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Sample records for tip cantilever atomic

  1. Nonlinear dynamic response of cantilever beam tip during atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanolithography of copper surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Y-L; Jang, M-J; Wang, C-C; Lin, Y-P; Chen, K-S

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the nonlinear dynamic response of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beam tip during the nanolithography of a copper (Cu) surface using a high-depth feed. The dynamic motion of the tip is modeled using a combined approach based on Newton's law and empirical observations. The cutting force is determined from experimental observations of the piling height on the Cu surface and the rotation angle of the cantilever beam tip. It is found that the piling height increases linearly with the cantilever beam carrier velocity. Furthermore, the cantilever beam tip is found to execute a saw tooth motion. Both this motion and the shear cutting force are nonlinear. The elastic modulus in the y direction is variable. Finally, the velocity of the cantilever beam tip as it traverses the specimen surface has a discrete characteristic rather than a smooth, continuous profile

  2. Method of mechanical holding of cantilever chip for tip-scan high-speed atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Shingo [Department of Physics, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio [Department of Physics, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology of the Japan Science and Technology Agency, 7 Goban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    In tip-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) that scans a cantilever chip in the three dimensions, the chip body is held on the Z-scanner with a holder. However, this holding is not easy for high-speed (HS) AFM because the holder that should have a small mass has to be able to clamp the cantilever chip firmly without deteriorating the Z-scanner’s fast performance, and because repeated exchange of cantilever chips should not damage the Z-scanner. This is one of the reasons that tip-scan HS-AFM has not been established, despite its advantages over sample stage-scan HS-AFM. Here, we present a novel method of cantilever chip holding which meets all conditions required for tip-scan HS-AFM. The superior performance of this novel chip holding mechanism is demonstrated by imaging of the α{sub 3}β{sub 3} subcomplex of F{sub 1}-ATPase in dynamic action at ∼7 frames/s.

  3. Accurate measurement of Atomic Force Microscope cantilever deflection excluding tip-surface contact with application to force calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, Ashley D.; Blanch, Adam J.; Quinton, Jamie S.; Gibson, Christopher T., E-mail: christopher.gibson@flinders.edu.au

    2013-08-15

    Considerable attention has been given to the calibration of AFM cantilever spring constants in the last 20 years. Techniques that do not require tip-sample contact are considered advantageous since the imaging tip is not at risk of being damaged. Far less attention has been directed toward measuring the cantilever deflection or sensitivity, despite the fact that the primary means of determining this factor relies on the AFM tip being pressed against a hard surface, such as silicon or sapphire; which has the potential to significantly damage the tip. A recent method developed by Tourek et al. in 2010 involves deflecting the AFM cantilever a known distance from the imaging tip by pressing the cantilever against a sharpened tungsten wire. In this work a similar yet more precise method is described, whereby the deflection of the cantilever is achieved using an AFM probe with a spring constant much larger than the test cantilever, essentially a rigid cantilever. The exact position of loading on the test cantilever was determined by reverse AFM imaging small spatial markers that are milled into the test cantilever using a focussed ion beam. For V shaped cantilevers it is possible to reverse image the arm intersection in order to determine the exact loading point without necessarily requiring FIB milled spatial markers, albeit at the potential cost of additional uncertainty. The technique is applied to tip-less, beam shaped and V shaped cantilevers and compared to the hard surface contact technique with very good agreement (on average less than 5% difference). While the agreement with the hard surface contact technique was very good the error on the technique is dependent upon the assumptions inherent in the method, such as cantilever shape, loading point distance and ratio of test to rigid cantilever spring constants. The average error ranged between 2 to 5% for the majority of test cantilevers studied. The sensitivity derived with this technique can then be used to

  4. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  5. A more comprehensive modeling of atomic force microscope cantilever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, M.H.; Farshidianfar, A.; Tahani, M.; Mahdavi, S.; Dalir, H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a complete model of an atomic force microscope (AFM) micro-cantilever beam, based on considering the effects of four major factors in modeling the cantilever. They are: rotary inertia and shear deformation of the beam and mass and rotary inertia of the tip. A method based on distributed-parameter modeling approach is proposed to solve the governing equations. The comparisons generally show a very good agreement between the present results and the results of other investigators. As expected, rotary inertia and shear deformation of the beam decrease resonance frequency especially at high ratio of cantilever thickness to its length, and it is relatively more pronounced for higher-order frequencies, than lower ones. Mass and rotary inertia of the tip have similar effects when the mass-ratio of the tip to the cantilever is high. Moreover, the influence of each of these four factors, thickness of the cantilever, density of the tip and inclination of the cantilever on the resonance frequencies has been investigated, separately. It is felt that this work might help the engineers in reducing AFM micro-cantilever design time, by providing insight into the effects of various parameters with the micro-cantilever.

  6. Improving tapping mode atomic force microscopy with piezoelectric cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, B.; Manning, L.; Sulchek, T.; Adams, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    This article summarizes improvements to the speed, simplicity and versatility of tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Improvements are enabled by a piezoelectric microcantilever with a sharp silicon tip and a thin, low-stress zinc oxide (ZnO) film to both actuate and sense deflection. First, we demonstrate self-sensing tapping mode without laser detection. Similar previous work has been limited by unoptimized probe tips, cantilever thicknesses, and stress in the piezoelectric films. Tests indicate self-sensing amplitude resolution is as good or better than optical detection, with double the sensitivity, using the same type of cantilever. Second, we demonstrate self-oscillating tapping mode AFM. The cantilever's integrated piezoelectric film serves as the frequency-determining component of an oscillator circuit. The circuit oscillates the cantilever near its resonant frequency by applying positive feedback to the film. We present images and force-distance curves using both self-sensing and self-oscillating techniques. Finally, high-speed tapping mode imaging in liquid, where electric components of the cantilever require insulation, is demonstrated. Three cantilever coating schemes are tested. The insulated microactuator is used to simultaneously vibrate and actuate the cantilever over topographical features. Preliminary images in water and saline are presented, including one taken at 75.5 μm/s - a threefold improvement in bandwidth versus conventional piezotube actuators

  7. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T. [Field of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F. [Nanomechanical Properties Group, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  8. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included

  9. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  10. Reconstruction of the Tip-Surface Interaction Potential by Analysis of the Brownian Motion of an Atomic Force Microscope Tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, O.H.; Kuipers, L.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    2000-01-01

    The thermal movement of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is used to reconstruct the tip-surface interaction potential. If a tip is brought into the vicinity of a surface, its movement is governed by the sum of the harmonic cantilever potential and the tip-surface interaction potential. By

  11. z calibration of the atomic force microscope by means of a pyramidal tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Flemming

    1993-01-01

    A new method for imaging the probe tip of an atomic force microscope cantilever by the atomic force microscope itself (self-imaging) is presented. The self-imaging is accomplished by scanning the probe tip across a sharper tip on the surface. By using a pyramidal probe tip with a very well......-defined aspect ratio, this technique provides an excellent z-calibration standard for the atomic force microscope....

  12. Cantilever contribution to the total electrostatic force measured with the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guriyanova, Svetlana; Golovko, Dmytro S; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2010-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool for surface imaging at the nanometer scale and surface force measurements in the piconewton range. Among long-range surface forces, the electrostatic forces play a predominant role. They originate if the electric potentials of the substrate and of the tip of the AFM cantilever are different. A quantitative interpretation of the AFM signal is often difficult because it depends in a complicated fashion on the cantilever–tip–surface geometry. Since the electrostatic interaction is a long-range interaction, the cantilever, which is many microns from the surface, contributes to the total electrostatic force along with the tip. Here we present results of the electrostatic interaction between a conducting flat surface and horizontal or tilted cantilevers, with and without tips, at various distances from the surface. As addressed in a previous work, we show that the contribution of the cantilever to the overall force cannot be neglected. Based on a predictive model and on 3D confocal measurements, we discuss the influence of the tilting angle of the cantilever

  13. Finite-Element Simulation of Cantilever Vibrations in Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, F J Espinoza [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN. Unidad Queretaro, Apdo. Postal 1-798, 76001 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Scholz, T [Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Advanced Ceramics, Denickestrasse 15, D-21073 Hamburg (Germany); Schneider, G A [Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Advanced Ceramics, Denickestrasse 15, D-21073 Hamburg (Germany); Munoz-Saldana, J [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN. Unidad Queretaro, Apdo. Postal 1-798, 76001 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Rabe, U [Fraunhofer Institute for Non-Destructive Testing (IZFP), Bldg. E3.1, University, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Arnold, W [Fraunhofer Institute for Non-Destructive Testing (IZFP), Bldg. E3.1, University, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy has been proven to be a powerful technique for materials characterization with nanoscale lateral resolution. This technique allows one to obtain images of elastic properties of materials. By means of spectroscopic measurements of the tip-sample contact-resonance frequencies, it is possible to obtain quantitative values of the mechanical stiffness of the sample surface. For quantitative analysis a reliable relation between the spectroscopic data and the contact stiffness is required based on a correct geometrical model of the cantilever vibrations. This model must be precise enough for predicting the resonance frequencies of the tip-sample interaction when excited over a wide range of frequencies. Analytical models have served as a good reference for understanding the vibrational behavior of the AFM cantilever. They have certain limits, however, for reproducing the tip-sample contact-resonances due to the cantilever geometries used. For obtaining the local elastic modulus of samples, it is necessary to know the tip-sample contact area which is usually obtained by a calibration procedure with a reference sample. In this work we show that finiteelement modeling may be used to replace the analytical inversion procedure for AFAM data. First, the three first bending modes of cantilever resonances were used for finding the geometrical dimension of the cantilever employed. Then the normal and in-plane stiffness of the sample were obtained for each measurement on the surface to be measured. A calibration was needed to obtain the tip position of the cantilever by making measurements on a sample with known surface elasticity, here crystalline silicon. The method developed in this work was applied to AFAM measurements on silicon, zerodur, and strontium titanate.

  14. Analysis of dynamic cantilever behavior in tapping mode atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wenqi; Zhang, Guang-Ming; Murphy, Mark F; Lilley, Francis; Harvey, David M; Burton, David R

    2015-10-01

    Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides phase images in addition to height and amplitude images. Although the behavior of tapping mode AFM has been investigated using mathematical modeling, comprehensive understanding of the behavior of tapping mode AFM still poses a significant challenge to the AFM community, involving issues such as the correct interpretation of the phase images. In this paper, the cantilever's dynamic behavior in tapping mode AFM is studied through a three dimensional finite element method. The cantilever's dynamic displacement responses are firstly obtained via simulation under different tip-sample separations, and for different tip-sample interaction forces, such as elastic force, adhesion force, viscosity force, and the van der Waals force, which correspond to the cantilever's action upon various different representative computer-generated test samples. Simulated results show that the dynamic cantilever displacement response can be divided into three zones: a free vibration zone, a transition zone, and a contact vibration zone. Phase trajectory, phase shift, transition time, pseudo stable amplitude, and frequency changes are then analyzed from the dynamic displacement responses that are obtained. Finally, experiments are carried out on a real AFM system to support the findings of the simulations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Influence of tip mass on dynamic behavior of cracked cantilever pipe conveying fluid with moving mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Han Ik; Son, In Soo

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we studied about the effect of the open crack and a tip mass on the dynamic behavior of a cantilever pipe conveying fluid with a moving mass. The equation of motion is derived by using Lagrange's equation and analyzed by numerical method. The cantilever pipe is modelled by the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The crack section is represented by a local flexibility matrix connecting two undamaged pipe segments. The influences of the crack, the moving mass, the tip mass and its moment of inertia, the velocity of fluid, and the coupling of these factors on the vibration mode, the frequency, and the tip-displacement of the cantilever pipe are analytically clarified

  16. Nonlinear vibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers by considering the Hertzian contact theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, A., E-mail: a_sadeghi@srbiau.ac.ir [Islamic Azad Univ., Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zohoor, H. [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); The Academy of Sciences if I.R. Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The nonlinear flexural vibration for a rectangular atomic force microscope cantilever is investigated by using Timoshenko beam theory. In this paper, the normal and tangential tip-sample interaction forces are found from a Hertzian contact model and the effects of the contact position, normal and lateral contact stiffness, tip height, thickness of the beam, and the angle between the cantilever and the sample surface on the nonlinear frequency to linear frequency ratio are studied. The differential quadrature method is employed to solve the nonlinear differential equations of motion. The results show that softening behavior is seen for most cases and by increasing the normal contact stiffness, the frequency ratio increases for the first mode, but for the second mode, the situation is reversed. The nonlinear-frequency to linear-frequency ratio increases by increasing the Timoshenko beam parameter, but decreases by increasing the contact position for constant amplitude for the first and second modes. For the first mode, the frequency ratio decreases by increasing both of the lateral contact stiffness and the tip height, but increases by increasing the angle α between the cantilever and sample surface. (author)

  17. On the calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers modified by particle attachment and lamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, James; Zhang, Zhibing; Adams, Michael J; Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael C L; Walliman, Dominic; Arkless, Stuart G

    2010-01-01

    A simple but effective method for estimating the spring constant of commercially available atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is presented, based on estimating the cantilever thickness from knowledge of its length, width, resonant frequency and the presence or absence of an added mass, such as a colloid probe at the cantilever apex, or a thin film of deposited material. The spring constant of the cantilever can then be estimated using standard equations for cantilever beams. The results are compared to spring constant calibration measurements performed using reference cantilevers. Additionally, the effect of the deposition of Cr and Ti thin films onto rectangular Si cantilevers is investigated

  18. Quantifying Tip-Sample Interactions in Vacuum Using Cantilever-Based Sensors: An Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Zhou, Chao; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2018-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy is an analytical characterization method that is able to image a sample's surface topography at high resolution while simultaneously probing a variety of different sample properties. Such properties include tip-sample interactions, the local measurement of which has gained much popularity in recent years. To this end, either the oscillation frequency or the oscillation amplitude and phase of the vibrating force-sensing cantilever are recorded as a function of tip-sample distance and subsequently converted into quantitative values for the force or interaction potential. Here, we theoretically and experimentally show that the force law obtained from such data acquired under vacuum conditions using the most commonly applied methods may deviate more than previously assumed from the actual interaction when the oscillation amplitude of the probe is of the order of the decay length of the force near the surface, which may result in a non-negligible error if correct absolute values are of importance. Caused by approximations made in the development of the mathematical reconstruction procedures, the related inaccuracies can be effectively suppressed by using oscillation amplitudes sufficiently larger than the decay length. To facilitate efficient data acquisition, we propose a technique that includes modulating the drive amplitude at a constant height from the surface while monitoring the oscillation amplitude and phase. Ultimately, such an amplitude-sweep-based force spectroscopy enables shorter data acquisition times and increased accuracy for quantitative chemical characterization compared to standard approaches that vary the tip-sample distance. An additional advantage is that since no feedback loop is active while executing the amplitude sweep, the force can be consistently recovered deep into the repulsive regime.

  19. High-speed tapping-mode atomic force microscopy using a Q-controlled regular cantilever acting as the actuator: Proof-of-principle experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balantekin, M., E-mail: mujdatbalantekin@iyte.edu.tr [Electrical and Electronics Engineering, İzmir Institute of Technology, Urla, İzmir 35430 (Turkey); Satır, S.; Torello, D.; Değertekin, F. L. [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We present the proof-of-principle experiments of a high-speed actuation method to be used in tapping-mode atomic force microscopes (AFM). In this method, we do not employ a piezotube actuator to move the tip or the sample as in conventional AFM systems, but, we utilize a Q-controlled eigenmode of a cantilever to perform the fast actuation. We show that the actuation speed can be increased even with a regular cantilever.

  20. High-speed dynamic atomic force microscopy by using a Q-controlled cantilever eigenmode as an actuator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balantekin, M., E-mail: mujdatbalantekin@iyte.edu.tr

    2015-02-15

    We present a high-speed operating method with feedback to be used in dynamic atomic force microscope (AFM) systems. In this method we do not use an actuator that has to be employed to move the tip or the sample as in conventional AFM setups. Instead, we utilize a Q-controlled eigenmode of an AFM cantilever to perform the function of the actuator. Simulations show that even with an ordinary tapping-mode cantilever, imaging speed can be increased by about 2 orders of magnitude compared to conventional dynamic AFM imaging. - Highlights: • A high-speed imaging method is developed for dynamic-AFM systems. • An eigenmode of an AFM cantilever is utilized to perform fast actuation. • Simulations show 2 orders of magnitude increase in scan speed. • The time spent for dynamic-AFM imaging experiments will be minimized.

  1. Cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope in liquid using an optical-fiber tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung I. Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed a novel cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope (COIFM to study molecular interaction in liquid environments. The force sensor was created by attaching a chemically etched optical-fiber tip to the force sensor with UV epoxy, and characterized by imaging on a calibration grid. The performance of the COIFM was then demonstrated by measuring the force between two oxidized silicon surfaces in 1 mM KCl as a function of distance. The result was consistent with previously reported electrical double layer forces, suggesting that a COIFM using an optical-fiber tip is capable of measuring force in a liquid environment.

  2. Self-sensing cantilevers with integrated conductive coaxial tips for high-resolution electrical scanning probe metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haemmerli, Alexandre J.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Harjee, Nahid; Koenig, Markus; Garcia, Andrei G. F.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2015-01-01

    The lateral resolution of many electrical scanning probe techniques is limited by the spatial extent of the electrostatic potential profiles produced by their probes. Conventional unshielded conductive atomic force microscopy probes produce broad potential profiles. Shielded probes could offer higher resolution and easier data interpretation in the study of nanostructures. Electrical scanning probe techniques require a method of locating structures of interest, often by mapping surface topography. As the samples studied with these techniques are often photosensitive, the typical laser measurement of cantilever deflection can excite the sample, causing undesirable changes electrical properties. In this work, we present the design, fabrication, and characterization of probes that integrate coaxial tips for spatially sharp potential profiles with piezoresistors for self-contained, electrical displacement sensing. With the apex 100 nm above the sample surface, the electrostatic potential profile produced by our coaxial tips is more than 2 times narrower than that of unshielded tips with no long tails. In a scan bandwidth of 1 Hz–10 kHz, our probes have a displacement resolution of 2.9 Å at 293 K and 79 Å at 2 K, where the low-temperature performance is limited by amplifier noise. We show scanning gate microscopy images of a quantum point contact obtained with our probes, highlighting the improvement to lateral resolution resulting from the coaxial tip

  3. Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using standard and inverted static methods assisted by FIB-milled spatial markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slattery, Ashley D; Blanch, Adam J; Quinton, Jamie S; Gibson, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    Static methods to determine the spring constant of AFM cantilevers have been widely used in the scientific community since the importance of such calibration techniques was established nearly 20 years ago. The most commonly used static techniques involve loading a trial cantilever with a known force by pressing it against a pre-calibrated standard or reference cantilever. These reference cantilever methods have a number of sources of uncertainty, which include the uncertainty in the measured spring constant of the standard cantilever, the exact position of the loading point on the reference cantilever and how closely the spring constant of the trial and reference cantilever match. We present a technique that enables users to minimize these uncertainties by creating spatial markers on reference cantilevers using a focused ion beam (FIB). We demonstrate that by combining FIB spatial markers with an inverted reference cantilever method, AFM cantilevers can be accurately calibrated without the tip of the test cantilever contacting a surface. This work also demonstrates that for V-shaped cantilevers it is possible to determine the precise loading position by AFM imaging the section of the cantilever where the two arms join. Removing tip-to-surface contact in both the reference cantilever method and sensitivity calibration is a significant improvement, since this is an important consideration for AFM users that require the imaging tip to remain in pristine condition before commencing measurements. Uncertainties of between 5 and 10% are routinely achievable with these methods. (paper)

  4. Application of a Cantilevered SWCNT with Mass at the Tip as a Nanomechanical Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehdipour, I.; Barari, Amin; Domairry, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the continuum mechanics method and a bending model is applied to obtain the resonant frequency of the fixed-free SWCNT where the mass is rigidly attached to the tip. This method used the Euler–Bernoulli theory with cantilevered boundary conditions where the effect of attached mass ...... of resonant frequency are decreased. The validity and the accuracy of these formulas are examined with other sensor equations in the literatures. The results indicate that the new sensor equations can be used for CNT like CNT-based biosensors with reasonable accuracy....

  5. Influence of Poisson's ratio variation on lateral spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, M.-K.; Tai, N.-Ha; Chen, B.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to measure the surface morphologies and the mechanical properties of nanostructures. The force acting on the AFM cantilever can be obtained by multiplying the spring constant of AFM cantilever and the corresponding deformation. To improve the accuracy of force experiments, the spring constant of AFM cantilever must be calibrated carefully. Many methods, such as theoretical equations, the finite element method, and the use of reference cantilever, were reported to obtain the spring constant of AFM cantilevers. For the cantilever made of single crystal, the Poisson's ratio varies with different cantilever-crystal angles. In this paper, the influences of Poisson's ratio variation on the lateral spring constant and axial spring constant of rectangular and V-shaped AFM cantilevers, with different tilt angles and normal forces, were investigated by the finite element analysis. When the cantilever's tilt angle is 20 deg. and the Poisson's ratio varies from 0.02 to 0.4, the finite element results show that the lateral spring constants decrease 11.75% for the rectangular cantilever with 1 μN landing force and decrease 18.60% for the V-shaped cantilever with 50 nN landing force, respectively. The influence of Poisson's ratio variation on axial spring constant is less than 3% for both rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers. As the tilt angle increases, the axial spring constants for rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers decrease substantially. The results obtained can be used to improve the accuracy of the lateral force measurement when using atomic force microscopy

  6. Discussion of the Improved Methods for Analyzing a Cantilever Beam Carrying a Tip-Mass under Base Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hongjin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two improved analytical methods of calculations for natural frequencies and mode shapes of a uniform cantilever beam carrying a tip-mass under base excitation are presented based on forced vibration theory and the method of separation of variables, respectively. The cantilever model is simplified in detail by replacing the tip-mass with an equivalent inertial force and inertial moment acting at the free end of the cantilever based on D’Alembert’s principle. The concentrated equivalent inertial force and inertial moment are further represented as distributed loads using Dirac Delta Function. In this case, some typical natural frequencies and mode shapes of the cantilever model are calculated by the improved and unimproved analytical methods. The comparing results show that, after improvement, these two methods are in extremely good agreement with each other even the offset distance between the gravity center of the tip-mass and the attachment point is large. As further verification, the transient and steady displacement responses of the cantilever system under a sine base excitation are presented in which two improved methods are separately utilized. Finally, an experimental cantilever system is fabricated and the theoretical displacement responses are validated by the experimental measurements successfully.

  7. Lorentz force actuation of a heated atomic force microscope cantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Prater, Craig B; King, William P

    2012-02-10

    We report Lorentz force-induced actuation of a silicon microcantilever having an integrated resistive heater. Oscillating current through the cantilever interacts with the magnetic field around a NdFeB permanent magnet and induces a Lorentz force that deflects the cantilever. The same current induces cantilever heating. With AC currents as low as 0.2 mA, the cantilever can be oscillated as much as 80 nm at resonance with a DC temperature rise of less than 5 °C. By comparison, the AC temperature variation leads to a thermomechanical oscillation that is about 1000 times smaller than the Lorentz deflection at the cantilever resonance. The cantilever position in the nonuniform magnetic field affects the Lorentz force-induced deflection, with the magnetic field parallel to the cantilever having the largest effect on cantilever actuation. We demonstrate how the cantilever actuation can be used for imaging, and for measuring the local material softening temperature by sensing the contact resonance shift.

  8. On the dynamics of tapered vibro-impacting cantilever with tip mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, P. S.; Vyas, Vishal [Suman Mashruwala Advanced Microengineering Laboratory, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology - Bombay, Mumai (India)

    2017-01-15

    This paper explores nonlinear dynamic behavior of vibro-impacting tapered cantilever with tip mass with regard to frequency response analysis. A typical frequency response curve of vibro-impacting beams displays well-known resonance frequency shift along with a hysteric jump and drop phenomena. We did a comprehensive parametric analysis capturing the effects of taper, tip-mass, stop location, and gap on the non-smooth frequency response. Analysis is presented in a non-dimensional form useful for other similar cases. Simulation results are further validated with corresponding experimental results for a few cases. Illustrative comparison of simulation results for varying parameters brings out several interesting aspects of variation in the nonlinear behavior.

  9. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J., E-mail: manish.butte@stanford.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  10. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A., E-mail: dbristow@mst.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65401 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  11. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  12. Spring constant calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers of arbitrary shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sader, John E. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Kavli Nanoscience Institute and Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Sanelli, Julian A.; Adamson, Brian D.; Bieske, Evan J. [School of Chemistry, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Monty, Jason P.; Marusic, Ivan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Wei Xingzhan; Mulvaney, Paul [School of Chemistry, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Crawford, Simon A. [School of Botany, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); MicroNanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)

    2012-10-15

    The spring constant of an atomic force microscope cantilever is often needed for quantitative measurements. The calibration method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] for a rectangular cantilever requires measurement of the resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (typically air), and knowledge of its plan view dimensions. This intrinsically uses the hydrodynamic function for a cantilever of rectangular plan view geometry. Here, we present hydrodynamic functions for a series of irregular and non-rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers that are commonly used in practice. Cantilever geometries of arrow shape, small aspect ratio rectangular, quasi-rectangular, irregular rectangular, non-ideal trapezoidal cross sections, and V-shape are all studied. This enables the spring constants of all these cantilevers to be accurately and routinely determined through measurement of their resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (such as air). An approximate formulation of the hydrodynamic function for microcantilevers of arbitrary geometry is also proposed. Implementation of the method and its performance in the presence of uncertainties and non-idealities is discussed, together with conversion factors for the static and dynamic spring constants of these cantilevers. These results are expected to be of particular value to the design and application of micro- and nanomechanical systems in general.

  13. Spring constant calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers of arbitrary shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sader, John E.; Sanelli, Julian A.; Adamson, Brian D.; Bieske, Evan J.; Monty, Jason P.; Marusic, Ivan; Wei Xingzhan; Mulvaney, Paul; Crawford, Simon A.; Friend, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The spring constant of an atomic force microscope cantilever is often needed for quantitative measurements. The calibration method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] for a rectangular cantilever requires measurement of the resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (typically air), and knowledge of its plan view dimensions. This intrinsically uses the hydrodynamic function for a cantilever of rectangular plan view geometry. Here, we present hydrodynamic functions for a series of irregular and non-rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers that are commonly used in practice. Cantilever geometries of arrow shape, small aspect ratio rectangular, quasi-rectangular, irregular rectangular, non-ideal trapezoidal cross sections, and V-shape are all studied. This enables the spring constants of all these cantilevers to be accurately and routinely determined through measurement of their resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (such as air). An approximate formulation of the hydrodynamic function for microcantilevers of arbitrary geometry is also proposed. Implementation of the method and its performance in the presence of uncertainties and non-idealities is discussed, together with conversion factors for the static and dynamic spring constants of these cantilevers. These results are expected to be of particular value to the design and application of micro- and nanomechanical systems in general.

  14. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Jorge R., E-mail: jorge.rr@cea.cu [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Canto Blanco, 28049 Madrid, España (Spain)

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  15. A method to provide rapid in situ determination of tip radius in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Sergio; Guang Li; Souier, Tewfik; Gadelrab, Karim; Chiesa, Matteo; Thomson, Neil H.

    2012-01-01

    We provide a method to characterize the tip radius of an atomic force microscopy in situ by monitoring the dynamics of the cantilever in ambient conditions. The key concept is that the value of free amplitude for which transitions from the attractive to repulsive force regimes are observed, strongly depends on the curvature of the tip. In practice, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe a transition, the sharper the tip. This general behavior is remarkably independent of the properties of the sample and cantilever characteristics and shows the strong dependence of the transitions on the tip radius. The main advantage of this method is rapid in situ characterization. Rapid in situ characterization enables one to continuously monitor the tip size during experiments. Further, we show how to reproducibly shape the tip from a given initial size to any chosen larger size. This approach combined with the in situ tip size monitoring enables quantitative comparison of materials measurements between samples. These methods are set to allow quantitative data acquisition and make direct data comparison readily available in the community.

  16. Analyzing the Effect of Capillary Force on Vibrational Performance of the Cantilever of an Atomic Force Microscope in Tapping Mode with Double Piezoelectric Layers in an Air Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahavandi, Amir; Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the effects of forces exerted on the cantilever probe tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM). These forces vary according to the separation distance between the probe tip and the surface of the sample being examined. Hence, at a distance away from the surface (farther than d(on)), these forces have an attractive nature and are of Van der Waals type, and when the probe tip is situated in the range of a₀≤ d(ts) ≤ d(on), the capillary force is added to the Van der Waals force. At a distance of d(ts) ≤ a₀, the Van der Waals and capillary forces remain constant at intermolecular distances, and the contact repulsive force repels the probe tip from the surface of sample. The capillary force emerges due to the contact of thin water films with a thickness of h(c) which have accumulated on the sample and probe. Under environmental conditions a layer of water or hydrocarbon often forms between the probe tip and sample. The capillary meniscus can grow until the rate of evaporation equals the rate of condensation. For each of the above forces, different models are presented. The smoothness or roughness of the surfaces and the geometry of the cantilever tip have a significant effect on the modeling of forces applied on the probe tip. Van der Waals and the repulsive forces are considered to be the same in all the simulations, and only the capillary force is altered in order to evaluate the role of this force in the AFM-based modeling. Therefore, in view of the remarkable advantages of the piezoelectric microcantilever and also the extensive applications of the tapping mode, we investigate vibrational motion of the piezoelectric microcantilever in the tapping mode. The cantilever mentioned is entirely covered by two piezoelectric layers that carry out both the actuation of the probe tip and the measuringof its position.

  17. Stability enhancement of an atomic force microscope for long-term force measurement including cantilever modification for whole cell deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, P. P.; McGarry, J. P.; van Es, M. H.; Kilpatrick, J. I.; Ronan, W.; Nolan, D. R.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2012-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used in the study of both morphology and mechanical properties of living cells under physiologically relevant conditions. However, quantitative experiments on timescales of minutes to hours are generally limited by thermal drift in the instrument, particularly in the vertical (z) direction. In addition, we demonstrate the necessity to remove all air-liquid interfaces within the system for measurements in liquid environments, which may otherwise result in perturbations in the measured deflection. These effects severely limit the use of AFM as a practical tool for the study of long-term cell behavior, where precise knowledge of the tip-sample distance is a crucial requirement. Here we present a readily implementable, cost effective method of minimizing z-drift and liquid instabilities by utilizing active temperature control combined with a customized fluid cell system. Long-term whole cell mechanical measurements were performed using this stabilized AFM by attaching a large sphere to a cantilever in order to approximate a parallel plate system. An extensive examination of the effects of sphere attachment on AFM data is presented. Profiling of cantilever bending during substrate indentation revealed that the optical lever assumption of free ended cantilevering is inappropriate when sphere constraining occurs, which applies an additional torque to the cantilevers "free" end. Here we present the steps required to accurately determine force-indentation measurements for such a scenario. Combining these readily implementable modifications, we demonstrate the ability to investigate long-term whole cell mechanics by performing strain controlled cyclic deformation of single osteoblasts.

  18. Investigation of polymer derived ceramics cantilevers for application of high speed atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yun

    High speed Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a wide variety of applications ranging from nanomanufacturing to biophysics. In order to have higher scanning speed of certain AFM modes, high resonant frequency cantilevers are needed; therefore, the goal of this research is to investigate using polymer derived ceramics for possible applications in making high resonant frequency AFM cantilevers using complex cross sections. The polymer derived ceramic that will be studied, is silicon carbide. Polymer derived ceramics offer a potentially more economic fabrication approach for MEMS due to their relatively low processing temperatures and ease of complex shape design. Photolithography was used to make the desired cantilever shapes with micron scale size followed by a wet etching process to release the cantilevers from the substrates. The whole manufacturing process we use borrow well-developed techniques from the semiconducting industry, and as such this project also could offer the opportunity to reduce the fabrication cost of AFM cantilevers and MEMS in general. The characteristics of silicon carbide made from the precursor polymer, SMP-10 (Starfire Systems), were studied. In order to produce high qualities of silicon carbide cantilevers, where the major concern is defects, proper process parameters needed to be determined. Films of polymer derived ceramics often have defects due to shrinkage during the conversion process. Thus control of defects was a central issue in this study. A second, related concern was preventing oxidation; the polymer derived ceramics we chose is easily oxidized during processing. Establishing an environment without oxygen in the whole process was a significant challenge in the project. The optimization of the parameters for using photolithography and wet etching process was the final and central goal of the project; well established techniques used in microfabrication were modified for use in making the cantilever in the project. The techniques

  19. Minimizing tip-sample forces in jumping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega-Esteban, A. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-3, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Horcas, I. [Nanotec Electronica S.L., Centro Empresarial Euronova 3, Ronda de Poniente 12, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Hernando-Perez, M. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-3, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ares, P. [Nanotec Electronica S.L., Centro Empresarial Euronova 3, Ronda de Poniente 12, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Perez-Berna, A.J.; San Martin, C.; Carrascosa, J.L. [Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia (CNB-CSIC), Darwin 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pablo, P.J. de [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-3, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Herrero, J., E-mail: julio.gomez@uam.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-3, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Control and minimization of tip-sample interaction forces are imperative tasks to maximize the performance of atomic force microscopy. In particular, when imaging soft biological matter in liquids, the cantilever dragging force prevents identification of the tip-sample mechanical contact, resulting in deleterious interaction with the specimen. In this work we present an improved jumping mode procedure that allows detecting the tip-sample contact with high accuracy, thus minimizing the scanning forces ({approx}100 pN) during the approach cycles. To illustrate this method we report images of human adenovirus and T7 bacteriophage particles which are prone to uncontrolled modifications when using conventional jumping mode. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improvement in atomic force microscopy in buffer solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak force detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subtracting the cantilever dragging force. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Forces in the 100 pN range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imaging of delicate viruses with atomic force microscopy.

  20. Tip Effect of the Tapping Mode of Atomic Force Microscope in Viscous Fluid Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hua-Ju; Shih, Po-Jen

    2015-07-28

    Atomic force microscope with applicable types of operation in a liquid environment is widely used to scan the contours of biological specimens. The contact mode of operation allows a tip to touch a specimen directly but sometimes it damages the specimen; thus, a tapping mode of operation may replace the contact mode. The tapping mode triggers the cantilever of the microscope approximately at resonance frequencies, and so the tip periodically knocks the specimen. It is well known that the cantilever induces extra liquid pressure that leads to drift in the resonance frequency. Studies have noted that the heights of protein surfaces measured via the tapping mode of an atomic force microscope are ~25% smaller than those measured by other methods. This discrepancy may be attributable to the induced superficial hydrodynamic pressure, which is worth investigating. In this paper, we introduce a semi-analytical method to analyze the pressure distribution of various tip geometries. According to our analysis, the maximum hydrodynamic pressure on the specimen caused by a cone-shaped tip is ~0.5 Pa, which can, for example, pre-deform a cell by several nanometers in compression before the tip taps it. Moreover, the pressure calculated on the surface of the specimen is 20 times larger than the pressure without considering the tip effect; these results have not been motioned in other papers. Dominating factors, such as surface heights of protein surface, mechanical stiffness of protein increasing with loading velocity, and radius of tip affecting the local pressure of specimen, are also addressed in this study.

  1. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E., E-mail: georg.fantner@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5–10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100–500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  2. Contrast artifacts in tapping tip atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Zandbergen, Julie Bjerring

    1998-01-01

    When recording images with an atomic force microscope using the resonant vibrating cantilever mode, surprising strange results are often achieved. Typical artifacts are strange contours, unexpected height shifts, and sudden changes of the apparent resolution in the acquired images. Such artifacts...

  3. Bandwidth Widening of Piezoelectric Cantilever Beam Arrays by Mass-Tip Tuning for Low-Frequency Vibration Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Dechant

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks usually rely on internal permanent or rechargeable batteries as a power supply, causing high maintenance efforts. An alternative solution is to supply the entire system by harvesting the ambient energy, for example, by transducing ambient vibrations into electric energy by virtue of the piezoelectric effect. The purpose of this paper is to present a simple engineering approach for the bandwidth optimization of vibration energy harvesting systems comprising multiple piezoelectric cantilevers (PECs. The frequency tuning of a particular cantilever is achieved by changing the tip mass. It is shown that the bandwidth enhancement by mass tuning is limited and requires several PECs with close resonance frequencies. At a fixed frequency detuning between subsequent PECs, the achievable bandwidth shows a saturation behavior as a function of the number of cantilevers used. Since the resonance frequency of each PEC is different, the output voltages at a particular excitation frequency have different amplitudes and phases. A simple power-transfer circuit where several PECs with an individual full wave bridge rectifier are connected in parallel allows one to extract the electrical power close to the theoretical maximum excluding the diode losses. The experiments performed on two- and three-PEC arrays show reasonable agreement with simulations and demonstrate that this power-transfer circuit additionally influences the frequency dependence of the harvested electrical power.

  4. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-01-01

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10−100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed

  5. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E., E-mail: Tilman.Schaeffer@uni-tuebingen [Institute of Applied Physics and LISA, University of Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10−100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed.

  6. Dynamic of cold-atom tips in anharmonic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menold, Tobias; Federsel, Peter; Rogulj, Carola; Hölscher, Hendrik; Fortágh, József

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding the dynamics of ultracold quantum gases in an anharmonic potential is essential for applications in the new field of cold-atom scanning probe microscopy. Therein, cold atomic ensembles are used as sensitive probe tips to investigate nanostructured surfaces and surface-near potentials, which typically cause anharmonic tip motion. Results: Besides a theoretical description of this anharmonic tip motion, we introduce a novel method for detecting the cold-atom tip dynamics in situ and real time. In agreement with theory, the first measurements show that particle interactions and anharmonic motion have a significant impact on the tip dynamics. Conclusion: Our findings will be crucial for the realization of high-sensitivity force spectroscopy with cold-atom tips and could possibly allow for the development of advanced spectroscopic techniques such as Q-control. PMID:28144505

  7. Difficulties in fitting the thermal response of atomic force microscope cantilevers for stiffness calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, D G

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the difficulties of calibrating atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, in particular the effect calibrating under light fluid-loading (in air) and under heavy fluid-loading (in water) has on the ability to use thermal motion response to fit model parameters that are used to determine cantilever stiffness. For the light fluid-loading case, the resonant frequency and quality factor can easily be used to determine stiffness. The extension of this approach to the heavy fluid-loading case is troublesome due to the low quality factor (high damping) caused by fluid-loading. Simple calibration formulae are difficult to realize, and the best approach is often to curve-fit the thermal response, using the parameters of natural frequency and mass ratio so that the curve-fit's response is within some acceptable tolerance of the actual thermal response. The parameters can then be used to calculate the cantilever stiffness. However, the process of curve-fitting can lead to erroneous results unless suitable care is taken. A feedback model of the fluid–structure interaction between the unloaded cantilever and the hydrodynamic drag provides a framework for fitting a modeled thermal response to a measured response and for evaluating the parametric uncertainty of the fit. The cases of uncertainty in the natural frequency, the mass ratio, and combined uncertainty are presented and the implications for system identification and stiffness calibration using curve-fitting techniques are discussed. Finally, considerations and recommendations for the calibration of AFM cantilevers are given in light of the results of this paper

  8. MEMS Tunneling Micro Thermometer Based onTip Deflection of Bimetallic Cantilever Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samrand K. Nezhadian

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Micro-electro-mechanical (MEM technology promises to significantly reduce the size, weight and cost of a variety of sensor systems. In this article has been described a highly sensitive novel type of thermometer based on deflection of a “bimetallic” microbeam. The proposed thermometer converts the thermal changes of a cantilevered bimetallic beam of submillimeter size into an electrical signal through tunneling-current modulation. The governing thermo-mechanical equation of a bimetallic cantilever beam has been derived and solved analytically. The obtained results show that the proposed tunneling micro thermometer is very sensitive to temperature changes due to exponential increasing of tunneling current but because of small gap between metallic electrodes, measurable range of temperature changes is small.

  9. Application of a LIPCA for the structural vibration suppression of an aluminum cantilever beam with a tip mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martua, Landong; Heo, Seok; Goo, Nam Seo

    2007-01-01

    Use of bare PZT as an actuator in the field of active vibration suppression may cause some drawbacks such as critical breaks in the installation process, short circuits in the host material and low fatigue performance. To alleviate these problems, we developed a new actuator called a lightweight piezocomposite actuator (LIPCA). The LIPCA has five layers: three glass-epoxy layers, a carbon-epoxy layer and a PZT layer. We implemented a LIPCA as an actuator to suppress the vibration of an aluminum cantilever beam with a tip mass. For the control algorithm in our test, we used positive position feedback. The filter frequency for this type of feedback should be tuned to the frequency of the target mode. The first three experimental natural frequencies of the aluminum cantilever beam agree well with the results of finite element methods. The effectiveness of using a LIPCA as an actuator in active vibration suppression was investigated with respect to the time and frequency domains, and the experimental results show that LIPCAs can significantly reduce the amplitude of forced vibrations as well as the settling time of free vibrations

  10. Piezoelectric cantilever sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Wan Y. (Inventor); Shih, Wei-Heng (Inventor); Shen, Zuyan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A piezoelectric cantilever with a non-piezoelectric, or piezoelectric tip useful as mass and viscosity sensors. The change in the cantilever mass can be accurately quantified by monitoring a resonance frequency shift of the cantilever. For bio-detection, antibodies or other specific receptors of target antigens may be immobilized on the cantilever surface, preferably on the non-piezoelectric tip. For chemical detection, high surface-area selective absorbent materials are coated on the cantilever tip. Binding of the target antigens or analytes to the cantilever surface increases the cantilever mass. Detection of target antigens or analytes is achieved by monitoring the cantilever's resonance frequency and determining the resonance frequency shift that is due to the mass of the adsorbed target antigens on the cantilever surface. The use of a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever allows both electrical actuation and electrical sensing. Incorporating a non-piezoelectric tip (14) enhances the sensitivity of the sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric cantilever can withstand damping in highly viscous liquids and can be used as a viscosity sensor in wide viscosity range.

  11. Influence of the tip mass and position on the AFM cantilever dynamics: Coupling between bending, torsion and flexural modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari-Nezhad, F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saidi, A.R., E-mail: saidi@mail.uk.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ziaei-Rad, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology (IUT), Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    The effects of the geometrical asymmetric related to tip position as a concentrated mass, on the sensitivity of all three vibration modes, lateral excitation (LE), torsional resonance (TR) and vertical excitation (VE), of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) microcantilever have been analyzed. The effects of the tip mass and its position are studied to report the novel results to estimating the vibration behavior of AFM such as resonance frequency and amplitude of the microcantilever. In this way, to achieve more accurate results, the coupled motion in all three modes is considered. In particular, it is investigated that performing the coupled motion in analysis of AFM microcantilever is almost necessary. It is shown that the tip mass and its position have significant effects on vibrational responses. The results show that considering the tip mass decreases the resonance frequencies particularly on high-order modes. However, dislocating of tip position has an inverse effect that causes an increase in the resonance frequencies. In addition, it has been shown that the amplitude of the AFM microcantilever is affected by the influences of tip and its position. These effects are caused by the interaction between flexural and torsional motion due to the moment of inertia of the tip mass.

  12. Influence of the tip mass and position on the AFM cantilever dynamics: Coupling between bending, torsion and flexural modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari-Nezhad, F.; Saidi, A.R.; Ziaei-Rad, S.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of the geometrical asymmetric related to tip position as a concentrated mass, on the sensitivity of all three vibration modes, lateral excitation (LE), torsional resonance (TR) and vertical excitation (VE), of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) microcantilever have been analyzed. The effects of the tip mass and its position are studied to report the novel results to estimating the vibration behavior of AFM such as resonance frequency and amplitude of the microcantilever. In this way, to achieve more accurate results, the coupled motion in all three modes is considered. In particular, it is investigated that performing the coupled motion in analysis of AFM microcantilever is almost necessary. It is shown that the tip mass and its position have significant effects on vibrational responses. The results show that considering the tip mass decreases the resonance frequencies particularly on high-order modes. However, dislocating of tip position has an inverse effect that causes an increase in the resonance frequencies. In addition, it has been shown that the amplitude of the AFM microcantilever is affected by the influences of tip and its position. These effects are caused by the interaction between flexural and torsional motion due to the moment of inertia of the tip mass.

  13. Enhanced quality factors and force sensitivity by attaching magnetic beads to cantilevers for atomic force microscopy in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoof, Sebastian; Nand Gosvami, Nitya; Hoogenboom, Bart W.

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid remains complicated due to the strong viscous damping of the cantilever resonance. Here, we show that a high-quality resonance (Q >20) can be achieved in aqueous solution by attaching a microgram-bead at the end of the nanogram-cantilever. The resulting increase in cantilever mass causes the resonance frequency to drop significantly. However, the force sensitivity—as expressed via the minimum detectable force gradient—is hardly affected, because of the enhanced quality factor. Through the enhancement of the quality factor, the attached bead also reduces the relative importance of noise in the deflection detector. It can thus yield an improved signal-to-noise ratio when this detector noise is significant. We describe and analyze these effects for a set-up that includes magnetic actuation of the cantilevers and that can be easily implemented in any AFM system that is compatible with an inverted optical microscope.

  14. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, John E; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied - in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry - neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  15. CO tip functionalization in subatomic resolution atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Minjung; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) employing a CO-functionalized tip displays dramatically enhanced resolution wherein covalent bonds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon can be imaged. Employing real-space pseudopotential first-principles calculations, we examine the role of CO in functionalizing the nc-AFM tip. Our calculations allow us to simulate full AFM images and ascertain the enhancement mechanism of the CO molecule. We consider two approaches: one with an explicit inclusion of the CO molecule and one without. By comparing our simulations to existing experimental images, we ascribe the enhanced resolution of the CO functionalized tip to the special orbital characteristics of the CO molecule

  16. Dielectrophoretic positioning of single nanoparticles on atomic force microscope tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Christian; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Singh, Prabha; Wirth, Janina; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, a combination of Raman spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy, is a powerful technique to detect the vibrational fingerprint of molecules at the nanometer scale. A metal nanoparticle at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip leads to a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field when illuminated with an appropriate wavelength, resulting in an increased Raman signal. A controlled positioning of individual nanoparticles at the tip would improve the reproducibility of the probes and is quite demanding due to usually serial and labor-intensive approaches. In contrast to commonly used submicron manipulation techniques, dielectrophoresis allows a parallel and scalable production, and provides a novel approach toward reproducible and at the same time affordable tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tips. We demonstrate the successful positioning of an individual plasmonic nanoparticle on a commercial atomic force microscope tip by dielectrophoresis followed by experimental proof of the Raman signal enhancing capabilities of such tips. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. An atomic force microscope for the study of the effects of tip sample interactions on dimensional metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Koenders, Ludger; Wolff, Helmut

    2007-02-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed for studying interactions between the AFM tip and the sample. Such interactions need to be taken into account when making quantitative measurements. The microscope reported here has both the conventional beam deflection system and a fibre optical interferometer for measuring the movement of the cantilever. Both can be simultaneously used so as to not only servo control the tip movements, but also detect residual movement of the cantilever. Additionally, a high-resolution homodyne differential optical interferometer is used to measure the vertical displacement between the cantilever holder and the sample, thereby providing traceability for vertical height measurements. The instrument is compatible with an x-ray interferometer, thereby facilitating high resolution one-dimensional scans in the X-direction whose metrology is based on the silicon d220 lattice spacing (0.192 nm). This paper concentrates on the first stage of the instrument's development and presents some preliminary results validating the instrument's performance and showing its potential.

  18. Robust procedure for creating and characterizing the atomic structure of scanning tunneling microscope tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Sumit; Bastiaans, Koen M; Allan, Milan P; van Ruitenbeek, Jan M

    2017-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopes (STM) are used extensively for studying and manipulating matter at the atomic scale. In spite of the critical role of the STM tip, procedures for controlling the atomic-scale shape of STM tips have not been rigorously justified. Here, we present a method for preparing tips in situ while ensuring the crystalline structure and a reproducibly prepared tip structure up to the second atomic layer. We demonstrate a controlled evolution of such tips starting from undefined tip shapes.

  19. Atomic force microscope cantilever as an encoding sensor for real-time displacement measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiaomei; Koenders, Ludger; Wolff, Helmut; Haertig, Frank; Schilling, Meinhard

    2010-01-01

    A tuning fork-based atomic force microscope cantilever has been investigated for application as an encoding sensor for real-time displacement measurement. The algorithm used to encode the displacement is based on the direct count of the integer pitches of a known grating, and the calculation of the fractional parts of a pitch at the beginning and during displacement. A cross-correlation technique has been adopted and applied to the real-time signal filtering process for the determination of the pitch during scanning by using a half sinusoidal waveform template. For the first investigation, a 1D sinusoidal grating with the pitch of 300 nm is used. The repeatability of displacement measurements over a distance of 70 µm is better than 2.2 nm. As the first application, the real-time displacement of a scanning stage is measured by the new encoding principle as it is moved in an open-loop mode and closed-loop mode based on its built-in capacitance sensor

  20. Structure and stability of semiconductor tip apexes for atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pou, P; Perez, R; Ghasemi, S A; Goedecker, S; Jelinek, P; Lenosky, T

    2009-01-01

    The short range force between the tip and the surface atoms, that is responsible for atomic-scale contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM), is mainly controlled by the tip apex. Thus, the ability to image, manipulate and chemically identify single atoms in semiconductor surfaces is ultimately determined by the apex structure and its composition. Here we present a detailed and systematic study of the most common structures that can be expected at the apex of the Si tips used in experiments. We tackle the determination of the structure and stability of Si tips with three different approaches: (i) first principles simulations of small tip apexes; (ii) simulated annealing of a Si cluster; and (iii) a minima hopping study of large Si tips. We have probed the tip apexes by making atomic contacts between the tips and then compared force-distance curves with the experimental short range forces obtained with dynamic force spectroscopy. The main conclusion is that although there are multiple stable solutions for the atomically sharp tip apexes, they can be grouped into a few types with characteristic atomic structures and properties. We also show that the structure of the last atomic layers in a tip apex can be both crystalline and amorphous. We corroborate that the atomically sharp tips are thermodynamically stable and that the tip-surface interaction helps to produce the atomic protrusion needed to get atomic resolution.

  1. Resonance frequencies of AFM cantilevers in contact with a surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbiest, G.J., E-mail: Verbiest@physik.rwth-aachen.de [JARA-FIT and II. Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Rost, M.J., E-mail: Rost@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-12-15

    To make the forces in an Atomic Force Microscope that operates in a dynamic mode with one or multiple vibrations applied to the cantilever, quantitative, one needs to relate a change in resonance frequency of the cantilever to a specific tip–sample interaction. Due to the time dependence of the force between the tip and sample caused by the vibrations, this task is not only difficult, but in fact only possible to solve for certain limiting cases, if one follows common theoretical approaches with a Taylor expansion around the deflection point. Here, we present an analytical method for calculating the resonance frequencies of the cantilever that is valid for any tip–sample interaction. Instead of linearizing the tip–sample interaction locally, we calculate an averaged, weighted linearization taking into account all positions of the tip while vibrating. Our method bridges, therefore, the difficult gap between a free oscillating cantilever and a cantilever that is pushed infinitely hard into contact with a surface, which describes a clamped-pinned boundary condition. For a correct description of the cantilever dynamics, we take into account both the tip mass and the tip moment of inertia. Applying our model, we show that it is possible to calculate the modal response of a cantilever as a function of the tip–sample interaction strength. Based on these modal vibration characteristics, we show that the higher resonance frequencies of a cantilever are completely insensitive to the strength of the tip–sample interaction. - Highlights: • A method to calculate the resonances of AFM cantilevers under any force is proposed. • The analytical model is based on Euler-beam theory. • The shift in resonance frequency due to forces decrease with increasing mode number. • The proposed method enables quantitative ultrasound AFM experiments. • Our results explain also the applicability of the higher modes in SubSurface-AFM.

  2. Robust procedure for creating and characterizing the atomic structure of scanning tunneling microscope tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Tewari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Scanning tunneling microscopes (STM are used extensively for studying and manipulating matter at the atomic scale. In spite of the critical role of the STM tip, procedures for controlling the atomic-scale shape of STM tips have not been rigorously justified. Here, we present a method for preparing tips in situ while ensuring the crystalline structure and a reproducibly prepared tip structure up to the second atomic layer. We demonstrate a controlled evolution of such tips starting from undefined tip shapes.

  3. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proksch, R.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample

  4. Note: A scanning electron microscope sample holder for bidirectional characterization of atomic force microscope probe tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenstein, Alon; Goh, M. Cynthia [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    A novel sample holder that enables atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips to be mounted inside a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the purpose of characterizing the AFM tips is described. The holder provides quick and easy handling of tips by using a spring clip to hold them in place. The holder can accommodate two tips simultaneously in two perpendicular orientations, allowing both top and side view imaging of the tips by the SEM.

  5. Energy dissipation in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Pukhova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The instantaneous displacement, velocity and acceleration of a cantilever tip impacting onto a graphite surface are reconstructed. The total dissipated energy and the dissipated energy per cycle of each excited flexural mode during the tip interaction is retrieved. The tip dynamics evolution is studied by wavelet analysis techniques that have general relevance for multi-mode atomic force microscopy, in a regime where few cantilever oscillation cycles characterize the tip–sample interaction.

  6. Robustness of tungsten single atom tips to thermal treatment and air exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesa, Cristian; Urban, Radovan [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G7 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2M9 (Canada); Pitters, Jason L., E-mail: jason.pitters@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2M9 (Canada); Wolkow, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G7 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2M9 (Canada)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • W(1 1 1) single atom tips (SATs) were exposed to air. • SATs could be regenerated by field assisted chemical etching after exposure. • Warming procedures to minimize tip contamination were developed. • Degassing temperatures for air exposed tips were established. • Tip faceting occurred when SATs and unetched tips were annealed above 1200 °C. - Abstract: Experiments aimed at assessing the robustness of nitrogen-etched, single-atom tips (SATs) prepared using W(1 1 1) single crystal wire were performed. Our experiments showed that single-atoms tips sustain minimal damage when exposed to atmospheric conditions and can be readily and quickly nitrogen-etched to single-atom tips thereafter. The SATs can be annealed at temperatures up to 1100 °C with minimal shape changes. Moreover, annealing temperatures in excess of 1200 °C resulted in an apex faceting which may prove important in further single-atom tip creation. Procedures for warming of the SATs from operating temperatures of 80 K were also evaluated to determine conditions that limit tip contamination. These results show that SATS could be fabricated in a dedicated vacuum system and subsequently transferred to other instruments where they would undergo a brief conditioning procedure to recover the single-atom apex configuration prior to being subjected to operating conditions.

  7. Refined tip preparation by electrochemical etching and ultrahigh vacuum treatment to obtain atomically sharp tips for scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Till; El Ouali, Mehdi; Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter

    2011-11-01

    A modification of the common electrochemical etching setup is presented. The described method reproducibly yields sharp tungsten tips for usage in the scanning tunneling microscope and tuning fork atomic force microscope. In situ treatment under ultrahigh vacuum (p ≤10(-10) mbar) conditions for cleaning and fine sharpening with minimal blunting is described. The structure of the microscopic apex of these tips is atomically resolved with field ion microscopy and cross checked with field emission. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  8. Refined tip preparation by electrochemical etching and ultrahigh vacuum treatment to obtain atomically sharp tips for scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagedorn, Till; Ouali, Mehdi El; Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Gruetter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A modification of the common electrochemical etching setup is presented. The described method reproducibly yields sharp tungsten tips for usage in the scanning tunneling microscope and tuning fork atomic force microscope. In situ treatment under ultrahigh vacuum (p ≤10 -10 mbar) conditions for cleaning and fine sharpening with minimal blunting is described. The structure of the microscopic apex of these tips is atomically resolved with field ion microscopy and cross checked with field emission.

  9. Conductive oxide cantilever for cryogenic nano-potentiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroya, Tsutomu; Inagaki, Katsuhiko; Tanda, Satoshi; Tsuneta, Taku; Yamaya, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Nanoscale electrical transport properties have attracted attentions because of new phenomena such as ballistic transport, quantized resistance, and Coulomb blockade. For measurement of nanoscale resistance, we have been developing a cryogenic atomic force microscope that can operate at 1.8 K. To use it as an electrode, we coated the cantilever with conductive oxides of TiO and indium tin oxide (ITO). We verified that TiO and ITO thin films remain conductive even at 4.2 K. Also we measured I-V characteristics of the tip-sample contact with a standard sample of NbSe 2 single crystal, and found that the conductive coats were not lost under large stresses due to the tip-sample contact. Moreover, we succeeded in obtaining a room temperature nano-potentiometry of a gold thin film with the ITO coated cantilever. In conclusion, the TiO and ITO coated cantilevers are applicable to cryogenic nano-potentiometry

  10. Influence of the tip mass on the tip-sample interactions in TM-AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat, E-mail: nejat@mech.sharif.edu [Nano-Robotics Laboratory, Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, P.O. Box 11365-9465 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meghdari, Ali [Nano-Robotics Laboratory, Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, P.O. Box 11365-9465 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    This paper focuses on the influences of the tip mass ratio (the ratio of the tip mass to the cantilever mass), on the excitation of higher oscillation eigenmodes and also on the tip-sample interaction forces in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). A precise model for the cantilever dynamics capable of accurate simulations is essential for the investigation of the tip mass effects on the interaction forces. In the present work, the finite element method (FEM) is used for modeling the AFM cantilever to consider the oscillations of higher eigenmodes oscillations. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) is used to calculate precise data for the tip-sample force as a function of tip vertical position with respect to the sample. The results demonstrate that in the presence of nonlinear tip-sample interaction forces, the tip mass ratio plays a significant role in the excitations of higher eigenmodes and also in the normal force applied on the surface. Furthermore, it has been shown that the difference between responses of the FEM and point-mass models in different system operational conditions is highly affected by the tip mass ratio. -- Highlights: {yields} A strong correlation exists between the tip mass ratio and the 18th harmonic amplitude. {yields} Near the critical tip mass ratio a small change in the tip mass may lead to a significant force change. {yields} Inaccuracy of the lumped model depends significantly on the tip mass ratio.

  11. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  12. Microelectromechanical system device for calibration of atomic force microscope cantilever spring constants between 0.01 and 4 N/m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Hedley, John; Clifford, Charles A.; Chen Xinyong; Allen, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    Calibration of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is necessary for the measurement of nano-newton and pico-newton forces, which are critical to analytical application of AFM in the analysis of polymer surfaces, biological structures and organic molecules. Previously we have described microfabricated array of reference spring (MARS) devices for AFM cantilever spring-constant calibration. Hitherto, these have been limited to the calibration of AFM cantilevers above 0.03 N/m, although they can be used to calibrate cantilevers of lower stiffness with reduced accuracy. Below this limit MARS devices similar to the designs hitherto described would be fragile and difficult to manufacture with reasonable yield. In this work we describe a device we call torsional MARS. This is a large-area torsional mechanical resonator, manufactured by bulk micromachining of a 'silicon-on-insulator' wafer. By measuring its torsional oscillation accurately in vacuum we can deduce its torsional spring constant. The torsional reference spring spans the range of spring constant (from 4 down to 0.01 N/m) that is important in biological AFM, allowing even the most compliant AFM cantilever to be calibrated easily and rapidly

  13. Numerical simulations for quantitative analysis of electrostatic interaction between atomic force microscopy probe and an embedded electrode within a thin dielectric: meshing optimization, sensitivity to potential distribution and impact of cantilever contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azib, M.; Baudoin, F.; Binaud, N.; Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Bugarin, F.; Segonds, S.; Teyssedre, G.

    2018-04-01

    Recent experimental results demonstrated that an electrostatic force distance curve (EFDC) can be used for space charge probing in thin dielectric layers. A main advantage of the method is claimed to be its sensitivity to charge localization, which, however, needs to be substantiated by numerical simulations. In this paper, we have developed a model which permits us to compute an EFDC accurately by using the most sophisticated and accurate geometry for the atomic force microscopy probe. To avoid simplifications and in order to reproduce experimental conditions, the EFDC has been simulated for a system constituted of a polarized electrode embedded in a thin dielectric layer (SiN x ). The individual contributions of forces on the tip and on the cantilever have been analyzed separately to account for possible artefacts. The EFDC sensitivity to potential distribution is studied through the change in electrode shape, namely the width and the depth. Finally, the numerical results have been compared with experimental data.

  14. Three-way flexible cantilever probes for static contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fei; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Jensen, Helle Vendelbo

    2011-01-01

    In micro four-point probe measurements, three-way flexible L-shaped cantilever probes show significant advantages over conventional straight cantilever probes. The L-shaped cantilever allows static contact to the sample surface which reduces the frictional wear of the cantilever tips. We analyze...

  15. The mechanisms underlying the enhanced resolution of atomic force microscopy with functionalized tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, Nikolaj; Gross, Leo; Mohn, Fabian; Curioni, Alessandro; Meyer, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    By functionalizing the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a molecule or an atom that significantly contributes to the tip-sample interaction, the resolution can be dramatically enhanced. The interaction and therefore the resolution crucially depend on the chemical nature of the tip termination. Employing a tip functionalized with a CO molecule, atomic resolution of a pentacene molecule was recently demonstrated. In this work, the interaction between the CO tip and the pentacene imaged are studied with first principles calculations. The calculated frequency shifts compare very well with the experiment. The different energy contributions are analyzed and the Pauli energy is computed. We demonstrate that the source of the high resolution is Pauli repulsion, whereas van der Waals and electrostatic interactions only add a diffuse attractive background.

  16. Influence of atomic force microscope tip-sample interaction on the study of scaling behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aue, J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1997-01-01

    Images acquired with atomic force microscopy are based on tip-sample interaction. It is shown that using scanning probe techniques for determining scaling parameters of a surface leads to an underestimate of the actual scaling dimension, due to the dilation of tip and surface. How much we

  17. Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Kocun, Marta; Walsh, Tim; Meinhold, Jieh; Proksch, Tania; Meinhold, Waiman; Anderson, Caleb; Proksch, Roger; Lysy, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented for calibrating the higher eigenmodes (resonant modes) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers that can be performed prior to any tip-sample interaction. The method leverages recent efforts in accurately calibrating the first eigenmode by providing the higher-mode stiffness as a ratio to the first mode stiffness. A one-time calibration routine must be performed for every cantilever type to determine a power-law relationship between stiffness and frequency, which is then stored for future use on similar cantilevers. Then, future calibrations only require a measurement of the ratio of resonant frequencies and the stiffness of the first mode. This method is verified through stiffness measurements using three independent approaches: interferometric measurement, AC approach-curve calibration, and finite element analysis simulation. Power-law values for calibrating higher-mode stiffnesses are reported for several cantilever models. Once the higher-mode stiffnesses are known, the amplitude of each mode can also be calibrated from the thermal spectrum by application of the equipartition theorem.

  18. Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Kocun, Marta; Walsh, Tim; Meinhold, Jieh; Proksch, Tania; Meinhold, Waiman; Anderson, Caleb; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, an Oxford Instruments Company, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States); Lysy, Martin [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    A method is presented for calibrating the higher eigenmodes (resonant modes) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers that can be performed prior to any tip-sample interaction. The method leverages recent efforts in accurately calibrating the first eigenmode by providing the higher-mode stiffness as a ratio to the first mode stiffness. A one-time calibration routine must be performed for every cantilever type to determine a power-law relationship between stiffness and frequency, which is then stored for future use on similar cantilevers. Then, future calibrations only require a measurement of the ratio of resonant frequencies and the stiffness of the first mode. This method is verified through stiffness measurements using three independent approaches: interferometric measurement, AC approach-curve calibration, and finite element analysis simulation. Power-law values for calibrating higher-mode stiffnesses are reported for several cantilever models. Once the higher-mode stiffnesses are known, the amplitude of each mode can also be calibrated from the thermal spectrum by application of the equipartition theorem.

  19. Analysis the effect of different geometries of AFM's cantilever on the dynamic behavior and the critical forces of three-dimensional manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad, E-mail: hkorayem@iust.ac.ir; Saraie, Maniya B.; Saraee, Mahdieh B.

    2017-04-15

    An important challenge when using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is to be able to control the force exerted by the AFM for performing various tasks. Nevertheless, the exerted force is proportional to the deflection of the AFM cantilever, which itself is affected by a cantilever's stiffness coefficient. Many papers have been published so far on the methods of obtaining the stiffness coefficients of AFM cantilevers in 2D; however, a comprehensive model is yet to be presented on 3D cantilever motion. The discrepancies between the equations of the 2D and 3D analysis are due to the number and direction of forces and moments that are applied to a cantilever. Moreover, in the 3D analysis, contrary to the 2D analysis, due to the interaction between the forces and moments applied on a cantilever, its stiffness values cannot be separately expressed for each direction; and instead, a stiffness matrix should be used to correctly derive the relevant equations. In this paper, 3D stiffness coefficient matrices have been obtained for three common cantilever geometries including the rectangular, V-shape and dagger-shape cantilevers. The obtained equations are validated by two methods. In the first approach, the Finite Element Method is combined with the cantilever deflection values computed by using the obtained stiffness matrices. In the second approach, by reducing the problem's parameters, the forces applied on a cantilever along different directions are compared with each other in 2D and 3D cases. Then the 3D manipulation of a stiff nanoparticle is modeled and simulated by using the stiffness matrices obtained for the three cantilever geometries. The obtained results indicate that during the manipulation process, the dagger-shaped and rectangular cantilevers exert the maximum and minimum amounts of forces on the stiff nanoparticle, respectively. Also, by examining the effects of different probe tip geometries, it is realized that a probe tip of cylindrical geometry

  20. Analysis the effect of different geometries of AFM's cantilever on the dynamic behavior and the critical forces of three-dimensional manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Saraie, Maniya B.; Saraee, Mahdieh B.

    2017-01-01

    An important challenge when using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is to be able to control the force exerted by the AFM for performing various tasks. Nevertheless, the exerted force is proportional to the deflection of the AFM cantilever, which itself is affected by a cantilever's stiffness coefficient. Many papers have been published so far on the methods of obtaining the stiffness coefficients of AFM cantilevers in 2D; however, a comprehensive model is yet to be presented on 3D cantilever motion. The discrepancies between the equations of the 2D and 3D analysis are due to the number and direction of forces and moments that are applied to a cantilever. Moreover, in the 3D analysis, contrary to the 2D analysis, due to the interaction between the forces and moments applied on a cantilever, its stiffness values cannot be separately expressed for each direction; and instead, a stiffness matrix should be used to correctly derive the relevant equations. In this paper, 3D stiffness coefficient matrices have been obtained for three common cantilever geometries including the rectangular, V-shape and dagger-shape cantilevers. The obtained equations are validated by two methods. In the first approach, the Finite Element Method is combined with the cantilever deflection values computed by using the obtained stiffness matrices. In the second approach, by reducing the problem's parameters, the forces applied on a cantilever along different directions are compared with each other in 2D and 3D cases. Then the 3D manipulation of a stiff nanoparticle is modeled and simulated by using the stiffness matrices obtained for the three cantilever geometries. The obtained results indicate that during the manipulation process, the dagger-shaped and rectangular cantilevers exert the maximum and minimum amounts of forces on the stiff nanoparticle, respectively. Also, by examining the effects of different probe tip geometries, it is realized that a probe tip of cylindrical geometry exerts the

  1. Quantitative assessment of intermolecular interactions by atomic force microscopy imaging using copper oxide tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönig, Harry; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Timmer, Alexander; Hu, Zhixin; Liu, Lacheng; Díaz Arado, Oscar; Cnudde, Marvin; Strassert, Cristian Alejandro; Ji, Wei; Rohlfing, Michael; Fuchs, Harald

    2018-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy is an impressive tool with which to directly resolve the bonding structure of organic compounds1-5. The methodology usually involves chemical passivation of the probe-tip termination by attaching single molecules or atoms such as CO or Xe (refs 1,6-9). However, these probe particles are only weakly connected to the metallic apex, which results in considerable dynamic deflection. This probe particle deflection leads to pronounced image distortions, systematic overestimation of bond lengths, and in some cases even spurious bond-like contrast features, thus inhibiting reliable data interpretation8-12. Recently, an alternative approach to tip passivation has been used in which slightly indenting a tip into oxidized copper substrates and subsequent contrast analysis allows for the verification of an oxygen-terminated Cu tip13-15. Here we show that, due to the covalently bound configuration of the terminal oxygen atom, this copper oxide tip (CuOx tip) has a high structural stability, allowing not only a quantitative determination of individual bond lengths and access to bond order effects, but also reliable intermolecular bond characterization. In particular, by removing the previous limitations of flexible probe particles, we are able to provide conclusive experimental evidence for an unusual intermolecular N-Au-N three-centre bond. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CuOx tips allow the characterization of the strength and configuration of individual hydrogen bonds within a molecular assembly.

  2. Note: Determination of torsional spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers: Combining normal spring constant and classical beam theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez-Asencio, R.; Thormann, Esben; Rutland, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    A technique has been developed for the calculation of torsional spring constants for AFM cantilevers based on the combination of the normal spring constant and plate/beam theory. It is easy to apply and allow the determination of torsional constants for stiff cantilevers where the thermal power s...... spectrum is difficult to obtain due to the high resonance frequency and low signal/noise ratio. The applicability is shown to be general and this simple approach can thus be used to obtain torsional constants for any beam shaped cantilever. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC....

  3. Functionalization of gold and nanocrystalline diamond atomic force microscope tips for single molecule force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Michael E.

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has fueled interest in nanotechnology because of its ability to image surfaces at the nanometer level and act as a molecular force sensor. Functionalization of the surface of an AFM tip surface in a stable, controlled manner expands the capabilities of the AFM and enables additional applications in the fields of single molecule force spectroscopy and nanolithography. Two AFM tip functionalizations are described: the assembly of tripodal molecular tips onto gold AFM tips and the photochemical attachment of terminal alkenes to nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) AFM tips. Two separate tripodal molecules with different linker lengths and a monopodal molecule terminated with biotin were synthesized to attach to a gold AFM tip for single molecule force spectroscopy. The immobilization of these molecules was examined by contact angle measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. All three molecules displayed rupture forces that agreed with previously reported values for the biotin--avidin rupture. The tripodal molecular tip displayed narrower distribution in their force histograms than the monopodal molecular tip. The performance of the tripodal molecular tip was compared to the monopodal molecular tip in single molecule force spectroscopy studies. Over repeated measurements, the distribution of forces for the monopodal molecular tip shifted to lower forces, whereas the distribution for the tripodal molecular tip remained constant throughout. Loading rate dependence and control experiments further indicated that the rupture forces of the tripod molecular tips were specific to the biotin--NeutrAvidin interaction. The second functionalization method used the photochemical attachment of undecylenic acid to NCD AFM tips. The photochemical attachment of undecylenic acid to hydrogen-terminated NCD wafer surfaces was investigated by contact angle measurements, x

  4. Thermoelectric voltage at a nanometer-scale heated tip point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Patrick C.; Lee, Byeonghee; King, William P.

    2012-01-01

    We report thermoelectric voltage measurements between the platinum-coated tip of a heated atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and a gold-coated substrate. The cantilevers have an integrated heater-thermometer element made from doped single crystal silicon, and a platinum tip. The voltage can be measured at the tip, independent from the cantilever heating. We used the thermocouple junction between the platinum tip and the gold substrate to measure thermoelectric voltage during heating. Experiments used either sample-side or tip-side heating, over the temperature range 25-275 °C. The tip-substrate contact is ˜4 nm in diameter and its average measured Seebeck coefficient is 3.4 μV K-1. The thermoelectric voltage is used to determine tip-substrate interface temperature when the substrate is either glass or quartz. When the non-dimensional cantilever heater temperature is 1, the tip-substrate interface temperature is 0.593 on glass and 0.125 on quartz. Thermal contact resistance between the tip and the substrate heavily influences the tip-substrate interface temperature. Measurements agree well with modeling when the tip-substrate interface contact resistance is 108 K W-1.

  5. Probing the atomic structure of metallic nanoclusters with the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouteden, Koen; Lauwaet, Koen; Janssens, Ewald; Barcaro, Giovanni; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Lievens, Peter

    2014-02-21

    Preformed Co clusters with an average diameter of 2.5 nm are produced in the gas phase and are deposited under controlled ultra-high vacuum conditions onto a thin insulating NaCl film on Au(111). Relying on a combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we demonstrate visualization of the three-dimensional atomic structure of the Co clusters by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) using a Cl functionalized STM tip that can be obtained on the NaCl surface. More generally, use of a functionalized STM tip may allow for systematic atomic structure determination with STM of nanoparticles that are deposited on metal surfaces.

  6. Investigation of static and dynamic behavior of functionally graded piezoelectric actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Vibhuti Bhushan; Parashar, Sandeep Kumar, E-mail: skparashar@rtu.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajasthan Technical University, Kota (India)

    2016-04-13

    In the present paper a novel functionally graded piezoelectric (FGP) actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe is proposed for atomic force microscope. The shear piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 15} has much higher value than coupling coefficients d{sub 31} and d{sub 33}, hence in the present work the micro cantilever beam actuated by d{sub 15} effect is utilized. The material properties are graded in the thickness direction of actuator by a simple power law. A three dimensional finite element analysis has been performed using COMSOL Multiphysics® (version 4.2) software. Tip deflection and free vibration analysis for the micro cantilever probe has been done. The results presented in the paper shall be useful in the design of micro cantilever probe and their subsequent utilization in atomic force microscopes.

  7. Tapping mode imaging and measurements with an inverted atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sandra S F; Green, John-Bruce D

    2006-07-18

    This report demonstrates the successful use of the inverted atomic force microscope (i-AFM) for tapping mode AFM imaging of cantilever-supported samples. i-AFM is a mode of AFM operation in which a sample supported on a tipless cantilever is imaged by one of many tips in a microfabricated tip array. Tapping mode is an intermittent contact mode whereby the cantilever is oscillated at or near its resonance frequency, and the amplitude and/or phase are used to image the sample. In the process of demonstrating that tapping mode images could be obtained in the i-AFM design, it was observed that the amplitude of the cantilever oscillation decreased markedly as the cantilever and tip array were approached. The source of this damping of the cantilever oscillations was identified to be the well-known "squeeze film damping", and the extent of damping was a direct consequence of the relatively shorter tip heights for the tip arrays, as compared to those of commercially available tapping mode cantilevers with integrated tips. The functional form for the distance dependence of the damping coefficient is in excellent agreement with previously published models for squeeze film damping, and the values for the fitting parameters make physical sense. Although the severe damping reduces the cantilever free amplitude substantially, we found that we were still able to access the low-amplitude regime of oscillation necessary for attractive tapping mode imaging of fragile molecules.

  8. Lateral and vertical manipulations of single atoms on the Ag(1 1 1) surface with the copper single-atom and trimer-apex tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yiqun; Yang Tianxing; Ye Xiang; Huang Lei

    2011-01-01

    We study the lateral and vertical manipulations of single Ag and Cu atoms on the Ag(1 1 1) surface with the Cu single-atom and trimer-apex tips using molecular statics simulations. The reliability of the lateral manipulation with the Cu single-atom tip is investigated, and compared with that for the Ag tips. We find that overall the manipulation reliability (MR) increases with the decreasing tip height, and in a wide tip-height range the MR is better than those for both the Ag single-atom and trimer-apex tips. This is due to the stronger attractive force of the Cu tip and its better stability against the interactions with the Ag surface. With the Cu trimer-apex tip, the single Ag and Cu adatoms can be picked up from the flat Ag(1 1 1) surface, and moreover a reversible vertical manipulation of single Ag atoms on the stepped Ag(1 1 1) surface is possible, suggesting a method to modify two-dimensional Ag nanostructures on the Ag(1 1 1) surface with the Cu trimer-apex tip.

  9. An analytical model accounting for tip shape evolution during atom probe analysis of heterogeneous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, N; Larson, D J; Geiser, B P; Duguay, S; Vurpillot, F; Blavette, D

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model describing the field evaporation dynamics of a tip made of a thin layer deposited on a substrate is presented in this paper. The difference in evaporation field between the materials is taken into account in this approach in which the tip shape is modeled at a mesoscopic scale. It was found that the non-existence of sharp edge on the surface is a sufficient condition to derive the morphological evolution during successive evaporation of the layers. This modeling gives an instantaneous and smooth analytical representation of the surface that shows good agreement with finite difference simulations results, and a specific regime of evaporation was highlighted when the substrate is a low evaporation field phase. In addition, the model makes it possible to calculate theoretically the tip analyzed volume, potentially opening up new horizons for atom probe tomographic reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [TIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzini, Augusto; Carrillo, Alvaro; Cantella, Raúl

    1998-01-01

    Esophageal hemorrage due to variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients represents a serious problem for the physician in charge, especially in this country where liver transplants are inexistent; and also, it is a drama for the patient and its familly. We propose here the Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS). Twenty one patients were part of a study where 23 TIPS were placed, observing an immediate improval in 18 of them, a rebleeding in 2, within the first 24 and 48 hours. An embolization of the coronary veins was performed in the procedure in 15 patients, and a second intervention due to rebleeding in 2 of them. In the latter patients, the embolization of the coronary veins was rutinary.The survival of the patients has been outstanding.We conclude that this interventional procedure is a worldwide reality in the treatment of esophageal hemorrage by variceal bleeding due to portal hipertension, and it does not cut down the probability of liver transplant, unfortunately inexistent in our country. This procedure results in a low morbimortality with an adequate quality of life.

  11. Resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Cantrell, Sean A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope and methodology called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features.

  12. Influence of the atomic force microscope tip on the multifractal analysis of rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapetek, Petr; Ohlidal, Ivan; Bilek, Jindrich

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of atomic force microscope tip on the multifractal analysis of rough surfaces is discussed. This analysis is based on two methods, i.e. on the correlation function method and the wavelet transform modulus maxima method. The principles of both methods are briefly described. Both methods are applied to simulated rough surfaces (simulation is performed by the spectral synthesis method). It is shown that the finite dimensions of the microscope tip misrepresent the values of the quantities expressing the multifractal analysis of rough surfaces within both the methods. Thus, it was concretely shown that the influence of the finite dimensions of the microscope tip changed mono-fractal properties of simulated rough surface to multifractal ones. Further, it is shown that a surface reconstruction method developed for removing the negative influence of the microscope tip does not improve the results obtained in a substantial way. The theoretical procedures concerning both the methods, i.e. the correlation function method and the wavelet transform modulus maxima method, are illustrated for the multifractal analysis of randomly rough gallium arsenide surfaces prepared by means of the thermal oxidation of smooth gallium arsenide surfaces and subsequent dissolution of the oxide films

  13. Functionalization of atomic force microscope tips by dielectrophoretic assembly of Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Andreia G; Ananias, Duarte; Andre, Paulo S; Ferreira, Rute A sa; Carlos, Luis D; Kholkin, Andrei L; Rocha, J

    2008-01-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip has been coated with photoluminescent Eu 3+ -doped Gd 2 O 3 nanorods using a dielectrophoresis technique, which preserves the red emission of the nanorods (quantum yield 0.47). The performance of the modified tips has been tested by using them for regular topography imaging in tapping and contact modes. Both a regular AFM standard grid and a patterned surface (of an organic-inorganic methacrylate Zr-based oxo-cluster and poly(oxyethylene)/siloxane hybrid) have been used. Similar depth values have been measured using a conventional silicon tip and the nanorod-modified tip. The tips before and after use exhibit similar SEM images and photoluminescence spectra and, thus, seem to be stable under working conditions. These tips should find applications in scanning near-field optical microscopy and other scanning techniques

  14. An intelligent control scheme for precise tip-motion control in atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanyan; Hu, Xiaodong; Xu, Linyan

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a new intelligent control method to precisely control the tip motion of the atomic force microscopy (AFM). The tip moves up and down at a high rate along the z direction during scanning, requiring the utilization of a rapid feedback controller. The standard proportional-integral (PI) feedback controller is commonly used in commercial AFMs to enable topography measurements. The controller's response performance is determined by the set of the proportional (P) parameter and the integral (I) parameter. However, the two parameters cannot be automatically altered simultaneously according to the scanning speed and the surface topography during continuors scanning, leading to an inaccurate measurement. Thus a new intelligent controller combining the fuzzy controller and the PI controller is put forward in the paper. The new controller automatically selects the most appropriate PI parameters to achieve a fast response rate on basis of the tracking errors. In the experimental setup, the new controller is realized with a digital signal process (DSP) system, implemented in a conventional AFM system. Experiments are carried out by comparing the new method with the standard PI controller. The results demonstrate that the new method is more robust and effective for the precise tip motion control, corresponding to the achievement of a highly qualified image by shortening the response time of the controller. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Lateral manipulation of small clusters on the Cu and Ag(1 1 1) surfaces with the single-atom and trimer-apex tips: Reliability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yiqun; Liu Fen; Huang Lei

    2010-01-01

    We study the reliability of the lateral manipulation of small Cu clusters (dimer and trimer) on the flat Cu(1 1 1) surface with both the single-atom and trimer-apex tips and that for the Ag/Ag(1 1 1) system, and compare the results between the two systems as well as with the single-atom manipulation on these surfaces. Manipulations are simulated using molecular statics method with semi-empirical potentials. The dependence of the manipulation reliability on the tip height and tip orientation are investigated. Overall, the manipulation reliability increases with decreasing tip height although it depends obviously on the tip orientation. For the Cu/Cu(1 1 1) system, the manipulation of the dimmer and trimer can be successful with both tips. The manipulation reliability can be improved by the trimer-apex tip, and the tip-height range for the successful manipulation is also broader, as compared to the single-atom apex tip. Differently from the single-atom manipulation, the tip orientation has a noticeable influence on the manipulation reliability even for the single-atom tip due to the stronger tip-cluster and surface-adatom interactions in cluster manipulation. For the Ag/Ag(1 1 1) system, successful manipulations only be achieved with the trimer-apex tip, and the manipulation reliability is worse than that of the Cu/Cu(1 1 1) system, indicating the difference in mechanic properties between the two surfaces at the atomic level.

  16. Reliable lateral and vertical manipulations of a single Cu adatom on a Cu(111) surface with multi-atom apex tip: semiempirical and first-principles simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yiqun; Liu Qingwei; Zhang Peng; Wang Songyou; Li Yufen; Gan Fuxi; Zhuang Jun; Zhang Wenqing; Zhuang Min

    2008-01-01

    We study the reliability of the lateral manipulation of a single Cu adatom on a Cu(111) surface with single-atom, dimer and trimer apex tips using both semiempirical and first-principles simulations. The dependence of the manipulation reliability on tip height is investigated. For the single-atom apex tip the manipulation reliability increases monotonically with decreasing tip height. For the dimer and trimer apex tips the manipulation reliability is greatly improved compared to that for the single-atom apex tip over a certain tip-height range. Two kinds of mechanism are found responsible for this improvement. One is the so-called enhanced interaction mechanism in which the lateral tip-adatom interaction in the manipulation direction is improved. The other is the suspended atom mechanism in which the relative lateral trapping ability of the tip is improved due to the strong vertical attraction of the tip on the adatom. Both mechanisms occur in the manipulations with the trimer apex tip, while in those with the dimer apex tip only the former is effective. Moreover, we present a method to realize reversible vertical manipulation of a single atom on a Cu(111) surface with the trimer apex tip, based on its strong vertical and lateral attraction on the adatom

  17. Silver nanowires for highly reproducible cantilever based AFM-TERS microscopy: towards a universal TERS probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walke, Peter; Fujita, Yasuhiko; Peeters, Wannes; Toyouchi, Shuichi; Frederickx, Wout; De Feyter, Steven; Uji-I, Hiroshi

    2018-04-26

    Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) microscopy is a unique analytical tool to provide complementary chemical and topographic information of surfaces with nanometric resolution. However, difficulties in reliably producing the necessary metallized scanning probe tips has limited its widespread utilisation, particularly in the case of cantilever-based atomic force microscopy. Attempts to alleviate tip related issues using colloidal or bottom-up engineered tips have so far not reported consistent probes for both Raman and topographic imaging. Here we demonstrate the reproducible fabrication of cantilever-based high-performance TERS probes for both topographic and Raman measurements, based on an approach that utilises noble metal nanowires as the active TERS probe. The tips show 10 times higher TERS contrasts than the most typically used electrochemically-etched tips, and show a reproducibility for TERS greater than 90%, far greater than found with standard methods. We show that TERS can be performed in tapping as well as contact AFM mode, with optical resolutions around or below 15 nm, and with a maximum resolution achieved in tapping-mode of 6 nm. Our work illustrates that superior TERS probes can be produced in a fast and cost-effective manner using simple wet-chemistry methods, leading to reliable and reproducible high-resolution and high-sensitivity TERS, and thus renders the technique applicable for a broad community.

  18. Thermoelectric voltage at a nanometer-scale heated tip point contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, Patrick C; Lee, Byeonghee; King, William P

    2012-01-01

    We report thermoelectric voltage measurements between the platinum-coated tip of a heated atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and a gold-coated substrate. The cantilevers have an integrated heater–thermometer element made from doped single crystal silicon, and a platinum tip. The voltage can be measured at the tip, independent from the cantilever heating. We used the thermocouple junction between the platinum tip and the gold substrate to measure thermoelectric voltage during heating. Experiments used either sample-side or tip-side heating, over the temperature range 25–275 °C. The tip–substrate contact is ∼4 nm in diameter and its average measured Seebeck coefficient is 3.4 μV K −1 . The thermoelectric voltage is used to determine tip–substrate interface temperature when the substrate is either glass or quartz. When the non-dimensional cantilever heater temperature is 1, the tip–substrate interface temperature is 0.593 on glass and 0.125 on quartz. Thermal contact resistance between the tip and the substrate heavily influences the tip–substrate interface temperature. Measurements agree well with modeling when the tip–substrate interface contact resistance is 10 8 K W −1 . (paper)

  19. Evaluation of the nanotube intrinsic resistance across the tip-carbon nanotube-metal substrate junction by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamarguy David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Using an atomic force microscope (AFM at a controlled contact force, we report the electrical signal response of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs disposed on a golden thin film. In this investigation, we highlight first the theoretical calculation of the contact resistance between two types of conductive tips (metal-coated and doped diamond-coated, individual MWCNTs and golden substrate. We also propose a circuit analysis model to schematize the «tip-CNT-substrate» junction by means of a series-parallel resistance network. We estimate the contact resistance R of each contribution of the junction such as R tip-CNT, R CNT-substrate and R tip-substrate by using the Sharvin resistance model. Our final objective is thus to deduce the CNT intrinsic radial resistance taking into account the calculated electrical resistance values with the global resistance measured experimentally. An unwished electrochemical phenomenon at the tip apex has also been evidenced by performing measurements at different bias voltages with diamond tips. For negative tip-substrate bias, a systematic degradation in color and contrast of the electrical cartography occurs, consisting of an important and non-reversible increase of the measured resistance. This effect is attributed to the oxidation of some amorphous carbon areas scattered over the diamond layer covering the tip. For a direct polarization, the CNT and substrate surface can in turn be modified by an oxidation mechanism.

  20. Reversible mechano-electrochemical writing of metallic nanostructures with the tip of an atomic force microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Obermair

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We recently introduced a method that allows the controlled deposition of nanoscale metallic patterns at defined locations using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM as a “mechano-electrochemical pen”, locally activating a passivated substrate surface for site-selective electrochemical deposition. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility of this process and study the long-term stability of the resulting metallic structures. The remarkable stability for more than 1.5 years under ambient air without any observable changes can be attributed to self-passivation. After AFM-activated electrochemical deposition of copper nanostructures on a polycrystalline gold film and subsequent AFM imaging, the copper nanostructures could be dissolved by reversing the electrochemical potential. Subsequent AFM-tip-activated deposition of different copper nanostructures at the same location where the previous structures were deleted, shows that there is no observable memory effect, i.e., no effect of the previous writing process on the subsequent writing process. Thus, the four processes required for reversible information storage, “write”, “read”, “delete” and “re-write”, were successfully demonstrated on the nanometer scale.

  1. Reversible mechano-electrochemical writing of metallic nanostructures with the tip of an atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermair, Christian; Kress, Marina; Wagner, Andreas; Schimmel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We recently introduced a method that allows the controlled deposition of nanoscale metallic patterns at defined locations using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a "mechano-electrochemical pen", locally activating a passivated substrate surface for site-selective electrochemical deposition. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility of this process and study the long-term stability of the resulting metallic structures. The remarkable stability for more than 1.5 years under ambient air without any observable changes can be attributed to self-passivation. After AFM-activated electrochemical deposition of copper nanostructures on a polycrystalline gold film and subsequent AFM imaging, the copper nanostructures could be dissolved by reversing the electrochemical potential. Subsequent AFM-tip-activated deposition of different copper nanostructures at the same location where the previous structures were deleted, shows that there is no observable memory effect, i.e., no effect of the previous writing process on the subsequent writing process. Thus, the four processes required for reversible information storage, "write", "read", "delete" and "re-write", were successfully demonstrated on the nanometer scale.

  2. Spatial Manipulation and Assembly of Nanoparticles by Atomic Force Microscopy Tip-Induced Dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Yang, Wenguang; Wen, Yangdong; Wang, Zhidong; Li, Wen Jung; Liu, Lianqing

    2017-05-17

    In this article, we present a novel method of spatial manipulation and assembly of nanoparticles via atomic force microscopy tip-induced dielectrophoresis (AFM-DEP). This method combines the high-accuracy positioning of AFM with the parallel manipulation of DEP. A spatially nonuniform electric field is induced by applying an alternating current (AC) voltage between the conductive AFM probe and an indium tin oxide glass substrate. The AFM probe acted as a movable DEP tweezer for nanomanipulation and assembly of nanoparticles. The mechanism of AFM-DEP was analyzed by numerical simulation. The effects of solution depth, gap distance, AC voltage, solution concentration, and duration time were experimentally studied and optimized. Arrays of 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles were assembled into various nanostructures, including lines, ellipsoids, and arrays of dots. The sizes and shapes of the assembled structures were controllable. It was thus demonstrated that AFM-DEP is a flexible and powerful tool for nanomanipulation.

  3. Wet-chemical etching of atom probe tips for artefact free analyses of nanoscaled semiconductor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkonyan, D; Fleischmann, C; Veloso, A; Franquet, A; Bogdanowicz, J; Morris, R J H; Vandervorst, W

    2018-03-01

    We introduce an innovative specimen preparation method employing the selectivity of a wet-chemical etching step to improve data quality and success rates in the atom probe analysis of contemporary semiconductor devices. Firstly, on the example of an SiGe fin embedded in SiO 2 we demonstrate how the selective removal of SiO 2 from the final APT specimen significantly improves accuracy and reliability of the reconstructed data. With the oxide removal, we eliminate the origin of shape artefacts, i.e. the formation of a non-hemispherical tip shape, that are typically observed in the reconstructed volume of complex systems. Secondly, using the same approach, we increase success rates to ∼90% for the damage-free, 3D site-specific localization of short (250 nm), vertical Si nanowires at the specimen apex. The impact of the abrupt emitter radius change that is introduced by this specimen preparation method is evaluated as being minor using field evaporation simulation and comparison of different reconstruction schemes. The Ge content within the SiGe fin as well as the 3D boron distribution in the Si NW as resolved by atom probe analysis are in good agreement with TEM/EDS and ToF-SIMS analysis, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Competition of elastic and adhesive properties of carbon nanotubes anchored to atomic force microscopy tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Charlotte; Marsaudon, Sophie; Boisgard, Rodolphe; Aime, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we address the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes anchored to atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips in a detailed analysis of experimental results and exhaustive description of a simple model. We show that volume elastic and surface adhesive forces both contribute to the dynamical AFM experimental signals. Their respective weights depend on the nanotube properties and on an experimental parameter: the oscillation amplitude. To quantify the elastic and adhesive contributions, a simple analytical model is used. It enables analytical expressions of the resonance frequency shift and dissipation that can be measured in the atomic force microscopy dynamical frequency modulation mode. It includes the nanotube adhesive contribution to the frequency shift. Experimental data for single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes compare well to the model predictions for different oscillation amplitudes. Three parameters can be extracted: the distance necessary to unstick the nanotube from the surface and two spring constants corresponding to tube compression and to the elastic force required to overcome the adhesion force

  5. Electrostatic force microscopy with a self-sensing piezoresistive cantilever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, U. H.; Kye, J. I.; Shin, S.; Khim, Z. G.; Hong, J. W.; Yoon, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method for electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) using a piezoresistive cantilever instead of the conventional cantilever with an optical detector. In EFM with a piezoresistive cantilever, the electrostatic force between the tip and the sample is monitored by sensing the change in the resistance of the piezoresistive cantilever at a frequency of several tens of kHz. A large stray capacitance effect can be rejected by using an appropriate phase tuning of the phase-sensitive detection. We observed the ferroelectric domain images of a triglycine sulfate single crystal. We could also write fine patterns on a lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) thin film through domain reversal by applying various dc voltages between the tip and the sample. We suggest that the EFM technique using a self-sensing and self-actuating piezoresistive cantilever can be applied to a high-density data storage field

  6. Micromechanical testing of SU-8 cantilevers

    OpenAIRE

    Hopcroft, M; Kramer, T; Kim, G; Takashima, K; Higo, Y; Moore, D; Brugger, J

    2005-01-01

    SU-8 is a photoplastic polymer with a wide range of possible applications in microtechnology. Cantilevers designed for atomic force microscopes were fabricated in SU-8. The mechanical properties of these cantilevers were investigated using two microscale testing techniques: contact surface profilometer beam deflection and static load deflection at a point on the beam using a specially designed test machine. The SU-8 Young's modulus value from the microscale test methods is approximately 2-3 GPa.

  7. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-01-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations

  8. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morawski, Ireneusz [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-3) and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Wrocław, pl. M. Borna 9, 50-204 Wrocław (Poland); Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-3) and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  9. Evaluation of the nanotube intrinsic resistance across the tip-carbon nanotube-metal substrate junction by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiczak, Maguy; Otubo, Larissa; Alamarguy, David; Houzé, Frédéric; Volz, Sebastian; Noël, Sophie; Bai, Jinbo

    2011-04-14

    Using an atomic force microscope (AFM) at a controlled contact force, we report the electrical signal response of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) disposed on a golden thin film. In this investigation, we highlight first the theoretical calculation of the contact resistance between two types of conductive tips (metal-coated and doped diamond-coated), individual MWCNTs and golden substrate. We also propose a circuit analysis model to schematize the «tip-CNT-substrate» junction by means of a series-parallel resistance network. We estimate the contact resistance R of each contribution of the junction such as Rtip-CNT, RCNT-substrate and Rtip-substrate by using the Sharvin resistance model. Our final objective is thus to deduce the CNT intrinsic radial resistance taking into account the calculated electrical resistance values with the global resistance measured experimentally. An unwished electrochemical phenomenon at the tip apex has also been evidenced by performing measurements at different bias voltages with diamond tips. For negative tip-substrate bias, a systematic degradation in color and contrast of the electrical cartography occurs, consisting of an important and non-reversible increase of the measured resistance. This effect is attributed to the oxidation of some amorphous carbon areas scattered over the diamond layer covering the tip. For a direct polarization, the CNT and substrate surface can in turn be modified by an oxidation mechanism.

  10. Topotactic changes on η-Mo4O11 caused by biased atomic force microscope tip and cw-laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovšak, Miloš; Šutar, Petra; Goreshnik, Evgeny; Mihailovic, Dragan

    2015-11-01

    We present topotactic changes on Mo4O11 crystals induced by a biased atomic force microscope tip and continuous laser. The transformation does not change the topography of the samples, while the surface potential shows remarkable changes on areas where the biased AFM tip was applied. No structural changes were observed by Raman spectroscopy, but AFM scans revealed changes to surface potential due to laser illumination. The observed phenomenon could be potentially useful for memristive memory devices considering the fact that properties of other molybdenum oxides vary from metallic to insulators.

  11. Realization of cantilever arrays for parallel proximity imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarov, Y; Ivanov, Tz; Frank, A; Zoellner, J-P; Nikolov, N; Rangelow, I W

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterisation of self-actuating, and self-sensing cantilever arrays for large-scale parallel surface scanning. Each cantilever is integrated with a sharp silicon tip, a thermal-driven bimorph actuator, and a piezoresistive deflection sensor. Thus, the tip to the sample distance can be controlled individually for each cantilever. A radius of the tips below 10 nm is obtained, which enables nanometre in-plane surface imaging by Angstrom resolution in vertical direction. The fabricated cantilever probe arrays are also applicable for large-area manipulation, sub-10 nm metrology, bottom-up synthesis, high-speed gas analysis, for different bio-applications like recognition of DNA, RNA, or various biomarkers of a single disease, etc.

  12. Xenon gas field ion source from a single-atom tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Chiao; Lin, Chun-Yueh; Chang, Wei-Tse; Li, Po-Chang; Fu, Tsu-Yi; Chang, Chia-Seng; Tsong, T. T.; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2017-06-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) systems have become powerful diagnostic and modification tools for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Gas field ion sources (GFISs) built from atomic-size emitters offer the highest brightness among all ion sources and thus can improve the spatial resolution of FIB systems. Here we show that the Ir/W(111) single-atom tip (SAT) can emit high-brightness Xe+ ion beams with a high current stability. The ion emission current versus extraction voltage was analyzed from 150 K up to 309 K. The optimal emitter temperature for maximum Xe+ ion emission was ˜150 K and the reduced brightness at the Xe gas pressure of 1 × 10-4 torr is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that of a Ga liquid metal ion source, and four to five orders of magnitude higher than that of a Xe inductively coupled plasma ion source. Most surprisingly, the SAT emitter remained stable even when operated at 309 K. Even though the ion current decreased with increasing temperature, the current at room temperature (RT) could still reach over 1 pA when the gas pressure was higher than 1 × 10-3 torr, indicating the feasibility of RT-Xe-GFIS for application to FIB systems. The operation temperature of Xe-SAT-GFIS is considerably higher than the cryogenic temperature required for the helium ion microscope (HIM), which offers great technical advantages because only simple or no cooling schemes can be adopted. Thus, Xe-GFIS-FIB would be easy to implement and may become a powerful tool for nanoscale milling and secondary ion mass spectroscopy.

  13. Modular design of AFM probe with sputtered silicon tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Thaysen, Jacob; Bouwstra, Siebe

    2001-01-01

    of the thin films constituting the cantilever. The AFM probe has an integrated tip made of a thick sputtered silicon layer, which is deposited after the probe has been defined and just before the cantilevers are released. The tips are so-called rocket tips made by reactive ion etching. We present probes...

  14. Nonlinear mathematical modeling of vibrating motion of nanomechanical cantilever active probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ghaderi

    Full Text Available Nonlinear vibration response of nanomechanical cantilever (NMC active probes in atomic force microscope (AFM application has been studied in the amplitude mode. Piezoelectric layer is placed piecewise and as an actuator on NMC. Continuous beam model has been chosen for analysis with regard to the geometric discontinuities of piezoelectric layer attachment and NMC's cross section. The force between the tip and the sample surface is modeled using Leonard-Jones potential. Assuming that cantilever is inclined to the sample surface, the effect of nonlinear force on NMC is considered as a shearing force and the concentrated bending moment is regarded at the end. Nonlinear frequency response of NMC is obtained close to the sample surface using the dynamic modeling. It is then become clear that the distance and angle of NMC, the probe length, and the geometric dimensions of piezoelectric layer can affect frequency response bending of the curve.

  15. Three-way flexible cantilever probes for static contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fei; Petersen, Dirch H; Hansen, Christian; Mortensen, Dennis; Friis, Lars; Hansen, Ole; Jensen, Helle V

    2011-01-01

    In micro four-point probe measurements, three-way flexible L-shaped cantilever probes show significant advantages over conventional straight cantilever probes. The L-shaped cantilever allows static contact to the sample surface which reduces the frictional wear of the cantilever tips. We analyze the geometrical design space that must be fulfilled for the cantilevers to obtain static contact with the test sample. The design space relates the spring constant tensor of the cantilevers to the minimal value of the static tip-to-sample friction coefficient. Using an approximate model, we provide the analytical calculation of the compliance matrix of the L-shaped cantilever. Compared to results derived from finite element model simulations, the theoretical model provides a good qualitative analysis while deviations for the absolute values are seen. From a statistical analysis, the deviation is small for cantilevers with low effective spring constants, while the deviation is significant for large spring constants where the quasi one-dimensional approximation is no longer valid

  16. Imaging contrast and tip-sample interaction of non-contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy with Q -control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Shuai; Guo, Dan; Luo, Jianbin

    2017-01-01

    Active quality factor ( Q ) exhibits many promising properties in dynamic atomic force microscopy. Energy dissipation and image contrasts are investigated in the non-contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) with an active Q -control circuit in the ambient air environment. Dissipated power and virial were calculated to compare the highly nonlinear interaction of tip-sample and image contrasts with different Q gain values. Greater free amplitudes and lower effective Q values show better contrasts for the same setpoint ratio. Active quality factor also can be employed to change tip-sample interaction force in non-contact regime. It is meaningful that non-destructive and better contrast images can be realized in non-contact AM-AFM by applying an active Q -control to the dynamic system. (paper)

  17. Cantilever arrays with self-aligned nanotips of uniform height

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelmans, W W; Peters, T; Berenschot, E; De Boer, M J; Siekman, M H; Abelmann, L

    2012-01-01

    Cantilever arrays are employed to increase the throughput of imaging and manipulation at the nanoscale. We present a fabrication process to construct cantilever arrays with nanotips that show a uniform tip–sample distance. Such uniformity is crucial, because in many applications the cantilevers do not feature individual tip–sample spacing control. Uniform cantilever arrays lead to very similar tip–sample interaction within an array, enable non-contact modes for arrays and give better control over the load force in contact modes. The developed process flow uses a single mask to define both tips and cantilevers. An additional mask is required for the back side etch. The tips are self-aligned in the convex corner at the free end of each cantilever. Although we use standard optical contact lithography, we show that the convex corner can be sharpened to a nanometre scale radius by an isotropic underetch step. The process is robust and wafer-scale. The resonance frequencies of the cantilevers within an array are shown to be highly uniform with a relative standard error of 0.26% or lower. The tip–sample distance within an array of up to ten cantilevers is measured to have a standard error around 10 nm. An imaging demonstration using the AFM shows that all cantilevers in the array have a sharp tip with a radius below 10 nm. The process flow for the cantilever arrays finds application in probe-based nanolithography, probe-based data storage, nanomanufacturing and parallel scanning probe microscopy. (paper)

  18. Modified cantilevers to probe unambiguously out-of-plane piezoresponse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyabyeva, Natalia; Ouvrard, Aimeric; Lindfors-Vrejoiu, Ionela; Kolomiytsev, Alexey; Solodovnik, Maxim; Ageev, Oleg; McGrouther, Damien

    2018-06-01

    We demonstrate and investigate the coupling of contributions from both in-plane (IP) polarization and out-of-plane (OP) components in BiFeO3 (BFO) thin-film polarization probed by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Such coupling leads to image artifacts which prevent the correct determination of OP polarization vector directions and the corresponding piezoelectric coefficient d33. Using material strength theory with a one-dimensional modeling of the cantilever oscillation amplitude under electrostatic and elastic forces as a function of the tip length, we have evidenced the impact of IP piezoresponse to the OP signal for tip length longer than 4 μm. The IP polarization vector induces a significant longitudinal bending of the cantilever, due to the small spring constant of long tips, which provokes a normal deviation superimposed to the OP piezoresponse. These artifacts can be reduced by increasing the longitudinal spring constant of the cantilever by shortening the tip length. Standard cantilevers with 15-μm-long tips were modified to reach the desired tip length, using focused ion-beam techniques and tested using PFM on the same BFO thin film. Tip length shortening has strongly reduced IP artifacts as expected, while the impact of nonlocal electrostatic forces, becoming predominant for tips shorter than 1 μm, has led to a non-negligible deflection offset. For shorter tips, a strong electric field from a cantilever beam can induce polarization switching as observed for a 0.5-μm-long tip. Tip length ranging from 1 to 4 μm allowed minimizing both artifacts to probe unambiguously OP piezoresponse and quantify the d33 piezoelectric coefficient.

  19. Understanding interferometry for micro-cantilever displacement detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander von Schmidsfeld

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric displacement detection in a cantilever-based non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM operated in ultra-high vacuum is demonstrated for the Michelson and Fabry–Pérot modes of operation. Each mode is addressed by appropriately adjusting the distance between the fiber end delivering and collecting light and a highly reflective micro-cantilever, both together forming the interferometric cavity. For a precise measurement of the cantilever displacement, the relative positioning of fiber and cantilever is of critical importance. We describe a systematic approach for accurate alignment as well as the implications of deficient fiber–cantilever configurations. In the Fabry–Pérot regime, the displacement noise spectral density strongly decreases with decreasing distance between the fiber-end and the cantilever, yielding a noise floor of 24 fm/Hz0.5 under optimum conditions.

  20. Micromechanical contact stiffness devices and application for calibrating contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Matthew R.; Chen, Sihan; Prater, Craig B.; King, William P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of micromechanical devices that can present an engineered contact stiffness to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tip. These devices allow the contact stiffness between the AFM tip and a substrate to be easily and accurately measured, and can be used to calibrate the cantilever for subsequent mechanical property measurements. The contact stiffness devices are rigid copper disks of diameters 2-18 μm integrated onto a soft silicone substrate. Analytical modeling and finite element simulations predict the elastic response of the devices. Measurements of tip-sample interactions during quasi-static force measurements compare well with modeling simulation, confirming the expected elastic response of the devices, which are shown to have contact stiffness 32-156 N m-1. To demonstrate one application, we use the disk sample to calibrate three resonant modes of a U-shaped AFM cantilever actuated via Lorentz force, at approximately 220, 450, and 1200 kHz. We then use the calibrated cantilever to determine the contact stiffness and elastic modulus of three polymer samples at these modes. The overall approach allows cantilever calibration without prior knowledge of the cantilever geometry or its resonance modes, and could be broadly applied to both static and dynamic measurements that require AFM calibration against a known contact stiffness.

  1. Combined short scale roughness and surface dielectric function gradient effects on the determination of tip-sample force in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusso, André, E-mail: gusso@metal.eeimvr.uff.br [Departamento de Ciências Exatas-EEIMVR, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Volta Redonda, RJ 27255-125 (Brazil)

    2013-11-11

    The contribution of tip roughness to the van der Waals force between an atomic force microscopy probe tip and the sample is calculated using the multilayer effective medium model, which allows us to consider the relevant case of roughness characterized by correlation length and amplitude in the nanometer scale. The effect of the surface dielectric function gradient is incorporated in the tip-sample force model. It is concluded that for rms roughness in the few nanometers range the effect of short scale tip roughness is quite significant.

  2. Characterization of piesoelectric ZnO thin films and the fabrication of piezoelectric micro-cantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Raegan Lynn [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    In Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), a microcantilever is raster scanned across the surface of a sample in order to obtain a topographical image of the sample's surface. In a traditional, optical AFM, the sample rests on a bulk piezoelectric tube and a control loop is used to control the tip-sample separation by actuating the piezo-tube. This method has several disadvantages--the most noticeable one being that response time of the piezo-tube is rather long which leads to slow imaging speeds. One possible solution aimed at improving the speed of imaging is to incorporate a thin piezoelectric film on top of the cantilever beam. This design not only improves the speed of imaging because the piezoelectric film replaces the piezo-tube as an actuator, but the film can also act as a sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric film can excite the cantilever beam near its resonance frequency. This project aims to fabricate piezoelectric microcantilevers for use in the AFM. Prior to fabricating the cantilevers and also part of this project, a systematic study was performed to examine the effects of deposition conditions on the quality of piezoelectric ZnO thin films deposited by RF sputtering. These results will be presented. The deposition parameters that produced the highest quality ZnO film were used in the fabrication of the piezoelectric cantilevers. Unfortunately, the fabricated cantilevers warped due to the intrinsic stress of the ZnO film and were therefore not usable in the AFM. The complete fabrication process will be detailed, the results will be discussed and reasons for the warping will be examined.

  3. Atomic force and shear force based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kharintsev, S.S.; Hoffmann, G.G.; Dorozhkin, P.S.; With, de G.; Loos, J.

    2007-01-01

    Underlying near-field optibal effects on the nanoscale have stimulated the development of apertureless vibrational spectroscopy and imaging with ultrahigh spatial resolution. We demonstrate tip-enhanced Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), recorded with a scanning near-field

  4. Topotactic changes on η-Mo4O11 caused by biased atomic force microscope tip and cw-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovšak, Miloš; Šutar, Petra; Goreshnik, Evgeny; Mihailovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We report influencing electronic properties of η-Mo 4 O 11 . • With the biased AFM tip we induce the surface potential changes on η-Mo 4 O 11 . • We used cw-laser to induced similar effect on surface potential on η-Mo 4 O 11 . • We do not influence the surface and topography of the samples. • No change in topography of samples indicates the topotactic transformation. - Abstract: We present topotactic changes on Mo 4 O 11 crystals induced by a biased atomic force microscope tip and continuous laser. The transformation does not change the topography of the samples, while the surface potential shows remarkable changes on areas where the biased AFM tip was applied. No structural changes were observed by Raman spectroscopy, but AFM scans revealed changes to surface potential due to laser illumination. The observed phenomenon could be potentially useful for memristive memory devices considering the fact that properties of other molybdenum oxides vary from metallic to insulators.

  5. Label-free glucose detection using cantilever sensor technology based on gravimetric detection principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shuchen; Hsieh, Shu-Ling; Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Lin, Po-Chiao; Wu, Chun-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Efficient maintenance of glucose homeostasis is a major challenge in diabetes therapy, where accurate and reliable glucose level detection is required. Though several methods are currently used, these suffer from impaired response and often unpredictable drift, making them unsuitable for long-term therapeutic practice. In this study, we demonstrate a method that uses a functionalized atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever as the sensor for reliable glucose detection with sufficient sensitivity and selectivity for clinical use. We first modified the AFM tip with aminopropylsilatrane (APS) and then adsorbed glucose-specific lectin concanavalin A (Con A) onto the surface. The Con A/APS-modified probes were then used to detect glucose by monitoring shifts in the cantilever resonance frequency. To confirm the molecule-specific interaction, AFM topographical images were acquired of identically treated silicon substrates which indicated a specific attachment for glucose-Con A and not for galactose-Con A. These results demonstrate that by monitoring the frequency shift of the AFM cantilever, this sensing system can detect the interaction between Con A and glucose, one of the biomolecule recognition processes, and may assist in the detection and mass quantification of glucose for clinical applications with very high sensitivity.

  6. Some aspects of forces and fields in atomic models of crack tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoagland, R.G.; Daw, M.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the stresses and displacement gradients in atomistic models of cracks based on an EAM potential devised for aluminum. Methods for computing these quantities are described. Results are presented for two models differing in terms of the orientations of the crack relative to the crystal, a [100](010) orientation that behaves in a brittle fashion and a [111](110) orientation which emits partial dislocations prior to extending. Both models display lattice trapping. The stresses in the brittle crack model are compared with the linear elastic prediction and found to be in remarkably good agreement to within distances of about one lattice parameter of the crack tip and at the free surface where contributions from sources other than strain energy (e.g., surface tension) influence the results. Similar results are observed for the ductile model until dislocation emission occurs. The largest stresses that develop just prior to crack extension or dislocation emission are used to estimate the ratio of theoretical tensile strength to shear strength in this material. Eshelby's conservation integrals, F and M, are also computed. F is found to be essentially contour independent and in agreement with the linear elastic prediction in both models until dislocation emission occurs, at which point a large screening contribution arises from the emitted partials. The contour size dependence of M reveals some interesting features of the crack tip including a slight wobble of the crack tip inside its potential well with changing applied K and the existence of forces acting to move the crack faces apart as blunting occurs

  7. Energy dissipation unveils atomic displacement in the noncontact atomic force microscopy imaging of Si(111 )-(7 ×7 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Toyoko; Inamura, Ryo; Kura, Daiki; Tomitori, Masahiko

    2018-03-01

    The kinetic energy of the oscillating cantilever of noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) at room temperature was considerably dissipated over regions between a Si adatom and its neighboring rest atom for Si(111 )-(7 ×7 ) in close proximity to a Si tip on the cantilever. However, nc-AFM topographic images showed no atomic features over those regions, which were the hollow sites of the (7 ×7 ). This energy dissipation likely originated from displacement of Si adatoms with respect to the tip over the hollow sites, leading to a lateral shift of the adatoms toward the rest atom. This interaction led to hysteresis over each cantilever oscillation cycle; when the tip was retracted, the Si adatom likely returned to its original position. To confirm the atomic processes involved in the force interactions through Si dangling bonds, the Si(111 )-(7 ×7 ) surface was partly terminated with atomic hydrogen (H) and examined by nc-AFM. When the Si adatoms and/or the rest atoms were terminated with H, the hollow sites were not bright (less dissipation) in images of the energy dissipation channels by nc-AFM. The hollow sites acted as metastable sites for Si adatoms in surface diffusion and atom manipulation; thus, the dissipation energy which is saturated on the tip likely corresponds to the difference in the potential energy between the hollow site and the Si adatom site. In this study, we demonstrated the ability of dissipation channels of nc-AFM to enable visualization of the dynamics of atoms and molecules on surfaces, which cannot be revealed by nc-AFM topographic images alone.

  8. The extended wedge method: atomic force microscope friction calibration for improved tolerance to instrument misalignments, tip offset, and blunt probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, H S; Burris, D L

    2013-05-01

    One of the major challenges in understanding and controlling friction is the difficulty in bridging the length and time scales of macroscale contacts and those of the single asperity interactions they comprise. While the atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a unique ability to probe tribological surfaces in a wear-free single-asperity contact, instrument calibration challenges have limited the usefulness of this technique for quantitative nanotribological studies. A number of lateral force calibration techniques have been proposed and used, but none has gained universal acceptance due to practical considerations, configuration limitations, or sensitivities to unknowable error sources. This paper describes a simple extension of the classic wedge method of AFM lateral force calibration which: (1) allows simultaneous calibration and measurement on any substrate, thus eliminating prior tip damage and confounding effects of instrument setup adjustments; (2) is insensitive to adhesion, PSD cross-talk, transducer/piezo-tube axis misalignment, and shear-center offset; (3) is applicable to integrated tips and colloidal probes; and (4) is generally applicable to any reciprocating friction coefficient measurement. The method was applied to AFM measurements of polished carbon (99.999% graphite) and single crystal MoS2 to demonstrate the technique. Carbon and single crystal MoS2 had friction coefficients of μ = 0.20 ± 0.04 and μ = 0.006 ± 0.001, respectively, against an integrated Si probe. Against a glass colloidal sphere, MoS2 had a friction coefficient of μ = 0.005 ± 0.001. Generally, the measurement uncertainties ranged from 10%-20% and were driven by the effect of actual frictional variation on the calibration rather than calibration error itself (i.e., due to misalignment, tip-offset, or probe radius).

  9. Role of tip chemical reactivity on atom manipulation process in dynamic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sugimoto, Y.; Yurtsever, A.; Abe, M.; Morita, S.; Ondráček, Martin; Pou, P.; Perez, R.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2013), s. 7370-7376 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP204/11/P578 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M100101207 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : noncontact atomic force microscopy * atomic manipulation * force spectroscopy * chemical interaction force * DFT simulations * nudged elastic band Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 12.033, year: 2013 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn403097p

  10. Fabrication of nano-sized magnetic tunnel junctions using lift-off process assisted by atomic force probe tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ku Youl; Min, Byoung-Chul; Ahn, Chiyui; Choi, Gyung-Min; Shin, Il-Jae; Park, Seung-Young; Rhie, Kungwon; Shin, Kyung-Ho

    2013-09-01

    We present a fabrication method for nano-scale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), employing e-beam lithography and lift-off process assisted by the probe tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). It is challenging to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates because it is difficult to use chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process. The AFM-assisted lift-off process enables us to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates (12.5 mm x 12.5 mm) without CMP process. The e-beam patterning has been done using bi-layer resist, the poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA)/ hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ). The PMMA/HSQ resist patterns are used for both the etch mask for ion milling and the self-aligned mask for top contact formation after passivation. The self-aligned mask buried inside a passivation oxide layer, is readily lifted-off by the force exerted by the probe tip. The nano-MTJs (160 nm x 90 nm) fabricated by this method show clear current-induced magnetization switching with a reasonable TMR and critical switching current density.

  11. Multi-directional energy harvesting by piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum with internal resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Tang, J.

    2015-01-01

    This letter reports a piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum design for multi-directional energy harvesting. A pendulum is attached to the tip of a piezoelectric cantilever-type energy harvester. This design aims at taking advantage of the nonlinear coupling between the pendulum motion in 3-dimensional space and the beam bending vibration at resonances. Experimental studies indicate that, under properly chosen parameters, 1:2 internal resonance can be induced, which enables the multi-directional energy harvesting with a single cantilever. The advantages of the design with respect to traditional piezoelectric cantilever are examined

  12. Multi-directional energy harvesting by piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum with internal resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Tang, J., E-mail: jtang@engr.uconn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)

    2015-11-23

    This letter reports a piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum design for multi-directional energy harvesting. A pendulum is attached to the tip of a piezoelectric cantilever-type energy harvester. This design aims at taking advantage of the nonlinear coupling between the pendulum motion in 3-dimensional space and the beam bending vibration at resonances. Experimental studies indicate that, under properly chosen parameters, 1:2 internal resonance can be induced, which enables the multi-directional energy harvesting with a single cantilever. The advantages of the design with respect to traditional piezoelectric cantilever are examined.

  13. Magnetic and transport properties of FeβV1-β atom bridge constructed between an STM tip and a solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kasai, Hideaki; Kishi, Tomoya; Dino, W.A.; Komori, Fumio; Okiji, Ayao

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetic and transport properties of an atom bridge made from magnetic materials, which is an atom-scale wire constructed between a scanning tunneling microscopy tip and a solid surface, with the aid of ab initio calculations. In the case of Fe β V 1-β alloy atom bridges, we have found that the value of the mean magnetic moment is similar to that of the corresponding alloy bulk, and the quantized conductance contribution from both the majority and minority spin electrons changes as β changes. These properties are different from the case of Fe 1-α Ni α alloy atom bridge

  14. Potential of interferometric cantilever detection and its application for SFM/AFM in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, B W [London Centre for Nanotechnology and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Frederix, P L T M; Engel, A [M E Mueller Institute, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 70, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Fotiadis, D [Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of Berne, Buehlstrasse 28, 3012 Berne (Switzerland); Hug, H J [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, EMPA, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)], E-mail: b.hoogenboom@ucl.ac.uk

    2008-09-24

    We have developed an optical cantilever deflection detector with a spot size <3 {mu}m and fm Hz{sup -1/2} sensitivity over a>10 MHz bandwidth. In this work, we demonstrate its potential for detecting small-amplitude oscillations of various flexural and torsional oscillation modes of cantilevers. The high deflection sensitivity of the interferometer is particularly useful for detecting cantilever oscillations in aqueous solutions, enabling us to reach the thermal noise limit in scanning or atomic force microscopy experiments with stiff cantilevers. This has resulted in atomic-resolution images of solid-liquid interfaces and submolecular-resolution images of native membranes.

  15. Potential of interferometric cantilever detection and its application for SFM/AFM in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, B W; Frederix, P L T M; Engel, A; Fotiadis, D; Hug, H J

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an optical cantilever deflection detector with a spot size -1/2 sensitivity over a>10 MHz bandwidth. In this work, we demonstrate its potential for detecting small-amplitude oscillations of various flexural and torsional oscillation modes of cantilevers. The high deflection sensitivity of the interferometer is particularly useful for detecting cantilever oscillations in aqueous solutions, enabling us to reach the thermal noise limit in scanning or atomic force microscopy experiments with stiff cantilevers. This has resulted in atomic-resolution images of solid-liquid interfaces and submolecular-resolution images of native membranes

  16. Lateral force calibration in atomic force microscopy: A new lateral force calibration method and general guidelines for optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannara, Rachel J.; Eglin, Michael; Carpick, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Proper force calibration is a critical step in atomic and lateral force microscopies (AFM/LFM). The recently published torsional Sader method [C. P. Green et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 1988 (2004)] facilitates the calculation of torsional spring constants of rectangular AFM cantilevers by eliminating the need to obtain information or make assumptions regarding the cantilever's material properties and thickness, both of which are difficult to measure. Complete force calibration of the lateral signal in LFM requires measurement of the lateral signal deflection sensitivity as well. In this article, we introduce a complete lateral force calibration procedure that employs the torsional Sader method and does not require making contact between the tip and any sample. In this method, a colloidal sphere is attached to a 'test' cantilever of the same width, but different length and material as the 'target' cantilever of interest. The lateral signal sensitivity is calibrated by loading the colloidal sphere laterally against a vertical sidewall. The signal sensitivity for the target cantilever is then corrected for the tip length, total signal strength, and in-plane bending of the cantilevers. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this approach in comparison with the other established lateral force calibration techniques, and make a direct comparison with the 'wedge' calibration method. The methods agree to within 5%. The propagation of errors is explicitly considered for both methods and the sources of disagreement discussed. Finally, we show that the lateral signal sensitivity is substantially reduced when the laser spot is not centered on the detector

  17. Robust operation and performance of integrated carbon nanotubes atomic force microscopy probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rius, G; Clark, I T; Yoshimura, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a complete characterization of carbon nanotubes-atomic force microscopy (CNT-AFM) probes to evaluate the cantilever operation and advanced properties originating from the CNTs. The fabrication consists of silicon probes tip-functionalized with multiwalled CNTs by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A dedicated methodology has been defined to evaluate the effect of CNT integration into the Si cantilevers. The presence of the CNTs provides enhanced capability for sensing and durability, as demonstrated using dynamic and static modes, e.g. imaging, indentation and force/current characterization.

  18. Design of a micro-cartridge system for the robotic assembly of exchangeable AFM-probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartenwerfer, Malte; Eichhorn, Volkmar; Fatikow, Sergej

    2013-01-01

    demand an even higher lateral resolution of the measurements. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a common tool for this characterization and a standard instrument for all kinds of research and development disciplines. However, the characterization of three dimensional high-aspect ratio and sidewall...... structures remains a hardly accomplishable task. Novel exchangeable and customizable scanning probe tips, so-called NanoBits, can be attached to standard AFM cantilevers offering unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of the tips to the surface topology of the specific application. The ultimate...

  19. Fabrication of wear-resistant silicon microprobe tips for high-speed surface roughness scanning devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Yu, Feng; Doering, Lutz; Völlmeke, Stefan; Brand, Uwe; Bakin, Andrey; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Silicon microprobe tips are fabricated and integrated with piezoresistive cantilever sensors for high-speed surface roughness scanning systems. The fabrication steps of the high-aspect-ratio silicon microprobe tips were started with photolithography and wet etching of potassium hydroxide (KOH) resulting in crystal-dependent micropyramids. Subsequently, thin conformal wear-resistant layer coating of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was demonstrated on the backside of the piezoresistive cantilever free end using atomic layer deposition (ALD) method in a binary reaction sequence with a low thermal process and precursors of trimethyl aluminum and water. The deposited Al2O3 layer had a thickness of 14 nm. The captured atomic force microscopy (AFM) image exhibits a root mean square deviation of 0.65 nm confirming the deposited Al2O3 surface quality. Furthermore, vacuum-evaporated 30-nm/200-nm-thick Au/Cr layers were patterned by lift-off and served as an etch mask for Al2O3 wet etching and in ICP cryogenic dry etching. By using SF6/O2 plasma during inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic dry etching, micropillar tips were obtained. From the preliminary friction and wear data, the developed silicon cantilever sensor has been successfully used in 100 fast measurements of 5- mm-long standard artifact surface with a speed of 15 mm/s and forces of 60-100 μN. Moreover, the results yielded by the fabricated silicon cantilever sensor are in very good agreement with those of calibrated profilometer. These tactile sensors are targeted for use in high-aspect-ratio microform metrology.

  20. Atomic species recognition on oxide surfaces using low temperature scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zong Min, E-mail: mzmncit@163.com [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Shi, Yun Bo; Mu, Ji Liang; Qu, Zhang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Qin, Li [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Liu, Jun, E-mail: liuj@nuc.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • The coexisted phase of p(2 × 1)and c(6 × 2) on Cu(110)-O surface using AFM under UHV at low temperature. • Two different c(6 × 2) phase depending on the status of the tip apex. • Electronic state of tip seriously effect the resolution and stability of the sample surface. - Abstract: In scanning probe microscopy (SPM), the chemical properties and sharpness of the tips of the cantilever greatly influence the scanning of a sample surface. Variation in the chemical properties of the sharp tip apex can induce transformation of the SPM images. In this research, we explore the relationship between the tip and the structure of a sample surface using dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) on a Cu(110)-O surface under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperature (78 K). We observed two different c(6 × 2) phase types in which super-Cu atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of O atoms and O atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of Cu atoms. We also found that the electronic state of the tip has a serious effect on the resolution and stability of the sample surface, and provide an explanation for these phenomena. This technique can be used to identify atom species on sample surfaces, and represents an important development in the SPM technique.

  1. Mechanically stable tuning fork sensor with high quality factor for the atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangyoon; Park, Jun-Young; Kim, K B; Lee, Naesung; Seo, Yongho

    2014-01-01

    A quartz tuning fork was used instead of cantilever as a force sensor for the atomic force microscope. A tungsten tip was made by electrochemical etching from a wire of 50 µm diameter. In order to have mechanical stability of the tuning fork, it was attached on an alumina plate. The tungsten tip was attached on the inside end of a prong of a tuning fork. The phase shift was used as a feedback signal to control the distance between the tip and sample, and the amplitude was kept constant using a lock-in amplifier and a homemade automatic gain controller. Due to the mechanical stability, the sensor shows a high quality factor (∼10(3)), and the image quality obtained with this sensor was equivalent to that of the cantilever-based AFM. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Graphene cantilever under Casimir force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derras-Chouk, Amel; Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Garanin, Dmitry A.; Jaafar, Reem

    2018-05-01

    The stability of graphene cantilever under Casimir attraction to an underlying conductor is investigated. The dependence of the instability threshold on temperature and flexural rigidity is obtained. Analytical work is supplemented by numerical computation of the critical temperature above which the graphene cantilever irreversibly bends down and attaches to the conductor. The geometry of the attachment and exfoliation of the graphene sheet is discussed. It is argued that graphene cantilever can be an excellent tool for precision measurements of the Casimir force.

  3. Calibration of optical cantilever deflection readers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zhiyu; Seeley, Tim; Kossek, Sebastian; Thundat, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Because of its ultrahigh sensitivity, the optical lever detection method similar to that used in the atomic force microscope (AFM) has been widely employed as a standard technique for measuring microcantilever deflection. Along with the increasing interest in using the microcantilever as a sensing platform, there is also a requirement for a reliable calibration technique. Many researchers have used the concept of optical lever detection to construct microcantilever deflection readout instruments for chemical, physical, and biological detection. However, without an AFM piezo z scanner, it is very difficult to precisely calibrate these instruments. Here, we present a step-by-step method to conveniently calibrate an instrument using commercially available piezoresistive cantilevers. The experimental results closely match the theoretical calculation. Following this procedure, one can easily calibrate any optical cantilever deflection detection system with high reproducibility, precision, and reliability. A detailed discussion of the optical lever readout system design has been addressed in this article

  4. GaAs/AlAs/InGaP heterostructure: a versatile material basis for cantilever designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregušová, Dagmar; Kúdela, Róbert; Eliáš, Peter; Šoltýs, Ján; Cambel, Vladimír; Kostič, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and initial mechanical testing of cantilevers with tips based on a GaAs/In 0.485 Ga 0.515 P/AlAs heterostructure grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. They were produced using a dedicated technological process based on (1) the formation of integrated tips through an AlAs-assisted surface sacrificial wet-etching process and (2) the GaAs cantilever release fully protected between two InGaP etch-stop layers. 2 µm thick InGaP/GaAs/InGaP cantilevers had integrated pyramidal tips with the sides at ∼45° to (1 0 0). Metallic elements were processed close to the tip apexes using non-standard optical lithography. The cantilever release was accomplished using photolithography, Ar ion milling of InGaP and wet chemical etching of GaAs via resist layers deposited by a draping technique. A tip–cantilever prototype with length, width and thickness of 150, 35 and 2 µm, respectively, exhibited a resonance frequency of 66.2 kHz, which correlated well with a theoretical value of 57 kHz for a GaAs cantilever of identical dimensions. (technical note)

  5. Hard-tip, soft-spring lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Wooyoung; Braunschweig, Adam B; Liao, Xing; Chai, Jinan; Lim, Jong Kuk; Zheng, Gengfeng; Mirkin, Chad A

    2011-01-27

    Nanofabrication strategies are becoming increasingly expensive and equipment-intensive, and consequently less accessible to researchers. As an alternative, scanning probe lithography has become a popular means of preparing nanoscale structures, in part owing to its relatively low cost and high resolution, and a registration accuracy that exceeds most existing technologies. However, increasing the throughput of cantilever-based scanning probe systems while maintaining their resolution and registration advantages has from the outset been a significant challenge. Even with impressive recent advances in cantilever array design, such arrays tend to be highly specialized for a given application, expensive, and often difficult to implement. It is therefore difficult to imagine commercially viable production methods based on scanning probe systems that rely on conventional cantilevers. Here we describe a low-cost and scalable cantilever-free tip-based nanopatterning method that uses an array of hard silicon tips mounted onto an elastomeric backing. This method-which we term hard-tip, soft-spring lithography-overcomes the throughput problems of cantilever-based scanning probe systems and the resolution limits imposed by the use of elastomeric stamps and tips: it is capable of delivering materials or energy to a surface to create arbitrary patterns of features with sub-50-nm resolution over centimetre-scale areas. We argue that hard-tip, soft-spring lithography is a versatile nanolithography strategy that should be widely adopted by academic and industrial researchers for rapid prototyping applications.

  6. The importance of cantilever dynamics in the interpretation of Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satzinger, Kevin J; Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M

    2012-09-15

    A realistic interpretation of the measured contact potential difference (CPD) in Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is crucial in order to extract meaningful information about the sample. Central to this interpretation is a method to include contributions from the macroscopic cantilever arm, as well as the cone and sharp tip of a KPFM probe. Here, three models of the electrostatic interaction between a KPFM probe and a sample are tested through an electrostatic simulation and compared with experiment. In contrast with previous studies that treat the KPFM cantilever as a rigid object, we allow the cantilever to bend and rotate; accounting for cantilever bending provides the closest agreement between theory and experiment. We demonstrate that cantilever dynamics play a major role in CPD measurements and provide a simulation technique to explore this phenomenon.

  7. Magnetic and transport properties of Fe{sub {beta}}V{sub 1-{beta}} atom bridge constructed between an STM tip and a solid surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kasai, Hideaki E-mail: kasai@dyn.ap.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kishi, Tomoya; Dino, W.A.; Komori, Fumio; Okiji, Ayao

    2004-05-01

    We have investigated the magnetic and transport properties of an atom bridge made from magnetic materials, which is an atom-scale wire constructed between a scanning tunneling microscopy tip and a solid surface, with the aid of ab initio calculations. In the case of Fe{sub {beta}}V{sub 1-{beta}} alloy atom bridges, we have found that the value of the mean magnetic moment is similar to that of the corresponding alloy bulk, and the quantized conductance contribution from both the majority and minority spin electrons changes as {beta} changes. These properties are different from the case of Fe{sub 1-{alpha}}Ni{sub {alpha}} alloy atom bridge.

  8. Biosensors based on cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Mar; Carrascosa, Laura G; Zinoviev, Kiril; Plaza, Jose A; Lechuga, Laura M

    2009-01-01

    Microcantilevers based-biosensors are a new label-free technique that allows the direct detection of biomolecular interactions in a label-less way and with great accuracy by translating the biointeraction into a nanomechanical motion. Low cost and reliable standard silicon technologies are widely used for the fabrication of cantilevers with well-controlled mechanical properties. Over the last years, the number of applications of these sensors has shown a fast growth in diverse fields, such as genomic or proteomic, because of the biosensor flexibility, the low sample consumption, and the non-pretreated samples required. In this chapter, we report a dedicated design and a fabrication process of highly sensitive microcantilever silicon sensors. We will describe as well an application of the device in the environmental field showing the immunodetection of an organic toxic pesticide as an example. The cantilever biofunctionalization process and the subsequent pesticide determination are detected in real time by monitoring the nanometer-scale bending of the microcantilever due to a differential surface stress generated between both surfaces of the device.

  9. System identification and control parameter optimization for a stylus profiler with exchangeable cantilevers

    OpenAIRE

    Felix Ströer; Katharina Trinkaus; Indek Raid; Jörg Seewig

    2018-01-01

    Stylus instruments are widely used in production metrology due to their robustness. Interchangeable cantilevers allow a wide range of measuring tasks to be covered with one measuring device. When approaching the sample, the positioning of the stylus instrument tip relative to the measurement object has to be accomplished in a controlled way in order to prevent damages to the specimen and the stylus cantilever. This is achieved by a closed-loop control. We present a method for the objective de...

  10. System identification and control parameter optimization for a stylus profiler with exchangeable cantilevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Ströer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Stylus instruments are widely used in production metrology due to their robustness. Interchangeable cantilevers allow a wide range of measuring tasks to be covered with one measuring device. When approaching the sample, the positioning of the stylus instrument tip relative to the measurement object has to be accomplished in a controlled way in order to prevent damages to the specimen and the stylus cantilever. This is achieved by a closed-loop control. We present a method for the objective description of the stylus cantilever dynamics with system-theoretical techniques and show a simple iterative approach to optimize closed-loop control parameters with boundary conditions.

  11. Method for lateral force calibration in atomic force microscope using MEMS microforce sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekoński, Cezary; Dera, Wojciech; Jarząbek, Dariusz M

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we present a simple and direct method for the lateral force calibration constant determination. Our procedure does not require any knowledge about material or geometrical parameters of an investigated cantilever. We apply a commercially available microforce sensor with advanced electronics for direct measurement of the friction force applied by the cantilever's tip to a flat surface of the microforce sensor measuring beam. Due to the third law of dynamics, the friction force of the equal value tilts the AFM cantilever. Therefore, torsional (lateral force) signal is compared with the signal from the microforce sensor and the lateral force calibration constant is determined. The method is easy to perform and could be widely used for the lateral force calibration constant determination in many types of atomic force microscopes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji; Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Kelly, Michael A.; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  13. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-04-21

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  14. Tip-Loading, Force-Dependent Tunneling Behavior in Alkanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers Studied Through Conducting Atomic Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Hyung; Song, Hyun Wook

    2013-01-01

    The force-dependent tunneling transport in metal/alkanethiol/metal junctions was examined using CAFM. Tunneling current and current density through alkanethiol SAMs increased with increasing tip-loading force in CAFM, which suggests that a potential change in geometry of the molecules under the tip loads influences the transport properties of alkanethiol SAMs. Enhanced intermolecular tunneling transport in the tilted molecular configuration under tip-loading effect is likely responsible for such an increase in tunneling current density. We also demonstrated that through-bond tunneling is a more efficient pathway in alkanethiol SAMs than are intermolecular chain-to-chain pathways, by demonstrating a dependence of current density on the associated tunneling distances. We report a tip-loading, force-dependent tunneling behavior in alkanethiol SAMs using CAFM. A variable tip-loading force applies to alkanethiol SAMs with a standard AFM feedback, and current(I)-voltage(V) characteristics are simultaneously measured while varying the loading forces. In particular, we observe how a tip-loading force in CAFM influences the transport properties of alkanethiol SAMs

  15. AFM cantilever with in situ renewable mercury microelectrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schön, Peter Manfred; Geerlings, J.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Sarajlic, Edin

    2013-01-01

    We report here first results obtained on a novel, in situ renewable mercury microelectrode integrated into an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever. Our approach is based on a fountain pen probe with appropriate dimensions enabling reversible filling with(nonwetting) mercury under changing the

  16. Nonlinear Phenomena in the Single-Mode Dynamics in an AFM Cantilever Beam

    KAUST Repository

    Ruzziconi, Laura; Lenci, Stefano; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    This study deals with the nonlinear dynamics arising in an atomic force microscope cantilever beam. After analyzing the static behavior, a single degree of freedom Galerkin reduced order model is introduced, which describes the overall scenario

  17. Chemical sensor with oscillating cantilevered probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jesse D

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides a method of detecting a chemical species with an oscillating cantilevered probe. A cantilevered beam is driven into oscillation with a drive mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A free end of the oscillating cantilevered beam is tapped against a mechanical stop coupled to a base end of the cantilevered beam. An amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured with a sense mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A treated portion of the cantilevered beam is exposed to the chemical species, wherein the cantilevered beam bends when exposed to the chemical species. A second amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured, and the chemical species is determined based on the measured amplitudes.

  18. Dual frequency modulation with two cantilevers in series: a possible means to rapidly acquire tip–sample interaction force curves with dynamic AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solares, Santiago D; Chawla, Gaurav

    2008-01-01

    One common application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the acquisition of tip–sample interaction force curves. However, this can be a slow process when the user is interested in studying non-uniform samples, because existing contact- and dynamic-mode methods require that the measurement be performed at one fixed surface point at a time. This paper proposes an AFM method based on dual frequency modulation using two cantilevers in series, which could be used to measure the tip–sample interaction force curves and topography of the entire sample with a single surface scan, in a time that is comparable to the time needed to collect a topographic image with current AFM imaging modes. Numerical simulation results are provided along with recommended parameters to characterize tip–sample interactions resembling those of conventional silicon tips and carbon nanotube tips tapping on silicon surfaces

  19. Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cantilever Shaped Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Thundat

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Microcantilevers were first introduced as imaging probes in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM due to their extremely high sensitivity in measuring surface forces. The versatility of these probes, however, allows the sensing and measurement of a host of mechanical properties of various materials. Sensor parameters such as resonance frequency, quality factor, amplitude of vibration and bending due to a differential stress can all be simultaneously determined for a cantilever. When measuring the mechanical properties of materials, identifying and discerning the most influential parameters responsible for the observed changes in the cantilever response are important. We will, therefore, discuss the effects of various force fields such as those induced by mass loading, residual stress, internal friction of the material, and other changes in the mechanical properties of the microcantilevers. Methods to measure variations in temperature, pressure, or molecular adsorption of water molecules are also discussed. Often these effects occur simultaneously, increasing the number of parameters that need to be concurrently measured to ensure the reliability of the sensors. We therefore systematically investigate the geometric and environmental effects on cantilever measurements including the chemical nature of the underlying interactions. To address the geometric effects we have considered cantilevers with a rectangular or circular cross section. The chemical nature is addressed by using cantilevers fabricated with metals and/or dielectrics. Selective chemical etching, swelling or changes in Young’s modulus of the surface were investigated by means of polymeric and inorganic coatings. Finally to address the effect of the environment in which the cantilever operates, the Knudsen number was determined to characterize the molecule-cantilever collisions. Also bimaterial cantilevers with high thermal sensitivity were used to discern the effect of temperature

  20. Design and fabrication of a micro PZT cantilever array actuator for applications in fluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, H.; In, C.; Yoon, Gil Ho

    2005-01-01

    In this article, a micro cantilever array actuated by PZT films is designed and fabricated for micro fluidic systems. The design features for maximizing tip deflections and minimizing fluid leakage are described. The governing equation of the composite PZT cantilever is derived and the actuating......, dielectric constant, and dielectric loss. Tip deflections of 12 mu m at 5 V are measured, which agreed well with the predicted value. The 18 mu l/s leakage rate of air was observed at a pressure difference of 1000 Pa. Micro cooler is introduced, and its possible application to micro compressor is discussed....

  1. Tip-enhanced Raman mapping with top-illumination AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2011-04-29

    Tip-enhanced Raman mapping is a powerful, emerging technique that offers rich chemical information and high spatial resolution. Currently, most of the successes in tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) measurements are based on the inverted configuration where tips and laser are approaching the sample from opposite sides. This results in the limitation of measurement for transparent samples only. Several approaches have been developed to obtain tip-enhanced Raman mapping in reflection mode, many of which involve certain customisations of the system. We have demonstrated in this work that it is also possible to obtain TERS nano-images using an upright microscope (top-illumination) with a gold-coated Si atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever without significant modification to the existing integrated AFM/Raman system. A TERS image of a single-walled carbon nanotube has been achieved with a spatial resolution of ∼ 20-50 nm, demonstrating the potential of this technique for studying non-transparent nanoscale materials.

  2. Tip-enhanced Raman mapping with top-illumination AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G, E-mail: s.kazarian@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-29

    Tip-enhanced Raman mapping is a powerful, emerging technique that offers rich chemical information and high spatial resolution. Currently, most of the successes in tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) measurements are based on the inverted configuration where tips and laser are approaching the sample from opposite sides. This results in the limitation of measurement for transparent samples only. Several approaches have been developed to obtain tip-enhanced Raman mapping in reflection mode, many of which involve certain customisations of the system. We have demonstrated in this work that it is also possible to obtain TERS nano-images using an upright microscope (top-illumination) with a gold-coated Si atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever without significant modification to the existing integrated AFM/Raman system. A TERS image of a single-walled carbon nanotube has been achieved with a spatial resolution of {approx} 20-50 nm, demonstrating the potential of this technique for studying non-transparent nanoscale materials.

  3. Tip-enhanced Raman mapping with top-illumination AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2011-01-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman mapping is a powerful, emerging technique that offers rich chemical information and high spatial resolution. Currently, most of the successes in tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) measurements are based on the inverted configuration where tips and laser are approaching the sample from opposite sides. This results in the limitation of measurement for transparent samples only. Several approaches have been developed to obtain tip-enhanced Raman mapping in reflection mode, many of which involve certain customisations of the system. We have demonstrated in this work that it is also possible to obtain TERS nano-images using an upright microscope (top-illumination) with a gold-coated Si atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever without significant modification to the existing integrated AFM/Raman system. A TERS image of a single-walled carbon nanotube has been achieved with a spatial resolution of ∼ 20-50 nm, demonstrating the potential of this technique for studying non-transparent nanoscale materials.

  4. Passive microrheology of soft materials with atomic force microscopy: A wavelet-based spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Torres, C.; Streppa, L. [CNRS, UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, Université de Lyon, 69007 Lyon (France); Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F. [CNRS, UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, Université de Lyon, 69007 Lyon (France); CNRS, UMR5798, Laboratoire Ondes et Matière d' Aquitaine, Université de Bordeaux, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence (France); Argoul, P. [Université Paris-Est, Ecole des Ponts ParisTech, SDOA, MAST, IFSTTAR, 14-20 Bd Newton, Cité Descartes, 77420 Champs sur Marne (France)

    2016-01-18

    Compared to active microrheology where a known force or modulation is periodically imposed to a soft material, passive microrheology relies on the spectral analysis of the spontaneous motion of tracers inherent or external to the material. Passive microrheology studies of soft or living materials with atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever tips are rather rare because, in the spectral densities, the rheological response of the materials is hardly distinguishable from other sources of random or periodic perturbations. To circumvent this difficulty, we propose here a wavelet-based decomposition of AFM cantilever tip fluctuations and we show that when applying this multi-scale method to soft polymer layers and to living myoblasts, the structural damping exponents of these soft materials can be retrieved.

  5. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  6. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva

    2016-01-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m −1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification. (paper)

  7. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Putman, C.A.J.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1994-01-01

    We show that standard silicon nitride cantilevers can be used for tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) in air, provided that the energy of the oscillating cantilever is sufficiently high to overcome the adhesion of the water layer. The same cantilevers are successfully used for tapping mode

  8. Nonlinear Phenomena in the Single-Mode Dynamics in an AFM Cantilever Beam

    KAUST Repository

    Ruzziconi, Laura

    2016-12-05

    This study deals with the nonlinear dynamics arising in an atomic force microscope cantilever beam. After analyzing the static behavior, a single degree of freedom Galerkin reduced order model is introduced, which describes the overall scenario of the structure response in a neighborhood of the primary resonance. Extensive numerical simulations are performed when both the forcing amplitude and frequency are varied, ranging from low up to elevated excitations. The coexistence of competing attractors with different characteristics is analyzed. Both the non-resonant and the resonant behavior are observed, as well as ranges of inevitable escape. Versatility of behavior is highlighted, which may be attractive in applications. Special attention is devoted to the effects of the tip-sample separation distance, since this aspect is of fundamental importance to understand the operation of an AFM. We explore the metamorphoses of the multistability region when the tip-sample separation distance is varied. To have a complete description of the AFM response, comprehensive behavior charts are introduced to detect the theoretical boundaries of appearance and disappearance of the main attractors. Also, extensive numerical simulations investigate the AFM response when both the forcing amplitude and the tip-sample separation distance are considered as control parameters. The main features are analyzed in detail and the obtained results are interpreted in terms of oscillations of the cantilever-tip ensemble. However, we note that all the aforementioned results represent the limit when disturbances are absent, which never occurs in practice. Here comes the importance of overcoming local investigations and exploring dynamics from a global perspective, by introducing dynamical integrity concepts. To extend the AFM results to the practical case where disturbances exist, we develop a dynamical integrity analysis. After performing a systematic basin of attraction analysis, integrity

  9. Topotactic changes on η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11} caused by biased atomic force microscope tip and cw-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovšak, Miloš, E-mail: milos.borovsak@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty for Mathematics and Physics, Jadranska ulica 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Šutar, Petra; Goreshnik, Evgeny [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mihailovic, Dragan [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); International Postgraduate School Jožef Stefan, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • We report influencing electronic properties of η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11}. • With the biased AFM tip we induce the surface potential changes on η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11}. • We used cw-laser to induced similar effect on surface potential on η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11}. • We do not influence the surface and topography of the samples. • No change in topography of samples indicates the topotactic transformation. - Abstract: We present topotactic changes on Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11} crystals induced by a biased atomic force microscope tip and continuous laser. The transformation does not change the topography of the samples, while the surface potential shows remarkable changes on areas where the biased AFM tip was applied. No structural changes were observed by Raman spectroscopy, but AFM scans revealed changes to surface potential due to laser illumination. The observed phenomenon could be potentially useful for memristive memory devices considering the fact that properties of other molybdenum oxides vary from metallic to insulators.

  10. Controlling the opto-mechanics of a cantilever in an interferometer via cavity loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidsfeld, A. von, E-mail: avonschm@uos.de; Reichling, M., E-mail: reichling@uos.de [Fachbereich Physik, Universität Osnabrück, Barbarastraße 7, 49076 Osnabrück (Germany)

    2015-09-21

    In a non-contact atomic force microscope, based on interferometric cantilever displacement detection, the optical return loss of the system is tunable via the distance between the fiber end and the cantilever. We utilize this for tuning the interferometer from a predominant Michelson to a predominant Fabry-Pérot characteristics and introduce the Fabry-Pérot enhancement factor as a quantitative measure for multibeam interference in the cavity. This experimentally easily accessible and adjustable parameter provides a control of the opto-mechanical interaction between the cavity light field and the cantilever. The quantitative assessment of the light pressure acting on the cantilever oscillating in the cavity via the frequency shift allows an in-situ measurement of the cantilever stiffness with remarkable precision.

  11. The effects of substrate layer thickness on piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting with a bimorph type cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosaari, Jaakko; Leinonen, Mikko; Juuti, Jari; Jantunen, Heli

    2018-06-01

    In this research four piezoelectric bimorph type cantilevers for energy harvesting were manufactured, measured and analyzed to study the effects of substrate layer thickness on energy harvesting efficiency and durability under different accelerations. The cantilevers had the same dimensions of the piezoelectric ceramic components, but had different thicknesses of the steel substrate (no steel, 30 μm, 50 μm and 75 μm). The cantilevers were tuned to the same resonance frequency with different sizes of tip mass (2.13 g, 3.84 g, 4.17 g and 5.08 g). The energy harvester voltage outputs were then measured across an electrical load near to the resonance frequency (∼40 Hz) with sinusoidal vibrations under different accelerations. The stress exhibited by the four cantilevers was compared and analyzed and their durability was tested with accelerations up to 2.5 g-forces.

  12. A versatile atomic force microscope for three-dimensional nanomanipulation and nanoassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hui; Haliyo, Dogan Sinan; Regnier, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    A conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) has been successfully applied to manipulating nanoparticles (zero-dimensional), nanowires (one-dimensional) or nanotubes (one- or two-dimensional) by widely used pushing or pulling operations on a single surface. However, pick-and-place nanomanipulation in air is still a challenge. In this research, a modified AFM, called a three-dimensional (3D) manipulation force microscope (3DMFM), was developed to realize 3D nanomanipulation in air. This system consists of two individually actuated cantilevers with protruding tips that are facing each other, constructing a nanotweezer for the pick-and-place nanomanipulation. Before manipulation, one of the cantilevers is employed to position nano-objects and locate the tip of the other cantilever by image scanning. During the manipulation, these two cantilevers work collaboratively as a nanotweezer to grasp, transport and place the nano-objects with real-time force sensing. The manipulation capabilities of the nanotweezer were demonstrated by grabbing and manipulating silicon nanowires to build 3D nanowire crosses. 3D nanomanipulation and nanoassembly performed in air could become feasible through this newly developed 3DMFM.

  13. Cantilever-like micromechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja; Dohn, Søren; Keller, Stephan Sylvest

    2011-01-01

    The field of cantilever-based sensing emerged in the mid-1990s and is today a well-known technology for label-free sensing which holds promise as a technique for cheap, portable, sensitive and highly parallel analysis systems. The research in sensor realization as well as sensor applications has...... increased significantly over the past 10 years. In this review we will present the basic modes of operation in cantilever-like micromechanical sensors and discuss optical and electrical means for signal transduction. The fundamental processes for realizing miniaturized cantilevers are described with focus...... on silicon-and polymer-based technologies. Examples of recent sensor applications are given covering such diverse fields as drug discovery, food diagnostics, material characterizations and explosives detection....

  14. Electronically droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    2012-01-01

    A report is presented on free falling droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers. The harvester incorporates a multimorph clamped-free cantilever which is composed of five layers of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thick films

  15. A compact CCD-monitored atomic force microscope with optical vision and improved performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyue, Liu; Haijun, Zhang; Dongxian, Zhang

    2013-09-01

    A novel CCD-monitored atomic force microscope (AFM) with optical vision and improved performances has been developed. Compact optical paths are specifically devised for both tip-sample microscopic monitoring and cantilever's deflection detecting with minimized volume and optimal light-amplifying ratio. The ingeniously designed AFM probe with such optical paths enables quick and safe tip-sample approaching, convenient and effective tip-sample positioning, and high quality image scanning. An image stitching method is also developed to build a wider-range AFM image under monitoring. Experiments show that this AFM system can offer real-time optical vision for tip-sample monitoring with wide visual field and/or high lateral optical resolution by simply switching the objective; meanwhile, it has the elegant performances of nanometer resolution, high stability, and high scan speed. Furthermore, it is capable of conducting wider-range image measurement while keeping nanometer resolution. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Search for the optimally suited cantilever type for high-frequency MFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koblischka, M R; Wei, J D; Kirsch, M; Lessel, M; Pfeifer, R; Brust, M; Hartmann, U; Richter, C; Sulzbach, T

    2007-01-01

    To optimize the performance of the high-frequency MFM (HF-MFM) technique [1-4], we performed a search for the best suited cantilever type and magnetic material coating. Using a HF-MFM setup with hard disk writer poles as test samples, we carried out HF-MFM imaging at frequencies up to 2 GHz. For HF-MFM, it is an essential ingredient that the tip material can follow the fast switching of the high-frequency fields. In this contribution, we investigated 6 different types of cantilevers (i) the 'standard' MFM tip (Nanoworld Pointprobe) with 30 nm CoCr coating, (ii) a 'SSS' (Nanoworld SuperSharpSilicon TM ) cantilever with a 10 nm CoCr coating, (iii) a (Ni, Zn)-ferrite coated pointprobe tip (iv) a Ba 3 Co 2 Fe 23 O 41 (BCFO) coated pointprobe tip, (v) a low-coercivity NiCo alloy coated tip, and (vi) a permalloy-coated tip

  17. Tips for TIPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, C.F.

    2015-01-01

    The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure is one of the most technically challenging procedures in interventional radiology. During the procedure, interventional radiologists (IRs) insert very thin and long instruments through a little incision in the patient’s neck. They

  18. Modelling atomic scale manipulation with the non-contact atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevethan, T; Watkins, M; Kantorovich, L N; Shluger, A L; Polesel-Maris, J; Gauthier, S

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of calculations performed to model the process of lateral manipulation of an oxygen vacancy in the MgO(001) surface using the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM). The potential energy surfaces for the manipulation as a function of tip position are determined from atomistic modelling of the MgO(001) surface interacting with a Mg terminated MgO tip. These energies are then used to model the dynamical evolution of the system as the tip oscillates and at a finite temperature using a kinetic Monte Carlo method. The manipulation process is strongly dependent on the lateral position of the tip and the system temperature. It is also found that the expectation value of the point at which the vacancy jumps depends on the trajectory of the oscillating cantilever as the surface is approached. The effect of the manipulation on the operation of the NC-AFM is modelled with a virtual dynamic AFM, which explicitly simulates the entire experimental instrumentation and control loops. We show how measurable experimental signals can result from a single controlled atomic scale event and suggest the most favourable conditions for achieving successful atomic scale manipulation experimentally

  19. Si{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase change material studied by an atomic force microscope nano-tip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yanbo; Min Guoquan; Zhang Jing; Zhou Weimin; Wan Yongzhong; Zhang Jianping; Li Xiaoli [Laboratory of Nano-Technology, Shanghai Nanotechnology Promotion Center, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhang Ting; Niu Xiaoming; Song Zhitang; Feng Songlin, E-mail: liuyanbo@snpc.org.c, E-mail: tzhang@mail.sim.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2009-06-01

    The Si{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase change material has been studied by applying a nano-tip (30 nm in diameter) on an atomic force microscopy system. Memory switching from a high resistance state to a low resistance state has been achieved, with a resistance change of about 1000 times. In a typical I-V curve, the current increases significantly after the voltage exceeds approx4.3 V. The phase transformation of a Si{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film was studied in situ by means of in situ X-ray diffraction and temperature dependent resistance measurements. The thermal stability of Si{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} was characterized and compared as well.

  20. Polymeric Cantilever Arrays for Biosensing Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J.; Johansson, Alicia

    2003-01-01

    We report the fabrication of arrays of polymeric cantilevers for biochemistry applications. The cantilevers are fabricated in the polymer SU-8. The use of a polymer as the component material for the cantilevers provides the sensors with very high sensitivity due to convenient mechanical material...... properties. The fabrication process is based on spin coating of the photosensitive polymer and near-ultraviolet exposure. The method allows obtaining well-controlled and uniform mechanical properties of the cantilevers. The elastic constant of the cantilevers was measured, and their dynamic response...

  1. Photopicking : In Situ Approach for Site-Specific Attachment of Single Multiprotein Nanoparticles to Atomic Force Microscopy Tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liashkovich, Ivan; Rosso, Gonzalo; Rangl, Martina; Ebner, Andreas; Hafezi, Wali; Kühn, Joachim; Schön, Peter; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Shahin, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Ligand–receptor interactions are fundamental in life sciences and include hormone–receptor, protein–protein, pathogen–host, and cell–cell interactions, among others. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) proved to be invaluable for scrutinizing ligand–receptor interactions at the single molecular level.

  2. Influence of tip indentation on the adhesive behavior of viscoelastic polydimethylsiloxane networks studied by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, J.P.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2001-01-01

    A commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) outfitted with a custom control and data acquisition system was used to investigate the adhesive nature of a viscoelastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) network. Due to the complex dependence of the adhesion of this sample on factors such as indentation,

  3. Piezoresistive Cantilever Performance-Part I: Analytical Model for Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Jin; Doll, Joseph C; Pruitt, Beth L

    2010-02-01

    An accurate analytical model for the change in resistance of a piezoresistor is necessary for the design of silicon piezoresistive transducers. Ion implantation requires a high-temperature oxidation or annealing process to activate the dopant atoms, and this treatment results in a distorted dopant profile due to diffusion. Existing analytical models do not account for the concentration dependence of piezoresistance and are not accurate for nonuniform dopant profiles. We extend previous analytical work by introducing two nondimensional factors, namely, the efficiency and geometry factors. A practical benefit of this efficiency factor is that it separates the process parameters from the design parameters; thus, designers may address requirements for cantilever geometry and fabrication process independently. To facilitate the design process, we provide a lookup table for the efficiency factor over an extensive range of process conditions. The model was validated by comparing simulation results with the experimentally determined sensitivities of piezoresistive cantilevers. We performed 9200 TSUPREM4 simulations and fabricated 50 devices from six unique process flows; we systematically explored the design space relating process parameters and cantilever sensitivity. Our treatment focuses on piezoresistive cantilevers, but the analytical sensitivity model is extensible to other piezoresistive transducers such as membrane pressure sensors.

  4. Piezoresistive Cantilever Performance—Part I: Analytical Model for Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Jin; Doll, Joseph C.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2010-01-01

    An accurate analytical model for the change in resistance of a piezoresistor is necessary for the design of silicon piezoresistive transducers. Ion implantation requires a high-temperature oxidation or annealing process to activate the dopant atoms, and this treatment results in a distorted dopant profile due to diffusion. Existing analytical models do not account for the concentration dependence of piezoresistance and are not accurate for nonuniform dopant profiles. We extend previous analytical work by introducing two nondimensional factors, namely, the efficiency and geometry factors. A practical benefit of this efficiency factor is that it separates the process parameters from the design parameters; thus, designers may address requirements for cantilever geometry and fabrication process independently. To facilitate the design process, we provide a lookup table for the efficiency factor over an extensive range of process conditions. The model was validated by comparing simulation results with the experimentally determined sensitivities of piezoresistive cantilevers. We performed 9200 TSUPREM4 simulations and fabricated 50 devices from six unique process flows; we systematically explored the design space relating process parameters and cantilever sensitivity. Our treatment focuses on piezoresistive cantilevers, but the analytical sensitivity model is extensible to other piezoresistive transducers such as membrane pressure sensors. PMID:20336183

  5. A new detection system for extremely small vertically mounted cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognozzi, M; Ulcinas, A; Picco, L; Simpson, S H; Miles, M J; Heard, P J; Szczelkun, M D; Brenner, B

    2008-01-01

    Detection techniques currently used in scanning force microscopy impose limitations on the geometrical dimensions of the probes and, as a consequence, on their force sensitivity and temporal response. A new technique, based on scattered evanescent electromagnetic waves (SEW), is presented here that can detect the displacement of the extreme end of a vertically mounted cantilever. The resolution of this method is tested using different cantilever sizes and a theoretical model is developed to maximize the detection sensitivity. The applications presented here clearly show that the SEW detection system enables the use of force sensors with sub-micron size, opening new possibilities in the investigation of biomolecular systems and high speed imaging. Two types of cantilevers were successfully tested: a high force sensitivity lever with a spring constant of 0.17 pN nm -1 and a resonant frequency of 32 kHz; and a high speed lever with a spring constant of 50 pN nm -1 and a resonant frequency of 1.8 MHz. Both these force sensors were fabricated by modifying commercial microcantilevers in a focused ion beam system. It is important to emphasize that these modified cantilevers could not be detected by the conventional optical detection system used in commercial atomic force microscopes

  6. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  7. Accurate Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation of the Normal Spring Constant of Various AFM Cantilevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke’s law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%.

  8. Shielded piezoresistive cantilever probes for nanoscale topography and electrical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yongliang; Ma, Eric Yue; Cui, Yong-Tao; Lai, Keji; Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Haemmerli, Alexandre; Harjee, Nahid; Pruitt, Beth L

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and fabrication of piezoresistive cantilever probes for microwave impedance microscopy (MIM) to enable simultaneous topographic and electrical imaging. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited Si 3 N 4  cantilevers with a shielded center conductor line and nanoscale conductive tip apex are batch fabricated on silicon-on-insulator wafers. Doped silicon piezoresistors are integrated at the root of the cantilevers to sense their deformation. The piezoresistive sensitivity is 2 nm for a bandwidth of 10 kHz, enabling topographical imaging with reasonable speed. The aluminum center conductor has a low resistance (less than 5 Ω) and small capacitance (∼1.7 pF) to ground; these parameters are critical for high sensitivity MIM imaging. High quality piezoresistive topography and MIM images are simultaneously obtained with the fabricated probes at ambient and cryogenic temperatures. These new piezoresistive probes remarkably broaden the horizon of MIM for scientific applications by operating with an integrated feedback mechanism at low temperature and for photosensitive samples. (paper)

  9. Scanning probe microscopy with vertically oriented cantilevers made easy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdrè, G; Moro, D; Ulian, G

    2012-01-01

    Non-contact imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is becoming of great importance in particular for imaging biological matter and in general soft materials. Transverse dynamic force microscopy (TDFM) is an SPM-based methodology that exploiting a cantilever oriented in a vertical configuration with respect to the sample surface may work with very low tip to sample interaction forces. The probe is oscillated parallel to the sample surface, usually by a piezoelectric element. However, this methodology often requires complex microscope setups and detection systems, so it is usually developed in specific laboratories as a prototype microscope. Here, we present a very simple device that easily enables a commercial SPM head to be oriented in such a way to have the cantilever long axis perpendicular to the sample surface. No modifications of the SPM hardware and software are required and commercial available cantilevers can be used as probes. Performance tests using polystyrene spheres, muscovite crystallographic steps and DNA single molecules were successful and all resulted in agreement with other TDFM and SPM observations demonstrating the reliability of the device. (paper)

  10. Role of the tip induced local anodic oxidation in the conductive atomic force microscopy of mixed phase silicon thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vetushka, Aliaksi; Fejfar, Antonín; Ledinský, Martin; Rezek, Bohuslav; Stuchlík, Jiří; Kočka, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 7, 3-4 (2010), s. 728-731 ISSN 1862-6351 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040; GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100100902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : local anodic oxidation (LAO) * conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/123289759/abstract

  11. Fabrication of amorphous silicon nanoribbons by atomic force microscope tip-induced local oxidation for thin film device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, L; Rogel, R; Demami, F

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of induced local oxidation of amorphous silicon by atomic force microscopy. The resulting local oxide is used as a mask for the elaboration of a thin film silicon resistor. A thin amorphous silicon layer deposited on a glass substrate is locally oxidized following narrow continuous lines. The corresponding oxide line is then used as a mask during plasma etching of the amorphous layer leading to the formation of a nanoribbon. Such an amorphous silicon nanoribbon is used for the fabrication of the resistor

  12. Nanomechanical properties of SiC films grown from C{sub 60} precursors using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Balooch, M.; Hamza, A.V.; Belak, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The mechanical properties of SiC films grown via C{sub 60} precursors were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Conventional silicon nitride and modified diamond cantilever AFM tips were employed to determine the film hardness, friction coefficient, and elastic modulus. The hardness is found to be between 26 and 40 GPa by nanoindentation of the film with the diamond tip. The friction coefficient for the silicon nitride tip on the SiC film is about one third that for silicon nitride sliding on a silicon substrate. By combining nanoindentation and AFM measurements an elastic modulus of {approximately}300 GPa is estimated for these SiC films. In order to better understand the atomic scale mechanisms that determine the hardness and friction of SiC, we simulated the molecular dynamics of a diamond indenting a crystalline SiC substrate.

  13. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ... tv tip-overs. The force of a large television falling from tipping furniture can be staggering. A ...

  14. CPAP Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... now Try it free Find out why Close CPAP Tips from FDA USFoodandDrugAdmin Loading... Unsubscribe from USFoodandDrugAdmin? ... apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device when sleeping? Here are some tips from ...

  15. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of a large television falling from tipping furniture ... 50 lb. TV falls with about the same force as child falling from the third story of ...

  16. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture ... about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of a ...

  17. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Blog About OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by ... danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe ...

  18. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  19. Atomic Force Microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We can visualize macroscopic organisms like animals, plants, and insects by the .... has a tiny tip attached to the free end of the cantilever which contacts the sample. ..... radicals by reducing the intracellular level of Fe2+ when the cell is.

  20. Fabrication of resonant micro cantilevers with integrated transparent fluidic channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Faheem; Schmid, Silvan; Davis, Zachary James

    2011-01-01

    Microfabricated cantilevers are proving their potential as excellent tools for analysis applications. In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication and testing of resonant micro cantilevers with integrated transparent fluidic channels. The cantilevers have been devised to measure the density...

  1. Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Marina; te Riet, Joost; Wolf, Katarina

    2013-12-01

    The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness together with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact and the fate of the cell. Using cantilevers functionalized with either tips or beads and spring constants ranging from 0.06-10 N m-1, force-deformation curves were generated from nuclear positions of adherent HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell populations at unchallenged integrity, and a nuclear stiffness range of 0.2 to 2.5 kPa was identified depending on cantilever type and the use of extended fitting models. Chromatin-decondensating agent trichostatin A (TSA) induced nuclear softening of up to 50%, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. Finally, using a stiff bead-functionalized cantilever pushing at maximal system-intrinsic force, the nucleus was deformed to 20% of its original height which after TSA treatment reduced further to 5% remaining height confirming chromatin organization as an important determinant of nuclear stiffness. Thus, combined AFM-confocal microscopy is a feasible approach to study nuclear compressibility to complement concepts of limiting nuclear deformation in cancer cell invasion and other biological processes.

  2. Techniques for imaging human metaphase chromosomes in liquid conditions by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushiki, Tatsuo; Hoshi, Osamu [Division of Microscopic Anatomy and Bio-imaging, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 1-757 Asahimachi-dori, Chuo-ku, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Shigeno, Masatsugu [SII NanoTechnology Incorporated, RBM Tsukiji Building, Shintomi 2-15-5, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0041 (Japan)], E-mail: t-ushiki@med.niigata-u.ac.jp

    2008-09-24

    The purpose of this study was to obtain three-dimensional images of wet chromosomes by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions. Human metaphase chromosomes-obtained either by chromosome spreads or by an isolation technique-were observed in a dynamic mode by AFM in a buffer solution. Under suitable operating conditions with a soft triangular cantilever (with the spring constant of 0.08-0.4 N m{sup -1}), clear images of fixed chromosomes in the chromosome spread were obtained by AFM. For imaging isolated chromosomes with the height of more than 400 nm, a cantilever with a high aspect ratio probing tip was required. The combination of a Q-control system and the sampling intelligent scan (SIS) system in dynamic force mode AFM was useful for obtaining high-quality images of the isolated chromosomes, in which globular or cord-like structures about 50 nm thick were clearly observed on the surface of each chromatid.

  3. On the origin of amplitude reduction mechanism in tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvani, Aliasghar; Sadeghian, Hamed; Goosen, Hans; van Keulen, Fred

    2018-04-01

    The origin of amplitude reduction in Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM) is typically attributed to the shift in resonance frequency of the cantilever due to the nonlinear tip-sample interactions. In this paper, we present a different insight into the same problem which, besides explaining the amplitude reduction mechanism, provides a simple reasoning for the relationship between tip-sample interactions and operation parameters (amplitude and frequency). The proposed formulation, which attributes the amplitude reduction to an interference between the tip-sample and dither force, only deals with the linear part of the system; however, it fully agrees with experimental results and numerical solutions of the full nonlinear model of TM-AFM.

  4. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  5. Multi-MHz micro-electro-mechanical sensors for atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, Bernard; Salvetat, Jean-Paul; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Théron, Didier; Aimé, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Silicon ring-shaped micro-electro-mechanical resonators have been fabricated and used as probes for dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. They offer resotnance frequency above 10 MHz, which is notably greater than that of usual cantilevers and quartz-based AFM probes. On-chip electrical actuation and readout of the tip oscillation are obtained by means of built-in capacitive transducers. Displacement and force resolutions have been determined from noise analysis at 1.5 fm/√Hz and 0.4 pN/√Hz, respectively. Despite the high effective stiffness of the probes, the tip-surface interaction force is kept below 1 nN by using vibration amplitude significantly below 100 pm and setpoint close to the free vibration conditions. Imaging capabilities in amplitude- and frequency-modulation AFM modes have been demonstrated on block copolymer surfaces. Z-spectroscopy experiments revealed that the tip is vibrating in permanent contact with the viscoelastic material, with a pinned contact line. Results are compared to those obtained with commercial AFM cantilevers driven at large amplitudes (>10 nm). - Highlights: • Silicon MEMS resonators are used as AFM probes above 10 MHz. • Integrated capacitive transducers drive and sense sub-nanometer tip oscillation. • Force resolution is below 1 pN/√Hz. • Block copolymer surface is imaged using AM and FM AFM modes. • Probes are operated at small vibration amplitude in permanent viscoelastic contact.

  6. Multi-MHz micro-electro-mechanical sensors for atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legrand, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.legrand@laas.fr [LAAS-CNRS, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Salvetat, Jean-Paul [CRPP, 115 avenue Schweitzer, F-33600 Pessac (France); Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Théron, Didier [IEMN, avenue Henri Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Aimé, Jean-Pierre [CBMN, allée Geoffroy Saint Hilaire, Bât. B14, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2017-04-15

    Silicon ring-shaped micro-electro-mechanical resonators have been fabricated and used as probes for dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. They offer resotnance frequency above 10 MHz, which is notably greater than that of usual cantilevers and quartz-based AFM probes. On-chip electrical actuation and readout of the tip oscillation are obtained by means of built-in capacitive transducers. Displacement and force resolutions have been determined from noise analysis at 1.5 fm/√Hz and 0.4 pN/√Hz, respectively. Despite the high effective stiffness of the probes, the tip-surface interaction force is kept below 1 nN by using vibration amplitude significantly below 100 pm and setpoint close to the free vibration conditions. Imaging capabilities in amplitude- and frequency-modulation AFM modes have been demonstrated on block copolymer surfaces. Z-spectroscopy experiments revealed that the tip is vibrating in permanent contact with the viscoelastic material, with a pinned contact line. Results are compared to those obtained with commercial AFM cantilevers driven at large amplitudes (>10 nm). - Highlights: • Silicon MEMS resonators are used as AFM probes above 10 MHz. • Integrated capacitive transducers drive and sense sub-nanometer tip oscillation. • Force resolution is below 1 pN/√Hz. • Block copolymer surface is imaged using AM and FM AFM modes. • Probes are operated at small vibration amplitude in permanent viscoelastic contact.

  7. Autopilot for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Schlesinger, Itai; Sivan, Uri, E-mail: phsivan@tx.technion.ac.il [Department of Physics and the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-10-15

    One of the most challenging aspects of operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) is finding optimal feedback parameters. This statement applies particularly to frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM), which utilizes three feedback loops to control the cantilever excitation amplitude, cantilever excitation frequency, and z-piezo extension. These loops are regulated by a set of feedback parameters, tuned by the user to optimize stability, sensitivity, and noise in the imaging process. Optimization of these parameters is difficult due to the coupling between the frequency and z-piezo feedback loops by the non-linear tip-sample interaction. Four proportional-integral (PI) parameters and two lock-in parameters regulating these loops require simultaneous optimization in the presence of a varying unknown tip-sample coupling. Presently, this optimization is done manually in a tedious process of trial and error. Here, we report on the development and implementation of an algorithm that computes the control parameters automatically. The algorithm reads the unperturbed cantilever resonance frequency, its quality factor, and the z-piezo driving signal power spectral density. It analyzes the poles and zeros of the total closed loop transfer function, extracts the unknown tip-sample transfer function, and finds four PI parameters and two lock-in parameters for the frequency and z-piezo control loops that optimize the bandwidth and step response of the total system. Implementation of the algorithm in a home-built AFM shows that the calculated parameters are consistently excellent and rarely require further tweaking by the user. The new algorithm saves the precious time of experienced users, facilitates utilization of FM-AFM by casual users, and removes the main hurdle on the way to fully automated FM-AFM.

  8. Autopilot for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Schlesinger, Itai; Sivan, Uri

    2015-10-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) is finding optimal feedback parameters. This statement applies particularly to frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM), which utilizes three feedback loops to control the cantilever excitation amplitude, cantilever excitation frequency, and z-piezo extension. These loops are regulated by a set of feedback parameters, tuned by the user to optimize stability, sensitivity, and noise in the imaging process. Optimization of these parameters is difficult due to the coupling between the frequency and z-piezo feedback loops by the non-linear tip-sample interaction. Four proportional-integral (PI) parameters and two lock-in parameters regulating these loops require simultaneous optimization in the presence of a varying unknown tip-sample coupling. Presently, this optimization is done manually in a tedious process of trial and error. Here, we report on the development and implementation of an algorithm that computes the control parameters automatically. The algorithm reads the unperturbed cantilever resonance frequency, its quality factor, and the z-piezo driving signal power spectral density. It analyzes the poles and zeros of the total closed loop transfer function, extracts the unknown tip-sample transfer function, and finds four PI parameters and two lock-in parameters for the frequency and z-piezo control loops that optimize the bandwidth and step response of the total system. Implementation of the algorithm in a home-built AFM shows that the calculated parameters are consistently excellent and rarely require further tweaking by the user. The new algorithm saves the precious time of experienced users, facilitates utilization of FM-AFM by casual users, and removes the main hurdle on the way to fully automated FM-AFM.

  9. Cantilevers orthodontics forces measured by fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Neblyssa; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Valmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    Fibers Bragg Gratings were used to evaluate the transmission of the forces generates by orthodontic mechanic based one and two cantilevers used to move molars to the upright position. The results showed levels forces of approximately 0,14N near to the root of the molar with one and two cantilevers.

  10. Cantilever sensors: Nanomechanical tools for diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datar, R.; Kim, S.; Jeon, S.

    2009-01-01

    Cantilever sensors have attracted considerable attention over the last decade because of their potential as a highly sensitive sensor platform for high throughput and multiplexed detection of proteins and nucleic acids. A micromachined cantilever platform integrates nanoscale science and microfab......Cantilever sensors have attracted considerable attention over the last decade because of their potential as a highly sensitive sensor platform for high throughput and multiplexed detection of proteins and nucleic acids. A micromachined cantilever platform integrates nanoscale science...... and microfabrication technology for the label-free detection of biological molecules, allowing miniaturization. Molecular adsorption, when restricted to a single side of a deformable cantilever beam, results in measurable bending of the cantilever. This nanoscale deflection is caused by a variation in the cantilever...... surface stress due to biomolecular interactions and can be measured by optical or electrical means, thereby reporting on the presence of biomolecules. Biological specificity in detection is typically achieved by immobilizing selective receptors or probe molecules on one side of the cantilever using...

  11. Three-electrode self-actuating self-sensing quartz cantilever: design, analysis, and experimental verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C Julian; Schwarz, Alex; Wiesendanger, Roland; Horn, Oliver; Müller, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    We present a novel quartz cantilever for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) which has three electrodes: an actuating electrode, a sensing electrode, and a ground electrode. By applying an ac signal on the actuating electrode, the cantilever is set to vibrate. If the frequency of actuation voltage closely matches one of the characteristic frequencies of the cantilever, a sharp resonance should be observed. The vibration of the cantilever in turn generates a current on the sensing electrode. The arrangement of the electrodes is such that the cross-talk capacitance between the actuating electrode and the sensing electrode is less than 10(-16) F, thus the direct coupling is negligible. To verify the principle, a number of samples were made. Direct measurements with a Nanosurf easyPPL controller and detector showed that for each cantilever, one or more vibrational modes can be excited and detected. Using classical theory of elasticity, it is shown that such novel cantilevers with proper dimensions can provide optimized performance and sensitivity in FM-AFM with very simple electronics.

  12. Cancelation of thermally induced frequency shifts in bimaterial cantilevers by nonlinear optomechanical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vy, Nguyen Duy, E-mail: nguyenduyvy@tdt.edu.vn [Theoretical Physics Research Group, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City 756636 (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City 756636 (Viet Nam); Tri Dat, Le [Faculty of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Science, Ho Chi Minh City 748355 (Viet Nam); Iida, Takuya [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2016-08-01

    Bimaterial cantilevers have recently been used in, for example, the calorimetric analysis with picowatt resolution in microscopic space based on state-of-the-art atomic force microscopes. However, thermally induced effects usually change physical properties of the cantilevers, such as the resonance frequency, which reduce the accuracy of the measurements. Here, we propose an approach to circumvent this problem that uses an optical microcavity formed between a metallic layer coated on the back of the cantilever and one coated at the end of an optical fiber irradiating the cantilever. In addition to increasing the sensitivity, the optical rigidity of this system diminishes the thermally induced frequency shift. For a coating thickness of several tens of nanometers, the input power is 5–10 μW. These values can be evaluated from parameters derived by directly irradiating the cantilever in the absence of the microcavity. The system has the potential of using the cantilever both as a thermometer without frequency shifting and as a sensor with nanometer-controlled accuracy.

  13. Nanometer-Scale Dissection of Chromosomes by Atomic Force Microscopy Combined with Heat-Denaturing Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Kazumi; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shichiri, Motoharu; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Toshio; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a method for dissecting chromosome fragments with a size of a few hundred nanometers by atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using this method, we demonstrated reproducible dissections of silkworm chromosomes in the pachytene phase. The dissected fragments were successfully recovered on the cantilever tips, as confirmed by fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent stained chromosomes. To recover dissected chromosome fragments from a larger chromosome, such as the human metaphase chromosome of a somatic cell, heat denaturation was found to be effective. Further improvements in this method may lead to a novel tool for isolating valuable genes and/or investigating local genome structures in the near future.

  14. Oscillations of end loaded cantilever beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macho-Stadler, E; Elejalde-García, M J; Llanos-Vázquez, R

    2015-01-01

    This article presents several simple experiments based on changing transverse vibration frequencies in a cantilever beam, when acted on by an external attached mass load at the free end. By using a mechanical wave driver, available in introductory undergraduate laboratories, we provide various experimental results for end loaded cantilever beams that fit reasonably well into a linear equation. The behaviour of the cantilever beam’s weak-damping resonance response is studied for the case of metal resonance strips. As the mass load increases, a more pronounced decrease occurs in the fundamental frequency of beam vibration. It is important to note that cantilever construction is often used in architectural design and engineering construction projects but current analysis also predicts the influence of mass load on the sound generated by musical free reeds with boundary conditions similar to a cantilever beam. (paper)

  15. Oscillations of end loaded cantilever beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho-Stadler, E.; Elejalde-García, M. J.; Llanos-Vázquez, R.

    2015-09-01

    This article presents several simple experiments based on changing transverse vibration frequencies in a cantilever beam, when acted on by an external attached mass load at the free end. By using a mechanical wave driver, available in introductory undergraduate laboratories, we provide various experimental results for end loaded cantilever beams that fit reasonably well into a linear equation. The behaviour of the cantilever beam’s weak-damping resonance response is studied for the case of metal resonance strips. As the mass load increases, a more pronounced decrease occurs in the fundamental frequency of beam vibration. It is important to note that cantilever construction is often used in architectural design and engineering construction projects but current analysis also predicts the influence of mass load on the sound generated by musical free reeds with boundary conditions similar to a cantilever beam.

  16. Protein crystals as scanned probes for recognition atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremasinghe, Nissanka S; Hafner, Jason H

    2005-12-01

    Lysozyme crystal growth has been localized at the tip of a conventional silicon nitride cantilever through seeded nucleation. After cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, lysozyme protein crystal tips image gold nanoparticles and grating standards with a resolution comparable to that of conventional tips. Force spectra between the lysozyme crystal tips and surfaces covered with antilysozyme reveal an adhesion force that drops significantly upon blocking with free lysozyme, thus confirming that lysozyme crystal tips can detect molecular recognition interactions.

  17. Force Measurement with a Piezoelectric Cantilever in a Scanning Force Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Tansock, J.; Williams, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Detection of surface forces between a tip and sample has been demonstrated with a piezoelectric cantilever in a scanning force microscope (SFM). The use of piezoelectric force sensing is particularly advantageous in semiconductor applications where stray light from conventional optical force-sensing methods can significantly modify the local carrier density. Additionally, the piezoelectric sensors are simple, provide good sensitivity to force, and can be batch fabricated. Our piezoelectric fo...

  18. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  19. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... now Try it free Find out why Close CPAP Tips from FDA USFoodandDrugAdmin Loading... Unsubscribe from USFoodandDrugAdmin? ... apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device when sleeping? Here are some tips from ...

  20. Technology Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathematics Teacher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Some inexpensive or free ways that enable to capture and use images in work are mentioned. The first tip demonstrates the methods of using some of the built-in capabilities of the Macintosh and Windows-based PC operating systems, and the second tip describes methods to capture and create images using SnagIt.

  1. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to ...

  2. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ...

  3. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be < 5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L- 1 and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples.

  4. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-05

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be <5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L(-1) and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced atomic force microscopy: Development and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Deron A.

    Over the decade since atomic force microscopy (AFM) was invented, development of new microscopes has been closely intertwined with application of AFM to problems of interest in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. New techniques such as tapping mode AFM move quickly in our lab from the designer's bench to the user's table-since this is often the same piece of furniture. In return, designers get ample feedback as to what problems are limiting current instruments, and thus need most urgent attention. Tip sharpness and characterization are such a problem. Chapter 1 describes an AFM designed to operate in a scanning electron microscope, whose electron beam is used to deposit sharp carbonaceous tips. These tips can be tested and used in situ. Another limitation is addressed in Chapter 2: the difficulty of extracting more than just topographic information from a sample. A combined AFM/confocal optical microscope was built to provide simultaneous, independent images of the topography and fluorescence of a sample. In combination with staining or antibody labelling, this could provide submicron information about the composition of a sample. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss two generations of small cantilevers developed for lower-noise, higher-speed AFM of biological samples. In Chapter 4, a 26 mum cantilever is used to image the process of calcite growth from solution at a rate of 1.6 sec/frame. Finally, Chapter 5 explores in detail a biophysics problem that motivates us to develop fast, quiet, and gentle microscopes; namely, the control of crystal growth in seashells by the action of soluble proteins on a growing calcite surface.

  6. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  7. Characterization and fabrication of fully metal-coated scanning near-field optical microscopy SiO2 tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschimann, L; Akiyama, T; Staufer, U; De Rooij, N F; Thiery, L; Eckert, R; Heinzelmann, H

    2003-03-01

    The fabrication of silicon cantilever-based scanning near-field optical microscope probes with fully aluminium-coated quartz tips was optimized to increase production yield. Different cantilever designs for dynamic- and contact-mode force feedback were implemented. Light transmission through the tips was investigated experimentally in terms of the metal coating and the tip cone-angle. We found that transmittance varies with the skin depth of the metal coating and is inverse to the cone angle, meaning that slender tips showed higher transmission. Near-field optical images of individual fluorescing molecules showed a resolution thermocouple showed no evidence of mechanical defect or orifice formation by thermal effects.

  8. A compact atomic force-scanning tunneling microscope for studying microelectronics and environmental aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.

    1996-06-01

    This dissertation describes the characteristics and the construction of a compact atomic force/scanning tunneling microscope (AFM/STM). The basics and the method of preparing a tunneling junction between a chemically etched tunneling tip and a micro-manufactured cantilever is outlined by analyzing the forces between tunneling tip and cantilever as well as between force-sensing tip and sample surfaces. To our best knowledge this instrument is the first one using a commercial cantilever with only one piezoelectric tube carrying the whole tunneling sensor. The feedback control system has been optimized after a careful analysis of the electronic loop characteristics. The mode of operation has been determined by analyzing the dynamic characteristics of the scan heads and by investigating the time characteristics of the data acquisition system. The vibration isolation system has been calibrated by analyzing the characteristics of the damping setup and the stiffness of the scan head. The calculated results agree well with the measured ones. Also, a software package for data acquisition and real time display as well as for image processing and three-dimensional visualization has been developed. With this home-made software package, the images can be processed by means of a convolution filter, a Wiener filter and other 2-D FFT filters, and can be displayed in different ways. Atomic resolution images of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and graphite surfaces have been obtained in AFM and STM mode. New theoretical explanations have been given for the observed anomalous STM and AFM images of graphite by calculating the asymmetric distribution of quantum conductance and tip-surface forces on a graphite surface. This not only resolved the theoretical puzzles of STM and AFM of graphite, but also revealed the relation between atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy of graphite. Applications of STM and AFM to micro-electronic devices have been investigated

  9. The effect of drive frequency and set point amplitude on tapping forces in atomic force microscopy: simulation and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legleiter, Justin

    2009-01-01

    In tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM), a sharp probe tip attached to an oscillating cantilever is allowed to intermittently strike a surface. By raster scanning the probe while monitoring the oscillation amplitude of the cantilever via a feedback loop, topographical maps of surfaces with nanoscale resolution can be acquired. While numerous studies have employed numerical simulations to elucidate the time-resolved tapping force between the probe tip and surface, until recent technique developments, specific read-outs from such models could not be experimentally verified. In this study, we explore, via numerical simulation, the impact of imaging parameters, i.e. set point ratio and drive frequency as a function of resonance, on time-varying tip-sample force interactions, which are directly compared to reconstructed tapping forces from real AFM experiments. As the AFM model contains a feedback loop allowing for the simulation of the entire scanning process, we further explore the impact that various tip-sample force have on the entire imaging process.

  10. Tipping Point

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  11. Tipping Point

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  12. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... see news reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The ...

  13. CPAP Tips

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    Full Text Available ... sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely and effectively use your CPAP device. Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ...

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    Full Text Available ... opinion count. Sign in ... and use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device when sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely ...

  15. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... third story of a building. That kind of impact can kill a child or cause severe injuries. ... to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter Google Plus Reddit Connect with Me:  Visit ...

  16. Piezoresistor-equipped fluorescence-based cantilever probe for near-field scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2007-08-01

    Scanning near-field optical microscopes (SNOMs) with fluorescence-based probes are promising tools for evaluating the optical characteristics of nanoaperture devices used for biological investigations, and this article reports on the development of a microfabricated fluorescence-based SNOM probe with a piezoresistor. The piezoresistor was built into a two-legged root of a 160-microm-long cantilever. To improve the displacement sensitivity of the cantilever, the piezoresistor's doped area was shallowly formed on the cantilever surface. A fluorescent bead, 500 nm in diameter, was attached to the bottom of the cantilever end as a light-intensity-sensitive material in the visible-light range. The surface of the scanned sample was simply detected by the probe's end being displaced by contact with the sample. Measuring displacements piezoresistively is advantageous because it eliminates the noise arising from the use of the optical-lever method and is free of any disturbance in the absorption or the emission spectrum of the fluorescent material at the probe tip. The displacement sensitivity was estimated to be 6.1 x 10(-6) nm(-1), and the minimum measurable displacement was small enough for near-field measurement. This probe enabled clear scanning images of the light field near a 300 x 300 nm(2) aperture to be obtained in the near-field region where the tip-sample distance is much shorter than the light wavelength. This scanning result indicates that the piezoresistive way of tip-sample distance regulation is effective for characterizing nanoaperture optical devices.

  17. Dissipative and electrostatic force spectroscopy of indium arsenide quantum dots by non-contact atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomp, Romain-Pierre

    This thesis is devoted to the studies of self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) by low-temperature Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in frequency modulation mode. Several spectroscopic methods are developed to investigate single electron charging from a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) to an individual InAs QD. Furthermore, a new technique to measure the absolute tip-sample capacitance is also demonstrated. The main observables are the electrostatic force between the metal-coated AFM tip and sample as well as the sample-induced energy dissipation, and therefore no tunneling current has to be collected at the AFM tip. Measurements were performed by recording simultaneously the shift in the resonant frequency and the Q-factor degradation of the oscillating cantilever either as a function of tip-sample voltage or distance. The signature of single electron charging was detected as an abrupt change in the frequency shift as well as corresponding peaks in the dissipation. The main experimental features in the force agree well with the semi-classical theory of Coulomb blockade by considering the free energy of the system. The observed dissipation peaks can be understood as a back-action effect on the oscillating cantilever beam due to the fluctuation in time of electrons tunneling back and forth between the 2DEG and the QD. It was also possible to extract the absolute value of the tip-sample capacitance, as a consequence of the spectroscopic analysis of the electrostic force as a function of tip-sample distance for different values of the applied voltage. At the same time, the contact potential difference and the residual non-capacitive force could also be determined as a function of tip-sample distance.

  18. Functional dependence of resonant harmonics on nanomechanical parameters in dynamic mode atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramazio, Federico; Lorenzoni, Matteo; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Rull Trinidad, Enrique; Staufer, Urs; Fraxedas, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of the dependence of resonant higher harmonics of rectangular cantilevers of an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a function of relevant parameters such as the cantilever force constant, tip radius and free oscillation amplitude as well as the stiffness of the sample's surface. The simulations reveal a universal functional dependence of the amplitude of the 6th harmonic (in resonance with the 2nd flexural mode) on these parameters, which can be expressed in terms of a gun-shaped function. This analytical expression can be regarded as a practical tool for extracting qualitative information from AFM measurements and it can be extended to any resonant harmonics. The experiments confirm the predicted dependence in the explored 3-45 N/m force constant range and 2-345 GPa sample's stiffness range. For force constants around 25 N/m, the amplitude of the 6th harmonic exhibits the largest sensitivity for ultrasharp tips (tip radius below 10 nm) and polymers (Young's modulus below 20 GPa).

  19. AFM tip-sample convolution effects for cylinder protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Fei-Hu; Gan, Yang

    2017-11-01

    A thorough understanding about the AFM tip geometry dependent artifacts and tip-sample convolution effect is essential for reliable AFM topographic characterization and dimensional metrology. Using rigid sapphire cylinder protrusions (diameter: 2.25 μm, height: 575 nm) as the model system, a systematic and quantitative study about the imaging artifacts of four types of tips-two different pyramidal tips, one tetrahedral tip and one super sharp whisker tip-is carried out through comparing tip geometry dependent variations in AFM topography of cylinders and constructing the rigid tip-cylinder convolution models. We found that the imaging artifacts and the tip-sample convolution effect are critically related to the actual inclination of the working cantilever, the tip geometry, and the obstructive contacts between the working tip's planes/edges and the cylinder. Artifact-free images can only be obtained provided that all planes and edges of the working tip are steeper than the cylinder sidewalls. The findings reported here will contribute to reliable AFM characterization of surface features of micron or hundreds of nanometers in height that are frequently met in semiconductor, biology and materials fields.

  20. Microstructuring of piezoresistive cantilevers for gas detection and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarov, Y.; Sarova, V.; Bitterlich, Ch.; Richter, O.; Guliyev, E.; Zoellner, J.-P.; Rangelow, I. W.; Andok, R.; Bencurova, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we report on a design and fabrication of cantilevers for gas detection and analysis. The cantilevers have expanded area of interaction with the gas, while the signal transduction is realized by an integrated piezoresistive deflection sensor, placed at the narrowed cantilever base with highest stress along the cantilever. Moreover, the cantilevers have integrated bimorph micro-actuator detection in a static and dynamic mode. The cantilevers are feasible as pressure, temperature and flow sensors and under chemical functionalization - for gas recognition, tracing and composition analysis. (authors)

  1. CPAP Tips

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    Full Text Available ... Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try it free Find out why Close CPAP Tips from FDA ... safely and effectively use your CPAP device. Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  2. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter Google Plus Reddit Connect with Me:  Visit other Web Sites Maintained by CPSC: cpsc.gov| poolsafely.gov| recalls.gov| saferproducts.gov Privacy, Security, and Legal Notice | Accessibility Policy | Open Government @ ...

  3. CPAP Tips

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  4. CPAP Tips

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    Full Text Available ... sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely and effectively use your CPAP device. Category ... Ambulance Service 21,588 views 4:34 Obstructive Sleep Apnea ...

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  6. Cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S Srinivasulu Raju; M Umapathy; G Uma

    2015-01-01

    Energy harvesting employing piezoelectric materials in mechanical structures such as cantilever beams, plates, diaphragms, etc, has been an emerging area of research in recent years. The research in this area is also focused on structural tailoring to improve the harvested power from the energy harvesters. Towards this aim, this paper presents a method for improving the harvested power from a cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester by introducing multiple rectangular cavities. A generalized model for a piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple rectangular cavities at a single section and two sections is developed. A method is suggested to optimize the thickness of the cavities and the number of cavities required to generate a higher output voltage for a given cantilever beam structure. The performance of the optimized energy harvesters is evaluated analytically and through experimentation. The simulation and experimental results show that the performance of the energy harvester can be increased with multiple cavities compared to the harvester with a single cavity. (paper)

  7. An experimentally validated bimorph cantilever model for piezoelectric energy harvesting from base excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erturk, A; Inman, D J

    2009-01-01

    Piezoelectric transduction has received great attention for vibration-to-electric energy conversion over the last five years. A typical piezoelectric energy harvester is a unimorph or a bimorph cantilever located on a vibrating host structure, to generate electrical energy from base excitations. Several authors have investigated modeling of cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvesters under base excitation. The existing mathematical modeling approaches range from elementary single-degree-of-freedom models to approximate distributed parameter solutions in the sense of Rayleigh–Ritz discretization as well as analytical solution attempts with certain simplifications. Recently, the authors have presented the closed-form analytical solution for a unimorph cantilever under base excitation based on the Euler–Bernoulli beam assumptions. In this paper, the analytical solution is applied to bimorph cantilever configurations with series and parallel connections of piezoceramic layers. The base excitation is assumed to be translation in the transverse direction with a superimposed small rotation. The closed-form steady state response expressions are obtained for harmonic excitations at arbitrary frequencies, which are then reduced to simple but accurate single-mode expressions for modal excitations. The electromechanical frequency response functions (FRFs) that relate the voltage output and vibration response to translational and rotational base accelerations are identified from the multi-mode and single-mode solutions. Experimental validation of the single-mode coupled voltage output and vibration response expressions is presented for a bimorph cantilever with a tip mass. It is observed that the closed-form single-mode FRFs obtained from the analytical solution can successfully predict the coupled system dynamics for a wide range of electrical load resistance. The performance of the bimorph device is analyzed extensively for the short circuit and open circuit resonance

  8. Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy in ambient environments utilizing robust feedback tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, J. I.; Gannepalli, A.; Cleveland, J. P.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2009-02-01

    Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is rapidly evolving as the technique of choice in the pursuit of high resolution imaging of biological samples in ambient environments. The enhanced stability afforded by this dynamic AFM mode combined with quantitative analysis enables the study of complex biological systems, at the nanoscale, in their native physiological environment. The operational bandwidth and accuracy of constant amplitude FM-AFM in low Q environments is heavily dependent on the cantilever dynamics and the performance of the demodulation and feedback loops employed to oscillate the cantilever at its resonant frequency with a constant amplitude. Often researchers use ad hoc feedback gains or instrument default values that can result in an inability to quantify experimental data. Poor choice of gains or exceeding the operational bandwidth can result in imaging artifacts and damage to the tip and/or sample. To alleviate this situation we present here a methodology to determine feedback gains for the amplitude and frequency loops that are specific to the cantilever and its environment, which can serve as a reasonable "first guess," thus making quantitative FM-AFM in low Q environments more accessible to the nonexpert. This technique is successfully demonstrated for the low Q systems of air (Q ˜40) and water (Q ˜1). In addition, we present FM-AFM images of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells acquired using the gains calculated by this methodology demonstrating the effectiveness of this technique.

  9. Self-heating in piezoresistive cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Joseph C; Corbin, Elise A; King, William P; Pruitt, Beth L

    2011-05-30

    We report experiments and models of self-heating in piezoresistive microcantilevers that show how cantilever measurement resolution depends on the thermal properties of the surrounding fluid. The predicted cantilever temperature rise from a finite difference model is compared with detailed temperature measurements on fabricated devices. Increasing the fluid thermal conductivity allows for lower temperature operation for a given power dissipation, leading to lower force and displacement noise. The force noise in air is 76% greater than in water for the same increase in piezoresistor temperature.

  10. Design & fabrication of cantilever array biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja; Thundat, T

    2009-01-01

    Surface immobilization of functional receptors on microfabricated cantilever arrays offers a new paradigm for the development of biosensors based on nanomechanics. Microcantilever-based systems are capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of unlabeled disease markers in extremely small volumes......, electronic processing, and even local telemetry on a single chip have the potential of satisfying the need for highly sensitive and selective multiple-target detection in very small samples. Here we will review the design and fabrication process of cantilever-based biosensors....

  11. Electronically droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud Al

    2012-01-01

    A report is presented on free falling droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers. The harvester incorporates a multimorph clamped-free cantilever which is composed of five layers of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thick films. During the impact, the droplet kinetic energy is transferred into the form of mechanical stress forcing the piezoelectric structure to vibrate. Experimental results show energy of 0.3 μJ per droplet. The scenario of moderate falling drop intensity, i.e. 230 drops per second, yields a total energy of 400 μJ. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  12. Physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, James V; Clague, David S; Lee, Christopher L; Rudd, Robert E; Burnham, Alan K; Tringe, Joseph W

    2013-11-19

    A method of using physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays. The methods utilize deflection of a micromachined cantilever that represents the chemical, biological, or physical element being detected. One embodiment of the method comprises the steps of modeling the deflection of the micromachined cantilever producing a deflection model, sensing the deflection of the micromachined cantilever and producing a signal representing the deflection, and comparing the signal representing the deflection with the deflection model.

  13. Simulation of imaging in tapping-mode atomic-force microscopy: a comparison amongst a variety of approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pishkenari, H N; Mahboobi, S H; Meghdari, A, E-mail: mahboobi@sharif.edu [Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-23

    Models capable of accurate simulation of microcantilever dynamics coupled with complex tip-sample interactions are essential for interpretation and prediction of the imaging results in amplitude modulation or tapping-mode atomic-force microscopy (AM-AFM or TM-AFM). In this paper, four approaches based on combinations of lumped and finite element methods for modelling of cantilever dynamics, and van der Waals and molecular dynamics for modelling of tip-sample interactions, are used to simulate the precise imaging by AM-AFM. Based on the simulated imaging and force determination, the efficiency of different modelling schemes is evaluated. This comparison is performed considering their coincidence with the realistic behaviour of AM-AFM in imaging of nanoscale features. In the conducted simulations, a diamond tip is used to scan a C60 molecule absorbed on a graphite substrate. The effects of amplitude set-point, cantilever stiffness and quality factor on the accuracy of different modelling approaches are studied.

  14. Cantilever-Based Microwave Biosensors: Analysis, Designs and Optimizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Chenhui; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Jónasson, Sævar Þór

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel microwave readout scheme for measuring deflection of cantilevers in nanometer range. The cantilever deflection can be sensed by the variation of transmission levels or resonant frequencies of microwave signals. The sensitivity of the cantilever biosensor based on LC...

  15. Polymeric cantilever-based biosensors with integrated readout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Alicia; Blagoi, Gabriela; Boisen, Anja

    2006-01-01

    The authors present an SU-8 cantilever chip with integrated piezoresistors for detection of surface stress changes due to adsorption of biomolecules on the cantilever surface. Mercaptohexanol is used as a model biomolecule to study molecular interactions with Au-coated SU-8 cantilevers and surfac...

  16. Tip enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    This book discusses the recent advances in the area of near-field Raman scattering, mainly focusing on tip-enhanced and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Some of the key features covered here are the optical structuring and manipulations, single molecule sensitivity, analysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes, and analytic applications in chemistry, biology and material sciences. This book also discusses the plasmonic materials for better enhancement, and optical antennas. Further, near-field microscopy based on second harmonic generation is also discussed. Chapters have been written by some of the leading scientists in this field, who present some of their recent work in this field.·Near-field Raman scattering·Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Nano-photonics·Nanoanalysis of Physical, chemical and biological materials beyond the diffraction limits·Single molecule detection

  17. A simulation of atomic force microscope microcantilever in the tapping mode utilizing couple stress theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    The nonlinear vibration behavior of a Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM) microcantilever under acoustic excitation force has been modeled and investigated. In dynamic AFM, the tip-surface interactions are strongly nonlinear, rapidly changing and hysteretic. First, the governing differential equation of motion and boundary conditions for dynamic analysis are obtained using the modified couple stress theory. Afterwards, closed-form expressions for nonlinear frequency and effective nonlinear damping ratio are derived utilizing perturbation method. The effect of tip connection position on the vibration behavior of the microcantilever are also analyzed. The results show that nonlinear frequency is size dependent. According to the results, an increase in the equilibrium separation between the tip and the sample surface reduces the overall effect of van der Waals forces on the nonlinear frequency, but its effect on the effective nonlinear damping ratio is negligible. The results also indicate that both the change in the distance between tip and cantilever free end and the reduction of tip radius have significant effects on the accuracy and sensitivity of the TM-AFM in the measurement of surface forces. The hysteretic behavior has been observed in the near resonance frequency response due to softening and hardening of the forced vibration response. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microstructure cantilever beam for current measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T.E. Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Most microelectromechanical systems (MEMS sensors are based on the microcantilever technology, which uses a broad range of design materials and structures. The benefit ofMEMStechnology is in developing devices with a lower cost, lower power consumption, higher performance and greater integration. A free-end cantilever beam with a magnetic material mass has been designed using MEMS software tools. The magnetic material was used to improve the sensitivity of the cantilever beam to an externally-applied magnetic field. The cantilever was designed to form a capacitance transducer, which consisted of variable capacitance where electrical and mechanical energies were exchanged. The aim of this paper was to analyse the system design of the microcantilever when subjected to a magnetic field produced by a current-carrying conductor. When the signal, a sinusoidal current with a constant frequency, was applied, the cantilever beam exhibited a vibration motion along the vertical axis when placed closer to the line current. This motion created corresponding capacitance changes and generated a voltage output proportional to the capacitive change in the signal-processing circuitry attached to the microcantilever. The equivalent massspring system theory was used to describe and analyse the effect of the natural frequency of the system vibrations and motion due to the applied magnetic field, in a single-degree of freedom. The main application of this microcantilever is in current measurements to develop a non-contact current sensor mote.

  19. Development of a microfabricated electrochemical-cantilever hybrid platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Lee MacKenzie; Pedersen, Christoffer; Elkjær, Karl

    2011-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a combined electrochemical-cantilever microfluidic system is described. A chip integrating cantilevers with electrodes into a microchannel is presented with the accompanying polymer flow cell. Issues such as electrical and fluid connections are addressed......, electromechanical behavior in ionic solution is investigated, and two uses of the system are demonstrated. First, all cantilevers are functionalized with cysteine, to facilitate detection of Cu2+ ions, then one cantilever is electrochemically cleaned in situ to generate a reference cantilever for differential...

  20. Atomic force microscopy indentation of fluorocarbon thin films fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical deposition at low radio frequency power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirghi, L.; Ruiz, A.; Colpo, P.; Rossi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation technique is used for characterization of mechanical properties of fluorocarbon (CF x ) thin films obtained from C 4 F 8 gas by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition at low r.f. power (5-30 W) and d.c. bias potential (10-80 V). This particular deposition method renders films with good hydrophobic property and high plastic compliance. Commercially available AFM probes with stiff cantilevers (10-20 N/m) and silicon sharpened tips (tip radius < 10 nm) are used for indentations and imaging of the resulted indentation imprints. Force depth curves and imprint characteristics are used for determination of film hardness, elasticity modulus and plasticity index. The measurements show that the decrease of the discharge power results in deposition of films with decreased hardness and stiffness and increased plasticity index. Nanolithography based on AFM indentation is demonstrated on thin films (thickness of 40 nm) with good plastic compliance.

  1. Creation and recovery of a W(111) single atom gas field ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitters, Jason L.; Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten single atom tips have been prepared from a single crystal W(111) oriented wire using the chemical assisted field evaporation and etching method. Etching to a single atom tip occurs through a symmetric structure and leads to a predictable last atom unlike etching with polycrystalline tips. The single atom tip formation procedure is shown in an atom by atom removal process. Rebuilds of single atom tips occur on the same crystalline axis as the original tip such that ion emission emanates along a fixed direction for all tip rebuilds. This preparation method could be utilized and developed to prepare single atom tips for ion source development.

  2. Coalescence and movement of nanobubbles studied with tapping mode AFM and tip-bubble interaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Wang Yuliang; Maali, Abdelhamid

    2008-01-01

    Imaging of a polystyrene (PS) coated silicon wafer immersed in deionized (DI) water was conducted using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping mode (TMAFM). As reported earlier, spherical cap-like domains, referred to as nanobubbles, were observed to be distributed on the PS surface. Experiments reveal that, in addition to the well-known parameter of scan load, scan speed is also an important parameter which affects nanobubble coalescence. The process of nanobubble coalescence was studied. It was found that during coalescence, small nanobubbles were easily moved and merged into bigger ones. Based on the interaction between the AFM cantilever tip and a bubble in the so-called force modulation mode of TMAFM, bubble height and adhesive force information for a given bubble was extracted. A viscoelastic model is used to obtain the interaction stiffness and damping coefficient, which provides a method to obtain the mechanical properties of nanobubbles. The model was further used to study the effect of surface tension force on attractive interaction force and contact angle hysteresis on the changes of the interaction damping coefficient during tip-bubble interaction.

  3. High-resolution and large dynamic range nanomechanical mapping in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Ozgur; Erina, Natalia

    2008-01-01

    High spatial resolution imaging of material properties is an important task for the continued development of nanomaterials and studies of biological systems. Time-varying interaction forces between the vibrating tip and the sample in a tapping-mode atomic force microscope contain detailed information about the elastic, adhesive, and dissipative response of the sample. We report real-time measurement and analysis of the time-varying tip-sample interaction forces with recently introduced torsional harmonic cantilevers. With these measurements, high-resolution maps of elastic modulus, adhesion force, energy dissipation, and topography are generated simultaneously in a single scan. With peak tapping forces as low as 0.6 nN, we demonstrate measurements on blended polymers and self-assembled molecular architectures with feature sizes at 1, 10, and 500 nm. We also observed an elastic modulus measurement range of four orders of magnitude (1 MPa to 10 GPa) for a single cantilever under identical feedback conditions, which can be particularly useful for analyzing heterogeneous samples with largely different material components.

  4. Atomic force microscope characterization of a resonating nanocantilever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abadal, G.; Davis, Zachary James; Borrise, X.

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) is used as a nanometer-scale resolution tool for the characterization of the electromechanical behaviour of a resonant cantilever-based mass sensor. The cantilever is actuated electrostatically by applying DC and AC voltages from a driver electrode placed closely...

  5. Enhancing output power of a piezoelectric cantilever energy harvester using an oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haili; Huang, Zhenyu; Xu, Tianzhu; Chen, Dayue

    2012-01-01

    The piezoelectric cantilever with a tip mass (Mass-PC), as a conventional vibration energy harvester, usually works at its fundamental frequency matching ambient excitation. By attaching an oscillator to a piezoelectric cantilever (Osc-PC), a double-mode energy harvester is developed to harvest more power from two matched ambient driving frequencies. Meanwhile, it allows the first operating frequency of the Osc-PC to be adjusted to be very low with only a limited mass attached. A distributed-parameter model of this harvester and the explicit expressions of its operating frequencies are derived to analyze and design the Osc-PC. Numerical investigations reveal that a heaver oscillator placed near the clamped end of the piezoelectric cantilever has better performance at the given exciting frequencies. Following the specified design criteria, an Osc-PC whose operating frequencies match two given exciting frequencies was constructed for the purpose of experimental testing. The results show that, compared to that of a corresponding Mass-PC whose operating frequency matches the lower exciting frequency, the energy harvesting efficiency of the Osc-PC increases by almost four times at the first operating frequency, while the output power at the second operating frequency of the Osc-PC accounts for 68% of that of the Mass-PC. (paper)

  6. Orthodontic Traction of Impacted Canine Using Cantilever

    OpenAIRE

    Nakandakari, Cláudia; Gonçalves, João Roberto; Cassano, Daniel Serra; Raveli, Taísa Boamorte; Bianchi, Jonas; Raveli, Dirceu Barnabé

    2016-01-01

    The impaction of the maxillary canines causes relevant aesthetic and functional problems. The multidisciplinary approach to the proper planning and execution of orthodontic traction of the element in question is essential. Many strategies are cited in the literature; among them is the good biomechanical control in order to avoid possible side effects. The aim of this paper is to present a case report in which a superior canine impacted by palatine was pulled out with the aid of the cantilever...

  7. Cantilever steel post damaged by wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An analysis for the cause of fracture failure of a cantilever steel sign post damaged by wind has been carried out. An unusual cause of failure has been identified, which is the subject of this paper. Microscopy and microanalysis of the fracture surface showed that the failure was due to pre-existing cracks, from the fabrication of the post. This conclusion was reached after detecting and analysing a galvanised layer on the fracture surfaces.

  8. Two-dimensional dopant profiling by electrostatic force microscopy using carbon nanotube modified cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, S.-C.; Chang, Y.-C.; Chang, C.-S.; Tsong, T T; Hsu, Chen-Chih; Wu, Chih-I; Lin, W-H; Woon, W-Y; Lin, L-T; Tao, H-J

    2008-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) dopant profiling technique is demonstrated in this work. We apply a unique cantilever probe in electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) modified by the attachment of a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT). Furthermore, the tip apex of the MWNT was trimmed to the sharpness of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). This ultra-sharp MWNT tip helps us to resolve dopant features to within 10 nm in air, which approaches the resolution achieved by ultra-high vacuum scanning tunnelling microscopy (UHV STM). In this study, the CNT-probed EFM is used to profile 2D buried dopant distribution under a nano-scale device structure and shows the feasibility of device characterization for sub-45 nm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect transistors

  9. Dynamic state switching in nonlinear multiferroic cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Onuta, Tiberiu-Dan; Long, Christian J.; Lofland, Samuel E.; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate read-write-read-erase cyclical mechanical-memory properties of all-thin-film multiferroic heterostructured Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48) O3 / Fe0.7Ga0.3 cantilevers when a high enough voltage around the resonant frequency of the device is applied on the Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48) O3 piezo-film. The device state switching process occurs due to the presence of a hysteresis loop in the piezo-film frequency response, which comes from the nonlinear behavior of the cantilever. The reference frequency at which the strain-mediated Fe0.7Ga0.3 based multiferroic device switches can also be tuned by applying a DC magnetic field bias that contributes to the increase of the cantilever effective stiffness. The switching dynamics is mapped in the phase space of the device measured transfer function characteristic for such high piezo-film voltage excitation, providing additional information on the dynamical stability of the devices.

  10. Towards easy and reliable AFM tip shape determination using blind tip reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flater, Erin E.; Zacharakis-Jutz, George E.; Dumba, Braulio G.; White, Isaac A.; Clifford, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative determination of the geometry of an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe tip is critical for robust measurements of the nanoscale properties of surfaces, including accurate measurement of sample features and quantification of tribological characteristics. Blind tip reconstruction, which determines tip shape from an AFM image scan without knowledge of tip or sample shape, was established most notably by Villarrubia [J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Tech. 102 (1997)] and has been further developed since that time. Nevertheless, the implementation of blind tip reconstruction for the general user to produce reliable and consistent estimates of tip shape has been hindered due to ambiguity about how to choose the key input parameters, such as tip matrix size and threshold value, which strongly impact the results of the tip reconstruction. These key parameters are investigated here via Villarrubia's blind tip reconstruction algorithms in which we have added the capability for users to systematically vary the key tip reconstruction parameters, evaluate the set of possible tip reconstructions, and determine the optimal tip reconstruction for a given sample. We demonstrate the capabilities of these algorithms through analysis of a set of simulated AFM images and provide practical guidelines for users of the blind tip reconstruction method. We present a reliable method to choose the threshold parameter corresponding to an optimal reconstructed tip shape for a given image. Specifically, we show that the trend in how the reconstructed tip shape varies with threshold number is so regular that the optimal, or Goldilocks, threshold value corresponds with the peak in the derivative of the RMS difference with respect to the zero threshold curve vs. threshold number. - Highlights: • Blind tip reconstruction algorithms have been implemented and augmented to determine the optimal input parameters. • We demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithms using a simulated AFM

  11. Dual-tip magnetic force microscopy with suppressed influence on magnetically soft samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precner, Marián; Fedor, Ján; Šoltýs, Ján; Cambel, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Standard magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is considered as a powerful tool used for magnetic field imaging at nanoscale. The method consists of two passes realized by the magnetic tip. Within the first one, the topography pass, the magnetic tip directly touches the magnetic sample. Such contact perturbs the magnetization of the sample explored. To avoid the sample touching the magnetic tip, we present a new approach to magnetic field scanning by segregating the topological and magnetic scans with two different tips located on a cut cantilever. The approach minimizes the disturbance of sample magnetization, which could be a major problem in conventional MFM images of soft magnetic samples. By cutting the cantilever in half using the focused ion beam technique, we create one sensor with two different tips—one tip is magnetized, and the other one is left non-magnetized. The non-magnetized tip is used for topography and the magnetized one for the magnetic field imaging. The method developed we call dual-tip magnetic force microscopy (DT-MFM). We describe in detail the dual-tip fabrication process. In the experiments, we show that the DT-MFM method reduces significantly the perturbations of the magnetic tip as compared to the standard MFM method. The present technique can be used to investigate microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic samples and is relevant in a wide range of applications, e.g., data storage and biomedicine. (paper)

  12. Dissipation and oscillatory solvation forces in confined liquids studied by small amplitude atomic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    We determine conservative and dissipative tip–sample interaction forces from the amplitude and phase response of acoustically driven atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using a non-polar model fluid (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, which displays strong molecular layering) and atomically flat

  13. Micro‑cantilevers for optical sensing of biogenic amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ying; Bravo Costa, Carlos André; Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina

    2017-01-01

    molecules in the gas phase. Different functionalization conditions were investigated by immersing gold coated AFM cantilevers in cyclam solutions at different concentrations, for different functionalization times, and for different post-annealing treatments. The optimum morphology for high capture...... micro-cantilever based mass detection. We demonstrate that besides conventional AFM systems a MEMS cantilever in combination with an optical read out is a powerful analytic system which is highly attractive for widespread use in diagnostic applications, with optimized functionalization conditions...

  14. Numerical analysis of dynamic force spectroscopy using the torsional harmonic cantilever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solares, Santiago D; Hoelscher, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    A spectral analysis method has been recently introduced by Stark et al (2002 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 99 8473-8) and implemented by Sahin et al (2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 507-14) using a T-shaped cantilever design, the torsional harmonic cantilever (THC), which is capable of performing simultaneous tapping-mode atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy. Here we report on numerical simulations of the THC system using a simple dual-mass flexural-torsional model, which is applied in combination with Fourier data processing software to illustrate the spectroscopy process for quality factors corresponding to liquid, air and vacuum environments. We also illustrate the acquisition of enhanced topographical images and deformed surface contours under the application of uniform forces, and compare the results to those obtained with a previously reported linear dual-spring-mass model.

  15. An electrochemical-cantilever platform for hybrid sensing applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Lee MacKenzie; Dohn, Søren; Boisen, Anja

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a fully-functional, microfabricated electrochemical-cantilever hybrid platform with flow control. A new cantilever chip format is designed, fabricated, and mounted in a custom polymer flow cell. Issues such as leakage and optical/electrical access are addressed, and combined...... mechanical and electrochemical performance is investigated. Lastly, a cantilever is “defunctionalized” in situ to create a reference cantilever for differential measurements in detection of Cu2+ ions at concentrations of 10 μM and 100 nM....

  16. Modification of AFM Tips for Facilitating Picking-up of Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Wang; Hai-Jun, Yang; Hua-Bin, Wang; Hai, Li; Xin-Yan, Wang; Ying, Wang; Jun-Hong, Lü; Bin, Li; Yi, Zhang; Jun, Hu

    2008-01-01

    The radius of atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is a key factor that influences nonspecific interactions between AFM tip and nanoparticles. Generally, a tip with larger radius contributes to a higher efficiency of picking up nanoparticles. We provide two methods for modifying the AFM tip: one is to wear a tip apex on a solid substrate and the other is to coat a tip with poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Both the approaches can enhance the adhesion force between the tip and nanoparticles by increasing tip radius. The experimental results show that a modified tip, compared to an unmodified one, achieves six-fold efficiency improvement in the capture of targeted colloidal gold nanoparticles. (general)

  17. Subharmonic Oscillations and Chaos in Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of dynamic atomic force microscopy (d-AFM) for nanoscale materials characterization calls for a deeper understanding of the cantilever dynamics influencing scan stability, predictability, and image quality. Model development is critical to such understanding. Renormalization of the equations governing d- AFM provides a simple interpretation of cantilever dynamics as a single spring and mass system with frequency dependent cantilever stiffness and damping parameters. The renormalized model is sufficiently robust to predict the experimentally observed splitting of the free-space cantilever resonance into multiple resonances upon cantilever-sample contact. Central to the model is the representation of the cantilever sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients F(sub ij) (i,j = 0, 1, 2) that account for the effective interaction stiffness parameter, the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Application of the Melnikov method to the model equation is shown to predict a homoclinic bifurcation of the Smale horseshoe type leading to a cascade of period doublings with increasing drive displacement amplitude culminating in chaos and loss of image quality. The threshold value of the drive displacement amplitude necessary to initiate subharmonic generation depends on the acoustic drive frequency, the effective damping coefficient, and the nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force. For parameter values leading to displacement amplitudes below threshold for homoclinic bifurcation other bifurcation scenarios can occur, some of which lead to chaos.

  18. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Meier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm3 is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm3. In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers.

  19. Imaging of Au nanoparticles deeply buried in polymer matrix by various atomic force microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, some papers reported successful imaging of subsurface features using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Some theoretical studies have also been presented, however the imaging mechanisms are not fully understood yet. In the preceeding papers, imaging of deeply buried nanometer-scale features has been successful only if they were buried in a soft matrix. In this paper, subsurface features (Au nanoparticles) buried in a soft polymer matrix were visualized. To elucidate the imaging mechanisms, various AFM techniques; heterodyne force microscopy, ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM), 2nd-harmonic UAFM and force modulation microscopy (FMM) were employed. The particles buried under 960 nm from the surface were successfully visualized which has never been achieved. The results elucidated that it is important for subsurface imaging to choose a cantilever with a suitable stiffness range for a matrix. In case of using the most suitable cantilever, the nanoparticles were visualized using every technique shown above except for FMM. The experimental results suggest that the subsurface features buried in a soft matrix with a depth of at least 1 µm can affect the local viscoelasticity (mainly viscosity) detected as the variation of the amplitude and phase of the tip oscillation on the surface. This phenomenon presumably makes it possible to visualize such deeply buried nanometer-scale features in a soft matrix. - Highlights: • We visualized subsurface features buried in soft matrix, and investigated its imaging mechanism. • AFM techniques; UAFM, FMM, HFM and 2nd-harmonic UAFM were applied to elucidate the mechanism. • Au nanoparticles buried under 960 nm from surface were visualized, which has never been achieved. • Imaging at contact resonance using a cantilever of suitable stiffness is important. • Subsurface features in a soft matrix affect surface viscoelasticity, which are detected by AFM

  20. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: a theoretical analysis for simple liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuma, Takeshi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-12-14

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρDS) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρDS. The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule.

  1. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: A theoretical analysis for simple liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Ken-ichi, E-mail: aman@tohoku-pharm.ac.jp; Takahashi, Ohgi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1 Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8558 (Japan); Suzuki, Kazuhiro [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Fukuma, Takeshi [Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Kobe University, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-14

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρ{sub DS}) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρ{sub DS}. The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule.

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy Images Label-Free, Drug Encapsulated Nanoparticles In Vivo and Detects Difference in Tissue Mechanical Properties of Treated and Untreated: A Tip for Nanotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprou, Dimitrios A.; Venkatpurwar, Vinod; Kumar, M. N. V. Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Overcoming the intractable challenge of imaging of label-free, drug encapsulated nanoparticles in tissues in vivo would directly address associated regulatory concerns over 'nanotoxicology'. Here we demonstrate the utility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for visualising label-free, drug encapsulated polyester particles of ∼280 nm distributed within tissues following their intravenous or peroral administration to rodents. A surprising phenomenon, in which the tissues' mechanical stiffness was directly measured (also by AFM) and related to the number of embedded nanoparticles, was utilised to generate quantitative data sets for nanoparticles localisation. By coupling the normal determination of a drug's pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics with post-sacrifice measurement of nanoparticle localisation and number, we present for the first time an experimental design in which a single in vivo study relates the PK/PD of a nanomedicine to its toxicokinetics. PMID:23724054

  3. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: A theoretical analysis for simple liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuma, Takeshi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρ DS ) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρ DS . The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule

  4. Fabrication of biopolymer cantilevers using nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Fisker-Bødker, Nis

    2011-01-01

    The biodegradable polymer poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) was introduced for the fabrication of micromechanical devices. For this purpose, thin biopolymer films with thickness around 10 μm were spin-coated on silicon substrates. Patterning of microcantilevers is achieved by nanoimprint lithography. A major...... challenge was the high adhesion between PLLA and silicon stamp. Optimized stamp fabrication and the deposition of a 125 nm thick fluorocarbon anti-stiction coating on the PLLA allowed the fabrication of biopolymer cantilevers. Resonance frequency measurements were used to estimate the Young’s modulus...

  5. Cantilever torque magnetometry on coordination compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perfetti, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    compounds, such as quantum computation or information storage. This review enlightens that CTM offers a unique combination of accuracy and precision to disentangle noncollinear contributions inside Single Crystals as well as the sensitivity to detect molecular order of thin films. CTM can also detect......Cantilever Torque Magnetometry (CTM) is one of the leading techniques to deeply understand magnetic anisotropy of coordination compounds. The knowledge of magnetic anisotropy is a mandatory requirement before proceeding with any future application related to the magnetic properties of coordination...... quantum phenomena such as magnetization steps and molecular hysteresis curves. Moreover, it can also provide the energy levels splitting and avefunctions composition, especially if coupled with microwave radiation....

  6. Quantitative analysis of tip-sample interaction in non-contact scanning force spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios-Lidon, Elisa; Colchero, Jaime

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of tip-sample interaction in scanning force microscopy is fundamental for optimum image acquisition as well as data interpretation. In this work we discuss how to characterize the electrostatic and van der Waals contribution to tip-sample interaction in non-contact scanning force microscopy precisely. The spectroscopic technique presented is based on the simultaneous measurement of cantilever deflection, oscillation amplitude and frequency shift as a function of tip-sample voltage and tip-sample distance as well as on advanced data processing. Data are acquired at a fixed lateral position as interaction images, with the bias voltage as fast scan, and tip-sample distance as slow scan. Due to the quadratic dependence of the electrostatic interaction with tip-sample voltage the van der Waals force can be separated from the electrostatic force. Using appropriate data processing, the van der Waals interaction, the capacitance and the contact potential can be determined as a function of tip-sample distance. The measurement of resonance frequency shift yields very high signal to noise ratio and the absolute calibration of the measured quantities, while the acquisition of cantilever deflection allows the determination of the tip-sample distance

  7. Cantilever surface stress sensors with single-crystalline silicon piezoresistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Andreas; Hansen, Ole; Boisen, Anja

    2005-01-01

    We present a cantilever with piezoresistive readout optimized for measuring the static deflection due to isotropic surface stress on the surface of the cantilever [Sens. Actuators B 79(2-3), 115 (2001)]. To our knowledge nobody has addressed the difference in physical regimes, and its influence o...

  8. Development of an Electrochemical-Cantilever Hybrid Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Lee MacKenzie

    . For at binde kobber (II) ioner blev rækker af cantilevere funktionaliseret med aminosyre L-cysteine(Cys) og tetrapeptid Cys-Gly-Gly-His (CGGH). Dette funktionelle lag blev fjernet fra en enkelt cantilever, ved selektivt at anvende et voltammetrisk signal til at generere en ren reference cantilever til brug...

  9. SU-8 Cantilever Sensor with Integrated Read-Out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Alicia Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Cantilever baserede biosensorer kan bruges til så kaldet label-free detektion af små koncentrationer af molekyler i en opløsning. Når et specifikt molekyle binder til overfladen af en cantilever induceres et overfladestress som resulterer i en udbøjning af cantileveren. Cantileverens udbøjningen ...

  10. Atomic force microscopy: A three-dimensional reconstructive tool of oral microbiota in gingivitis and periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sunder Salavadhi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to ascertain the advantages of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in the morphologic study of microorganisms and their interactions within the subgingival biofilm in patients with gingivitis and periodontitis. Settings and Design: Conducted a study on twenty patients, ten patients with severe periodontitis with probing the pocket depth of ≥8 mm, with a clinical attachment loss (CAL of ≥6 mm CAL and ten patients with gingivitis: ≥5 mm pocket depth, and no attachment loss, was selected for the study. Materials and Methods: Bacterial biofilms were collected and slide preparation done. Morphological study was done using AFM. AFM consists of a cantilever-mounted tip, a piezoelectric scanner, a photodetector diode, a laser diode, and a feedback control. The laser beam is reflected from back of the cantilever into the quadrant of the photodetector. AFM works on the principle of interaction between the tip and the sample which causes the cantilever to deflect, thereby changing the position of laser onto the photodetector. Methodology used for studying the bacteria through AFM includes the following: (1 Probe type: Platinum coated silicon nitrate tip. (2 Probe force: 0.11 N/m. (3 Probe geometry: Triangular shaped tip. (4 Probe frequency: 22 KHz. (5 Probe immobilization: Used in Contact mode. AFM Solver Pro-M (NT-MDT equipped with ETALON probe was used to take images in Nova software. Results: The investigation showed various morphological features, such as shape, size, and secretory product-like vesicles of the bacterial species involved in gingivitis and periodontitis. More bacterial surface details were studied by reproducing a three-dimensional reconstruction using AFM. Conclusions: The morphological variations of bacteria of different sizes, and shapes, cell wall structures, secretory product-like vesicles flagellated and filamentous microorganisms, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and bacterial coaggregation analysis were done by

  11. Orthodontic Traction of Impacted Canine Using Cantilever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Nakandakari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The impaction of the maxillary canines causes relevant aesthetic and functional problems. The multidisciplinary approach to the proper planning and execution of orthodontic traction of the element in question is essential. Many strategies are cited in the literature; among them is the good biomechanical control in order to avoid possible side effects. The aim of this paper is to present a case report in which a superior canine impacted by palatine was pulled out with the aid of the cantilever on the Segmented Arch Technique (SAT concept. A 14.7-year-old female patient appeared at clinic complaining about the absence of the upper right permanent canine. The proposed treatment prioritized the traction of the upper right canine without changing the occlusion and aesthetics. For this, it only installed the upper fixed appliance (Roth with slot 0.018, opting for SAT in order to minimize unwanted side effects. The use of cantilever to the traction of the upper right canine has enabled an efficient and predictable outcome, because it is of statically determined mechanics.

  12. Magnetic force driven magnetoelectric effect in bi-cantilever composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ru; Wu, Gaojian; Zhang, Ning

    2017-12-01

    The magnetic force driven magnetoelectric (ME) effect in bi-cantilever Mn-Zn-Ferrite /PZT composites is presented. Compared with single cantilever, the ME voltage coefficient in bi-cantilever composite is a little lower and the resonance frequency is higher, but the bi-cantilever structure is advantageous for integration. When the magnetic gap is 3 mm, the ME voltage coefficient can achieve 6.2 Vcm-1Oe-1 at resonance under optimum bias field Hm=1030 Oe; when the magnetic gap is 1.5 mm, the ME voltage coefficient can get the value as high as 4.4 Vcm-1Oe-1 under much lower bias field H=340 Oe. The stable ME effect in bi-cantilever composites has important potential application in the design of new type ME device.

  13. Electrical property heterogeneity at transparent conductive oxide/organic semiconductor interfaces: mapping contact ohmicity using conducting-tip atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Gordon A; Veneman, P Alexander; Placencia, Diogenes; Armstrong, Neal R

    2012-11-27

    We demonstrate mapping of electrical properties of heterojunctions of a molecular semiconductor (copper phthalocyanine, CuPc) and a transparent conducting oxide (indium-tin oxide, ITO), on 20-500 nm length scales, using a conductive-probe atomic force microscopy technique, scanning current spectroscopy (SCS). SCS maps are generated for CuPc/ITO heterojunctions as a function of ITO activation procedures and modification with variable chain length alkyl-phosphonic acids (PAs). We correlate differences in small length scale electrical properties with the performance of organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) based on CuPc/C(60) heterojunctions, built on these same ITO substrates. SCS maps the "ohmicity" of ITO/CuPc heterojunctions, creating arrays of spatially resolved current-voltage (J-V) curves. Each J-V curve is fit with modified Mott-Gurney expressions, mapping a fitted exponent (γ), where deviations from γ = 2.0 suggest nonohmic behavior. ITO/CuPc/C(60)/BCP/Al OPVs built on nonactivated ITO show mainly nonohmic SCS maps and dark J-V curves with increased series resistance (R(S)), lowered fill-factors (FF), and diminished device performance, especially near the open-circuit voltage. Nearly optimal behavior is seen for OPVs built on oxygen-plasma-treated ITO contacts, which showed SCS maps comparable to heterojunctions of CuPc on clean Au. For ITO electrodes modified with PAs there is a strong correlation between PA chain length and the degree of ohmicity and uniformity of electrical response in ITO/CuPc heterojunctions. ITO electrodes modified with 6-8 carbon alkyl-PAs show uniform and nearly ohmic SCS maps, coupled with acceptable CuPc/C(60)OPV performance. ITO modified with C14 and C18 alkyl-PAs shows dramatic decreases in FF, increases in R(S), and greatly enhanced recombination losses.

  14. Analytical solutions to the free vibration of a double-walled carbon nanotube carrying a bacterium at its tip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storch, Joel A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330-8348 (United States); Elishakoff, Isaac [Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    We calculate the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a cantilevered double-walled carbon nanotube carrying a rigid body—representative of a bacterium or virus—at the tip of the outer nanotube. By idealizing the nanotubes as Bernoulli-Euler beams, we are able to obtain exact expressions for both the mode shapes and characteristic frequency equation. Separate analyses are performed for the special case of a concentrated tip mass and the more complicated situation where the tip body also exhibits inertia and mass center offset from the beam tip.

  15. Measuring adhesion on rough surfaces using atomic force microscopy with a liquid probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan V. Escobar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a procedure to perform and interpret pull-off force measurements during the jump-off-contact process between a liquid drop and rough surfaces using a conventional atomic force microscope. In this method, a micrometric liquid mercury drop is attached to an AFM tipless cantilever to measure the force required to pull this drop off a rough surface. We test the method with two surfaces: a square array of nanometer-sized peaks commonly used for the determination of AFM tip sharpness and a multi-scaled rough diamond surface containing sub-micrometer protrusions. Measurements are carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere to avoid water capillary interactions. We obtain information about the average force of adhesion between a single peak or protrusion and the liquid drop. This procedure could provide useful microscopic information to improve our understanding of wetting phenomena on rough surfaces.

  16. Novel operation mode for eliminating influence of inclination angle and friction in atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Yueyu; Zhou, Faquan; Zhao, Xuezeng

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of topography imaging in contact force mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) depends on the one-to-one corresponding relationship between the cantilever deflection and the tip-sample distance, whereas such a relationship cannot be always achieved in the presence of friction and incline angle of sample surface. Recently, we have developed a novel operation mode in which we keep the van der Waals force as constant instead of the applied normal force, to eliminate the effect of inclination angle and friction on topography imaging in the contact force mode. We have improved our AFM to enable the new operation mode for validation. Comparative experiments have been performed and the results have shown that the effect of friction and inclination angle on topography imaging in contact mode of AFM can be eliminated or at least decreased effectively by working in the new operation mode we present.

  17. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy to probe single membrane proteins in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, K Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has opened vast avenues hitherto inaccessible to the biological scientist. The high temporal (millisecond) and spatial (nanometer) resolutions of the AFM are suited for studying many biological processes in their native conditions. The AFM cantilever stylus is aptly termed as a "lab on a tip" owing to its versatility as an imaging tool as well as a handle to manipulate single bonds and proteins. Recent examples assert that the AFM can be used to study the mechanical properties and monitor processes of single proteins and single cells, thus affording insight into important mechanistic details. This chapter specifically focuses on practical and analytical protocols of single-molecule AFM methodologies related to high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. Both these techniques are operator oriented, and require specialized working knowledge of the instrument, theoretical, and practical skills.

  18. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of atomic force microscopy under deterministic and random excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat; Behzad, Mehdi; Meghdari, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) system has evolved into a useful tool for direct measurements of intermolecular forces with atomic-resolution characterization that can be employed in a broad spectrum of applications. This paper is devoted to the analysis of nonlinear behavior of amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) modes of atomic force microscopy. For this, the microcantilever (which forms the basis for the operation of AFM) is modeled as a single mode approximation and the interaction between the sample and cantilever is derived from a van der Waals potential. Using perturbation methods such as averaging, and Fourier transform nonlinear equations of motion are analytically solved and the advantageous results are extracted from this nonlinear analysis. The results of the proposed techniques for AM-AFM, clearly depict the existence of two stable and one unstable (saddle) solutions for some of exciting parameters under deterministic vibration. The basin of attraction of two stable solutions is different and dependent on the exciting frequency. From this analysis the range of the frequency which will result in a unique periodic response can be obtained and used in practical experiments. Furthermore the analytical responses determined by perturbation techniques can be used to detect the parameter region where the chaotic motion is avoided. On the other hand for FM-AFM, the relation between frequency shift and the system parameters can be extracted and used for investigation of the system nonlinear behavior. The nonlinear behavior of the oscillating tip can easily explain the observed shift of frequency as a function of tip sample distance. Also in this paper we have investigated the AM-AFM system response under a random excitation. Using two different methods we have obtained the statistical properties of the tip motion. The results show that we can use the mean square value of tip motion to image the sample when the excitation signal is random

  19. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of atomic force microscopy under deterministic and random excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat [Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behzad, Mehdi [Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: m_behzad@sharif.edu; Meghdari, Ali [Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) system has evolved into a useful tool for direct measurements of intermolecular forces with atomic-resolution characterization that can be employed in a broad spectrum of applications. This paper is devoted to the analysis of nonlinear behavior of amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) modes of atomic force microscopy. For this, the microcantilever (which forms the basis for the operation of AFM) is modeled as a single mode approximation and the interaction between the sample and cantilever is derived from a van der Waals potential. Using perturbation methods such as averaging, and Fourier transform nonlinear equations of motion are analytically solved and the advantageous results are extracted from this nonlinear analysis. The results of the proposed techniques for AM-AFM, clearly depict the existence of two stable and one unstable (saddle) solutions for some of exciting parameters under deterministic vibration. The basin of attraction of two stable solutions is different and dependent on the exciting frequency. From this analysis the range of the frequency which will result in a unique periodic response can be obtained and used in practical experiments. Furthermore the analytical responses determined by perturbation techniques can be used to detect the parameter region where the chaotic motion is avoided. On the other hand for FM-AFM, the relation between frequency shift and the system parameters can be extracted and used for investigation of the system nonlinear behavior. The nonlinear behavior of the oscillating tip can easily explain the observed shift of frequency as a function of tip sample distance. Also in this paper we have investigated the AM-AFM system response under a random excitation. Using two different methods we have obtained the statistical properties of the tip motion. The results show that we can use the mean square value of tip motion to image the sample when the excitation signal is random.

  20. Magnetic elements for switching magnetization magnetic force microscopy tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, V.; Elias, P.; Gregusova, D.; Martaus, J.; Fedor, J.; Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.

    2010-01-01

    Using combination of micromagnetic calculations and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging we find optimal parameters for novel magnetic tips suitable for switching magnetization MFM. Switching magnetization MFM is based on two-pass scanning atomic force microscopy with reversed tip magnetization between the scans. Within the technique the sum of the scanned data with reversed tip magnetization depicts local atomic forces, while their difference maps the local magnetic forces. Here we propose the design and calculate the magnetic properties of tips suitable for this scanning probe technique. We find that for best performance the spin-polarized tips must exhibit low magnetic moment, low switching fields, and single-domain state at remanence. The switching field of such tips is calculated and optimum shape of the Permalloy elements for the tips is found. We show excellent correspondence between calculated and experimental results for Py elements.

  1. High-frequency multimodal atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian P. Nievergelt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multifrequency atomic force microscopy imaging has been recently demonstrated as a powerful technique for quickly obtaining information about the mechanical properties of a sample. Combining this development with recent gains in imaging speed through small cantilevers holds the promise of a convenient, high-speed method for obtaining nanoscale topography as well as mechanical properties. Nevertheless, instrument bandwidth limitations on cantilever excitation and readout have restricted the ability of multifrequency techniques to fully benefit from small cantilevers. We present an approach for cantilever excitation and deflection readout with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, enabling multifrequency techniques extended beyond 2 MHz for obtaining materials contrast in liquid and air, as well as soft imaging of delicate biological samples.

  2. Development of Tuning Fork Based Probes for Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Romaneh; Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M.; Torrez, Neil; Alizadeh, Amirali; Askari, Davood

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the development of tuning fork-based AFM/STM probes in NaugaNeedles LLC for use in atomic force microscopy. These probes can be mounted on different carriers per customers' request. (e.g., RHK carrier, Omicron carrier, and tuning fork on a Sapphire disk). We are able to design and engineer tuning forks on any type of carrier used in the market. We can attach three types of tips on the edge of a tuning fork prong (i.e., growing Ag2Ga nanoneedles at any arbitrary angle, cantilever of AFM tip, and tungsten wire) with lengths from 100-500 μm. The nanoneedle is located vertical to the fork. Using a suitable insulation and metallic coating, we can make QPlus sensors that can detect tunneling current during the AFM scan. To make Qplus sensors, the entire quartz fork will be coated with an insulating material, before attaching the nanoneedle. Then, the top edge of one prong is coated with a thin layer of conductive metal and the nanoneedle is attached to the fork end of the metal coated prong. The metal coating provides electrical connection to the tip for tunneling current readout and to the electrodes and used to read the QPlus current. Since the amount of mass added to the fork is minimal, the resonance frequency spectrum does not change and still remains around 32.6 KHz and the Q factor is around 1,200 in ambient condition. These probes can enhance the performance of tuning fork based atomic microscopy.

  3. Robust energy harvesting from walking vibrations by means of nonlinear cantilever beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Jocelyn M.; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.; Slocum, Alexander H.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work we examine how mechanical nonlinearity can be appropriately utilized to achieve strong robustness of performance in an energy harvesting setting. More specifically, for energy harvesting applications, a great challenge is the uncertain character of the excitation. The combination of this uncertainty with the narrow range of good performance for linear oscillators creates the need for more robust designs that adapt to a wider range of excitation signals. A typical application of this kind is energy harvesting from walking vibrations. Depending on the particular characteristics of the person that walks as well as on the pace of walking, the excitation signal obtains completely different forms. In the present work we study a nonlinear spring mechanism that is composed of a cantilever wrapping around a curved surface as it deflects. While for the free cantilever, the force acting on the free tip depends linearly on the tip displacement, the utilization of a contact surface with the appropriate distribution of curvature leads to essentially nonlinear dependence between the tip displacement and the acting force. The studied nonlinear mechanism has favorable mechanical properties such as low frictional losses, minimal moving parts, and a rugged design that can withstand excessive loads. Through numerical simulations we illustrate that by utilizing this essentially nonlinear element in a 2 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) system, we obtain strongly nonlinear energy transfers between the modes of the system. We illustrate that this nonlinear behavior is associated with strong robustness over three radically different excitation signals that correspond to different walking paces. To validate the strong robustness properties of the 2DOF nonlinear system, we perform a direct parameter optimization for 1DOF and 2DOF linear systems as well as for a class of 1DOF and 2DOF systems with nonlinear springs similar to that of the cubic spring that are physically realized

  4. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, M.J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J.E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J.P.; Jarvis, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity

  5. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M. J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J. E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J. P.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity.

  6. An elastography method based on the scanning contact resonance of a piezoelectric cantilever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ji; Li, Faxin, E-mail: lifaxin@pku.edu.cn [State Key Lab for Turbulence and Complex Systems, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China and HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technologies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Most tissues may become significantly stiffer than their normal states when there are lesions inside. The tissue's modulus can then act as an identification parameter for clinic diagnosis of tumors or fibrosis, which leads to elastography. This study introduces a novel elastography method that can be used for modulus imaging of superficial organs. Methods: This method is based on the scanning contact-resonance of a unimorph piezoelectric cantilever. The cantilever vibrates in its bending mode with the tip pressed tightly on the sample. The contact resonance frequency of the cantilever-sample system is tracked at each scanning point, from which the sample's modulus can be derived based on a beam dynamic model and a contact mechanics model. Scanning is performed by a three-dimensional motorized stage and the whole system is controlled by a homemade software program based on LabVIEW. Results: Testing onin vitro beef tissues indicates that the fat and the muscle can be easily distinguished using this system, and the accuracy of the modulus measurement can be comparable with that of nanoindentation. Imaging on homemade gelatin phantoms shows that the depth information of the abnormalities can be qualitatively obtained by varying the pressing force. The detection limit of this elastography method is specially examined both experimentally and numerically. Results show that it can detect the typical lesions in superficial organs with the depth of several centimeters. The lateral resolution of this elastography method/system is better than 0.5 mm, and could be further enhanced by using more scanning points. Conclusions: The proposed elastography system can be regarded as a sensitive palpation robot, which may be very promising in early diagnosis of tumors in superficial organs such as breast and thyroid.

  7. An elastography method based on the scanning contact resonance of a piezoelectric cantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ji; Li, Faxin

    2013-12-01

    Most tissues may become significantly stiffer than their normal states when there are lesions inside. The tissue's modulus can then act as an identification parameter for clinic diagnosis of tumors or fibrosis, which leads to elastography. This study introduces a novel elastography method that can be used for modulus imaging of superficial organs. This method is based on the scanning contact-resonance of a unimorph piezoelectric cantilever. The cantilever vibrates in its bending mode with the tip pressed tightly on the sample. The contact resonance frequency of the cantilever-sample system is tracked at each scanning point, from which the sample's modulus can be derived based on a beam dynamic model and a contact mechanics model. Scanning is performed by a three-dimensional motorized stage and the whole system is controlled by a homemade software program based on LabVIEW. Testing on in vitro beef tissues indicates that the fat and the muscle can be easily distinguished using this system, and the accuracy of the modulus measurement can be comparable with that of nanoindentation. Imaging on homemade gelatin phantoms shows that the depth information of the abnormalities can be qualitatively obtained by varying the pressing force. The detection limit of this elastography method is specially examined both experimentally and numerically. Results show that it can detect the typical lesions in superficial organs with the depth of several centimeters. The lateral resolution of this elastography method∕system is better than 0.5 mm, and could be further enhanced by using more scanning points. The proposed elastography system can be regarded as a sensitive palpation robot, which may be very promising in early diagnosis of tumors in superficial organs such as breast and thyroid.

  8. Forced vibrations of a cantilever beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repetto, C E; Roatta, A; Welti, R J

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is ‘downwards’, i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping resonance response are compared for the case of an elastic beam made from PVC plastic excited over a frequency range from 1 to 30 Hz. The current analysis predicts the presence of ‘pseudo-nodes’ in the normal modes of oscillation. It is important to note that our results were obtained using very simple equipment, present in the teaching laboratory. (paper)

  9. Stabilizing device for control rod tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdone, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    A control rod has a spring device on its lower end for eliminating oscillatory contact of the rod against its adjacent guide tube wall. The base of the device is connected to the lower tip of the rod. A plurality of elongated extensions are cantilevered downward from the base. Each extension has a shoulder for contacting the guide tube, and the plurality of shoulders as a group has a transverse dimension that is preset to be larger than the inner diameter of the guide tube such that an interference fit is obtained when the control rod is inserted in the tube. The elongated extensions form an open-ended, substantially hollow member through which most of the liquid coolant flows, and the spaces between adjacent extensions allow the flow to bypass the shoulders without experiencing a significant pressure drop

  10. Bending and Shear Stresses Developed by the Instantaneous Arrest of the Root of a Moving Cantilever Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Elbridge, Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation has been made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in transverse motion when its root is suddenly brought to rest. Equations are given for determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that arise in the beam as a result of the impact. The theoretical equations, which have been confirmed experimentally, reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam, whereas the shear stresses vary inversely with the length.

  11. Optimization of sensitivity and noise in piezoresistive cantilevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xiaomei; Thaysen, Jacob; Hansen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the sensitivity and the noise of piezoresistive cantilevers were systematically investigated with respect to the piezoresistor geometry, the piezoresistive materials, the doping dose, the annealing temperature, and the operating biased voltage. With the noise optimization results......(-6), the biggest gauge factors was 95, and the minimum detectable deflection (MDD) at 6 V and 200 Hz-measurement bandwidth was 0.3 nm for a single-crystal silicon cantilever. Of the two LPCVD silicon piezoresistive cantilevers, amorphous silicon piezoresistors had relatively lower 1/f noise. The MDD for a LPCVD...

  12. Energy harvesting from radio frequency propagation using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud

    2012-02-01

    This work reports an induced strain in a piezoelectric cantilever due to radio frequency signal propagation. The piezoelectric actuator is coupled to radio frequency (RF) line through a gap of 0.25 mm. When a voltage signal of 10 Vpp propagates in the line it sets an alternating current in the actuator electrodes. This flowing current drives the piezoelectric cantilever to mechanical movement, especially when the frequency of the RF signal matches the mechanical resonant frequency of the cantilever. Output voltage signals versus frequency for both mechanical vibrational and RF signal excitations have been measured using different loads.© 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Polymer cantilever platform for dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Alicia; Calleja, M.; Dimaki, Maria

    2004-01-01

    A polymer cantilever platform for dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotubes has been designed and realized. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes from aqueous solution have been assembled between two metal electrodes that are separated by 2 mu m and embedded in the polymer cantilever. The entire chip......, except for the metallic electrodes and wiring, was fabricated in the photoresist SU-8. SU-8 allows for an inexpensive, flexible and fast fabrication method, and the cantilever platform provides a hydrophobic surface that should be well suited for nanotube assembly. The device can be integrated in a micro...

  14. Tips on Blood Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Test Pain, Discomfort and Anxiety Tips to Help Children through Their Medical Tests Tips to Help the Elderly through Their Medical Tests Find Us On Social Media: Facebook Twitter Google Plus Footer Menu Home About ...

  15. Nanoscale indent formation in shape memory polymers using a heated probe tip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, F [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Wornyo, E [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Gall, K [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); King, W P [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2007-07-18

    This paper presents experimental investigation of nanoscale indentation formation in shape memory polymers. The polymers were synthesized by photopolymerizing a tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) monomer with a poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) (PEGDMA) crosslinker. The concentration and the molecular weight of the crosslinker were varied to produce five polymers with tailored properties. Nanoscale indentations were formed on the polymer surfaces by using a heated atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever at various temperatures near or above the glass transition (between 84 and 215 deg. C) and a range of heating durations from 100 {mu}s to 8 ms. The images of the indents were obtained with the same probe tip at room temperature. The contact pressure, a measure of transient hardness, was derived from the indentation height data as a function of time and temperature for different polymers. With increasing crosslinker molecular weight and decreasing crosslinker concentration, the contact pressures decreased at a fixed maximum load due to increased crosslink spacing in the polymer system. The results provide insight into the nanoscale response of these novel materials.

  16. Indentation modulus and hardness of viscoelastic thin films by atomic force microscopy: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passeri, D.; Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; Rossi, M.; Alippi, A.; Tamburri, E.; Lucci, M.; Davoli, I.; Berezina, S.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a nanoindentation technique based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) that allows one to deduce both indentation modulus and hardness of viscoelastic materials from the force versus penetration depth dependence, obtained by recording the AFM cantilever deflection as a function of the sample vertical displacement when the tip is pressed against (loading phase) and then removed from (unloading phase) the surface of the sample. Reliable quantitative measurements of both indentation modulus and hardness of the investigated sample are obtained by calibrating the technique through a set of different polymeric samples, used as reference materials, whose mechanical properties have been previously determined by standard indentation tests. By analyzing the dependence of the cantilever deflection versus time, the proposed technique allows one to evaluate and correct the effect of viscoelastic properties of the investigated materials, by adapting a post-experiment data processing procedure well-established for standard depth sensing indentation tests. The technique is described in the case of the measurement of indentation modulus and hardness of a thin film of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(4-styrenesulfonate), deposited by chronoamperometry on an indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate.

  17. Indentation modulus and hardness of viscoelastic thin films by atomic force microscopy: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passeri, D., E-mail: daniele.passeri@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; Rossi, M.; Alippi, A. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Tamburri, E. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy); Lucci, M.; Davoli, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy); Berezina, S. [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, 01026, Univerzitna 1 Zilina (Slovakia)

    2009-11-15

    We propose a nanoindentation technique based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) that allows one to deduce both indentation modulus and hardness of viscoelastic materials from the force versus penetration depth dependence, obtained by recording the AFM cantilever deflection as a function of the sample vertical displacement when the tip is pressed against (loading phase) and then removed from (unloading phase) the surface of the sample. Reliable quantitative measurements of both indentation modulus and hardness of the investigated sample are obtained by calibrating the technique through a set of different polymeric samples, used as reference materials, whose mechanical properties have been previously determined by standard indentation tests. By analyzing the dependence of the cantilever deflection versus time, the proposed technique allows one to evaluate and correct the effect of viscoelastic properties of the investigated materials, by adapting a post-experiment data processing procedure well-established for standard depth sensing indentation tests. The technique is described in the case of the measurement of indentation modulus and hardness of a thin film of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(4-styrenesulfonate), deposited by chronoamperometry on an indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate.

  18. Linearity of amplitude and phase in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salapaka, M.V.; Chen, D.J.; Cleveland, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    In this article tapping-mode atomic force microscope dynamics is studied. The existence of a periodic orbit at the forcing frequency is shown under unrestrictive conditions. The dynamics is further analyzed using the impact model for the tip-sample interaction and a spring-mass-damper model of the cantilever. Stability of the periodic orbit is established. Closed-form expressions for various variables important in tapping-mode imaging are obtained. The linear relationship of the amplitude and the sine of the phase of the first harmonic of the periodic orbit with respect to cantilever-sample offset is shown. The study reinforces gentleness of the tapping-mode on the sample. Experimental results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the theoretical predictions. The linear relationship of the sine of the phase and the amplitude can be used to infer sample properties. The comparison between the theory and the experiments indicates essential features that are needed in a more refined model

  19. The TIPS Liquidity Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Christensen, Jens H.E.; Simon Riddell, Simon

    We introduce an arbitrage-free term structure model of nominal and real yields that accounts for liquidity risk in Treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS). The novel feature of our model is to identify liquidity risk from individual TIPS prices by accounting for the tendency that TIPS, lik...

  20. Vibration suppression of a rotating flexible cantilever pipe conveying fluid using piezoelectric layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khajehpour

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this study, the governing equations of a rotating cantilever pipe conveying fluid are derived and the longitudinal and lateral induced vibrations are controlled. The pipe considered as an Euler Bernoulli beam with tip mass which piezoelectric layers attached both side of it as sensors and actuators. The follower force due to the fluid discharge causes both conservative and non-conservative work. For mathematical modeling, the Lagrange-Rayleigh-Ritz technique is utilized. An adaptive-robust control scheme is applied to suppress the vibration of the pipe. The adaptive-robust control method is robust against parameter uncertainties and disturbances. Finally, the system is simulated and the effects of varying parameters are studied. The simulation results show the excellent performance of the controller.

  1. Bidirectional frequency tuning of a piezoelectric energy converter based on a cantilever beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, C; Goldschmidtboeing, F; Woias, P

    2009-01-01

    A piezoelectric energy converter is presented, whose resonance frequency can be tuned by applying mechanical stress to its structure. The converter consists of a piezo-polymer cantilever beam with two additional thin arms, which are used to apply an axial preload to the tip of the beam. The compressive or tensile prestress applied through the arms leads to a shift of the beam's resonance frequency. Experiments with this structure indicate a high potential: the resonance frequency of a harvester to which a compressive preload was applied could be altered from 380 Hz to 292 Hz. In another experiment, a harvester with stiffened arms was tuned from 440 Hz to 460 Hz by applying a tensile preload. In combination with automatic control of the applied force, this type of structure could be used to enhance the performance of energy harvesters in vibrating environments with occasional shifts of the vibrational frequency

  2. Tip studies using CFD and comparison with tip loss models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Johansen, J.

    2004-01-01

    The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD......The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD...

  3. Integrated MEMS/NEMS Resonant Cantilevers for Ultrasensitive Biological Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the recent researches implemented in Chinese Academy of Sciences, with achievements on integrated resonant microcantilever sensors. In the resonant cantilevers, the self-sensing elements and resonance exciting elements are both top-down integrated with silicon micromachining techniques. Quite a lot of effort is focused on optimization of the resonance mode and sensing structure for improvement of sensitivity. On the other hand, to enable the micro-cantilevers specifically sensitive to bio/chemical molecules, sensing materials are developed and modified on the cantilever surface with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM based bottom-up construction and surface functionalization. To improve the selectivity of the sensors and depress environmental noise, multiple and localized surface modifications are developed. The achieved volume production capability and satisfactory detecting resolution to trace-level biological antigen of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP give the micro-cantilever sensors a great promise for rapid and high-resoluble detection.

  4. Influence of cantilevered sheet pile deflection on adjacent roadways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Cantilevered sheet pile walls are often used adjacent roadways as temporary support during construction. Excess movement of these walls has led to excessive roadway distress causing additional repairs to be necessary. This study assessed the effects ...

  5. An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Electrostatically Coupled Cantilever Microbeams

    KAUST Repository

    Ilyas, Saad; Chappanda, Karumbaiah N.; Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Ramini, Abdallah; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of the static and dynamic behavior of electrostatically coupled laterally actuated silicon microbeams. The coupled beam resonators are composed of two almost identical flexible cantilever

  6. Squeeze-film damping characteristics of cantilever microresonators ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    perturbation approach does not apply to cantilever plates because of ...... Direct coupling of electrostatic and structural domain has been achieved using ... forces are computed to obtain the modal squeeze stiffness and damping parameters.

  7. Quantitative measurement of local elasticity of SiOx film by atomic force acoustic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cun-Fu, He; Gai-Mei, Zhang; Bin, Wu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the elastic properties of SiO x film are investigated quantitatively for local fixed point and qualitatively for overall area by atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) in which the sample is vibrated at the ultrasonic frequency while the sample surface is touched and scanned with the tip contacting the sample respectively for fixed point and continuous measurements. The SiO x films on the silicon wafers are prepared by the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The local contact stiffness of the tip-SiO x film is calculated from the contact resonance spectrum measured with the atomic force acoustic microscopy. Using the reference approach, indentation modulus of SiO x film for fixed point is obtained. The images of cantilever amplitude are also visualized and analysed when the SiO x surface is excited at a fixed frequency. The results show that the acoustic amplitude images can reflect the elastic properties of the sample. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  8. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Goodman, Miriam B. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  9. MIDAS: Lessons learned from the first spaceborne atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Mark Stephen; Arends, Herman; Butler, Bart; Gavira, Jose; Jeszenszky, Harald; Mannel, Thurid; Romstedt, Jens; Schmied, Roland; Torkar, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System (MIDAS) atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta orbiter was the first such instrument launched into space in 2004. Designed only a few years after the technique was invented, MIDAS is currently orbiting comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko and producing the highest resolution 3D images of cometary dust ever made in situ. After more than a year of continuous operation much experience has been gained with this novel instrument. Coupled with operations of the Flight Spare and advances in terrestrial AFM a set of "lessons learned" has been produced, cumulating in recommendations for future spaceborne atomic force microscopes. The majority of the design could be reused as-is, or with incremental upgrades to include more modern components (e.g. the processor). Key additional recommendations are to incorporate an optical microscope to aid the search for particles and image registration, to include a variety of cantilevers (with different spring constants) and a variety of tip geometries.

  10. Comparison of different aminofunctionalization strategies for attachment of single antibodies to AFM cantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebner, Andreas [Institute of Biophysics, University of Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria)], E-mail: andreas.ebner@jku.at; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J. [Institute of Biophysics, University of Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2007-10-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has developed into a key technique for elucidation of biological systems on the single molecular level. In particular, molecular recognition force microscopy has proven to be a powerful tool for the investigation of biological interactions under near physiological conditions. For this purpose, ligands are tethered to AFM tips and the interaction forces with cognate receptors on the sample surface are measured with pico-Newton accuracy. In the first step of tip functionalization, amino groups are typically introduced on the initially inert AFM tip. Several methods have been developed to reproducibly adjust the desired low density of amino groups on the tip surface, i.e. esterification with ethanolamine, gas-phase silanization with aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES), or treatment with aminophenyl-trimethoxysilane (APhS) in toluene solution. In the present study, the usefulness of these methods for attachments of antibodies to AFM tips was characterized by a standardized test system, in which biotinylated IgG was bound to the tip and a dense monolayer of avidin on mica served as test sample. All three methods of aminofunctionalization were found fully satisfactory for attachment of single antibodies to AFM tips, only in a parallel macroscopic assay on silicon nitride chips a minor difference was found in that APTES appeared to yield a slightly lower surface density of amino groups.

  11. Structure and dynamics of TIP3P, TIP4P, and TIP5P water near smooth and atomistic walls of different hydroaffinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrach, Michael F.; Drossel, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to observe the structure and dynamics of water using different water models (TIP3P, TIP4P, TIP5P) at ambient conditions, constrained by planar walls, which are either modeled by smooth potentials or regular atomic lattices, imitating the honeycomb-structure of graphene. We implement walls of different hydroaffinity, different lattice constant, and different types of interaction with the water molecules. We find that in the hydrophobic regime the smooth wall generally represents a good abstraction of the atomically rough walls, while in the hydrophilic regime there are noticeable differences in structure and dynamics between all stages of wall roughness. For a small lattice constant however the smooth and the atomically rough wall still share a number of structural and dynamical similarities. Out of the three water models, TIP5P water shows the largest degree of tetrahedral ordering and is often the one that is least perturbed by the presence of the wall

  12. Characterization of Films with Thickness Less than 10 nm by Sensitivity-Enhanced Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muraoka Mikio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a method for characterizing ultrathin films using sensitivity-enhanced atomic force acoustic microscopy, where a concentrated-mass cantilever having a flat tip was used as a sensitive oscillator. Evaluation was aimed at 6-nm-thick and 10-nm-thick diamond-like carbon (DLC films deposited, using different methods, on a hard disk for the effective Young's modulus defined as E/(1 - ν2, where E is the Young's modulus, and ν is the Poisson's ratio. The resonant frequency of the cantilever was affected not only by the film's elasticity but also by the substrate even at an indentation depth of about 0.6 nm. The substrate effect was removed by employing a theoretical formula on the indentation of a layered half-space, together with a hard disk without DLC coating. The moduli of the 6-nm-thick and 10-nm-thick DLC films were 392 and 345 GPa, respectively. The error analysis showed the standard deviation less than 5% in the moduli.

  13. Efficiency Enhancement of a Cantilever-Based Vibration Energy Harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali E. Kubba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracting energy from ambient vibration to power wireless sensor nodes has been an attractive area of research, particularly in the automotive monitoring field. This article reports the design, analysis and testing of a vibration energy harvesting device based on a miniature asymmetric air-spaced cantilever. The developed design offers high power density, and delivers electric power that is sufficient to support most wireless sensor nodes for structural health monitoring (SHM applications. The optimized design underwent three evolutionary steps, starting from a simple cantilever design, going through an air-spaced cantilever, and ending up with an optimized air-spaced geometry with boosted power density level. Finite Element Analysis (FEA was used as an initial tool to compare the three geometries’ stiffness (K, output open-circuit voltage (Vave, and average normal strain in the piezoelectric transducer (εave that directly affect its output voltage. Experimental tests were also carried out in order to examine the energy harvesting level in each of the three designs. The experimental results show how to boost the power output level in a thin air-spaced cantilever beam for energy within the same space envelope. The developed thin air-spaced cantilever (8.37 cm3, has a maximum power output of 2.05 mW (H = 29.29 μJ/cycle.

  14. Post-critical behavior of Beck`s column with a tip mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. B.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2002-01-01

    This study examines how a tip mass with rotary inertia affects the stability of a follower-loaded cantilevered column. Using nonlinear modeling and perturbation analysis, expressions are set up for determining the stability of the straight column and the amplitude of post-critical flutter...... oscillations. Bifurcation diagrams are given, showing how the vibration amplitude changes with follower load and other parameters. These results agree closely with numerical simulation. It is found that sufficiently large values of tip mass rotary inertia can change the primary bifurcation from supercritical...

  15. Thermo-mechanical analysis of FG nanobeam with attached tip mass: an exact solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, Majid; Jafari, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Present disquisition proposes an analytical solution method for exploring the vibration characteristics of a cantilever functionally graded nanobeam with a concentrated mass exposed to thermal loading for the first time. Thermo-mechanical properties of FGM nanobeam are supposed to change through the thickness direction of beam based on the rule of power-law (P-FGM). The small-scale effect is taken into consideration based on nonlocal elasticity theory of Eringen. Linear temperature rise (LTR) through thickness direction is studied. Existence of centralized mass in the free end of nanobeam influences the mechanical and physical properties. Timoshenko beam theory is employed to derive the nonlocal governing equations and boundary conditions of FGM beam attached with a tip mass under temperature field via Hamilton's principle. An exact solution procedure is exploited to achieve the non-dimensional frequency of FG nanobeam exposed to temperature field with a tip mass. A parametric study is led to assess the efficacy of temperature changes, tip mass, small scale, beam thickness, power-law exponent, slenderness and thermal loading on the natural frequencies of FG cantilever nanobeam with a point mass at the free end. It is concluded that these parameters play remarkable roles on the dynamic behavior of FG nanobeam subjected to LTR with a tip mass. The results for simpler states are confirmed with known data in the literature. Presented numerical results can serve as benchmarks for future thermo-mechanical analyses of FG nanobeam with tip mass.

  16. Evaluation of the safety and efficiency of novel metallic ultrasonic scaler tip on titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Shon, Won-Jun; Bae, Kwang-Shik; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Lee, Woo-Cheol; Park, Young-Seok

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficiency of novel ultrasonic scaler tips, conventional stainless-steel tips, and plastic tips on titanium surfaces. Mechanical instrumentation was carried out using conventional ultrasonic scalers (EMS, Nyon, Switzerland) with novel metallic implant tip (BS), a plastic-headed tip (ES), a plastic tip (PS) and a conventional stainless-steel tip (CS) on 10 polished commercially pure titanium disks (Grade II) per group. Arithmetic mean roughness (R(a) ) and maximum height roughness (R(y) ) of titanium samples were measured and dissipated power of the scaler tip in the tip-surface junction was estimated to investigate the scaling efficiency. The instrumented surface morphology of samples was viewed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and surface profile of the each sample was investigated using contact mode with a commercial atomic force microscope (AFM). There were no significant differences in surface roughness (R(a) and R(y) ) among BS, ES, and PS group. However, CS group showed significant higher surface roughness (R(a) and R(y) ). The efficiency of CS tip is twice as much higher than that of BS tip, the efficiency of BS tip is 20 times higher than that of PS tip, and the efficiency of BS tip is 90 times higher than that of ES tip. Novel metallic copper alloy ultrasonic scaler tips may minimally influence the titanium surface, similar to plastic tip. Therefore, they can be a suitable instrument for implant maintenance therapy. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. ADHD: Tips to Try

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español ADHD: Tips to Try KidsHealth / For Teens / ADHD: Tips to Try Print en español TDAH: Consejos que puedes probar ADHD , short for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder , is a ...

  18. Total Telephone Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, Lloyd E.; And Others

    This manual of telephone behavior tips for business and sales professionals offers ways to handle the disgruntled caller and makes suggestions on topics relevant to the telephone. The manual is divided into the following sections and subsections: (1) Common Courtesy (staff tips, answering the telephone, screening calls, transferring calls, taking…

  19. Tip Cells in Angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Dallinga (Marchien); S.E.M. Boas (Sonja); I. Klaassen (Ingeborg); R.M.H. Merks (Roeland); C.J.F. van Noorden; R.O. Schlingemann (Reinier)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractIn angiogenesis, the process in which blood vessel sprouts grow out from a pre-existing vascular network, the so-called endothelial tip cells play an essential role. Tip cells are the leading cells of the sprouts; they guide following endothelial cells and sense their environment for

  20. Improved Noninterferometric Test of Collapse Models Using Ultracold Cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinante, A.; Mezzena, R.; Falferi, P.; Carlesso, M.; Bassi, A.

    2017-09-01

    Spontaneous collapse models predict that a weak force noise acts on any mechanical system, as a consequence of the collapse of the wave function. Significant upper limits on the collapse rate have been recently inferred from precision mechanical experiments, such as ultracold cantilevers and the space mission LISA Pathfinder. Here, we report new results from an experiment based on a high-Q cantilever cooled to millikelvin temperatures, which is potentially able to improve the current bounds on the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model by 1 order of magnitude. High accuracy measurements of the cantilever thermal fluctuations reveal a nonthermal force noise of unknown origin. This excess noise is compatible with the CSL heating predicted by Adler. Several physical mechanisms able to explain the observed noise have been ruled out.

  1. A new approach for elasto-plastic finite strain analysis of cantilever ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new approach for elasto-plastic finite strain analysis of cantilever beams subjected to uniform bending moment ... Curvature; deflection curve; cantilever beam; elasto-plastic analysis; tapered beam subjected to tipmoment; ... Sadhana | News.

  2. Fiber-top cantilever: a new generation of micromachined sensors for multipurpose applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannuzzi, D.; Deladi, S.; Schreuders, H.; Slaman, M.; Rector, J.H.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-top cantilevers are new monolithic devices obtained by carving a cantilever out of the edge of a single-mode optical fiber. Here we report evidences of their potential impact as sensing devices for multipurpose applications.

  3. Multiple regimes of operation in bimodal AFM: understanding the energy of cantilever eigenmodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kiracofe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the key goals in atomic force microscopy (AFM imaging is to enhance material property contrast with high resolution. Bimodal AFM, where two eigenmodes are simultaneously excited, confers significant advantages over conventional single-frequency tapping mode AFM due to its ability to provide contrast between regions with different material properties under gentle imaging conditions. Bimodal AFM traditionally uses the first two eigenmodes of the AFM cantilever. In this work, the authors explore the use of higher eigenmodes in bimodal AFM (e.g., exciting the first and fourth eigenmodes. It is found that such operation leads to interesting contrast reversals compared to traditional bimodal AFM. A series of experiments and numerical simulations shows that the primary cause of the contrast reversals is not the choice of eigenmode itself (e.g., second versus fourth, but rather the relative kinetic energy between the higher eigenmode and the first eigenmode. This leads to the identification of three distinct imaging regimes in bimodal AFM. This result, which is applicable even to traditional bimodal AFM, should allow researchers to choose cantilever and operating parameters in a more rational manner in order to optimize resolution and contrast during nanoscale imaging of materials.

  4. High resolution magnetic force microscopy using focused ion beam modified tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, G.N.; Siekman, Martin Herman; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscope tips coated by the thermal evaporation of a magnetic 30 nm thick Co film have been modified by focused ion beam milling with Ga+ ions to produce tips suitable for magnetic force microscopy. Such tips possess a planar magnetic element with high magnetic shape anisotropy, an

  5. Pembuatan Cantilever Bridge Anterior Rahang Atas sebagai Koreksi Estetik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusrina Sumartati

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang. Kehilangan gigi anterior rahang atas mengakibatkan gangguan fungsi fonetik dan estetik. Gangguan fungsi estetik menyebabkan pasie menjadi rendah diri. Kondisi ini dapat diatasi oleh dokter gigi, salah satunya dengan pembuatan cantilever bridge. Tujuan. Penulisan ini yaitu untuk memberi informasi bahwa pada kasus kehilangan gigi-gigi anterior rahang atas dengan space yang telah menyempit dan malposisi gigi dapat dibuatkan protesa berupa gigi tiruan cekat dengan desain cantilever bridge. Kasus dan perawatan. Laporan kasus ini membahas tentang pasien perempuan umur 39 tahun yang datang ke Rumah Sakit Gigi dan Mulut Prof. Soedomo, dengan keluhan merasa kurang percaya diri karena gigi depan rahang atas hilang sejak 5 tahun yang lalu akibat kecelakaan. Gigi-gigi anterior rahang atas yang masih ada mengalami malposisi akibat pemakaian gigi tiruan sebagian lepasan yang tidak baik. Perawatan yang dilakukan adalah dengan pembuatan cantilever bridge pada gigi 11, 12, 13 dan 21, 22, 23. Kesimpulan. Gangguan fungsi estetik pada gigi anterior rahang atas dapat diatasi dengan pembuatan cantilever bridge.   Background. Maxillary anteriortooth loss resulting in impaired function of phonetic and aesthetic. Impaired function of aesthetic cause patients to become self conscious. This condition can be treated by a dentist, one with a cantilever bridge. Purpose. To inform that in case of missing anterior teeth of the upper jaw with a space that has been narrowed, and malposition of teeth can be made prosthesis denture fixed bridge with a cantilever design. Case and treatment. This case report discusses the 39 years old female patient who came to he Dental Hospital Prof. Soedomo, with complaints of feeling less confident due to the maxillary front teeth missing since 5 years ago due to an accident. Anterior teeth of the upper jaw are still experiencing malposition due to the use of removable partial dentures are not good. The treatment is done is by

  6. Safety Tips: Basketball (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Safety Tips: Basketball KidsHealth / For Parents / Safety Tips: Basketball ... make sure they follow these tips. Why Basketball Safety Is Important Fortunately, very few basketball injuries are ...

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are much less likely to require a TIPS. ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  8. Thermal Diffusion Processes in Metal-Tip-Surface Interactions: Contact Formation and Adatom Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Jonsson, Hannes

    1996-01-01

    and the surface can occur by a sequence of atomic hop and exchange processes which become active on a millisecond time scale when the tip is about 3-5 Angstrom from the surface. Adatoms on the surface are stabilized by the presence of the tip and energy barriers for diffusion processes in the region under the tip......We have carried out computer simulations to identify and characterize various thermally activated atomic scale processes that can play an important role in room temperature experiments where a metal tip is brought close to a metal surface. We find that contact formation between the tip...

  9. Integrated optical readout for miniaturization of cantilever-based sensor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Maria; Zauner, Dan; Calleja, Montserrat

    2007-01-01

    The authors present the fabrication and characterization of an integrated optical readout scheme based on single-mode waveguides for cantilever-based sensors. The cantilever bending is read out by monitoring changes in the optical intensity of light transmitted through the cantilever that also acts...

  10. Lightning Safety Tips and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Services Careers Contact Us Glossary Safety National Program Lightning Safety Tips and Resources Weather.gov > Safety > Lightning Safety Tips and Resources Lightning Resources Lightning strikes ...

  11. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research an Oxford Instruments Company, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States)

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  12. Fabrication of tungsten tip for scanning tunneling microscope by the lever principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yang; Wang Huabin; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Gong Jinlong; Zhu Dezhang

    2007-01-01

    A novel experimental setup was designed to fabricate tungsten tips for scanning tunneling microscope (STM), based on simple mechanical lever principle. The equipment can quickly separate the tip from electrolyte to avoid the further etching of the fine-shaped tungsten tip. The setup is advantageous for its simplicity over complex electronic control systems. The use result in scanning electron microscope demonstrates that the radius of the tip can reach 50 nm. The tip was applied to scan the surface of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite, and the results were satisfactory. It is shown that the tip can be used for the scanning of atomically resolved images. (authors)

  13. Contact stiffness and damping of liquid films in dynamic atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Rong-Guang; Leng, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties and dissipation behaviors of nanometers confined liquid films have been long-standing interests in surface force measurements. The correlation between the contact stiffness and damping of the nanoconfined film is still not well understood. We establish a novel computational framework through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for the first time to study small-amplitude dynamic atomic force microscopy (dynamic AFM) in a simple nonpolar liquid. Through introducing a tip driven dynamics to mimic the mechanical oscillations of the dynamic AFM tip-cantilever assembly, we find that the contact stiffness and damping of the confined film exhibit distinct oscillations within 6-7 monolayer distances, and they are generally out-of-phase. For the solid-like film with integer monolayer thickness, further compression of the film before layering transition leads to higher stiffness and lower damping, while much lower stiffness and higher damping occur at non-integer monolayer distances. These two alternating mechanisms dominate the mechanical properties and dissipation behaviors of simple liquid films under cyclic elastic compression and inelastic squeeze-out. Our MD simulations provide a direct picture of correlations between the structural property, mechanical stiffness, and dissipation behavior of the nanoconfined film.

  14. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Lanza, Mario, E-mail: mlanza@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nanoscience and Technology, Soochow University, 199 Ren-Ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Iglesias, Vanessa [International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Lewis, David [Nanonics Imaging, Har Hotzvim, Jerusalem 91487 (Israel); Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming [Laboratory of Nanofabrication and Novel Device Integration, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther [Deggendorf Institute of Technology, Edlmairstr. 6+8, 94469 Deggendorf (Germany); Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem.

  15. Contact stiffness and damping of liquid films in dynamic atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Rong-Guang; Leng, Yongsheng, E-mail: leng@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    The mechanical properties and dissipation behaviors of nanometers confined liquid films have been long-standing interests in surface force measurements. The correlation between the contact stiffness and damping of the nanoconfined film is still not well understood. We establish a novel computational framework through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for the first time to study small-amplitude dynamic atomic force microscopy (dynamic AFM) in a simple nonpolar liquid. Through introducing a tip driven dynamics to mimic the mechanical oscillations of the dynamic AFM tip-cantilever assembly, we find that the contact stiffness and damping of the confined film exhibit distinct oscillations within 6-7 monolayer distances, and they are generally out-of-phase. For the solid-like film with integer monolayer thickness, further compression of the film before layering transition leads to higher stiffness and lower damping, while much lower stiffness and higher damping occur at non-integer monolayer distances. These two alternating mechanisms dominate the mechanical properties and dissipation behaviors of simple liquid films under cyclic elastic compression and inelastic squeeze-out. Our MD simulations provide a direct picture of correlations between the structural property, mechanical stiffness, and dissipation behavior of the nanoconfined film.

  16. Low Vision Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/lowvision.html MedlinePlus: Low Vision Tips We are sorry. MedlinePlus no longer maintains the For Low Vision Users page. You will still find health resources ...

  17. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes: Dental Tips For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse ... damage the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place and may lead to painful chewing ...

  18. Incontinence Treatment: Dietary Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax-deductible donation. Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel ... arises requiring an expert’s care. © Copyright 1998-2018 International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, Inc. (IFFGD). All ...

  19. An Astigmatic Detection System for Polymeric Cantilever-based Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwu, En-Te; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Bosco, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    fluctuation measurements on cantilever beams with a subnanometer resolution. Furthermore, an external excitation can intensify the resonance amplitude, enhancing the signal- to-noise ratio. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the laser spot is 568 nm, which facilitates read-out on potentially...

  20. Energy harvesting from radio frequency propagation using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2012-01-01

    This work reports an induced strain in a piezoelectric cantilever due to radio frequency signal propagation. The piezoelectric actuator is coupled to radio frequency (RF) line through a gap of 0.25 mm. When a voltage signal of 10 Vpp propagates

  1. Global consequences of a local Casimir force : Adhered cantilever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svetovoy, V. B.; Melenev, A. E.; Lokhanin, M. V.; Palasantzas, G.

    2017-01-01

    Although stiction is a cumbersome problem for microsystems, it stimulates investigations of surface adhesion. In fact, the shape of an adhered cantilever carries information of the adhesion energy that locks one end to the substrate. We demonstrate here that the system is also sensitive to the

  2. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes - Cantilever Floor Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taggart, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Sikora, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Wood, A. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented.

  3. Aluminum nano-cantilevers for high sensitivity mass sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Zachary James; Boisen, Anja

    2005-01-01

    We have fabricated Al nano-cantilevers using a very simple one mask contact UV lithography technique with lateral dimensions under 500 nm and vertical dimensions of approximately 100 nm. These devices are demonstrated as highly sensitive mass sensors by measuring their dynamic properties. Further...

  4. Optimised cantilever biosensor with piezoresistive read-out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Thaysen, J.; Hansen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    We present a cantilever-based biochemical sensor with piezoresistive read-out which has been optimised for measuring surface stress. The resistors and the electrical wiring on the chip are encapsulated in low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) silicon nitride, so that the chip is well sui...

  5. Note: A resonating reflector-based optical system for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathishkumar, P.; Punyabrahma, P.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-01-01

    A robust, compact optical measurement unit for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays enables development of portable micro-cantilever sensors. This paper reports on an optical beam deflection-based system to measure the deflection of micro-cantilevers in an array that employs a single laser source, a single detector, and a resonating reflector to scan the measurement laser across the array. A strategy is also proposed to extract the deflection of individual cantilevers from the acquired data. The proposed system and measurement strategy are experimentally evaluated and demonstrated to measure motion of multiple cantilevers in an array

  6. Optimizing 1-μs-Resolution Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Devin T; Faulk, Jaevyn K; Sanders, Aric W; Bull, Matthew S; Walder, Robert; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Sousa, Marcelo C; Perkins, Thomas T

    2015-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is widely used to mechanically measure the folding and unfolding of proteins. However, the temporal resolution of a standard commercial cantilever is 50-1000 μs, masking rapid transitions and short-lived intermediates. Recently, SMFS with 0.7-μs temporal resolution was achieved using an ultrashort (L = 9 μm) cantilever on a custom-built, high-speed AFM. By micromachining such cantilevers with a focused ion beam, we optimized them for SMFS rather than tapping-mode imaging. To enhance usability and throughput, we detected the modified cantilevers on a commercial AFM retrofitted with a detection laser system featuring a 3-μm circular spot size. Moreover, individual cantilevers were reused over multiple days. The improved capabilities of the modified cantilevers for SMFS were showcased by unfolding a polyprotein, a popular biophysical assay. Specifically, these cantilevers maintained a 1-μs response time while eliminating cantilever ringing (Q ≅ 0.5). We therefore expect such cantilevers, along with the instrumentational improvements to detect them on a commercial AFM, to accelerate high-precision AFM-based SMFS studies.

  7. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagi, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr; Scheuring, Simon, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr [U1006 INSERM, Université Aix-Marseille, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13009 Marseille (France)

    2016-05-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed.

  8. Sobol method application in dimensional sensitivity analyses of different AFM cantilevers for biological particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korayem, M. H.; Taheri, M.; Ghahnaviyeh, S. D.

    2015-08-01

    Due to the more delicate nature of biological micro/nanoparticles, it is necessary to compute the critical force of manipulation. The modeling and simulation of reactions and nanomanipulator dynamics in a precise manipulation process require an exact modeling of cantilevers stiffness, especially the stiffness of dagger cantilevers because the previous model is not useful for this investigation. The stiffness values for V-shaped cantilevers can be obtained through several methods. One of them is the PBA method. In another approach, the cantilever is divided into two sections: a triangular head section and two slanted rectangular beams. Then, deformations along different directions are computed and used to obtain the stiffness values in different directions. The stiffness formulations of dagger cantilever are needed for this sensitivity analyses so the formulations have been driven first and then sensitivity analyses has been started. In examining the stiffness of the dagger-shaped cantilever, the micro-beam has been divided into two triangular and rectangular sections and by computing the displacements along different directions and using the existing relations, the stiffness values for dagger cantilever have been obtained. In this paper, after investigating the stiffness of common types of cantilevers, Sobol sensitivity analyses of the effects of various geometric parameters on the stiffness of these types of cantilevers have been carried out. Also, the effects of different cantilevers on the dynamic behavior of nanoparticles have been studied and the dagger-shaped cantilever has been deemed more suitable for the manipulation of biological particles.

  9. Drift study of SU8 cantilevers in liquid and gaseous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenje, Maria; Keller, Stephan; Dohn, Søren; Davis, Zachary J; Boisen, Anja

    2010-05-01

    We present a study of the drift, in terms of cantilever deflections without probe/target interactions, of polymeric SU8 cantilevers. The drift is measured in PBS buffer (pH 7.4) and under vacuum (1mbar) conditions. We see that the cantilevers display a large drift in both environments. We believe this is because the polymer matrix absorbs liquid in one situation whereas it is being degassed in the other. An inhomogeneous expansion/contraction of the cantilever is seen because one surface of the cantilever may still have remains of the release layer from the fabrication. To further study the effect, we coat the cantilevers with a hydrophobic coating, perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS). Fully encapsulating the SU8 cantilever greatly reduces the drift in liquid whereas a less significant change is seen in vacuum.

  10. Drift study of SU8 cantilevers in liquid and gaseous environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenje, Maria; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Dohn, Søren

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the drift, in terms of cantilever deflections without probe/target interactions, of polymeric SU8 cantilevers. The drift is measured in PBS buffer (pH 7.4) and under vacuum (1 mbar) conditions. We see that the cantilevers display a large drift in both environments. We believe...... coat the cantilevers with a hydrophobic coating, perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS). Fully encapsulating the SU8 cantilever greatly reduces the drift in liquid whereas a less significant change is seen in vacuum....... this is because the polymer matrix absorbs liquid in one situation whereas it is being degassed in the other. An inhomogeneous expansion/contraction of the cantilever is seen because one surface of the cantilever may still have remains of the release layer from the fabrication. To further study the effect, we...

  11. Invited Review Article: Tip modification methods for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and colloidal probe technique: A 10 year update (2006-2016) review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C. C.; Zhang, D.; Gan, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Engineering atomic force microscopy tips for reliable tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and colloidal probe technique are becoming routine practices in many labs. In this 10 year update review, various new tip modification methods developed over the past decade are briefly reviewed to help researchers select the appropriate method. The perspective is put in a large context to discuss the opportunities and challenges in this area, including novel combinations of seemingly different methods, potential applications of some methods which were not originally intended for TERS tip fabrication, and the problems of high cost and poor reproducibility of tip fabrication.

  12. Torsional tapping atomic force microscopy for molecular resolution imaging of soft matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jamie; Mullin, Nic

    2012-02-01

    Despite considerable advances in image resolution on challenging, soft systems, a method for obtaining molecular resolution on `real' samples with significant surface roughness has remained elusive. Here we will show that a relatively new technique, torsional tapping AFM (TTAFM), is capable of imaging with resolution down to 3.7 Angrstrom on the surface of `bulk' polymer films [1]. In TTAFM T-shaped cantilevers are driven into torsional oscillation. As the tip is offset from the rotation axis this provides a tapping motion. Due to the high frequency and Q of the oscillation and relatively small increase in spring constant, improved cantilever dynamics and force sensitivity are obtained. As the tip offset from the torsional axis is relatively small (typically 25 microns), the optical lever sensitivity is considerably improved compared to flexural oscillation. Combined these give a reduction in noise floor by a factor of 12 just by changing the cantilever geometry. The ensuing low noise allows the use of ultra-sharp `whisker' tips with minimal blunting. As the cantilevers remain soft in the flexural axis, the force when imaging with error is also reduced, further protecting the tip. We will show that this combination allows routine imaging of the molecular structure of semicrystalline polymer films, including chain folds, loose loops and tie-chains in polyethylene, and the helical conformation of polypropylene within the crystal, using a standard, commercial AFM. [4pt] [1] N Mullin, JK Hobbs, PRL 107, 197801 (2011)

  13. Magnet pole tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Craig E.; Chasman, Chellis; Baltz, Anthony J.

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  14. Tapping mode microwave impedance microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, K.; Kundhikanjana, W.; Peng, H.; Cui, Y.; Kelly, M. A.; Shen, Z. X.

    2009-01-01

    We report tapping mode microwave impedance imaging based on atomic force microscope platforms. The shielded cantilever probe is critical to localize the tip-sample interaction near the tip apex. The modulated tip-sample impedance can be accurately

  15. On developing an optimal design procedure for a bimorph piezoelectric cantilever energy harvester under a predefined volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulfotoh, Noha; Twiefel, Jens

    2018-06-01

    A typical vibration harvester is tuned to operate at resonance in order to maximize the power output. There are many design parameter sets for tuning the harvester to a specific frequency, even for simple geometries. This work studies the impact of the geometrical parameters on the harvested power while keeping the resonance frequency constant in order to find the combination of the parameters that optimizes the power under a predefined volume. A bimorph piezoelectric cantilever is considered for the study. It consists of two piezoelectric layers and a middle non-piezoelectric layer and holds a tip mass. A theoretical model was derived to obtain the system parameters and the power as functions of the design parameters. Formulas for the optimal load resistance that provide maximum power capability at resonance and anti-resonance frequency were derived. The influence of the width on the power is studied, considering a constant mass ratio (between the tip mass and the mass of the beam). This keeps the resonance frequency constant while changing the width. The influence of the ratio between the thickness of the middle layer and that of the piezoelectric layer is also studied. It is assumed that the total thickness of the cantilever is constant and the middle layer has the same mechanical properties (elasticity and density) as the piezoelectric layer. This keeps the resonance frequency constant while changing the ratio between the thicknesses. Finally, the influence of increasing the free length as well as of increasing the mass ratio on the power is investigated. This is done by first, increasing each of them individually and secondly, by increasing each of them simultaneously while increasing the total thickness under the condition of maintaining a constant resonance frequency. Based on the analysis of these influences, recommendations as to how to maximize the geometrical parameters within the available volume and mass are presented.

  16. Improved flare tip design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogolek, P. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre

    2004-07-01

    This paper discusses the testing procedures and development of an improved flare tip design. Design objectives included performance equal to or better than utility flares at low wind speed; conversion efficiency; fuel slip; smoking; significant improvement at high wind speed; and no increase in trace emissions. A description of the testing facility of the flare tip was provided, with reference to the fact that the facility allowed for realistic near full scale gas flares in a single-pass flare test facility. Other details of the facility included: an adjustable ceiling; high capacity variable speed fan; sampling ports along working section in stack; windows along working section; and air cooled walls, floor, and ceiling. The fuels used in the flare tip included natural gas, propane, gasoline and inert gases. Details of wind speed, appurtenances and turbulence generating grids were presented, with reference to continuous gas emission measurements. A list of design constraints was provided. Flare performance included wind speed, turbulence and fuel composition. A chart of conversion inefficiencies with a correlation of wind speed and turbulence, fuel flow and pipe size was also presented. Several new tip designs were fabricated for testing, with screening tests for comparison to basic pipe and ranking designs. Significant improvements were found in one of the new designs, including results with 30 per cent propane in fuel. Emissions reduction from 10 to 35 per cent were noted. It was concluded that future work should focus on evaluating improved tip for stability at low wind speeds. Fuel slips are the primary source of emissions, and it was recommended that further research is necessary to improve existing flare tips. tabs, figs.

  17. Fabrication of silver tips for scanning tunneling microscope induced luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Gao, B; Chen, L G; Meng, Q S; Yang, H; Zhang, R; Tao, X; Gao, H Y; Liao, Y; Dong, Z C

    2011-08-01

    We describe a reliable fabrication procedure of silver tips for scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced luminescence experiments. The tip was first etched electrochemically to yield a sharp cone shape using selected electrolyte solutions and then sputter cleaned in ultrahigh vacuum to remove surface oxidation. The tip status, in particular the tip induced plasmon mode and its emission intensity, can be further tuned through field emission and voltage pulse. The quality of silver tips thus fabricated not only offers atomically resolved STM imaging, but more importantly, also allows us to perform challenging "color" photon mapping with emission spectra taken at each pixel simultaneously during the STM scan under relatively small tunnel currents and relatively short exposure time.

  18. Productivity tips for developers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    I like to read about productivity tools and techniques, but the problem is - most of them are completely overrated, the tips are not that useful or they are too difficult to implement. But, sometimes I can find some stuff that really makes me think "damn, how could I live without this before?!". Today, I would like to share some of them and hopefully hear about the tips and tricks that you use. Maybe we can find a way to share them somehow (github repo/forum)?

  19. Intrinsically aligned chemo-mechanical functionalization of twin cantilever structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toffoli, V; Esch, F; Melli, M; Pozzato, A; Tormen, M; Lazzarino, M; Cataruzza, F; Carrato, S; Scoles, G

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical oscillators became a main focus of research in recent years for potential applications in biomolecule detectors. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of a scheme based on twin cantilevers with a sensitivity down to the single molecule. This approach is extremely promising under the condition that the two terminals of the device can be functionalized with high selectivity and nanometric accuracy by linker molecules. Here we demonstrate a chemo-mechanical method to achieve the intrinsically aligned functionalization of two silicon surfaces, which can be separated by a gap controllable with nanometric precision. The chemical binding of the target molecules in the selected position is obtained through a cycloaddition reaction which exploits the reactivity of the freshly cleaved surfaces that form when the cantilever gap is created. The general validity of this approach is shown by the use in different chemical environments of two compounds with different reactive functional groups.

  20. Direct and quantitative broadband absorptance spectroscopy with multilayer cantilever probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Tong, Jonathan Kien-Kwok; Liao, Bolin; Chen, Gang

    2015-04-21

    A system for measuring the absorption spectrum of a sample is provided that includes a broadband light source that produces broadband light defined within a range of an absorptance spectrum. An interferometer modulates the intensity of the broadband light source for a range of modulation frequencies. A bi-layer cantilever probe arm is thermally connected to a sample arm having at most two layers of materials. The broadband light modulated by the interferometer is directed towards the sample and absorbed by the sample and converted into heat, which causes a temperature rise and bending of the bi-layer cantilever probe arm. A detector mechanism measures and records the deflection of the probe arm so as to obtain the absorptance spectrum of the sample.

  1. First application of multilayer graphene cantilever for laser photoacoustic detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchánek, Jan; Dostál, Michal; Vlasáková, T.; Janda, Pavel; Klusáčková, Monika; Kubát, Pavel; Nevrlý, V.; Bitala, P.; Civiš, Svatopluk; Zelinger, Zdeněk

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 101, APR 2017 (2017), s. 9-14 ISSN 0263-2241 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-14696S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14022 Grant - others:COST(XE) TD1105 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Cantilever * Multilayer graphene * Photoacoustic detection * Methanol detection Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 2.359, year: 2016

  2. Simulation Study on Material Property of Cantilever Piezoelectric Vibration Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For increasing generating capacity of cantilever piezoelectric vibration generator with limited volume, relation between output voltage, inherent frequency and material parameter of unimorph, bimorph in series type and bimorph in parallel type piezoelectric vibration generator is analyzed respectively by mechanical model and finite element modeling. The results indicate PZT-4, PZT- 5A and PZT-5H piezoelectric materials and stainless steel, nickel alloy substrate material should be firstly chosen.

  3. Heater-Integrated Cantilevers for Nano-Samples Thermogravimetric Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Toffoli, Valeria; Carrato, Sergio; Lee, Dongkyu; Jeon, Sangmin; Lazzarino, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a micro-system for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in which heater, temperature sensor and mass sensor are integrated into a single device are presented. The system consists of a suspended cantilever that incorporates a microfabricated resistor, used as both heater and thermometer. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to define the structure parameters. TGA sensors were fabricated by standard microlithographic techniques and tested using mill...

  4. Unstable oscillation of tubular cantilevered beams conveying a compressible fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.O.; Stoneking, J.E.; Carley, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is concerned with establishing the conditions of stability of a cantilevered tube conveying a compressible fluid. Solutions to Niordson's eigenvalue problem associated with the equations of motion are computed using Muller's method. The effects on critical velocity of compressibility which are accommodated by specifying the tube aspect ratio and fluid sonic velocity are parametrically studied. Aspect ratio is found to have a more pronounced effect on critical velocity than sonic velocity over the parameter range that was considered. (orig.)

  5. Characterizing Vibrating Cantilevers for Liquid Viscosity and Density Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Jakoby

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Miniaturized liquid sensors are essential devices in online process or condition monitoring. In case of viscosity and density sensing, microacoustic sensors such as quartz crystal resonators or SAW devices have proved particularly useful. However, these devices basically measure a thin-film viscosity, which is often not comparable to the macroscopic parameters probed by conventional viscometers. Miniaturized cantilever-based devices are interesting alternatives for such applications, but here the interaction between the liquid and the oscillating beam is more involved. In our contribution, we describe a measurement setup, which allows the investigation of this interaction for different beam cross-sections. We present an analytical model based on an approximation of the immersed cantilever as an oscillating sphere comprising the effective mass and the intrinsic damping of the cantilever and additional mass and damping due to the liquid loading. The model parameters are obtained from measurements with well-known sample liquids by a curve fitting procedure. Finally, we present the measurement of viscosity and density of an unknown sample liquid, demonstrating the feasibility of the model.

  6. Dynamic modelling and experimental study of cantilever beam with clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, B; Jin, W; Han, L; He, Z

    2012-01-01

    Clearances occur in almost all mechanical systems, typically such as the clearance between slide plate of gun barrel and guide. Therefore, to study the clearances of mechanisms can be very important to increase the working performance and lifetime of mechanisms. In this paper, rigid dynamic modelling of cantilever with clearance was done according to the subject investigated. In the rigid dynamic modelling, clearance is equivalent to the spring-dashpot model, the impact of beam and boundary face was also taken into consideration. In ADAMS software, the dynamic simulation was carried out according to the model above. The software simulated the movement of cantilever with clearance under external excitation. Research found: When the clearance is larger, the force of impact will become larger. In order to study how the stiffness of the cantilever's supporting part influences natural frequency of the system, A Euler beam which is restricted by a draught spring and a torsion spring at its end was raised. Through numerical calculation, the relationship between natural frequency and stiffness was found. When the value of the stiffness is close to the limit value, the corresponding boundary condition is illustrated. An ADAMS experiment was carried out to check the theory and the simulation.

  7. Dynamic modelling and experimental study of cantilever beam with clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Jin, W.; Han, L.; He, Z.

    2012-05-01

    Clearances occur in almost all mechanical systems, typically such as the clearance between slide plate of gun barrel and guide. Therefore, to study the clearances of mechanisms can be very important to increase the working performance and lifetime of mechanisms. In this paper, rigid dynamic modelling of cantilever with clearance was done according to the subject investigated. In the rigid dynamic modelling, clearance is equivalent to the spring-dashpot model, the impact of beam and boundary face was also taken into consideration. In ADAMS software, the dynamic simulation was carried out according to the model above. The software simulated the movement of cantilever with clearance under external excitation. Research found: When the clearance is larger, the force of impact will become larger. In order to study how the stiffness of the cantilever's supporting part influences natural frequency of the system, A Euler beam which is restricted by a draught spring and a torsion spring at its end was raised. Through numerical calculation, the relationship between natural frequency and stiffness was found. When the value of the stiffness is close to the limit value, the corresponding boundary condition is illustrated. An ADAMS experiment was carried out to check the theory and the simulation.

  8. Note: A silicon-on-insulator microelectromechanical systems probe scanner for on-chip atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Anthony G.; Maroufi, Mohammad; Moheimani, S. O. Reza, E-mail: Reza.Moheimani@newcastle.edu.au [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    A new microelectromechanical systems-based 2-degree-of-freedom (DoF) scanner with an integrated cantilever for on-chip atomic force microscopy (AFM) is presented. The silicon cantilever features a layer of piezoelectric material to facilitate its use for tapping mode AFM and enable simultaneous deflection sensing. Electrostatic actuators and electrothermal sensors are used to accurately position the cantilever within the x-y plane. Experimental testing shows that the cantilever is able to be scanned over a 10 μm × 10 μm window and that the cantilever achieves a peak-to-peak deflection greater than 400 nm when excited at its resonance frequency of approximately 62 kHz.

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy and Real Atomic Resolution. Simple Computer Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsos, V.; Manias, E.; Brinke, G. ten; Hadziioannou, G.

    1994-01-01

    Using a simple computer simulation for AFM imaging in the contact mode, pictures with true and false atomic resolution are demonstrated. The surface probed consists of two f.c.c. (111) planes and an atomic vacancy is introduced in the upper layer. Changing the size of the effective tip and its

  10. Sports Dehydration Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sports Dehydration Safety Tips Everything you need to know to keep your kids safe from dehydration when playing sports. To keep kids in top ... to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. Dehydration occurs when a body loses more water than ...

  11. Fabrication Effects on Polysilicon-based Micro cantilever Piezo resistivity for Biological Sensing Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nina Korlina Madzhi; Balkish Natra; Mastura Sidek; Khuan, L.Y.; Anuar Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    In principle, adsorption of biological molecules on a functionalized surface of a micro fabricated cantilever will cause a surface stress and consequently the cantilever bending. In this work, four different type of polysilicon-based piezo resistive micro cantilever sensors were designed to increase the sensitivity of the micro cantilevers sensor because the forces involved is very small. The design and optimization was performed by using finite element analysis to maximize the relative resistance changes of the piezo resistors as a function of the cantilever vertical displacements. The resistivity of the piezo resistivity micro cantilevers was analyzed before and after dicing process. The maximum resistance changes were systematically investigated by varying the piezo resistor length. The results show that although the thickness of piezo resistor was the same at 0.5 μm the resistance value was varied. (author)

  12. Investigations on antibody binding to a micro-cantilever coated with a BAM pesticide residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamand Jens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The attachment of an antibody to an antigen-coated cantilever has been investigated by repeated experiments, using a cantilever-based detection system by Cantion A/S. The stress induced by the binding of a pesticide residue BAM (2,6 dichlorobenzamide immobilized on a cantilever surface to anti-BAM antibody is measured using the CantiLab4© system from Cantion A/S with four gold-coated cantilevers and piezo resistive readout. The detection mechanism is in principle label-free, but fluorescent-marked antibodies have been used to subsequently verify the binding on the cantilever surface. The bending and increase in mass of each cantilever has also been investigated using a light interferometer and a Doppler Vibrometer. The system has been analyzed during repeated measurements to investigate whether the CantiLab4© system is a suited platform for a pesticide assay system.

  13. A Review on Surface Stress-Based Miniaturized Piezoresistive SU-8 Polymeric Cantilever Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Ribu; Ravi Sankar, A.

    2018-06-01

    In the last decade, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) SU-8 polymeric cantilevers with piezoresistive readout combined with the advances in molecular recognition techniques have found versatile applications, especially in the field of chemical and biological sensing. Compared to conventional solid-state semiconductor-based piezoresistive cantilever sensors, SU-8 polymeric cantilevers have advantages in terms of better sensitivity along with reduced material and fabrication cost. In recent times, numerous researchers have investigated their potential as a sensing platform due to high performance-to-cost ratio of SU-8 polymer-based cantilever sensors. In this article, we critically review the design, fabrication, and performance aspects of surface stress-based piezoresistive SU-8 polymeric cantilever sensors. The evolution of surface stress-based piezoresistive cantilever sensors from solid-state semiconductor materials to polymers, especially SU-8 polymer, is discussed in detail. Theoretical principles of surface stress generation and their application in cantilever sensing technology are also devised. Variants of SU-8 polymeric cantilevers with different composition of materials in cantilever stacks are explained. Furthermore, the interdependence of the material selection, geometrical design parameters, and fabrication process of piezoresistive SU-8 polymeric cantilever sensors and their cumulative impact on the sensor response are also explained in detail. In addition to the design-, fabrication-, and performance-related factors, this article also describes various challenges in engineering SU-8 polymeric cantilevers as a universal sensing platform such as temperature and moisture vulnerability. This review article would serve as a guideline for researchers to understand specifics and functionality of surface stress-based piezoresistive SU-8 cantilever sensors.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. On the electromechanical modelling of a resonating nano-cantilever-based transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teva, J.; Abadal, G.; Davis, Zachary James

    2004-01-01

    deflection and the frequency response of the oscillation amplitude for different voltage polarization conditions. For the electrostatic force calculation the model takes into account the real deflection shape of the cantilever and the contribution to the cantilever-driver capacitance of the fringing field....... Both the static and dynamic predictions have been validated experimentally by measuring the deflection of the cantilever by means of an optical microscope. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or bypass, without the risks that accompany open surgery. TIPS is a minimally invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect ...

  16. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... then placed in this tunnel to keep the pathway open. Patients who typically need a TIPS have ... and stomach. A TIPS procedure involves creating a pathway through the liver that connects the portal vein ( ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and/or hydrothorax (in the chest). Budd-Chiari syndrome , a blockage in one or more veins that ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these substances to bypass the ...

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the esophagus and stomach. A TIPS procedure involves creating a pathway through the liver that connects the ... diseases. This can result in significant challenges in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and ...

  20. Tips for Living with Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients Tips for Living Tips for Living with Scleroderma Ways to help manage your symptoms The Scleroderma ... help find improved therapies and a cure for scleroderma! Your gift today will be matched to have ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIPS. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A TIPS is used to ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  2. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect than open surgical bypass on ...

  3. Harmonic and power balance tools for tapping-mode atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, A.; Salapaka, M. V.; Chen, D. J.; Cleveland, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool for investigating surfaces at atomic scales. Harmonic balance and power balance techniques are introduced to analyze the tapping-mode dynamics of the atomic force microscope. The harmonic balance perspective explains observations hitherto unexplained in the AFM literature. A nonconservative model for the cantilever - sample interaction is developed. The energy dissipation in the sample is studied and the resulting power balance equations combined with the harmonic balance equations are used to estimate the model parameters. Experimental results confirm that the harmonic and power balance tools can be used effectively to predict the behavior of the tapping cantilever. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  4. Characterization of metal-coated fiber tip for NSOM lithography by tip-to-tip scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubicova, I.; Pudis, D.; Suslik, L.; Skriniarova, J.

    2011-01-01

    For the optical field characterization, a tip-to-tip scan of two metal-coated fiber tips with circular aperture at the apex was performed. The optical field irradiated from the fiber probe in illumination mode was analyzed by NSOM represented by fiber probe in collection mode. The near-field intensity profile of the source fiber tip in the plane perpendicular to the axis of the tip was taken. Experimental stage requires high resolution 3D motion system controlled by computer (Fig. 1). The source and the detector fiber tip were placed on the moving and static part of the 3D nanoposition system, respectively. As a light source, a modulated 473 nm DPSS laser was used. After the source fiber tip characterization, the NSOM lithography was performed. In the experimental setup from Fig. 1, the detector fiber tip was replaced by a sample fixed in a vacuum holder. As a sample, a 600 nm positive photoresist AZ 5214E was spin-coated on a GaAs substrate. Exposure was carried out by irradiation of the sample at desired positions through the fiber tip aperture. The sample was developed in AZ 400K developer for 30 s and rinsed in DI water. A promising tip-to-tip scanning technique for characterization of metal-coated fiber tips with aperture at the apex was presented. Nearly-circular aperture shapes were documented from NSOM measurements with diameter estimated to be less than 460 nm. By knowing the source-detector distance and the FWHM of the near-field intensity profile, the tip-to-tip scan proves an easy and fast method to analyze the fiber tip aperture properties. The fiber tip resolution was confirmed by preparation of 2D planar structures in thin photoresist layer, where the NSOM lithography uses the metal-coated fiber tip characterized in previous section. (authors)

  5. Cantilever-based micro-particle filter with simultaneous single particle detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noeth, Nadine-Nicole; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    2011-01-01

    Currently, separation of whole blood samples on lab-on-a-chip systems is achieved via filters followed by analysis of the filtered matter such as counting of blood cells. Here, a micro-chip based on cantilever technology is developed, which enables simultaneous filtration and counting of micro-particles...... from a liquid. A hole-array is integrated into a micro-cantilever, which is inserted into a microfluidic channel perpendicular to the flow. A metal pad at the apex of the cantilever enables an optical read-out of the deflection of the cantilever. When a micro-particle is too large to pass a hole...

  6. AFM tip characterization by using FFT filtered images of step structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yongda, E-mail: yanyongda@hit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Micro-systems and Micro-structures Manufacturing of Ministry of Education, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Center For Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Xue, Bo [Key Laboratory of Micro-systems and Micro-structures Manufacturing of Ministry of Education, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Center For Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen [Center For Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The measurement resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is largely dependent on the radius of the tip. Meanwhile, when using AFM to study nanoscale surface properties, the value of the tip radius is needed in calculations. As such, estimation of the tip radius is important for analyzing results taken using an AFM. In this study, a geometrical model created by scanning a step structure with an AFM tip was developed. The tip was assumed to have a hemispherical cone shape. Profiles simulated by tips with different scanning radii were calculated by fast Fourier transform (FFT). By analyzing the influence of tip radius variation on the spectra of simulated profiles, it was found that low-frequency harmonics were more susceptible, and that the relationship between the tip radius and the low-frequency harmonic amplitude of the step structure varied monotonically. Based on this regularity, we developed a new method to characterize the radius of the hemispherical tip. The tip radii estimated with this approach were comparable to the results obtained using scanning electron microscope imaging and blind reconstruction methods. - Highlights: • The AFM tips with different radii were simulated to scan a nano-step structure. • The spectra of the simulation scans under different radii were analyzed. • The functions of tip radius and harmonic amplitude were used for evaluating tip. • The proposed method has been validated by SEM imaging and blind reconstruction.

  7. Capillary forces in tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zitzler, L.; Herminghaus, S.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the relative humidity on amplitude and phase of the cantilever oscillation while operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) in the tapping mode. If the free oscillation amplitude A0 exceeds a certain critical amplitude Ac, the amplitude- and phase-distance curves

  8. Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with tip-modified propellers and the methods which, over a period of two decades, have been applied to develop such propellers. The development is driven by the urge to increase the efficiency of propellers and can be seen as analogous to fitting end plates and winglets to aircraft...... propeller, have efficiency increases of a reasonable magnitude in both open-water and behind-ship conditions....

  9. Silicon nitride grids are compatible with correlative negative staining electron microscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for use in the detection of micro-organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausch, V; Hermann, P; Laue, M; Bannert, N

    2014-06-01

    Successive application of negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is a new correlative approach that could be used to rapidly and specifically detect and identify single pathogens including bioterrorism-relevant viruses in complex samples. Our objective is to evaluate the TERS-compatibility of commonly used electron microscopy (EM) grids (sample supports), chemicals and negative staining techniques and, if required, to devise appropriate alternatives. While phosphortungstic acid (PTA) is suitable as a heavy metal stain, uranyl acetate, paraformaldehyde in HEPES buffer and alcian blue are unsuitable due to their relatively high Raman scattering. Moreover, the low thermal stability of the carbon-coated pioloform film on copper grids (pioloform grids) negates their utilization. The silicon in the cantilever of the silver-coated atomic force microscope tip used to record TERS spectra suggested that Si-based grids might be employed as alternatives. From all evaluated Si-based TEM grids, the silicon nitride (SiN) grid was found to be best suited, with almost no background Raman signals in the relevant spectral range, a low surface roughness and good particle adhesion properties that could be further improved by glow discharge. Charged SiN grids have excellent particle adhesion properties. The use of these grids in combination with PTA for contrast in the TEM is suitable for subsequent analysis by TERS. The study reports fundamental modifications and optimizations of the negative staining EM method that allows a combination with near-field Raman spectroscopy to acquire a spectroscopic signature from nanoscale biological structures. This should facilitate a more precise diagnosis of single viral particles and other micro-organisms previously localized and visualized in the TEM. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Determining mode I cohesive law of Pinus pinaster by coupling double cantilever beam test with digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The direct identification of the cohesive law in pure mode I of Pinus pinaster is addressed. The approach couples the double cantilever beam (DCB test with digital image correlation (DIC. Wooden beam specimens loaded in the radial-longitudinal (RL fracture propagation system are used. The strain energy release rate in mode I ( is uniquely determined from the load-displacement ( curve by means of the compliance-based beam method (CBBM. This method relies on the concept of equivalent elastic crack length ( and therefore does not require the monitoring of crack propagation during test. The crack tip opening displacement in mode I is determined from the displacement field at the initial crack tip. The cohesive law in mode I is then identified by numerical differentiation of the relationship. Moreover, the proposed procedure is validated by finite element analyses including cohesive zone modelling. It is concluded that the proposed data reduction scheme is adequate for assessing the cohesive law in pure mode I of P. pinaster

  11. Heater-Integrated Cantilevers for Nano-Samples Thermogravimetric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Toffoli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and characteristics of a micro-system for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA in which heater, temperature sensor and mass sensor are integrated into a single device are presented. The system consists of a suspended cantilever that incorporates a microfabricated resistor, used as both heater and thermometer. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to define the structure parameters. TGA sensors were fabricated by standard microlithographic techniques and tested using milli-Q water and polyurethane microcapsule. The results demonstrated that our approach provides a faster and more sensitive TGA with respect to commercial systems.

  12. Piezoelectric Bimorph Cantilever for Vibration-Producing-Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Cheng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A device composed of a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever and a water electrolysis device was fabricated to realize piezoelectrochemical hydrogen production. The obvious output of the hydrogen and oxygen through application of a mechanical vibration of ~0.07 N and ~46.2 Hz was observed. This method provides a cost-effective, recyclable, environment-friendly and simple way to directly split water for hydrogen fuels by scavenging mechanical waste energy forms such as noise or traffic vibration in the environment.

  13. Micro-cantilever flow sensor for small aircraft

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi; Calo, Victor M.; Claudel, Christian G.

    2013-01-01

    We extend the use of cantilever beams as flow sensors for small aircraft. As such, we propose a novel method to measure the airspeed and the angle of attack at which the air travels across a small flying vehicle. We measure beam deflections and extract information about the surrounding flow. Thus, we couple a nonlinear beam model with a potential flow simulator through a fluid-structure interaction scheme. We use this numerical approach to generate calibration curves that exhibit the trend for the variations of the limit cycle oscillations amplitudes of flexural and torsional vibrations with the air speed and the angle of attack, respectively. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. APPARATUS FOR NON-DESTRUCTIVE INSPECTION OF CANTILEVERED MEMBERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E.R.; Mahoney, C.H.; Lay, C.R.

    1961-10-24

    An apparatus for non-destructive inspection of cantilevered members, such as compressor blades, is described. The member under inspection is vibrated with a regulated source of air under pressure. The amplitude of vibration of the member is maintained at its natural frequency. The frequency of vibration of the member is measured. An indication of an excessive decay or erratic shifting in the measured frequency above an allowable hysteretic decay is provided as an indication of a fault in the member. The member is vibrated for a selected test period. (AEC)

  15. Heater-Integrated Cantilevers for Nano-Samples Thermogravimetric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffoli, Valeria; Carrato, Sergio; Lee, Dongkyu; Jeon, Sangmin; Lazzarino, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a micro-system for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in which heater, temperature sensor and mass sensor are integrated into a single device are presented. The system consists of a suspended cantilever that incorporates a microfabricated resistor, used as both heater and thermometer. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to define the structure parameters. TGA sensors were fabricated by standard microlithographic techniques and tested using milli-Q water and polyurethane microcapsule. The results demonstrated that our approach provides a faster and more sensitive TGA with respect to commercial systems.

  16. Desain Cantilever Beam Piezoelectric Untuk Aplikasi Energi Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roer Pawinanto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Material piezoelektrik sudah mulai diaplkasikan dalam beberapa aplikasi seperti sebagai transduser untuk energi harvesting. Dalam studi ini kami menggunakan metode FEA untuk mengoptimasi beam piezoelektrik. Defleksi yang diperoleh pada studi ini yaitu sebesar 83 nm manakala frekuensi resonansi nya diperoleh di 13.4 Hz. Material piezoelektrik ini dapat menghasilkan defleksi yang besar ketika bergetar pada frekuensi resonansinya. Hasil optimisasi juga menunjukkan bahwa daya listrik yang dihasilkan mengindikasikan resistansi yang besar juga dan berkaitan dengan panjang material PZT serta dapat mempengaruhi defleksi dari cantilever beam.

  17. Analytical simulation of the cantilever-type energy harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Mei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an analytical model of the cantilever-type energy harvester based on Euler–Bernoulli’s beam theory. Starting from the Hamiltonian form of total energy equation, the bending mode shapes and electromechanical dynamic equations are derived. By solving the constitutive electromechanical dynamic equation, the frequency transfer function of output voltage and power can be obtained. Through a case study of a unimorph piezoelectric energy harvester, this analytical modeling method has been validated by the finite element method.

  18. Micro-cantilever flow sensor for small aircraft

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi

    2013-10-01

    We extend the use of cantilever beams as flow sensors for small aircraft. As such, we propose a novel method to measure the airspeed and the angle of attack at which the air travels across a small flying vehicle. We measure beam deflections and extract information about the surrounding flow. Thus, we couple a nonlinear beam model with a potential flow simulator through a fluid-structure interaction scheme. We use this numerical approach to generate calibration curves that exhibit the trend for the variations of the limit cycle oscillations amplitudes of flexural and torsional vibrations with the air speed and the angle of attack, respectively. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Size-dependent effective Young’s modulus of silicon nitride cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babaei Gavan, K.; Westra, H.J.R.; Van der Drift, E.W.J.M.; Venstra, W.J.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2009-01-01

    The effective Young’s modulus of silicon nitride cantilevers is determined for thicknesses in the range of 20–684 nm by measuring resonance frequencies from thermal noise spectra. A significant deviation from the bulk value is observed for cantilevers thinner than 150 nm. To explain the observations

  20. Optical device comprising a cantilever and method of fabrication and use thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannuzzi, Davide; Deladi, S.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The present invention provides an optical device, comprising an optical fiber and a cantilever that is arranged on an end of the optical fiber; The cantilever may be an integral part of the optical fiber, and may have a length that is substantially equal to a diameter of the optical fiber.

  1. Optical device comprising a cantilever and method of fabrication and use thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannuzzi, Davide; Deladi, S.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2011-01-01

    The present invention provides an optical device, comprising an optical fiber and a cantilever that is arranged on an end of the optical fiber; The cantilever may be an integral part of the optical fiber, and may have a length that is substantially equal to a diameter of the optical fiber.

  2. A new approach to integrate PLZT thin films with micro-cantilevers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana; Volume 34; Issue 4. A new approach to integrate PLZT thin films with micro-cantilevers ... Different types of cantilever beams incorporating PLZT films have been successfully fabricated using 'lift-off' process and bulk micromachining technology. The proposed process can be advantageously ...

  3. Determination of young's modulus of PZT-influence of cantilever orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazeer, H.; Woldering, L.A.; Abelmann, Leon; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    Calculation of the resonance frequency of cantilevers fabricated from an elastically anisotropic material requires the use of an effective Young’s modulus. In this paper a technique to determine the appropriate effective Young’s modulus for arbitrary cantilever geometries is introduced. This

  4. Investigations on antibody binding to a micro-cantilever coated with a BAM pesticide residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Michael; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef; Schmid, Silvan

    2011-01-01

    -BAM antibody is measured using the CantiLab4© system from Cantion A/S with four gold-coated cantilevers and piezo resistive readout. The detection mechanism is in principle label-free, but fluorescent-marked antibodies have been used to subsequently verify the binding on the cantilever surface. The bending...

  5. A novel fabrication technique for free-hanging homogeneous polymeric cantilever waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, M.; Calleja, M.; Hübner, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel bonding technique developed for the fabrication of a cantilever-based biosensing system with integrated optical read-out. The read-out mechanism is based on single-mode waveguides fabricated monolithically in SU-8. For optimal operation of the read-out mode, the cantilever...

  6. Monolithic Concrete vs Precast Concrete for the Construction of Bridge by Th Cantilever Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morlova Dumitru Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the article "Monolithic Concrete vs Precast Concrete for the Construction of Bridges by the Cantilever Method", there are approached a number of issues that come out in the design and execution of prestressed concrete bridge structures using the cantilever method.

  7. Single cell adhesion force measurement for cell viability identification using an AFM cantilever-based micro putter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Kojima, Masaru; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-11-01

    Fast and sensitive cell viability identification is a key point for single cell analysis. To address this issue, this paper reports a novel single cell viability identification method based on the measurement of single cell shear adhesion force using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever-based micro putter. Viable and nonviable yeast cells are prepared and put onto three kinds of substrate surfaces, i.e. tungsten probe, gold and ITO substrate surfaces. A micro putter is fabricated from the AFM cantilever by focused ion beam etching technique. The spring constant of the micro putter is calibrated using the nanomanipulation approach. The shear adhesion force between the single viable or nonviable cell and each substrate is measured using the micro putter based on the nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. The adhesion force is calculated based on the deflection of the micro putter beam. The results show that the adhesion force of the viable cell to the substrate is much larger than that of the nonviable cell. This identification method is label free, fast, sensitive and can give quantitative results at the single cell level.

  8. Mechanical characterization of biocompatible thin film materials by scanning along micro-machined cantilevers for micro-/nano-system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, J.H.; Luo, J.K.; Le, H.R.; Moore, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical characterization is vital for the design of micro-/nano-electro-mechanical system (MEMS/NEMS). This paper describes a new characterization method to extract the mechanical properties of the thin film materials, which is simple, inexpensive and applicable to a wide range of materials including biocompatible ones described in this paper. The beams of the material under tests, are patterned by laser micro-machining and released by alkaline etch. A surface profilometer is used to scan along micro-machined cantilevers and produce a bending profile, from which the Young's modulus can be extracted. Biocompatible SiN x , SiC and nanocrystal diamond cantilevers have been fabricated and their Young's modulus has been evaluated as 154 ± 12, 360 ± 50 and 504 ± 50 GPa, respectively, which is consistent with those measured by nano-indentation. Residual stress gradient has also been extracted by surface profilometer, which is comparable with the results inferred from ZYGO interferometer measurements. This method can be extended to atomic force microscopy stylus or nanometer-stylus profilometer for Bio-NEMS mechanical characterization

  9. Mechanochemistry Induced Using Force Exerted by a Functionalized Microscope Tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Yongfeng; Lü, Jing-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Atomic-scale mechanochemistry is realized from force exerted by a C60 -functionalized scanning tunneling microscope tip. Two conformers of tin phthalocyanine can be prepared on coinage-metal surfaces. A transition between these conformers is induced on Cu(111) and Ag(100). Density...

  10. Role of attractive forces in tapping tip force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    We present experimental and numerical results demonstrating the drastic influence of attractive forces on the behaviour of the atomic force microscope when operated in the resonant tapping tip mode in an ambient environment. It is often assumed that tapping is related to repulsive interaction...

  11. Ultra-high aspect ratio replaceable AFM tips using deformation-suppressed focused ion beam milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savenko, Alexey; Yildiz, Izzet; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of ultra-high aspect ratio exchangeable and customizable tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) using lateral focused ion beam (FIB) milling is presented. While on-axis FIB milling does allow high aspect ratio (HAR) AFM tips to be defined, lateral milling gives far better flexibility...

  12. Instability of a cantilevered flexible plate in viscous channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, T. S.; Lucey, A. D.

    2005-10-01

    The stability of a flexible cantilevered plate in viscous channel flow is studied as a representation of the dynamics of the human upper airway. The focus is on instability mechanisms of the soft palate (flexible plate) that cause airway blockage during sleep. We solve the Navier Stokes equations for flow with Reynolds numbers up to 1500 fully coupled with the dynamics of the plate motion solved using finite-differences. The study is 2-D and based upon linearized plate mechanics. When both upper and lower airways are open, the plate is found to lose its stability through a flutter mechanism and a critical Reynolds number exists. When one airway is closed, the plate principally loses its stability through a divergence mechanism and a critical flow speed exists. However, below the divergence-onset flow speed, flutter can exist for low levels of structural damping in the flexible plate. Our results serve to extend understanding of flow-induced instability of cantilevered flexible plates and will ultimately improve the diagnosis and treatment of upper-airway disorders.

  13. Fluid-structure interactions of photo-responsive polymer cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Jonghoon; Oates, William S.; Yousuff Hussaini, M.

    2013-02-01

    A new class of photomechanical liquid crystal networks (LCNs) has emerged, which generate large bending deformation and fast response times that scale with the resonance of the polymer films. Here, a numerical study is presented that describes the photomechanical structural dynamic behavior of an LCN in a fluid medium; however, the methodology is also applicable to fluid-structure interactions of a broader range of adaptive structures. Here, we simulate the oscillation of photomechanical cantilevers excited by light while simultaneously modeling the effect of the surrounding fluid at different ambient pressures. The photoactuated LCN is modeled as an elastic thin cantilever plate, and gradients in photostrain from the external light are computed from the assumptions of light absorption and photoisomerization through the film thickness. Numerical approximations of the equations governing the plate are based on cubic B-spline shape functions and a second order implicit Newmark central scheme for time integration. For the fluid, three dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method, which employs a structured body-fitted curvilinear coordinate system where the solid-fluid interface is a mesh line of the system, and the complicated interface boundary conditions are accommodated in a conventional finite-volume formulation. Numerical examples are given which provide new insight into material behavior in a fluid medium as a function of ambient pressure.

  14. Higher Order Modes Excitation of Micro Cantilever Beams

    KAUST Repository

    Jaber, Nizar

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we present analytical and experimental investigation of electrically actuated micro cantilever based resonators. These devices are fabricated using polyimide and coated with chrome and gold layers from both sides. The cantilevers are highly curled up due to stress gradient, which is a common imperfection in surface micro machining. Using a laser Doppler vibrometer, we applied a noise signal to experimentally find the first four resonance frequencies. Then, using a data acquisition card, we swept the excitation frequency around the first four natural modes of vibrations. Theoretically, we derived a reduced order model using the Galerkin method to simulate the dynamics of the system. Extensive numerical analysis and computations were performed. The numerical analysis was able to provide good matching with experimental values of the resonance frequencies. Also, we proved the ability to excite higher order modes using partial electrodes with shapes that resemble the shape of the mode of interest. Such micro-resonators are shown to be promising for applications in mass and gas sensing.

  15. A piezoresistive cantilever for lateral force detection fabricated by a monolithic post-CMOS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Xu; Li Zhihong; Li Juan; Wang Yangyuan; Xi Jianzhong

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a post-CMOS process to monolithically integrate a piezoresistive cantilever for lateral force detection and signal processing circuitry. The fabrication process includes a standard CMOS process and one more lithography step to micromachine the cantilever structure in the post-CMOS process. The piezoresistors are doped in the CMOS process but defined in the post-CMOS micromachining process without any extra process required. A partially split cantilever configuration is developed for the lateral force detection. The piezoresistors are self-aligned to the split cantilever, and therefore the width of the beam is only limited by lithography. Consequently, this kind of cantilever potentially has a high resolution. The preliminary experimental results show expected performances of the fabricated piezoresistors and electronic circuits

  16. The Mechanics of a Cantilever Beam with an Embedded Horizontal Crack Subjected to an End Transverse Force, Part A: Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos G. Charalambides

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the mechanics of a cracked cantilever beam subjected to a transverse force applied at it’s free end. In this Part A of a two Part series of papers, emphasis is placed on the development of a four-beam model for a beam with a fully embedded horizontal sharp crack. The beam aspect ratio, crack length and crack centre location appear as general model parameters. Rotary springs are introduced at the crack tip cross sections as needed to account for the changes in the structural compliance due to the presence of the sharp crack and augmented load transfer through the near-tip transition regions. Guided by recent finite element findings reported elsewhere, the four-beam model is advanced by recognizing two key observations, (a the free surface and neutral axis curvatures of the cracked beam at the crack center location match the curvature of a healthy beam (an identical beam without a crack under the same loading conditions, (b the neutral axis rotations (slope of the cracked beam in the region between the applied load and the nearest crack tip matches the corresponding slope of the healthy beam. The above observations led to the development of close form solutions for the resultant forces (axial and shear and moment acting in the beams above and below the crack. Axial force and bending moment predictions are found to be in excellent agreement with 2D finite element results for all normalized crack depths considered. Shear force estimates dominating the beams above and below the crack as well as transition region length estimates are also obtained. The model developed in this study is then used along with 2D finite elements in conducting parametric studies aimed at both validating the model and establishing the mechanics of the cracked system under consideration. The latter studies are reported in the companion paper Part B-Results and Discussion.

  17. AERODYNAMICS OF WING TIP SAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observers have always been fascinated by soaring birds. An interesting feature of these birds is the existence of few feathers extending from the tip of the wing. In this paper, small lifting surfaces were fitted to the tip of a NACA0012 wing in a fashion similar to that of wing tip feathers. Experimental measurements of induced drag, longitudinal static stability and trailing vortex structure were obtained.The tests showed that adding wing tip surfaces (sails decreased the induced drag factor and increased the longitudinal static stability. Results identified two discrete appositely rotated tip vortices and showed the ability of wing tip surfaces to break them down and to diffuse them.

  18. Force, current and field effects in single atom manipulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, K.-F.; Hla, S.; Pertaya, N.; Soe, W.H.; Flipse, C.F.J.; Rieder, K.

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the manipulation of Ag and Au atoms with a STM tip on the Ag(111) surface at 5K. The interpretation of the feed-back loop signal gives a precise picture of the movement of the atom during manipulation. The threshold tunnelling resistance and tip-height to move

  19. Atomic-scale observation of hydrogen-induced crack growth by atom-probe FIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, Y.; Pickering, H.W.; Sakurai, T.

    1980-01-01

    Formation and propagation of a microcrack due to hydrogen in a Fe-0.29 wt.% Ti alloy was observed at the atomic scale by field ion microscopy. A microcrack (-20 nm in length) formed and became noticeably large when the tip was heated at 950 0 C in the presence of about 1 torr of Hg. Propagation was reported several times by reheating, until a portion of the tip ruptured and became detached from the tip. Compositional analysis, performed in situ using a high performance atom-probe, identified atomic hydrogen in quantity and some hydrogen molecules and FEH in the crack, but not elsewhere on the surface

  20. Interface debonding characterization by image correlation integrated with Double Cantilever Beam kinematics

    KAUST Repository

    Blaysat, Benoît

    2015-03-01

    A procedure is proposed for the identification of spatial interfacial traction profiles of peel loaded Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) samples, from which the corresponding traction-separation relation is extracted. The procedure draws upon recent developments in the area of non-contact optical techniques and makes use of so-called Integrated Digital Image Correlation (I-DIC) concepts. The distinctive feature of the I-DIC approach proposed herein is that the unknown degrees of freedom are not displacements or rotations, but the set of interfacial fracture properties describing the traction profile. A closed-form theoretical model is developed to reconstruct a mechanically admissible displacement field representing the deformation of the adhering layers during debonding in the DCB fracture test. The proposed modeling accounts for the spatial traction profile along the interface between the adherends using few degrees of freedom, i.e. crack tip position, maximum stress and size of the process zone. By minimizing the correlation residual with respect to the degrees of freedom, the full set of interfacial fracture properties is obtained through a one-step algorithm, revealing a substantial gain in terms of computational efficiency and robustness. It is shown that the identified traction profile can be effectively combined with the crack opening displacement to extract the corresponding traction-separation relation, i.e. the key input data for any cohesive zone model (CZM). The proposed procedure is validated by post-processing virtually deformed images generated through the finite element method. The robustness with respect to noisy data, as well as the low sensitivity to the initial guess, are demonstrated.

  1. Reliable lateral manipulation of a single Ag adatom on a Ag(1 1 1) surface with a trimer-apex tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yiqun; Shi Wangzhou; Du Guoping

    2009-01-01

    We study the reliability of the lateral manipulation of a single Ag adatom on a Ag(1 1 1) surface with the single-atom and trimer-apex tips based on molecular statics simulations using surface embedded-atom-method potential. The dependence of the manipulation reliability on tip height and orientation is investigated. For the single-atom tip the manipulation reliability increases monotonically with decreasing tip height, which is owing to the strengthened lateral tip-adatom interaction as the tip height lowers. For the trimer-apex tip, the manipulation reliability is sensitive to the tip orientation in the lower tip-height range, while in the higher tip-height range the manipulation reliability is independent of the tip orientation and moreover can be greatly improved due to the strong vertical attraction of the tip on the adatom as compared to the single-atom tip. We also compare these results to those for manipulating single Cu adatoms on the Cu(1 1 1) surface, reveal the underlying physics, and propose the method to improve the manipulation reliability for different systems.

  2. Tips for Starting Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legislative Information Advisory & Coordinating Committees Strategic Plans & Reports Research Areas FAQs ... Starting Physical Activity Related Topics Section Navigation Tips to Help You Get Active ...

  3. Simulation of high-resolution MFM tip using exchange-spring magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, H. [Faculty of Resource Science and Engineering, Akita University, Akita 010-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: hsaito@ipc.akita-u.ac.jp; Yatsuyanagi, D. [Faculty of Resource Science and Engineering, Akita University, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Ishio, S. [Faculty of Resource Science and Engineering, Akita University, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Ito, A. [Nitto Optical Co. Ltd., Misato, Akita 019-1403 (Japan); Kawamura, H. [Nitto Optical Co. Ltd., Misato, Akita 019-1403 (Japan); Ise, K. [Research Institute of Advanced Technology Akita, Akita 010-1623 (Japan); Taguchi, K. [Research Institute of Advanced Technology Akita, Akita 010-1623 (Japan); Takahashi, S. [Research Institute of Advanced Technology Akita, Akita 010-1623 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    The transfer function of magnetic force microscope (MFM) tips using an exchange-spring trilayer composed of a centered soft magnetic layer and two hard magnetic layers was calculated and the resolution was estimated by considering the thermodynamic noise limit of an MFM cantilever. It was found that reducing the thickness of the centered soft magnetic layer and the magnetization of hard magnetic layer are important to obtain high resolution. Tips using an exchange-spring trilayer with a very thin FeCo layer and isotropic hard magnetic layers, such as CoPt and FePt, are found to be suitable for obtaining a resolution less than 10 nm at room temperature.

  4. Time-series observation of the spreading out of microvessel endothelial cells with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Dong; Ma Wanyun; Liao Fulong; Yeh Meiling; Ouyang Zhigang; Sun Yunxu

    2003-01-01

    The spreading out of microvessel endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis and the post-injury healing of endothelial cells. In our study, a physical force applied with an atomic force microscopic (AFM) cantilever tip in contact mode partly broke the peripheral adhesion that just-confluent cultured rat cerebral microvessel endothelial cells had formed with basal structures and resulted in the cells actively withdrawing from the stimulated area. Time-series changes in cell extension were imaged using tapping mode AFM, in conjunction with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, intensified charge-coupled device and field emission scanning electron microscopy. We also interpreted phase images of living endothelial cells. The results showed that formation of a fibronectin molecule monolayer is key to the spreading out of the cells. Lamellipods as well as filopods would spread out in temporal and spatial distribution following the formation of fibronectin layer. In addition, a lattice-like meshwork of filopods formed in the regions leading lamellipods, which would possibly provide a fulcrum for the filaments of the cytoskeleton within the leading cell body periphery

  5. Magnetic domain structure investigation of Bi: YIG-thin films by combination of AFM and cantilever-based aperture SNOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vysokikh, Yu E; Shevyakov, V I; Krasnoborodko, S Yu; Shelaev, A V; Prokopov, A R

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of magnetic domain structure investigation by combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). Special hollow-pyramid AFM cantilevers with aperture was used. This combination allows us use same probe for both topography and domain structure visualization of Bi -substituted ferrite garnet films of micro- and nano-meter thickness. Samples were excited through aperture by tightly focused linearly polarized laser beam. Magneto-optical effect rotates polarization of transmitted light depend on domain orientation. Visualization of magnetic domains was performed by detecting cross polarized component of transmitted light. SNOM allows to obtain high resolution magnetic domain image and prevent sample from any disturbance by magnetic probe. Same area SNOM and MFM images are presented. (paper)

  6. Design and performance of a beetle-type double-tip scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaschinsky, Philipp; Coenen, Peter; Pirug, Gerhard; Voigtlaender, Bert

    2006-01-01

    A combination of a double-tip scanning tunneling microscope with a scanning electron microscope in ultrahigh vacuum environment is presented. The compact beetle-type design made it possible to integrate two independently driven scanning tunneling microscopes in a small space. Moreover, an additional level for coarse movement allows the decoupling of the translation and approach of the tunneling tip. The position of the two tips can be controlled from the millimeter scale down to 50 nm with the help of an add-on electron microscope. The instrument is capable of atomic resolution imaging with each tip

  7. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics.

  8. Anterior Cantilever Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prostheses: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourshed, Bilal; Samran, Abdulaziz; Alfagih, Amal; Samran, Ahalm; Abdulrab, Saleem; Kern, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    This review evaluated the survival rate of single retainer anterior resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs) to determine whether the choice of material affects their clinical outcome. An electronic search of the English peer-reviewed dental literature in PubMed was conducted to identify all publications reporting on cantilever RBFDPs until May 2016. Study information extraction and methodological quality assessments were accomplished by two reviewers independently. The searched keywords were as follows: "resin-bonded, single retainer, all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs), all-ceramic RBFDPs, cantilever resin, RBFDPs, cantilever resin-bonded bridge, two units cantilevered, two-unit cantilevered, metal-ceramic cantilever, and metal-ceramic." Furthermore, the ''Related Articles'' feature of PubMed was used to identify further references of interest within the primary search. The bibliographies of the obtained references were used to identify pertinent secondary references. Review articles were also used to identify relevant articles. After the application of exclusion criteria, the definitive list of articles was screened to extract the qualitative data, and the results were analyzed. Overall 2588 articles were dedicated at the first review phase; however, only 311 studies were left after the elimination of duplicates and unrelated studies. Seventeen studies passed the second review phase. Five studies were excluded because they were follow-up studies of the same study cohort. Twelve studies were finally selected. The use of cantilever RBFDPs showed promising results and high survival rates. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Experiments of flow-induced in-line oscillation of a circular cylinder in a water tunnel. 2. Influence of the aspect ratio of a cantilevered circular cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akira; Okajima, Atsushi; Kosugi, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    The flow-induced in-line oscillation of a cantilevered circular cylinder was experimentally studied through free-oscillation tests in a water tunnel. The response displacement amplitude at a circular cylinder tip was measured at reduced velocity from 1.0 to 4.0. A cantilevered cylinder was supported by a plate spring mounted on the water tunnel wall. The cylinder aspect ratio was varied from 5 to 21 to investigate the effect of aspect ratio on the response displacement. It is found that cylinders with aspect ratios of 5 and 10 have one excitation region, while cylinders with aspect ratios of 14 and 21 have two excitation regions. The aspect ratio, therefore, affects the amplitude of the excitation regions. The influence of end-effect was also investigated using cylinders with an end plate attached to the free end. Since the cylinders with an end plate show two excitation regions, even at an aspect ratio of 5, the flow around the free end of a cantilevered cylinder causes the end-effect. The mechanism of vibration was investigated using a cylinder with a splitter plate in wake to prevent alternate vortices. The amplitude is greater than those of a normal cylinder without a splitter plate, especially at V r =2.3 to 3.0, where a cylinder with an end plate shows the second excitation region. In order words, the alternate vortices suppress the amplitude in this range. The maximum amplitude of each excitation region decreases in proportion to C n and the amplitude of the first excitation is more sensitive to C n . (author)

  10. Investigation of Subcombination Internal Resonances in Cantilever Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider N. Arafat

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of subcombination internal resonances in transversely excited cantilever beams is investigated. The effect of geometric and inertia nonlinearities, which are cubic in the governing equation of motion, is considered. The method of time-averaged Lagrangian and virtual work is used to determine six nonlinear ordinary-differential equations governing the amplitudes and phases of the three interacting modes. Frequency- and force-response curves are generated for the case ω ≈ ω4 ≈ 1/2(ω2 + ω5. There are two possible responses: single-mode and three-mode responses. The single-mode periodic response is found to undergo supercritical and subcritical pitchfork bifurcations, which result in three-mode interactions. In the case of three-mode responses, there are conditions where the low-frequency mode dominates the response, resulting in high-amplitude quasiperiodic oscillations.

  11. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  12. Photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy of a photosensitive polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Dongkyu; Jung, Namchul; Jeon, Sangmin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seonghwan; Chae, Inseok; Thundat, Thomas [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada)

    2012-05-14

    The mechanical and chemical information of a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film on a microcantilever were simultaneously acquired by photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy as a function of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation time. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectra from the PMMA-coated microcantilever agreed well with the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of PMMA on gold-coated silicon wafer. The decreasing intensities of nanomechanical IR peaks represent chemical as well as mechanical information of UV radiation-induced photodegradation processes in the PMMA which cannot be obtained by a conventional FTIR technique. The observed decrease in the resonance frequency of the microcantilever is related to the change in the Young's modulus of the PMMA under UV exposure.

  13. Tips for Good Electronic Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    Describes library uses of presentation graphics software and offers tips for creating electronic presentations. Tips include: audience retention; visual aid options; software package options; presentation planning; presentation showing; and use of text, colors, and graphics. Sidebars note common presentation errors and popular presentation…

  14. Manipulating a Co adatom on a stepped Cu surface by an STM tip: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Huang, R.Z.; Sun, Y.S.N.; Du, C.C.; Zhang, R.J.; Zheng, Y.X.; Wu, Y.X.

    2014-01-01

    A successful atomic manipulation may be influenced by many factors such as bias voltage, tip structure and manipulation modes et al. Here, performing atomic-scale simulations with ab initio based many-body potentials, we have studied the vertical and lateral manipulation of a single Co adatom on metallic Cu surfaces using STM tips at zero bias voltage. A suitable scheme for manipulating the Co adatom on a Cu(5 5 4) surface is proposed. The optimum tip height for a successful lateral manipulation is determined and the reliability of the lateral manipulation of the adatom on the stepped surface is assessed

  15. Atomic force microscope adhesion measurements and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at different humidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Sairanen, Hannu; Korpelainen, Virpi; Husu, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Lassila, Antti; Reischl, Bernhard; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L; Nordlund, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Due to their operation principle atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are sensitive to all factors affecting the detected force between the probe and the sample. Relative humidity is an important and often neglected—both in experiments and simulations—factor in the interaction force between AFM probe and sample in air. This paper describes the humidity control system designed and built for the interferometrically traceable metrology AFM (IT-MAFM) at VTT MIKES. The humidity control is based on circulating the air of the AFM enclosure via dryer and humidifier paths with adjustable flow and mixing ratio of dry and humid air. The design humidity range of the system is 20–60 %rh. Force–distance adhesion studies at humidity levels between 25 %rh and 53 %rh are presented and compared to an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The uncertainty level of the thermal noise method implementation used for force constant calibration of the AFM cantilevers is 10 %, being the dominant component of the interaction force measurement uncertainty. Comparing the simulation and the experiment, the primary uncertainties are related to the nominally 7 nm radius and shape of measurement probe apex, possible wear and contamination, and the atomistic simulation technique details. The interaction forces are of the same order of magnitude in simulation and measurement (5 nN). An elongation of a few nanometres of the water meniscus between probe tip and sample, before its rupture, is seen in simulation upon retraction of the tip in higher humidity. This behaviour is also supported by the presented experimental measurement data but the data is insufficient to conclusively verify the quantitative meniscus elongation. (paper)

  16. Going Vertical To Improve the Accuracy of Atomic Force Microscopy Based Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, Robert; Van Patten, William J; Adhikari, Ayush; Perkins, Thomas T

    2018-01-23

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is a powerful technique to characterize the energy landscape of individual proteins, the mechanical properties of nucleic acids, and the strength of receptor-ligand interactions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based SMFS benefits from ongoing progress in improving the precision and stability of cantilevers and the AFM itself. Underappreciated is that the accuracy of such AFM studies remains hindered by inadvertently stretching molecules at an angle while measuring only the vertical component of the force and extension, degrading both measurements. This inaccuracy is particularly problematic in AFM studies using double-stranded DNA and RNA due to their large persistence length (p ≈ 50 nm), often limiting such studies to other SMFS platforms (e.g., custom-built optical and magnetic tweezers). Here, we developed an automated algorithm that aligns the AFM tip above the DNA's attachment point to a coverslip. Importantly, this algorithm was performed at low force (10-20 pN) and relatively fast (15-25 s), preserving the connection between the tip and the target molecule. Our data revealed large uncorrected lateral offsets for 100 and 650 nm DNA molecules [24 ± 18 nm (mean ± standard deviation) and 180 ± 110 nm, respectively]. Correcting this offset yielded a 3-fold improvement in accuracy and precision when characterizing DNA's overstretching transition. We also demonstrated high throughput by acquiring 88 geometrically corrected force-extension curves of a single individual 100 nm DNA molecule in ∼40 min and versatility by aligning polyprotein- and PEG-based protein-ligand assays. Importantly, our software-based algorithm was implemented on a commercial AFM, so it can be broadly adopted. More generally, this work illustrates how to enhance AFM-based SMFS by developing more sophisticated data-acquisition protocols.

  17. The use of functionalized AFM tips as molecular sensors in the detection of pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deda, Daiana K.; Pereira, Barbara B.S.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Silva, Aline N. da; Ribeiro, Gabrielle A.; Amarante, Adriano M.; Leite, Fabio L.; Franca, Eduardo F.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy, a technique derived from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), allowed to distinguish nonspecific and specific interactions between the acetolactate synthase enzyme (ALS) and anti-atrazine antibody biomolecules and the herbicides imazaquin, metsulfuron-methyl and atrazine. The presence of specific interactions increased the adhesion force (F adh ) between the AFM tip and the herbicides, which made the modified tip a powerful biosensor. Increases of approximately 132% and 145% in the F adh values were observed when a tip functionalized with ALS was used to detect imazaquin and metsulfuron-methyl, respectively. The presence of specific interactions between the atrazine and the anti-atrazine antibody also caused an increase in the F adh values (approximately 175%) compared to those observed when using an unfunctionalized tip. The molecular modeling results obtained with the ALS enzyme suggest that the orientation of the biomolecule on the tip surface could be suitable for allowing interaction with the herbicides imazaquin and metsulfuron-methyl. (author)

  18. The use of functionalized AFM tips as molecular sensors in the detection of pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana K. Deda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force spectroscopy, a technique derived from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, allowed us to distinguish nonspecific and specific interactions between the acetolactate synthase enzyme (ALS and anti-atrazine antibody biomolecules and the herbicides imazaquin, metsulfuron-methyl and atrazine. The presence of specific interactions increased the adhesion force (Fadh between the AFM tip and the herbicides, which made the modified tip a powerful biosensor. Increases of approximately 132% and 145% in the Fadh values were observed when a tip functionalized with ALS was used to detect imazaquin and metsulfuron-methyl, respectively. The presence of specific interactions between the atrazine and the anti-atrazine antibody also caused an increase in the Fadh values (approximately 175% compared to those observed when using an unfunctionalized tip. The molecular modeling results obtained with the ALS enzyme suggest that the orientation of the biomolecule on the tip surface could be suitable for allowing interaction with the herbicides imazaquin and metsulfuron-methyl.

  19. Self-mixing interferometry in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for nanomechanical cantilever sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, David; Greve, Anders; Hvam, Jørn M.; Boisen, Anja; Yvind, Kresten

    2009-03-01

    We have experimentally investigated self-mixing interference produced by the feedback of light from a polymer micrometer-sized cantilever into a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser for sensing applications. In particular we have investigated how the visibility of the optical output power and the junction voltage depends on the laser injection current and the distance to the cantilever. The highest power visibility obtained from cantilevers without reflective coatings was ˜60%, resulting in a very high sensitivity of 45 mV/nm with a noise floor below 1.2 mV. Different detection schemes are discussed.

  20. Self-mixing interferometry in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for nanomechanical cantilever sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, David; Greve, Anders; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2009-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated self-mixing interference produced by the feedback of light from a polymer micrometer-sized cantilever into a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser for sensing applications. In particular we have investigated how the visibility of the optical output power...... and the junction voltage depends on the laser injection current and the distance to the cantilever. The highest power visibility obtained from cantilevers without reflective coatings was 60%, resulting in a very high sensitivity of 45 mV/nm with a noise floor below 1.2 mV. Different detection schemes are discussed....

  1. Feedback cooling of cantilever motion using a quantum point contact transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montinaro, M.; Mehlin, A.; Solanki, H. S.; Peddibhotla, P.; Poggio, M.; Mack, S.; Awschalom, D. D.

    2012-01-01

    We use a quantum point contact (QPC) as a displacement transducer to measure and control the low-temperature thermal motion of a nearby micromechanical cantilever. The QPC is included in an active feedback loop designed to cool the cantilever's fundamental mechanical mode, achieving a squashing of the QPC noise at high gain. The minimum achieved effective mode temperature of 0.2 K and the displacement resolution of 10 -11 m/√(Hz) are limited by the performance of the QPC as a one-dimensional conductor and by the cantilever-QPC capacitive coupling.

  2. A novel fabrication technique for free-hanging homogeneous polymeric cantilever waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordström, Maria; Hübner, Jörg; Boisen, Anja; Calleja, Montserrat

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel bonding technique developed for the fabrication of a cantilever-based biosensing system with integrated optical read-out. The read-out mechanism is based on single-mode waveguides fabricated monolithically in SU-8. For optimal operation of the read-out mode, the cantilever waveguides should be homogenous and this bonding technique ensures free-hanging cantilevers that are surrounded by the same material for bottom and top claddings. The bonding step is necessary because SU-8 is a negative resist where free-hanging structures cannot be fabricated directly. This paper gives details on the processing aspects and the parameters of the fabrication steps

  3. Integrated MOSFET-Embedded-Cantilever-Based Biosensor Characteristic for Detection of Anthrax Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafa, Salwa [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lee, Ida [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Eliza, Sazia A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shekhawat, Gajendra [Northwestern University, Evanston; Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern University, Evanston; Tulip, Fahmida S [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In this work, MOSFET-embedded cantilevers are configured as microbial sensors for detection of anthrax simulants, Bacillus thuringiensis. Anthrax simulants attached to the chemically treated gold-coated cantilever cause changes in the MOSFET drain current due to the bending of the cantilever which indicates the detection of anthrax simulant. Electrical properties of the anthrax simulant are also responsible for the change in the drain current. The test results suggest a detection range of 10 L of stimulant test solution (a suspension population of 1.3 107 colony-forming units/mL diluted in 40% ethanol and 60% deionized water) with a linear response of 31 A/ L.

  4. Ultra-high aspect ratio replaceable AFM tips using deformation-suppressed focused ion beam milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savenko, Alexey; Yildiz, Izzet; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bøggild, Peter; Bartenwerfer, Malte; Krohs, Florian; Oliva, Maria; Harzendorf, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of ultra-high aspect ratio exchangeable and customizable tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) using lateral focused ion beam (FIB) milling is presented. While on-axis FIB milling does allow high aspect ratio (HAR) AFM tips to be defined, lateral milling gives far better flexibility in terms of defining the shape and size of the tip. Due to beam-induced deformation, it has so far not been possible to define HAR structures using lateral FIB milling. In this work we obtain aspect ratios of up to 45, with tip diameters down to 9 nm, by a deformation-suppressing writing strategy. Several FIB milling strategies for obtaining sharper tips are discussed. Finally, assembly of the HAR tips on a custom-designed probe as well as the first AFM scanning is shown. (paper)

  5. At the Tipping Point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H. S.

    2011-02-28

    There comes a time in every field of science when things suddenly change. While it might not be immediately apparent that things are different, a tipping point has occurred. Biology is now at such a point. The reason is the introduction of high-throughput genomics-based technologies. I am not talking about the consequences of the sequencing of the human genome (and every other genome within reach). The change is due to new technologies that generate an enormous amount of data about the molecular composition of cells. These include proteomics, transcriptional profiling by sequencing, and the ability to globally measure microRNAs and post-translational modifications of proteins. These mountains of digital data can be mapped to a common frame of reference: the organism’s genome. With the new high-throughput technologies, we can generate tens of thousands of data points from each sample. Data are now measured in terabytes and the time necessary to analyze data can now require years. Obviously, we can’t wait to interpret the data fully before the next experiment. In fact, we might never be able to even look at all of it, much less understand it. This volume of data requires sophisticated computational and statistical methods for its analysis and is forcing biologists to approach data interpretation as a collaborative venture.

  6. Tipping the scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    In the US, the October 1998 murder of a physician who performed abortions was an outward manifestation of the insidious battle against legal abortion being waged by radical Christian social conservatives seeking to transform the US democracy into a theocracy. This movement has been documented in a publication entitled, "Tipping the Scales: The Christian Right's Legal Crusade Against Choice" produced as a result of a 4-year investigation conducted by The Center for Reproductive Law and Policy. This publication describes how these fundamentalists have used sophisticated legal, lobbying, and communication strategies to further their goals of challenging the separation of church and state, opposing family planning and sexuality education that is not based solely on abstinence, promoting school prayer, and restricting homosexual rights. The movement has resulted in the introduction of more than 300 anti-abortion bills in states, 50 of which have passed in 23 states. Most Christian fundamentalist groups provide free legal representation to abortion clinic terrorists, and some groups solicit women to bring specious malpractice claims against providers. Sophisticated legal tactics are used by these groups to remove the taint of extremism and mask the danger posed to US constitutional principles being posed by "a well-financed and zealous brand of radical lawyers and their supporters."

  7. Non-contact quantification of laser micro-impulse in water by atomic force microscopy and its application for biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Yoichiroh

    2011-12-01

    We developed a local force measurement system of a femtosecond laser-induced impulsive force, which is due to shock and stress waves generated by focusing an intense femtosecond laser into water with a highly numerical aperture objective lens. In this system, the force localized in micron-sized region was detected by bending movement of a cantilever of atomic force microscope (AFM). Here we calculated the bending movement of the AFM cantilever when the femtosecond laser is focused in water at the vicinity of the cantilever and the impulsive force is loaded on the cantilever. From the result, a method to estimate the total of the impulsive force at the laser focal point was suggested and applied to estimate intercellular adhesion strength.

  8. Indium phosphide-based monolithically integrated PIN waveguide photodiode readout for resonant cantilever sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siwak, N. P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Laboratory for the Physical Sciences, 8050 Greenmead Drive, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Fan, X. Z.; Ghodssi, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Kanakaraju, S.; Richardson, C. J. K. [Laboratory for the Physical Sciences, 8050 Greenmead Drive, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    An integrated photodiode displacement readout scheme for a microelectromechanical cantilever waveguide resonator sensing platform is presented. III-V semiconductors are used to enable the monolithic integration of passive waveguides with active optical components. This work builds upon previously demonstrated results by measuring the displacement of cantilever waveguide resonators with on-chip waveguide PIN photodiodes. The on-chip integration of the readout provides an additional 70% improvement in mass sensitivity compared to off-chip photodetector designs due to measurement stability and minimized coupling loss. In addition to increased measurement stability, reduced packaging complexity is achieved due to the simplicity of the readout design. We have fabricated cantilever waveguides with integrated photodetectors and experimentally characterized these cantilever sensors with monolithically integrated PIN photodiodes.

  9. Fracture strength of fiber-reinforced surface-retained anterior cantilever restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oezcan, Mutlu; Kumbuloglu, Ovul; User, Atilla

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the fracture strength of direct anterior cantilever fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) reinforced with 3 types of E-glass fibers preimpregnated with either urethane tetramethacrylate, bisphenol glycidylmethacrylate/polymethyl methacrylate, or

  10. Computer aided design of Langasite resonant cantilevers: analytical models and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, C. R.; Leblois, T. G.; Durand, S.

    2010-05-01

    Analytical models for the piezoelectric excitation and for the wet micromachining of resonant cantilevers are proposed. Firstly, computations of metrological performances of micro-resonators allow us to select special cuts and special alignment of the cantilevers. Secondly the self-elaborated simulator TENSOSIM based on the kinematic and tensorial model furnishes etching shapes of cantilevers. As the result the number of selected cuts is reduced. Finally the simulator COMSOL® is used to evaluate the influence of final etching shape on metrological performances and especially on the resonance frequency. Changes in frequency are evaluated and deviating behaviours of structures with less favourable built-ins are tested showing that the X cut is the best cut for LGS resonant cantilevers vibrating in flexural modes (type 1 and type 2) or in torsion mode.

  11. Sensing technology for damage assessment of sign supports and cantilever poles : final report, August 31, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    This report presents the results of research activities conducted under Contract No. 519691-PIT 008 on Sensing Technology for : Damage Assessment of Sign Supports and Cantilever Poles between the University of Pittsburgh and the Pennsylvania De...

  12. Significant improvements in stability and reproducibility of atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akrami, S M R; Nakayachi, H; Fukuma, T; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancement of dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for liquid-environment applications enabled atomic-scale studies on various interfacial phenomena. However, instabilities and poor reproducibility of the measurements often prevent systematic studies. To solve this problem, we have investigated the effect of various tip treatment methods for atomic-scale imaging and force measurements in liquid. The tested methods include Si coating, Ar plasma, Ar sputtering and UV/O 3 cleaning. We found that all the methods provide significant improvements in both the imaging and force measurements in spite of the tip transfer through the air. Among the methods, we found that the Si coating provides the best stability and reproducibility in the measurements. To understand the origin of the fouling resistance of the cleaned tip surface and the difference between the cleaning methods, we have investigated the tip surface properties by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results show that the contaminations adsorbed on the tip during the tip transfer through the air should desorb from the surface when it is immersed in aqueous solution due to the enhanced hydrophilicity by the tip treatments. The tip surface prepared by the Si coating is oxidized when it is immersed in aqueous solution. This creates local spots where stable hydration structures are formed. For the other methods, there is no active mechanism to create such local hydration sites. Thus, the hydration structure formed under the tip apex is not necessarily stable. These results reveal the desirable tip properties for atomic-scale AFM measurements in liquid, which should serve as a guideline for further improvements of the tip treatment methods. (paper)

  13. The Correlated Dynamics of Micron-Scale Cantilevers in a Viscous Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Brian A.

    A number of microcantilever systems of fundamental importance are explored using theoretical and numerical methods to quantify and provide physical insights into the dynamics of experimentally accessible systems that include a variety of configurations and viscous fluids. It is first shown that the correlated dynamics of both a laterally and vertically offset cantilever pair can be accurately predicted by numerical simulations. This is verified by comparing the correlated dynamics yielded by numerical simulations with experimental measurement. It is also demonstrated that in order to obtain these accurate predictions, geometric details of the cantilever must be included in the numerical simulation to directly reflect the experimental cantilever. A microrheology technique that utilizes the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is proposed. It is shown that by including the frequency dependence of the fluid damping, improvements in accuracy of the predictions of the rheological properties of the surrounding fluid are observed over current techniques. The amplitude spectrum of a 2-D cantilever in a power-law fluid is studied. The resulting amplitude spectrum yielded a curve similar to an overdamped system. It is observed that the amplitude and noise spectrum yield the same qualitative response for a 2-D cantilever in a shear-thinning, power-law fluid. The correlated dynamics of a tethered vertically offset cantilever pair is investigated. It is shown that for a range of stiffness ratios, which is the ratio of the spring constant of the tethering relative to the cantilever spring constant, the change in the correlated dynamics of a Hookean spring tethered cantilever pair can be seen in the presence of fluid coupling. The dynamics of a spring-mass tethered, vertically offset cantilever pair is qualitatively studied by simplifying the model to an array of springs and masses. The resulting study found that the correlated dynamics of the displacement of mass of the tethered

  14. DESIGN of MICRO CANTILEVER BEAM for VAPOUR DETECTION USING COMSOL MULTI PHYSICS SOFTWARE

    OpenAIRE

    Sivacoumar R; Parvathy JM; Pratishtha Deep

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of micro cantilever beam of various shapes and materials for vapour detection. The design of micro cantilever beam, analysis and simulation is done for each shape. The simulation is done using COMSOL Multi physics software using structural mechanics and chemical module. The simulation results of applied force and resulting Eigen frequencies will be analyzed for different beam structures. The vapour analysis is done using flow cell that consists of chemical pill...

  15. A closed-loop system for frequency tracking of piezoresistive cantilever sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Zhang, Qing; Merzsch, Stephan; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2013-05-01

    A closed loop circuit capable of tracking resonant frequencies for MEMS-based piezoresistive cantilever resonators is developed in this work. The proposed closed-loop system is mainly based on a phase locked loop (PLL) circuit. In order to lock onto the resonant frequency of the resonator, an actuation signal generated from a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) is locked to the phase of the input reference signal of the cantilever sensor. In addition to the PLL component, an instrumentation amplifier and an active low pass filter (LPF) are connected to the system for gaining the amplitude and reducing the noise of the cantilever output signals. The LPF can transform a rectangular signal into a sinusoidal signal with voltage amplitudes ranging from 5 to 10 V which are sufficient for a piezoactuator input (i.e., maintaining a large output signal of the cantilever sensor). To demonstrate the functionality of the system, a self-sensing silicon cantilever resonator with a built-in piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge is fabricated and integrated with the circuit. A piezoactuator is utilized for actuating the cantilever into resonance. Implementation of this closed loop system is used to track the resonant frequency of a silicon cantilever-based sensor resonating at 9.4 kHz under a cross-sensitivity test of ambient temperature. The changes of the resonant frequency are interpreted using a frequency counter connected to the system. From the experimental results, the temperature sensitivity and coefficient of the employed sensor are 0.3 Hz/°C and 32.8 ppm/°C, respectively. The frequency stability of the system can reach up to 0.08 Hz. The development of this system will enable real-time nanoparticle monitoring systems and provide a miniaturization of the instrumentation modules for cantilever-based nanoparticle detectors.

  16. MEMS-based silicon cantilevers with integrated electrothermal heaters for airborne ultrafine particle sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Merzsch, Stephan; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2013-05-01

    The development of low-cost and low-power MEMS-based cantilever sensors for possible application in hand-held airborne ultrafine particle monitors is described in this work. The proposed resonant sensors are realized by silicon bulk micromachining technology with electrothermal excitation, piezoresistive frequency readout, and electrostatic particle collection elements integrated and constructed in the same sensor fabrication process step of boron diffusion. Built-in heating resistor and full Wheatstone bridge are set close to the cantilever clamp end for effective excitation and sensing, respectively, of beam deflection. Meanwhile, the particle collection electrode is located at the cantilever free end. A 300 μm-thick, phosphorus-doped silicon bulk wafer is used instead of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) as the starting material for the sensors to reduce the fabrication costs. To etch and release the cantilevers from the substrate, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic dry etching is utilized. By controlling the etching parameters (e.g., temperature, oxygen content, and duration), cantilever structures with thicknesses down to 10 - 20 μm are yielded. In the sensor characterization, the heating resistor is heated and generating thermal waves which induce thermal expansion and further cause mechanical bending strain in the out-of-plane direction. A resonant frequency of 114.08 +/- 0.04 kHz and a quality factor of 1302 +/- 267 are measured in air for a fabricated rectangular cantilever (500x100x13.5 μm3). Owing to its low power consumption of a few milliwatts, this electrothermal cantilever is suitable for replacing the current external piezoelectric stack actuator in the next generation of the miniaturized cantilever-based nanoparticle detector (CANTOR).

  17. Use of self-sensing piezoresistive Si cantilever sensor for determining carbon nanoparticle mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasisto, H. S.; Merzsch, S.; Stranz, A.; Waag, A.; Uhde, E.; Kirsch, I.; Salthammer, T.; Peiner, E.

    2011-06-01

    A silicon cantilever with slender geometry based Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) for nanoparticles mass detection is presented in this work. The cantilever is actuated using a piezoactuator at the bottom end of the cantilever supporting frame. The oscillation of the microcantilever is detected by a self-sensing method utilizing an integrated full Wheatstone bridge as a piezoresistive strain gauge for signal read out. Fabricated piezoresistive cantilevers of 1.5 mm long, 30 μm wide and 25 μm thick have been employed. This self-sensing cantilever is used due to its simplicity, portability, high-sensitivity and low-cost batch microfabrication. In order to investigate air pollution sampling, a nanoparticles collection test of the piezoresistive cantilever sensor is performed in a sealed glass chamber with a stable carbon aerosol inside. The function principle of cantilever sensor is based on detecting the resonance frequency shift that is directly induced by an additional carbon nanoparticles mass deposited on it. The deposition of particles is enhanced by an electrostatic field. The frequency measurement is performed off-line under normal atmospheric conditions, before and after carbon nanoparticles sampling. The calculated equivalent mass-induced resonance frequency shift of the experiment is measured to be 11.78 +/- 0.01 ng and a mass sensitivity of 8.33 Hz/ng is obtained. The proposed sensor exhibits an effective mass of 2.63 μg, a resonance frequency of 43.92 kHz, and a quality factor of 1230.68 +/- 78.67. These results and analysis indicate that the proposed self-sensing piezoresistive silicon cantilever can offer the necessary potential for a mobile nanoparticles monitor.

  18. A Novel Approach to the Sensing of Liquid Density Using a Plastic Optical Fibre Cantilever Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Youngjin; Kim, Taesung

    2009-01-01

    This article reports for the first time the use of a plastic optical fibre (POF) cantilever beam to measure the density of a liquid. The sensor is based on the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The sensor consists of a POF bonded on the surface of a metal beam in the form of a cantilever configuration, and at the free end of the beam a displacer is…

  19. Fabrication of a cantilever-based microfluidic flow meter with nL min(-1) resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noeth, Nadine-Nicole; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    2011-01-01

    A microfluidic flow meter based on cantilever deflection is developed, showing a resolution down to 3 nL min(-1) for flows in the microliter range. The cantilevers are fabricated in SU-8 and have integrated holes with dimensions from 5 x 5 to20x 20 mu m(2). The holes make it possible to measure i......, hole-to-hole distance, amount of holes, etc) the sensitivity of the sensor can be changed....

  20. 3D mechanical measurements with an atomic force microscope on 1D structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Christian; Larsen, Martin Benjamin Barbour Spanget; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    the nanorod, using the apex of the cantilever itself rather than the tip normally used for probing surfaces. This enables accurate determination of nanostructures' spring constant. From these measurements, Young's modulus is found on many individual nanorods with different geometrical and material structures...... in a short time. Based on this method Young's modulus of carbon nanofibers and epitaxial grown III-V nanowires has been determined....

  1. Silicon technology-based micro-systems for atomic force microscopy/photon scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall-Borrut, P; Belier, B; Falgayrettes, P; Castagne, M; Bergaud, C; Temple-Boyer, P

    2001-04-01

    We developed silicon nitride cantilevers integrating a probe tip and a wave guide that is prolonged on the silicon holder with one or two guides. A micro-system is bonded to a photodetector. The resulting hybrid system enables us to obtain simultaneously topographic and optical near-field images. Examples of images obtained on a longitudinal cross-section of an optical fibre are shown.

  2. Innovative multi-cantilever array sensor system with MOEMS read-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaldi, F.; Bieniek, T.; Janus, P.; Grabiec, P.; Majstrzyk, W.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T.

    2016-11-01

    Cantilever based sensor system are a well-established sensor family exploited in several every-day life applications as well as in high-end research areas. The very high sensitivity of such systems and the possibility to design and functionalize the cantilevers to create purpose built and highly selective sensors have increased the interest of the scientific community and the industry in further exploiting this promising sensors type. Optical deflection detection systems for cantilever sensors provide a reliable, flexible method for reading information from cantilevers with the highest sensitivity. However the need of using multi-cantilever arrays in several fields of application such as medicine, biology or safety related areas, make the optical method less suitable due to its structural complexity. Working in the frame of a the Joint Undertaking project Lab4MEMS II our group proposes a novel and innovative approach to solve this issue, by integrating a Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical-System (MOEMS) with dedicated optics, electronics and software with a MOEMS micro-mirror, ultimately developed in the frame of Lab4MEMSII. In this way we are able to present a closely packed, lightweight solution combining the advantages of standard optical read-out systems with the possibility of recording multiple read-outs from large cantilever arrays quasi simultaneously.

  3. Electrothermal piezoresistive cantilever resonators for personal measurements of nanoparticles in workplace exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Wu, Wenze; Uhde, Erik; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Low-cost and low-power piezoresistive cantilever resonators with integrated electrothermal heaters are developed to support the sensing module enhancement of the second generation of handheld cantilever-based airborne nanoparticle (NP) detector (CANTOR-2). These sensors are used for direct-reading of exposure to carbon engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) at indoor workplaces. The cantilever structures having various shapes of free ends are created using silicon bulk micromachining technologies (i.e, rectangular, hammer-head, triangular, and U-shaped cantilevers). For a complete wearable CANTOR-2, all components of the proposed detector can be grouped into two main units depending on their packaging placements (i.e., the NP sampler head and the electronics mounted in a handy-format housing). In the NP sampler head, a miniaturized electrophoretic aerosol sampler and a resonant silicon cantilever mass sensor are employed to collect the ENPs from the air stream to the cantilever surfaces and measuring their mass concentration, respectively. After calibration, the detected ENP mass concentrations of CANTOR-2 show a standard deviation from fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS, TSI 3091) of 8-14%.

  4. Determining the thermal expansion coefficient of thin films for a CMOS MEMS process using test cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Chao-Lin; Fang, Weileun; Tsai, Ming-Han

    2015-01-01

    Many standard CMOS processes, provided by existing foundries, are available. These standard CMOS processes, with stacking of various metal and dielectric layers, have been extensively applied in integrated circuits as well as micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). It is of importance to determine the material properties of the metal and dielectric films to predict the performance and reliability of micro devices. This study employs an existing approach to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) of metal and dielectric films for standard CMOS processes. Test cantilevers with different stacking of metal and dielectric layers for standard CMOS processes have been designed and implemented. The CTEs of standard CMOS films can be determined from measurements of the out-of-plane thermal deformations of the test cantilevers. To demonstrate the feasibility of the present approach, thin films prepared by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacture Company 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS process are characterized. Eight test cantilevers with different stacking of CMOS layers and an auxiliary Si cantilever on a SOI wafer are fabricated. The equivalent elastic moduli and CTEs of the CMOS thin films including the metal and dielectric layers are determined, respectively, from the resonant frequency and static thermal deformation of the test cantilevers. Moreover, thermal deformations of cantilevers with stacked layers different to those of the test beams have been employed to verify the measured CTEs and elastic moduli. (paper)

  5. Design and Fabrication of Piezoresistive Based Encapsulated Poly-Si Cantilevers for Bio/chemical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, N. P. Vamsi; Murthy, T. R. Srinivasa; Reddy, K. Jayaprakash; Sangeeth, K.; Hegde, G. M.

    Cantilever-based sensing is a growing research field not only within micro regime but also in nano technology. The technology offers a method for rapid, on-line and in-situ monitoring of specific bio/chemical substances by detecting the nanomechanical responses of a cantilever sensor. Cantilever with piezoresistive based detection scheme is more attractive because of its electronics compatibility. Majority of commercially available micromachined piezoresistive sensors are bulk micromachined devices and are fabricated using single crystal silicon wafers. As substrate properties are not important in surface micromachining, the expensive silicon wafers can be replaced by cheaper substrates, such as poly-silicon, glass or plastic. Here we have designed SU-8 based bio/chemical compatible micro electro mechanical device that includes an encapsulated polysilicon piezoresistor for bio/chemical sensing. In this paper we report the design, fabrication and analysis of the encapsulated poly-Si cantilevers. Design and theoretical analysis are carried out using Finite Element Analysis software. For fabrication of poly-silicon piezoresistive cantilevers we followed the surface micromachining process steps. Preliminary characterization of the cantilevers is presented.

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... bleeding resistant to traditional medical treatments. The greatest difference in performing TIPS in children is their tremendous ...

  7. Fitness: Tips for Staying Motivated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness Fitness is for life. Motivate yourself with these practical tips. By Mayo Clinic Staff Have ... 27, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/fitness/art-20047624 . Mayo Clinic ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deeply you are sedated. When the needle is advanced through the liver and the pathway is expanded ... are the limitations of TIPS? Patients with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening ...

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to determine the severity of the condition. To help plan for the placement of the TIPS stent, ... Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not ...

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in patients with ... stomach, lower esophagus, and intestines, causing enlarged vessels, bleeding and the accumulation of fluid in the chest ...

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the chest or abdomen. This condition is most commonly seen in adults, often as a result ... minimally invasive procedures such as a TIPS are most often performed by a specially trained interventional radiologist ...

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... open. Patients who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal ... problems leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are ...

  13. Energy Savers: Cool Summer Tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.

    2001-01-01

    A tri-fold brochure addressing energy-saving tips for homeowners ranging from low- or no-cost suggestions to higher cost suggestions for longer-term savings. Cooling, windows, weatherizing, and landscaping are addressed

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complex and lengthy procedures requiring extended fluoroscopy use) death (rare) top of page What are the limitations ... filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these substances to bypass the ...

  15. Girlfriends' Health and Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Women? Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work Health Equity Girlfriends' Health and Safety Tips Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Having friends is an important part of life. Celebrate female friendship and support your girlfriends by ...

  16. Search Tips: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/searchtips.html Search Tips To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. How do I search MedlinePlus? The search box appears at the top ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, allergies and medications you’re taking. You ... with ascites or variceal bleeding resistant to traditional medical treatments. The greatest difference in performing TIPS in ...

  18. Computerized automatic tip scanning operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Fukushima, T.; Nakai, H.; Yanagisawa, A.

    1984-01-01

    In BWR nuclear power stations the Traversing Incore Probe (TIP) system is one of the most important components in reactor monitoring and control. In previous TIP systems, however, operators have suffered from the complexity of operation and long operation time required. The system presented in this paper realizes the automatic operation of the TIP system by monitoring and driving it with a process computer. This system significantly reduces the burden on customer operators and improves plant efficiency by simplifying the operating procedure, augmenting the accuracy of the measured data, and shortening operating time. The process computer is one of the PODIA (Plant Operation by Displayed Information Automation) systems. This computer transfers control signals to the TIP control panel, which in turn drives equipment by microprocessor control. The process computer contains such components as the CRT/KB unit, the printer plotter, the hard copier, and the message typers required for efficient man-machine communications. Its operation and interface properties are described

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ...