study showed lack of corneodesmosin (CDSN) in the skin, and standard PCR for genomic DNA failed to amplify CDSN product, suggesting CDSN defect. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and genomic quantitative real-time PCR analyses detected large homozygous deletion of 59,184bp extending from 40.6kb upstream to 13.2kb downstream of CDSN, which included 6 genes (TCF19, CCHCR1, PSORS1C2, PSORS1C1, CDSN and C6orf15). The continuous gene lost did not result in additional clinical features. Inverted repeats with 85% similarity flanking the deletion breakpoint were considered to mediate the deletion by non-homologous end joining or fork stalling and template switching/microhomology-mediated break-induced replication. Parents were clinically unaffected and were heterozygote carriers of the same deletion, which was absent in 284 ethnically matched control alleles. We also developed simple PCR method, which is useful for detection of this deletion. Although 5 other genes were also deleted, homozygous deletion of CDSN was considered to be responsible for this PSD. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Precision IORT - Image guided intraoperative radiation therapy (igIORT) using online treatment planning including tissue heterogeneity correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Frank; Bludau, Frederic; Clausen, Sven; Fleckenstein, Jens; Obertacke, Udo; Wenz, Frederik

    2017-05-01

    To the present date, IORT has been eye and hand guided without treatment planning and tissue heterogeneity correction. This limits the precision of the application and the precise documentation of the location and the deposited dose in the tissue. Here we present a set-up where we use image guidance by intraoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for precise online Monte Carlo treatment planning including tissue heterogeneity correction. An IORT was performed during balloon kyphoplasty using a dedicated Needle Applicator. An intraoperative CBCT was registered with a pre-op CT. Treatment planning was performed in Radiance using a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm simulating dose in homogeneous (MCwater) and heterogeneous medium (MChet). Dose distributions on CBCT and pre-op CT were compared with each other. Spinal cord and the metastasis doses were evaluated. The MCwater calculations showed a spherical dose distribution as expected. The minimum target dose for the MChet simulations on pre-op CT was increased by 40% while the maximum spinal cord dose was decreased by 35%. Due to the artefacts on the CBCT the comparison between MChet simulations on CBCT and pre-op CT showed differences up to 50% in dose. igIORT and online treatment planning improves the accuracy of IORT. However, the current set-up is limited by CT artefacts. Fusing an intraoperative CBCT with a pre-op CT allows the combination of an accurate dose calculation with the knowledge of the correct source/applicator position. This method can be also used for pre-operative treatment planning followed by image guided surgery. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. WE-AB-303-04: A Tissue Model of Cherenkov Emission From the Skin Surface During Megavoltage X-Ray Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, A. N.; Loyalka, S. K. [University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Izaguirre, E. W. [University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Baylor Scott & White Health, Temple, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a tissue model of Cherenkov radiation emitted from the skin surface during external beam radiotherapy. Imaging Cherenkov radiation emitted from human skin allows visualization of the beam position and potentially surface dose estimates, and our goal is to characterize the optical properties of these emissions. Methods: We developed a Monte Carlo model of Cherenkov radiation generated in a semi-infinite tissue slab by megavoltage x-ray beams with optical transmission properties determined by a two-layered skin model. We separate the skin into a dermal and an epidermal layer in our model, where distinct molecular absorbers modify the Cherenkov intensity spectrum in each layer while we approximate the scattering properties with Mie and Rayleigh scattering from the highly structured molecular organization found in human skin. Results: We report on the estimated distributions of the Cherenkov wavelength spectrum, emission angles, and surface distribution for the modeled irradiated skin surface. The expected intensity distribution of Cherenkov radiation emitted from skin shows a distinct intensity peak around 475 nm, the blue region of the visible spectrum, between a pair of optical absorption bands in hemoglobin and a broad plateau beginning near 600 nm and extending to at least 700 nm where melanin and hemoglobin absorption are both low. We also find that the Cherenkov intensity decreases with increasing angle from the surface normal, the majority being emitted within 20 degrees of the surface normal. Conclusion: Our estimate of the spectral distribution of Cherenkov radiation emitted from skin indicates an advantage to using imaging devices with long wavelength spectral responsivity. We also expect the most efficient imaging to be near the surface normal where the intensity is greatest; although for contoured surfaces, the relative intensity across the surface may appear to vary due to decreasing Cherenkov intensity with increased angle from the

  7. Factors affecting the mechanical behavior of collagen hydrogels for skin tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensalfini, Marco; Ehret, Alexander E; Stüdeli, Silvia; Marino, Daniela; Kaech, Andres; Reichmann, Ernst; Mazza, Edoardo

    2017-05-01

    The effect of the production factors yielding a functional dermal substitute was investigated by means of monotonic and cyclic uniaxial tensile tests, as well as electron microscopy visualizations. The role of (i) plastic compression, (ii) product incubation, and (iii) cell permanence in the collagenous matrix in order to achieve a skin-like behavior were characterized in terms of material and structural stiffness, in-plane kinematics, and cyclic response, as well as pore size and network density. The plastic compression resulted in a denser and stiffer material, while no corresponding change was observed in the behavior of the entire structure. This was related to the progressive reduction in product thickness and amount of excess water, rather than to formation of new crosslinks between fibers. Contrary, irrespective of the presence of human fibroblasts, the product incubation induced both material and structural stiffening, indicating the formation of a denser network. These results were confirmed by similar evolutions in the construct in-plane kinematics and cyclic stress reduction. Finally, comparison of constructs incubated in different culture media indicated a determinant contribution of the biochemical environment, rather than of the seeded cells, to the achieved mechanical properties. The observed features are relevant in terms of mechanical biocompatibility of the implant and might direct future optimizations of the production process in order to rapidly attain the desired mechanical properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasonic modulation of tissue optical properties in ex vivo porcine skin to improve transmitted transdermal laser intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Paul J D; Qian, Chenxi; Golda, Nicholas; Hunt, Heather K

    2017-09-01

    Applications of light-based energy devices involving optical targets within the dermis frequently experience negative side-effects resultant from surface scattering and excess optical absorption by epidermal melanin. As a broadband optical absorber, melanin decreases the efficacy of light-based treatments throughout the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectra while also generating additional heat within the surface tissue that can lead to inflammation or tissue damage. Consequently, procedures may be performed using greater energy densities to ensure that the target receives a clinically relevant dose of light; however, such practices are limited, as doing so tends to exacerbate the detrimental complications resulting from melanin absorption of treatment light. The technique presented herein represents an alternative method of operation aimed at increasing epidermal energy fluence while mitigating excess absorption by unintended chromophores. The approach involves the application of continuously pulsed ultrasound to modulate the tissue's optical properties and thereby improve light transmission through the epidermis. To demonstrate the change in optical properties, pulsed light at a wavelength of 532 nm from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was transmitted into 4 mm thick samples of porcine skin, comprised of both epidermal and dermal tissue. The light was transmitted using an optical waveguide, which allowed for an ultrasonic transducer to be incorporated for simultaneous paraxial pulsation in parallel with laser operation. Light transmitted through the tissue was measured by a photodiode attached to an integrating sphere. Increasing the driving voltage of ultrasonic pulsation resulted in an increase in mean transmitted optical power of up to a factor of 1.742 ± 0.0526 times the control, wherein no ultrasound was applied, after which the optical power increase plateaued to an average amplification factor of 1.733 ± 0.549 times the control. The

  9. Tumour suppression in skin and other tissues via cross-talk between vitamin D- and p53-signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg eReichrath

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available P53 and its family members have been implicated in the direct regulation of the vitamin D receptor (VDR. Vitamin D- and p53-signaling pathways have a significant impact on spontaneous or carcinogen-induced malignant transformation of cells, with VDR and p53 representing important tumour suppressors. VDR and the p53/p63/p73 proteins all function typically as receptors or sensors that turn into transcriptional regulators upon stimulus, with the main difference being that the nuclear VDR is activated as a transcription factor after binding its naturally occurring ligand 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D with high affinity while the p53 family of transcription factors, mostly in the nucleoplasm, responds to a large number of alterations in cell homeostasis commonly referred to as stress. An increasing body of evidence now convincingly demonstrates a cross-talk between vitamin D- and p53-signaling that occurs at different levels, has genome-wide implications and that should be of high importance for many malignancies, including non-melanoma skin cancer. One interaction involves the ability of p53 to increase skin pigmentation via POMC derivatives including alpha-MSH and ACTH. Pigmentation protects the skin against UV-induced DNA damage and skin carcinogenesis, yet on the other hand reduces cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D. A second level of interaction may be through the ability of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to increase the survival of skin cells after UV irradiation. UV irradiation-surviving cells show significant reductions in thymine dimers in the presence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D that are associated with increased nuclear p53 protein expression, and significantly reduced NO products. A third level of interaction is documented by the ability of vitamin D compounds to regulate the expression of the murine double minute 2 (MDM2 gene in dependence of the presence of wild-type p53. MDM2 has a well established role as a key negative regulator of p53 activity

  10. Numerical simulation of time fractional dual-phase-lag model of heat transfer within skin tissue during thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Rai, K N

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the thermal behavior in living biological tissues using time fractional dual-phase-lag bioheat transfer (DPLBHT) model subjected to Dirichelt boundary condition in presence of metabolic and electromagnetic heat sources during thermal therapy. We solved this bioheat transfer model using finite element Legendre wavelet Galerkin method (FELWGM) with help of block pulse function in sense of Caputo fractional order derivative. We compared the obtained results from FELWGM and exact method in a specific case, and found a high accuracy. Results are interpreted in the form of standard and anomalous cases for taking different order of time fractional DPLBHT model. The time to achieve hyperthermia position is discussed in both cases as standard and time fractional order derivative. The success of thermal therapy in the treatment of metastatic cancerous cell depends on time fractional order derivative to precise prediction and control of temperature. The effect of variability of parameters such as time fractional derivative, lagging times, blood perfusion coefficient, metabolic heat source and transmitted power on dimensionless temperature distribution in skin tissue is discussed in detail. The physiological parameters has been estimated, corresponding to the value of fractional order derivative for hyperthermia treatment therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. YAP regulates the expression of Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 in mouse and human oral and skin epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Zhao, Shuangyun; Lin, Qingjie; Wang, Xiu-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a Hippo signaling transcriptional coactivator that plays pivotal roles in stem cell proliferation, organ size control, and tumor development. The downstream targets of YAP have been shown to be highly context dependent. In this study, we used the embryonic mouse tooth germ as a tool to search for the downstream targets of YAP in ectoderm-derived tissues. Yap deficiency in the dental epithelium resulted in a small tooth germ with reduced epithelial cell proliferation. We compared the gene expression profiles of embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) Yap conditional knockout and YAP transgenic mouse tooth germs using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) and further confirmed the differentially expressed genes using real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. We found that YAP regulates the expression of Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 in oral and dental epithelial tissues as well as in the epidermis of skin during embryonic and adult stages. Sphere formation assay suggested that Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 are functionally involved in YAP-regulated epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay implies that YAP may regulate Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 expression through TEAD transcription factors. These results provide mechanistic insights into abnormal YAP activities in mice and humans. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Matrigel immobilization on the shish-kebab structured poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanofibers for skin tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xin; Mi, Hao-Yang; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Surface properties of tissue engineering scaffolds such as topography, hydrophilicity, and functional groups play a vital role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and apoptosis. First, poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) shish-kebab scaffolds (PCL-SK), which feature a three-dimensional structure comprised of electrospun PCL nanofibers covered by periodic, self-induced PCL crystal lamellae on the surface, was created to mimic the nanotopography of native collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Second, matrigel was covalently immobilized on the surface of alkaline hydrolyzed PCL-SK scaffolds to enhance their hydrophilicity. This combined approach not only mimics the nanotopography of native collagen fibrils, but also simulates the surface features of collagen fibrils for cell growth. To investigate the viability of such scaffolds, HEF1 fibroblast cell assays were conducted and the results revealed that the nanotopography of the PCL-SK scaffolds facilitated cell adhesion and proliferation. The matrigel functionalization on PCL-SK scaffolds further enhanced cellular response, which suggested elevated biocompatibility and greater potential for skin tissue engineering applications.

  13. Matrigel immobilization on the shish-kebab structured poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibers for skin tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Xin, E-mail: jingxinscut@gmail.com; Mi, Hao-Yang [National Engineer Research Center of Novel Equipment for Polymer Processing, The Key Laboratory of Polymer Processing Engineering of Ministry of Education, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 53715 (United States); Peng, Xiang-Fang, E-mail: pmxfpeng@scut.edu.cn, E-mail: turng@engr.wisc.edu [National Engineer Research Center of Novel Equipment for Polymer Processing, The Key Laboratory of Polymer Processing Engineering of Ministry of Education, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Turng, Lih-Sheng, E-mail: pmxfpeng@scut.edu.cn, E-mail: turng@engr.wisc.edu [Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 53715 (United States)

    2016-03-09

    Surface properties of tissue engineering scaffolds such as topography, hydrophilicity, and functional groups play a vital role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and apoptosis. First, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) shish-kebab scaffolds (PCL-SK), which feature a three-dimensional structure comprised of electrospun PCL nanofibers covered by periodic, self-induced PCL crystal lamellae on the surface, was created to mimic the nanotopography of native collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Second, matrigel was covalently immobilized on the surface of alkaline hydrolyzed PCL-SK scaffolds to enhance their hydrophilicity. This combined approach not only mimics the nanotopography of native collagen fibrils, but also simulates the surface features of collagen fibrils for cell growth. To investigate the viability of such scaffolds, HEF1 fibroblast cell assays were conducted and the results revealed that the nanotopography of the PCL-SK scaffolds facilitated cell adhesion and proliferation. The matrigel functionalization on PCL-SK scaffolds further enhanced cellular response, which suggested elevated biocompatibility and greater potential for skin tissue engineering applications.

  14. Thermal mapping on male genital and skin tissues of laptop thermal sources and electromagnetic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mahdi; Mosleminiya, Navid; Abdolali, Ali

    2017-10-01

    Since the development of communication devices and expansion of their applications, there have been concerns about their harmful health effects. The main aim of this study was to investigate laptop thermal effects caused by exposure to electromagnetic fields and thermal sources simultaneously; propose a nondestructive, replicable process that is less expensive than clinical measurements; and to study the effects of positioning any new device near the human body in steady state conditions to ensure safety by U.S. and European standard thresholds. A computer simulation was designed to obtain laptop heat flux from SolidWorks flow simulation. Increase in body temperature due to heat flux was calculated, and antenna radiation was calculated using Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio software. Steady state temperature and specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution in user's body, and heat flux beneath the laptop, were obtained from simulations. The laptop in its high performance mode caused 420 (W/m 2 ) peak two-dimensional heat flux beneath it. The cumulative effect of laptop in high performance mode and 1 W antenna radiation resulted in temperatures of 42.9, 38.1, and 37.2 °C in lap skin, scrotum, and testis, that is, 5.6, 2.1, and 1.4 °C increase in temperature, respectively. Also, 1 W antenna radiation caused 0.37 × 10 -3 and 0.13 × 10 -1 (W/kg) peak three-dimensional SAR at 2.4 and 5 GHz, respectively, which could be ignored in reference to standards and temperature rise due to laptop use. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:550-558, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Quantitative Volumetric K-Means Cluster Segmentation of Fibroglandular Tissue and Skin in Breast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niukkanen, Anton; Arponen, Otso; Nykänen, Aki; Masarwah, Amro; Sutela, Anna; Liimatainen, Timo; Vanninen, Ritva; Sudah, Mazen

    2017-10-18

    Mammographic breast density (MBD) is the most commonly used method to assess the volume of fibroglandular tissue (FGT). However, MRI could provide a clinically feasible and more accurate alternative. There were three aims in this study: (1) to evaluate a clinically feasible method to quantify FGT with MRI, (2) to assess the inter-rater agreement of MRI-based volumetric measurements and (3) to compare them to measurements acquired using digital mammography and 3D tomosynthesis. This retrospective study examined 72 women (mean age 52.4 ± 12.3 years) with 105 disease-free breasts undergoing diagnostic 3.0-T breast MRI and either digital mammography or tomosynthesis. Two observers analyzed MRI images for breast and FGT volumes and FGT-% from T1-weighted images (0.7-, 2.0-, and 4.0-mm-thick slices) using K-means clustering, data from histogram, and active contour algorithms. Reference values were obtained with Quantra software. Inter-rater agreement for MRI measurements made with 2-mm-thick slices was excellent: for FGT-%, r = 0.994 (95% CI 0.990-0.997); for breast volume, r = 0.985 (95% CI 0.934-0.994); and for FGT volume, r = 0.979 (95% CI 0.958-0.989). MRI-based FGT-% correlated strongly with MBD in mammography (r = 0.819-0.904, P K-means clustering-based assessments of the proportion of the fibroglandular tissue in the breast at MRI are highly reproducible. In the future, quantitative assessment of FGT-% to complement visual estimation of FGT should be performed on a more regular basis as it provides a component which can be incorporated into the individual's breast cancer risk stratification.

  16. Comparison of the antiseptic efficacy of tissue-tolerable plasma and an octenidine hydrochloride-based wound antiseptic on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J; Richter, H; Schanzer, S; Patzelt, A; Thiede, G; Kramer, A; Weltmann, K-D; Hartmann, B; Lange-Asschenfeldt, B

    2012-01-01

    Colonization and infection of wounds represent a major reason for the impairment of tissue repair. Recently, it has been reported that tissue-tolerable plasma (TTP) is highly efficient in the reduction of the bacterial load of the skin. In the present study, the antiseptic efficacy of TTP was compared to that of octenidine hydrochloride with 2-phenoxyethanol. Both antiseptic methods proved to be highly efficient. Cutaneous treatment of the skin with octenidine hydrochloride and 2-phenoxyethanol leads to a 99% elimination of the bacteria, and 74% elimination is achieved by TTP treatment. Technical challenges with an early prototype TTP device could be held responsible for the slightly reduced antiseptic properties of TTP, compared to a standard antiseptic solution, since the manual treatment of the skin surface with a small beam of the TTP device might have led to an incomplete coverage of the treated area. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Evaluation of light scattering properties and chromophore concentrations in skin tissue based on diffuse reflectance signals at isosbestic wavelengths of hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokokawa, Takumi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a method to evaluate light-scattering properties and chromophore concentrations in human skin tissue through diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using the reflectance signals acquired at isosbestic wavelengths of hemoglobin (420, 450, 500, and 585 nm). In the proposed method, Monte Carlo simulation-based empirical formulas are used to specify the scattering parameters of skin tissue, such as the scattering amplitude a and the scattering power b, as well as the concentration of melanin C m and the total blood concentration C tb. The use of isosbestic wavelengths of hemoglobin enables the values of C m, C tb, a, and b to be estimated independently of the oxygenation of hemoglobin. The spectrum of the reduced scattering coefficient is reconstructed from the scattering parameters. Experiments using in vivo human skin tissues were performed to confirm the feasibility of the proposed method for evaluating the changes in scattering properties and chromophore concentrations in skin tissue. The experimental results revealed that light scattering is significantly reduced by the application of a glycerol solution, which indicates an optical clearing effect due to osmotic dehydration and the matching of the refractive indices of scatterers in the epidermis.

  18. Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal aureus skin and soft tissue infections presenting in primary care: a South Texas Ambulatory Research Network (STARNet) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchman, Michael L; Munoz, Abel

    2009-01-01

    To examine skin and soft tissue infections presenting at 4 primary care clinics and assess if historical risk factors and examination findings were associated with a positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) culture. During the 10-month observational study (April 2007 through January 2008), physicians in 5 practices across South Texas collected history, physical examination findings, culture results, and antibiotic(s) prescribed for all patients presenting with a skin or soft tissue infection. Analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between historical indicators, location of lesions, and examination findings with a positive MRSA culture. Across 4 practices, 164 cases of skin and soft tissue infections were collected during 10 months. Of the 94 with a culture, 63 (67%) were MRSA positive. Patients working in or exposed to a health care setting were more likely to have a culture positive for MRSA, as were those presenting with an abscess. MRSA-positive lesions were also significantly smaller in size. Because of the high prevalence of MRSA skin and soft tissue infections among patients presenting to family physicians, presumptive treatment for MRSA may be indicated. However, increasing levels of resistance to current antibiotics is concerning and warrants development of alternative management strategies.

  19. In vitro susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections to vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid and tedizolid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Marcela Vanegas Múnera

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: In vitro effectiveness of tedizolid was superior for isolates from skin and soft tissue infections in comparison with the other antibiotics evaluated. The above added to its less toxicity, good bioavailability, daily dose and unnecessity of dosage adjustment, make tedizolid in a promising alternative for the treatment of infections caused by MRSA.

  20. Skin-Tissue-sparing Excision with Electrosurgical Peeling (STEEP) : a surgical treatment option for severe hidradenitis suppurativa Hurley stage II/III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, J. L.; Spoo, J. R.; Leeman, F. W. J.; Jonkman, M. F.; Horvath, B.

    BackgroundSurgery is the only curative treatment for removal of the persistent sinus tracts in the skin that are characteristic of severe hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Complete resection of the affected tissue by wide excision is currently regarded as the preferred surgical technique in these

  1. Regenerative and Antibacterial Properties of Acellular Fish Skin Grafts and Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane: Implications for Tissue Preservation in Combat Casualty Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Skuli; Baldursson, Baldur Tumi; Kjartansson, Hilmar; Rolfsson, Ottar; Sigurjonsson, Gudmundur Fertram

    2017-03-01

    Improvised explosive devices and new directed energy weapons are changing warfare injuries from penetrating wounds to large surface area thermal and blast injuries. Acellular fish skin is used for tissue repair and during manufacturing subjected to gentle processing compared to biologic materials derived from mammals. This is due to the absence of viral and prion disease transmission risk, preserving natural structure and composition of the fish skin graft. The aim of this study was to assess properties of acellular fish skin relevant for severe battlefield injuries and to compare those properties with those of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane. We evaluated cell ingrowth capabilities of the biological materials with microscopy techniques. Bacterial barrier properties were tested with a 2-chamber model. The microstructure of the acellular fish skin is highly porous, whereas the microstructure of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane is mostly nonporous. The fish skin grafts show superior ability to support 3-dimensional ingrowth of cells compared to dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (p fish skin is a bacterial barrier for 24 to 48 hours. The unique biomechanical properties of the acellular fish skin graft make it ideal to be used as a conformal cover for severe trauma and burn wounds in the battlefield. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Novel Tissue Models of Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa to Characterize Functional Mechanisms of Sulfur Mustard Injury to Human Skin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garlick, Joanthan

    2003-01-01

    In the second year of our research, our laboratory has extensively studied skin pathophysiology in response to SM by adapting in vivo, human skin/nude mouse chimera to further understand mechanisms...

  3. Skin perfusion pressure as an indicator of tissue perfusion in valvular heart surgery: Preliminary results from a prospective, observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Song

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic management aims to provide adequate tissue perfusion, which is often altered during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. We evaluated whether skin perfusion pressure (SPP can be used for monitoring of adequacy of tissue perfusion in patients undergoing valvular heart surgery. Seventy-two patients undergoing valve replacement were enrolled. SPP and serum lactate level were assessed after anaesthesia induction (baseline, during CPB, after CPB-off, end of surgery, arrival at intensive care unit, and postoperative 6 h. Lactate was further measured until postoperative 48 h. Association of SPP with lactate and 30-day morbidity comprising myocardial infarction, acute kidney injury, stroke, prolonged intubation, sternal infection, reoperation, and mortality was assessed. Among the lactate levels, postoperative 6 h peak value was most closely linked to composite of 30-day morbidity. The SPP value during CPB and its % change from the baseline value were significantly associated with the postoperative 6 h peak lactate (r = -0.26, P = 0.030 and r = 0.47, P = 0.001, respectively. Optimal cut-off of % decrease in SPP during CPB from baseline value for the postoperative 6 h hyperlactatemia was 48% (area under curve, 0.808; 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.652-0.963; P = 0.001. Decrease in SPP >48% during CPB from baseline value was associated with a 12.8-fold increased risk of composite endpoint of 30-day morbidity (95% CI, 1.48-111.42; P = 0.021 on multivariate logistic regression. Large decrease in SPP during CPB predicts postoperative 6 h hyperlactatemia and 30-day morbidity, which implicates a promising role of SPP monitoring in the achievement of optimal perfusion during CPB.

  4. Skin perfusion pressure as an indicator of tissue perfusion in valvular heart surgery: Preliminary results from a prospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young; Soh, Sarah; Shim, Jae-Kwang; Park, Kyoung-Un; Kwak, Young-Lan

    2017-01-01

    Hemodynamic management aims to provide adequate tissue perfusion, which is often altered during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We evaluated whether skin perfusion pressure (SPP) can be used for monitoring of adequacy of tissue perfusion in patients undergoing valvular heart surgery. Seventy-two patients undergoing valve replacement were enrolled. SPP and serum lactate level were assessed after anaesthesia induction (baseline), during CPB, after CPB-off, end of surgery, arrival at intensive care unit, and postoperative 6 h. Lactate was further measured until postoperative 48 h. Association of SPP with lactate and 30-day morbidity comprising myocardial infarction, acute kidney injury, stroke, prolonged intubation, sternal infection, reoperation, and mortality was assessed. Among the lactate levels, postoperative 6 h peak value was most closely linked to composite of 30-day morbidity. The SPP value during CPB and its % change from the baseline value were significantly associated with the postoperative 6 h peak lactate (r = -0.26, P = 0.030 and r = 0.47, P = 0.001, respectively). Optimal cut-off of % decrease in SPP during CPB from baseline value for the postoperative 6 h hyperlactatemia was 48% (area under curve, 0.808; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.652-0.963; P = 0.001). Decrease in SPP >48% during CPB from baseline value was associated with a 12.8-fold increased risk of composite endpoint of 30-day morbidity (95% CI, 1.48-111.42; P = 0.021) on multivariate logistic regression. Large decrease in SPP during CPB predicts postoperative 6 h hyperlactatemia and 30-day morbidity, which implicates a promising role of SPP monitoring in the achievement of optimal perfusion during CPB.

  5. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Haustermans, Karin; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011–0.013) clinical factor was “previous abdominal surgery.” As second significant (p = 0.012–0.016) factor, “cardiac history” was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including “diabetes” was significant (p = 0.039–0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003–0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D 50 . Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints. Conclusions

  6. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defraene, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.defraene@uzleuven.be [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Van den Bergh, Laura [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Haustermans, Karin [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Heemsbergen, Wilma [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lebesque, Joos V. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints

  7. Complete horizontal skin cell resurfacing and delayed vertical cell infiltration into porcine reconstructive tissue matrix compared to bovine collagen matrix and human dermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirastschijski, Ursula; Kerzel, Corinna; Schnabel, Reinhild; Strauss, Sarah; Breuing, Karl-Heinz

    2013-10-01

    Xenogenous dermal matrices are used for hernia repair and breast reconstruction. Full-thickness skin replacement is needed after burn or degloving injuries with exposure of tendons or bones. The authors used a human skin organ culture model to study whether porcine reconstructive tissue matrix (Strattice) is effective as a dermal tissue replacement. Skin cells or split-thickness skin grafts were seeded onto human deepidermized dermis, Strattice, and Matriderm. Cellular resurfacing and matrix infiltration were monitored by live fluorescence imaging, histology, and electron microscopy. Proliferation, apoptosis, cell differentiation, and adhesion were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Epithelial resurfacing and vertical proliferation were reduced and delayed with both bioartificial matrices compared with deepidermized dermis; however, no differences in apoptosis, cell differentiation, or basement membrane formation were found. Vertical penetration was greatest on Matriderm, whereas no matrix infiltration was found on Strattice in the first 12 days. Uncompromised horizontal resurfacing was greatest with Strattice but was absent with Matriderm. Strattice showed no stimulatory effect on cellular inflammation. Matrix texture and surface properties governed cellular performance on tissues. Although dense dermal compaction delayed vertical cellular ingrowth for Strattice, it allowed uncompromised horizontal resurfacing. Dense dermal compaction may slow matrix decomposition and result in prolonged biomechanical stability of the graft. Reconstructive surgeons should choose the adequate matrix substitute depending on biomechanical requirements at the recipient site. Strattice may be suitable as a dermal replacement at recipient sites with high mechanical load requirements.

  8. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of microporous chitosan hydrogel/nanofibrin composite bandage for skin tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheesh Kumar, P T; Raj, N Mincy; Praveen, G; Chennazhi, Krishna Prasad; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we have developed chitosan hydrogel/nanofibrin composite bandages (CFBs) and characterized using Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The homogeneous distribution of nanofibrin in the prepared chitosan hydrogel matrix was confirmed by phosphotungstic acid-hematoxylin staining. The mechanical strength, swelling, biodegradation, porosity, whole-blood clotting, and platelet activation studies were carried out. In addition, the cell viability, cell attachment, and infiltration of the prepared CFBs were evaluated using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells. It was found that the CFBs were microporous, flexible, biodegradable, and showed enhanced blood clotting and platelet activity compared to the one without nanofibrin. The prepared CFBs were capable of absorbing fluid and this was confirmed when immersed in phosphate buffered saline. Cell viability studies on HUVECs and HDF cells proved the nontoxic nature of the CFBs. Cell attachment and infiltration studies showed that the cells were found attached and proliferated on the CFBs. In vivo experiments were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats and found that the wound healing occurred within 2 weeks when treated with CFBs than compared to the bare wound and wound treated with Kaltostat. The deposition of collagen was found to be more on CFB-treated wounds compared to the control. The above results proved the use of these CFBs as an ideal candidate for skin tissue regeneration and wound healing.

  9. The rise of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: now the dominant cause of skin and soft tissue infection in Central Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmorran, E; Harch, S; Athan, E; Lane, S; Tong, S; Crawford, L; Krishnaswamy, S; Hewagama, S

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the epidemiology and treatment outcomes of community-onset purulent staphylococcal skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) in Central Australia. We performed a prospective observational study of patients hospitalised with community-onset purulent staphylococcal SSTI (n = 160). Indigenous patients accounted for 78% of cases. Patients were predominantly young adults; however, there were high rates of co-morbid disease. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was the dominant phenotype, accounting for 60% of cases. Hospitalisation during the preceding 6 months, and haemodialysis dependence were significant predictors of CA-MRSA infection on univariate analysis. Clinical presentation and treatment outcomes were found to be comparable for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant cases. All MRSA isolates were characterised as non-multi-resistant, with this term used interchangeably with CA-MRSA in this analysis. We did not find an association between receipt of an active antimicrobial agent within the first 48 h, and progression of infection; need for further surgical debridement; unplanned General Practitioner or hospital re-presentation; or need for further antibiotics. At least one adverse outcome was experienced by 39% of patients. Clindamycin resistance was common, while rates of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance were low. This study suggested the possibility of healthcare-associated transmission of CA-MRSA. This is the first Australian report of CA-MRSA superseding MSSA as the cause of community onset staphylococcal SSTI.

  10. Fusidic acid suspension twice daily: a new treatment schedule for skin and soft tissue infection in children, with improved tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, Eva; Somogyi, Tihamér; Rutkai, Krisztina; Iglesias, Luis; Bielsa, Isabel

    2004-06-01

    This multicentre, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study aimed to compare a new regimen of fusidic acid suspension against a standard regimen in children with skin and soft tissue infections. Treatment groups were given either a new regimen of fusidic acid suspension (20 mg/kg divided b.i.d.) or a standard regimen (50 mg/kg divided t.i.d.), which were administered for 5 days in both groups and for a further 5 days if evidence of infection persisted. Assessment of those cured was carried out 14 days. Both regimens were effective. Cure was achieved in 194 (91.1%) of the 213 children given the new b.i.d. dosage and for 194 (89.4%) of the 217 children given the standard t.i.d. dosage (intention-to-treat population; p=0.72). Cure was maintained at the follow-up assessment for 94.8% (181 of 191) and 95.7% (180 of 188), respectively, of the children. Bacteriological cure of infections due to fusidic acid susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and/or group A beta-haemolytic streptococci, with elimination of pathogens, was achieved in all 121 (100%) children treated with the new b.i.d. regimen and in 123 (99.2%) of the 124 children treated with the standard TID regimen. The new twice-daily regimen had significantly better tolerance (p=0.025).

  11. Characterization of the Embryogenic Tissue of the Norway Spruce Including a Transition Layer between the Tissue and the Culture Medium by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kořínek R.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the visualization of the cells (ESEs and mucilage (ECMSN in an embryogenic tissue via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI relaxometry measurement combined with the subsequent multi-parametric segmentation. The computed relaxometry maps T1 and T2 show a thin layer (transition layer between the culture medium and the embryogenic tissue. The ESEs, mucilage, and transition layer differ in their relaxation times T1 and T2; thus, these times can be used to characterize the individual parts within the embryogenic tissue. The observed mean values of the relaxation times T1 and T2 of the ESEs, mucilage, and transition layer are as follows: 1469 ± 324 and 53 ± 10 ms, 1784 ± 124 and 74 ± 8 ms, 929 ± 164 and 32 ± 4.7 ms, respectively. The multi-parametric segmentation exploiting the T1 and T2 relaxation times as a classifier shows the distribution of the ESEs and mucilage within the embryogenic tissue. The discussed T1 and T2 indicators can be utilized to characterize both the growth-related changes in an embryogenic tissue and the effect of biotic/abiotic stresses, thus potentially becoming a distinctive indicator of the state of any examined embryogenic tissue.

  12. TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASE 1, MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 9, ALPHA-1 ANTITRYPSIN, METALLOTHIONEIN AND UROKINASE TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR RECEPTOR IN SKIN BIOPSIES FROM PATIENTS AFFECTED BY AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors have been described to play a role in autoimmune skin blistering diseases. We studied skin lesional biopsies from patients affected by several autoimmune skin blistering diseases for proteinases and proteinase inhibitors. Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry to evaluate biopsies for alpha-1-antitrypsin, human matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1, metallothionein and urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR. We tested 30 patients affected by endemic pemphigus, 30 controls from the endemic area, and 15 normal controls. We also tested 30 biopsies from patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus, and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH. Results: Contrary to findings in the current literature, most autoimmune skin blistering disease biopsies were negative for uPAR and MMP9. Only some chronic patients with El Bagre-EPF were positive to MMP9 in the dermis, in proximity to telocytes. TIMP-1 and metallothionein were positive in half of the biopsies from BP patients at the basement membrane of the skin, within several skin appendices, in areas of dermal blood vessel inflammation and within dermal mesenchymal-epithelial cell junctions.

  13. Stable isotope discrimination factors and between-tissue isotope comparisons for bone and skin from captive and wild green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner Tomaszewicz, Calandra N; Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Price, Mike; Kurle, Carolyn M

    2017-11-30

    The ecological application of stable isotope analysis (SIA) relies on taxa- and tissue-specific stable carbon (Δ 13 C) and nitrogen (Δ 15 N) isotope discrimination factors, determined with captive animals reared on known diets for sufficient time to reflect dietary isotope ratios. However, captive studies often prohibit lethal sampling, are difficult with endangered species, and reflect conditions not experienced in the wild. We overcame these constraints and determined the Δ 13 C and Δ 15 N values for skin and cortical bone from green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) that died in captivity and evaluated the utility of a mathematical approach to predict discrimination factors. Using stable carbon (δ 13 C values) and nitrogen (δ 15 N values) isotope ratios from captive and wild turtles, we established relationships between bone stable isotope (SI) ratios and those from skin, a non-lethally sampled tissue, to facilitate comparisons of SI ratios among studies using multiple tissues. The mean (±SD) Δ 13 C and Δ 15 N values (‰) between skin and bone from captive turtles and their diet (non-lipid-extracted) were 2.3 ± 0.3 and 4.1 ± 0.4 and 2.1 ± 0.6 and 5.1 ± 1.1, respectively. The mathematically predicted Δ 13 C and Δ 15 N values were similar (to within 1‰) to the experimentally derived values. The mean δ 15 N values from bone were higher than those from skin for captive (+1.0 ± 0.9‰) and wild (+0.8 ± 1.0‰) turtles; the mean δ 13 C values from bone were lower than those from skin for wild turtles (-0.6 ± 0.9‰), but the same as for captive turtles. We used linear regression equations to describe bone vs skin relationships and create bone-to-skin isotope conversion equations. For sea turtles, we provide the first (a) bone-diet SI discrimination factors, (b) comparison of SI ratios from individual-specific bone and skin, and (c) evaluation of the application of a mathematical approach to predict stable isotope discrimination factors. Our approach

  14. Skin Picking Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Cetinay Aydin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin picking disorder is not a dermatological disorder and it is a table characterized with picking skin excessively and repetitively, leading to damage in skin tissue. Unlike normal picking behaviour, psychogenic skin picking is repetitive and it can lead to severe damage in the skin and even complications which constitute vital danger. While some patients define frequent but short lasting picking attacks, others define rarer attacks which last a few hours. Skin picking disorder, which is not included in the classification systems up to DSM-5 as a separate diagnosis category, is included as an independent diagnosis in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Associated Disorders category in DSM-5. In case reports, open label studies and double blind studies selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are shown to be effective in the treatment of skin picking disorder. Mostly, cognitive-behaviourial techniques are used and have been proven to be useful in psychotherapy. Habit reversal is one of the behaviourial techniques which are frequently applied, give positive results in which well-being state can be maintained. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 401-428

  15. Tissue-engineered cartilaginous constructs for the treatment of caprine cartilage defects, including distribution of laminin and type IV collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Lily; Hsu, Hu-Ping; Spector, Myron

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was the immunohistochemical evaluation of (1) cartilage tissue-engineered constructs; and (2) the tissue filling cartilage defects in a goat model into which the constructs were implanted, particularly for the presence of the basement membrane molecules, laminin and type IV collagen. Basement membrane molecules are localized to the pericellular matrix in normal adult articular cartilage, but have not been examined in tissue-engineered constructs cultured in vitro or in tissue filling cartilage defects into which the constructs were implanted. Cartilaginous constructs were engineered in vitro using caprine chondrocyte-seeded type II collagen scaffolds. Autologous constructs were implanted into 4-mm-diameter defects created to the tidemark in the trochlear groove in the knee joints of skeletally mature goats. Eight weeks after implantation, the animals were sacrificed. Constructs underwent immunohistochemical and histomorphometric evaluation. Widespread staining for the two basement membrane molecules was observed throughout the extracellular matrix of in vitro and in vivo samples in a distribution unlike that previously reported for cartilage. At sacrifice, 70% of the defect site was filled with reparative tissue, which consisted largely of fibrous tissue and some fibrocartilage, with over 70% of the reparative tissue bonded to the adjacent host tissue. A novel finding of this study was the observation of laminin and type IV collagen in in vitro engineered cartilaginous constructs and in vivo cartilage repair samples from defects into which the constructs were implanted, as well as in normal caprine articular cartilage. Future work is needed to elucidate the role of basement membrane molecules during cartilage repair and regeneration.

  16. Skin and Soft Tissue Surgery in the Office Versus Operating Room Setting: An Analysis Based on Individual-Level Medicare Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Jonathan

    2018-03-23

    The relative volume of skin and soft tissue excision and reconstructive procedures performed in the outpatient office versus facility (ambulatory surgical center or hospital) differs by specialty, and has major implications for quality of care, outcomes, development of guidelines, resident education, health care economics, and patient perception. To assess the relative volume of surgical procedures performed in each setting (office vs ambulatory surgery center [ASC]/hospital) by dermatologists and nondermatologists. A cross-sectional analytical study was performed using the Medicare public use file (PUF) for 2014, which includes every patient seen in an office, ASC, or hospital in the United States billed to Medicare part B. Data were divided by physician specialty and setting. A total of 9,316,307 individual encounters were included in the Medicare PUF. Dermatologists account for 195,001 (2.1%) of the total. Dermatologists were more likely to perform surgical procedures in an office setting only (odds ratio 5.48 [95% confidence interval 5.05-5.95], p office setting, and dermatologists are more than 5 times as likely as other specialists to operate in an office setting.

  17. A comparison between 133Xenon washout technique and Laser Doppler flowmetry in the measurement of local vasoconstrictor effects on the microcirculation in subcutaneous tissue and skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J; Bülow, J; Lassen, N A

    1987-01-01

    Changes in skin blood flow measured by Laser Doppler flowmetry and changes in subcutaneous blood flow measured by 133Xenon washout technique were compared during activation of the local sympathetic mediated veno-arteriolar vasoconstrictor reflex by lowering the area of investigation below heart...... forearm, and on the calf with preserved sympathetic nerve supply. The Laser Doppler method registered a 23% reduction in skin blood flow during lowering of the extremities independently of the sympathetic nerve supply to the skin. The 133Xenon method recorded a 44% decrease in blood flow in innervated...... level. The measurements were performed in tissue with and without sympathetic innervation. In five subjects, who all had been cervically sympathectomized for manual hyperhidrosis, the Laser Doppler and 133Xenon blood flow measurements were performed simultaneously on the sympathetically denervated...

  18. Effectiveness of Acellular Dermal Matrix on Autologous Split-Thickness Skin Graft in Treatment of Deep Tissue Defect: Esthetic Subjective and Objective Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoo Jung; Park, Myong Chul; Park, Dong Ha; Hahn, Hyung Min; Kim, Sue Min; Lee, Il Jae

    2017-10-01

    A split-thickness skin graft (STSG) is performed to cover a large full-thickness skin defect. Esthetic and functional deficits can result, and many studies have sought to overcome them. This study compared the effectiveness of the acellular dermal matrix (ADM) graft and STSG concerning esthetic and functional effectiveness of ADM on scar quality. Of the patients who underwent anterolateral thigh free flap from 2011 to 2015, patients who received skin graft only (n = 10) or skin graft with ADM (n = 20) for coverage of the donor site were enrolled. In all cases, autologous STSG was performed with 1:1.5 meshed 0.008-0.010-inch-thick skin. In the skin graft with ADM group, 0.008-0.013-inch-thick meshed ADM (CGderm ® ; CGBio, Inc., Seungnam, Korea) was co-grafted. Negative-pressure wound therapy (CuraVAC ® ; CGBio, Inc., Seungnam, Korea) was applied to both groups in continuous mode at -120 mmHg. We investigate early outcomes (skin loss rate, duration of negative-pressure wound therapy, days to removal of stitches, days to achieve complete healing, and complications) and late outcomes in terms of scar quality (vascularity, pigmentation, pliability and height) and graft-related symptoms (itching sensation and pain). Assessments used the Vancouver Scar Scale and the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Skin fold was measured to evaluate the elasticity of scar tissue. In the Vancouver Scar Scale, vascularity subscore (p = 0.003) and total score (p = 0.016) were significantly lower in the skin graft with ADM group. In Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale, the pain (p = 0.037) and stiffness subscores (p = 0.002), and total score (p = 0.017) were significantly lower in the skin graft with ADM group. Skin graft with ADM results in better scar quality in objective and subjective aspects. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to

  19. New description of gradual substitution of graft by bone tissue including biomechanical and structural effects, nutrients supply and consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanfei; Lekszycki, Tomasz

    2018-03-01

    A new description of graft substitution by bone tissue is proposed in this work. The studied domain is considered as a continuum model consisting of a mixture of the bone tissue and the graft material. Densities of both components evolve in time as a result of cellular activity and biodegradation. The proposed model focuses on the interaction between the bone cell activity, mechanical stimuli, nutrients supply and scaffold microstructure. Different combinations of degradation rate and stiffness of the graft material were examined by numerical simulation. It follows from the calculations that the degradation rate of the scaffold should be tuned to the synthesis/resorption rate of the tissue, which are dependent among the others on scaffold porosity changes. Simulation results imply potential criteria to choose proper bone substitute material in consideration of degradation rate, initial porosity and mechanical characteristics.

  20. Skin mechanical properties and modeling: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joodaki, Hamed; Panzer, Matthew B

    2018-04-01

    The mechanical properties of the skin are important for various applications. Numerous tests have been conducted to characterize the mechanical behavior of this tissue, and this article presents a review on different experimental methods used. A discussion on the general mechanical behavior of the skin, including nonlinearity, viscoelasticity, anisotropy, loading history dependency, failure properties, and aging effects, is presented. Finally, commonly used constitutive models for simulating the mechanical response of skin are discussed in the context of representing the empirically observed behavior.

  1. Antibacterial Treatment of Meticillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Complicated Skin and Soft Tissue Infections: a Cost and Budget Impact Analysis in Greek Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasakis, Kostas; Petrakis, Ioannis; Ollandezos, Mark; Tsoulas, Christos; Patel, Dipen A.; Karampli, Eleftheria; Kyriopoulos, John

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Meticillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of antimicrobial-resistant infections worldwide. Its prevalence remains high in the Greek hospital setting. Complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) due to MRSA are associated with prolonged hospitalization, additional healthcare costs and significant morbidity. The purpose of this study was to conduct a cost analysis and a budget impact analysis relative to different management scenarios for MRSA...

  2. Hydroxyethyl methacrylate grafted carboxy methyl tamarind (CMT-g-HEMA) polysaccharide based matrix as a suitable scaffold for skin tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Priyanka; Kumar, Satish; Singh, Abhishek; Kumar, Ashutosh; Kaur, Navneet; Sanyasi, Sridhar; Chawla, Saurabh; Goswami, Chandan; Goswami, Luna

    2018-06-01

    Patho-physiologies related to skin are diverse in nature such as burns, skin ulcers, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis etc. which impose severe bio-medical problems and thus enforce requirement of new and healthy skin prepared through tissues engineering methodologies. However, fully functional and biodegradable matrix for attachment, growth, proliferation and differentiation of the relevant cells is not available. In the present study, we introduce a set of hydrogels synthesized by incorporation of a synthetic monomer (Hydroxyethlmethacryate) with a semi-synthetic polymer backbone (carboxy methyl tamarind, CMT) in different mole ratios. We termed these materials as CMT:HEMA based hydrogels and these were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques, namely by X-Ray Diffraction, SEM and Dynamic Light Scattering. Biocompatibility studies with HaCaT, NIH-3T3 and mouse dermal fibroblasts confirm that this material is biocompatible. MTT assay further confirmed that this material does not have any cytotoxic effects. Assays for mitochondrial functionality such as ATP assay and mitochondrial reactive oxygen (ROS) generation also suggest that this material is safe and does not have any cytotoxicity. Hemolytic assay with red blood cells and acute skin irritation test on SD Rats confirmed that this material is suitable for ex-vivo application in future. We suggest that this hydrogel is suitable for in-vivo applications and may have clinical and commercial importance against skin disorders. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Tissue distribution and subcellular localizations determine in vivo functional relationship among prostasin, matriptase, HAI-1, and HAI-2 in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Kao, Chen-Yu; Chang, Shun-Cheng; Chiu, Yi-Lin; Chen, Yen-Ju; Chen, Ming-Hsing G; Chang, Chun-Chia; Lin, Yu-Wen; Chiang, Chien-Ping; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong; Johnson, Michael D

    2018-01-01

    The membrane-bound serine proteases prostasin and matriptase and the Kunitz-type protease inhibitors HAI-1 and HAI-2 are all expressed in human skin and may form a tightly regulated proteolysis network, contributing to skin pathophysiology. Evidence from other systems, however, suggests that the relationship between matriptase and prostasin and between the proteases and the inhibitors can be context-dependent. In this study the in vivo zymogen activation and protease inhibition status of matriptase and prostasin were investigated in the human skin. Immunohistochemistry detected high levels of activated prostasin in the granular layer, but only low levels of activated matriptase restricted to the basal layer. Immunoblot analysis of foreskin lysates confirmed this in vivo zymogen activation status and further revealed that HAI-1 but not HAI-2 is the prominent inhibitor for prostasin and matriptase in skin. The zymogen activation status and location of the proteases does not support a close functional relation between matriptase and prostasin in the human skin. The limited role for HAI-2 in the inhibition of matriptase and prostasin is the result of its primarily intracellular localization in basal and spinous layer keratinocytes, which probably prevents the Kunitz inhibitor from interacting with active prostasin or matriptase. In contrast, the cell surface expression of HAI-1 in all viable epidermal layers renders it an effective regulator for matriptase and prostasin. Collectively, our study suggests the importance of tissue distribution and subcellular localization in the functional relationship between proteases and protease inhibitors.

  4. A Weight-Loss Diet Including Coffee-Derived Mannooligosaccharides Enhances Adipose Tissue Loss in Overweight Men but Not Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Salinardi, Taylor; Herron-Rubin, Kristin; Black, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Mannooligosaccharides (MOS), extracted from coffee, have been shown to promote a decrease in body fat when consumed as part of free-living, weight-maintaining diets. Our objective was to determine if MOS consumption (4 g/day), in conjunction with a weight-loss diet, would lead to greater reductions in adipose tissue compartments than placebo. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled weight-loss study in which 60 overweight men and women consumed study beverages and received weekly group counseling for 12 weeks. Weight and blood pressure were measured weekly, and adipose tissue distribution was assessed at baseline and at end point using magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 54 subjects completed the study. Men consuming the MOS beverage had greater loss of body weight than men consuming the Placebo beverage (−6.0 ± 0.6% vs. −2.3 ± 0.5%, respectively, P coffee-derived MOS to a weight-loss diet enhanced both weight and adipose tissue losses in men, suggesting a potential functional use of MOS for weight management and improvement in adipose tissue distribution. More studies are needed to investigate the apparent gender difference in response to MOS consumption. PMID:21938072

  5. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Skin; Dose de tolerance des tissus sains: la peau et les phaneres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginot, A.; Doyen, J.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Courdi, A. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France)

    2010-07-15

    Acute skin toxicity is frequent during radiation therapy and can lead to temporary arrest of the treatment. Chronic toxicity can occur and conduct to cosmetic problems. Alopecia is the most frequent toxicity concerning hair and is most of the time reversible. Several factors linked to patients influence skin toxicity, such as under-nutrition, old age, obesity, smoking, skin diseases, autoimmune diseases, failure of DNA reparation. Skin, hair and nail toxicities depend also on radiation schedule. Acute toxicity is greater when dose per fraction increases. Chronic and acute toxicities are more often when total dose increases. Under 45 Gy, the risk of severe skin toxicity is low, and begins above 50 Gy. Skin toxicity depends also on the duration of radiotherapy and split course schedules are associated with less toxicities. Irradiation surface seems to influence skin toxicity but interaction is more complex. Reirradiation is often feasible in case of cancer recurrence but with a risk of grade 3-4 toxicity above all in head and neck cancer. The benefit/risk ratio has to be always precisely evaluated. Permanent alopecia is correlated with the follicle dose. Modern techniques of radiation therapy allow to spare skin. (authors)

  6. Interaction of dermatologically relevant nanoparticles with skin cells and skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Vogt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of nanoparticle interactions with tissues is complex. High levels of standardization, ideally testing of different material types in the same biological model, and combinations of sensitive imaging and detection methods are required. Here, we present our studies on nanoparticle interactions with skin, skin cells, and biological media. Silica, titanium dioxide and silver particles were chosen as representative examples for different types of skin exposure to nanomaterials, e.g., unintended environmental exposure (silica versus intended exposure through application of sunscreen (titanium dioxide or antiseptics (silver. Because each particle type exhibits specific physicochemical properties, we were able to apply different combinations of methods to examine skin penetration and cellular uptake, including optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray microscopy on cells and tissue sections, flow cytometry of isolated skin cells as well as Raman microscopy on whole tissue blocks. In order to assess the biological relevance of such findings, cell viability and free radical production were monitored on cells and in whole tissue samples. The combination of technologies and the joint discussion of results enabled us to look at nanoparticle–skin interactions and the biological relevance of our findings from different angles.

  7. Climatic factors and community - associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infections - a time-series analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Krushna Chandra; Sahoo, Soumyakanta; Marrone, Gaetano; Pathak, Ashish; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby; Tamhankar, Ashok J

    2014-08-29

    Skin and soft tissue infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (SA-SSTIs) including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have experienced a significant surge all over the world. Changing climatic factors are affecting the global burden of dermatological infections and there is a lack of information on the association between climatic factors and MRSA infections. Therefore, association of temperature and relative humidity (RH) with occurrence of SA-SSTIs (n = 387) and also MRSA (n = 251) was monitored for 18 months in the outpatient clinic at a tertiary care hospital located in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Time-series analysis was used to investigate the potential association of climatic factors (weekly averages of maximum temperature, minimum temperature and RH) with weekly incidence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA infections. The analysis showed that a combination of weekly average maximum temperature above 33 °C coinciding with weekly average RH ranging between 55% and 78%, is most favorable for the occurrence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA and within these parameters, each unit increase in occurrence of MRSA was associated with increase in weekly average maximum temperature of 1.7 °C (p = 0.044) and weekly average RH increase of 10% (p = 0.097).

  8. Climatic Factors and Community — Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections — A Time-Series Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krushna Chandra Sahoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin and soft tissue infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (SA-SSTIs including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA have experienced a significant surge all over the world. Changing climatic factors are affecting the global burden of dermatological infections and there is a lack of information on the association between climatic factors and MRSA infections. Therefore, association of temperature and relative humidity (RH with occurrence of SA-SSTIs (n = 387 and also MRSA (n = 251 was monitored for 18 months in the outpatient clinic at a tertiary care hospital located in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Time-series analysis was used to investigate the potential association of climatic factors (weekly averages of maximum temperature, minimum temperature and RH with weekly incidence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA infections. The analysis showed that a combination of weekly average maximum temperature above 33 °C coinciding with weekly average RH ranging between 55% and 78%, is most favorable for the occurrence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA and within these parameters, each unit increase in occurrence of MRSA was associated with increase in weekly average maximum temperature of 1.7 °C (p = 0.044 and weekly average RH increase of 10% (p = 0.097.

  9. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bleeding Problem not going away Infection Pain Scarring Skin color changes Some laser surgery is done when you are asleep and ... TG, Elston DM, eds. Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical ... lasers, lights, and tissue interactions. In: Hruza GJ, Avram ...

  10. Safety of radiofrequency treatment over human skin previously injected with medium-term injectable soft-tissue augmentation materials: a controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Murad; Levy, Ross; Pajvani, Urvi; Pavjani, Urvi; Ramierez, James A; Guitart, Joan; Veen, Heather; Gladstone, Hayes B

    2006-03-01

    Several soft-tissue augmentation materials are now available for reduction of nasolabial fold creases and perioral rhytides. Nasolabial folds and perioral rhytides can also be improved by skin tightening delivered by non-ablative radiofrequency (RF) treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of RF treatment over skin areas recently injected with medium-term injectable soft-tissue augmentation materials. Five subjects were assigned to the experimental arm (augmentation materials plus RF) and one to the control arm (augmentation materials alone). Each subject received injections of 0.3 mL of hyaluronic acid derivative (Restylane) and calcium hydroxylapatite (Radiesse) 3 cm apart on the upper inner arm. Two weeks later, two non-overlapping passes of RF (Thermage ThermaCool TC) were delivered at 63.5 setting with medium-fast 1.5 cm2 tip over injected sites in all of the experimental subjects. Punch skin biopsies were obtained 3 days later from each of the two injection sites on each subject. Light microscopy and digital photomicrographs obtained at low, medium, and high power showed no difference between filler materials in experimental and control subjects. In both cases filler was evident at the deep dermal-subcutaneous junction. Nodule formation, foreign body extravasation, or hemorrhage/clot was not observed grossly or histologically. Subjects and physicians did not report any difference in signs and symptoms between the experimental and control arms. Slightly increased transitory pain was noted when RF was delivered over filler versus over normal skin. Applying RF treatment over the same area 2 weeks after deep dermal injection with hyaluronic acid derivatives or calcium hydroxylapatite does not appear to cause gross morphological changes in the filler material or surrounding skin. Further studies with different parameters are necessary to confirm these findings. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Skin appendage-derived stem cells: cell biology and potential for wound repair

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Jiangfan; Yao, Bin; Han, Yutong; Huang, Sha; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells residing in the epidermis and skin appendages are imperative for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also participate in the repair of the epidermis after injuries, inducing restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unlike epidermis-derived stem cells, comprehensive knowledge about skin appendage-derived stem cells remains limited. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of skin appendage-derived stem cells, including their fundament...

  12. Identification of Differential Gene Expression Patterns after Acute Exposure to High and Low Doses of Low-LET Ionizing Radiation in a Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Hays, Spencer; Taylor, Ronald C.; Stenoien, David L.

    2016-11-01

    Our goal here was to identify dose and temporal dependent radiation responses in a complex tissue, reconstituted human skin. Direct sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) was used to quantify altered transcripts following exposure to 0.1, 2 and 10 Gy of ionizing radiation at 3 and 8 hours. These doses include a low dose in the range of some medical diagnostic procedures (0.1 Gy), a dose typically received during radiotherapy (2.0 Gy) and a lethal dose (10 Gy). These doses could be received after an intentional or accidental radiation exposure and biomarkers are needed to rapidly and accurately triage exposed individuals. A total of 1701 genes were deemed to be significantly affected by high dose radiation exposure with the majority of genes affected at 10 Gy. A group of 29 genes including GDF15, BBC3, PPM1D, FDXR, GADD45A, MDM2, CDKN1A, TP53INP1, CYCSP27, SESN1, SESN2, PCNA, and AEN were similarly altered at both 2 and 10 Gy, but not 0.1 Gy, at multiple time points. A much larger group of up regulated genes, including those involved in inflammatory responses, was significantly altered only after a 10 Gy exposure. At high doses, down regulated genes were associated with cell cycle regulation and exhibited an apparent linear response between 2 and 10 Gy. While only a handful of genes were significantly affected by 0.1 Gy exposure using stringent statistical filters, groups of related genes regulating cell cycle progression and inflammatory responses consistently exhibited opposite trends in their regulation compared to the high dose exposures. Differential regulation of PLK1 signaling at low and high doses was confirmed using qRT-PCR. These results indicate that some alterations in gene expression are qualitatively different at low and high doses of radiation in this model system.

  13. High frequency of methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in children under 1 year old with skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Ospina, Lorena; Jiménez, Judy Natalia

    2017-09-21

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large number of infections in pediatric population; however, information about the behavior of such infections in this population is limited. The aim of the study was to describe the clinical, epidemiological, and molecular characteristics of infections caused by methicillin-susceptible and resistant S. aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in a pediatric population. A cross-sectional descriptive study in patients from birth to 14 years of age from three high-complexity institutions was conducted (2008-2010). All patients infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus and a representative sample of patients infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus were included. Clinical and epidemiological information was obtained from medical records and molecular characterization included spa typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In addition, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and virulence factor genes were detected. A total of 182 patients, 65 with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus infections and 117 with methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections, were included in the study; 41.4% of the patients being under 1 year. The most frequent infections were of the skin and soft tissues. Backgrounds such as having stayed in day care centers and previous use of antibiotics were more common in patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections (p≤0.05). Sixteen clonal complexes were identified and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains were more diverse. The most common cassette was staphylococcal cassette chromosomemec IVc (70.8%), which was linked to Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl). In contrast with other locations, a prevalence of infections in children under 1 year of age in the city could be observed; this emphasizes the importance of epidemiological knowledge at the local level. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights

  14. Diagnostic value of static MR imaging of soft tissue tumours including lesion size, borders and local extend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacikowska, M.

    2001-01-01

    The usefulness of MR imaging in the evaluation of the degree of soft tissue malignancy is widely discussed. The aim of this study was to analyse the diagnostic value of MR imaging in the evaluation of local progression of soft tissue tumours and to analyse the usefulness of MR imaging in the differential diagnosis (malignant versus benign lesions). One hundred and ten patients with soft tissue tumours were examined by MR imaging (60 men and 50 women, aged 16 to 84 years). MR imaging was carried out with an Elscint 2T or 0.5T unit. Surface coils (passive) or circular polarized coils (active) depending on the localisation of the lesions were used with field vision from 20x24 cm or 40x40 cm, matrices 200x256, 256x256, or 22x315, layer thickness from 3 to 10 mm, gap 20-30%. SE T1 sequences (TR = 500 - 800 ms, TE = 15 - 20 ms) and FSE T2 (Tr = 2000-4500 ms, TE = 96-104 ms) were routinely used in at least two planes: transverse, frontal or saggital, and SE T1 sequences were used after administration of gadolinium Gd-DTPA in 0.1 m - 0.2 mmol/kg body weigh doses. The tumour dimensions by MR imaging were compared with the results of histological examination of samples obtained during surgery (65 cases) - the statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test, with statistically significant difference accepted at p = 0.05 or less. The borders of the lesions were assessed in the entire material and in the group of 65 patients treated surgically. The latter were compared with the results of histological examination after surgery, thus calculating MR sensitivity and specificity. Static imaging is a valuable diagnostic method for preoperative assesment of the local progression of soft tissue tumours, however it is not suitable for differentiating malignant lesions from benign according to tumour size, borders and local extent. (author)

  15. Bathing in carbon dioxide-enriched water alters protein expression in keratinocytes of skin tissue in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälsch, Julia; Pott, Leona L.; Takeda, Atsushi; Kumamoto, Hideo; Möllmann, Dorothe; Canbay, Ali; Sitek, Barbara; Baba, Hideo A.

    2017-04-01

    Beneficial effects of balneotherapy using naturally occurring carbonated water (CO2 enriched) have been known since the Middle Ages. Although this therapy is clinically applied for peripheral artery disease and skin disorder, the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated.

  16. Role of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy in the treatment of community acquired skin and soft tissue infections in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Monica; Ooi, Chee Kheong; Wong, Joshua; Zhong, Lihua; Lye, David

    2017-07-06

    Treatment of community acquired skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) is a common indication for outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in USA, UK and Australasia, however data from Asia are lacking. OPAT is well established within the Singapore healthcare since 2002, however, systematic use of OPAT for the treatment of SSTIs remains infrequent. In this report, we describe the treatment and outcome of patients with SSTIs referred directly from Emergency Department (ED) to OPAT for continuation of intravenous (IV) antibiotics in Singapore, thus avoiding potential hospital admission. This is a single center university hospital retrospective study of patients with SSTIs presenting to ED who were assessed to require IV antibiotics and accepted to the OPAT clinic for continuation of IV treatment. Exclusion criteria were: haemodynamic instability, uncontrolled or serious underlying co-morbidities, necessity for inpatient surgical drainage, facial cellulitis and cephalosporin allergy. Patients returned daily to the hospital’s OPAT clinic for administration of IV antibiotics and review, then switched to oral antibiotics on improvement. From 7 February 2012 to 31 July 2015, 120 patients with SSTIs were treated in OPAT. Median age was 56 years and 63% were male. Lower limbs were affected in 91%. Diabetes was present in 20%. Sixty-seven (56%) had been treated with oral antibiotics for a median duration of 3 days prior to OPAT treatment. Common symptoms were erythema (100%), swelling (96%), pain (88%) and fever (55%). Antibiotics administered were IV cefazolin with oral probenecid (71%) or IV ceftriaxone (29%) for median 3 days then oral cloxacillin (85%) for median 7 days. Clinical improvement occurred in 90%. Twelve patients (10%) were hospitalized for worsening cellulitis, with 4 patients requiring surgical drainage of abscess. Microbiological cultures from 2 patients with drained abscess grew methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and Klebsiella

  17. Novel feed including bioactive compounds from winery wastes improved broilers' redox status in blood and tissues of vital organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makri, Sotiria; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Stagos, Dimitrios; Chamokeridou, Theodora; Petrotos, Konstantinos; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Mpesios, Anastasios; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Kokkas, Stylianos; Goulas, Panagiotis; Komiotis, Dimitrios; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    Currently, there is a great interest in the production of animal feed with antioxidant activity. The aim of this study was to examine the potential antioxidant effects of a feed supplemented with grape pomace (GP), a winery by-product with high environmental load, in chickens. Broilers of 15 days post birth were separated into two groups fed either with standard diet or with diet supplemented with GP for 35 days. Blood and tissues collections were performed after feeding for 15 and 35 days with the experimental diet (i.e. at 30 and 50 days post birth). Free radical toxicity markers, namely thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, protein carbonyls, total antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione, catalase activity and rate of H 2 O 2 decomposition were determined in blood and tissues of vital organs. The results indicated that feed supplemented with GP decreased oxidative stress-induced toxic effects and improved chickens' redox status, and so it may also improve their wellness and productivity. On the other hand, this exploitation of GP may solve problems of environmental pollution in areas with wineries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Skin graft influence in human tissue radiated in nude mice regeneration; Influencia do enxerto de pele humana irradiada na regeneracao tecidual de camundongos nude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Jurandir Tomaz de

    2016-07-01

    Over the last few years it has increased the interest in the human skin grafts radio sterilized for application mainly in extensive and deep burns. Because these grafts quickly grip and present antigenic lower potential, compared with other treatments used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histoarchitecture of human skin grafts irradiated with doses 25 kGy, 50 kGy and non-irradiated during the repair tissue process in nude mice submitted by skin grafting in the dorsal region. Three groups of animals received irradiated human skin grafts (25 kGy and 50 kGy) and non-irradiated and were euthanized on the 3{sup rd}, 7{sup th} and 21{sup th} day after the surgery. Indeed, routine histologic procedures, tissue samples were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) for quantification of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, immune cells and blood vessels and immunofluorescence (IF) was performed to determine the expression human collagen type I and collagen type I and III mouse. Therefore, quantification of both the cells and the collagen types was performed by image analysis using Image-Pro Plus 6.0 software. Histologic results demonstrated at a dose of 25 kGy that human skin irradiation when grafted influences the increase in the number of cells in wound site over time and it provides better dispersion of these cells. In addition, on the 21{sup st} day, three groups of animals with human skin graft were embedded part of the graft in the healing process. On the other hand, the group not irradiated showed greater incorporation of the graft (43 %), but less production of collagen type III mouse (22 %). Since the groups irradiated skin graft showed lower graft incorporation (6 and 15%), but with greater production of collagen type III mice (35 % and 28 % to 25 kGy and 50 kGy, respectively). In conclusion, this study presented that the group irradiated to 25 kGy and it has a higher cell proliferation and vessel formation, and better remodeling of the healing area. (author)

  19. A comparison between 133Xenon washout technique and Laser Doppler flowmetry in the measurement of local vasoconstrictor effects on the microcirculation in subcutaneous tissue and skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastrup, J.; Buelow, J.; Lassen, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in skin blood flow measured by Laser Doppler flowmetry and changes in subcutaneous blood flow measured by 133 Xenon washout technique were compared during activation of the local sympathetic mediated veno-arteriolar vaso-constrictor reflex by lowering the area of investigation below heart level. The measurements were performed in tissue with and without sympathetic innervation. In five subjects, who all had been cervically sympathectomized for manual hyperhidrosis, the Laser Doppler and 133 Xenon blood flow measurements were performed simultaneously on the sympathetically denervated forearm, and on the calf with preserved sympathetic nerve supply. The Laser Doppler method registered a 23% reduction in skin blood flow during lowering of the extremities independently of the sympathetic nerve supply to the skin. The 133 Xenon method recorded a 44% decrease in blood flow in innervated and unchanged blood flow in denervated subcutaneous tissue during lowering of the extremities. Our results indicate that the Laser Doppler method and 133 Xenon method are not comparable, and that the Laser Doppler method is not useful in measuring local sympathetic mediated blood flow changes. (author)

  20. Comparison between /sup 133/Xenon washout technique and Laser Doppler flowmetry in the measurement of local vasoconstrictor effects on the microcirculation in subcutaneous tissue and skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastrup, J.; Buelow, J.; Lassen, N.A.

    1987-10-01

    Changes in skin blood flow measured by Laser Doppler flowmetry and changes in subcutaneous blood flow measured by /sup 133/Xenon washout technique were compared during activation of the local sympathetic mediated veno-arteriolar vaso-constrictor reflex by lowering the area of investigation below heart level. The measurements were performed in tissue with and without sympathetic innervation. In five subjects, who all had been cervically sympathectomized for manual hyperhidrosis, the Laser Doppler and /sup 133/Xenon blood flow measurements were performed simultaneously on the sympathetically denervated forearm, and on the calf with preserved sympathetic nerve supply. The Laser Doppler method registered a 23% reduction in skin blood flow during lowering of the extremities independently of the sympathetic nerve supply to the skin. The /sup 133/Xenon method recorded a 44% decrease in blood flow in innervated and unchanged blood flow in denervated subcutaneous tissue during lowering of the extremities. Our results indicate that the Laser Doppler method and /sup 133/Xenon method are not comparable, and that the Laser Doppler method is not useful in measuring local sympathetic mediated blood flow changes.

  1. Leishmania infantum proteophosphoglycans regurgitated by the bite of its natural sand fly vector, Lutzomyia longipalpis, promote parasite establishment in mouse skin and skin-distant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Matthew Edward; Corware, Karina; Müller, Ingrid; Bates, Paul Andrew

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate that a proteophosphoglycan-rich gel secreted by Leishmania infantum inside the midgut of Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies (promastigote secretory gel) is regurgitated along with an average dose of 500 L. infantum metacyclic promastigotes per infected bite. Using both low (10³) and high (10⁵) doses of parasites in the ears of BALB/c mice we show that the infections benefit from the presence of vector saliva and parasite gel in the skin. However, chronic infection of the spleen was only enhanced in high dose co-infections with gel. These results provide the framework for a more natural experimental model of visceral leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  2. Excellent Aesthetic and Functional Outcome After Fractionated Carbon Dioxide Laser Skin Graft Revision Surgery: Case Report and Review of Laser Skin Graft Revision Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Derek; Jagdeo, Jared

    2015-11-01

    Skin grafts are utilized in dermatology to reconstruct a defect secondary to surgery or trauma of the skin. Common indications for skin grafts include surgical removal of cutaneous malignancies, replacement of tissue after burns or lacerations, and hair transplantation in alopecia. Skin grafts may be cosmetically displeasing, functionally limiting, and significantly impact patient's quality-of-life. There is limited published data regarding skin graft revision to enhance aesthetics and function. Here, we present a case demonstrating excellent aesthetic and functional outcome after fractionated carbon dioxide (CO2) laser skin graft revision surgery and review of the medical literature on laser skin graft revision techniques.

  3. Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Morrissey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In vivo gene therapy directed at tissues of mesenchymal origin could potentially augment healing. We aimed to assess the duration and magnitude of transene expression in vivo in mice and ex vivo in human tissues. Methods. Using bioluminescence imaging, plasmid and adenoviral vector-based transgene expression in murine quadriceps in vivo was examined. Temporal control was assessed using a doxycycline-inducible system. An ex vivo model was developed and optimised using murine tissue, and applied in ex vivo human tissue. Results. In vivo plasmid-based transgene expression did not silence in murine muscle, unlike in liver. Although maximum luciferase expression was higher in muscle with adenoviral delivery compared with plasmid, expression reduced over time. The inducible promoter cassette successfully regulated gene expression with maximum levels a factor of 11 greater than baseline. Expression was re-induced to a similar level on a temporal basis. Luciferase expression was readily detected ex vivo in human muscle and tendon. Conclusions. Plasmid constructs resulted in long-term in vivo gene expression in skeletal muscle, in a controllable fashion utilising an inducible promoter in combination with oral agents. Successful plasmid gene transfection in human ex vivo mesenchymal tissue was demonstrated for the first time.

  4. Skin bioprinting: a novel approach for creating artificial skin from synthetic and natural building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Robin

    2018-05-12

    Significant progress has been made over the past few decades in the development of in vitro-engineered substitutes that mimic human skin, either as grafts for the replacement of lost skin, or for the establishment of in vitro human skin models. Tissue engineering has been developing as a novel strategy by employing the recent advances in various fields such as polymer engineering, bioengineering, stem cell research and nanomedicine. Recently, an advancement of 3D printing technology referred as bioprinting was exploited to make cell loaded scaffolds to produce constructs which are more matching with the native tissue. Bioprinting facilitates the simultaneous and highly specific deposition of multiple types of skin cells and biomaterials, a process that is lacking in conventional skin tissue-engineering approaches. Bioprinted skin substitutes or equivalents containing dermal and epidermal components offer a promising approach in skin bioengineering. Various materials including synthetic and natural biopolymers and cells with or without signalling molecules like growth factors are being utilized to produce functional skin constructs. This technology emerging as a novel strategy to overcome the current bottle-necks in skin tissue engineering such as poor vascularization, absence of hair follicles and sweat glands in the construct.

  5. Treatment patterns, resource utilization, and outcomes among hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus complicated skin and soft tissue infections in Lebanon and Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matar MJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Madonna J Matar,1 Rima Moghnieh,2 Adel F Alothman,3 Abdulhakeem O Althaqafi,4 Thamer H Alenazi,3 Fayssal M Farahat,4 Shelby Corman,5 Caitlyn T Solem,5 Nirvana Raghubir,6 Cynthia Macahilig,7 Seema Haider,8 Jennifer M Stephens5 1Department of Infectious Diseases, Notre Dame des Secours University Hospital, Jbeil, Lebanon; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Makassed General Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon; 3College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Infection Prevention and Control, King AbdulAziz Medical City, King Saud bin AbdulAziz University for Health Sciences, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 5Pharmerit International, Real-World Evidence/Data Analytics, Bethesda, MD, 6Pfizer, New York, NY, 7Medical Data Analytics, Parsippany, NJ, 8Pfizer, Groton, CT, USA Objectives: To describe treatment patterns and medical resource use for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTI in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon in terms of drug selection against the infecting pathogen as well as hospital resource utilization and clinical outcomes among patients with these infections. Methods: This retrospective chart review study evaluated 2011–2012 data from five hospitals in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon. Patients were included if they had been discharged with a diagnosis of MRSA cSSTI, which was culture-proven or suspected based on clinical criteria. Hospital data were abstracted for a random sample of patients with each infection type to capture demographics, treatment patterns, hospital resource utilization, and clinical outcomes. Statistical analysis was descriptive. Results: Data were abstracted from medical records of 87 patients with MRSA cSSTI; mean age 52.4±25.9 years and 61% male. Only 64% of patients received an MRSA active initial therapy, with 56% of first

  6. Laser Doppler imaging, thermographic imaging, and tissue oxygen saturation measurements detect early skin reactions during breast radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David K.; Harrison, Eileen M.; Newton, David J.; Windsor, Phyllis M.

    2001-05-01

    A range of acute skin reactions, ranging from mild erythema to moist desquamation, can be seen in patients receiving standard fractionated radiotherapy to the breast for conservation therapy of breast carcinoma. In a number of cases these reactions can cause considerable discomfort and seriously affect the patient's quality of life. In previous studies we have used the techniques of laser Doppler imaging, digital thermographic imaging and lightguide spectrophotometry to study oxygen supply and blood flow in inflammatory reactions induced experimentally in forearm skin. The present study is an attempt to use the same techniques to investigate whether any or all of them can detect changes in breast skin very early on in the course of radiotherapy treatment. A further aim of the longer term study is to investigate to what extent these early changes may be able to predict the occurrence later of severe acute or delayed reactions.

  7. [Cellular subcutaneous tissue. Anatomic observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart-Elbaz, C; Varnaison, E; Sick, H; Grosshans, E; Cribier, B

    2001-11-01

    We showed in a companion paper that the definition of the French "subcutaneous cellular tissue" considerably varied from the 18th to the end of the 20th centuries and has not yet reached a consensus. To address the anatomic reality of this "subcutaneous cellular tissue", we investigated the anatomic structures underlying the fat tissue in normal human skin. Sixty specimens were excised from the surface to the deep structures (bone, muscle, cartilage) on different body sites of 3 cadavers from the Institut d'Anatomie Normale de Strasbourg. Samples were paraffin-embedded, stained and analysed with a binocular microscope taking x 1 photographs. Specimens were also excised and fixed after subcutaneous injection of Indian ink, after mechanic tissue splitting and after performing artificial skin folds. The aspects of the deep parts of the skin greatly varied according to their anatomic localisation. Below the adipose tissue, we often found a lamellar fibrous layer which extended from the interlobular septa and contained horizontally distributed fat cells. No specific tissue below the hypodermis was observed. Artificial skin folds concerned either exclusively the dermis, when they were superficial or included the hypodermis, but no specific structure was apparent in the center of the fold. India ink diffused to the adipose tissue, mainly along the septa, but did not localise in a specific subcutaneous compartment. This study shows that the histologic aspects of the deep part of the skin depend mainly on the anatomic localisation. Skin is composed of epidermis, dermis and hypodermis and thus the hypodermis can not be considered as being "subcutaneous". A difficult to individualise, fibrous lamellar structure in continuity with the interlobular septa is often found under the fat lobules. This structure is a cleavage line, as is always the case with loose connective tissues, but belongs to the hypodermis (i.e. fat tissue). No specific tissue nor any virtual space was

  8. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus blood and skin and soft tissue infections in the US military health system, 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Michael L; Neumann, Charlotte; Cook, Courtney; Chukwuma, Uzo; Ellis, Michael W; Hospenthal, Duane R; Murray, Clinton K

    2012-07-04

    Rates of hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are reported as decreasing, but recent rates of community-onset S. aureus infections are less known. To characterize the overall and annual incidence rates of community-onset and hospital-onset S. aureus bacteremia and skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in a national health care system and to evaluate trends in the incidence rates of S. aureus bacteremia and SSTIs and the proportion due to MRSA. Observational study of all Department of Defense TRICARE beneficiaries from January 2005 through December 2010. Medical record databases were used to identify and classify all annual first-positive S. aureus blood and wound or abscess cultures as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus or MRSA, and as community-onset or hospital-onset infections (isolates collected >3 days after hospital admission). Unadjusted incidence rates per 100,000 person-years of observation, the proportion of infections that was due to MRSA, and annual trends for 2005 through 2010 (examined using the Spearman rank correlation test or the Mantel-Haenszel χ2 test for linear trend). During 56 million person-years (nonactive duty: 47 million person-years; active duty: 9 million person-years), there were 2643 blood and 80,281 wound or abscess annual first-positive S. aureus cultures. Annual incidence rates varied from 3.6 to 6.0 per 100,000 person-years for S. aureus bacteremia and 122.7 to 168.9 per 100,000 person-years for S. aureus SSTIs. The annual incidence rates for community-onset MRSA bacteremia decreased from 1.7 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 1.5-2.0 per 100,000 person-years) in 2005 to 1.2 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 0.9-1.4 per 100,000 person-years) in 2010 (P = .005 for trend). The annual incidence rates for hospital-onset MRSA bacteremia also decreased from 0.7 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 0.6-0.9 per 100,000 person-years) in 2005 to 0.4 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 0.3-0.5 per 100

  9. Characterization of community acquired Staphylococcus aureus associated with skin and soft tissue infection in Beijing: high prevalence of PVL+ ST398.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjiang Zhao

    Full Text Available Adult community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (CA-MSSA skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI in China is not well described. A prospective cohort of adults with SSTI was established between January 2009 and August 2010 at 4 hospitals in Beijing. Susceptibility testing and molecular typing, including multilocus sequence typing, spa, agr typing, and toxin detection were assessed for all S. aureus isolates. Overall, 501 SSTI patients were enrolled. Cutaneous abscess (40.7% was the most common infection, followed by impetigo (6.8% and cellulitis (4.8%. S. aureus accounted for 32.7% (164/501 of SSTIs. Five isolates (5/164, 3.0% were CA-MRSA. The most dominant ST in CA-MSSA was ST398 (17.6%. The prevalence of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (pvl gene was 41.5% (66/159 in MSSA. Female, younger patients and infections requiring incision or drainage were more commonly associated with pvl-positive S. aureus (P<0.03; sec gene was more often identified in CC5 (P<0.03; seh gene was more prevalent in CC1 (P = 0.001. Importantly, ST59 isolates showed more resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline, and needed more surgical intervention. In conclusion, CA-MRSA infections were rare among adult SSTI patients in Beijing. Six major MSSA clones were identified and associated with unique antimicrobial susceptibility, toxin profiles, and agr types. A high prevalence of livestock ST398 clone (17.1% of all S. aureus infections was found with no apparent association to animal contact.

  10. Artificial skin in perspective: concepts and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohem, Carla A; Cardeal, Laura B da Silva; Tiago, Manoela; Soengas, María S; Barros, Silvia B de Moraes; Maria-Engler, Silvya S

    2011-02-01

    Skin, the largest organ of the human body, is organized into an elaborate layered structure consisting mainly of the outermost epidermis and the underlying dermis. A subcutaneous adipose-storing hypodermis layer and various appendages such as hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, nerves, lymphatics, and blood vessels are also present in the skin. These multiple components of the skin ensure survival by carrying out critical functions such as protection, thermoregulation, excretion, absorption, metabolic functions, sensation, evaporation management, and aesthetics. The study of how these biological functions are performed is critical to our understanding of basic skin biology such as regulation of pigmentation and wound repair. Impairment of any of these functions may lead to pathogenic alterations, including skin cancers. Therefore, the development of genetically controlled and well characterized skin models can have important implications, not only for scientists and physicians, but also for manufacturers, consumers, governing regulatory boards and animal welfare organizations. As cells making up human skin tissue grow within an organized three-dimensional (3D) matrix surrounded by neighboring cells, standard monolayer (2D) cell cultures do not recapitulate the physiological architecture of the skin. Several types of human skin recombinants, also called artificial skin, that provide this critical 3D structure have now been reconstructed in vitro. This review contemplates the use of these organotypic skin models in different applications, including substitutes to animal testing. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Spread of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infection within a family: implications for antibiotic therapy and prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amir, N H

    2010-04-01

    Outbreaks or clusters of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) within families have been reported. We describe a family cluster of CA-MRSA skin and soft-tissue infection where CA-MRSA was suspected because of recurrent infections which failed to respond to flucloxacillin. While the prevalence of CA-MRSA is low worldwide, CA-MRSA should be considered in certain circumstances depending on clinical presentation and risk assessment. Surveillance cultures of family contacts of patients with MRSA should be considered to help establish the prevalence of CA-MRSA and to inform the optimal choice of empiric antibiotic treatment.

  12. The development and application of a cold atmospheric plasma generator for treatment of skin and soft-tissue injuries in animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, O. A.; Petrova, N. O.; Smirnova, N. V.; Shemet, M. V.

    2017-08-01

    We describe a device for obtaining cold plasma in air at atmospheric pressure using a system of positive high-voltage pin electrodes, which is intended for the treatment of skin and soft-tissue injuries in animals. Plasma is generated due to the development of periodic pulsed discharge of nanosecond duration at current pulse amplitudes 10-20 mA, characteristic frequencies 10-20 kHz, and applied voltages within 8-10 kV. The high efficacy of the proposed device and method is confirmed by the good clinical results of treating large domestic animals with traumatic injuries.

  13. Unbalanced inflammatory reaction could increase tissue destruction and worsen skin infectious diseases - a comparative study of leishmaniasis and sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, F N; de Carvalho, L M V; Leite-Silva, J; Seba, A J; Pimentel, M I F; Fagundes, A; Madeira, M F; Lyra, M R; Oliveira, M M; Schubach, A O; Conceição-Silva, F

    2018-02-13

    The clinical presentations of skin diseases produced by different pathogens, as American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) and sporotrichosis can be similar and possibly influenced by the skin immune system (SIS). The aim of the study was to understand the underlying mechanisms of skin inflammation produced by different pathogens. We used immunohistochemistry to analyze 96 patients: a- localized cutaneous leishmaniasis (LCL-ATL); b- sporotrichoid cutaneous leishmaniasis (SCL-ATL); c-lymphocutaneous (LC-SP); d- fixed (F-SP) sporotrichosis. LCL-ATL and SCL-ATL had a significantly higher percentage of CD8, FasL and NOS2 than sporotrichosis. In contrast, LC-SP had a substantially higher percentage of CD4, BCl2 and neutrophils than ATL lesions. These results indicated some differences in the profile of the in situ immune response suggesting that SIS is a complex, adaptable system capable of different responses to intracellular or extracellular pathogens. However, regardless of the etiological agents, the inflammatory reaction and clinical manifestations can be similar. SCL-ATL and LC-SP presented similarities in both clinical presentation and in situ inflammatory profile (CD3, CD22, neutrophils, macrophages). The clinical presentation of ATL and sporotrichosis could be explained by a combination of factors both of the host SIS and the etiological agent. The unbalanced host parasite relationship could result in atypical manifestations of skin disease.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy Differentiates Each Tissue From the Skin to the Spinal Cord: A Novel Method for Epidural Needle Placement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. Anthony; Kang, Jeon Woong; Gubin, Tatyana; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; So, Peter T. C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neuraxial anesthesia and epidural steroid injection techniques require precise anatomical targeting to ensure successful and safe analgesia. Previous studies suggest that only some of the tissues encountered during these procedures can be identified by spectroscopic methods, and no previous study has investigated the use of Raman, diffuse reflectance, and fluorescence spectroscopies. The authors hypothesized that real-time needle-tip spectroscopy may aid epidural needle placement and tested the ability of spectroscopy to distinguish each of the tissues in the path of neuraxial needles. METHODS For comparison of detection methods, the spectra of individual, dissected ex vivo paravertebral and neuraxial porcine tissues were collected using Raman spectroscopy (RS), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), and fluorescence spectroscopy (FS). Real-time spectral guidance was tested using a 2 mm inner diameter fiber optic probe-in-needle device. Raman spectra were collected during the needle’s passage through intact paravertebral and neuraxial porcine tissue and analyzed afterward. The RS tissue signatures were verified as mapping to individual tissue layers using histochemical staining and widefield microscopy. RESULTS Raman spectroscopy revealed a unique spectrum for all ex vivo paravertebral and neuraxial tissue layers; DRS and FS spectra were not distinct for all tissues. Moreover, when accounting for the expected order of tissues, real-time Raman spectra recorded during needle insertion also permitted identification of each paravertebral and neuraxial porcine tissue. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates Raman spectroscopy can distinguish the tissues encountered during epidural needle insertion. This technology may prove useful during needle placement by providing evidence of its anatomical localization. PMID:27466032

  15. Determination of the exposure parameters that maximise the concentrations of the anaesthetic/sedative eugenol in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin-on fillet tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Porcher, Scott T.; Smerud, Justin R.

    2014-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the anaesthetic/sedative concentrations and durations that would maximize anaesthetic/sedative residue concentrations in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin-on fillet tissue. Rainbow trout (167–404 g) were exposed to 50 mg l−1 AQUI-S® 20E (10% active ingredient, eugenol) in 17°C freshwater for durations up to 1440 min, 100 and 250 mg l−1 AQUI-S® 20E for durations up to 240 min, and 500 and 1000 mg l−1 AQUI-S® 20E for durations up to 90 min. Fish exposed to 100 mg l−1 AQUI-S® 20E for durations of 30, 60, 120 and 240 min had the greatest eugenol concentrations in the fillet tissue, 50, 58, 54 and 62 µg g−1, respectively. All other exposure concentrations and durations resulted in significantly lower eugenol concentrations, i.e. all −1.

  16. Determination of the exposure parameters that maximise the concentrations of the anaesthetic/sedative eugenol in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin-on fillet tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, J R; Porcher, S T; Smerud, J R; Gaikowski, M P

    2014-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the anaesthetic/sedative concentrations and durations that would maximise anaesthetic/sedative residue concentrations in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin-on fillet tissue. Rainbow trout (167-404 g) were exposed to 50 mg l(-1) AQUI-S(®) 20E (10% active ingredient, eugenol) in 17°C freshwater for durations up to 1440 min, 100 and 250 mg l(-1) AQUI-S(®) 20E for durations up to 240 min, and 500 and 1000 mg l(-1) AQUI-S(®) 20E for durations up to 90 min. Fish exposed to 100 mg l(-1) AQUI-S(®) 20E for durations of 30, 60, 120 and 240 min had the greatest eugenol concentrations in the fillet tissue, 50, 58, 54 and 62 µg g(-1), respectively. All other exposure concentrations and durations resulted in significantly lower eugenol concentrations, i.e. all < 39 µg g(-1).

  17. PXR (NR1I2): splice variants in human tissues, including brain, and identification of neurosteroids and nicotine as PXR activators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamba, Vishal; Yasuda, Kazuto; Lamba, Jatinder K.; Assem, Mahfoud; Davila, Julio; Strom, Stephen; Schuetz, Erin G.

    2004-01-01

    To gain insight on the expression of pregnane X receptor (PXR), we analyzed PXR.1 and PXR alternatively spliced transcripts in a panel of 36 human tissues. PXR.1 was expressed in many more tissues than previously determined, including human bone marrow and select regions of the human brain. In each of these tissues, we observed alternative splicing of various exons of PXR that generated multiple distinct PXR isoforms. The most abundant PXR alternative mRNA transcripts lacked 111 nucleotides, deleting 37 amino acids from the PXR LBD (PXR.2), or lacked 123 nt, deleting 41 amino acids from the PXR LBD (PXR.3). CYP3A4, a gene transcriptionally regulated by PXR, showed incomplete overlap with PXR in its tissue distribution. Quantitation of PXR mRNAs in human liver demonstrated that PXR.2 and PXR.3 represented 6.7% and 0.32% of total PXR mRNA transcripts. Brain expression of PXR prompted analysis of whether some brain acting chemicals were PXR ligands. The neurosteroids allopregnanolone and pregnanolone activated PXR and induced transcription of a CYP3A4-luciferase reporter. Nicotine, the psychoactive and addictive chemical in cigarettes, and a known inducer of brain CYP2B6, was an efficacious activator of PXR and inducer of CYP3A4 transcription. Because nicotine activation of PXR will enhance metabolism of nicotine to the non-psychoactive cotinine, these results provide one molecular mechanism for the development of tolerance to nicotine. Moreover, the identification of PXR in many human tissues, such as brain, and activation by tissue specific ligands (such as neurosteroids) suggests additional biological roles for this receptor in these tissues

  18. PXR (NR1I2): splice variants in human tissues, including brain, and identification of neurosteroids and nicotine as PXR activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Vishal; Yasuda, Kazuto; Lamba, Jatinder K; Assem, Mahfoud; Davila, Julio; Strom, Stephen; Schuetz, Erin G

    2004-09-15

    To gain insight on the expression of pregnane X receptor (PXR), we analyzed PXR.1 and PXR alternatively spliced transcripts in a panel of 36 human tissues. PXR.1 was expressed in many more tissues than previously determined, including human bone marrow and select regions of the human brain. In each of these tissues, we observed alternative splicing of various exons of PXR that generated multiple distinct PXR isoforms. The most abundant PXR alternative mRNA transcripts lacked 111 nucleotides, deleting 37 amino acids from the PXR LBD (PXR.2), or lacked 123 nt, deleting 41 amino acids from the PXR LBD (PXR.3). CYP3A4, a gene transcriptionally regulated by PXR, showed incomplete overlap with PXR in its tissue distribution. Quantitation of PXR mRNAs in human liver demonstrated that PXR.2 and PXR.3 represented 6.7% and 0.32% of total PXR mRNA transcripts. Brain expression of PXR prompted analysis of whether some brain acting chemicals were PXR ligands. The neurosteroids allopregnanolone and pregnanolone activated PXR and induced transcription of a CYP3A4-luciferase reporter. Nicotine, the psychoactive and addictive chemical in cigarettes, and a known inducer of brain CYP2B6, was an efficacious activator of PXR and inducer of CYP3A4 transcription. Because nicotine activation of PXR will enhance metabolism of nicotine to the non-psychoactive cotinine, these results provide one molecular mechanism for the development of tolerance to nicotine. Moreover, the identification of PXR in many human tissues, such as brain, and activation by tissue specific ligands (such as neurosteroids) suggests additional biological roles for this receptor in these tissues.

  19. Injury induces in vivo expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGF receptor mRNAs in skin epithelial cells and PDGF mRNA in connective tissue fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniades, H.N.; Galanopoulos, T.; Neville-Golden, J.; Kiritsy, C.P.; Lynch, S.E.

    1991-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates many of the processes important in tissue repair, including proliferation of fibroblasts and synthesis of extracellular matrices. In this study, the authors have demonstrated with in situ hydridization and immunocytochemistry the reversible expression of 3-sis/PDGF-2 and PDGF receptor (PDGF-R) b mRNAs and their respective protein products in epithelial cells and fibroblasts following cutaneous injury in pigs. Epithelial cells in control, unwounded skin did not express c-sis and PDGF-R mRNAs, and fibroblasts expressed only PDGF-R mRNA. The expression levels in the injured site were correlated with the stage of tissue repair, being highest during the initial stages of the repair process and declining at the time of complete re-epithelialization and tissue remodeling. These studies provide a mulecular basis for understanding the mechanisms contributing to normal tissue repair. They suggest the possibility that a defect in these mechanisms may be associated with defective wound healing. It is also conceivable that chronic injury may induce irreversible gene expression leading to pathologic, unregulated cell growth

  20. Reconstructing in-vivo reflectance spectrum of pigmented skin lesion by Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; He, Qingli; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2012-03-01

    In dermatology applications, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been extensively investigated as a promising tool for the noninvasive method to distinguish melanoma from benign pigmented skin lesion (nevus), which is concentrated with the skin chromophores like melanin and hemoglobin. We carried out a theoretical study to examine melanin distribution in human skin tissue and establish a practical optical model for further pigmented skin investigation. The theoretical simulation was using junctional nevus as an example. A multiple layer skin optical model was developed on established anatomy structures of skin, the published optical parameters of different skin layers, blood and melanin. Monte Carlo simulation was used to model the interaction between excitation light and skin tissue and rebuild the diffuse reflectance process from skin tissue. A testified methodology was adopted to determine melanin contents in human skin based on in vivo diffuse reflectance spectra. The rebuild diffuse reflectance spectra were investigated by adding melanin into different layers of the theoretical model. One of in vivo reflectance spectra from Junctional nevi and their surrounding normal skin was studied by compare the ratio between nevus and normal skin tissue in both the experimental and simulated diffuse reflectance spectra. The simulation result showed a good agreement with our clinical measurements, which indicated that our research method, including the spectral ratio method, skin optical model and modifying the melanin content in the model, could be applied in further theoretical simulation of pigmented skin lesions.

  1. Thermal wave propagation in blood perfused tissues under hyperthermia treatment for unique oscillatory heat flux at skin surface and appropriate initial condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Jaideep; Kundu, Balaram

    2018-05-01

    This paper aims to develop an analytical study of heat propagation in biological tissues for constant and variable heat flux at the skin surface correlated with Hyperthermia treatment. In the present research work we have attempted to impose two unique kind of oscillating boundary condition relevant to practical aspect of the biomedical engineering while the initial condition is constructed as spatially dependent according to a real life situation. We have implemented Laplace's Transform method (LTM) and Green Function (GFs) method to solve single phase lag (SPL) thermal wave model of bioheat equation (TWMBHE). This research work strongly focuses upon the non-invasive therapy by employing oscillating heat flux. The heat flux at the skin surface is considered as constant, sinusoidal, and cosine forms. A comparative study of the impact of different kinds of heat flux on the temperature field in living tissue explored that sinusoidal heat flux will be more effective if the time of therapeutic heating is high. Cosine heating is also applicable in Hyperthermia treatment due to its precision in thermal waveform. The result also emphasizes that accurate observation must be required for the selection of phase angle and frequency of oscillating heat flux. By possible comparison with the published experimental research work and published mathematical study we have experienced a difference in temperature distribution as 5.33% and 4.73%, respectively. A parametric analysis has been devoted to suggest an appropriate procedure of the selection of important design variables in viewpoint of an effective heating in hyperthermia treatment.

  2. TSG-6 released from intradermally injected mesenchymal stem cells accelerates wound healing and reduces tissue fibrosis in murine full-thickness skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yu; Jiang, Dongsheng; Sindrilaru, Anca; Stegemann, Agatha; Schatz, Susanne; Treiber, Nicolai; Rojewski, Markus; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Vander Beken, Seppe; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Böhm, Markus; Seitz, Andreas; Scholz, Natalie; Dürselen, Lutz; Brinckmann, Jürgen; Ignatius, Anita; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2014-02-01

    Proper activation of macrophages (Mφ) in the inflammatory phase of acute wound healing is essential for physiological tissue repair. However, there is a strong indication that robust Mφ inflammatory responses may be causal for the fibrotic response always accompanying adult wound healing. Using a complementary approach of in vitro and in vivo studies, we here addressed the question of whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-due to their anti-inflammatory properties-would control Mφ activation and tissue fibrosis in a murine model of full-thickness skin wounds. We have shown that the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated protein 6 (TSG-6) released from MSCs in co-culture with activated Mφ or following injection into wound margins suppressed the release of TNF-α from activated Mφ and concomitantly induced a switch from a high to an anti-fibrotic low transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)/TGF-β3 ratio. This study provides insight into what we believe to be a previously undescribed multifaceted role of MSC-released TSG-6 in wound healing. MSC-released TSG-6 was identified to improve wound healing by limiting Mφ activation, inflammation, and fibrosis. TSG-6 and MSC-based therapies may thus qualify as promising strategies to enhance tissue repair and to prevent excessive tissue fibrosis.

  3. Skin graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin transplant; Skin autografting; FTSG; STSG; Split thickness skin graft; Full thickness skin graft ... donor site. Most people who are having a skin graft have a split-thickness skin graft. This takes ...

  4. Improved application of the electrophoretic tissue clearing technology, CLARITY, to intact solid organs including brain, pancreas, liver, kidney, lung, and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunsu; Park, Jae-Hyung; Seo, Incheol; Park, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Shin

    2014-12-21

    Mapping of tissue structure at the cellular, circuit, and organ-wide scale is important for understanding physiological and biological functions. A bio-electrochemical technique known as CLARITY used for three-dimensional anatomical and phenotypical mapping within transparent intact tissues has been recently developed. This method provided a major advance in understanding the structure-function relationships in circuits of the nervous system and organs by using whole-body clearing. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to improve the original CLARITY procedure and developed specific CLARITY protocols for various intact organs. We determined the optimal conditions for reducing bubble formation, discoloration, and depositing of black particles on the surface of tissue, which allowed production of clearer organ images. We also determined the appropriate replacement cycles of clearing solution for each type of organ, and convincingly demonstrated that 250-280 mA is the ideal range of electrical current for tissue clearing. We then acquired each type of cleared organs including brain, pancreas, liver, lung, kidney, and intestine. Additionally, we determined the images of axon fibers of hippocampal region, the Purkinje layer of cerebellum, and vessels and cellular nuclei of pancreas. CLARITY is an innovative biochemical technology for the structural and molecular analysis of various types of tissue. We developed improved CLARITY methods for clearing of the brain, pancreas, lung, intestine, liver, and kidney, and identified the appropriate experimental conditions for clearing of each specific tissue type. These optimized methods will be useful for the application of CLARITY to various types of organs.

  5. Skin and soft-tissue infections in suburban primary care: epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and observations on abscess management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boggs John

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports from urban medical centers suggest that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has become the most common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs. Risk factors for MRSA have been identified but have not been clinically useful. Findings From May 2006-April 2007, we performed an observational study of 529 SSTIs among ambulatory patients in the urgent care departments of a large suburban primary-care practice. SSTIs were included if they produced pus or fluid. The proportion of MRSA was determined overall (defined as prevalence and by SSTI diagnosis. Potential risk factors for MRSA were examined with multivariate analysis, and descriptive statistics were generated for follow-up and abscess management. The prevalence of MRSA was 22% and did not rise during the study. MRSA was isolated from 36% of abscesses, 15% of cellulitis, and 14% of other SSTIs. Independent risk factors for MRSA included a prior history of MRSA (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 41.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11.4-147.3, a close contact with prior MRSA (aOR, 12.83; 95% CI, 4.2-39.2, erythema ≥10 cm (aOR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.5-4.4, and abscess diagnosis (aOR, 3.19; 95% CI, 2.1-5.0. Prior MRSA had a positive predictive value of 88% for current MRSA. When both abscess diagnosis and erythema ≥10 cm were present, the proportion of MRSA was 59%. The vast majority of SSTIs (96 percent resolved or improved within one week. Most abscesses, even small ones, were treated with antibiotics. Resource utilization was highest in those abscesses with erythema ≥10 cm. Conclusions The prevalence of MRSA is relatively low among SSTIs in suburban primary care. However, MRSA is common in the subgroup of abscesses with large erythema. While the effectiveness of adjunctive antibiotic therapy for large abscesses is unknown, drugs chosen for these infections should be active against MRSA. Most non-abscess SSTIs do not require treatment with a MRSA

  6. Tigecycline Susceptibility Trends Among Pathogens Isolated from Complicated Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections in North and Latin America: 2012–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, Daryl; Renteria, Martha; Leister-Tebbe, Heidi; Sahm, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The Tigecycline Evaluation Surveillance Trial (TEST) monitors the activity of tigecycline and other antimicrobials against clinically-relevant pathogens collected globally. This study reports the activity of tigecycline (TGC) against Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates collected in North and Latin America from patients with complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (CSSTI). Methods Hospital sites from North America (NA) and Latin America (LA) collected non-duplicate clinical Gram-positive and -negative isolates from various complicated skin and skin structure infection sources during 2012–2016. Organism identification and antibiotic susceptibility (S) testing was performed by the local laboratories. Susceptibility testing was determined using the broth microdilution method according to CLSI guidelines and categorical interpretation of results was done using CLSI or FDA (tigecycline) breakpoint criteria where appropriate. Cefoxitin disk testing was performed for all S. aureus to determine methicillin susceptibility (i.e., MRSA and MSSA). Results The table provides %S and MIC90 data for TGC against CSSTI isolates Region, n, %S, MIC 90 (µg/ml) North America Latin America Organism n %S MIC 90 n %S MIC 90 S. aureus 2270 100 0.12 310 100 0.25 Enterobacter spp. 925 96.4 1 159 92.5 2 P. aeruginosa 758 na* > 8 165 na > 8 E. coli 716 99.9 0.25 241 100 0.25 Enterococcus spp. 691 99.3 0.12 135 100 0.12 S. agalactiae 503 100 0.12 58 100 0.06 K. pneumoniae 471 94.9 2 152 91.5 2 S. marcescens 347 96.8 2 67 97.0 2 A. baumannii 310 na* 2 97 na 1 K. oxytoca 204 99.0 0.5 15 100 1 *na = not applicable or no breakpoints available for this species. Conclusion Based on %S and MIC90 data TGC exhibited potent activity against isolates of all organism groups from complicated skin and soft-tissue infections, regardless of the geographic region. However, given the potential many of these organisms have for developing resistance, continued and careful

  7. Antibacterial Treatment of Meticillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Complicated Skin and Soft Tissue Infections: a Cost and Budget Impact Analysis in Greek Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasakis, Kostas; Petrakis, Ioannis; Ollandezos, Mark; Tsoulas, Christos; Patel, Dipen A; Karampli, Eleftheria; Kyriopoulos, John

    2014-12-01

    Meticillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of antimicrobial-resistant infections worldwide. Its prevalence remains high in the Greek hospital setting. Complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) due to MRSA are associated with prolonged hospitalization, additional healthcare costs and significant morbidity. The purpose of this study was to conduct a cost analysis and a budget impact analysis relative to different management scenarios for MRSA-cSSTIs from a hospital perspective. Equal efficacy was assumed for the pharmacotherapies under evaluation and resource use was elicited via an expert panel of seven local infectious disease specialists. The model was based on a previously published economic model that was adapted for the Greek hospital setting and included a decision tree for the management of hospitalized patients with MRSA-cSSTIs, which simulated costs and outcomes for the duration of hospitalization according to the therapeutic scenario. Inpatient costs consisted of hospitalization, diagnostic/laboratory testing, physician visits and antibiotic treatment. Current economic impact of MRSA-cSSTIs for the inpatient setting in Greek hospitals was estimated at €29,196,218. Total per patient cost according to first-line agent was €2,457, €2,762, €2,850, €3,494 and €3,094 and mean length of stay was 9.2, 12.5, 10.3, 13.0 and 14.0 days for linezolid, vancomycin, daptomycin, tigecycline, and teicoplanin, respectively. An estimated 10,287 MRSA-cSSTI patients are treated annually in Greek hospitals. Thus, increasing the use of linezolid by 11% over a 3-year period (current use 19%; 3 year projection 30%), for the management of MRSA-cSSTIs, could result in 3-year savings of €896,065. Management of MRSA-cSSTI requires intensive resource use; overall healthcare costs differ according to the chosen first-line treatment. In light of considerable budget constraints, development of hospital strategies which facilitate

  8. Safety and tolerability of tigecycline for the treatment of complicated skin and soft-tissue and intra-abdominal infections: an analysis based on five European observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirao, Xavier; Sánchez García, Miguel; Bassetti, Matteo; Bodmann, Klaus Friedrich; Dupont, Hervé; Montravers, Philippe; Heizmann, Wolfgang R; Capparella, Maria Rita; Simoneau, Damien; Eckmann, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Tigecycline is approved for the treatment of complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTIs) and complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs) in adults. In this analysis the safety and tolerability profile of tigecycline (used alone or in combination) for the treatment of patients with approved indications of cSSTI and cIAI were examined under real-life clinical conditions. Individual patient-level data were pooled from five European observational studies (July 2006 to October 2011). A total of 254 cSSTI and 785 cIAI patients were included. The mean age was 63 years; 34.4% and 56.6% were in intensive care units, 90.9% and 88.1% had at least one comorbidity and mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores at the beginning of treatment were 15.0 ± 7.9 and 16.9 ± 7.6, respectively. Data on adverse events (AEs) were available for 198 cSSTI and 590 cIAI patients in three studies. Nausea and vomiting were reported in ≤ 2% of patients. The most common serious AEs were multi-organ failure (4.0% and 10.0% in cSSTI and cIAI patients, respectively) and sepsis (4.0% and 6.1%, respectively). Death was recorded for 24/254 (9.4%) cSSTI and 147/785 (18.7%) cIAI patients. Mortality rates were higher in the group with a baseline APACHE II score of >15 compared with those with a score of ≤ 15 (18.7% versus 3.5% for cSSTI patients and 23.8% versus 16.0% for cIAI patients). A similar trend was seen when cIAI patients were stratified by Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. The safety and tolerability of tigecycline, alone and in combination, are consistent with the level of critical illness among patients in these real-life studies.

  9. 'Care and Prevent': rationale for investigating skin and soft tissue infections and AA amyloidosis among people who inject drugs in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M; Brathwaite, R; McGowan, Catherine R; Ciccarone, D; Gilchrist, G; McCusker, M; O'Brien, K; Dunn, J; Scott, J; Hope, V

    2018-05-08

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among people who inject drugs (PWID). International data indicate up to one third of PWID have experienced an SSTI within the past month. Complications include sepsis, endocarditis and amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis. AA amyloidosis is a serious sequela of chronic SSTI among PWID. Though there is a paucity of literature reporting on AA amyloidosis among PWID, what has been published suggests there is likely a causal relationship between AA amyloidosis and injecting-related SSTI. If left untreated, AA amyloidosis can lead to renal failure; premature mortality among diagnosed PWID is high. Early intervention may reverse disease. Despite the high societal and individual burden of SSTI among PWID, empirical evidence on the barriers and facilitators to injecting-related SSTI prevention and care or the feasibility and acceptability of AA amyloidosis screening and treatment referral are limited. This study aims to fill these gaps and assess the prevalence of AA amyloidosis among PWID. Care and Prevent is a UK National Institute for Health Research-funded mixed-methods study. In five phases (P1-P5), we aim to assess the evidence for AA amyloidosis among PWID (P1); assess the feasibility of AA amyloidosis screening, diagnostic and treatment referral among PWID in London (P2); investigate the barriers and facilitators to AA amyloidosis care (P3); explore SSTI protection and risk (P4); and co-create harm reduction resources with the affected community (P5). This paper describes the conceptual framework, methodological design and proposed analysis for the mixed-methods multi-phase study. We are implementing the Care and Prevent protocol in London. The systematic review component of the study has been completed and published. Care and Prevent will generate an estimate of AA amyloidosis prevalence among community recruited PWID in London, with implications for the development of screening

  10. Model for end-stage liver disease (MELD score as a predictor and monitor of mortality in patients with Vibrio vulnificus necrotizing skin and soft tissue infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chin Huang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio vulnificus necrotizing skin and soft tissue infections (VNSSTIs usually predispose patients with or without preexisting liver disease to septic shock, and then evolve to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS, thus resulting in high mortality in humans. However, clinicians do not have a valid prediction model to provide a reliable estimate of case-fatality rate when caring for these acutely and/or critically ill patients.We retrospectively analyzed 39 consecutive patients with VNSSTIs (mean age: 65.7 ± 11.3 years at our institution between 2007 and 2010. All patients were treated with the same protocol. Demographic and clinical characteristics, disease severity on admission, treatment details, and outcomes were collected for each patient and extracted for analyses. We studied the predictive value of the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD, modified MELD including sodium (MELD-Na, and laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis (LRINEC scores for case-fatality. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analyses were performed. The mean MELD, MELD-Na and LRINEC scores on admission were 15.1 ± 1.1, 17.7 ± 1.1, and 3.4 ± 0.4 points, respectively. After admission, these patients had temporary or progressive deterioration of nearly all their scores and lab values. The area under the ROC curve for the MELD and ΔMELD scoring models were 0.929 (p = 0.002 and 0.897 (p = 0.005, respectively. An optimal MELD/ΔMELD cutoff value ≥ 20/2 had a good sensitivity and specificity (all > 80%, with a 64/13-fold increased odds for case-fatality. Additionally, the development of severe forms of anemia (p = 0.014 and hypoalbuminemia (p = 0.019 were associated with an increased case-fatality rate.The MELD/ΔMELD scoring model is an effective risk stratification indicator at the time of admission and also an excellent condition monitor during hospitalization for medical care of acutely and/or critically ill patients

  11. Tissue-resident memory CD8+ T cells continuously patrol skin epithelia to quickly recognize local antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariotti, S.; Beltman, J.B.; Chodaczek, G.; Hoekstra, M.E.; van Beek, A.E.; Gomez-Eerland, R.; Ritsma, L.; van Rheenen, J.; Maree, A.F.; Zal, T.; de Boer, R.J.; Haanen, J.B.; Schumacher, T.N.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that following the clearance of infection a stable population of memory T cells remains present in peripheral organs and contributes to the control of secondary infections. However, little is known about how tissue-resident memory T cells behave in situ and how they

  12. Tissue engineering of ligaments : A comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eijk, F; Riesle, J; Willems, WJ; Van Blitterswijk, CA; Verbout, AJ; Dhert, WJA

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell

  13. Different types of stainless steel used in equipment in meat plants do not affect the initial microbial transfer, including pathogens, from pork skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larivière-Gauthier, Guillaume; Quessy, Sylvain; Fournaise, Sylvain; Letellier, Ann; Fravalo, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    This study describes and measures the impact of different compositions and finishes of stainless steel used in equipment in the meat industry on the transfer of natural flora and selected pathogens from artificially contaminated pork skin. It is known that the adhesion to surfaces of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella, 2 pathogens frequently found in contaminated pork meat, depends on the nature and roughness of the surface. Our results show no statistically significant differences in microbial transfer regardless of the types of stainless steel considered, with the highest measured transfer difference being 0.18 log colony-forming units (CFUs)/800 cm(2). Moreover, no differences in total microbial community were observed after transfer on the 5 types of stainless steel using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). It was concluded that the different characteristics of the stainless steel tested did not affect the initial bacterial transfer in this study.

  14. Innate lymphoid cells and the skin

    OpenAIRE

    Salimi, Maryam; Ogg, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells are an emerging family of effector cells that contribute to lymphoid organogenesis, metabolism, tissue remodelling and protection against infections. They maintain homeostatic immunity at barrier surfaces such as lung, skin and gut (Nature 464:1367?1371, 2010, Nat Rev Immunol 13: 145?149, 2013). Several human and mouse studies suggest a role for innate lymphoid cells in inflammatory skin conditions including atopic eczema and psoriasis. Here we review the innate lymphoid...

  15. GC and GC-MS studies of the effects of gamma-irradiation on olive oil and chicken skin tissue fat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuominen, J.; Kiutamo, T.; Sjoeberg, A.M.; Leinonen

    1991-01-01

    Reduction of the microbial cell count in a frozen packaged chicken by ionizing radiation is an advantageous method with a microbiologically optimum dose of 4 kGy (5). However, the detection of irradiation in poultry is a problem in food analysis. Our study focused on to the possible changes in the fatty acid composition and formation of long-chain hydrocarbons in the chicken fat. The composition of chicken fat is complex. Therefore, our study was started with some pure fatty acids and a vegetable oil consisting mainly of triglycerides of fatty acids and having, qualitatively, the same fatty acids as the chicken. Pure olive oil (a retail oil from Italy) was chosen for the purpose. Later, also fat extracted from chicken skin was analysed. All samples were analysed as irradiated and non-irradiated. The results show that no new radiolytically induced fatty acids or other related compounds could be detected by using a BP-21 polar capillary column and flame ionization detector. Moreover, the composition of the major fatty acids remained constant. In the qualitative analysis of hydrocarbons produced by irradiation, it was shown that there is a distinct difference in the hydrocarbon pattern between non-irradiated and irradiated chicken skin tissues. (5 figs, 2 tabs, 6 refs)

  16. Hyaluronic acid/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) core/shell fiber meshes loaded with epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate as skin tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Linhua; Jin, Oh Seong; Shin, Yong Cheol; Sang, Jin Oh; Lee, Jaebeom; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Han, Dong-Wook

    2014-11-01

    In this study, hyaluronic acid (HA)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) core/shell fiber meshes loaded with epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) (HA/PLGA-E) for application to tissue engineering scaffolds for skin regeneration were prepared via coaxial electrospinning. Physicochemical properties of HA/PLGA-E core/shell fiber meshes were characterized by SEM, Raman spectroscopy, contact angle, EGCG release profiling and in vitro degradation. Biomechanical properties of HA/PLGA-E meshes were also investigated by a tensile strength test. SEM images showed that HA/PLGA-E fiber meshes had a three-dimensional interconnected pore structure with an average fiber diameter of about 1270 nm. Raman spectra revealed that EGCG was uniformly dispersed in the PLGA shell of meshes. HA/PLGA-E meshes showed sustained EGCG release patterns by controlled diffusion and PLGA degradation over 4 weeks. EGCG loading did not adversely affect the tensile strength and elastic modulus of HA/PLGA meshes, while increased their hydrophilicity and surface energy. Attachment of human dermal fibroblasts on HA/PLGA-E meshes was appreciably increased and their proliferation was steadily retained during the culture period. These results suggest that HA/PLGA-E core/shell fiber meshes can be potentially used as scaffolds supporting skin regeneration.

  17. Modification of the radiation response of pig skin by manipulation of tissue oxygen tension using anesthetics and administration of BW12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van den Aardweg, G.J.; Hopewell, J.W.; Barnes, D.W.; Sansom, J.M.; Nethersell, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of tissue oxygen tension on radiosensitivity was studied by examining modifications in the incidence of moist desquamation in pig skin after irradiation with strontium-90 plaques. The effects were analyzed using quantal dose-response data and comparisons were made using ED50 values for moist desquamation. Under standard anesthetic conditions of 2% halothane, approximately 70% oxygen, and approximately 30% nitrous oxide, the ED50 value (+/- SE) for moist desquamation was 27.32 +/- 0.52 Gy with no significant variation in radiosensitivity between dorsal, lateral, and ventral skin sites on the flank. Irradiation with 2% halothane and air increased the ED50 to 31.25 +/- 0.94 Gy, primarily due to an increased radioresistance of the dorsal sites. When combined with BW12C, a drug which binds oxygen selectively to hemoglobin and hence reduced the oxygen availability to tissues, a further increase in the ED50 values was observed. This was approximately 39 Gy with BW12C concentrations of 30 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg b.w. of BW12C, indicating a dose modification factor (DMF) of approximately 1.26. However, when animals were breathing the standard gas mixture, this DMF was reduced to 1.15 for 30 mg/kg of BW12C, indicating that a higher level of oxygen partly counteracted the effects of the drug in these studies with BW12C. The greatest variability in radiosensitivity was seen in the dorsal fields. This suggested complex physiological adaptation, a phenomenon that might also explain the absence of any modification of the radiation response when 100 mg/kg of BW12C was used

  18. Polymer scaffolds with no skin-effect for tissue engineering applications fabricated by thermally induced phase separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasoju, Naresh; Kubies, Dana; Sedlačík, Tomáš; Janoušková, Olga; Koubková, Jana; Kumorek, Marta M.; Rypáček, František

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2016), 015002_1-015002_13 ISSN 1748-6041 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : tissue engineering * porous scaffolds * thermally induced phase separation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.469, year: 2016

  19. Acute effects of nicotine and smoking on blood flow, tissue oxygen, and aerobe metabolism of the skin and subcutis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Stig; Petersen, Lars J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nicotine released from tobacco smoke causing reduction in blood flow has been suggested as causative for postoperative wound complications in smokers, but the mechanism remains unknown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In eight healthy male smokers and eight ex-smokers, the cutaneous and subcut......BACKGROUND: Nicotine released from tobacco smoke causing reduction in blood flow has been suggested as causative for postoperative wound complications in smokers, but the mechanism remains unknown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In eight healthy male smokers and eight ex-smokers, the cutaneous...... and subcutaneous blood flow (QBF, SqBF) was assessed by Laser Doppler and 133Xe clearance. Tissue oxygen tension (TO(2)) was measured by a LICOX O(2)-electrode. Tissue glucose and lactate (Tgluc, Tlact) were assessed by microdialysis. The parameters were studied after intravenous infusion of 1.0 mg nicotine......, smoking of one cigarette, arterial occlusion, and reperfusion. RESULTS: Nicotine infusion decreased SqBF from 4.2 +/- 2.0 to 3.1 +/- 1.2 mL/100 g tissue/min (P

  20. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  1. Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells Maintain Immune Homeostasis in Skin by Activating Skin Resident Regulatory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneschal, Julien; Clark, Rachael A.; Gehad, Ahmed; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the skin of a normal individual contains 10-20 billion resident memory T cells ( which include various T helper, T cytotoxic, and T regulatory subsets, that are poised to respond to environmental antigens. Using only autologous human tissues, we report that both in vitro and in vivo, resting epidermal Langerhan cells (LC) selectively and specifically induced the activation and proliferation of skin resident regulatory T cells (Treg), a minor subset of skin resident memory T cells. In the presence of foreign pathogen, however, the same LC activated and induced proliferation of effector memory T (Tem) cells and limited Treg cells activation. These underappreciated properties of LC: namely maintenance of tolerance in normal skin, and activation of protective skin resident memory T cells upon infectious challenge, help clarify the role of LC in skin. PMID:22560445

  2. An optimized method for fatty acid analysis, including quantification of trans fatty acids, in human adipose tissue by gas-liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Anette; Cold, S; Hølmer, Gunhild Kofoed

    1999-01-01

    Considering the need for a quick direct method for measurement of the fatty acid composition including trans isomers ofhuman adipose tissue we have developed a procedure using gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) alone, which is thussuitable for validation of fatty acid status in epidemiological studies...... for 25 min, and finally raised at 25 degrees C/min to 225 degrees C. The trans and cis isomers of18:1 were well separated from each other, as shown by silver-ion thin-layer chromatography. Verification by standardsshowed that the trans 18:1 isomers with a double bond in position 12 or lower were...

  3. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm, Martin C., Jr.; Austen, William G., Jr.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-05-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases.

  4. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm Jr., Martin C.; Austen Jr., William G.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases. PMID:25965851

  5. Superficial skin ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaila, Modupeola O.; Rafindadi, Abdulmumini H.; Oluwole, Olabode P.; Adewuyi, Sunday A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to determine the underlying cause of superficial skin ulcers over a 15-year period. A retrospective histopathological analysis of 670 cases of superficial skin ulcers diagnosed in the Dept. of Pathology, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria from January 1991 to December 2005. A total of 670 superficial skin ulcers were analyzed. The mail to female gender ratio was 409:261(1.5:1.0) and a peakage frequency of 44.3 %( 297) in the 5th and 6th decades. Spectrum of lesions encountered was categorized into inflammatory, infections, benign and malignant diseases. The malignant lesions were 309 (46.1%), non-specific inflammation 302 (45.1%), granulation tissue 25 (3.7%) and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia 14 (2.1%). A total of 18(2.7%) specific infections were encountered, which included bacterial, fungal and viral infection. Benign lesions were 2(0.3%), comprising of neurofibroma and Bowen's disease. The most common malignant lesion was squamous cell carcinoma 203 (30.3%) with a male to female ratio of 128:75 (1.7:1.0). Of these 161 were well differentiated tumors. The lower limb was the prevalent site distribution of all the ulcers. Superficial ulcers may be harbinger of malignant diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma remains the most common malignant lesion arising from chronic superficial ulcers from our setting. Adequate tissue biopsy and early diagnosis may reduce the attendant morbidity of these ulcers. (author)

  6. Trends of reactive hyperaemia responses to repetitive loading on skin tissue of rats - Implications for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapp, Jong-Heng; Kamil, Raja; Rozi, M; Mohtarrudin, Norhafizah; Loqman, M Y; Ezamin, A R; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Abu Bakar, Zuki

    2017-08-01

    Tissue recovery is important in preventing tissue deterioration, which is induced by pressure and may lead to pressure ulcers (PU). Reactive hyperaemia (RH) is an indicator used to identify people at risk of PU. In this study, the effect of different recovery times on RH trend is investigated during repetitive loading. Twenty-one male Sprague-Dawley rats (seven per group), with body weight of 385-485 g, were categorised into three groups and subjected to different recovery times with three repetitive loading cycles. The first, second, and third groups were subjected to short (3 min), moderate (10 min), and prolonged (40 min) recovery, respectively, while fixed loading time and pressure (10 min and 50 mmHg, respectively). Peak hyperaemia was measured in the three cycles to determine trends associated with different recovery times. Three RH trends (increasing, decreasing, and inconsistent) were observed. As the recovery time is increased (3 min vs. 10 min vs. 40 min), the number of samples with increasing RH trend decreases (57% vs. 29% vs. 14%) and the number of samples with inconsistent RH trend increases (29% vs. 57% vs. 72%). All groups consists of one sample with decreasing RH trend (14%). Results confirm that different recovery times affect the RH trend during repetitive loading. The RH trend may be used to determine the sufficient recovery time of an individual to avoid PU development. Copyright © 2017 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bioprinting of skin constructs for wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    He, Peng; Zhao, Junning; Zhang, Jiumeng; Li, Bo; Gou, Zhiyuan; Gou, Maling; Li, Xiaolu

    2018-01-01

    Extensive burns and full-thickness skin wounds are difficult to repair. Autologous split-thickness skin graft (ASSG) is still used as the gold standard in the clinic. However, the shortage of donor skin tissues is a serious problem. A potential solution to this problem is to fabricate skin constructs using biomaterial scaffolds with or without cells. Bioprinting is being applied to address the need for skin tissues suitable for transplantation, and can lead to the development of skin equivale...

  8. Free Boomerang-shaped Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous flap: The longest possible skin/myocutaneous free flap for soft tissue reconstruction of extremities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok R Koul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A soft tissue defect requiring flap cover which is longer than that provided by the conventional "long" free flaps like latissimus dorsi (LD and anterolateral thigh (ALT flap is a challenging problem. Often, in such a situation, a combination of flaps is required. Over the last 3 years, we have managed nine such defects successfully with a free "Boomerang-shaped" Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous (BERAM flap. This flap is the slightly modified and "free" version of a similar flap described by Ian Taylor in 1983. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent free BERAM flap reconstruction of soft tissue defects of extremity over the last 3 years. We also did a clinical study on 30 volunteers to compare the length of flap available using our design of BERAM flap with the maximum available flap length of LD and ALT flaps, using standard markings. Results: Our clinical experience of nine cases combined with the results of our clinical study has confirmed that our design of BERAM flap consistently provides a flap length which is 32.6% longer than the standard LD flap and 42.2% longer than the standard ALT flap in adults. The difference is even more marked in children. The BERAM flap is consistently reliable as long as the distal end is not extended beyond the mid-axillary line. Conclusion: BERAM flap is simple in design, easy to harvest, reliable and provides the longest possible free skin/myocutaneous flap in the body. It is a useful new alternative for covering long soft tissue defects in the limbs.

  9. Free Boomerang-shaped Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous flap: The longest possible skin/myocutaneous free flap for soft tissue reconstruction of extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Ashok R; Nahar, Sushil; Prabhu, Jagdish; Kale, Subhash M; Kumar, Praveen H P

    2011-09-01

    A soft tissue defect requiring flap cover which is longer than that provided by the conventional "long" free flaps like latissimus dorsi (LD) and anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is a challenging problem. Often, in such a situation, a combination of flaps is required. Over the last 3 years, we have managed nine such defects successfully with a free "Boomerang-shaped" Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous (BERAM) flap. This flap is the slightly modified and "free" version of a similar flap described by Ian Taylor in 1983. This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent free BERAM flap reconstruction of soft tissue defects of extremity over the last 3 years. We also did a clinical study on 30 volunteers to compare the length of flap available using our design of BERAM flap with the maximum available flap length of LD and ALT flaps, using standard markings. Our clinical experience of nine cases combined with the results of our clinical study has confirmed that our design of BERAM flap consistently provides a flap length which is 32.6% longer than the standard LD flap and 42.2% longer than the standard ALT flap in adults. The difference is even more marked in children. The BERAM flap is consistently reliable as long as the distal end is not extended beyond the mid-axillary line. BERAM flap is simple in design, easy to harvest, reliable and provides the longest possible free skin/myocutaneous flap in the body. It is a useful new alternative for covering long soft tissue defects in the limbs.

  10. In-vivo optical imaging of hsp70 expression to assess collateral tissue damage associated with infrared laser ablation of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Opalenik, Susan R.; Beckham, Joshua T.; Mackanos, Mark A.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Contag, Christopher H.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2013-01-01

    Laser surgical ablation is achieved by selecting laser parameters that remove confined volumes of target tissue and cause minimal collateral damage. Previous studies have measured the effects of wavelength on ablation, but neglected to measure the cellular impact of ablation on cells outside the lethal zone. In this study, we use optical imaging in addition to conventional assessment techniques to evaluate lethal and sublethal collateral damage after ablative surgery with a free-electron laser (FEL). Heat shock protein (HSP) expression is used as a sensitive quantitative marker of sublethal damage in a transgenic mouse strain, with the hsp70 promoter driving luciferase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression (hsp70A1-L2G). To examine the wavelength dependence in the mid-IR, laser surgery is conducted on the hsp70A1-L2G mouse using wavelengths targeting water (OH stretch mode, 2.94 μm), protein (amide-II band, 6.45 μm), and both water and protein (amide-I band, 6.10 μm). For all wavelengths tested, the magnitude of hsp70 expression is dose-dependent and maximal 5 to 12 h after surgery. Tissues treated at 6.45 μm have approximately 4× higher hsp70 expression than 6.10 μm. Histology shows that under comparable fluences, tissue injury at the 2.94-μm wavelength was 2× and 3× deeper than 6.45 and 6.10 μm, respectively. The 6.10-μm wavelength generates the least amount of epidermal hyperplasia. Taken together, this data suggests that the 6.10-μm wavelength is a superior wavelength for laser ablation of skin. PMID:19021444

  11. In vivo skin characterization by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Caspers (Peter)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Various areas of skin research depend on detailed knowledge of the molecular composition of skin and molecular structure of skin constituents. On a microscopic scale the skin is a highly heterogeneous tissue. Molecular composition and structure vary

  12. Next generation human skin constructs as advanced tools for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, H E; Guo, Zongyou; Doucet, Yanne; Jacków, Joanna; Christiano, Angela

    2017-11-01

    Many diseases, as well as side effects of drugs, manifest themselves through skin symptoms. Skin is a complex tissue that hosts various specialized cell types and performs many roles including physical barrier, immune and sensory functions. Therefore, modeling skin in vitro presents technical challenges for tissue engineering. Since the first attempts at engineering human epidermis in 1970s, there has been a growing interest in generating full-thickness skin constructs mimicking physiological functions by incorporating various skin components, such as vasculature and melanocytes for pigmentation. Development of biomimetic in vitro human skin models with these physiological functions provides a new tool for drug discovery, disease modeling, regenerative medicine and basic research for skin biology. This goal, however, has long been delayed by the limited availability of different cell types, the challenges in establishing co-culture conditions, and the ability to recapitulate the 3D anatomy of the skin. Recent breakthroughs in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and microfabrication techniques such as 3D-printing have allowed for building more reliable and complex in vitro skin models for pharmaceutical screening. In this review, we focus on the current developments and prevailing challenges in generating skin constructs with vasculature, skin appendages such as hair follicles, pigmentation, immune response, innervation, and hypodermis. Furthermore, we discuss the promising advances that iPSC technology offers in order to generate in vitro models of genetic skin diseases, such as epidermolysis bullosa and psoriasis. We also discuss how future integration of the next generation human skin constructs onto microfluidic platforms along with other tissues could revolutionize the early stages of drug development by creating reliable evaluation of patient-specific effects of pharmaceutical agents. Impact statement Skin is a complex tissue that hosts various

  13. Monte Carlo study of skin optical clearing to enhance light penetration in the tissue: implications for photodynamic therapy of acne vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Genina, Elina A.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.

    2008-06-01

    Result of Monte Carlo simulations of skin optical clearing is presented. The model calculations were carried out with the aim of studying of spectral response of skin under immersion liquids action and calculation of enhancement of light penetration depth. In summary, we have shown that: 1) application of glucose, propylene glycol and glycerol produced significant decrease of light scattering in different skin layers; 2) maximal clearing effect will be obtained in case of optical clearing of skin dermis, however, absorbed light fraction in skin dermis changed insignificantly, independently on clearing agent and place it administration; 3) in contrast to it, the light absorbed fraction in skin adipose layer increased significantly in case of optical clearing of skin dermis. It is very important because it can be used for development of optical methods of obesity treatment; 4) optical clearing of superficial skin layers can be used for decreasing of power of light radiation used for treatment of acne vulgaris.

  14. Mantoux Tuberculin Skin Test

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Learn how to evaluate people for latent TB infection with the Mantoux tuberculin skin test. This podcast includes sections on administering and reading the Mantoux tuberculin skin test, the standard method for detecting latent TB infection since the 1930s.

  15. Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Your Skin KidsHealth / For Kids / Your Skin What's in this ... body) are really dead skin cells. Bye-Bye Skin Cells These old cells are tough and strong, ...

  16. A prospective, multicenter, observational study of complicated skin and soft tissue infections in hospitalized patients: clinical characteristics, medical treatment, and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipsky Benjamin A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs occur frequently, but limited data do not allow any consensus on an optimal treatment strategy. We designed this prospective, multicenter, observational study to to explore the current epidemiology, treatment, and resulting clinical outcomes of cSSTIs to help develop strategies to potentially improve outcomes. Methods From June 2008 to December 2009 we enrolled a pre-specified number of adults treated in 56 U.S. hospitals with intravenous antibiotic(s for any of the following cSSTIs: diabetic foot infection (DFI; surgical site infection (SSI; deep soft tissue abscess (DSTA; or, cellulitis. Investigators treated all patients per their usual practice during the study and collected data on a standardized form. Results We enrolled 1,033 patients (DFI 27%; SSI 32%; DSTA 14%; cellulitis 27%; mean age 54 years; 54% male, of which 74% had healthcare-associated risk factors. At presentation, 89% of patients received initial empiric therapy with intravenous antibiotics; ~20% of these patients had this empiric regimen changed or discontinued based on culture and sensitivity results. Vancomycin was the most frequently used initial intravenous antibiotic, ordered in 61% of cases. During their stay 44% of patients underwent a surgical procedure related to the study infection, usually incision and drainage or debridement. The mean length of stay was 7.1 days, ranging from 5.8 (DSTA to 8.1 (SSI. Conclusion Our findings from this large prospective observational study that characterized patients with cSSTIs from diverse US inpatient populations provide useful information on the current epidemiology, clinical management practices and outcomes of this common infection.

  17. Advances in plasma skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, K Wade; Moy, Ronald L; Fincher, Edgar F

    2008-09-01

    Plasma skin regeneration (PSR) is a novel method of resurfacing that uses plasma energy to create a thermal effect on the skin. PSR is different from lasers, light sources, and ablative lasers in that it is not chromophore dependent and does not vaporize tissue, but leaves a layer of intact, desiccated epidermis that acts as a natural biologic dressing and promotes wound healing and rapid recovery. Histological studies performed on plasma resurfacing patients have confirmed continued collagen production, reduction of elastosis, and progressive skin rejuvenation beyond 1 year after treatment. PSR has received US Food and Drug Administration 510 (k) clearance for treatment of rhytides of the body, superficial skin lesions, actinic keratoses, viral papillomata, and seborrheic keratoses. PSR also has beneficial effects in the treatment of other conditions including dyschromias, photoaging, skin laxity, and acne scars. The safety profile of PSR is excellent, and there have been no reports of demarcation lines in perioral, periorbital, or jawline areas, as can sometimes be observed following CO2 resurfacing. PSR is effective in improving facial and periorbital rhytides and can be used on nonfacial sites, including the hands, neck, and chest. Numerous treatment protocols with variable energy settings allow for individualized treatments and provide the operator with fine control over the degree of injury and length of subsequent recovery time.

  18. Oily skin: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Thais H; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-01-01

    Oily skin (seborrhea) is a common cosmetic problem that occurs when oversized sebaceous glands produce excessive amounts of sebum giving the appearance of shiny and greasy skin. This paper overviews the main concepts of sebaceous gland anatomy and physiology, including the biosynthesis, storage and release of sebum, as well as its relationship to skin hydration and water barrier function. We also address how skin oiliness may vary according to diet, age, gender, ethnicity and hot humid climates. The deeper understanding of this skin type provides the opportunity to better guide patients regarding skin care and also assist in the development of sebosuppressive agents. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Characterising the variations in ethnic skin colours: a new calibrated data base for human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, K; Yates, J M; Zardawi, F; Sueeprasan, S; Liao, N; Gill, L; Li, C; Wuerger, S

    2017-02-01

    Accurate skin colour measurements are important for numerous medical applications including the diagnosis and treatment of cutaneous disorders and the provision of maxillofacial soft tissue prostheses. In this study, we obtained accurate skin colour measurements from four different ethnic groups (Caucasian, Chinese, Kurdish, Thai) and at four different body locations (Forehead, cheek, inner arm, back of hand) with a view of establishing a new skin colour database for medical and cosmetic applications. Skin colours are measured using a spectrophotometer and converted to a device-independent standard colour appearance space (CIELAB) where skin colour is expressed as values along the three dimensions: Lightness L*, Redness a* and Yellowness b*. Skin colour differences and variation are then evaluated as a function of ethnicity and body location. We report three main results: (1) When plotted in a standard colour appearance space (CIELAB), skin colour distributions for the four ethnic groups overlap significantly, although there are systematic mean differences. Between ethnicities, the most significant skin colour differences occur along the yellowness dimension, with Thai skin exhibiting the highest yellowness (b*) value and Caucasian skin the lowest value. Facial redness (a*) is invariant across the four ethnic groups. (2) Between different body locations, there are significant variations in redness (a*), with the forehead showing the highest redness value and the inner arm the lowest. (3) The colour gamut is smallest in the Chinese sample and largest in the Caucasian sample, with the Chinese gamut lying entirely the Caucasian gamut. Similarly, the largest variability in skin tones is found in the Caucasian group, and the smallest in the Chinese group. Broadly speaking, skin colour variation can be explained by two main factors: individual differences in lightness and yellowness are mostly due to ethnicity, whereas differences in redness are primarily due to

  20. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections samples and healthy carriers in the Central Slovenia region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svent-Kucina, Natasa; Pirs, Mateja; Kofol, Romina; Blagus, Rok; Smrke, Dragica Maja; Bilban, Marjan; Seme, Katja

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is among the most important human pathogens. It is associated with different infections and is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). The aim of our study was to compare S. aureus isolates associated with SSTIs with isolates obtained from healthy carriers in the Central Slovenia region in terms of antimicrobial susceptibility, genetic diversity by clonal complex (CC)/sequence type, spa type, and by toxin gene profiling. In total, 274 S. aureus isolates were collected prospectively by culturing wound samples from 461 SSTI patients and nasal samples from 451 healthy carriers. We have demonstrated high heterogeneity in terms of CCs and spa type in both groups of isolates. The main clone among SSTI strains was Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene (pvl) positive CC121, whereas the main clone among carrier strains was CC45 carrying a large range of toxin genes. The main spa type in both groups was t091. Pvl was more frequently present in SSTI strains (31.2% SSTI vs 3.6% carrier strains) and staphylococcal enterotoxin C was more frequently present in carrier strains (1.6% SSTI vs 17.0% carrier strains). We have also demonstrated that methicillin-resistant S. aureus was a rare cause (2.8%) of SSTIs in our region. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Skin color independent assessment of aging using skin autofluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, M.; Nur, Erfan; Chunmao, Han; Lutgers, Helen L.; Links, Thera P.; Smit, Andries J.; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Graaff, Reindert

    2010-01-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) for the non-invasive assessment of the amount of accumulated tissue Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) increases with aging. In subjects with darker skin colors, measurements typically result in lower AF values than in subjects with fair skin colors, e.g. due to

  2. Skin color independent assessment of aging using skin autofluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, M.; Nur, E.; Chunmao, H.; Lutgers, H.L.; Links, T.P.; Smit, A.J.; Rakhorst, G.; de Graaff, R.

    2010-01-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) for the non-invasive assessment of the amount of accumulated tissue Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) increases with aging. In subjects with darker skin colors, measurements typically result in lower AF values than in subjects with fair skin colors, e. g. due to

  3. Neurotrophins in healthy and diseased skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, U; Kapp, A

    2010-04-01

    Understanding the complex mechanism of allergic inflammatory skin diseases has been a main challenge of clinical and experimental research for years. It is well known that the inflammatory response is also controlled by tissue resident cells including neurons and structural cells. Thus, allergic inflammation triggers neuronal dysfunction and structural changes in diseased skin. Prime candidates for the interaction between immune, structural, and neuronal cells are presented by neurotrophins. Neurotrophins have initially been described for their neurotrophic capacity. However, recent evidence emerges that neurotrophins display bidirectional interaction pathways in activating structural cells, immune cells in addition to neurons. Neurotrophins including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are upregulated in allergic inflammatory skin diseases. Further, structural cells, neurons and tissue resident cells have not only been shown to be a target but also a source of neurotrophin. In this regard, eosinophil granulocytes which are key target effector cells in chronic inflammatory skin have been identified as a target of neurotrophins but are also capable of neurotrophin production. Thus, neuroimmune interaction mechanisms in allergic inflammatory skin display a novel pathophysiological aspect in which neurotrophins serve as prime candidates for bidirectional interaction mechanisms. In this review, we provide an actual overview of neurotrophins in healthy and diseased skin with special emphasis on atopic dermatitis and therapeutic implications.

  4. A Perspective on the Interplay of Ultraviolet-Radiation, Skin Microbiome and Skin Resident Memory TCRαβ+ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VijayKumar Patra

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The human skin is known to be inhabited by diverse microbes, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, archaea, and mites. This microbiome exerts a protective role against infections by promoting immune development and inhibiting pathogenic microbes to colonize skin. One of the factors having an intense effect on the skin and its resident microbes is ultraviolet-radiation (UV-R. UV-R can promote or inhibit the growth of microbes on the skin and modulate the immune system which can be either favorable or harmful. Among potential UV-R targets, skin resident memory T cells (TRM stand as well positioned immune cells at the forefront within the skin. Both CD4+ or CD8+ αβ TRM cells residing permanently in peripheral tissues have been shown to play prominent roles in providing accelerated and long-lived specific immunity, tissue homeostasis, wound repair. Nevertheless, their response upon UV-R exposure or signals from microbiome are poorly understood compared to resident TCRγδ cells. Skin TRM survive for long periods of time and are exposed to innumerable antigens during lifetime. The interplay of TRM with skin residing microbes may be crucial in pathophysiology of various diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and polymorphic light eruption. In this article, we share our perspective about how UV-R may directly shape the persistence, phenotype, specificity, and function of skin TRM; and moreover, whether UV-R alters barrier function, leading to microbial-specific skin TRM, disrupting the healthy balance between skin microbiome and skin immune cells, and resulting in chronic inflammation and diseased skin.

  5. Management of defects on lower extremities with the use of matriderm and skin graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Young; Kim, Seong-Hun; Oh, Gwang-Jin; Roh, Si-Gyun; Lee, Nae-Ho; Yang, Kyung-Moo

    2014-07-01

    The reconstruction of large skin and soft tissue defects on the lower extremities is challenging. The skin graft is a simple and frequently used method for covering a skin defect. However, poor skin quality and architecture are well-known problems that lead to scar contracture. The collagen-elastin matrix, Matriderm, has been used to improve the quality of skin grafts; however, no statistical and objective review of the results has been reported. Thirty-four patients (23 male and 11 female) who previously received a skin graft and simultaneous application of Matriderm between January 2010 and June 2012 were included in this study. The quality of the skin graft was evaluated using Cutometer, occasionally accompanied by pathologic findings. All 34 patients showed good skin quality compared to a traditional skin graft and were satisfied with their results. The statistical data for the measurement of the mechanical properties of the skin were similar to those for normal skin. In addition, there was no change in the engraftment rate. The biggest problem of a traditional skin graft is scar contracture. However, the dermal matrix presents an improvement in skin quality with elastin and collagen. Therefore, a skin graft along with a simultaneous application of Matriderm is safe and effective and leads to a significantly better outcome from the perspective of skin elasticity.

  6. An Adhesive Patch-Based Skin Biopsy Device for Molecular Diagnostics and Skin Microbiome Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zuxu; Moy, Ronald; Allen, Talisha; Jansen, Burkhard

    2017-10-01

    A number of diagnoses in clinical dermatology are currently histopathologically confirmed and this image recognition-based confirmation generally requires surgical biopsies. The increasing ability of molecular pathology to corroborate or correct a clinical diagnosis based on objective gene expression, mutation analysis, or molecular microbiome data is on the horizon and would be further supported by a tool or procedure to collect samples non-invasively. This study characterizes such a tool in form of a 'bladeless' adhesive patch-based skin biopsy device. The performance of this device was evaluated through a variety of complementary technologies including assessment of sample biomass, electron microscopy demonstrating the harvesting of layers of epidermal tissue, and isolation of RNA and DNA from epidermal skin samples. Samples were obtained by application of adhesive patches to the anatomical area of interest. Biomass assessment demonstrated collection of approximately 0.3mg of skin tissue per adhesive patch and electron microscopy confirmed the nature of the harvested epidermal skin tissue. The obtained tissue samples are stored in a stable fashion on adhesive patches over a wide range of temperatures (-80oC to +60oC) and for extended periods of time (7 days or more). Total human RNA, human genomic DNA and microbiome DNA yields were 23.35 + 15.75ng, 27.72 + 20.71ng and 576.2 + 376.8pg, respectively, in skin samples obtained from combining 4 full patches collected non-invasively from the forehead of healthy volunteers. The adhesive patch skin sampling procedure is well tolerated and provides robust means to obtain skin tissue, RNA, DNA, and microbiome samples without involving surgical biopsies. The non-invasively obtained skin samples can be shipped cost effectively at ambient temperature by mail or standard courier service, and are suitable for a variety of molecular analyses of the skin microbiome as well as of keratinocytes, T cells, dendritic cells

  7. The Use of Matriderm and Autologous Skin Graft in the Treatment of Full Thickness Skin Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Hwan Min

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background For patients with full thickness skin defects, autologous Split-thickness skin grafts (STSG are generally regarded as the mainstay of treatment. However, skin grafts have some limitations, including undesirable outcomes resulting from scars, poor elasticity, and limitations in joint movement due to contractures. In this study, we present outcomes of Matriderm grafts used for various skin tissue defects whether it improves on these drawbacks. Methods From January 2010 to March 2012, a retrospective review of patients who had undergone autologous STSG with Matriderm was performed. We assessed graft survival to evaluate the effectiveness of Matriderm. We also evaluated skin quality using a Cutometer, Corneometer, Tewameter, or Mexameter, approximately 12 months after surgery. Results A total of 31 patients underwent STSG with Matriderm during the study period. The success rate of skin grafting was 96.7%. The elasticity value of the portion on which Matriderm was applied was 0.765 (range, 0.635-0.800, the value of the trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL was 10.0 (range, 8.15-11.00 g/hr/m2, and the humidification value was 24.0 (range, 15.5-30.0. The levels of erythema and melanin were 352.0 arbitrary unit (AU (range, 299.25-402.75 AU and 211.0 AU (range, 158.25-297.00 AU, respectively. When comparing the values of elasticity and TEWL of the skin treated with Matriderm to the values of the surrounding skin, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that a dermal substitute (Matriderm with STSG was adopted stably and with minimal complications. Furthermore, comparing Matriderm grafted skin to normal skin using Cutometer, Matriderm proved valuable in restoring skin elasticity and the skin barrier.

  8. The first nationwide surveillance of antibacterial susceptibility patterns of pathogens isolated from skin and soft-tissue infections in dermatology departments in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Ohnishi, Takamitsu; Yuasa, Akira; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Iwata, Satoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Akira; Sato, Junko; Hanaki, Hideaki; Manabe, Motomu; Suzuki, Tamio; Otsuka, Fujio; Aihara, Michiko; Iozumi, Ken; Tamaki, Takeshi; Funada, Yuichi; Shinozaki, Mikio; Kobayashi, Motoko; Okuda, Masaru; Kikyo, Go; Kikuchi, Kumi; Okada, Yoshitane; Takeshima, Masanori; Kaneko, Osamu; Ogawa, Natsuki; Ito, Rie; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Shimada, Shinji; Shimizu, Tadamichi; Hatta, Naohito; Manabu, Maeda; Tsutsui, Kiyohiro; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Asada, Hideo; Furukawa, Fukumi; Kurokawa, Ichiro; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Hide, Michihiro; Muto, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Osamu; Niihara, Hiroyuki; Takagaki, Kenji; Kubota, Yasuo; Sayama, Koji; Sano, Shigetoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Kanekura, Takuro

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the trends of antimicrobial resistance in pathogens isolated from skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI) at dermatology departments in Japan, a Japanese surveillance committee conducted the first nationwide survey in 2013. Three main organisms were collected from SSTI at 30 dermatology departments in medical centers and 10 dermatology clinics. A total of 860 strains - 579 of Staphylococcus aureus, 240 of coagulase-negative Staphylococci, and 41 of Streptococcus pyogenes - were collected and shipped to a central laboratory for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The patient profiles were also studied. Among all 579 strains of S. aureus, 141 (24.4%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). Among 97 Staphylococcus epidermidis strains, 54 (55.7%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSE). MRSA and MRSE were more frequently isolated from inpatients than from outpatients. Furthermore, these methicillin-resistant strains were also isolated more frequently from patients with histories of taking antibiotics within 4 weeks and hospitalization within 1 year compared to those without. However, there were no significant differences in MIC values and susceptibility patterns of the MRSA strains between patients with a history of hospitalization within 1 year and those without. Therefore, most of the isolated MRSA cases at dermatology departments are not healthcare-acquired, but community-acquired MRSA. S. pyogenes strains were susceptible to most antibiotics except macrolides. The information in this study is not only important in terms of local public health but will also contribute to an understanding of epidemic clones of pathogens from SSTI. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predictors of skin and soft tissue infections in HIV-infected outpatients in the community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmige, V; McNulty, M; Silverman, E; David, M Z

    2015-02-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are common in the era of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but the risk factors are not well defined. We sought to elucidate the risk factors for SSTI occurrence in an HIV cohort. This investigation was a retrospective, single-center cohort study, carried out during the period 2005-2009. In this cohort of 511 HIV-infected individuals, 133 SSTIs occurred in 87 individuals over 1,228.6 person-years of follow-up, for an incidence of 108 SSTIs/1,000 person-years [95 % confidence interval (CI) 87-135]. The incidence declined significantly over time (p < 0.01). In a multivariable Cox regression, diabetes [hazard ratio (HR) 2.01; 95 % CI 1.04-3.89], psoriasis (HR 5.77; 95 % CI 1.86-17.9), lymphedema (HR 6.84; 95 % CI 2.59-18.1), intravenous catheter presence (HR 3.38; 95 % CI 1.00-11.5), and HIV viral load greater than 1,000 copies/mL (HR 2.13; 95 % CI 1.33-3.41) were most strongly associated with development of the first SSTI. Trends toward an association between SSTI risk and Medicaid insurance (HR 1.67; 95 % CI 0.98-2.83) and sexually transmitted disease during follow-up (HR 1.66; 0.99-2.78) were present. CD4+ count and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use were not associated with SSTI risk. HIV-infected individuals are at high risk for SSTIs. In a primarily urban, African-American cohort, we found that a number of immunologic and demographic factors were associated with SSTI risk.

  10. The volume of fluid injected into the tissue expander and the tissue expansion

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    Mahmood Omranifard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Replacement of the lost tissue is the major concerns of the plastic surgeons. Expanded area should be coherent with the surrounding tissue. Tissue expansion technique is the reforming methods the skin tissue scarcities. Several methods for tissue expansion are available; including usage of silicon balloon and injecting fluid into the tissue expander. Materials and Methods: In a clinical trial study, 35 patients, with burn scars, in the face, skull and neck area were studied. We provided a tissue expander device with capacities of 125, 250 and 350cc. Fluid was injected inside the device, 3 consecutive weeks with 1-week interval. After 3 months the device was set out and the tissue expansion was measured using a transparent board and the results were analyzed. Multiple regression was done by SPSS 20 to analyze the data. Results: Regression model showed Skin expansion was positively correlated with the volume of the injected fluid. For each centimeter square of skin expansion, about 6-8 ml of fluid must be injected. Conclusion: Correction of skin defects resulting from burning scar is possible using tissue expanders. The tissue expansion is correlated with the amount of the injected fluid.

  11. Skin Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  12. Marine algae as attractive source to skin care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Jean-Yves; Nachat-Kappes, Rachida; Bey, Mathieu; Cadoret, Jean-Paul; Renimel, Isabelle; Filaire, Edith

    2017-06-01

    As the largest organ in the human body, the skin has multiple functions of which one of the most important is the protection against various harmful stressors. The keratinised stratified epidermis and an underlying thick layer of collagen-rich dermal connective tissues are important components of the skin. The environmental stressors such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and pollution increase the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), contributing to clinical manifestations such as wrinkle formation and skin aging. Skin aging is related to the reduction of collagen production and decrease of several enzymatic activities including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which degrade collagen structure in the dermis; and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), which inhibit the action of MMPs. In addition to alterations of DNA, signal transduction pathways, immunology, UVR, and pollution activate cell surface receptors of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the skin. This action leads to a breakdown of collagen in the extracellular matrix and a shutdown of new collagen synthesis. Therefore, an efficient antioxidants strategy is of major importance in dermis and epidermis layers. Marine resources have been recognised for their biologically active substances. Among these, marine algae are rich-sources of metabolites, which can be used to fight against oxidative stress and hence skin aging. These metabolites include, among others, mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), polysaccharides, sulphated polysaccharides, glucosyl glycerols, pigments, and polyphenols. This paper reviews the role of oxidative processes in skin damage and the action of the compounds from algae on the physiological processes to maintain skin health.

  13. Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Procedures: A Review of Radiation Effects on Patients’ Skin and Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    severe radiation injuries can extend into the subcutaneous fat and muscle ( 21 ). Patients may face years of associated pain , multiple surgical...skin injury has been reviewed in detail ( 9 ). Tissues at risk include the skin, hair, subcutaneous fat, and muscle . The expression of this injury...bleomycin, epirubicin, and gemcitabine), antibiot- ics (cefotetan), statins (simvastatin), and herbal preparations (hypericin, otherwise known as St

  14. Skin abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... Skin abscesses are common and affect people of all ages. They occur when an infection causes pus ...

  15. Recurrent skin and soft tissue infections in HIV-infected patients during a 5-year period: incidence and risk factors in a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmige, Vagish; McNulty, Moira; Silverman, Ethan; David, Michael Z

    2015-10-26

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are common in the era of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus among HIV-infected patients. Recurrent infections are frequent. Risk factors for recurrence after an initial SSTI have not been well-studied. Retrospective cohort study, single center, 2005-2009. Paper and electronic medical records were reviewed by one of several physicians. Subjects with initial SSTI were followed until the time of SSTI recurrence. Standard descriptive statistics were calculated to describe the characteristics of subjects who did and did not develop a recurrent SSTI. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate the risk of recurrent SSTI. A Cox regression model was developed to identify predictors of SSTI recurrence. 133 SSTIs occurred in 87 individuals. 85 subjects were followed after their initial SSTI, of whom 30 (35.3 %) had a recurrent SSTI in 118.3 person-years of follow-up, for an incidence of second SSTI of 253.6 SSTIs/1000 person-years (95 % CI 166.8-385.7). The 1-year Kaplan-Meier estimated risk of a second SSTI was 29.2 % (95 % CI 20.3-41.0 %), while the 3-year risk was 47.0 % (95 % CI 34.4-61.6 %). Risk factors for recurrent SSTI in a multivariable Cox regression model were non-hepatitis liver disease (HR 3.44; 95 % CI 1.02-11.5; p = 0.05), the presence of an intravenous catheter (HR 6.50; 95 % CI 1.47-28.7; p = 0.01), and a history of intravenous drug use (IVDU) (HR 2.80; 95 % CI 1.02-7.65; p = 0.05); African-American race was associated with decreased risk of recurrent SSTI (HR 0.12; 95 % CI 0.04-0.41; p < 0.01). Some evidence was present for HIV viral load ≥ 1000 copies/mL as an independent risk factor for recurrent SSTI (HR 2.21; 95 % CI 0.99-4.94; p = 0.05). Hemodialysis, currently taking HAART, CD4+ count, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or azithromycin use, initial SSTI type, diabetes mellitus, incision and drainage of the original SSTI, or self-report of being a man who has sex with men were not

  16. Assessment of tissue fibrosis in skin biopsies from patients with systemic sclerosis employing confocal laser scanning microscopy: an objective outcome measure for clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, Joanna; Del Galdo, Francesco; Kissin, Eugene Y.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To obtain an objective, unbiased assessment of skin fibrosis in patients with SSc for use in clinical trials of SSc disease-modifying therapeutics. Methods. Skin biopsies from the dorsal forearm of six patients with diffuse SSc and six healthy controls, and skin biopsies from the forearm of one patient with diffuse SSc before and following 1 year treatment with mycophenolate mofetil were analysed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with specific antibodies against collagen types I and III or fibronectin. The integrated density of fluorescence (IDF) was calculated employing National Institutes of Health-ImageJ software in at least four different fields per biopsy spanning the full dermal thickness. Results. The intensities of collagen types I and III and fibronectin IDF were 174, 147 and 139% higher in SSc skin than in normal skin, respectively. All differences were statistically significant. The sum of the IDF values obtained for the three proteins yielded a comprehensive fibrosis score. The average fibrosis score for the six SSc samples was 28.3 × 106 compared with 18.6 × 106 for the six normal skin samples (P < 0.0001). Comparison of skin biopsies obtained from the same SSc patient before treatment and after 12 months of treatment with mycophenolate mofetil showed a reduction of 39% in total fibrosis score after treatment. Conclusions. CLSM followed by quantitative image analysis provides an objective and unbiased assessment of skin fibrosis in SSc and could be a useful end-point for clinical trials with disease-modifying agents to monitor the response or progression of the disease. PMID:20202926

  17. Nutrition and skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Apostolos; Liakou, Aikaterini; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2016-09-01

    Nutrition has long been associated with skin health, including all of its possible aspects from beauty to its integrity and even the aging process. Multiple pathways within skin biology are associated with the onset and clinical course of various common skin diseases, such as acne, atopic dermatitis, aging, or even photoprotection. These conditions have been shown to be critically affected by nutritional patterns and dietary interventions where well-documented studies have demonstrated beneficial effects of essential nutrients on impaired skin structural and functional integrity and have restored skin appearance and health. Although the subject could be vast, the intention of this review is to provide the most relevant and the most well-documented information on the role of nutrition in common skin conditions and its impact on skin biology.

  18. SKIN CARE IN INFANTS

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    I. N. Zakharova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is a complex organ in its structure. Numerous functions of the skin may be impaired in its pathology. Anatomical and physiological characteristics of the skin in children predispose to common diseases of the skin. Diaper dermatitis is one of the most common skin diseases during infancy and childhood. Diapered skin is exposed to friction and excessive hydration, has a higher pH than nondiapered skin, and is repeatedly soiled with feces that contains enzymes with high irritation potential for the skin. Diaper dermatitis may vary in clinical severity and course. Therapeutically, frequent diaper changes and adequate skin care are most important. Appropriate skin care can help to prevent the occurrence of diaper dermatitis and to speed up the healing of affected skin. This includes frequent diaper changes and aeration, gentle cleansing, and the use of a barrier cream. For the treatment of diaper dermatitis agents selected depending on the presence and severity of complications. For prevention and treatment of uncomplicated diaper dermatitis effective means of containing dexpantenol.

  19. Accumulation of radioactivity in rat brain and peripheral tissues including salivary gland after intravenous administration of 14C-D-aspartic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Takeshi; Santa, Tomofumi; Homma, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Juko; Kodama, Hirohiko; Yoshikawa, Masayoshi.

    1997-01-01

    After the intravenous administration of 14 C-D-aspartic acid (Asp) into Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 7-week-old), the distribution and elimination of radioactivity was investigated by the whole body autoradiography. High radioactivities were detected in pineal gland, pituitary gland and salivary gland at 30 min after administration. The other tissues detected were liver, lung, adrenal gland, pancreas and spleen where D-Asp was reported to occur naturally. After 24 hr, the radioactivities were still detected at high levels in the pineal, pituitary and salivary glands. The data suggested the natural occurrence of D-Asp in salivary gland. After careful examination utilizing fluorescent derivatization and chiral separation by high-performance liquid chromatography, the presence of D-Asp was, for the first time, demonstrated in salivary gland in situ, the concentration of which was 7.85 ± 1.0 nmol/g. The administration of 14 C-L-Asp was also carried out. The data suggested that D-Asp in the circulating blood is one of the sources of the tissue D-Asp. (author)

  20. Fractional nonablative laser resurfacing: is there a skin tightening effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauvar, Arielle N B

    2014-12-01

    Fractional photothermolysis, an approach to laser skin resurfacing that creates microscopic thermal wounds in skin separated by islands of spared tissue, was developed to overcome the high incidence of adverse events and prolonged healing times associated with full coverage ablative laser procedures. To examine whether fractional nonablative laser resurfacing induces skin tightening. A literature review was performed to evaluate the clinical and histologic effects of fractional nonablative laser resurfacing and full coverage ablative resurfacing procedures. Fractional nonablative lasers produce excellent outcomes with minimal risk and morbidity for a variety of clinical conditions, including photodamaged skin, atrophic scars, surgical and burn scars. Efforts to induce robust fibroplasia in histologic specimens and skin tightening in the clinical setting have yielded inconsistent results. A better understanding of the histology of fractional laser resurfacing will help to optimize clinical outcomes.

  1. Pathologies of the skin and its appendages in endocrine diseases

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    Hubert Arasiewicz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from endocrine disorders often present a wide profile of skin lesions. In hyperthyroidism we observe hair loss, lower leg myxedema and onycholysis or, in the case of hormone deficiency, generalized swelling of the skin, which becomes cold and pale. Primary hyperparathyroidism is revealed by pruritus, presence of chronic urticaria or deposition of amorphous calcium salts. In hypoparathyroidism, the skin is dry while the nails become very brittle. Skin lesions in diabetes include necrobiosis lipoidica, granuloma annulare, scleroderma-like diabetic edema and acanthosis nigricans. Overactive pituitary gland is often manifested as acromegaly with hypertrophy of soft tissue thickening and hypertrichosis. The skin in the early stages of hypopituitarism feels swollen, is pale yellow and oily, and finally becomes alabaster and dry. The characteristic features of Cushing syndrome are central obesity, lunar face, buffalo hump, and striae. In Addison’s disease we observe hyperpigmentation. Hyperandrogenism in women leads to acne, hirsutism and virilization.

  2. Fractional laser skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2012-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) has evolved over the past 2 decades from traditional ablative to fractional nonablative and fractional ablative resurfacing. Traditional ablative LSR was highly effective in reducing rhytides, photoaging, and acne scarring but was associated with significant side effects and complications. In contrast, nonablative LSR was very safe but failed to deliver consistent clinical improvement. Fractional LSR has achieved the middle ground; it combined the efficacy of traditional LSR with the safety of nonablative modalities. The first fractional laser was a nonablative erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser that produced microscopic columns of thermal injury in the epidermis and upper dermis. Heralding an entirely new concept of laser energy delivery, it delivered the laser beam in microarrays. It resulted in microscopic columns of treated tissue and intervening areas of untreated skin, which yielded rapid reepithelialization. Fractional delivery was quickly applied to ablative wavelengths such as carbon dioxide, Er:YAG, and yttrium scandium gallium garnet (2,790 nm), providing more significant clinical outcomes. Adjustable laser parameters, including power, pitch, dwell time, and spot density, allowed for precise determination of percent surface area, affected penetration depth, and clinical recovery time and efficacy. Fractional LSR has been a significant advance to the laser field, striking the balance between safety and efficacy.

  3. Berry flesh and skin ripening features in Vitis vinifera as assessed by transcriptional profiling.

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    Diego Lijavetzky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ripening of fleshy fruit is a complex developmental process involving the differentiation of tissues with separate functions. During grapevine berry ripening important processes contributing to table and wine grape quality take place, some of them flesh- or skin-specific. In this study, transcriptional profiles throughout flesh and skin ripening were followed during two different seasons in a table grape cultivar 'Muscat Hamburg' to determine tissue-specific as well as common developmental programs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an updated GrapeGen Affymetrix GeneChip® annotation based on grapevine 12×v1 gene predictions, 2188 differentially accumulated transcripts between flesh and skin and 2839 transcripts differentially accumulated throughout ripening in the same manner in both tissues were identified. Transcriptional profiles were dominated by changes at the beginning of veraison which affect both pericarp tissues, although frequently delayed or with lower intensity in the skin than in the flesh. Functional enrichment analysis identified the decay on biosynthetic processes, photosynthesis and transport as a major part of the program delayed in the skin. In addition, a higher number of functional categories, including several related to macromolecule transport and phenylpropanoid and lipid biosynthesis, were over-represented in transcripts accumulated to higher levels in the skin. Functional enrichment also indicated auxin, gibberellins and bHLH transcription factors to take part in the regulation of pre-veraison processes in the pericarp, whereas WRKY and C2H2 family transcription factors seems to more specifically participate in the regulation of skin and flesh ripening, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A transcriptomic analysis indicates that a large part of the ripening program is shared by both pericarp tissues despite some components are delayed in the skin. In addition, important tissue differences are

  4. Digital Genome-Wide ncRNA Expression, Including SnoRNAs, across 11 Human Tissues Using PolyA-Neutral Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, John C.; Armour, Christopher D.; Löwer, Martin; Haynor, David; Biery, Matthew; Bouzek, Heather; Chen, Ronghua; Jackson, Stuart; Johnson, Jason M.; Rohl, Carol A.; Raymond, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are an essential class of molecular species that have been difficult to monitor on high throughput platforms due to frequent lack of polyadenylation. Using a polyadenylation-neutral amplification protocol and next-generation sequencing, we explore ncRNA expression in eleven human tissues. ncRNAs 7SL, U2, 7SK, and HBII-52 are expressed at levels far exceeding mRNAs. C/D and H/ACA box snoRNAs are associated with rRNA methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively: spleen expresses both, hypothalamus expresses mainly C/D box snoRNAs, and testes show enriched expression of both H/ACA box snoRNAs and RNA telomerase TERC. Within the snoRNA 14q cluster, 14q(I-6) is expressed at much higher levels than other cluster members. More reads align to mitochondrial than nuclear tRNAs. Many lincRNAs are actively transcribed, particularly those overlapping known ncRNAs. Within the Prader-Willi syndrome loci, the snoRNA HBII-85 (group I) cluster is highly expressed in hypothalamus, greater than in other tissues and greater than group II or III. Additionally, within the disease locus we find novel transcription across a 400,000 nt span in ovaries. This genome-wide polyA-neutral expression compendium demonstrates the richness of ncRNA expression, their high expression patterns, their function-specific expression patterns, and is publicly available. PMID:20668672

  5. Digital genome-wide ncRNA expression, including SnoRNAs, across 11 human tissues using polyA-neutral amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Castle

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are an essential class of molecular species that have been difficult to monitor on high throughput platforms due to frequent lack of polyadenylation. Using a polyadenylation-neutral amplification protocol and next-generation sequencing, we explore ncRNA expression in eleven human tissues. ncRNAs 7SL, U2, 7SK, and HBII-52 are expressed at levels far exceeding mRNAs. C/D and H/ACA box snoRNAs are associated with rRNA methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively: spleen expresses both, hypothalamus expresses mainly C/D box snoRNAs, and testes show enriched expression of both H/ACA box snoRNAs and RNA telomerase TERC. Within the snoRNA 14q cluster, 14q(I-6 is expressed at much higher levels than other cluster members. More reads align to mitochondrial than nuclear tRNAs. Many lincRNAs are actively transcribed, particularly those overlapping known ncRNAs. Within the Prader-Willi syndrome loci, the snoRNA HBII-85 (group I cluster is highly expressed in hypothalamus, greater than in other tissues and greater than group II or III. Additionally, within the disease locus we find novel transcription across a 400,000 nt span in ovaries. This genome-wide polyA-neutral expression compendium demonstrates the richness of ncRNA expression, their high expression patterns, their function-specific expression patterns, and is publicly available.

  6. Conformal, wearable, thin microwave antenna for sub-skin and skin surface monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, Mark C.; Chang, John T.; Duoss, Eric B.

    2017-05-16

    A wearable antenna is operably positioned on a wearer's skin and is operably connected the wearer's tissue. A first antenna matched to the wearer's tissue is operably positioned on the wearer's skin. A second antenna matched to the air is operably positioned on the wearer's skin. Transmission lines connect the first antenna and the second antenna.

  7. A tan in a test tube - in vitro models for investigating ultraviolet radiation-induced damage in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Tara L; Dawson, Rebecca A; Van Lonkhuyzen, Derek R; Kimlin, Michael G; Upton, Zee

    2012-06-01

    Presently, global rates of skin cancers induced by ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure are on the rise. In view of this, current knowledge gaps in the biology of photocarcinogenesis and skin cancer progression urgently need to be addressed. One factor that has limited skin cancer research has been the need for a reproducible and physiologically-relevant model able to represent the complexity of human skin. This review outlines the main currently-used in vitro models of UVR-induced skin damage. This includes the use of conventional two-dimensional cell culture techniques and the major animal models that have been employed in photobiology and photocarcinogenesis research. Additionally, the progression towards the use of cultured skin explants and tissue-engineered skin constructs, and their utility as models of native skin's responses to UVR are described. The inherent advantages and disadvantages of these in vitro systems are also discussed. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Skin autofluorescence as proxy of tissue AGE accumulation is dissociated from SCORE cardiovascular risk score, and remains so after 3 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiessen, Ans H.; Jager, Willemein; ter Bogt, Nancy C. W.; Beltman, Frank W.; van der Meer, Klaas; Broer, Jan; Smit, Andries J.

    Background: Skin autofluorescence (SAF), as a proxy of AGE accumulation, is predictive of cardiovascular (CVD) complications in i.a. type 2 diabetes mellitus and renal failure, independently of most conventional CVD risk factors. The present exploratory substudy of the Groningen Overweight and

  9. Surveillance of Physician-Diagnosed Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Consistent With Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) among Nebraska High School Athletes, 2008-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Bryan F.; Connolly, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Though historically confined to hospital settings, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has received increasing attention in the wider community, particularly among athletes. A 2007-2008 investigation in Nebraska concluded that MRSA skin infections were an emerging problem among the state's student athletes. Statewide surveillance…

  10. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to a combination of lycopene, vitamin E, lutein and selenium and protection of the skin from UV-induced (including photo-oxidative) damage pursuant to Article 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    related to a combination of lycopene, vitamin E, lutein and selenium and protection of the skin from UV-induced (including photo-oxidative) damage. The Panel considers that the combination of lycopene, vitamin E, lutein and selenium is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect refers to the photo...... could be drawn from this study for the scientific substantiation of the claim. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of a combination of lycopene, vitamin E, lutein and selenium and protection of the skin from UV-induced (including......-protective activity of the food, delaying the appearance of UV-induced erythema and decreasing its intensity. The target population proposed by the applicant is healthy adults in the general population, and in particular people with sensitive skin. The Panel considers that protection of the skin from UV...

  11. Efficacy of humidity retention bags for the reduced adsorption and improved cleaning of tissue proteins including prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secker, T J; Pinchin, H E; Hervé, R C; Keevil, C W

    2015-01-01

    Increasing drying time adversely affects attachment of tissue proteins and prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel, and reduces the efficacy of commercial cleaning chemistries. This study tested the efficacy of commercial humidity retention bags to reduce biofouling on surgical stainless steel and to improve subsequent cleaning. Surgical stainless steel surfaces were contaminated with ME7-infected brain homogenates and left to dry for 15 to 1,440 min either in air, in dry polythene bags or within humidity retention bags. Residual contamination pre/post cleaning was analysed using Thioflavin T/SYPRO Ruby dual staining and microscope analysis. An increase in biofouling was observed with increased drying time in air or in sealed dry bags. Humidity retention bags kept both protein and prion-associated amyloid minimal across the drying times both pre- and post-cleaning. Therefore, humidity bags demonstrate a cheap, easy to implement solution to improve surgical instrument reprocessing and to potentially reduce associated hospital acquired infections.

  12. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Renowned experts present the latest knowledge Although a very fragile structure, the skin barrier is probably one of the most important organs of the body. Inward/out it is responsible for body integrity and outward/in for keeping microbes, chemicals, and allergens from penetrating the skin. Since...... the role of barrier integrity in atopic dermatitis and the relationship to filaggrin mutations was discovered a decade ago, research focus has been on the skin barrier, and numerous new publications have become available. This book is an interdisciplinary update offering a wide range of information...... on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...

  13. Skin Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Skin Complications Diabetes can affect every part of the ... lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. General Skin Conditions Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections ...

  14. Cryotherapy - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryosurgery - skin; Warts - freezing; Warts - cryotherapy; Actinic keratosis - cryotherapy; Solar keratosis - cryotherapy ... may be used to: Remove warts Destroy precancerous skin lesions (actinic keratoses or solar keratoses) In rare ...

  15. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types ... face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. Anyone ...

  16. Sagging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turkey neck,” this occurs as skin loses its elasticity and in cases where individuals have lost a ... technique or procedure is appropriate for my skin type? Did the doctor show me before-and-after ...

  17. Skin Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... like these: skin rashes or conditions, such as eczema or psoriasis skin infections, such as staph diseases, ...

  18. Does treatment of split-thickness skin grafts with negative-pressure wound therapy improve tissue markers of wound healing in a porcine experimental model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Christopher; Ciraulo, David; Coulter, Michael; Desjardins, Steven; Liaw, Lucy; Peterson, Sarah

    2012-08-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been used for to treat wounds for more than 15 years and, more recently, has been used to secure split-thickness skin grafts. There are some data to support this use of NPWT, but the actual mechanism by which NPWT speeds healing or improves skin graft take is not entirely known. The purpose of this project was to assess whether NPWT improved angiogenesis, wound healing, or graft survival when compared with traditional bolster dressings securing split-thickness skin grafts in a porcine model. We performed two split-thickness skin grafts on each of eight 30 kg Yorkshire pigs. We took graft biopsies on postoperative days 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 and submitted the samples for immunohistochemical staining, as well as standard hematoxylin and eosin staining. We measured the degree of vascular ingrowth via immunohistochemical staining for von Willenbrand's factor to better identify blood vessel epithelium. We determined the mean cross-sectional area of blood vessels present for each representative specimen, and then compared the bolster and NPWT samples. We also assessed each graft for incorporation and survival at postoperative day 10. Our analysis of the data revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the degree of vascular ingrowth as measured by mean cross-sectional capillary area (p = 0.23). We did not note any difference in graft survival or apparent incorporation on a macroscopic level, although standard hematoxylin and eosin staining indicated that microscopically, there seemed to be better subjective graft incorporation in the NPWT samples and a nonsignificant trend toward improved graft survival in the NPWT group. We were unable to demonstrate a significant difference in vessel ingrowth when comparing NPWT and traditional bolster methods for split-thickness skin graft fixation. More studies are needed to elucidate the manner by which NPWT exerts its effects and the true clinical magnitude of these

  19. Skin Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Ruka; Kishi, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Skin graft is one of the most indispensable techniques in plastic surgery and dermatology. Skin grafts are used in a variety of clinical situations, such as traumatic wounds, defects after oncologic resection, burn reconstruction, scar contracture release, congenital skin deficiencies, hair restoration, vitiligo, and nipple-areola reconstruction. Skin grafts are generally avoided in the management of more complex wounds. Conditions with deep spaces and exposed bones normally require the use o...

  20. Skin bank development and critical incident response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kellie T; Herson, Marisa R

    2011-05-01

    The Donor Tissue Bank of Victoria (DTBV), situated in Melbourne, Australia developed a skin banking program in 1994. It remains Australia's only operational skin bank, processing cryopreserved human cadaveric skin for the treatment of burns. The demand for allograft skin in Australia has steadily increased since the development of the program. The bank has been involved in the provision of skin for a number of critical incidences or disasters both in Australia and overseas. Demand always exceeds supply, and in the absence of other local skin banks, the DTBV has needed to develop strategies to enable increased provision of allograft skin nationally.

  1. Skin Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  2. Versatility of erbium YAG laser: from fractional skin rejuvenation to full-field skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, J David

    2011-05-01

    For the laser surgeon, the Er-YAG laser is an invaluable tool that delivers unsurpassed ablation efficiency, and with appropriate functionality (quasi long-pulse feature) provides sufficient tissue coagulation to remodel deep rhytids. As such, the 2940-nm wavelength is well suited for routine laser skin rejuvenation in full-field, fractional, and point-beam modes with additional benefits, including applicability to diverse skin types, short healing times, and a low likelihood of energy-related complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Spectroscopic detection of oral and skin tissue transformation in a model for squamous cell carcinoma: Autofluorescence versus systemic aminolevulinic acid-induced fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderBreggen, E. W. J.; Rem, A. I.; Christian, M. M.; Yang, C. J.; Calhoun, K. H.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; Motamedi, M.

    1996-01-01

    In recent Sears, applications of fluorescence spectroscopy to detect premalignant and malignant changes in various types of tissue has been proposed, The development of a safe and specific fluorescent agent that could enhance the spectroscopic contrast between normal and malignant tissue is highly

  4. Mechanical modeling of skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, C.W.J.; Peters, G.W.M.; Kassab, G.S.; Sacks, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter describes the work that was performed in the soft tissue biomechanics laboratory at Eindhoven University of Technology on the biomechanics of skin. A rationale is given for the changes from standard testing methods to inverse methods, from in vitro to in vivo and back to in vitro testing

  5. A Decrease in Spatially Resolved Near-Infrared Spectroscopy-Determined Frontal Lobe Tissue Oxygenation by Phenylephrine Reflects Reduced Skin Blood Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Sato, Kohei; Okazaki, Kazunobu

    2014-01-01

    , and there was a relationship between ScO2 and forehead skin blood flow (Pearson r = 0.55, P = 0.042, 95% confidence interval [CI], = 0.025-0.84; Spearman r = 0.81, P Pearson r = 0.62, P = 0.019, 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.86; Spearman r = 0.64, P = 0.012, 95% CI, 0...

  6. Identification of proteins from 4200-year-old skin and muscle tissue biopsies from ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period shows evidence of acute inflammation and severe immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jana; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Ravishankar, Prathiba; Xavier, Dylan; Lim, Do Seon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Bianucci, Raffaella; Haynes, Paul A

    2016-10-28

    We performed proteomics analysis on four skin and one muscle tissue samples taken from three ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period, approximately 4200 years old. The mummies were first dated by radiocarbon dating of the accompany-\\break ing textiles, and morphologically examined by scanning electron microscopy of additional skin samples. Proteins were extracted, separated on SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) gels, and in-gel digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analysed using nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We identified a total of 230 unique proteins from the five samples, which consisted of 132 unique protein identifications. We found a large number of collagens, which was confirmed by our microscopy data, and is in agreement with previous studies showing that collagens are very long-lived. As expected, we also found a large number of keratins. We identified numerous proteins that provide evidence of activation of the innate immunity system in two of the mummies, one of which also contained proteins indicating severe tissue inflammation, possibly indicative of an infection that we can speculate may have been related to the cause of death.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed.

  8. Correlation of cutaneous tension distribution and tissue oxygenation with acute external tissue expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquardt C

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Today, the biomechanical fundamentals of skin expansion are based on viscoelastic models of the skin. Although many studies have been conducted in vitro, analyses performed in vivo are rare. Here, we present in vivo measurements of the expansion at the skin surface as well as measurement of the corresponding intracutaneous oxygen partial pressure. In our study the average skin stretching was 24%, with a standard deviation of 11%, excluding age or gender dependency. The measurement of intracutaneous oxygen partial pressure produced strong inter-individual fluctuations, including initial values at the beginning of the measurement, as well as varying individual patient reactions to expansion of the skin. Taken together, we propose that even large defect wounds can be closed successfully using the mass displacement caused by expansion especially in areas where soft, voluminous tissue layers are present.

  9. Genetically engineered tissue to screen for glycan function in tissue formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M., Adamopoulou; E.M., Pallesen; A., Levann

    2017-01-01

    engineered GlycoSkin tissue models can be used to study biological interactions involving glycan structure on lipids, or glycosaminoglycans. This engineering approach will allow us to investigate the functions of glycans in homeostasis and elucidate the role of glycans in normal epithelial formation....... We use genetic engineering with CRISPR/Cas9 combined with 3D organotypic skin models to examine how distinct glycans influence epithelial formation. We have performed knockout and knockin of more than 100 select genes in the genome of human immortalized human keratinocytes, enabling a systematic...... analysis of the impact of specific glycans in the formation and transformation of the human skin. The genetic engineered human skin models (GlycoSkin) was designed with and without all major biosynthetic pathways in mammalian glycan biosynthesis, including GalNAc-O-glycans, O-fucosylation, O...

  10. Skin absorption through atopic dermatitis skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals...... ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis. We identified 40 articles, i.e. 11 human studies...... examining model penetrants, 26 human studies examining atopic dermatitis drugs and 3 animal studies. We conclude that atopic dermatitis patients have nearly two-fold increased skin absorption when compared to healthy controls. There is a need for well-designed epidemiological and dermato...

  11. Skin dosimetry - radiological protection aspects of skin dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Following a Workshop in Skin Dosimetry, a summary of the radiological protection aspects is given. Aspects discussed include routine skin monitoring and dose limits, the need for careful skin dosimetry in high accidental exposures, techniques for assessing skin dose at all relevant depths and the specification of dose quantities to be measured by personal dosemeters and the appropriate methods to be used in their calibration. (UK)

  12. Pig skin apposite dehydrated by lyophilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes F, M.L.; Gonzalez V, C.; Flores A, M.; Peralta R, J.; Reboyo B, D.; Rodriguez U, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Taking like base a work carried out in 2001 in the Radio sterilized Tissue Bank (BTR) in which lyophilized apposite of pig skin were obtained at laboratory scale, this work is presented that had as purpose to process pig skin to produce temporary covers of skin (apposite) dehydrated by lyophilization to commercial scale. (Author)

  13. Skin Cancers of the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot Health Awareness Month Diabetes Awareness What Are Skin Cancers of the Feet? Skin cancer can develop anywhere on the body, including ... cell carcinoma is the most common form of cancer on the skin of the feet. Most types of early squamous ...

  14. Regulatory T cells in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Niwa; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2017-11-01

    Foxp3 + CD4 + regulatory T (Treg) cells are a subset of immune cells that function to regulate tissue inflammation. Skin is one of the largest organs and is home to a large proportion of the body's Treg cells. However, relative to other tissues (such as the spleen and gastrointestinal tract) the function of Treg cells in skin is less well defined. Here, we review our understanding of how Treg cells migrate to skin and the cellular and molecular pathways required for their maintenance in this tissue. In addition, we outline what is known about the specialized functions of Treg cells in skin. Namely, the orchestration of stem cell-mediated hair follicle regeneration, augmentation of wound healing, and promoting adaptive immune tolerance to skin commensal microbes. A comprehensive understanding of the biology of skin Treg cells may lead to novel therapeutic approaches that preferentially target these cells to treat cutaneous autoimmunity, skin cancers and disorders of skin regeneration. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Visualizing radiofrequency-skin interaction using multiphoton microscopy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Wang, Chun-Chin; Hsu, Chih-Ting; Chu, Thomas; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Redundant skin laxity is a major feature of aging. Recently, radiofrequency has been introduced for nonablative tissue tightening by volumetric heating of the deep dermis. Despite the wide range of application based on this therapy, the effect of this technique on tissue and the subsequent tissue remodeling have not been investigated in detail. Our objective is to evaluate the potential of non-linear optics, including multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, as a non-invasive imaging modality for the real-time study of radiofrequency-tissue interaction. Electro-optical synergy device (ELOS) was used as the radiofrequency source in this study. The back skin of nude mouse was irradiated with radiofrequency at different passes. We evaluated the effect on skin immediately and 1 month after treatment with multiphoton microscopy. Corresponding histology was performed for comparison. We found that SHG is negatively correlated to radiofrequency passes, which means that collagen structural disruption happens immediately after thermal damage. After 1 month of collagen remodeling, SHG signals increased above baseline, indicating that collagen regeneration has occurred. Our findings may explain mechanism of nonablative skin tightening and were supported by histological examinations. Our work showed that monitoring the dermal heating status of RF and following up the detailed process of tissue reaction can be imaged and quantified with multiphoton microscopy non-invasively in vivo. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Nonsurgical tightening of skin laxity: a new radiofrequency approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusciani, Antonio; Curinga, Giuseppe; Menichini, Giulio; Alfano, Carmine; Rusciani, Luigi

    2007-04-01

    Improvement in skin laxity can be difficult to achieve without invasive surgical procedures. Monopolar radiofrequency (RF) treatment is used by physicians to heat skin and promote tissue tightening and contouring. RF technology produces an electric current that generates heat through resistance in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. The thermal effect depends on the conductivity features of the treated tissue. When heated, collagen fibrils will denature and contract, which is believed to lead to the observed tissue tightening. Ninety-three consecutive patients with mild to moderate laxity were included in the study. The Surgitron Dual Frequency RF (Radiowave technology, Ellman International) was used to treat skin laxity. The application of RF energy took place in an ambulatory setting with no need for skin sterilization or anesthesia. Patients immediately noticed a microlifting retraction in the treated tissues according to the vectors mapped in the area. There were no significant complications and the majority of patients were satisfied with the procedure and able to return to their daily routine after leaving the office, thereby substantiating the popularity of noninvasive rejuvenating procedures.

  17. Can the Hydroxyapatite-Coated Skin-Penetrating Abutment for Bone Conduction Hearing Implants Integrate with the Surrounding Skin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, Marc; Wigren, Stina; Duimel, Hans; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Flynn, Mark; Stokroos, Robert Jan

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous implants, such as bone conduction hearing implants, suffer from complications that include inflammation of the surrounding skin. A sealed skin-abutment interface can prevent the ingress of bacteria, which should reduce the occurrence of peri-abutment dermatitis. It was hypothesized that a hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated abutment in conjunction with soft tissue preservation surgery should enable integration with the adjacent skin. Previous research has confirmed that integration is never achieved with as-machined titanium abutments. Here, we investigate, in vivo, if skin integration is achievable in patients using a HA-coated abutment. One titanium abutment (control) and one HA-coated abutment (case) together with the surrounding skin were surgically retrieved from two patients who had a medical indication for this procedure. Histological sections of the skin were investigated using light microscopy. The abutment was qualitatively analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The titanium abutment only had a partial and thin layer of attached amorphous biological material. The HA-coated abutment was almost fully covered by a pronounced thick layer of organized skin, composed of different interconnected structural layers. Proof-of-principle evidence that the HA-coated abutment can achieve integration with the surrounding skin was presented for the first time.

  18. Depletion of eugenol residues from the skin-on fillet tissue of rainbow trout exposed to 14C-labeled eugenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Schreier, Theresa M.; Porcher, Scott T.; Smerud, Justin R.; Gaikowski, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. is lagging in access to an approved immediate-release sedative, i.e. a compound that can be safely and effectively used to sedate fish and has no withdrawal period. AQUI-S® 20E (10% active ingredient, eugenol) is under investigation as an immediate-release sedative for freshwater finfish. Because of its investigational status, data are needed to characterize the depletion, distribution, and identity of AQUI-S® 20E residues in fillet tissue. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to uniformly ring labeled 14C-eugenol at a nominal concentration of 10 mg/L for 60 min in 18 °C water. Fish (n = 6) were sampled immediately after the exposure (0 min) then at 30, 60, 120, and 240 min. Eugenol concentrations and characterization of 14C residues in the fillet tissue were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography and flow-through liquid scintillation counting techniques. Total 14C-residue burdens in fillet tissue were determined by tissue oxidation and static liquid scintillation counting techniques. Maximum eugenol and 14C-eugenol equivalent residue concentrations in the fillet tissue were measured immediately after the exposure (44.5 and 38.8 μg/g, respectively). Eugenol was the primary 14C-residue (> 90% of all 14C-residues) in extracts from fillet tissue taken from fish sampled immediately after the exposure (0 min) and from fish sampled at 30 and 60 min after the exposure. The depletion of 14C-eugenol residues from the fillet tissue was rapid (t1/2 = 26.25 min) after transferring the exposed fish to fresh flowing water.

  19. Effect of high energy electrons on the skin and on the underlying tissues of the rabbit. A clinical and histological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legeay, G.; Vialettes, H.; Adnet, J.J.; Court, L.; Masse, R.

    1967-01-01

    The authors consider in this report the effects of high-energy electrons on rabbit teguments and on the underlying tissues after a single high dose irradiation. After briefly considering the mechanism of interaction between the electrons and matter as a function of their energy, the authors describe the dosimetry carried out, as a function of the irradiation device. The animal received surface doses of 5700 to 22100 rads in the thigh; the electron energy varied from 21 to 30 MeV. A clinical study was carried out over a period of nine months with a view to following the evolution of the damage and the functional degradation of the underlying tissues. A histological study of the induced damage was made after a second irradiation using 30 MeV electrons to produce doses of 16400 rads. Interesting observations were made concerning the damage caused to muscular and nerve tissues. (authors) [fr

  20. Skin Bioprinting: Impending Reality or Fantasy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wei Long; Wang, Shuai; Yeong, Wai Yee; Naing, May Win

    2016-09-01

    Bioprinting provides a fully automated and advanced platform that facilitates the simultaneous and highly specific deposition of multiple types of skin cells and biomaterials, a process that is lacking in conventional skin tissue-engineering approaches. Here, we provide a realistic, current overview of skin bioprinting, distinguishing facts from myths. We present an in-depth analysis of both current skin bioprinting works and the cellular and matrix components of native human skin. We also highlight current limitations and achievements, followed by design considerations and a future outlook for skin bioprinting. The potential of bioprinting with converging opportunities in biology, material, and computational design will eventually facilitate the fabrication of improved tissue-engineered (TE) skin constructs, making bioprinting skin an impending reality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Protein-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis Uncovers New Genes Involved in Zebrafish Skin Development, Including a Neuregulin 2a-Based ErbB Signaling Pathway Required during Median Fin Fold Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie E Westcot

    Full Text Available Skin disorders are widespread, but available treatments are limited. A more comprehensive understanding of skin development mechanisms will drive identification of new treatment targets and modalities. Here we report the Zebrafish Integument Project (ZIP, an expression-driven platform for identifying new skin genes and phenotypes in the vertebrate model Danio rerio (zebrafish. In vivo selection for skin-specific expression of gene-break transposon (GBT mutant lines identified eleven new, revertible GBT alleles of genes involved in skin development. Eight genes--fras1, grip1, hmcn1, msxc, col4a4, ahnak, capn12, and nrg2a--had been described in an integumentary context to varying degrees, while arhgef25b, fkbp10b, and megf6a emerged as novel skin genes. Embryos homozygous for a GBT insertion within neuregulin 2a (nrg2a revealed a novel requirement for a Neuregulin 2a (Nrg2a-ErbB2/3-AKT signaling pathway governing the apicobasal organization of a subset of epidermal cells during median fin fold (MFF morphogenesis. In nrg2a mutant larvae, the basal keratinocytes within the apical MFF, known as ridge cells, displayed reduced pAKT levels as well as reduced apical domains and exaggerated basolateral domains. Those defects compromised proper ridge cell elongation into a flattened epithelial morphology, resulting in thickened MFF edges. Pharmacological inhibition verified that Nrg2a signals through the ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase network. Moreover, knockdown of the epithelial polarity regulator and tumor suppressor lgl2 ameliorated the nrg2a mutant phenotype. Identifying Lgl2 as an antagonist of Nrg2a-ErbB signaling revealed a significantly earlier role for Lgl2 during epidermal morphogenesis than has been described to date. Furthermore, our findings demonstrated that successive, coordinated ridge cell shape changes drive apical MFF development, making MFF ridge cells a valuable model for investigating how the coordinated regulation of cell polarity

  2. Protein-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis Uncovers New Genes Involved in Zebrafish Skin Development, Including a Neuregulin 2a-Based ErbB Signaling Pathway Required during Median Fin Fold Morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcot, Stephanie E; Hatzold, Julia; Urban, Mark D; Richetti, Stefânia K; Skuster, Kimberly J; Harm, Rhianna M; Lopez Cervera, Roberto; Umemoto, Noriko; McNulty, Melissa S; Clark, Karl J; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Ekker, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Skin disorders are widespread, but available treatments are limited. A more comprehensive understanding of skin development mechanisms will drive identification of new treatment targets and modalities. Here we report the Zebrafish Integument Project (ZIP), an expression-driven platform for identifying new skin genes and phenotypes in the vertebrate model Danio rerio (zebrafish). In vivo selection for skin-specific expression of gene-break transposon (GBT) mutant lines identified eleven new, revertible GBT alleles of genes involved in skin development. Eight genes--fras1, grip1, hmcn1, msxc, col4a4, ahnak, capn12, and nrg2a--had been described in an integumentary context to varying degrees, while arhgef25b, fkbp10b, and megf6a emerged as novel skin genes. Embryos homozygous for a GBT insertion within neuregulin 2a (nrg2a) revealed a novel requirement for a Neuregulin 2a (Nrg2a)-ErbB2/3-AKT signaling pathway governing the apicobasal organization of a subset of epidermal cells during median fin fold (MFF) morphogenesis. In nrg2a mutant larvae, the basal keratinocytes within the apical MFF, known as ridge cells, displayed reduced pAKT levels as well as reduced apical domains and exaggerated basolateral domains. Those defects compromised proper ridge cell elongation into a flattened epithelial morphology, resulting in thickened MFF edges. Pharmacological inhibition verified that Nrg2a signals through the ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase network. Moreover, knockdown of the epithelial polarity regulator and tumor suppressor lgl2 ameliorated the nrg2a mutant phenotype. Identifying Lgl2 as an antagonist of Nrg2a-ErbB signaling revealed a significantly earlier role for Lgl2 during epidermal morphogenesis than has been described to date. Furthermore, our findings demonstrated that successive, coordinated ridge cell shape changes drive apical MFF development, making MFF ridge cells a valuable model for investigating how the coordinated regulation of cell polarity and cell shape

  3. Dry Skin Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on a budget Skin care products Skin care secrets Skin lighteners Skin of color Summer skin problems ... condition, such as eczema. Additional related information Dermatologists' top tips for relieving dry skin FIND A DERMATOLOGIST ...

  4. Skin bioavailability of dietary vitamin E, carotenoids, polyphenols, vitamin C, zinc and selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richelle, Myriam; Sabatier, Magalie; Steiling, Heike; Williamson, Gary

    2006-08-01

    Dietary bioactive compounds (vitamin E, carotenoids, polyphenols, vitamin C, Se and Zn) have beneficial effects on skin health. The classical route of administration of active compounds is by topical application direct to the skin, and manufacturers have substantial experience of formulating ingredients in this field. However, the use of functional foods and oral supplements for improving skin condition is increasing. For oral consumption, some dietary components could have an indirect effect on the skin via, for example, secondary messengers. However, in the case of the dietary bioactive compounds considered here, we assume that they must pass down the gastrointestinal tract, cross the intestinal barrier, reach the blood circulation, and then be distributed to the different tissues of the body including the skin. The advantages of this route of administration are that the dietary bioactive compounds are metabolized and then presented to the entire tissue, potentially in an active form. Also, the blood continuously replenishes the skin with these bioactive compounds, which can then be distributed to all skin compartments (i.e. epidermis, dermis, subcutaneous fat and also to sebum). Where known, the distribution and mechanisms of transport of dietary bioactive compounds in skin are presented. Even for compounds that have been studied well in other organs, information on skin is relatively sparse. Gaps in knowledge are identified and suggestions made for future research.

  5. Tissue kinetics, ion transport, and recruitment of mitochondria-rich cells in the skin of the toad (Bufo bufo) in response to exposure to distilled water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz, Poul Egede; Christoffersen, Betina C.; Johansen, Jesper S.

    1995-01-01

    Mitochondria-rich cells (MRC) of the amphibian epidermis are responsible for active chloride uptake at low external salinity, and new MRCs are recruited in response to exposure to distilled (deionized) water. The time-course of this recruitment, the tissue kinetics and ion transport have been...

  6. Impairments in Skin Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphree, Rose W

    2017-09-01

    Altered skin integrity increases the chance of infection, impaired mobility, and decreased function and may result in the loss of limb or, sometimes, life. Skin is affected by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic factors can include altered nutritional status, vascular disease issues, and diabetes. Extrinsic factors include falls, accidents, pressure, immobility, and surgical procedures. Ensuring skin integrity in the elderly requires a team approach and includes the individual, caregivers, and clinicians. The twenty-first century clinician has several online, evidence-based tools to assist with optimal treatment plans. Understanding best practices in addressing skin integrity issues can promote positive outcomes with the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.